WorldWideScience

Sample records for old age assistance

  1. How old is too old? A contribution to the discussion on age limits for assisted reproduction technique access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourková, Jiřina; Konečná, Hana; Burcin, Boris; Kučera, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    In 2012, the Czech Republic established the women's age limit for access to assisted reproduction techniques at age 49 years. In this paper, the acceptability of this age limit from the children's perspective in the Czech Republic is assessed. Although the necessity of balancing the interests of parents and children is acknowledged, little research has taken children's interests into account. We have attempted to map out 'children's interests', asking older children and adolescents (aged 11-25 years) how old they would prefer their parents to be: Czech respondents would prefer to have younger parents. This finding is consistent with the optimal biological childbearing age rather than with the current postponement to a later age. So far, assisted reproduction techniques have been largely regarded as a medical treatment justifying the current women's age limit of 49 years. Had the children's perspective been taken into account, this age limit might have been lower than 49 years. We propose that reproductive health policy should adequately reflect multiple perspectives as an integral part of a multi-layered support system of a society.

  2. Sexuality in old age

    OpenAIRE

    KOSOVÁ, Kateřina

    2009-01-01

    Age and sex are two terms that are not frequently associated with each other. Sexuality is a natural part of human nature, accompanying people throughout their whole lives, still in old age. The elderly are often considered asexual by society, and therefore they feel too shy to speak out about problems they are facing in their sexual lives. In this paper, physiological and psychosocial changes the old age brings about, ailments and sexual dysfunctions that may affect seniors´ sexuality, and m...

  3. Assistive devices in activities of daily living used by persons with age-related macular degeneration: a population study of 85-year-olds living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin Ivanoff, S; Sonn, U

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the overall use of assistive devices among persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how it is related to dependence in daily activities. This was a retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional population study of 85-year-olds. The most common category of assistive devices was bathing devices followed by mobility devices. The overall use of assistive devices was 82%, and around 80% of the device users were independent in activities of daily living. They were multiple device users (57%) and used more mobility devices and personal assistance in mobility. In conclusion, the ARMD group comprises very frequent users of assistive devices and uses assistive devices to remain independent. This implies that health services should provide assistive devices at an early stage in the disablement process to avoid the development of dependence and should consider the likelihood of multiple health problems when assessing the needs of assistive devices among persons with ARMD.

  4. Old age and poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Drenka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of demographic changes in Serbia is followed by discussions on the need to provide safety at old age and solve the problems of poverty and social exclusion of older citizens. In the current state there are no mechanisms that guarantee an adequate life standard at old age, the consequence of which is a high poverty rate, deteriorating health and limited access to social programs. The results of the Survey on life standard from 2002 and 2007 show that poverty among population in general and pensioners has decreased, while the poverty risk among people older than 65 has increased twice. The restrictive methods of the reforms cause a change in the relation between the pensions and the earnings, so that more and more pensioners receive below average, i.e. minimal pensions. Not all old people are covered by pension insurance so that a significant number (around 400.000 does not have a safe monthly income at all. The state program of financial aid is of modest size and does not provide help to all of the poor. Welfare aid decreases the risk of poverty, but it do not guarantee an adequate level of material security at old age. The low level of minimal and average pensions, the decline of participation in the average earnings and the strict criteria of the social security system have brought to awareness the necessity of 'social pensions' and various help and support programs for the elderly. .

  5. [New challenges in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justiniano, I; Desbaillets, M

    2010-04-14

    Old age, with its inevitable succession of bereavement and loss, is a difficult time of life, and is often a cause of suffering on both an individual and a family level. The crises of aging, such as retirement, dependency or old age, bring a person face-to-face with their finiteness, creating anxiety and raising questions related to death. These are times of intense instability, which can lead either to personal growth through a process of adaptation and a rebuilding of one's self-image, or to a dysfunctional approach and an increase in suffering, through resistance to change. Through its work, the therapist aims to assist the elderly person to cope more serenely with the frustrations of the external reality and to come to terms with their future death.

  6. Old Age Stigmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gražina Rapolienė

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly, the discourse on ageism hardly profits from stigma research despite their common denominator—discrimination. The goal of this article is to discuss the stigma concept developed on micro-level interactions and apply it to ageism research on the macro level, i.e. using Round 4 data of the representative international European Social Survey (2008. The data analysis is focused on dominant opinions of the Lithuanian population (N=2002 and usual behavior toward older people, while international comparison is used for interpretation of results. The results show that old age in the Lithuanian society is an “open secret” type of stigma: verbal praise of older people, high assessment of their morals and polite declaration of respect conceal intolerance, disregard and discrimination on the behavioral level. The old age stigma is widespread in Lithuania and stronger than in advanced European countries. Its level is close to discrimination particular to other post-communist and Mediterranean countries.

  7. [Salutogenesis in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, U; Rölker, S; Hannich, H-J

    2004-10-01

    In this contribution, the significance of the salutogenic model (Antonovsky) and its core concept-the sense of coherence-for research into "successful aging" is explicated on the background of a gerodynamic perspective (Schroots). Common to both approaches is the idea that the basic principle of life is based on imbalance, disease, and suffering (heterostasis). According to this pessimistic view, aging is considered as the individual time dimension on which these inevitable impairments in biological, behavioral, and social respects take place. The continuous increase in entropy (disorder) will finally result in the death of the organism. In the face of gerontological research showing variability and individual plasticity in aging processes-especially for the third age-, the salutogenic question is why some people generally become (very) old and stay healthy. According to the salutogenic model, the sense of coherence determines the (re-)production of order over the life span and mediates the relationship between resources/stressors and health outcome. Considering activity/disengagement theory and the selective optimization with compensation model as an example, the integrative potential of the salutogenic model is shown. Finally, the value of the salutogenic model for the fourth age is discussed. Healthy aging is one chance of human existence, but in no way a collective duty that should be imposed on the individual.

  8. Pretreatment of old-age landfill leachate by microwave-assisted catalytic oxidation in the presence of activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Dong, Zhi-Yong; Fan, Yu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Landfill leachate is posing an ever-greater environmental hazard. Recently, a process for purification combining activated carbon, microwave (MW) and Fenton oxidation has drawn much attention. In this study, the effectiveness of this process for the pretreatment of an old-age landfill leachate was tested. The effects of various parameters were investigated and the optimal condition included as follows: MW energy density, 6 W/mL; MW power, 300 W; radiation time, 8 min; H2O2 dosage, 0.1 mol/L; Fe(2+)-EDTA dosage, 0.02 mol/L; granular activated carbon (GAC) dosage, 6 g/L. Within the present experimental condition applied, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal reached 56.5%, and the ratio of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) was enhanced from 0.122 to 0.462. Comparing with GAC, MW and Fenton alone or the combinations of any two of them, MW/Fenton/GAC displayed superior treatment efficiency. The MW/Fenton/GAC process is believed to be a promising pretreatment technology for biorefractory old-age landfill leachate.

  9. Old age psychiatry in the modern age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James P

    2015-11-01

    Old age psychiatry services globally are under threat. The discipline enjoyed its heyday in the two decades bridging the millennium. More recently there has been a move to integrate old age services with those of working age adults, to create 'ageless' services. Evidence is beginning to accumulate that this is a bad idea.

  10. Transgender, aging and old age - Do transgender people get old?

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Paulo Sammarco Antunes; Elisabeth Frohlich Mercadante

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to understand transgender aging context in Brazil. Normal and abnormal were especially created by biological sciences. For being considered deviants, transgender people are not seen as human beings. They end up living in violent environments. Their life expectancy is low. Many of them do not believe to reach old age. They face a lot of prejudice and death threat. Those who get to what we call old age are considered survivals. This investigation was able to show satisfactor...

  11. Constipation in old age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.

  12. Transgender, aging and old age - Do transgender people get old?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Sammarco Antunes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to understand transgender aging context in Brazil. Normal and abnormal were especially created by biological sciences. For being considered deviants, transgender people are not seen as human beings. They end up living in violent environments. Their life expectancy is low. Many of them do not believe to reach old age. They face a lot of prejudice and death threat. Those who get to what we call old age are considered survivals. This investigation was able to show satisfactorily their demands and needs. To be considered visible, they have to count on public policies to give them existence since their childhood. That way, we believe they will reach what we call old age with respect and dignity, already assured by the Universal Human Rights.

  13. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna Regina; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to pro...... to promote mobility in old age.......Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways...

  14. An Age-Old Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An aging society is defined by the UN as one where 10 per- cent of its population are aged above 60 years or those 65 years old and above make up 7 percent of the whole popula- tion.By this definition,China became an aging society seven years ago. Currently,China is home to 145 milfion people aged 60 years and above,accounting for 11 percent of the country’s population; and this group is growing at a rate of over 3 percent,meaning the country now has a sharply increasing elderly population.

  15. Old Age: Honor or Embarrassment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE SARTOR

    2010-01-01

    @@ "No, please don't ask me how old I am; I no longer celebrate my birthday," said one of my expat friends in Beijing the other day. I felt rebuked, almost as if I had insulted her. Certainly, Americans over 30 don't like to fess up to their birth year, their culture denigrates the aging process.

  16. A New Old Age Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伟

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sandra: I just read an artiele in today's newspaper that said there's going to be an old age home built in town. David: I think theyre just terrible. I don't know why anybody would put their parents in one of those.

  17. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.J.; Siersma, V.; Mänty, Minna Regina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mobility-related fatigue and low socioeconomic position predicts mobility limitations and disability in old age, but the interplay between these two factors is unknown. To evaluate whether mobility-related fatigue is a stronger risk factor for mobility limitations in certain socioecon......BACKGROUND: Mobility-related fatigue and low socioeconomic position predicts mobility limitations and disability in old age, but the interplay between these two factors is unknown. To evaluate whether mobility-related fatigue is a stronger risk factor for mobility limitations in certain...... socioeconomic groups, the aim of this study was to examine the combined effect of mobility-related fatigue and socioeconomic position on mobility limitations in a prospective study among older Danish men and women. METHODS: Multivariate linear regression models with combined exposure variables using generalised...

  18. Attitudes toward Embodied Old Age among Swedes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Peter; Tornstam, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Messages in the consumer culture are often youth oriented, aiming at the prevention of the bodily decay associated with biological aging. In gerontological discourses, this has been hypothesized to generate negative attitudes toward embodied aging and old age. Studies about general attitudes toward old age show that younger respondents have more…

  19. An Age-old Old-age Dilemma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    More facilities and caregivers are needed to help China’s elderly enjoy the twilight of their lives Zhang Lilan, a 65-year-old Beijing resident, was finally admitted to her top choice retirement home at the Beijing No. 1 Social Welfare Institution in June

  20. Skin care in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoker, A

    Older people face many problems in terms of skin care and can suffer from a number of distressing conditions. Annabel Smoker describes the management of the most common chronic conditions and suggests ways that nurses can assist older patients or their carers to alleviate or prevent these conditions.

  1. Education in Old Age: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The following work outlines an analysis of education initiatives aimed at the elderly. It examines the characteristics of the old aged learner, his/her "educability" and the foundations for an educational approach for this age group. These theoretical assumptions form the basis of this research: an exploratory study into various educational and…

  2. Visual processing speed in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habekost, Thomas; vogel, asmus; Rostrup, Egill

    2013-01-01

    of the perception threshold. A total of 33 non-demented old people (69-87 years) were tested for the ability to recognize briefly presented letters. Performance was analyzed by the TVA model. Visual processing speed decreased approximately linearly with age and was on average halved from 70 to 85 years. Less......Habekost, T., Vogel, A., Rostrup, E., Bundesen, C., Kyllingsbaek, S., Garde, E., Ryberg, C. & Waldemar, G. (2012). Visual processing speed in old age. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. Mental speed is a common concept in theories of cognitive aging, but it is difficult to get measures...

  3. Metabolic changes in bone in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratelli, L; Ravaglia, G; Ciapetti, G; Pizzoferrato, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors conducted a study on the effect of aging upon the factors which regulate calcium metabolism. Hormonal and biochemical tests were performed on samples from patients selected on the basis of sex, age, and other characteristics in order to determine the trend of these regulatory factors in middle and old age, with particular attention to osteoporosis in women. The authors propose several theories regarding the pathogenetic mechanisms of osteoporosis on the basis of this study as well as the literature.

  4. Brain Aging in the Oldest-Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. von Gunten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonagenarians and centenarians represent a quickly growing age group worldwide. In parallel, the prevalence of dementia increases substantially, but how to define dementia in this oldest-old age segment remains unclear. Although the idea that the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD decreases after age 90 has now been questioned, the oldest-old still represent a population relatively resistant to degenerative brain processes. Brain aging is characterised by the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and senile plaques (SPs as well as neuronal and synaptic loss in both cognitively intact individuals and patients with AD. In nondemented cases NFTs are usually restricted to the hippocampal formation, whereas the progressive involvement of the association areas in the temporal neocortex parallels the development of overt clinical signs of dementia. In contrast, there is little correlation between the quantitative distribution of SP and AD severity. The pattern of lesion distribution and neuronal loss changes in extreme aging relative to the younger-old. In contrast to younger cases where dementia is mainly related to severe NFT formation within adjacent components of the medial and inferior aspects of the temporal cortex, oldest-old individuals display a preferential involvement of the anterior part of the CA1 field of the hippocampus whereas the inferior temporal and frontal association areas are relatively spared. This pattern suggests that both the extent of NFT development in the hippocampus as well as a displacement of subregional NFT distribution within the Cornu ammonis (CA fields may be key determinants of dementia in the very old. Cortical association areas are relatively preserved. The progression of NFT formation across increasing cognitive impairment was significantly slower in nonagenarians and centenarians compared to younger cases in the CA1 field and entorhinal cortex. The total amount of amyloid and the neuronal loss in these regions

  5. A UTILITY THEORY OF OLD AGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAMLIN, ROY M.

    HERZBERG'S JOB SATISFACTION MODEL SERVES AS THE BASIS FOR AN ANALYSIS OF OLD AGE. THE PATTERN VARIES AMONG INDIVIDUALS, BUT THE CAPACITY FOR ORGANIZED BEHAVIOR RATHER THAN RANDOM STRESS REDUCTION SUPPLIES EACH INDIVIDUAL WITH A TASK. THE HYPOTHESIS IS THAT IF THE OLDER INDIVIDUAL REALIZES UTILITY IN HIS YEARS BEYOND 70, HE WILL RETAIN COMPETENCE…

  6. [Mental health and solitude in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazif-Thomas, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and solitude in old age. Elderly people experience solitude as isolation, even more so when the person is ill. However, in the same circumstances, some people see solitude as an experience of maturity. Is it simply a question of inner strength?

  7. Visual processing speed in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habekost, Thomas; vogel, asmus; Rostrup, Egill;

    2013-01-01

    of the speed of a particular psychological process that are not confounded by the speed of other processes. We used Bundesen's (1990) Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) to obtain specific estimates of processing speed in the visual system controlled for the influence of response latency and individual variations......Habekost, T., Vogel, A., Rostrup, E., Bundesen, C., Kyllingsbaek, S., Garde, E., Ryberg, C. & Waldemar, G. (2012). Visual processing speed in old age. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. Mental speed is a common concept in theories of cognitive aging, but it is difficult to get measures...... of the perception threshold. A total of 33 non-demented old people (69-87 years) were tested for the ability to recognize briefly presented letters. Performance was analyzed by the TVA model. Visual processing speed decreased approximately linearly with age and was on average halved from 70 to 85 years. Less...

  8. Unmaking old age: political and cognitive formats of active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Moreira, Tiago

    2014-08-01

    Active ageing is a policy tool that dominates the way the ageing society has been constituted during the last decades. The authors argue that active ageing is an attempt at unmaking the concept of old age, by engaging in the plasticity of ageing in various ways. Through a document study of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different formats. In the WHO, active ageing configures individual lifestyle in order to expand the plasticity of ageing, based on epidemiological and public health conventions. In the EU, active ageing reforms the retirement behaviour of populations in order to integrate the plasticity of ageing into the institutions, based on social gerontological and demographic conventions. These conventional arrangements are cognitive and political in the way they aim at unmaking both the structures and the expectations that has made old age and format a new ideal of the 'good late life'. The paper examines the role of knowledge in policy and questions whether the formats of active ageing should be made to co-exist, or whether the diversity and comprehensiveness enable a local adaptation and translation of active ageing policies.

  9. Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter introduces the notion of clutter moves as an experimental heuristic for tracing how movement threads together a range of cluttered entities in old age homecare ecologies. In particular it is concerned with older people and their cluttered technologies. It is based on empirical data...... originating from an ethnographic study of old age homecare in the United States. Here the category of home clutter was revealed as more complex than it is commonly portrayed in popular or scholarly accounts, especially gerontology and geriatric–related literature on falling risks. This literature frequently...... cites general household clutter as a hazard in the domestic environment. In such reports moving around with cluttered things tends to threaten a dangerous outcome for older people. But what other feasible vistas emerge when the analytical attention is focused explicitly on relational movements between...

  10. Gratitude From Early Adulthood to Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Mathias; Hill, Patrick L

    2016-02-01

    Are there age differences in gratitude from early adulthood to old age? The current studies tested several ways by which an association between age and dispositional gratitude may present, by considering multiple measures on both fronts. We used data from three cross-sectional studies (total N = 1,736; total age range: 19-94). The results indicated that (a) age effects in gratitude are more likely to occur for subjective age in terms of future time perspective (i.e., people's perceptions of their remaining opportunities and time) than chronological age; (b) chronological age effects are more domain specific than general in nature; and (c) they are more likely to occur for the instrumental domain as compared to the interpersonal domain. Finally, the results indicated that (d) perceived future time, particularly with respect to remaining opportunities, mediates the relation between chronological age and general gratitude. Overall, the findings suggest that gratitude is subject to a variety of developmental influences across adulthood.

  11. Longitudinal Predictors of Institutionalization in Old Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hajek

    Full Text Available To investigate time-dependent predictors of institutionalization in old age using a longitudinal approach.In a representative survey of the German general population aged 75 years and older predictors of institutionalization were observed every 1.5 years over six waves. Conditional fixed-effects logistic regressions (with 201 individuals and 960 observations were performed to estimate the effects of marital status, depression, dementia, and physical impairments (mobility, hearing and visual impairments on the risk of admission to old-age home or nursing home. By exploiting the longitudinal data structure using panel econometric models, we were able to control for unobserved heterogeneity such as genetic predisposition and personality traits.The probability of institutionalization increased significantly with occurrence of widowhood, depression, dementia, as well as walking and hearing impairments. In particular, the occurrence of widowhood (OR = 78.3, dementia (OR = 154.1 and substantial mobility impairment (OR = 36.7 were strongly associated with institutionalization.Findings underline the strong influence of loss of spouse as well as dementia on institutionalization. This is relevant as the number of old people (a living alone and (b suffering from dementia is expected to increase rapidly in the next decades. Consequently, it is supposed that the demand for institutionalization among the elderly will increase considerably. Practitioners as well as policy makers should be aware of these upcoming challenges.

  12. Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter introduces the notion of clutter moves as an experimental heuristic for tracing how movement threads together a range of cluttered entities in old age homecare ecologies. In particular it is concerned with older people and their cluttered technologies. It is based on empirical data...... cites general household clutter as a hazard in the domestic environment. In such reports moving around with cluttered things tends to threaten a dangerous outcome for older people. But what other feasible vistas emerge when the analytical attention is focused explicitly on relational movements between...

  13. [Typical forms of schizophrenia in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, E; Konzewoi, V

    1978-01-01

    Aside from typical forms of late schizophrenia which generally conform to the definition given by M. Bleuler, there also are psychoses appearing in old age which differ significantly from the atypical symptoms and consequently present certain diagnostic difficulties. This report contains descriptions of late manifestations in schizophrenic psychoses, which develop with a continuous or assault-like course with a prevalence of parnoial disorders. Paranoid delusions, in such cases, are characterized by aging traits (concrete and short-term delusions, exaggeration of the degree of superficial persecution and prejudice, and a limited number of people involved in the delusions). The development of such forms of late schizophrenia takes a slowly progressing course. The results of these studies, especially the psychopathological symptomatology, the genetic-constitutional background and the development and outcome of these psychoses are analyzed in detail. The data permit to consider such forms of psychose as atypical variants of late schizophrenia.

  14. Loneliness, depression and sociability in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The elderly population is large in general and growing due to advancement of health care education. These people are faced with numerous physical, psychological and social role changes that challenge their sense of self and capacity to live happily. Many people experience loneliness and depression in old age, either as a result of living alone or due to lack of close family ties and reduced connections with their culture of origin, which results in an inability to actively participate in the community activities. With advancing age, it is inevitable that people lose connection with their friendship networks and that they find it more difficult to initiate new friendships and to belong to new networks. The present study was conducted to investigate the relationships among depression, loneliness and sociability in elderly people. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 55 elderly people (both men and women. The tools used were Beck Depression Inventory, UCLA Loneliness Scale and Sociability Scale by Eysenck. Results: Results revealed a significant relationship between depression and loneliness. Conclusion: Most of the elderly people were found to be average in the dimension of sociability and preferred remaining engaged in social interactions. The implications of the study are discussed in the article.

  15. [Depression in Old Age--Challenge of an Ageing Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gühne, Uta; Stein, Janine; Riedel-Heller, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Besides dementia, depressive disorders belong to the most common mental disorders in the elderly. Along with the demographic change and the associated increasing proportion of older people aged 65 and more they become a central and urgent challenge. Depressive disorders in old age are treatable, although they involve special features when compared to younger adults. Guidelines are considered to be of great importance in the optimization of treatments. But how will the treatment of depressive disorders in the elderly displayed in the current guidelines? A systematic search for treatment recommendations in current evidence- and consensus-based guidelines regarding psychotherapeutic and psychosocial treatment approaches indicates that this highly relevant patient group has been strongly neglected so far.

  16. OE CAI: COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION OF OLD ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Alcaraz Sintes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offer a general but thorougli survey of Computer Assisted lnstruction as applied to the Old English language íkoni the work of the late 80's pioneers to December 2001. It enibraces all the different facets of the question: stand-alone and web-based applications, Internet sites. CD-ROMs, grammars, dictioriaries, general courses, reading software, extralinguistic material, exercises, handouts, audio files ... Each instruction itee whether it be a website, a java exercise, an online course or an electronic book- is reviewed and URLs are provided in Sootiiotes. These reviews are accompanied all throughout by the pertinent theoretical background and practical advice.

  17. Understanding Very Old Age: Looking Back and Thinking Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Leonard W; Martin, Peter; Hagberg, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding human development among the oldest old is a sequential building process taking into account building-block data, theories, and models from childhood, adulthood, and old age toward a new territory of oldest-old survivors who have lived way beyond the average life-span. A central question is whether the oldest-old survivors have developed specific survival techniques and/or protective environments that nurture survival. Or are the oldest old statistical outliers who by happenstance continue to survive further into old age? This commentary provides a historical framework on the papers in this series that describe challenges confronted by the oldest-old survivors in order to advance our understanding of survival of the oldest old. A clear understanding of the contributors to longevity could guide public policies toward well-being and life satisfaction among our oldest-old citizens.

  18. [Theories on aging and health: what do aging and old age mean and what constitutes a good life in old age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, S; Wiest, M; Tesch-Römer, C

    2010-05-01

    The present paper starts by introducing different perspectives of the aging process and includes biological, psychological, and sociological theories in its scope. The article addresses the issue of when "old age" begins and why a distinction is made between the third and fourth age. With increasing age, it becomes more and more difficult to differentiate between health-related losses due to illnesses or to aging. However, this can be important with respect to health behavior and health care. Having the best possible health in old age is an important factor for a good life in old age. Over their whole lives, from childhood to old age, people can actively contribute to their health in old age. But health is not the sole criterion for a good life in old age. Having interests and aims are just as important as being integrated in a social network. In old age, people often differ greatly and this is why there is such variety in what people consider to constitute a good life for themselves in old age.

  19. Classification Criteria in Middle and Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Nancy Wadsworth

    1974-01-01

    Discusses two experiments in which middle-aged, elderly, professional, and non-professional males and females were given the Conceptual Styles Test. An analysis of variance on the percentage of complementary responses revealed significant effects for age, occupation, and th interaction between age and sex. (ED)

  20. The othering of old age: Insights from Postcolonial Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Silke

    2016-12-01

    When it comes to old age, we are witnessing almost revolutionary changes at the present time. After decades of ignorance and lack of public interest, old age has fundamentally been re-negotiated. A diverse range of authors have diagnosed the growing bifurcation of old age into a rather independent and capable Third Age and a deep old Fourth Age that is characterized by sickness, frailty and dependency. Against this backdrop, many gerontologists claim that the so-called young-old are praised and valued for their (ongoing) "sameness" in terms of midlife-norms and capabilities, whereas the oldest old are increasingly excluded from humanity by radical "othering". Taking up this diagnosis, the article elaborates on this growing polarization within later life: Based on empirical research on the re-negotiation of old age in Germany, this contribution argues that the juxtaposition of "sameness" and "otherness" obscures the true character of the polarization, particularly with regard to the social role of the Third Age. Instead of sameness and otherness, we rather witness different processes of othering, with the young-old being valued as the other and the oldest old being disdained as the other. Despite the existence of profound critical analyses of the abjection associated with the Fourth Age as well as a considerable amount of literature on old age activation and the new role of the young-old, the specific point of this article's concern-the othering of the Third Age-has been completely neglected. The article discusses the reasons for this gap in more detail and will indicate to what extent concepts from Postcolonial Studies may help us to understand the dual process of othering-glorification and abjection.

  1. Old age, disability and care in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aging of the population profoundly changes the scope of action of public health, altering the profile of morbidity-mortality and increasing the demand for chronic care. In the aging population, disability serves as an indicator of health and a guideline for actions and policies. This enquiry, with a qualitative approach, based on interpretative anthropology and the emic perspective, aims to understand the way of thinking and acting of old people in the face of 'old age with disability' and their relationships with public health. Individual interviews were held at the subject's homes, using a semi-structured script, with 57 old people living in the city, including participants from the cohort of Bambuí. Collection and analysis of the data was oriented by the methodology of Signs, Meanings and Actions, making possible anthropological investigation of the representations and concrete behaviors associated with disability in old age in the local culture. Two categories relating to the relationships between old age, disability and public healthcare emerged from the analysis: (i) experience of care in old age with disability; and (ii) the fear of lack of care. The results reveal that public health needs to review its concepts about disability in old age and incorporate disability into the agenda of the functional dimension of health and care for old age.

  2. Nephrologic Problems in Old Age Period

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    Demet YAVUZ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are a fast growing population in the world, and they have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease. The function of the kidney changes markedly with age. The glomerular fi ltration rate falls progressively, independent of overt pathology. Declining renal function with age has important implications, not only for individual homeostasis but also for the use of drug therapy and for the receipt and donation of organs for transplantation. Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the kidney. The adaptive capacity of kidney to stress and disease in the elderly is restricted. The clinician should be aware of these alterations in order to anticipate and better treat the clinical conditions that occur in great frequency in elderly. Age-related changes has been reviewed in this manuscript.

  3. Orientation towards living in an old age home : an instrument to predict use of an old age home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haken, Liesbeth M.; Steverink, Nardi; Heuvel, Wim J.A. van den; Lindenberg, Siegwart M.

    2002-01-01

    Background, This study presents an alternative assessment method for establishing the demand for an old age home among a community-dwelling older Population, The instrument, called 'orientation towards admission into an old age home', represents the intensity of the need for admission as expressed b

  4. How old do you feel? The role of age discrimination and biological aging in subjective age.

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    Yannick Stephan

    Full Text Available Subjective age, or how young or old individuals experience themselves to be relative to their chronological age, is a crucial construct in gerontology. Subjective age is a significant predictor of important health outcomes, but little is known about the criteria by which individuals' subjectively evaluate their age. To identify psychosocial and biomedical factors linked to the subjective evaluation of age, this study examined whether perceived age discrimination and markers of biological aging are associated with subjective age. Participants were 4776 adults (Mage = 68 from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS who completed measures of subjective age, age discrimination, demographic variables, self-rated health and depression, and had physical health measures, including peak expiratory flow, grip strength, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Telomere length was available for a subset of participants in the 2008 wave (n = 2214. Regression analysis indicated that perceived age discrimination, lower peak expiratory flow, lower grip strength, and higher waist circumference were associated with an older subjective age, controlling for sociodemographic factors, self-rated health, and depression. In contrast, blood pressure and telomere length were not related to subjective age. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that how old a person feels depends in part on psychosocial and biomedical factors, including the experiences of ageism and perceptible indices of fitness and biological age.

  5. Diabetes in old age: an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavadev, J D; Short, K R; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2003-11-01

    Diabetes in the elderly is emerging as one of the most important public health problems of the 21st century. In developing countries, the majority of people with diabetes are in the age range of 45-64 years. A better understanding on the pathogenesis of diabetes in the aging population is required to successfully treat and prevent its devastating complications. Changes in body composition with accumulation of fat in the abdomen is a key factor in the causation of diabetes in the aging population. The size and strength of skeletal muscle, a major tissue involved in glucose metabolism, also declines leading to muscle weakness and a reduction in physical activity. These changes lead to marked reduction in energy expenditure and abdominal fat accumulation causing insulin resistance. Recent evidence suggests that four months of aerobic exercise can improve muscle oxidative capacity similarly in younger and older people, but that insulin sensitivity is less likely to improve in older people. It appears that older people need to exercise more frequently to improve their insulin sensitivity. Diagnosis and management of diabetes in the elderly requires special attention since age, genetics, body composition and lifestyle factors all interact. Increasing evidence suggests that postprandial hyperglycemia is more sensitive to diagnose diabetes in elderly people than in the young. Age related changes in body function and cognition demand special caution in the selection of hypoglycemic drugs in the elderly. Targets of diabetes therapy in the elderly have to be individualized, considering the age of the patient, remaining life-expectancy and severity of co-morbid conditions. Short acting insulin secretogogues are preferred to avoid prolonged and frequent hypoglycemia. Judicious choice of insulin sensitizers, timely introduction of insulin, meticulous control of hypertension and hyperlipidemia are critical to prevent complications.

  6. Acute coronary syndromes: an old age problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander D Simms; Philip D Batin; John Kurian; Nigel Durham; Christopher P Gale

    2012-01-01

    The increasing population in older age will lead to greater numbers of them presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This has implications on global healthcare resources and necessitates better management and selection for evidenced-based therapies. The elderly are a high risk group with more significant treatment benefits than younger ACS. Nevertheless, age related inequalities in ACS care are recognised and persist. This discrepancy in care, to some extent, is explained by the higher frequency of atypical and delayed presentations in the elderly, and less diagnostic electrocardiograms at presentation, potentiating a delay in ACS diagnosis. Under estimation of mortality risk in the elderly due to limited consideration for physiological frailty, co-morbidity, cognitive/psychological impairment and physical disability, less input by cardiology specialists and lack of randomised, controlled trials data to guide management in the elderly may further confound the inequality of care. While these inequalities exist, there remains a substantial opportunity to improve age related ACS outcomes. The selection of elderly patients for specific therapies and medication regimens are unanswered. There is a growing need for randomised, controlled trial data to be more representative of the population and enroll those of advanced age with co-morbidity. A lack of reporting of adverse events, such as renal impairment post coronary angiography, in the elderly further limit risk benefit decisions. Substantial improvements in care of elderly ACS patients are required and should be advocated. Ultimately, these improvements are likely to lead to better outcomes post ACS. However, the improvement in outcome is not infinite and will be limited by non-modifiable factors of age-related risk.

  7. Unmaking old age: political and cognitive formats of active ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Moreira, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different formats. In the WHO, active ageing configures individual lifestyle in order to expand the plasticity of ageing......, based on epidemiological and public health conventions. In the EU, active ageing reforms the retirement behaviour of populations in order to integrate the plasticity of ageing into the institutions, based on social gerontological and demographic conventions. These conventional arrangements are cognitive...

  8. Age Differences in Loneliness from Late Adolescence to Oldest Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Maike; Hawkley, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to common stereotypes, loneliness is not restricted to old age but can occur at any life stage. In this study, we used data from a large, nationally representative German study (N = 16,132) to describe and explain age differences in loneliness from late adolescence to oldest old age. The age distribution of loneliness followed a complex…

  9. Active ageing and the unmaking of old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    Since the end of the 1990s, the European Union and the World Health Organization have proposed active ageing as the best possible solution to the problem of ageing populations. This dissertation discusses how active ageing policies are constructed, what effects they have in the world, and how...... they are negotiated with everyday practices of the elderly. I have explored these topics via ethnographic fieldwork at two activity centres in the Copenhagen area, via document studies of policy papers and gerontological literature about the concept of activity, and via participation in a public-private innovation...... partnership (PPIP) that developed technologies catering to the active late life. A thorough analysis of active ageing entails studying what precisely active ageing tries to solve. I approach ageing as a matter of concern, a term proposed by Bruno Latour to describe how myriad practices and disputed facts...

  10. Relationships between Housing and Healthy Aging in Very Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Frank; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Schilling, Oliver; Nygren, Carita; Fange, Agneta; Sixsmith, Andrew; Sixsmith, Judith; Szeman, Zsuzsa; Tomsone, Signe; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to examine the relationship between aspects of objective and perceived housing and aspects of healthy aging, defined as independence in daily activities and subjective well-being. Furthermore, this research examined the comparability of relationships between housing and healthy aging in the five European countries.…

  11. [Living conditions of aging and old people in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch-Römer, C; Wurm, S

    2006-06-01

    This contribution aims to convey a general overview of the living conditions of aging and old people in Germany. It introduces a series of contributions devoted to the topic "health in old age" and focuses on older people as a very heterogeneous group in society. Who exactly are these older people? We start by discussing the definition of "old age" as a stage of life and the distinction between a "third" and "fourth" age. This is followed by a presentation of some facts describing demographic change at the population level. The main body of the contribution looks at households and housing, family relations and social integration, income, life satisfaction and the health of older people. The two waves of the German Aging Survey, a representative study of persons in the second half of life undertaken in 1996 and 2000, provide the empirical base for the paper.

  12. Diseases of Old Age in Two Paintings by Rembrandt

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    George M. Weisz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two paintings of older men by Rembrandt (1609–1669 are examined to demonstrate that historical attitudes toward diseases of old age and the ageing person’s response to illness can be investigated in paintings. The works selected are of different genres and date from different stages of Rembrandt’s own life, one from his youth and one from his old age. Both paintings show figures who have joint pathologies typically associated with the ageing process, the first involving the subject’s foot and the second involving the subject’s hand. Despite the sometimes painful nature of these conditions, the subjects are shown accommodating their illnesses while maintaining both their intellectual and social engagement and their emotional composure. Although the seventeenth century offered older people very little effective medical treatment in comparison with what is presently available, these paintings nevertheless present a view of illness as a subsidiary rather than a dominant feature of old age.

  13. Active ageing and the unmaking of old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    they are negotiated with everyday practices of the elderly. I have explored these topics via ethnographic fieldwork at two activity centres in the Copenhagen area, via document studies of policy papers and gerontological literature about the concept of activity, and via participation in a public-private innovation...... partnership (PPIP) that developed technologies catering to the active late life. A thorough analysis of active ageing entails studying what precisely active ageing tries to solve. I approach ageing as a matter of concern, a term proposed by Bruno Latour to describe how myriad practices and disputed facts...... are gathered into a concern (2004); I propose the ‘fibre’ metaphor as a tool to study matters of concern. In this metaphor, knowledge productions, policies, and everyday practices are different entangled formations of fibres that, through their relations, feed into matters of concern. Hence, the fibre metaphor...

  14. New perspectives on cardiovascular risk prediction in old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortvliet, Rosalinde Klazina Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    With increasing age, incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease increase. Many physicians face the dilemma whether or not to start preventive treatment in old age. To help physicians decide whether to advise preventive medication to their older patients, prediction of those at highest or

  15. The Premature Aging Hypothesis: Old Before Its Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Joel H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Administered California Verbal Learning Test to young and old alcoholics and controls. Alcoholism and aging produced similar levels of immediate and delayed free recall. However, poor recognition memory and more frequent intrusion and false positive errors were associated with alcoholism but not with aging. Results suggest that alcoholism and…

  16. Affirmative old age - the ageing body and feminist theories on difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn Sandberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Discourses on old age and ageing are framed in narrow and binary ways, either as a decline narrative or through discourses of positive and successful ageing. The decline narrative, on the one hand, is highly centred on the decline of the ageing body as frail, leaky and unbounded, and on how old age is characterised by non-productivity, increasing passivity and dependency. Discourses on successful ageing, on the other hand, rely heavily on neo-liberal imperatives of activity, autonomy and responsibility. In successful ageing, the specificities of ageing bodies are largely overlooked while the capacity of the old person to retain a youthful body, for example, with the aid of sexuopharmaceuticals, is celebrated. This article argues for the need of a theorising of old age that goes beyond the binaries of decline and success. Drawing on the work of feminist corpomaterialists Rosi Braidotti and Elisabeth Grosz, the article proposes affirmative old age as an alternative conceptualisation of old age. As a theoretical project, affirmative old age aims to acknowledge the material specificities of the ageing body and is an attempt to theorise the ageing body in terms of difference but without understanding it as a body marked by decline, lack or negation.

  17. Morbidity Profile of Elders in Old Age Homes in Chennai

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    M Anitha Rani, Palani G, Sathiyasekaran BWC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India “aged” population is the second largest in the world. The proportion of elders living in old age homes in India is increasing. This study was undertaken to explore the health problems of elders in old age homes. Methods: This cross sectional study was done among elders in selected old age homes in Chennai city. Data on health problems was collected by clinical examination and available medical records. Results: Medical services were found available in all the homes. Only 3.3% of elders were clinically free from health problem and the remaining elders were suffering from one or more health problems. Major health problems of elders were cardiovascular diseases 42.8% dental problem 37.6% and visual problem 35.1%. Conclusion: The present study show that greater proportions of institutionalized elders were suffering from wide range of morbidities.

  18. Age mimicry. A perspective on the young-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This essay proposes drawing on Homi K. Bhabha's concept of colonial mimicry to theorize the young-old's imitation of midlife. Bhabha states: "colonial mimicry is the desire for a reformed, recognizable Other, as a subject of a difference that is almost the same, but not quite". On an abstract level, similarities can be found in what is expected of the young-old: the young-old are to orient themselves towards middle-age norms, yet only to a certain degree and only when respecting the allegedly natural differences between the ages of life. Thus, the young-old are considered to be almost the same as the middle-aged, but 'not quite'; with this slight deviation the young-old in fact embody a distorted picture of the latter that causes irritation: through age mimicry midlife norms are not only affirmed but questioned. The paper focuses on the ambivalence in this position of the young-old, exploring examples from different contexts: styling, cosmetic surgery, and the world of work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Age Stereotypes in Middle-Aged through Old-Old Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Neil Carter; Friedrich, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of the study was to compare adult age groups on aging bias, with measures of knowledge of aging in the physical, psychological, and social domains and life satisfaction. The study sample, consisting of 752 men and women, 40 to 95 years of age, was tested using Neugarten, Havighurst, and Tobin's (1961) Life Satisfaction Index (LSI)…

  20. Old age mortality in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia

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    Danan Gu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eastern and South-Eastern Asian countries have witnessed a marked decline in old age mortality in recent decades. Yet no studies have investigated the trends and patterns in old age morality and cause-of-death in the region. Objective: We reviewed the trends and patterns of old age mortality and cause-of-death for countries in the region. Methods: We examined data on old age mortality in terms of life expectancy at age 65 and age-specific death rates from the 2012 Revision of the World Population Prospects for 14 countries in the region (China, Hong Kong, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam and data on cause-of-death from the WHO for five countries (China, Hong Kong, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Singapore from 1980 to 2010. Results: While mortality transitions in these populations took place in different times, and at different levels of socioeconomic development and living environment, changes in their age patterns and sex differentials in mortality showed certain similarities: women witnessed a similar decline to men in spite of their lower mortality, and young elders had a larger decline than the oldest-old. In all five countries examined for cause-of-death, most of the increases in life expectancy at age 65 in both men and women were attributable to declines in mortality from stroke and heart disease. GDP per capita, educational level, and urbanization explained much of the variations in life expectancy and cause-specific mortality, indicating critical contributions of these basic socioeconomic development indicators to the mortality decline over time in the region. Conclusions: These findings shed light on the relationship between epidemiological transition, changing age patterns of mortality, and improving life expectancy in these populations.

  1. A hermeneutic phenomenological explorations of living in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Juan Pardo, Ma Ángeles; Russo, María Teresa; Roqué Sánchez, María Victoria

    2017-06-03

    Although there have been some studies that explore the meaning of aging and give voice to older people, the impact that the aging experience can have on them justifies continued research in this area. In this study, with a hermeneutic phenomenological design and an interpretation method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur, we conducted in-depth interviews with 14 elderly people at a social day center in Rome (Italy). The analysis revealed three central themes associated with the experience of being old: changes and limitations related with being aged, the experience that comes from having lived a long life, and an awareness of death. The findings could help health professionals, families and caregivers to achieve a deeper understanding of what old age entails, and may also serve as a platform for interventions that seek to enable older people to experience aging as a meaningful and positive process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Social Barriers to Effective Communication in Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanecka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some communication barriers apply particularly to elderly people. The social barriers to effective communication in old age are the barriers caused by stereotypes of old age/elderly people and the barriers arising from limitations in using mass communication by seniors. Stereotypes of old age/elderly people embrace views regarding old people’s communication skills and the ideas about the correct way of communication with them. Therefore the communication problems of old people are correlated with the little and poor communication processes they are participating in. This seems to be a result of impetuses of poor quality sent to seniors by their communication partners. Not only face to face communication but also mass communication is very important for the elderly population. Therefore limitations in using new technologies and new communication channels as well as a limited presence in the mass media of content created by seniors and for seniors have an impact on their life, their well-being, and their interpersonal relationships. These problems are especially important when we faced with the ever growing population of elderly people.

  3. Discursive constructions of falls prevention : Discourses of active aging versus old age as disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Ulrich, Anita; Tanggaard, Lene

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a discourse analysis of falls prevention among older people in a context of a falls clinic. Data are based on an empirical study of the ways in which fall prevention was realized and managed in a falls clinic at the political, recruitment and treatment level. Despite massive...... information and investment in falls prevention programs, many still drop out or decline to participate in such programs. The study explores how discourses cross swords in the domain of falls prevention. We identify two main discourses in the field: Discourses of active aging opposed to discourses of old age...... as disease. In discourses of active aging falls are constructed as preventable and not necessarily related to old age; in discourses of old age as disease falls are constructed as a disease of old age. Specific agent positions are created within discourses. Discourses of active aging construct self...

  4. Treatment of cancer in old age, shortcomings and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, A.N.M.; Slaets, J.P.J.; Sleijfer, D. Th.

    2001-01-01

    The burden of cancer in old age is increasing as a result from both the expanding number of older persons in the population and the high and still increasing cancer incidence in this group. The goal of this article is to outline the shortcomings and challenges of the management of cancer in the

  5. Dependency Status and Happiness with Old Age on Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkin, Laura

    1994-01-01

    Used data from survey of elderly persons on Java to investigate prevalence of dependency status (functional, economic, residential) and implications of dependency status for happiness with old age. Dependency on kin was not negative situation, but having economic dependents appeared burdensome. Gender, being able to provide inheritance, and…

  6. Explaining Optimistic Old Age Disability and Longevity Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; Costa-Font, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Biased health care decision making has been regarded as responsible for inefficient behaviours (for example, the limited insurance purchase). This paper empirically examines two sets of biases in the perception of old age disability and longevity. Particularly, we test for the existence of a so called cumulative bias and, secondly, a so called…

  7. LDL cholesterol still a problem in old age?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postmus, Iris; Deelen, Joris; Sedaghat, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies in older subjects have shown no or inverse associations between cholesterol levels and mortality. However, in old age plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) may not reflect the lifetime level due to reverse causality, and hence the risk may...

  8. Hearing in old age - epidemiological and etiological aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction The number of elderly persons is increasing all over the world. This strong demographic trend will affect our societies profoundly. Since the largest relative increase is expected to occur in the group of very old persons, over 80 years of age, the demands on the society and on relatives in terms of health- and social care are considerable.

  9. Midlife Influences Upon Intellectual Functioning in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaie, K. Warner

    1984-01-01

    Presents evidence from the Seattle Longitudinal Study to show that cognitive style and other lifestyle variables in middle life can predict part of the individual differences in ability decline in old age. High performance on fluid abilities and on motor-cognitive flexibility, an engaged lifestyle, and the absence of family dissolution at middle…

  10. Erotica, sexuality and old age in a geriatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Murgieri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexuality is part of the quality of life of elder people and an important factor when it comes to institutionalized people since institutionalization is a turning point in the course of their lives. Myths about old age and gender make society and elders have judgmental ideas. Gay, lesbian and transgender issues in institutions are a separate study subject.

  11. Migration and the Problem of Old Age People in Nepal

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    Tika Ram Gautam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Current trends of migration in Nepal imply that the extensive out-migration of young people from rural areas, to foreign and internal urban centres, coincides with a rise in the problem of older couples in rural areas. This article examines the impact of migration on living condition and internal feelings of old age couples by drawing on the results of sociological and demographic field studies in Kandebash Village Development Committee (VDC comprising multiethnic communities of western Nepal. The methodology for identifying older people is, social survey followed by direct interview with semi-structured questionnaire, examining variations by socio-economic strata and family structures. Comparative analysis indicates considerable heterogeneity in past and present migration patterns, both within and between countries. Economically higher status families are commonly able to reinforce their position by making better use of emigration opportunities. These families are migrating permanently to urban centers within country. Migrants from economically middle and lower status families are continuing temporary migration to foreign countries. Temporary migration, both within and between countries, is making old age couples alone in rural villages. The migrants' financial and material contributions are a nominal support. The old age lonely couples are facing many problems such as feeling loneliness, helplessness, frustration, increased household and social burdening.Key words: Migration, emigration, immigration, old age couple, rural migration, NepalDOI = 10.3126/dsaj.v2i0.1361Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.2 pp.145-160

  12. Baby Boomers and the Shifting Political Construction of Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Robert B.; Gonyea, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Employing the political construct of "target" populations, we suggest that the Boomers in old age will constitute a conceptually distinct population from that represented by either their parents or grandparents. A fourfold typology organized along the dimensions posited by Schneider and Ingram (1993) yields categorizations of target populations as…

  13. Explaining Optimistic Old Age Disability and Longevity Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; Costa-Font, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Biased health care decision making has been regarded as responsible for inefficient behaviours (for example, the limited insurance purchase). This paper empirically examines two sets of biases in the perception of old age disability and longevity. Particularly, we test for the existence of a so called cumulative bias and, secondly, a so called…

  14. [A golden age of the elderly? Old age in a historical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Andreas

    2003-08-01

    The subject of the following article is 'old age' of women and men in prehistoric times, in the ancient Greek and Roman times, in the Middle Ages, in the Age of Enlightenment, in the times of the western industrial civilization and finally in the so-called post-modern civilization (in German terms "Erlebnisgesellschaft") of the present. There is a double focus on the subject. On one hand, the examination deals with the concrete circumstances of living of the elderly people. On the other hand, the examination analyzes the images of old age and the dominant image of the elderly people in the different times. The historical focus shows that old age is no anthropological or biological, unchangeable condition. Old age is a social and cultural construction that is historically formed and can be changed by society. This statement is valid for the number of the elderly in relation to the whole population of a historical society, it is valid for the way of every day life of the elderly and it is also valid to answer the question, who is an 'old' person. 'Old age' and the appearance of 'old age' depends on gender, on sociological items and last but not least on individual conditions during the different historical times. Dominant and strongly changing images of old age can be seen in all periods of human culture, in ancient times, in the Middle Ages and also in modern times. These images (negative or positive) depend strongly on the economic circumstances and conditions of living. Connected with these analyzed images of old age in all former cultures are concrete systems of values that have a leading function for the whole society.

  15. IN TODAY'S INFORMATION AGE ORGANISATIONS EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir DEĞİRMENCİ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It's as old as human history in the Executive Office and of the concept has caused the unborn. From the industrial revolution, they perform the organizational activities of all employees in the area are the name of the Office. Businesses are not just places that made production. Businesses also allows the production of all kinds of people have seen the need, the important strategic decisions, increase the quali ty of production and employees must work efficiently and effectively - conscious upon arrival places always have been offices. Marketing, management, human resources, accounting, as units have been operating in all offices within the organization. In today' s information age, information offices are produced, distributed to individuals and corporations concerned, but also has been the destruction of redundant information and important information later when needed has been used places. Today's globalization i s rapid change in knowledge and technology organizations in the management of business owners and managers will help many professions on WikiMapia. Office; Administrator, officer, Secretary, will serve the objectives of the business class ser vices help kin d of elements are needed. Businesses in maintaining vital activities, production and service provision of the activities of the Organization in ensuring an effective and efficient manner within the framework of the team spirit in the conduct of managers with the most important requirements for an Assistant Manager's position has been. Most modern - day organizations close to the administrator should be looking to key features of the Administrative Assistant; the Office of the administrator, who knows how t o keep a secret is not a characteristic of people who best represent the Bureau. When a business can stand in straight execution activities Administrative Assistant has important tasks to. Executive Assistants are indispensable ingredients of today's mode rn office.

  16. Trajectories of depressive symptoms in old age: Integrating age-, pathology-, and mortality-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Helena; Gerstorf, Denis; Hoppmann, Christiane A; Luszcz, Mary A

    2015-12-01

    Late life involves a variety of different challenges to well-being. This study extends and qualifies propositions drawn from the paradox of well-being in aging using 15-year longitudinal data on depressive symptoms from old and very old participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (Baseline N = 2,087; Mage = 78.69 years; range: 65-103 years; 49.40% women). We first examined age-related trajectories in depressive symptoms from young-old to oldest-old, taking into account (changes in) relevant correlates, pathology, and mortality; and, second, we investigated gender differences in these trajectories. Results revealed that age-related trajectories of depressive symptoms were predictive of mortality hazards. The unique predictive effects of both level of, and change in, depressive symptoms were independent of one another and held after taking into account education as well as changes in marital status, living arrangements, cognitive function, and illness burden. In addition, results indicated that depressive symptoms were elevated among participants suffering from arthritis, and increased with age more markedly in men than in women. In particular, the significant Age × Gender interaction indicated that the gender gap in depressive symptoms reduced from young-old to old-old and reversed in very old age when men showed more depressive symptoms than women. Qualifying the paradox of well-being in aging, findings demonstrated that depressive symptoms increased from young-old to oldest-old and suggest that age-, pathology-, and mortality-related changes should be examined in concert to advance our understanding of individual differences in depressive symptom trajectories in late life.

  17. Direct costs associated with depression in old age in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppa, Melanie; Heinrich, Sven; Matschinger, Herbert; Sandholzer, Hagen; Angermeyer, Matthias C; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2008-01-01

    Depression in old age is common. Only few studies, exclusively conducted in the USA, have examined the impact of depression on direct costs in the elderly (60+). This study aims to determine the effect of depression on direct costs of the advanced elderly in Germany from a societal perspective. 451 primary care patients aged 75+ were investigated face-to-face regarding depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale), chronic medical illness (Chronic Disease Score) and resource utilisation and costs (cost diary). Resource utilisation was monetarily valued using 2004/2005 prices. Mean annual direct costs of the depressed (euro5241) exceeded mean costs of non-depressed individuals (euro3648) by one third (pdentures, and for home care. Only few costs were caused by depression treatment. Depression has a significant impact on direct costs after controlling for age, gender, education, chronic medical illness and cognitive functions. A one-point increase in the GDS-Score was associated with a euro336 increase in the annual direct costs. Reported costs can be considered as rather conservative estimates. There were no nursing home residents and no patients with dementia disorders in the sample. Furthermore, recall bias cannot be ruled out completely. Depression in old age is associated with a significant increase of direct costs, even after adjustment for chronic medical illness. Future demographic changes in Germany will lead to an increase in the burden of old age depression. Therefore health policy should promote the development and use of cost-effective treatment strategies.

  18. The couple relationship - support functions and sexuality in Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Josefina Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze: 1 couple relationships – support functions and characteristics of the relationships – and their difference by gender, and 2 changes that occur in those relationships and in sexual activity in older heterosexual adults in the 65-85 age range. The subjects of the analysis were intentionally selected and the data has been collected in structured and semi-structured interviews. The results obtained by quantitative and qualitative analysis show that the couple relationship in old age fulfills functions such as emotional support, companionship and cognitive advice. Analysis by gender shows significant differences in 4 out of the 5 support functions that were explored. Among the changes that take place in old age, the decrease of frequency in sexual activity appears in the first place, though the level of satisfaction is maintained; and fellowship, mutual care and positive affect in relation to the partner increase.

  19. Growing Old before Old Age: Ageing in the Fiction of Marian Keyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Serrano, Elena

    2009-01-01

    This research analyzes the ways in which the ageing process is articulated in Marian Keyes's novels. Keyes is one of numerous authors within the genre of "chick lit," or "post-feminist fiction." This type of literature, begun in the mid-1990s, mainly deals with the process of the coming into adulthood of the female protagonists. They not only…

  20. Potential urinary aging markers of 20-month-old rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xundou Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Urine is a very good source for biomarker discovery because it accumulates changes in the body. However, a major challenge in urinary biomarker discovery is the fact that the urinary proteome is influenced by various elements. To circumvent these problems, simpler systems, such as animal models, can be used to establish associations between physiological or pathological conditions and alterations in the urinary proteome. In this study, the urinary proteomes of young (two months old and old rats (20 months old; nine in each group were analyzed using LC-MS/MS and quantified using the Progenesis LC-MS software. A total of 371 proteins were identified, 194 of which were shared between the young and old rats. Based on criteria of a fold change ≥2, P < 0.05 and identification in each rat of the high-abundance group, 33 proteins were found to be changed (15 increased and 18 decreased in old rats. By adding a more stringent standard (protein spectral counts from every rat in the higher group greater than those in the lower group, eight proteins showed consistent changes in all rats of the groups; two of these proteins are also altered in the urinary proteome of aging humans. However, no shared proteins between our results and the previous aging plasma proteome were identified. Twenty of the 33 (60% altered proteins have been reported to be disease biomarkers, suggesting that aging may share similar urinary changes with some diseases. The 33 proteins corresponded to 28 human orthologs which, according to the Human Protein Atlas, are strongly expressed in the kidney, intestine, cerebellum and lung. Therefore, the urinary proteome may reflect aging conditions in these organs.

  1. Biodemography of old-age mortality in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilova, Natalia S; Gavrilov, Leonid A

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of persons living beyond age 80 underscores the need for accurate measurement of mortality at advanced ages and understanding the old-age mortality trajectories. It is believed that exponential growth of mortality with age (Gompertz law) is followed by a period of deceleration, with slower rates of mortality increase at older ages. This pattern of mortality deceleration is traditionally described by the logistic (Kannisto) model, which is considered as an alternative to the Gompertz model. Mortality deceleration was observed for many invertebrate species, but the evidence for mammals is controversial. We compared the performance (goodness-of-fit) of two competing models-the Gompertz model and the logistic (Kannisto) model using data for three mammalian species: 22 birth cohorts of U.S. men and women, eight cohorts of laboratory mice, and 10 cohorts of laboratory rats. For all three mammalian species, the Gompertz model fits mortality data significantly better than the "mortality deceleration" Kannisto model (according to the Akaike's information criterion as the goodness-of-fit measure). These results suggest that mortality deceleration at advanced ages is not a universal phenomenon, and survival of mammalian species follows the Gompertz law up to very old ages.

  2. POLAND: NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN? OR: ON SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF OLD AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Stypinska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the various approaches to the phenomenon of old age in Poland from the perspective of social constructionism in sociology. It attempts to demonstrate that the defi nition of old age is not a primitive notion of essentialist character, but a set of meanings that are permanently transformed and negotiated depending on the social contexts in which they are deployed. The concept of social constructionism of Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann serves as a theoretical prism for the analysis of the empirical material. The empirical material consists of a set of texts and commentaries from the readers and users of the Internet portal GazetaWyborcza and the report “Is Poland a country for old men?”. The major guideline for the analysis of the empirical material was to identify the major themes and spheres of social life discussed among the readers and Internet users. The subsequent steps were: synthesis and interpretation of the results.The analysis showed that the main concerns regarding the topic of old age are the following: public space as a place of alienation or even perhaps “invisibility” of older people, the labour market as an area of domination of young people, media described as the “dictatorship of young faces”, and the usage of new technologies by seniors.

  3. Sweet old things: moral complexities in old age in Muriel Spark's Memento Mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Suzanne E; Rust, Martha D

    2015-04-01

    Through the lens of Muriel Spark's dark comedic novel, Memento Mori, this paper explores questions of morality, mortality, and the moral choices and performances in old age and in the systems and places of care. Spark's elderly characters are complex moral actors - some virtuous and some decidedly not - who have been receiving mysterious phone calls telling them simply, "Remember you must die." We, the co-authors, are from two different disciplines, namely Renaissance and medieval literature, and social work and critical gerontology. Among the questions that interest us is the paradox of a master narrative that on the one hand exempts the old from moral criticism yet holds them to a higher moral standard - essentially positioning them as moral nonentities, and relieving the old, their caretakers, and society of moral responsibility. Another is the question of whether moral agency in old age has distinctive aspects, and whether consciousness of one's impending mortality effects moral reasoning and performance. In this paper we offer our individual readings of the ways the novel opens up conceptual space in aging theory, and conclude with our thoughts about what our collaboration suggests for continuing cross-disciplinary dialogue.

  4. Shaping old age: Innovation partnerships, senior centres and billiards tables as active ageing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2017-01-01

    During the past decade active ageing has been positioned as a solution to the problem of global ageing. While the scientific, economic and even moral arguments for pursuing a more active old age has been many, the integration of active ageing in everyday practices face challenges. This chapter...... explores the ways that active ageing policies become part of everyday practices, by proposing the concept of active ageing technologies. Active ageing technologies are material and immaterial condensations of knowledge that form old age in specific ways. Through the cases of an innovation partnership, two...... activity centres and a billiards table, the author explores how active ageing policies are transformed in practice. The chapter draws on an ethnographic study of active ageing conducted at the two activity centres, as well as the author’s participation in the innovation partnership. The author uses...

  5. Hypoxia and dehydroepiandrosterone in old age: a mouse survival study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quillard Janine

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival remains an issue in pulmonary hypertension, a chronic disorder that often affects aged human adults. In young adult mice and rats, chronic 50% hypoxia (11% FIO2 or 0.5 atm induces pulmonary hypertension without threatening life. In this framework, oral dehydroepiandrosterone was recently shown to prevent and reverse pulmonary hypertension in rats within a few weeks. To evaluate dehydroepiandrosterone therapy more globally, in the long term and in old age, we investigated whether hypoxia decreases lifespan and whether dehydroepiandrosterone improves survival under hypoxia. Methods 240 C57BL/6 mice were treated, from the age of 21 months until death, by normobaric hypoxia (11% FIO2 or normoxia, both with and without dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (25 mg/kg in drinking water (4 groups, N = 60. Survival, pulmonary artery and heart remodeling, weight and blood patterns were assessed. Results In normoxia, control mice reached the median age of 27 months (median survival: 184 days. Hypoxia not only induced cardiopulmonary remodeling and polycythemia in old animals but also induced severe weight loss, trembling behavior and high mortality (p Conclusion Dehydroepiandrosterone globally reduced what may be called an age-related frailty induced by hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. This interestingly recalls an inverse correlation found in the prospective PAQUID epidemiological study, between dehydroepiandrosterone blood levels and mortality in aged human smokers and former smokers.

  6. Housing of old age households in 10 EU countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skak, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The paper is an extract of a study under the DEMHOW (Demographic Change and Housing Wealth) project financed by the under the EU Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development, which investigates the ways in which, across member states, demographic change and housing wealt...... are linked, and to use those investigations in order to contribute to policy making. The present paper uses SHARE to look at housing conditions for old age households in the 10 European countries included....

  7. Functional ability at age 75: is there an impact of physical inactivity from middle age to early old age?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Støvring, N; Schultz-Larsen, K

    2006-01-01

    ) and smoking, sex, school education, household composition, chronic disease at baseline and functional ability at age 70 as possible confounders. There was a strong association between physical inactivity at age 70 and disability at age 75. However, the analyses showed no effect of cumulated physical...... inactivity from age 50 to 60 to 70 on disability at age 75 when adjusting for functional ability at age 70. Physical inactivity is a risk factor for disability among old people. Thus, old people should be encouraged to take up and maintain physical training throughout the aging process....

  8. End-of-Life Decisions and Advanced Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that most people die in advanced old age, little attention is given to cases involving older people in debates about the moral and legal dimensions of end-of-life decision making. The purpose of this paper is to establish some of the ways our discussions should change as we pay attention to important factors influencing end-of-life decisions for people in advanced old age. Focusing on the prevalence of comorbidities and the likelihood that people in advanced old age will experience an extended period of declining function before death, I argue that our debates should be expanded to include greater consideration of how we want to live in the final stages of life. With this, I am arguing against the tendency to think that “end-of-life” decision making concerns only making decisions about when and how it is appropriate to terminate a person’s life. I argue, further, that we should move away from the medicalization of dying.

  9. Age Trajectory of High Cognitive Functioning Among the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Mikael; McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    individual differences. This decline of cognitive functioning at an individual level may suggest that cognitive function at a population level decreases with age. However, in the Danish 1905 cohort, the age trajectory of both average and high cognitive functioning is constant at a population level from......The chance of reaching age 90 years has increased markedly over the last 50 years, and this chance will probably continue to increase with successive cohorts. There is a widespread concern that a large fraction of the future oldest old will be cognitively impaired. However, there is strong evidence...... that later born cohorts may have better late-life cognitive function than earlier born cohorts as studies have shown a decline both in the prevalence and in the incidence of dementia. Cognitive functioning generally declines after the age of 40 years at an individual level, but there are substantial...

  10. Learning at old age: a study on winter bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Behrends

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is often accompanied by a decline in learning and memory abilities across the animal kingdom. Understanding age-related changes in cognitive abilities is therefore a major goal of current research. The honey bee is emerging as a novel model organism for age-related changes in brain function, because learning and memory can easily be studied in bees under controlled laboratory conditions. In addition, genetically similar workers naturally display life expectancies from six weeks (summer bees to six months (winter bees. We studied whether in honey bees, extreme longevity leads to a decline in cognitive functions. Six-month-old winter bees were conditioned either to odours or to tactile stimuli. Afterwards, long-term memory and discrimination abilities were analysed. Winter bees were kept under different conditions (flight /no flight opportunity to test for effects of foraging activity on learning performance. Despite their extreme age, winter bees did not display an age-related decline in learning or discrimination abilities, but had a slightly impaired olfactory long-term memory. The opportunity to forage indoors led to a slight decrease in learning performance. This suggests that in honey bees, unlike in most other animals, age per se does not impair associative learning. Future research will show which mechanisms protect winter bees from age-related deficits in learning.

  11. Comparative analysis of old-age mortality estimations in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Bendavid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survival to old ages is increasing in many African countries. While demographic tools for estimating mortality up to age 60 have improved greatly, mortality patterns above age 60 rely on models based on little or no demographic data. These estimates are important for social planning and demographic projections. We provide direct estimations of older-age mortality using survey data. METHODS: Since 2005, nationally representative household surveys in ten sub-Saharan countries record counts of living and recently deceased household members: Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Namibia, Nigeria, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. After accounting for age heaping using multiple imputation, we use this information to estimate probability of death in 5-year intervals ((5q(x. We then compare our (5q(x estimates to those provided by the World Health Organization (WHO and the United Nations Population Division (UNPD to estimate the differences in mortality estimates, especially among individuals older than 60 years old. FINDINGS: We obtained information on 505,827 individuals (18.4% over age 60, 1.64% deceased. WHO and UNPD mortality models match our estimates closely up to age 60 (mean difference in probability of death -1.1%. However, mortality probabilities above age 60 are lower using our estimations than either WHO or UNPD. The mean difference between our sample and the WHO is 5.9% (95% CI 3.8-7.9% and between our sample is UNPD is 13.5% (95% CI 11.6-15.5%. Regardless of the comparator, the difference in mortality estimations rises monotonically above age 60. INTERPRETATION: Mortality estimations above age 60 in ten African countries exhibit large variations depending on the method of estimation. The observed patterns suggest the possibility that survival in some African countries among adults older than age 60 is better than previously thought. Improving the quality and coverage of vital information in developing

  12. Comparative Analysis of Old-Age Mortality Estimations in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendavid, Eran; Seligman, Benjamin; Kubo, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Background Survival to old ages is increasing in many African countries. While demographic tools for estimating mortality up to age 60 have improved greatly, mortality patterns above age 60 rely on models based on little or no demographic data. These estimates are important for social planning and demographic projections. We provide direct estimations of older-age mortality using survey data. Methods Since 2005, nationally representative household surveys in ten sub-Saharan countries record counts of living and recently deceased household members: Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Namibia, Nigeria, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. After accounting for age heaping using multiple imputation, we use this information to estimate probability of death in 5-year intervals (5qx). We then compare our 5qx estimates to those provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Population Division (UNPD) to estimate the differences in mortality estimates, especially among individuals older than 60 years old. Findings We obtained information on 505,827 individuals (18.4% over age 60, 1.64% deceased). WHO and UNPD mortality models match our estimates closely up to age 60 (mean difference in probability of death -1.1%). However, mortality probabilities above age 60 are lower using our estimations than either WHO or UNPD. The mean difference between our sample and the WHO is 5.9% (95% CI 3.8–7.9%) and between our sample is UNPD is 13.5% (95% CI 11.6–15.5%). Regardless of the comparator, the difference in mortality estimations rises monotonically above age 60. Interpretation Mortality estimations above age 60 in ten African countries exhibit large variations depending on the method of estimation. The observed patterns suggest the possibility that survival in some African countries among adults older than age 60 is better than previously thought. Improving the quality and coverage of vital information in developing countries will become

  13. [Physical self-perceptions in adulthood and old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi Grandmontagne, Alfredo; Rodríguez Fernández, Arantzazu; Esnaola Etxaniz, Igor

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work is to confirm the tetra-factorial validity of the Cuestionario de Autoconcepto Físico (CAF [in English, the Physical Self-concept Questionnaire]) in adulthood and old age from the responses of 1,114 people (39.50% men and 60.50% women), divided into four age groups (24 to 34 years, n= 390; 35 to 49 years, n= 277; 50 to 64 years, n= 330; and over 65, n= 117). The correlations between scales (physical skills, physical fitness, physical attractiveness and strength) are lower than those obtained in previous studies, which supports their being different. However, confirmatory factor analysis supported the tetra-factorial structure primarily in the 24-34 age group.

  14. Tooth loss and subsequent disability and mortality in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Christiansen, Niels;

    2008-01-01

    one to nine teeth was associated with onset of disability at age 75 and 80. Health-related variables and education attenuated the associations between edentulism and onset of disability, although they remained marginally significant, whereas the association between having one to nine teeth and onset......OBJECTIVES: To examine whether tooth loss at age 70 is associated with onset of disability at 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year follow-up and to mortality at 21-year follow-up. SETTING: Community-based population in Copenhagen. DESIGN: A baseline study of a random sample of 70-year-old people born in 1914...... interviews and a medical and oral examination. Oral health was measured according to number of teeth (0, 1-9, 10-19, > or = 20). Disability was measured using the Avlund Mob-H scale at age 75, 80, 85, and 90. Mortality data were obtained from the National Death Register. RESULTS: Being edentulous or having...

  15. Age of old objects constraints on cosmic opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Dantas, M A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, it is proposed a cosmological model independent method to constrain the cosmic opacity. As an approach never seen before in literature, we use the ages of 32 old passive galaxies distributed over the redshift interval $0.11 < z < 1.84$ and of 9 extremely old globular clusters in M31 galaxy to obtain opacity free luminosity distance. By comparing them to the 580 distance moduli of supernovae from the so-called Union 2.1 compilation we put limits on the cosmic opacity parametrized by $\\tau(z) = \\epsilon z/(1+z)$ (for $\\epsilon =0$ the transparent universe is recovered). Considering the cosmic background radiation constraints on the spatial curvature of the Universe no significant deviation from transparency is verified.

  16. Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algilani S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Samal Algilani,1,* Lina Östlund-Lagerström,1,2,* Annica Kihlgren,1 Karin Blomberg,1 Robert J Brummer,1,2 Ida Schoultz1,2 1Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, 2Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre, School of Health and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Aging is characterized by loss of function and represents a perspective that puts the focus on the negative aspects of aging. Thus, it is fundamental to shift the focus from loss of function to maintaining good health and personal satisfaction through life; in other words, to promote optimal functionality at a level appropriate for older adults. However, it is not yet known what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's own perspective. Objective: To explore the concept of optimal functionality in old age from the older adult's perspective (ie, people over 65 years of age in industrialized Western countries. Methods: We undertook a scoping review and searched two electronic databases (PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL] from January 2002 to July 2013 for scientific studies, using the key search term personal satisfaction. In total, 25 scientific studies were analyzed. Results: Only six of the included articles applied a qualitative methodology. By analyzing the results of these articles, three major themes were identified as cornerstones in the concept of optimal functionality at old age: 1 self-related factors (eg, mental well-being; 2 body-related factors (eg, physical well-being; and 3 external factors equal to demographic and environmental factors. Conclusion: There is a lack of qualitative studies in the current literature, and hence of what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's perspective. The results outlined in this review identify three cornerstones (self-related factors, body

  17. How old is old in allegations of age discrimination? The limitations of existing law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard L; Farnum, Katlyn S

    2016-10-01

    Under Title VII, courts may give a mixed motive instruction allowing jurors to determine that defendants are liable for discrimination if an illegal factor (here: race, color, religion, sex, or national origin) contributed to an adverse decision. Recently, the Supreme Court held that to conclude that an employer discriminated against a worker because of age, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, unlike Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, requires "but for" causality, necessitating jurors to find that age was the determinative factor in an employer's adverse decision regarding that worker. Using a national online sample (N = 392) and 2 study phases, 1 to measure stereotypes, and a second to present experimental manipulations, this study tested whether older worker stereotypes as measured through the lens of the Stereotype Content Model, instruction type (but for vs. mixed motive causality), and plaintiff age influenced mock juror verdicts in an age discrimination case. Decision modeling in Phase 2 with 3 levels of case orientation (i.e., proplaintiff, prodefendant, and neutral) showed that participants relied on multiple factors when making a decision, as opposed to just 1, suggesting that mock jurors favor a mixed model approach to discrimination verdict decisions. In line with previous research, instruction effects showed that mock jurors found in favor of plaintiffs under mixed motive instructions but not under "but for" instructions especially for older plaintiffs (64- and 74-year-old as opposed to 44- and 54-year-old-plaintiffs). Most importantly, in accordance with the Stereotype Content Model theory, competence and warmth stereotypes moderated the instruction effects found for specific judgments. The results of this study show the importance of the type of legal causality required for age discrimination cases. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Emotional well-being in advanced old age: comparative study by age and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Buz Delgado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In very old age, emotional states become the most important reasonto maintain life satisfaction. In this study we examined the role of positive and negative emotions on the judgment of life satisfaction in advanced old age and the age and gender differences in a sample of 400 elderly people of Salamanca, aged between 75 and 104. The results show a higher frequency of positive emotions than negative, with the most frequent of the former being attentive,active and strong, and the less frequent ones being excited and inspired. Among the more frequent negative emotions are feeling jittery, nervous and alert, and the less frequent ones are feeling guilty, hostile and ashamed. In addition, there are differences in terms of both age (people aged between 75 and 84 are more active, enthusiastic and inspired and gender (very old women are more jittery, nervous, proud, afraid, scared and upset. Moreover, multiple regression analysis showed that remaining lively, happy, interested and alert to events is essential for maintaining the life satisfaction of people aged over 75. These results confirm that positive emotions are a potential resource for psychological esilience in advanced old age.

  19. Neuroinflammation and Cerebrovascular Disease in Old Age: A Translational Medicine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Mario; Shah, Imtiaz M.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of cerebrovascular disease is highest in the elderly population. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain response to cerebral ischemia in old age are currently poorly understood. Ischemic changes in the commonly used young animal stroke models do not reflect the molecular changes associated with the aged brain. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are important pathogenic processes occurring during the acute phase of cerebral ischemia. Free radical generation is also implicated in the aging process, and the combination of these effects in elderly stroke patients could explain the higher risk of morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of stroke pathophysiology in the elderly patient would assist in the development of new therapeutic strategies for this vulnerable age group. With the increasing use of reperfusion therapies, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress remain attractive therapeutic targets for the development of adjuvant neuroprotective agents. This paper will discuss these molecular aspects of acute stroke and senescence from a bench-to-bedside research perspective. PMID:22132330

  20. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dziechciaż

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging. The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists’ assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it.

  1. A Provocative Perspective on Population Aging and Old-Age Financial Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Holzmann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Population aging is typically associated with economic challenges for productivity and financial threats for the old-age financial protection system of a country. This paper takes an optimistic position and outlines key ingredients to make it a successful experience. Yet to turn this challenge into an opportunity requires a significant change in a society's mindset and policies, such as recognizing that population aging and increased life expectancy are quite likely the biggest challenge to m...

  2. Nutritional concerns, health and survival in old age

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    The ageing process is—apart from chance or good luck—not only influenced by factors intrinsic to the individual, but also by extrinsic factors that include environmental and lifestyle variables. This paper deals with the epidemiological evidence for the role of dietary patterns and key nutritional concerns in relation to survival and ageing related disorders that present themselves in later life. Dietary patterns, such as the Mediterranean diet, characterized by mainly plant foods including protective factors e.g. vegetables, nuts and monounsaturated fatty acids and excluding harmful factors e.g. trans-fatty acids and foods with a high glycemic factor, appear to be relevant even in old age. Specific nutritional concerns focus on general undernutrition, vitamin D and vitamin B12. Prevalence of nutritional inadequacies, diagnostic criteria, causes and health consequences are described. The paper ends with recommendations for guidance on healthy diets for elderly people. An important challenge should be research to further expand the knowledge base, acknowledging the complexity of the ageing process and integrating different dimensions of research into human healthy ageing in properly designed studies. In the mean time reversing poor adherence to existing guidelines for a healthy diet remains a first challenge in public health nutritional practices. PMID:20495957

  3. Old age in Polish and American tv series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOANNA ANIOŁ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The educational and socialization role of the media is not the latest novelty, however there are niches that have not been developed yet. Realizing the opinion-forming role of the mass media, which may be reflected in social behaviours, the authors of this article will analyse the content of chosen media products. The image of elderly people presented by the most popular Polish and American series will be examined. The research aims to find whether Desperate Housewives and Colours of happiness (original title: Barwy szczęścia adjust the image of old age to the social-demographic situation, which is constantly changing in the majority of countries. Does the colossus – television promote stereotypes which make age discrimination morally approved – or just the opposite – a well thought out image, shaping the recognition and respect for people in their “third age”?

  4. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L. D.; Vieira, Renata T.; Soares, Cândida D.; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B.; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed.

  5. Leisure in old age – disciplinary practices surrounding the discourse of active ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Hasmanová Marhánkova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, the World Health Organization adopted the term ‘‘active ageing’’, which currently represents a key vision of old age in Western societies facing the situation of demographic ageing. The meaning of the idea of active ageing is based on the concept of individuals actively and systematically influencing the conditions of their ageing through selfresponsibility and self-care. The aim of this article is to map how the idea of active ageing is constructed and the implications it presents with regard to the way in which seniors relate to their experience of old age. It concentrates on a pecific segment of senior-oriented social services (centres for seniors that offer leisure time activities and educational courses that represent an institutional context for the manifestation of the discourse of active ageing. A three-year ethnographic study was conducted in two such centres in the Czech Republic. The article focuses on various strategies for the disciplining of the ageing body. It points out that these disciplinary practices are an integral part of the daily running of the centres and that the seniors who intensively engage in them have internalised the idea of an active lifestyle as the most desirable lifestyle in old age. Active ageing was constructed by them as a project that must be worked on. Through the ‘‘technologies of self’’ embedded in the imperative of the necessity to move or do something, they participate in the production of the discourse of active ageing as a form of discipline of the body. At the same time, the article outlines how the idea of active ageing as the ‘‘correct’’ form of ageing influences the self-conception of these seniors and their attitudes towards ageing and their peers.

  6. Age determination of 15 old to intermediate-age small Magellanic cloud star clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Piatti, A. E. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Leiton, R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Carraro, G. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Costa, E. [Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Grocholski, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sarajedini, A., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: andres@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: roger.leiton@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org, E-mail: costa@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We present color-magnitude diagrams in the V and I bands for 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on data taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT, Chile). We selected these clusters from our previous work, wherein we derived cluster radial velocities and metallicities from calcium II infrared triplet (CaT) spectra also taken with the VLT. We discovered that the ages of six of our clusters have been appreciably underestimated by previous studies, which used comparatively small telescopes, graphically illustrating the need for large apertures to obtain reliable ages of old and intermediate-age SMC star clusters. In particular, three of these clusters, L4, L6, and L110, turn out to be among the oldest SMC clusters known, with ages of 7.9 ± 1.1, 8.7 ± 1.2, and 7.6 ± 1.0 Gyr, respectively, helping to fill a possible 'SMC cluster age gap'. Using the current ages and metallicities from Parisi et al., we analyze the age distribution, age gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of a sample of SMC clusters measured homogeneously. There is a suggestion of bimodality in the age distribution but it does not show a constant slope for the first 4 Gyr, and we find no evidence for an age gradient. Due to the improved ages of our cluster sample, we find that our AMR is now better represented in the intermediate/old period than we had derived in Parisi et al., where we simply took ages available in the literature. Additionally, clusters younger than ∼4 Gyr now show better agreement with the bursting model of Pagel and Tautvaišienė, but we confirm that this model is not a good representation of the AMR during the intermediate/old period. A more complicated model is needed to explain the SMC chemical evolution in that period.

  7. [Visual pattern analysis and reasoning: Ravens' Coloured Progressive Matrices in old-age and very-old-age adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F; Vink, M T

    1989-12-06

    Sixty-five non-demented elderly adults, born between 1895 and 1918 (mean age +/- sd: 80.0 +/- 5.4) were tested with Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM). Subjects were recruited from homes for the aged and were rated by the staff as free from any symptoms of dementia or other psychiatric disease. Mean number of years of education was 8.2 (range 5 to 18). CPM scores ranged from 9 to 35 with mean +/- sd of 25.9 +/- 5.9. Subjects who had received more formal education performed better on the CPM (Pearson's r: 0.49). When education was controlled for in the analysis, the correlation between age and performance was attenuated and did not reach statistical significance (Pearson's r: -0.24). Test results appeared to be specific for generations, regardless of age. Mean performance in this sample was significantly higher than less recently published norms suggest. Analysis of item content revealed that the CPM consists of three main types of problems: two of a predominantly visuospatial type (12 items of simple continuous pattern-completion and 15 concrete items showing progressive changes in one or two directions) and 9 items of an abstract reasoning type. The concrete visuospatial items appear very useful in the assessment of visuoperceptive dysfunction, as for example in visual apperceptive agnosia. The abstract matrices were very difficult for most of our elderly subjects, so that these items cannot be used to detect deviations from normal old age.

  8. The problem of old age in the context of family caring responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kowalik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent years show that demographic changes are leading to lengthening of life expectancy, to the extension of old age and consequently to a growing number of elderly people. Research indicates that by the mid-twenty-first century the number of elderly people will increase to 370 million. The constantly growing number of older people means that care of this group of patients acquires a new meaning, especially because most of them will wish to remain under the care of the family. This fact entails the need to involve family members to assist in the care of an elderly person in the home and beyond. Family potential understood as the ability to care for the old and sick has systematically decreased in recent years in Poland. The tendency of Poles to travel abroad for work purposes, especially for women, is one of the highest in the OECD. Migration of family members means that support for an older person may take various forms. Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States recognized that the scope of proper care must include the involvement of all stakeholders in compliance with the Bill of Rights and Duties of a nursing home boarder and the Standards and Elderly Care regulations issued by the Australian Government. In the Polish Act on social assistance in 2004, there is no clearly defined notation associated with the provision of care because of old age and loneliness. Controversial is the fact that the Chinese authorities have decided to punish family members for not visiting old people.

  9. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  10. 20 CFR 404.312 - How is my old-age benefit amount calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is my old-age benefit amount calculated? 404.312 Section 404.312 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Old-Age, Disability, Dependents' and Survivors' Insurance...

  11. 20 CFR 404.310 - When am I entitled to old-age benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When am I entitled to old-age benefits? 404.310 Section 404.310 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Old-Age, Disability, Dependents' and Survivors' Insurance Benefits; Period...

  12. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziechciaż, Małgorzata; Filip, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists' assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it.

  13. [Positive aspects of old ages - humor of seniors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    This survey study has five parts. In the first part two conceptual approaches to humor are characterized. One considers "the comic" to be an umbrella concept, and humor is only one of its rather positive forms. The other comes out from the umbrella concept "humor", and distinguishes between various forms of humor including the negative ones. Three main theories of humor are presented: theory of superiority, theory of incongruity, and a relief theory. The second part introduces humor in the elderly and draws the attention to the fact that we know relatively little about humor in old age because most research has been carried out in children, adolescents or adults in productive age. The third part of the study describes the process of diagnostics of humor in the elderly. For example, within the qualitative methods, in-depth interviews with seniors or analyses of their diary entries are used. Within quantitative methods, questionnaires are used, and this study presents the survey of seven most frequent ones applied in the studies of humor in the elderly. In the context of mixed methods, understanding of humor in young and seniors, or understanding of humor in relatively healthy seniors and seniors after stroke are compared. The fourth part of the study presents the Gelkopfs model on relationship between humor, treatment and cure of patients. The fifth part of the study demonstrates the options how to use humor to improve the mental state of the elderly (by means of individual or group interventions).

  14. Old Age Security: A Case from Rural Suzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhu

    2006-01-01

    During the course of urbanization and industrialization, a growing number of farmers have become landless as local governments have bought out their land for non-agricultural uses.Even in the localities where the industrialization process absorbs a vast majority of rural labor, the questions of how to compensate for the economic shock on the rural landless and how to alleviate and eliminate mental suffering as a result of losing land have always been a challenge to government capacity in social stabilization and ayardstick to measure social justice in local communities. In the administration areas of Suzhou City in Jiangsu Province,governments at all levels have successfully coped with this challenge. By means of "swapping land for old-age support" and income redistribution, Suzhou municipality has not only met the demand on land for urbanization and industrialization while maintaining social stability,but also laid a foundation for establishing an integrated pension system for both urban and rural residents. Such a system has changed the tradition of farmers ' households relying on land to deal with economic risk and of the aged depending on their sons for livelihood support in rural society.

  15. The effect of aging on dramatic realization of old age: the example of Ingmar Bergman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Shalev, A

    1992-12-01

    Ingmar Bergman's films Wild Strawberries and Fanny and Alexander can be viewed as two readings of the psychosocial world of old age. The picture of aging emerging from Wild Strawberries is dominated by pressure toward resolution, and Fanny and Alexander is governed by fragmentation. Closure and fragmentation are related to the artist's position in the life span at the time of creation. Whereas closure appears to be a midlife attempt to handle death anxiety and a sense of finality, fragmentation is the older Bergman's means of adapting to the experience of aging.

  16. Pondering over Some Chinese And Western Poems about Old Age%Pondering over Some Chinese And Wwstern Poems about Old Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏宏忖; 吴春容

    2007-01-01

    Through a comparative appreciation of Chinese and Western poems about old age, the present article tends to present a general convey of the western and eastern poets' attitudes and feelings towards old age, which is an aspect of human culture. The main themes are almost the same: reminiscence (sweet or bitter), solitude,contentment, detachment, sorrow and sentiment. But the Western are more optimistic and admire youth, regard old age as a natural stage of life. The Chinese, more conservative and perfectionist, show much more respect to the old, and think more about the past unfulfilled.

  17. The old age security hypothesis and optimal population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bental, B

    1989-03-01

    The application of the Samuelson-Diamond overlapping generations framework to the old age security hypothesis indicates that government intervention schemes can influence the relationship between population growth and capital accumulation. The most direct means of optimizing population growth is through taxes or subsidies that relate to the intergenerational transfer of wealth. A pay-as-you-go social security scheme, in which payment is predicated on the number of children the receiver has and is financed by taxes levied on the working population, emerges as the most likely intervention to produce the optimal steady state equilibrium. This system is able to correct any distortions the private sector may build into it. In contrast, a child support system, in which the government subsidizes or taxes workers according to their family size, can guarantee the optimal capital:labor ratio but not the optimal population growth rate. Thus, if the government seeks to decrease the population growth rate, the appropriate intervention is to levy a lump-sum social-security tax on workers and transfer the revenues to the old; the direction should be reversed if the goal is to increase population growth. Another alternative, a lump sum social security system, can guarantee optimal population growth but not a desirable capital:labor ratio. Finally, the introduction of money as a valued commodity into an economy with a high capital:labor ratio will also serve to decrease the population growth rate and solve the intergenerational transfer problem through the private sector without any need for government intervention.

  18. Physical performance in middle age and old age: good news for our sedentary and aging society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyk, Dieter; Rüther, Thomas; Wunderlich, Max; Sievert, Alexander; Essfeld, Dieter; Witzki, Alexander; Erley, Oliver; Küchmeister, Gerd; Piekarski, Claus; Löllgen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    .... We assessed the endurance of a physically active subgroup of the population by performing an age- and sex-stratified analysis of over 900,000 running times of marathon and half-marathon participants aged 20 to 79...

  19. Priming effects from young-old to very old age on a word-stem completion task: minimizing explicit contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.J. Spaan; J.G.W. Raaijmakers

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the size of repetition priming effects from young-old to very old age using a newly developed Word-Stem Completion (WSC) task. Retrospectively, we examined the role of explicit, intentional retrieval strategies in priming. We constructed our task by taking factors into account that w

  20. Priming effects from young-old to very old age on a word-stem completion task: minimizing explicit contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, P.E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the size of repetition priming effects from young-old to very old age using a newly developed Word-Stem Completion (WSC) task. Retrospectively, we examined the role of explicit, intentional retrieval strategies in priming. We constructed our task by taking factors into account that

  1. The "Cantankerous Old People" Next Door : How Old Age Is Represented in Serbian Television Commercials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of a three-month monitoring of Serbian television commercials which aimed to study the way elderly people are represented in the media. Elderly people appear in only six commercials, more often as a functional part of a series than as protagonists. Yet in spite of the small number of commercials in which they appear, it is easy to identify the stereotypes which are translated from a social paradigm into the sphere of the media. The stereotypes on which commercials are based belong for the most part to the corpus of negative stereotypes of elderly people as hopelessly behind the times, feeble, lonely, irritating, cantankerous, etc. Some positive stereotypes are also evident, but they are mostly limited to a perception of elderly people as kindly givers of useful advice. It is interesting to note that the "cantankerous people next door" are as a rule anonymous elderly people, as are those "lost in time and space", who are mostly elderly women. In contrast, those who let their careers and images be associated with a certain product, in order to pass on their great experience and knowledge, are as a rule famous persons. Just as it is possible to make a distinction between commercials depending on whether or not the products advertised are targeted at the elderly – which they rarely are – and whether elderly people appear in leading or supporting roles, in order to make viewers laugh or annoy them, so it is possible to distinguish between the "real-life principle", which involves the translation of the society’s dominant attitudes into commercials, and "commercial reality", which either makes old age invisible or "masks" it so that it is pleasant to the eye. The reason that old people are absent from television commercials or are mostly represented in a negative light is to be found in the low purchasing power of this age group, but also in the fact that advertising in Serbia developed practically overnight, and

  2. [Prevalence of negative stereotypes towards old age among personnel of a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco S, Mireya; Villarreal R, Enrique; Vargas D, Emma R; Martínez G, Lidia; Galicia R, Liliana

    2010-08-01

    Social representations are value systems. Social stereotypes are a social consensus of traits associated with a specific group. Stereotypes about older subjects, generally have negative connotations. To assess the prevalence of negative stereotypes towards older subjects among health care personnel. A questionnaire about stereotypes towards old age, with Likert type questions that included health, social motivations and personality-character domains, was applied to 52 doctors, 12 residents, 80 general nurses, 36 auxiliary nurses, four social workers and 10 medical assistants, working at a general hospital. The mean age of the professionals who answered the questionnaire was 38 years (95% confidence intervals (CI) 37-39 years) and 78% were women. The prevalence of a Global negative stereotype was 65.0%(95% CI: 59.5-70.5). The figure for the health domain was 64.5% (IC95%; 59.0-70.0), for the social motivation domain was 60%(5%CI: 54.3-65.7) and for the character personality domain was 64% (95%CI: 58.4-69.6). There is a high prevalence of a negative stereotype towards old age among health care personnel.

  3. Loneliness in old age: Psychosocial and health predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kaasa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  Study objectives  Design  Main results  17% (CI 12.5–23.0 of the respondents answered yes. A significant correlation was demonstratedbetween a feeling of loneliness and low self-perceived health, low vision and poor hearing, low activity of dailylife (ADL function, loss of a spouse, low social network, no hobbies and possession of a safety alarm. After amultiple regression analysis of the significant variables, the remaining variables as predictors for lonelinessincluded: number of social contacts, self-perceived health, using hearing aid and having a safety alarm.: : The information is obtained from a survey conducted among 232 inhabitants in this age group in the municipalityof Tønsberg, its Northern District. The interview data are composed of the responses from 202 elderlypeople living in a house or apartment (non-institutionalized to the question «do you generally feel lonely?».The purpose of this article is to study the prevalence of loneliness in a group of elderly peopleover 80 years old and the sociodemographic, health-related and social predictors for experiencing loneliness.ABSTRACT:

  4. Diverging trends in female old-age mortality: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Staetsky

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the second half of the 20th century a number of divergences and convergences of mortality schedules were observed across the world. Some of these developments remain incompletely understood. In recent overviews of old-age female mortality Mesle and Vallin (2006, Population and Development Review and Rau, Soroko, Jasilionis, and Vaupel (2008, Population and Development Review describe two contrasting patterns of mortality change between the mid-1980s and the end of the 20th century: a pattern of a large decrease in mortality exhibited by France and Japan and a pattern of a smaller decrease, stability or a certain increase in mortality shown by Denmark, the United States and the Netherlands. No satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon has been proposed so far. This paper shows that the divergence is, to a very significant extent, due to the differential impact of smoking related mortality on female populations of France and Japan versus Denmark, the United States and the Netherlands. The end to the diverging trends is demonstrated. Other lifestyle factors potentially implicated in the divergence are also discussed.

  5. [Is it possible to reduce health inequalities in old age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Pierre; Herrmann, François; Zekry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of prospective data collected between 1984 and 2008 by the CERN medical team (European Centre of Nuclear Research, Geneva) concerning 2040 former employees who were retired or had died stimulated our interest on the impact of inequalities in socioeconomic conditions, employment, lifestyle and classical risk factors on health and life expectancy. Such inequalities explain differences in life expectancy, potentially reaching several decades, between rich and poor countries (France vs Swaziland), but also within a given country (USA), a given city (Glasgow) or even a given enterprise (CERN) where all employees have the same level of healthcare insurance and access to treatment. Classical cardiovascular and neurovascular risk factors (smoking, arterial hypertension and lipid disorders) interact with socioeconomic status, intelligence, education, emotions and job responsibility/complexity, precipitating or preventing cardiovascular events. The same is true of dementia, for which midlife risk factors (obesity, arterial hypertension and hypercholesterolemia) should be considered in the psychosocioeconomic context, which influences cognitive reserves and thus affects the risk and severity of dementia in old age. Thus, in addition to lifestyle and classical risk factors, socioeconomic status appears as a major health determinant, by imposing behaviors and habits and by determining access to healthcare.

  6. Public Pensions as the Great Equalizer? Decomposition of Old-Age Income Inequality in South Korea, 1998-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Jae

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the redistributive effects of public pensions on old-age income inequality, testing whether public pensions function as the "great equalizer." Unlike the well-known alleviating effect of public pensions on old-age poverty, the effects of public pensions on old-age income inequality more generally have been less examined, particularly outside Western countries. Using repeated cross-sectional data of elderly Koreans between 1998 and 2010, we applied Gini coefficient decomposition to measure the impact of various income sources on old-age inequality, particularly focusing on public pensions. Our findings show that, contrary to expectations, public pension benefits have inequality-intensifying effects on old-age income in Korea, even countervailing the alleviating effects of public assistance. This rather surprising result is due to the specific institutional context of the Korean public pension system and suggests that the "structuring" of welfare policies could be as important as their expansion for the elderly, particularly for developing welfare states.

  7. Study of androgen and atherosclerosis in old-age male

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yun-mei; LV Xue-ying; HUANG Wei-dong; XU Zhe-rong; WU Ling-jiao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the difference of androgen and inflammatory cytokines level in atherosclerosis and analyse their relations. Method: Both carotid arteries and arteries of lower extremity were subjected to ultrasonic examination by Doppler's method. Those with much atheromatous plaque formation were ranged into case group, and those with normal result formed control group. Total, free testosterone and estradiol were assayed by radioimmunoassay. C reactive protein (CRP) was assayed by nepheloturbidity. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), Interleukin- 18 (IL- 18), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule- 1 (sICAM- 1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule- 1 (sVCAM- 1)were assayed by ELISA. The mean difference between two groups and the correlation between free testosterone and cytokines were analysed. Results: Free testosterone was (6.337±3.371) pg/L in case group and (11.375±4.733) pg/L in control group, P<0.01.No differences were found in total testosterone and estradiol. CRP was (27.294±10.238) mg/L in case group and (12.843±6.318)mg/L in control group, P<0.01. IL-6 was (41.700±31.385) pg/L in case group and (25.396±20.772) pg/L in control group, P<0.05.IL-8 was (89.249±58.357) pg/L in case group and (67.873±31.227) pg/L in control group, P<0.05. sICAM-1 was (470.491±134.078) pg/L in case group and (368.487±97.183) pg/L in control group, P<0.01. sVCAM-1 was (537.808±213.172)pg/L in case group and (457.275±157.273) pg/L in control group, P<0.05. There were no differences in TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-18.Correlation analysis showed that FT (free testosterone) had negative correlation with CRP, IL-6 and sICAM-1. Among them FT had well correlation with CRP, correlation index was -0.678. Conclusion: Free testosterone was in negative correlation with atherosclerosis in old-age male. Free testosterone may have the role of anti-atherosclerosis, and this effect was not achieved

  8. Impact of Aging and Cognition on Hearing Assistive Technology Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Lindsey E; Messersmith, Jessica J

    2015-08-01

    Many factors go into appropriate recommendation and use of hearing assistive technology (HAT). The aging auditory system presents with its own complications and intricacies; there are many types of age-related hearing loss, and it is possible that the underlying cause of hearing loss can significantly impact the recommendations and performance with HATs. The audiologist should take into consideration peripheral and central auditory function when selecting HATs for the aging adult population as well as when selecting appropriate types of technology including personal sound amplification products, hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive technology. The cognitive ability of the patient plays a central role in the recommendations of HAT. It is possible that the use of HATs could mitigate some of the effects of cognitive decline and thus should be considered as early as possible. Assessment of ability and appropriate recommendations are crucial to consistent use of HAT devices.

  9. The Old and the Oldest-old: Do They Have Different Perspectives on Adjustment to Aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia von Humboldt

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The outcomes presented in this paper stressed the varied perspectives concerning AtA, contoured in two different models, and the need of considering these when designing and implementing programs in health care for the old and the oldest-old.

  10. The Long History of Old Age The Long History of Old Age Thane Pat Thames & Hudson £25 320 0 500 25126 6 0500251266 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This book provides an absorbing overview of 'old age', charting the history of ageing within society. It aims to right the misconceptions of ageing throughout history by writing about topics that have been 'for too long surrounded by taboo' and by challenging some of the misconceptions associated with getting older.

  11. Neuroinflammation and Cerebrovascular Disease in Old Age: A Translational Medicine Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Di Napoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of cerebrovascular disease is highest in the elderly population. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain response to cerebral ischemia in old age are currently poorly understood. Ischemic changes in the commonly used young animal stroke models do not reflect the molecular changes associated with the aged brain. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are important pathogenic processes occurring during the acute phase of cerebral ischemia. Free radical generation is also implicated in the aging process, and the combination of these effects in elderly stroke patients could explain the higher risk of morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of stroke pathophysiology in the elderly patient would assist in the development of new therapeutic strategies for this vulnerable age group. With the increasing use of reperfusion therapies, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress remain attractive therapeutic targets for the development of adjuvant neuroprotective agents. This paper will discuss these molecular aspects of acute stroke and senescence from a bench-to-bedside research perspective.

  12. The Image of Old Age as Reflected on the Current American Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Annabel B.

    1983-01-01

    Reports the following research on plays presented in New York City from 1977-82: (1) the number having old age as a central focus; (2) length of runs; (3) aspects of old age treated; (4) positive or negative images on aging projected. (PD)

  13. Continuity and Discontinuity: The Case of Second Couplehood in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Continuity and discontinuity are controversial concepts in social theories on aging. The aim of this article is to explore these concepts using the experiences of older persons living in second couplehood in old age as a case in point. Design and Method: Based on a larger qualitative study on second couplehood in old age, following the…

  14. Continuity and Discontinuity: The Case of Second Couplehood in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Continuity and discontinuity are controversial concepts in social theories on aging. The aim of this article is to explore these concepts using the experiences of older persons living in second couplehood in old age as a case in point. Design and Method: Based on a larger qualitative study on second couplehood in old age, following the…

  15. Mindful Sustainable Aging: Advancing a Comprehensive Approach to the Challenges and Opportunities of Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Nilsson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this article is to present a new concept called mindful sustainable aging (MSA, which is informed by mindfulness practices that support the physical, the mental, and especially, the social and the existential dimensions of old life. The concept of MSA is discussed and compared with four influential psychosocial theories in the field of gerontology, i.e., activity theory, disengagement theory, successful aging theory and gerotranscendence theory. The article ends with reviewing research on how mindfulness practice can help to manage, diminish and/or improve a number of serious physical conditions that are common among older people. The potential of mindfulness when it comes to facilitating for older adults in their quest for spiritual and existential meaning is discussed extensively throughout the article.

  16. Bodies, technologies, and aging in Japan: thinking about old people and their silver products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Susan O

    2012-06-01

    Contemporary Japan is known both for its high tech culture and its rapidly aging population, with 22 % of people currently 65 years and older. Yet there has been little attention to the material culture of the elderly. This paper explores the way aging bodies, official ideology, and consumption of what are called "assistive devices" and "life technologies" come together in the experience of frail old people who depend not only on human caregivers but on "things" such as walkers, kidney dialysis machines, and electric massage chairs. It begins to consider the questions: What technology to aid failing bodies is available, and to whom? How does the advocacy of independence create new forms of consumption? How do "things" mediate ideological change regarding elder care and help to create new understandings of self and one's relation to others? Data come from interviews conducted in 2003-2007 as part of a study of elder care in Japan under the public long term care insurance system that began in 2000. These interviews point both to acceptance of the technology as a way to avoid over-dependence on caregivers, and to resistance to the limitations of aging and to its 21st century definition by the state.

  17. Stigma and old age: essays on the manipulation of the deteriorated age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Andréa Rodrigues Andrade

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The approach of the aging it is a subject handled by several sciences and knowledges. Before, the study in this area was a rarity, with the contribution of what has become a social problem, this category has received relative importance in academic arenas, television and in various areas of socialization, and as output, the purposes of third age. Among several approaches that are configured on it, we have issues of identity, social roles and stigma. This study aims to analyze the stigmatizing by which pass the elderly and how this phenomenon is interesting to reflect on the relationships between them and the other individuals in society. It was used books and articles available on the Internet, coming from authors who highlight in the subject, based on the study by Erving Goffman in his book Stigma: Notes on the management of the deteriorated image. It Will be discussed, the comprehension of stigma in Goffman, the social construction of old age and relationship with the social stigma, as they are referred to some elements, such as: social identity, visibility, concealment, techniques of information control and biography, which are relevant to reflect about concepts from stigma applyed by Goffman. Thus, this study establishes a connection between aging and stigma to not only increase knowledge on the subject, but also encourage the study and research on the topic for researchers and other interested parties.

  18. An apocalyptic vision of ageing in China: Old age care for the largest elderly population in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Sun, Li

    2015-06-01

    According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, by 2010 the number of people aged 60 or over had reached 178 million in China or 13% of its population. With the largest elderly population in the world in absolute numbers, China faces a challenge of providing care for the elderly both in the present and the future. Unlike old age pensions and health protection for the elderly, in Chinese society elderly care had never been considered to be a social problem but rather the individual family's responsibility. After the turn of the millennium, as the repercussions of increasingly ageing demographics, the results of the One-Child Policy and drastic changes in traditional family structures gradually became more apparent, this issue of elderly care has increasingly become one of the most pressing concerns for the ageing society. As there is little existing research on this particular topic, this article aims to shed light on elderly care in China, focusing on the care of elderly needing assistance with activities of daily living, since this group of elderly are most in need of care, their numbers having risen to 33 million in 2010. This article argues it is urgent for China to switch from informal family-based elderly care to the state's formal long-term care, illustrates that a model of social insurance (e.g. as in Germany) is advocated by many Chinese scholars and points out the ways in which it is different from both the commercialized models (e.g. as in the USA) and state organized "Beveridge" models (e.g. as in Sweden).

  19. Old Maids: Aging and Its Impact on Microglia Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Edward C.; McCullough, Louise D.; Ritzel, Rodney M.

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are highly active and vigilant housekeepers of the central nervous system that function to promote neuronal growth and activity. With advanced age, however, dysregulated inflammatory signaling and defects in phagocytosis impede their ability to perform the most essential of homeostatic functions, including immune surveillance and debris clearance. Microglial activation is one of the hallmarks of the aging brain and coincides with age-related neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Age-associated microglial dysfunction leads to cellular senescence and can profoundly alter the response to sterile injuries and immune diseases, often resulting in maladaptive responses, chronic inflammation, and worsened outcomes after injury. Our knowledge of microglia aging and the factors that regulate age-related microglial dysfunction remain limited, as the majority of pre-clinical studies are performed in young animals, and human brain samples are difficult to obtain quickly post-mortem or in large numbers. This review outlines the impact of normal aging on microglial function, highlights the potential mechanisms underlying age-related changes in microglia, and discusses how aging can shape the recovery process following injury. PMID:28379162

  20. Revisiting an age-old question regarding oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrey, Yael H.; Salmon, Adam B.

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in maintaining health throughout life can be made through a clear understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that regulate aging. The Oxidative Stress Theory of Aging (OSTA) is likely the most well-studied mechanistic theory of aging and suggests that the rate of aging is controlled by accumulation of oxidative damage. To directly test the OSTA, aging has been measured in several lines of mice with genetic alteration of the expression of enzymatic antioxidants. Under its strictest interpretation, these studies do not support the OSTA, as modulation of antioxidant expression does not generally affect mouse lifespan. However, the incidence of many age-related diseases and pathologies is altered in these models suggesting that oxidative stress does significantly impact some aspects of the aging process. Further, oxidative stress may affect aging in disparate patterns among tissues or under different environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding aging in antioxidant mutant mice and offer several interpretations on their support of the OSTA. PMID:24704971

  1. Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in a 1-month-old Infant with Pleural Empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Leung

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural empyema is a frequent complication of bacterial pneumonia in childhood but is rare in neonates. Various modalities of treatment from intravenous antibiotics, chest tube drainage, intrapleural fibrinolytic agent installation, video-assisted thoracostomy to surgical decortication have been suggested to treat different stages of empyema in children, but management of progressive empyema in neonates is still at the stage of antimicrobial therapy and tube thoracostomy. Here, we report a 1-month-old infant with staphy-lococcal pneumonia complicated with multiloculated empyema who was successfully treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS after 4 days of chest tube drainage and parenteral antibiotics. The patient's condition improved rapidly after the operation and the antimicrobial therapy was continued for 3 weeks. He was asymptomatic and thriving at follow-up 1 year later. Chest radiography at 1 month was free of any lesion. This case suggests that VATS can be a safe and effective treatment for neonatal empyema.

  2. Imagining transitions in old age through the Visual Matrix method:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne; Lading, Åse Høgsbro; Gripsrud, Birgitta Haga

    2017-01-01

    Dominant discourses of ageing are often confined to what is less painful to think about and therefore idealise or denigrate ageing and later life. We present findings from an exploratory psychosocial study, in a Nordic context, into three later-life transitions: from working life to retirement, f...

  3. CPB-assisted aortic valve replacement in a pregnant 27-year-old with endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, J; Rosin, M; Mycyk, T

    2009-09-01

    A 27-year-old, G(3)P( 2)A(0) female with acute Staph aureus (SA) endocarditis successfully underwent CPB-assisted aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic aortic valve at 22 weeks' gestation. This patient's presentation of acute endocarditis complicated by septic shock, congestive heart failure, severe aortic insufficiency, multiple septic embolic events and borderline renal failure appeared on the daunting background of chronic heavy tobacco usage, hepatitis C positivity, long-term IV drug abuse and a pregnancy into its twenty-second week. Optimal treatment strategies implemented for both mother and fetus throughout the perioperative period contributed to a successful outcome for both.

  4. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  5. To Flame With a Wild Life: Florida Scott-Maxwell's Experience of Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Harry J.

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes an intimate journal, Florida Scott-Maxwell's "The Measure of My Days". Scott-Maxwell's journal contains suggestive ideas about the experience of aging among the old-old, about the theoretical issue of late life individuation, and about successful aging. (Author/ABB)

  6. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  7. Movement Control in Older Adults: Does Old Age Mean Middle of the Road?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raw, Rachael K.; Kountouriotis, Georgios K.; Mon-Williams, Mark; Wilkie, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Old age is associated with poorer movement skill, as indexed by reduced speed and accuracy. Nevertheless, reductions in speed and accuracy can also reflect compensation as well as deficit. We used a manual tracing and a driving task to identify generalized spatial and temporal compensations and deficits associated with old age. In Experiment 1,…

  8. A Pilot Study of Urinary Peptides as Biomarkers for Intelligence in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lorna M.; Mullen, William; Zurbig, Petra; Harris, Sarah E.; Gow, Alan J.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Mischak, Harald; Deary, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Intelligence is an important indicator of physical, mental and social well-being. In old age, intelligence is also associated with a higher quality of life and better health. Heritability studies have shown that there are strong genetic influences, yet unknown, on intelligence, including in old age. Other approaches may be useful to investigate…

  9. Hope and Adaptation to Old Age: Their Relationship with Individual-Demographic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraitou, Despina; Kolovou, Chrysa; Papasozomenou, Chrysa; Paschoula, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between hope as disposition, adaptation to old age, and individual-demographic factors. One hundred and fifty older adults, aged 60-93 years old, completed the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale developed by Snyder et AL. [1991, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, pp. 570-585], and the Adaptation to…

  10. The Human Right to Leisure in Old Age: Reinforcement of the Rights of an Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karev, Iris; Doron, Israel Issi

    2017-01-01

    The right to leisure is recognized as a human right under the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The actual meaning and material content of this human right is subject to debate. The aim of this study is to examine the extent and the context to which this human right is specifically recognized with regard to older persons. Methodologically, this study textually analyzed 17 different international older persons' human rights documents. The findings reveal that in the majority of these documents there is no reference to the right to leisure. In the remaining documents, the right to leisure is mostly referred to indirectly or in a narrow legal construction. These findings support the notion that despite the growing body of knowledge regarding the importance of meaningful leisure in old age-and its empowering and anti-ageist nature-this knowledge has not transformed into a legal human rights discourse.

  11. For Many, Friends Are Key to Happiness in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reviewed responses regarding thoughts on friendship, family, health, happiness and satisfaction that were collected by the World Values Survey. More than 271,000 males and females across almost 100 countries participated, ranging in age from 15 to 99. ...

  12. Ageing, Health and Life Satisfaction of the Oldest Old: An Analysis for Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    This analysis uses data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and the Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to assess the effect of ageing and health on the life satisfaction of the oldest old (defined as 75 and older). We observe a U-shaped relationship between age and levels of life satisfaction for individuals aged between 16 and 65.…

  13. Biological versus chronological ovarian age: implications for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tredway Donald

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women have been able to delay childbearing since effective contraception became available in the 1960s. However, fertility decreases with increasing maternal age. A slow but steady decrease in fertility is observed in women aged between 30 and 35 years, which is followed by an accelerated decline among women aged over 35 years. A combination of delayed childbearing and reduced fecundity with increasing age has resulted in an increased number and proportion of women of greater than or equal to 35 years of age seeking assisted reproductive technology (ART treatment. Methods Literature searches supplemented with the authors' knowledge. Results Despite major advances in medical technology, there is currently no ART treatment strategy that can fully compensate for the natural decline in fertility with increasing female age. Although chronological age is the most important predictor of ovarian response to follicle-stimulating hormone, the rate of reproductive ageing and ovarian sensitivity to gonadotrophins varies considerably among individuals. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to depletion of the ovarian oocyte pool and reduction in oocyte quality. Thus, biological and chronological ovarian age are not always equivalent. Furthermore, biological age is more important than chronological age in predicting the outcome of ART. As older patients present increasingly for ART treatment, it will become more important to critically assess prognosis, counsel appropriately and optimize treatment strategies. Several genetic markers and biomarkers (such as anti-Müllerian hormone and the antral follicle count are emerging that can identify women with accelerated biological ovarian ageing. Potential strategies for improving ovarian response include the use of luteinizing hormone (LH and growth hormone (GH. When endogenous LH levels are heavily suppressed by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues, LH supplementation may help

  14. Concept of successful ageing among the community-dwelling oldest old in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Komata, Michiko; Hoshino, Akiko; Usui, Kanae; Katsura, Toshiki

    2015-12-01

    In Japan, increasing human longevity has forced society to rethink the notion of what constitutes 'successful ageing'. This study attempts to advocate a new concept of successful ageing that involves complete acceptance of the ageing process. Research was based on semi-structured interviews with 15 community dwelling oldest-old (aged 85 years and above) participants. The analysis was completed using a grounded theory approach. Successful ageing for the oldest old was grouped into six categories. Within these categories, we discovered the structure of successful ageing, which synthesises ideas from the adaptation process with those of physical and cognitive decreased function as well as spirituality. The oldest old in Japan work to arrive at a conclusion with their lives, all the while coping with the drawbacks of ageing, such as declining physical and cognitive functions. This resilient and flexible way of life makes their form of ageing an equally 'successful' one.

  15. Bilingualism May Protect the Mind from Deterioration in Old Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅晓明

    2004-01-01

    It is certainly useful to be able to speak more than one language. But, according to a paper by Ellen Bialystok, of York University in Canada, and her colleagues, in this month's issue of Psychology and Aging, it is useful not just for the obvious reason that it makes it

  16. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in elderly and old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, V V; Iordanishvili, A K; Ryzhak, G A

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of a detailed analysis of the clinical picture of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis the peculiarities of its flow in elderly and senile patients are demonstrated. The causes of odontogenic inflammation of the maxillary sinuses, the clinical features of inflammation of the maxillary sinus in older age groups, including those with oroantral communication are shown.

  17. "Old People Are Useless:" Representations of Aging on "The Simpsons"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeborough, Darren

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at how "The Simpsons'" representations of aging, considered ageist and stereotypical by some, can be viewed as a positive look at the elderly that attempts to subvert the same stereotypes that it seemingly employs. The Baby Boom cohort is now seen as an attractive economic group, and as they continue their journey through the…

  18. Nutritional concerns, health and survival in old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The ageing process is-apart from chance or good luck-not only influenced by factors intrinsic to the individual, but also by extrinsic factors that include environmental and lifestyle variables. This paper deals with the epidemiological evidence for the role of dietary patterns and key nutritional

  19. Old-age inflammatory bowel disease onset: A different problem?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joaquin Hinojosa del Val

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients aged > 60 accounts for 10%-15% of cases of the disease. Diganostic methods are the same as for other age groups. Care has to be taken to distinguish an IBD colitis from other forms of colitis that can mimick clinically, endoscopically and even histologically the IBD entity. The clinical pattern in ulcerative colitis (UC) is proctitis and left-sided UC,while granulomatous colitis with an inflammatory pattern is more common in Crohn's disease (CD). The treatment options are those used in younger patients, but a series of considerations related to potential pharmacological interactions and side effects of the drugs must be taken into account. The safety profile of conventional immunomodulators and biological therapy is acceptable but more data are required on the safety of use of these drugs in the elderly population. Biological therapy has risen question on the possibility of increased side effects, however this needs to be confirmed. Adherence to performing all the test prior to biologic treatment administration is very important. The overall response to treatment is similar in the different patient age groups but elderly patients have fewer recurrences. The number of hospitalizations in patients > 65 years is greater than in younger group,accounting for 25% of all admissions for IBD. Mortality is similar in UC and slightly higher in CD, but significantly increased in hospitalized patients. Failure of medical treatment continues to be the most common indication for surgery in patients aged > 60 years. Age is not considered a contraindication for performing restorative proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.However, incontinence evaluation should be taken into account an individualized options should be considered

  20. Old age as a privilege of the "selfish ones".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, Mladen; Sevo, Goran; Svorcan, Petar; Milosevic, Dragoslav P; Despotovic, Nebojsa; Erceg, Predrag

    2010-10-01

    In the past couple of centuries, scientists proposed great number of aging theories but neither of them appears to be fully satisfactory. In the statistical sense, we are dealing with an even greater challenge because large array of factors affects the aging process. Although at this point the most of these factors are well known, it is the very fact of their innumerability that complicates approaches to the issue at hand. Both in life and in medicine, the cause behind an effect can rarely be unequivocally determined. Thus, it appears that through out human history longevity has been primarily affected by eradication of diseases, especially by eradication of infectious diseases and introduction of the vaccines. For that reason, maybe we should not be referring to this issue as the «fountain of youth» but rather as the «vaccine of youth». The postulate that genetic instability is the precipitating factor both of aging and cancer has withstood many tests and keeps on being reaffirmed. For this reason, it is legitimate to pose a question of whether long-lived individuals may be those with «selfish» genes and more stable genetic material. They certainly cannot avoid aging, but aging in such individuals could be delayed due to steady character of their genome, which is less susceptible to mutations. On the population level, they constitute minority because stable genome would represent an obstacle to successful evolution of the species. If this was not the case, we might not be writing all these texts today.

  1. An Introduction to Export Assistance in the Internet Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Somasundaram; Rask, Morten

    2004-01-01

    's (2002) model about web marketing strategies for conceptualizing the Internet related developments associated with export assistance. Finally, we highlight the implications of providing export assistance over the Internet. Those interested in export assistance research and those providing export...

  2. An Introduction to Export Assistance in the Internet Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Somasundaram; Rask, Morten

    's (2002) model about web marketing strategies for conceptualizing the Internet related developments associated with export assistance. Finally, we highlight the implications of providing export assistance over the Internet. Those interested in export assistance research and those providing export...

  3. Facets of Subjective Health From Early Adulthood to Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franz, Carol E; Finkel, Deborah; Panizzon, Matthew S;

    2017-01-01

    ,900 twins (Mage = 63.38, range = 25-102) from nine studies in the Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies Consortium: self-rated health (SRH), health compared with others (COMP), and health interfering with activities (ACT). RESULTS: Analyses indicated age and sex differences in mean...... scores depending on the measure. SRH and ACT showed significant linear and non-linear moderation by age for individual differences in both genetic and environmental variance. Significant sex differences in components of variance were found for SRH and ACT, but not COMP. DISCUSSION: Subjective health......OBJECTIVE: Subjective health is a complex indicator predicting longevity independent of objective health. Few studies examine genetic and environmental mechanisms underlying different facets of subjective health across the life course. METHOD: Three subjective health measures were examined in 12...

  4. "Old people are useless": representations of aging on the Simpsons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeborough, Darren

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at how The Simpsons ' representations of aging, considered ageist and stereotypical by some, can be viewed as a positive look at the elderly that attempts to subvert the same stereotypes that it seemingly employs. The Baby Boom cohort is now seen as an attractive economic group, and as they continue their journey through the life cycle, they are drawing increased attention. A current scholarship exists that investigates the ways that the "aged" are seen, catered to, advertised at, seemingly marginalized, and represented in the larger context of the mass media. Relying primarily on the theoretical musings of Frederic Jameson and Linda Hutcheon, the article constructs a bridge that places The Simpsons squarely within a postmodern aesthetic and, using this rubric, shows how the inherent political nature of parodic irony can help to create an inversion of meaning.

  5. Clinical features of pneumonia in extreme old age

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The clinical features of 70 people over the age of 85 with radiologically positive pneumonia were studied. It was shown that the classical presenting symptoms of pneumonia were often absent and 81 % had one or more acute ’geriatric’ features such as acute confusion, recent onset of falls, recent worsening immobility or recent onset of incontinence, at the time of presentation. An increased risk of mortality was associated with acute confusion, dementia, central cyanosis and long term immobili...

  6. Old age insurance participation among rural-urban migrants in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Min

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chinese government has been introducing reform policies to improve the existing social security system, including the old age insurance schemes for rural-urban migrants. However, there are still challenges in the current system that hinder migrants who move frequently from participating in old age insurance schemes. Objective: The objectives of this paper are to describe the current coverage of old age insurance amongst migrant workers and examine the associated individual, household, and geographical factors, and to predict the probability of old age insurance participation among rural-urban migrants by province and relevant migrant characteristics. Methods: Data for the analysis are drawn from the 2011 Migrant Dynamics Monitoring Survey in China. The sample consists of 110,005 migrant workers with rural household registration. The analysis considers multinomial logistic regression with type of old age insurance as the outcome variable. Results: Of all rural-urban migrant workers nationwide, 16.4Š have participated in the Basic Pension Insurance for urban employees, 9.8Š in the New Old Age Pension scheme for rural residents, 3.3Š are covered by both schemes, and 70.5Š have no coverage with any old age pension scheme. Migrants moving within provinces or from relatively wealthy households are more likely to participate in an old age insurance scheme than those moving across provinces or from relatively poor households. Migrants' occupational status also influences their participation in old age pension schemes. The predicted probability of participation varies across China by province.

  7. The Age-Redshift Relationship of Old Passive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Wang, Fa-Yin; Yu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    We use 32 age measurements of passively evolving galaxies as a function of redshift to test and compare the standard model ($\\Lambda$CDM) with the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe. We show that the latter fits the data with a reduced $\\chi^2_{\\rm dof}=0.435$ for a Hubble constant $H_{0}= 67.2_{-4.0}^{+4.5}$ km $\\rm s^{-1}$ $\\rm Mpc^{-1}$. By comparison, the optimal flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, with two free parameters (including $\\Omega_{\\rm m}=0.12_{-0.11}^{+0.54}$ and $H_{0}=94.3_{-35.8}^{+32.7}$ km $\\rm s^{-1}$ $\\rm Mpc^{-1}$), fits the age-\\emph{z} data with a reduced $\\chi^2_{\\rm dof}=0.428$. Based solely on their $\\chi^2_{\\rm dof}$ values, both models appear to account for the data very well, though the optimized $\\Lambda$CDM parameters are only marginally consistent with those of the concordance model ($\\Omega_{\\rm m}=0.27$ and $H_{0}= 70$ km $\\rm s^{-1}$ $\\rm Mpc^{-1}$). Fitting the age-$z$ data with the latter results in a reduced $\\chi^2_{\\rm dof}=0.523$. However, because of the different number of free paramete...

  8. China's Urban and Rural Old Age Security System: Challenges and Options

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dewen Wang

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the urban and rural old age security system in China,and discusses the challenges in the process of constructing a sustained old age security system. Although funding gaps and empty individual accounts have imposed a heavy burden on the sustainability of China's urban pension system, there is a relatively high coverage rate of 35.3 percent for urban workers. However, China's pension system provides low coverage rate for rural farmers. The more rapidly aging population and lower incomes in rural areas pose challenges to the vulnerable rural household support system. The separation of the old age security system between rural and urban areas also puts great pressure as a result of urbanization on farmers who lose their farmland. Therefore, it is urgent for China to speed up the reform of its old age security system to provide an institutional support for its economic and social transition.

  9. Inflammation, But Not Telomere Length, Predicts Successful Ageing at Extreme Old Age: A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasumichi; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen M; Takayama, Michiyo; Abe, Yukiko; Takebayashi, Toru; Koyasu, Shigeo; Suematsu, Makoto; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    To determine the most important drivers of successful ageing at extreme old age, we combined community-based prospective cohorts: Tokyo Oldest Old Survey on Total Health (TOOTH), Tokyo Centenarians Study (TCS) and Japanese Semi-Supercentenarians Study (JSS) comprising 1554 individuals including 684 centenarians and (semi-)supercentenarians, 167 pairs of centenarian offspring and spouses, and 536 community-living very old (85 to 99 years). We combined z scores from multiple biomarkers to describe haematopoiesis, inflammation, lipid and glucose metabolism, liver function, renal function, and cellular senescence domains. In Cox proportional hazard models, inflammation predicted all-cause mortality with hazard ratios (95% CI) 1.89 (1.21 to 2.95) and 1.36 (1.05 to 1.78) in the very old and (semi-)supercentenarians, respectively. In linear forward stepwise models, inflammation predicted capability (10.8% variance explained) and cognition (8(.)6% variance explained) in (semi-)supercentenarians better than chronologic age or gender. The inflammation score was also lower in centenarian offspring compared to age-matched controls with Δ (95% CI) = - 0.795 (- 1.436 to - 0.154). Centenarians and their offspring were able to maintain long telomeres, but telomere length was not a predictor of successful ageing in centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. We conclude that inflammation is an important malleable driver of ageing up to extreme old age in humans.

  10. Does Volunteering Experience Influence Advance Care Planning in Old Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Khosla, Nidhi

    2016-07-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood patients will receive end-of-life care that is congruent with their preferences and lowers stress among both patients and caregivers. Previous efforts to increase ACP have mainly focused on information provision in the very late stage of life. This study examines whether a relationship exists between volunteering and ACP, and whether this relationship is associated with social support. The sample comprises 877 individuals who were aged 55+ in 2008, and were deceased before 2010. The sample is derived from seven waves (1998-2010) of data from the Health and Retirement Study. Logistic regression results showed that overall ACP and durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC) were both higher (OR = 1.61 and 1.71, respectively) for older adults with volunteering experience in the past 10 years than those without such experience. Available social support (relatives and friends living nearby) was not associated with the relationship between volunteering and ACP. Other factors related to ACP included poorer health, death being expected, death due to cancer, older age, and being a racial minority. Involving older people in volunteer work may help to increase ACP. Future research is encouraged to identify reasons for the association between volunteering and ACP.

  11. From old organisms to new molecules: integrative biology and therapeutic targets in accelerated human ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, L S; Faragher, R. G. A.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Understanding the basic biology of human ageing is a key milestone in attempting to ameliorate the deleterious consequences of old age. This is an urgent research priority given the global demographic shift towards an ageing population. Although some molecular pathways that have been proposed to contribute to ageing have been discovered using classical biochemistry and genetics, the complex, polygenic and stochastic nature of ageing is such that the process as a whole is not immedia...

  12. Life-History Related Differences in Possible Selves in Very Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Christiane; Smith, Jacqui

    2007-01-01

    The impact of early life events that take place under specific historical and societal circumstances on adult development have rarely been investigated in old age. We examined whether having started a family in young adulthood was related to the contents of possible selves generated by women aged 85 to 100+ in the Berlin Aging Study (N = 129; M…

  13. Is Old Age Depressing? Growth Trajectories and Cohort Variations in Late-Life Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2007-01-01

    Findings in previous research on the association of old age and depression are inconsistent due to a confounding of age changes and cohort differences. Using data from an accelerated longitudinal design from the National Institute of Aging Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly, this study addresses three questions: (1)…

  14. Chronic disease and independence in old age: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Pauline J. [Radiology Department, Arrowe Park Hospital, Upton, Wirral CH49 5EP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pauline.reeves@whnt.nhs.uk

    2006-08-15

    This report uses case study methodology to examine the issue of long-term care of the elderly in the United Kingdom, including where that care should take place. The report will examine the difficulties inherent in maintaining independent living for the elderly (in particular the danger and cost of falls). The case study presented is that of an elderly female patient who had suffered from chronic rheumatoid arthritis for over 10 years. She was admitted to hospital several times from December 2003 to January 2004. The discussion of her case is set in the context of the sociology of ageing; long-term care of the elderly and the UK National Service Frameworks, of which standard six relates to falls in the elderly. The report will also consider the problems in deciding whether it is necessary to terminate independent living for an individual.

  15. Being old in times of AIDS: aging, caring and relating in northwest Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, J.

    2011-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in northwest Tanzania has profoundly shaped the experience of growing old. Older men and women take on new care tasks, such as caring for orphaned grandchildren and nursing dying patients. Yet, at the same time, while the elderly grow older, their own old-age care becomes incre

  16. 20 CFR 404.311 - When does my entitlement to old-age benefits begin and end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does my entitlement to old-age benefits...-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Old-Age, Disability, Dependents' and Survivors' Insurance Benefits; Period of Disability Old-Age and Disability Benefits § 404.311 When does my...

  17. Lost ability to automatize task performance in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquestiaux, François; Didierjean, André; Ruthruff, Eric; Chauvel, Guillaume; Hartley, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Can elderly adults automatize a new task? To address this question, 10 older adults each performed 10,080 training trials over 12 sessions on an easy but novel task. The psychological refractory period (PRP) procedure was then used to evaluate whether this highly practiced task, when presented as task 2 along with an unpracticed task 1, could proceed automatically. If automatic, task 2 processing should bypass the bottleneck and, therefore, not be delayed while central attention is devoted to task 1, yielding little dual-task interference. This is exactly what Maquestiaux, Laguë-Beauvais, Ruthruff, and Bherer (Memory and Cognition 36:1262-1282, 2008) previously observed for almost all younger adults, even with half the training on a more difficult task. Although extensive training reduced older adults' reaction times to only 307 ms, a value virtually identical to that attained by Maquestiaux et al.'s (Memory and Cognition 36:1262-1282, 2008) younger adults, the highly practiced task 2 was slowed by 485 ms in the dual-task PRP procedure. Such a large slowing in older adults is striking given the easy tasks and massive amounts of practice. These findings demonstrate a qualitative change with age, in which older adults lose the ability to automatize novel tasks, which cannot be attributed merely to generalized cognitive slowing.

  18. Prevention in old age psychiatry in low-resource settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bichitra Nanda Patra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the global population is aging as a result of demographic transition. The elderly are at a higher risk of developing mental illness. This could be due to many reasons including biological factors such as multiple physical illnesses and their treatments and psychosocial factors such as migration, social isolation, and changing family structure. At times, the psychiatric illnesses in the elderly present with atypical features and often go unnoticed. There is a huge treatment gap in addressing the mental health issues of older adults in low-resource countries like India. So far, the preventive aspects in psychiatry are less developed and the mental health care mainly focuses on sickness and treatment. As the number of trained mental health professionals and resources allocated to the field of mental health is meager in low-resource settings, prevention of psychiatric disorders in older adults seems to be a cost-effective option for these settings. In this article, various measures for prevention of psychiatric disorders in elderly low-resource settings have been discussed.

  19. [An analysis of the relationship between the attitudes towards old age and ageing, and well-being indicators in a sample of old people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano Fuentes, Carmen Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In the last stage of their life cycle, old people can enjoy a satisfactory ageing thanks to the improvement of their quality of life. The present study analyses the links between 2 relevant variables at this life stage: the attitudes of the elderly towards their own ageing and their own physical and psychological state of well-being. The sample consisted of people over the age of 50 without cognitive impairment and with functional independence in their daily life (N = 117). The analyses include descriptive statistical data, gender differences and correlation matrices. The results of this study indicate that the positive attitude factors towards the old age and the ageing are related to the physical and psychological well-being, whilst negative attitude factors lead to a general state of malaise. The population sample showed a relative satisfaction with their life, as well as a low physical and psychological malaise. The results of this study reflect the significance of positive attitudes in the well-being of old people, with a direct impact on their quality of life. Copyright © 2011 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. A Study of Classification of Figures and Sizes for Middle-and Old-Aged Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴刚; 李元虹

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of human figurcs, variable laws and the basic sizes of each part of human body have been fouad by means of anthropometric measurements of the middle-and old-aged men and data analyses. Also,proposals of how to classify dimensions and sizes of the medium hunan figures among the middle-and old-aged men have been put forward.

  1. Age differences in the emotional modulation of ERP old/new effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; Van Strien, Jan W

    2008-11-01

    The emotional salience of stimuli influences ERP old/new effects, but despite proven age differences in emotional processing, the influence of emotion on old/new effects has previously been investigated in younger adults only. Therefore, we set out to examine age differences in the emotional modulation of old/new effects. To this end, the electroencephalogram of younger (17-27 years) and older (63-77 years) adults was recorded while they completed a continuous recognition test with unpleasant, neutral and pleasant pictures. Because recollection is typically enhanced by emotion, the parietal old/new effect was expected to be larger for emotional than neutral stimuli in the younger adults. Because recollection suffers from age-related decline, emotion enhancement of the parietal old/new effect was not expected in the older adults. The results showed that, in both age groups, recognition accuracy was not affected by emotion and that the response bias was more liberal for unpleasant pictures. The younger adults displayed an early, a parietal and a late frontal old/new effect, whereas the older adults showed an early, no parietal and an inverse left-lateralized late frontal old/new effect. Further, the emotional modulation of the old/new effects differed with age. Importantly, emotion enhanced the parietal and late frontal old/new effects in younger adults, and the early old/new effect in older adults. This suggests that whereas recollection and post-retrieval processes are augmented in emotional recognition memory in younger adults, familiarity is enhanced by emotional salience in older adults.

  2. [Disembedding and remoralization. Old age security and intergenerational relations in globalized welfare capitalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisering, L

    2002-08-01

    The article reconstructs the changes in provision for old age since the 19th century with regard to the ensuing change in intergenerational relationships. The first finding is a broadening of the arenas of provision for old age, a historical cumulation of family (which is still relevant), welfare state and, increasingly, private provision in financial markets, adding up to a 'welfare mix' in old age. This implies a complexification of intergenerational relationships. The second finding is an ambivalent qualitative change: on the one hand relationships between generations become more anonymous and disembedded from primary social relationships; on the other hand they are politicized (they become a public issue) and remoralized. This ambivalence applies to bureaucratic provision for old age in the welfare state, i.e., to social insurance. The main thesis is that--contrary to neoliberal belief--private old-age security in global financial markets cannot be seen as individualistic and moral-free but constitutes an anonymous exchange relationship between generations on financial markets that also raises issues of intergenerational justice. We can expect that these abstract relationships between generations will be politicized and remoralized as a consequence. Welfare state and financial markets offer solutions to problems of previous forms of provision for old age but they also produce new problems of intergenerational relationships.

  3. Something old, something new: data warehousing in the digital age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Rob; Woolf, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Australian Water Resource Information System (AWRIS) and the Australian Data Archive for Meteorology (ADAM). These maintain the national archive of hydrological and climate data. We are undertaking a migration of AWRIS from a 'software-centric' system to a 'data-centric' warehouse, with significant benefits in performance, scalability, and maintainability. As well, the architecture supports the use of conventional BI tools for product development and visualisation. We have also experimented with a warehouse ETL replacement for custom tsunameter ingest code in ADAM, with considerable success. Our experience suggests that there is benefit to be gained through adoption by science agencies of professional IT best practice that is mature in industry but may have been overlooked by scientific information practitioners. In the case of data warehousing, the practice requires a change of perspective from a focus on code development to a focus on data. It will continue to be relevant in the 'digital age' as vendors increasingly support integrated warehousing and 'big data' platforms.

  4. Cod liver oil consumption at different periods of life and bone mineral density in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysteinsdottir, Tinna; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Thorsdottir, Inga; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2015-07-01

    Cod liver oil is a traditional source of vitamin D in Iceland, and regular intake is recommended partly for the sake of bone health. However, the association between lifelong consumption of cod liver oil and bone mineral density (BMD) in old age is unclear. The present study attempted to assess the associations between intake of cod liver oil in adolescence, midlife, and old age, and hip BMD in old age, as well as associations between cod liver oil intake in old age and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration. Participants of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (age 66-96 years; n 4798), reported retrospectively cod liver oil intake during adolescence and midlife, as well as the one now in old age, using a validated FFQ. BMD of femoral neck and trochanteric region was measured by volumetric quantitative computed tomography, and serum 25(OH)D concentration was measured by means of a direct, competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay. Associations were assessed using linear regression models. No significant association was seen between retrospective cod liver oil intake and hip BMD in old age. Current intake of aged men was also not associated with hip BMD, while aged women with daily intakes had z-scores on average 0.1 higher, compared with those with an intake of < once/week. Although significant, this difference is small, and its clinical relevance is questionable. Intake of aged participants was positively associated with serum 25(OH)D: individuals with intakes of < once/week, one to six time(s)/week and daily intake had concentrations of approximately 40, 50 and 60 nmol/l respectively (P for trend < 0.001).

  5. "Love without sex is friendship. Sex without love is desire": sex life in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Berger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with sexuality in old age. This is a comparative study between classes "A" and "D". The main objective of this paper is to state the following paradox: on the one hand, sexuality in old age has been affirmed and valued in the construction of feminine self-esteem, on the other, can not only blame the woman who can not adhere to them, as well as produce a new homogenization of "being old" now associated with the proper management of sexuality.

  6. Family size and old-age wellbeing: effects of the fertility transition in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Venegas, Carlos; Sáenz, Joseph L; Wong, Rebeca

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims to determine how family size affects psycho-social, economic and health wellbeing in old age differently across two cohorts with declining fertility. The data are from the 2012 Mexican Health and Ageing Study (MHAS) including respondents aged 50+ (N = 13,102). Poisson (standard and zero-inflated) and logistic regressions are used to model determinants of wellbeing in old age: psycho-social (depressive symptoms), economic (consumer durables and insurance) and health (chronic conditions). In the younger cohort, having fewer children is associated with fewer depressive symptoms and chronic conditions, and better economic well-being. For the older cohort, having fewer children is associated with lower economic wellbeing and higher odds of being uninsured. Lower fertility benefited the younger cohort (born after 1937), whereas the older cohort (born in 1937 or earlier) benefited from lower fertility only in chronic conditions. Further research is needed to continue exploring the old-age effects of the fertility transition.

  7. "Not a replacement": emotional experiences and practical consequences of Israeli second couplehood stepfamilies constructed in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya; Lipman-Schiby, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    The increase in life expectancy enhances phenomena such as second couplehood in old age following widowhood or divorce as an alternative way of coping with changes that occur with aging. Research on the phenomenon has focused mainly on individual and dyadic perspectives of the repartnered. The aim of this article was to explore repartnering from the stepfamily's perspective, which has scarcely been studied. Nineteen Israeli stepfamilies (38 multigenerational families) were recruited using criterion sampling, of men who repartnered at age 65+ and women at 60+, with children and grandchildren from a lifelong marriage that ended in widowhood or divorce. We audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim 107 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with older partners, their adult children, and grandchildren. Analysis was based on grounded theory and dyadic analysis principles adapted to families. It showed how repartnering in old age changed the family structure, constructing complex stepfamilies, which require further study. Emotional experiences refer to repartnering being a replacement for couplehood but not for parenthood/grandparenthood. Practical consequences refer to "knowing their place" within the stepfamily and included the following subthemes: showing affection; participating in memorials for the deceased spouse; sharing, listening, and assisting. Findings are discussed regarding life course and family life cycle perspectives.

  8. The triad of renal function, erythropoietin and haemoglobin in old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Jorien M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of physiological changes in renal function, EPO and haemoglobin level and their impact at old age are essential for clinicians especially those working with older patients. The results of the studies presented in this thesis provide more insight in the physiological aspects of age related

  9. Growing Old in a New Age: National and International Evaluation of a Gerontology Telecourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubanoski, Joan Pabst; Goodman, Rebecca J.; Braun, Kathryn L.; Roberts, Ellen; Lenzer, Anthony M.

    1999-01-01

    "Growing Old in a New Age," a Public Broadcasting Service telecourse, was evaluated by 40 faculty, 29 state aging administrators, 2 international public broadcasting users, and a training specialist. The course was generally considered effective, but improvements were recommended in content, integration of video and text, and updated…

  10. Development of Life Satisfaction in Old Age: Another View on the "Paradox"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Empirical evidence of no age-related decline in life satisfaction (LS) in old age contrasts with frequently observed declines in the objective quality of elder people's lives and has therefore been labelled a "paradox" and interpreted in terms of stability of LS in the respective gerontological discussion. However, as this evidence was mainly…

  11. Working memory training in old age: an examination of transfer and maintenance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Erika; Carretti, Barbara; Zanoni, Giulia; Zavagnin, Michela; De Beni, Rossana

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a verbal working memory (WM) training program in old-old individuals (over 75 years of age). Thirty-six adults aged 75-87 took part in the study: 18 were randomly assigned to receive training and the remainder served as active controls. Specific training gains in a verbal WM task (criterion task), and transfer effects on measures of visuospatial WM, short-term memory, inhibition, processing speed, and fluid intelligence were examined. The trained old-old adults performed better than the controls in the criterion task, and this benefit persisted after 8 months; they also showed an increase in the efficiency of inhibitory mechanisms at follow-up compared with pretest. The results of this study suggest that the present WM training program produces benefits maintained over time even in old-old adults. These findings confirm that there is still room for plasticity in the basic mechanisms of cognition in advance old age.

  12. The importance of regional availability of health care for old age survival - Findings from German reunification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Tobias C; Vaupel, James W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article investigates the importance of regional health care availability for old age survival. Using German reunification as a natural experiment, we show that spatial variation in health care in East Germany considerably influenced the convergence of East German life expectancy...... at older ages were first seen in towns with university hospitals, where state-of-the-art services became available first. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the modernization of the health care system had a substantial effect on old-age life expectancy and helped to significantly reduce circulatory...

  13. Changes in social relations in old age. Are they influenced by functional ability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Due, Pernille; Holstein, Bjørn Evald;

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this article were to describe changes in social relations from ages 75 to 80, and analyze whether changes in social relations are influenced by functional ability at age 75. The study includes data from the NORA follow-up study of 75-80 year-old men and women in Jyväskylä (Finland...... for help in Physical Activities of Daily Living (PADL). Depressive symptoms, living alone and locality were included as covariates in the multivariate analyses. There were large changes in social relations in old age, but the changes included widely varying patterns of losses and gains among...

  14. Being given a cancer diagnosis in old age: a phenomenological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Swane, Christine E; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    constituents: growing old in the context of illness, becoming a patient with cancer, everyday life being controlled by bodily limitations, managing family reactions, becoming conscious about dying and death through illness experience and retaining hope, and enjoying life. Conclusion: It is important......Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate the lived experience of being given a cancer diagnosis in old age. Background: Little research has been done on the experience of elderly people developing cancer and the impact of the illness on their lives. Such knowledge is needed to support...... elderly people in dealing with issues arising after cancer is diagnosed. Design: A descriptive phenomenological method was used to investigate the phenomenon "the lived experience of being given a cancer diagnosis in old age". Participants: In total, 16 persons (aged 65+, mean age 76, range 68...

  15. Attributing heart attack and stroke to "Old Age": Implications for subsequent health outcomes among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tara L; Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which older adults attribute a recent heart attack/stroke to "old age," and examined consequences for subsequent lifestyle behavior and health-care service utilization. Community-dwelling adults (N = 57, ages 73-98 years) were interviewed about their heart attack/stroke, and an objective health registry provided data on health-care utilization over a 3-year period. Endorsement of "old age" as a cause of heart attack/stroke negatively predicted lifestyle behavior change, and positively predicted frequency of physician visits and likelihood of hospitalization over the subsequent 3 years. Findings suggest the importance of considering "old age" attributions in the context of cardiovascular health events.

  16. The influence of age on health valuations: the older olds prefer functional independence while the younger olds prefer less morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofman CS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia S Hofman,1,2 Peter Makai,1 Han Boter,3 Bianca M Buurman,4 Anton J de Craen,5 Marcel GM Olde Rikkert,1 Rogier Donders,2 René JF Melis1 1Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 2Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 5Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands Background: To assess the effectiveness of geriatric interventions, The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey – Composite Endpoint (TOPICS-CEP has been developed based on health valuations of older persons and informal caregivers. This study explored the influence of the raters’ age on the preference weights of TOPICS-CEP’s components.Methods: A vignette study was conducted with 200 raters (mean age ± standard deviation: 72.5±11.8 years; 66.5% female. Profiles of older persons were used to obtain the preference weights for all TOPICS-CEP components: morbidity, functional limitations, emotional wellbeing, pain experience, cognitive functioning, social functioning, self-perceived health, and self-perceived quality of life. The raters assessed the general wellbeing of these vignettes on a 0–10 scale. Mixed linear regression analysis with interaction terms was used to explore the effects of raters’ age on the preference weights.Results: Interaction effects between age and the TOPICS-CEP components showed that older raters gave significantly (P<0.05 more weight to functional limitations and social functioning and less to morbidities and pain experience, compared to younger raters.Conclusion: Researchers examining effectiveness in elderly care need to consider the

  17. Perceptions by the oldest old of successful aging, Vitality 90+ Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosraty, Lily; Jylhä, Marja; Raittila, Taina; Lumme-Sandt, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    To discover how 90-91-year-olds see a good old age and identify the dimensions of good and successful aging that appear in their talk. Life-story interviews with 45 community-dwelling nonagenarians (25 women and 20 men), conducted in the context of the Vitality 90+ Study. In the interviews the respondents were asked to give their opinions about a good old age and its constituents. The answers were subjected to thematic analysis with an inductive approach. The dimensions identified in most popular theories of successful aging, such as the physical, the cognitive, the psychological and social functioning, were also found in our study. But we were also able to identify new themes that have rarely been mentioned in previous studies of successful aging. These themes were "living circumstances", emphasizing the importance of having one's own home and living there as long as possible, "independence" in relation to various aspects of life and a "good death". The respondents saw themselves as having a good old age. Definitions of a good old age provided by the oldest old themselves give new insights into the concept of successful aging. Good health is important, but more in the sense of being pain-free than of being disease-free. Social and cognitive aspects seem to be more important than physical health. The important things for our nonagenarian respondents were to continue living independently, preferably in their own homes, and to have a quick and easy death rather than being institutionalized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between invasive and non-invasive blood pressure in young, middle and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to compare simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (IBP and NIBP) measurements in young, middle and old age using the data from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) database. In total, 23,679 blood pressure measurements were extracted from 742 patients, divided into three groups of young, middle and old age. IBP-NIBP differences in systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were 0.1 ± 16.5 mmHg/11.0 ± 12.2 mmHg in young age, -2.9 ± 19.8 mmHg/6.9 ± 17.5 mmHg in middle age and -3.2 ± 29.3 mmHg/8.5 ± 19.8 mmHg in old age. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of invasive systolic blood pressure (ISBP)-non-invasive systolic blood pressure (NISBP) differences increased from young to middle then to old age, and the SD of invasive diastolic blood pressure (IDBP)-non-invasive diastolic blood pressure (NIDBP) differences also increased with age. In young, middle and old age, the correlation coefficients were 0.86, 0.79 and 0.53, respectively, between ISBP and NISBP, and 0.78, 0.78 and 0.41 between IDBP and NIDBP. In conclusion, IBP showed good correlation with NIBP in each age category. The agreement between IBP and NIBP measurements was influenced by age category.

  19. Midlife memory improvement predicts preservation of hippocampal volume in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesani, Paul R; Weaver, Kurt E; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Richards, Anne L; Madhyastha, Tara M; Kahn, Ali R; Liang, Olivia; Ellenbogen, Rachel L; Beg, M Faisal; Schaie, K Warner; Willis, Sherry L

    2012-07-01

    This study examines whether midlife change in episodic memory predicts hippocampal volume in old age. From the Seattle Longitudinal Study we retrospectively identified 84 healthy, cognitively normal individuals, age 52 to 87, whose episodic memory had reliably declined (n = 33), improved (n = 28) or remained stable (n = 23) over a 14-year period in midlife (age 43-63). Midlife memory improvement was associated with 13% larger hippocampal volume (p volume for those currently in late middle age (age 52-65). The pattern of findings was not modified by gender, apolipoprotein ε4 status, education or current memory performance. Change in midlife memory scores over 14 years, but not any single assessment, predicted hippocampal volumes in old age, emphasizing the importance of longitudinal data in examining brain-cognition relationships. These findings suggest that improvement in memory in midlife is associated with sparing of hippocampal volume in later life.

  20. Financial literacy is associated with white matter integrity in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S Duke; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra; Yu, Lei; James, Bryan D; Bennett, David A

    2016-04-15

    Financial literacy, the ability to understand, access, and utilize information in ways that contribute to optimal financial outcomes, is important for independence and wellbeing in old age. We previously reported that financial literacy is associated with greater functional connectivity between brain regions in old age. Here, we tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy would be associated with greater white matter integrity in old age. Participants included 346 persons without dementia (mean age=81.36, mean education=15.39, male/female=79/267, mean MMSE=28.52) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Financial literacy was assessed using a series of questions imbedded as part of an ongoing decision making study. White matter integrity was assessed with diffusion anisotropy measured with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI). We tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter, adjusting for the effects of age, education, sex, and white matter hyperintense lesions. We then repeated the analysis also adjusting for cognitive function. Analyses revealed regions with significant positive associations between financial literacy and diffusion anisotropy, and many remained significant after accounting for cognitive function. White matter tracts connecting right hemisphere temporal-parietal brain regions were particularly implicated. Greater financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter of nondemented older adults after adjusting for important covariates. These results suggest that financial literacy is positively associated with white matter integrity in old age.

  1. Exposure to an enriched environment up to middle age allows preservation of spatial memory capabilities in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Fanny; Cosquer, Brigitte; Penazzi, Lorène; Mathis, Chantal; Kelche, Christian; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra

    2016-02-15

    In rats, some cognitive capabilities, like spatial learning and memory, are preserved from age-related decline by whole adult life enriched environment (EE) exposure. However, to which extent late EE contributes to such maintenance remains to be investigated. Here we assessed the impact of late housing condition (e.g., from the age of 18 months) on spatial learning and memory of aged rats (24 months) previously exposed or unexposed to EE from young adulthood. The results showed that late EE was not required for spatial memory maintenance in aged rats previously housed in EE. In contrast, late EE mitigates spatial memory deficit in aged rats previously unexposed to EE. These outcomes suggest that EE exposure up to middle age provides a "reserve"-like advantage which supports an enduring preservation of spatial capabilities in old age.

  2. Sociodemographic and health profile of inmates of old age homes in and around Belgaum city, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Joshi, A V; Pujar, Kirankumar; Patil, Sandhya

    2013-10-01

    A new trend of admitting more and more senior citizens hailing from the Indian middle class background to old age homes is being observed in recent times. The objectives of this study were to study sociodemographic dimensions and common health problems of inmates of old age homes and to know various reasons for their admissions and their leisure time activities in old age homes. The present cross-sectional study was conducted during March and April 2010 in 4 different old age homes in and around Belgaum city, North Karnataka, by interviewing the inmates of old age homes using predesigned, pretested, structured questionnaire followed by thorough clinical examination and haemoglobin estimation by Sahli's method. The collected data was compiled and analysed using SPSS software version 14. Out of 73 elderly, 54 were females (74.0%). Majority were in the age group of 61-70 years (50.7%) and 56 were belonging to nuclear family (76.7%). Thirty-nine inmates were widow/widower (53.4%) and 42 were having no children (57.5%). Forty-seven inmates were admitted as there was nobody to take care of them (64.4%). Common health problems observed were locomotive/joint and muscle disorders (35.6%), hypertension (34.2%), diabetes mellitus (26.0%), respiratory disorders (23.3%), hearing loss (21.9%) etc. Forty-nine were having normal body mass index (67.1%) while 19.2% were underweight. Majority were having haemoglobin levels between 10-12 g/dl (58.9%). Old age homes definitely will enable the elderly to remain sociopsychologically healthy and lead active lives if effective medical and emotional support is given.

  3. [Social aspects of ageing and old age in socialist society (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, I

    1981-01-01

    The term social age(ing) is discussed within a historical context. The basic idea is that social and biological existence should not be separated although both can overlap. The paper also goes into the tasks of a social scientist engaged in the subject of age research. Some theoretical questions are based on the "way of life" theory and it's constituting elements.

  4. Preparation for Old Age in Different Life Domains: Dimensions and Age Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornadt, Anna E.; Rothermund, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We investigated preparation for age-related changes from a multidimensional, life span perspective and administered a newly developed questionnaire to a large sample aged 30-80 years. Preparing for age-related changes was organized by life domains, with domain-specific types of preparation addressing obstacles and opportunities in the respective…

  5. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S.; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21–29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51–64 years old; and (3) Old: 65–84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups—an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of

  6. Widowhood, loneliness and sexuality in old age: mechanisms of coping and overcoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Montes de Oca Zavala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A long widowhood is associated with negative aspects in the life of the people, especially if they are in the stage of Old Age. However depending on the moment they experience this event in the course of life is possible to activate mechanisms to face life and reorder. This article shows from a exploratory perspective, qualitative and analytical, three case studies in the state of Mexico showing the perceived widowhood, which means in old age, their impacts economic and social, and how discourses and counter-discourses that have been generated subjects analyzed to overcome loneliness, isolation, the need for affection and love beyond providing family and children. Sexuality is seen from a critical and is an element highlighted in the narratives of these three cases and drew attention to the traditional way of analyzing Old Age and widowhood. The article consists of a literature review, objectives and methodology, as well as a section of results and final thoughts.

  7. Old-Age Support in Rural China:An Empirical Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJianxin; YuXuejun; WangGuangzhou; LiuHongyan

    2003-01-01

    Census data of 2000 indicated that the Chinese population aged 65 and over had accounted for 7% of the total population. In urban areas, in particular, that ratio was 6.30% and in rural areas, it was 7.35%. On average, China had entered an aging society. In recent years, old-age support in rural China has caught the attention of government officials and scholars alike. This is because rural households have undergone drastic transformation in size and structure as a result of the enforcement of the family planning policy. Coupled with the urbanization process andmassive migration of rural laborers into cities, the aging process in rural China has accelerated,challenging the traditional pattern of old-age support in rural China.

  8. Together and apart: a typology of re-partnering in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya

    2014-08-01

    The human need for love, friendship, and physical contact, and the fear of loneliness do not diminish with age. Widowhood and late-life divorce and increased life expectancy are likely to lead to alternative relationships, such as re-partnering. The purpose of this paper is to explore interplays between emotional and physical components of re-partnering in old age. Theoretical sampling of 20 couples included men who re-partnered at the age of 65+ years and women at the age of 60+ years, following termination of lifelong marriages due to death or divorce. Living arrangements included married or unmarried cohabitation under the same roof or in separate homes. Forty semi-structured interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The couple was the unit of analysis. Interplays between physical and emotional dimensions were examined using five abductive parameters derived from data analysis resulting in a fourfold typology of emotional and physical closeness/distance in re-partnering in old age: (1) living together (physically and emotionally); (2) living apart (physically) together (emotionally); (3) living together (physically) apart (emotionally); and (4) living apart (physically and emotionally). Findings revealed types of partner relationships that are different from lifelong marriages. The typology could help professionals working with older persons regarding what to expect in re-partnering in old age and be included in developmental theories as an option in old age. A quantitative tool for research and therapy purposes, entitled The Re-partnering in Old Age Typology Scale (RPOAT Scale), based on abductive parameters, could be established for measuring re-partnering relationship quality and classifying re-partnering couples.

  9. Learning and memory in mice with neuropathic pain: impact of old age and progranulin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris eAlbuquerque

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Persistent neuropathic pain is a frequent consequence of peripheral nerve injuries, particularly in the elderly. Using the IntelliCage we studied if a sciatic nerve injury obstructed learning and memory in young and aged mice, each in wild type and progranulin deficient mice, which develop premature signs of brain aging and are more susceptible to nerve injury evoked nociceptive hypersensitivity and hence allow to assess a potential mutual aggravation of pain and old age. Both young and aged mice developed long-term nerve injury-evoked hyperalgesia and allodynia but, in both genotypes, only aged mice with neuropathic pain showed high error rates in place avoidance acquisition tasks. Once learnt however, aged mice with neuropathic pain maintained the aversive memory longer, i.e. the extinction was significantly slowed. In addition, nerve injury in progranulin deficient mice impaired the learning of spatial sequences of awarded places, particularly in aged mice, whereas easy place preference learning was not affected by nerve injury or progranulin deficiency. The sequencing task required a discrimination of clockwise and anti-clockwise sequences and spatial flexibility to re-learn a novel sequence. The loss of spatial flexibility did not occur in sham operated mice, i.e. was a consequence of nerve injury and suggests that neuropathic pain accelerates manifestations of old age and progranulin deficiency. Neuropathic pain at old age, irrespective of the genotype, resulted in a long maintenance of aversive memory suggesting a negative alliance and possibly mutual aggravation of chronic neuropathic pain and aversive memory at old age.

  10. Aberrant post-translational modifications compromise human myosin motor function in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meishan; Ogilvie, Hannah; Ochala, Julien; Artemenko, Konstantin; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Bergquist, Jonas; Larsson, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Novel experimental methods, including a modified single fiber in vitro motility assay, X-ray diffraction experiments, and mass spectrometry analyses, have been performed to unravel the molecular events underlying the aging-related impairment in human skeletal muscle function at the motor protein level. The effects of old age on the function of specific myosin isoforms extracted from single human muscle fiber segments, demonstrated a significant slowing of motility speed (P old age in both type I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The force-generating capacity of the type I and IIa MyHC isoforms was, on the other hand, not affected by old age. Similar effects were also observed when the myosin molecules extracted from muscle fibers were exposed to oxidative stress. X-ray diffraction experiments did not show any myofilament lattice spacing changes, but unraveled a more disordered filament organization in old age as shown by the greater widths of the 1, 0 equatorial reflections. Mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed eight age-specific myosin post-translational modifications (PTMs), in which two were located in the motor domain (carbonylation of Pro79 and Asn81) and six in the tail region (carbonylation of Asp900, Asp904, and Arg908; methylation of Glu1166; deamidation of Gln1164 and Asn1168). However, PTMs in the motor domain were only observed in the IIx MyHC isoform, suggesting PTMs in the rod region contributed to the observed disordering of myosin filaments and the slowing of motility speed. Hence, interventions that would specifically target these PTMs are warranted to reverse myosin dysfunction in old age.

  11. [History and poetry in women's biological twilight: menopause and old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz y Hermida, Julio

    2011-01-01

    This is a poetical and historical approach to the last biological stages of the evolutive development of women, namely menopause and old age. It starts with the passages found in Egyptian Papirii such as Ebers or Smith, dated 1500-2000 BC, which describe, among other symptoms, the sweating and hig body temperatures caused by the diminishing hormon secretion of the ovaries. Other important works on the subject, some of them written in the 20th century and some others composed before that date, are also quoted, such as the Edad Crítica (Critical Age) by Dr. Marañon. The final stage of a woman's life, old age, is presented through the famous sonet "Alfa y Omega" (Alpha and Omega) by poet Manuel Machado. Using poetical strokes, the author conveys an image of the many phisiopatological consequences of old age in women: osteoporosis, genital prolapse, urine incontinence and "wrinkles" ("old age is neither shown by white hair nor by wrinkles but by the heart"). The work finishes with the famous statement uttered by Napoleon Bona-parte: "God wanted to be a writer: Man is His prose; His poetry, Women". The same poetry that Dr. Cruz y Hermida has found through the complexities of the evolutive process of feminine biology.

  12. Multidomain Trajectories of Psychological Functioning in Old Age: A Longitudinal Perspective on (Uneven) Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morack, Jennifer; Ram, Nilam; Fauth, Elizabeth B.; Gerstorf, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Life-span developmentalists have long been interested in the nature of and the contributing factors to successful aging. Using variable-oriented approaches, research has revealed critical insights into the intricacies of human development and successful aging. In the present study, we opted instead for a more subgroup-oriented approach and…

  13. Evaluation on the implementation of respiratory protection measures in old age homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee DT

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diana TF Lee,1 Doris Yu,1 Margaret Ip,2 Jennifer YM Tang3 1The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2Department of Microbiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sha Tin, 3Sau Po Centre on Ageing, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong Purpose: Old age homes (OAHs represent a vulnerable community for influenza outbreaks. Effective implementation of respiratory protection measures has been identified as an effective prevention measure to reduce mortality and morbidity caused by such outbreaks. Yet, relatively little is known about this aspect in these homes. This study evaluated the implementation of respiratory protection measures among infection control officers (ICOs and health care workers (HCWs in these homes in Hong Kong.Patients and methods: A territory-wide, cross-sectional survey was conducted in 87 OAHs. A total of 87 ICOs and 1,763 HCWs (including nurses, health workers, care workers, allied HCWs and assistants completed the questionnaires that evaluated the implementation at the organizational level and individual level, respectively. Generalized estimating equations with unstructured working correlation matrix were used to analyze the simultaneous influence of organizational and individual factors on the implementation.Results: At the organizational level, all homes had a policy on respiratory protection and implementation of such measures was generally adequate. Basic resources such as paper towels/hand dryers and equipment disinfectants, however, were rated as most inadequate by HCWs. Training opportunities were also identified as grossly inadequate. Only less than half of the ICOs and HCWs participated in training on infection control either at the initiation of employment or on a regular basis. Twenty-five percent of HCWs even indicated that they had never participated in any infection control training. At the individual level, hand hygiene, among other

  14. DEVELOPMENT VARIABILITY OF LONGITUDINAL SPINE FEATURES IN CHILDREN AGING 7-15 YEARS OLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kochan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased body growth is connected with higher sensitivity to environmental influence and may be a cause of instability of body posture. This happens when trunk and lower limbs growth is more intense. Because body posture disorders are most often diagnosed in children and school adolescents, the sample chosen were subjects between 7 and 15 years old. Material and methods. The data was gathered in 2002 in the town of Polkowice. Examination concerned 2706 boys and girls aged 7 to 15 years old. The measurement included basic somatic features and for the body posture photogrammetric method was used. Results. It was indicated that the relative trunk length in both sexes was decreasing in early school period but in the three oldest groups of age there was a significant increase. The height of kyphosis was increasing significantly in both sexes with age. Most intensive growth of this parameter was observed between 12 and 13 years old subjects. In both sexes there could be seen significant increase of kyphosis depth between 12 and 14 years old and also the decrease of lumbar lordosis between 12 and 13 years old subjects. Conclusion. Significant increase of thoracical spine relative height and lumbar lordosis depth in adolescents in both sexes can be one of the causes of weakening spine stability and affect correct body posture development.

  15. Old Age, Widows and Rural Solitude in the Eighteenth Century Central-Southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco GARCÍA GONZÁLEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current research about old age during the Ancient Regime in Spain is insufficient. And the same is the case with women, despite the large number of studies about gender and family history in the past decades. Taking, as a starting point, the analysis of widow women which became heads of households, this paper aims to know which specific characteristics had those households during their old age, composition, size, typology and the tendency to solitude; which activities and livelihood they had, paying attention to those differences as an expression of inequality; and which mechanisms and social reproduction strategies they followed to deal with the effects of aging. This paper is geografically focused in a wide rural area of central-southern Spain and aims to review the assumption that single and widow women in preindustrial age had subordinted lives. 

  16. Professor Age and Research Assistant Ratings of Passive-Avoidant and Proactive Leadership: The Role of Age-Related Work Concerns and Age Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that, in general, older professors are rated to have more passive-avoidant leadership styles than younger professors by their research assistants. The current study investigated professors' age-related work concerns and research assistants' favorable age stereotypes as possible explanations for this finding. Data came…

  17. Professor age and research assistant ratings of passive-avoidant and proactive leadership : The role of age-related work concerns and age stereotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that, in general, older professors are rated to have more passive-avoidant leadership styles than younger professors by their research assistants. The current study investigated professors' age-related work concerns and research assistants' favorable age stereotypes as poss

  18. Professor Age and Research Assistant Ratings of Passive-Avoidant and Proactive Leadership: The Role of Age-Related Work Concerns and Age Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that, in general, older professors are rated to have more passive-avoidant leadership styles than younger professors by their research assistants. The current study investigated professors' age-related work concerns and research assistants' favorable age stereotypes as possible explanations for this finding. Data came…

  19. An Introduction to Export Assistance in the Internet Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Somasundaram; Rask, Morten

    2004-01-01

    is provided over the Internet. For the research community, this presents an opportunity to document and explain the developments. Our objective in this paper is three fold. Firstly, we in this paper review 25 export assistance web sites and summarize the Internet related developments. Secondly, we use Rask......Governments and other non-profit organizations have been providing information-oriented services for long to encourage exports. The primary targeted recipient of such services is Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME's). The effectiveness of such activities has been researched extensively until......'s (2002) model about web marketing strategies for conceptualizing the Internet related developments associated with export assistance. Finally, we highlight the implications of providing export assistance over the Internet. Those interested in export assistance research and those providing export...

  20. An Introduction to Export Assistance in the Internet Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Somasundaram; Rask, Morten

    is provided over the Internet. For the research community, this presents an opportunity to document and explain the developments. Our objective in this paper is three fold. Firstly, we in this paper review 25 export assistance web sites and summarize the Internet related developments. Secondly, we use Rask......Governments and other non-profit organizations have been providing information-oriented services for long to encourage exports. The primary targeted recipient of such services is Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME's). The effectiveness of such activities has been researched extensively until......'s (2002) model about web marketing strategies for conceptualizing the Internet related developments associated with export assistance. Finally, we highlight the implications of providing export assistance over the Internet. Those interested in export assistance research and those providing export...

  1. Active life in old age. Combining measures of functional ability and social participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K; Holstein, B E; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    1999-01-01

    . SUBJECTS: A random sample of 75-year-old people who were invited to participate in the study (participation rate: 89, n = 477). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: ALC is a combination of two dichotomized variables: functional ability (dependent vs not dependent of help) and social participation (low vs. high). RESULTS......This paper describes a new measure of Active Life Expectancy, called Active Life Classification (ALC) in which the criterion for successful aging is a combination of good functional ability and high social participation. OBJECTIVES: 1) to describe the distribution of ALC among 75-year-old men...... were associated with ALC. CONCLUSIONS: It is an advantage to combine functional ability and social participation in the description of quality of life in old age, as 1) a high social participation may compensate for a poor functional ability, and vice versa, 2) the combined measure is meaningful...

  2. The meaning of having to live with cancer in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomé, B; Esbensen, B A; Dykes, A-K

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about how older people with cancer experience their life situation. To increase the understanding of how illness is experienced in older people with cancer, the aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of living with cancer in old age. The hermeneutic phenomenological meth...... person's thoughts about death. Thus, it is important to encourage the old person to describe her/his illness experience to increase understanding about what is meaningful for her/him.......Little is known about how older people with cancer experience their life situation. To increase the understanding of how illness is experienced in older people with cancer, the aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of living with cancer in old age. The hermeneutic phenomenological method...

  3. Ageing and Health: A Health Profile of Inmates of Old Age Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu M Bhatt, Shivani Vyas, Janak P Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It is observed that majority of inmates were suffering from health problems associated with ageing. The elderly comprise a very important vulnerable group is ignored but needs urgent attention.

  4. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and cognitive decline in the offspring up to old age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Soile; Kajantie, Eero; Henriksson, Markus; Leskinen, Jukka T.; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Heinonen, Kati; Lahti, Jari; Pyhälä, Riikka; Alastalo, Hanna; Lahti, Marius; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J.P.; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested whether maternal hypertensive disorders in pregnancy predict age-related change in cognitive ability in the offspring up to old age. Methods: Using mothers' blood pressure and urinary protein measurements from the maternity clinics and birth hospitals, we defined normotensive or hypertensive pregnancies in mothers of 398 men, who participated in the Helsinki Birth Cohort 1934–1944 Study. The men underwent the Finnish Defence Forces basic ability test twice: first during compulsory military service at age 20.1 (SD = 1.4) years and then in a retest at age 68.5 (SD = 2.9) years. The test yields a total score and subscores for tests measuring verbal, arithmetic, and visuospatial reasoning. Results: Men born after pregnancies complicated by a hypertensive disorder, compared with men born after normotensive pregnancies, scored 4.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.17–7.55) points lower on total cognitive ability at 68.5 years and displayed a greater decline in total cognitive ability (2.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.07–5.06) after 20.1 years. Of the subscores, associations were strongest for arithmetic reasoning. Conclusion: Maternal hypertensive disorders in pregnancy predict lower cognitive ability and greater cognitive decline up to old age. A propensity to lower cognitive ability and decline up to old age may have prenatal origins. PMID:23035059

  5. Memories that last in old age: motor skill learning and memory preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C D; Walton, A; Loveland, A D; Umberger, G H; Kryscio, R J; Gash, D M

    2005-06-01

    Using an automated test panel, age-associated declines in learning, remembering and performing a novel visuomotor task were assessed in 497 normal adults ranging from 18 to 95 years old. As predicted, task performance times slowed with increasing age in the cross-sectional portion of the study. However in the subsequent longitudinal study, while motor learning was significantly slower in adults over 62 years old, motor memory was pristinely preserved in normal adults from 18 to 95 years old. When tested 2 years after the first training session and without intervening rehearsal, mean performance times were retained and continued to improve by 10% in young adults and 13% in aged adults, reflecting long lasting preservation of motor memories. While the maximum lifetime of an unpracticed, novel motor memory in humans is not known, the present study suggests that new motor memories can be retained for at least 2 years without rehearsal in normal aged adults. This age-resistant component of motor memory stands in contrast to the well-known decrements in other motor and cognitive processes with human aging.

  6. Lifetime income and old age mortality risk in Italy over two decades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, Michele; Alessie, Rob; Kalwij, Adriaan; Marinacci, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The evidence on the shape and trend of the relationship between (lifetime) income and old age mortality is scarce and mixed both for North American and European countries. Nationwide evidence for Italy does not exist yet. OBJECTIVE We investigate the shape and evolution of the association

  7. Brain activity during source memory retrieval in young, middle-aged and old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, Selene; Trejo-Morales, Patricia; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Pasaye-Alcaraz, Erick Humberto; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Salgado-Lujambio, Perla; Sosa-Ortiz, Ana Luisa

    2015-08-27

    We investigated neurofunctional changes associated with source memory decline across the adult life span using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Young, middle-aged and old adults carried out a natural/artificial judgment of images of common objects that were randomly presented in one of the quadrants of the screen. At retrieval, the images were displayed at the center of the screen and the participants judged whether each image was new or old and, if old, they indicated in which quadrant of the screen the image had originally been presented. Comparing the items associated with correct versus incorrect source judgments revealed that no regions showed greater activity in young adults than in middle-aged adults; however, in young and middle-aged adults the activity in the left hippocampus and left anterior temporal cortex was of greater magnitude than in the older adults. Several regions also exhibited greater activity in young adults than in old adults. These results suggest that in middle age the recollection neural network, assessable by fMRI, is still preserved.

  8. Believing What You Hear: The Impact of Aging Stereotypes upon the Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Teri; Gaines, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Stereotypes about aging and the old, both negative and positive, have significant influence upon older people themselves. Often unknowingly, older people incorporate these stereotypes into their own thinking and self-perceptions. A literature search revealed four primary hypotheses about the manner in which these self-stereotypes impact older…

  9. Embracing Opposites: Meanings of Growing Old as Narrated by People Aged 85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Regina Santamaki; Norberg, Astrid; Lundman, Berit

    2008-01-01

    Many old people suffer from prolonged and multiple bodily ailments, new diseases, and increased risk for disadvantages and losses in life. Aging also means becoming mature and wise. This study illuminates the meaning of the lived experience with respect to changes in late life. Using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, this study analyzes…

  10. Believing What You Hear: The Impact of Aging Stereotypes upon the Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Teri; Gaines, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Stereotypes about aging and the old, both negative and positive, have significant influence upon older people themselves. Often unknowingly, older people incorporate these stereotypes into their own thinking and self-perceptions. A literature search revealed four primary hypotheses about the manner in which these self-stereotypes impact older…

  11. Twin's Birth-Order Differences in Height and Body Mass Index From Birth to Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Yoshie; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed birth order differences in means and variances of height and body mass index (BMI) in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins from infancy to old age. The data were derived from the international CODATwins database. The total number of height and BMI measures from 0.5 to 79.5 years ...

  12. Two Hemispheres for Better Memory in Old Age: Role of Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Lucie; Fay, Severine; Bouazzaoui, Badiaa; Isingrini, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This experiment explored the functional significance of age-related hemispheric asymmetry reduction associated with episodic memory and the cognitive mechanisms that mediate this brain pattern. ERPs were recorded while young and older adults performed a word-stem cued-recall task. Results confirmed that the parietal old/new effect was of larger…

  13. Marital Interaction in Middle and Old Age: A Predictor of Marital Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Marina; Kliegel, Matthias; Shapiro, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Many studies point out the importance of marital satisfaction for well-being. However, although being married is still the norm in middle and old age, research on the determinants of marital satisfaction has neglected long-term marriages. While research on short-term marriages mainly focuses on partner fit (e.g., in personality traits and…

  14. Parenthood, Stress, and Mental Health in Late Midlife and Early Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2009-01-01

    Using 2 waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I examine psychological consequences of potentially stressful, non-normative, or "off-time" aspects of the parental role in late midlife and early old age, including coresidence with adult children, stepparenthood, and parental bereavement. Additionally, I analyze gender differences in…

  15. C-reactive protein and genetic variants and cognitive decline in old age: The PROSPER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, have been associated with cognitive impairment in old age. However, it is unknown whether CRP is causally linked to cognitive decline. Within the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) tri...

  16. Nutritional care in old age: the effect of supplementation on nutritional status and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, M.

    2006-01-01

    Malnutrition is frequently observed in elderly people living in nursing homes and homes for the elderly. Anorexia resulting in inadequate dietary intake is often a cause of malnutrition. Malnutrition in old age affects several aspects of functioning. Earlier research has shown that a complete supple

  17. From the cradle to the grave: age differences in attachment from early adulthood to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopik, William J; Edelstein, Robin S; Fraley, R Chris

    2013-04-01

    Although attachment dynamics are thought to be important across the life span, relatively few studies have examined attachment processes beyond young adulthood. Extant research on age differences in attachment orientation has yielded conflicting results and interpretations. The purpose of this study was to provide a more complete picture of age-related differences in attachment anxiety and avoidance. We examined attachment anxiety and avoidance in 86,555 Internet respondents (71.8% female) ranging in age from 18 to 70. We found that attachment anxiety was highest among younger adults and lowest among middle-aged and older adults. Attachment avoidance showed less dramatic age differences overall but was highest among middle-aged adults and lowest among younger and older adults. In addition, partnered individuals reported lower levels of attachment anxiety and avoidance compared to single individuals, particularly in younger and older adulthood. Women also reported slightly higher anxiety and avoidance compared to men, especially in young adulthood. Findings are discussed in the context of life span changes in social roles, normative personality development, and emotion regulation throughout adulthood. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Influence of Social Factors on Life Satisfaction in Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Miha Kaučič

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research question (RQ: What is the connection between social factors and life satisfaction in old age? Purpose: The purpose of this research was to establish the influence of social factors on life satisfaction in old age. Method: The quantitative research method was used, a causal non-experimental method. As sampling data technique we used the technique of a survey questionnaire in ten statistical regions. For the analysis of causal effects and conditional associations we used the advanced statistical propensity score methods (Rubin, 2006. From the statistical set a simple random sample was chosen, we decided on proportionate stratification. For measuring life satisfaction we used Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, to which we added questions in order to study social factors. The research included 656 older adults aged 65 years and above, living in the home environment or in social care institutions. Results: Closely connected to life satisfaction in old age is the living conditions index (housing conditions, environment, financial situation, safety, whereas the lifestyle index (physical activity, nutrition, smoking, alcohol consumption is less closely connected. Discussion: Life satisfaction in old age is importantly influenced by social factors – suitable living conditions and less influenced by a healthy lifestyle, both of which allow for a quality life also in old age. Society: The research has an important influence on the society, as too little attention is being devoted to the phenomenon of ageing. By alerting the public we wish to contribute towards the detabuisation of ageing and ageism. For the stable healthcare system it is important that older adults remain healthy, independent and satisfied. Originality: The originality of the research is in the studying of social factor in the holistic model of satisfaction with life in the old age, which also includes physical, psychological and spiritual factors. Limitations

  19. Childhood cognitive ability accounts for associations between cognitive ability and brain cortical thickness in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karama, S; Bastin, M E; Murray, C; Royle, N A; Penke, L; Muñoz Maniega, S; Gow, A J; Corley, J; Valdés Hernández, M del C; Lewis, J D; Rousseau, M-É; Lepage, C; Fonov, V; Collins, D L; Booth, T; Rioux, P; Sherif, T; Adalat, R; Starr, J M; Evans, A C; Wardlaw, J M; Deary, I J

    2014-05-01

    Associations between brain cortical tissue volume and cognitive function in old age are frequently interpreted as suggesting that preservation of cortical tissue is the foundation of successful cognitive aging. However, this association could also, in part, reflect a lifelong association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue. We analyzed data on 588 subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 who had intelligence quotient (IQ) scores from the same cognitive test available at both 11 and 70 years of age as well as high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at approximately 73 years of age. Cortical thickness was estimated at 81 924 sampling points across the cortex for each subject using an automated pipeline. Multiple regression was used to assess associations between cortical thickness and the IQ measures at 11 and 70 years. Childhood IQ accounted for more than two-third of the association between IQ at 70 years and cortical thickness measured at age 73 years. This warns against ascribing a causal interpretation to the association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue in old age based on assumptions about, and exclusive reference to, the aging process and any associated disease. Without early-life measures of cognitive ability, it would have been tempting to conclude that preservation of cortical thickness in old age is a foundation for successful cognitive aging when, instead, it is a lifelong association. This being said, results should not be construed as meaning that all studies on aging require direct measures of childhood IQ, but as suggesting that proxy measures of prior cognitive function can be useful to take into consideration.

  20. Effect of inflammation in the periodontium in early old age on mortality at 21-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Krustrup, Ulla;

    2009-01-01

    To analyze whether inflammatory processes in the periodontium in early old age are related to subsequent mortality during 21 years of follow-up in a nondisabled 70-year-old population.......To analyze whether inflammatory processes in the periodontium in early old age are related to subsequent mortality during 21 years of follow-up in a nondisabled 70-year-old population....

  1. From old organisms to new molecules: integrative biology and therapeutic targets in accelerated human ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, L S; Faragher, R G A

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the basic biology of human ageing is a key milestone in attempting to ameliorate the deleterious consequences of old age. This is an urgent research priority given the global demographic shift towards an ageing population. Although some molecular pathways that have been proposed to contribute to ageing have been discovered using classical biochemistry and genetics, the complex, polygenic and stochastic nature of ageing is such that the process as a whole is not immediately amenable to biochemical analysis. Thus, attempts have been made to elucidate the causes of monogenic progeroid disorders that recapitulate some, if not all, features of normal ageing in the hope that this may contribute to our understanding of normal human ageing. Two canonical progeroid disorders are Werner's syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeroid syndrome (also known as progeria). Because such disorders are essentially phenocopies of ageing, rather than ageing itself, advances made in understanding their pathogenesis must always be contextualised within theories proposed to help explain how the normal process operates. One such possible ageing mechanism is described by the cell senescence hypothesis of ageing. Here, we discuss this hypothesis and demonstrate that it provides a plausible explanation for many of the ageing phenotypes seen in Werner's syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeriod syndrome. The recent exciting advances made in potential therapies for these two syndromes are also reviewed.

  2. Does a physically active lifestyle attenuate decline in all cognitive functions in old age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Mayas, Julia; Reales, Jose Manuel

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the performance of a group of 20 physically active older adults was compared with that of a group of 20 sedentary healthy older adults while performing a series of cognitive tasks. These tasks were designed to assess processes that deteriorate most with age, namely executive control (assessed with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) and processing speed (simple and choice reaction time tasks). A repetition priming task that does not decline with age, involving attended and unattended picture outlines at encoding, was also included as a control task. The results show that a physically active lifestyle has a positive influence on executive control, processing speed, and controlled processing. As expected, a physically active lifestyle did not enhance repetition priming for attended stimuli, nor did it produce priming for unattended stimuli at encoding. Both groups exhibited robust priming for attended stimuli and no priming for unattended ones. Executive control functions are of vital importance for independent living in old age. These results have practical implications for enhancing the cognitive processes that decline most in old age. Promoting a physically active lifestyle throughout adulthood could significantly reduce the decline of effortful executive control functions in old age.

  3. Is midlife occupational physical activity related to disability in old age? The SNAC-Kungsholmen study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Rydwik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Leisure-time physical activity (PA has been established to be related to more years lived without disability. However, less is known about the relationship between occupational PA and disability in old age. The aim of the study was 1 to investigate whether midlife occupational PA is related to late-life disability, and 2 to test the hypothesis that the association differs according to the occupational categories of blue and white collar work. METHODS: The study population was derived from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, and consisted of a random sample of 1804 subjects aged 72 and above. The association of occupational PA during the longest held occupation with disability in old age was determined using logistic regression. RESULTS: There was no significant relationship between occupational PA and disability in personal or instrumental activities of daily living (ADL after controlling for demographic and health-related factors. However, in stratified analyses moderate levels of occupational PA was associated with a lower odds ratio of dependency in personal ADL amongst white collar workers, compared to low level of occupational PA (OR = 0.34 95% C1 0.12-0.98. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate levels of midlife occupational PA were associated with a decreased risk of personal ADL disability in old age among white collar workers, but not among blue collar workers. Our results highlight the importance of encouraging white collar workers to engage in physical activity during or outside work hours.

  4. Outdoor motivation moderates the effects of accessibility on mobility in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Stefan T; Beyer, Anja; Lang, Frieder R

    2016-07-01

    Mobility plays a major role in healthy aging and social participation. This study explored whether accessibility problems in the housing environment are negatively associated with mobility in old age and whether this association is moderated by differences in an individual's preference for spending time outside the home (outdoor motivation). This article reports the results of a research project on mobility in old age. The project included a survey study of 120 community-dwelling older adults between 59 and 92 years of age (mean = 71.7 years, SD = 7.3 years) living in the metropolitan region of Nuremberg, Germany. Objective assessments were conducted in the participants' housing environment to evaluate the magnitude of accessibility problems. Accessibility problems were negatively associated with mobility. Interaction analyses suggested a buffering effect of outdoor motivation on this association, i.e. participants who reported a preference for spending time outside the home had a higher mobility in the face of accessibility problems as compared with those who preferred staying at home. Outdoor motivation may have protective effects for older adults when accessibility problems challenge mobility. These findings contribute to improving the understanding of how and under what circumstances older adults stay mobile and active in everyday life. Considering interindividual differences in outdoor motivation may binterventions and public health programs that are aimed at enhancing mobility and social participation in old age.

  5. Signaling pathway activation drift during aging: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts are comparable to normal middle-age and old-age cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliper, Alexander M; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin; Buzdin, Anton; Jetka, Tomasz; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Moskalev, Alexy; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, research in understanding the molecular basis of human aging has progressed significantly with the analysis of premature aging syndromes. Progerin, an altered form of lamin A, has been identified as the cause of premature aging in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), and may be a contributing causative factor in normal aging. However, the question of whether HGPS actually recapitulates the normal aging process at the cellular and organismal level, or simply mimics the aging phenotype is widely debated. In the present study we analyzed publicly available microarray datasets for fibroblasts undergoing cellular aging in culture, as well as fibroblasts derived from young, middle-age, and old-age individuals, and patients with HGPS. Using GeroScope pathway analysis and drug discovery platform we analyzed the activation states of 65 major cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis reveals that signaling pathway activation states in cells derived from chronologically young patients with HGPS strongly resemble cells taken from normal middle-aged and old individuals. This clearly indicates that HGPS may truly represent accelerated aging, rather than being just a simulacrum. Our data also points to potential pathways that could be targeted to develop drugs and drug combinations for both HGPS and normal aging.

  6. Adaptation in very old age: exploring the role of resources, beliefs, and attitudes for centenarians' happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopp, Daniela; Rott, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    When individuals reach very old age, accumulating negative conditions represent a serious challenge to their capacity to adapt and are likely to reduce the quality of life. By examining happiness and its determinants in centenarians, this study investigated the proposal that psychological resilience may come to an end in extremely old age. Data from the population-based Heidelberg Centenarian Study indicated high levels of happiness. Basic resources (i.e., job training, cognition, health, social network, extraversion) explained a substantial proportion of variance in happiness, but some resource effects were mediated through self-referent beliefs (e.g., self-efficacy) and attitudes toward life (e.g., optimistic outlook). Results challenge the view that psychological resilience reaches a critical limit or that the self-regulatory adaptation system loses its efficiency in very advanced age.

  7. An evaluation of recent old-age policy innovations in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Wolf, Douglas A

    2014-11-01

    In 2008, South Korea launched a Basic Old-Age Pension program, which provides income support for the bottom 60% of the population, and a universal Long-Term Care Insurance (LTCI) program. We investigate the effect of both policies on subjective well-being of the elderly. We use panel data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging, with the 2006 data representing the "pretreatment" and the 2008 data the "posttreatment" situations. We use regression methods for purposes of inferring program impacts. Our findings suggest that satisfaction with economic status was slightly improved by LTCI alone, and by LTCI and basic old-age pension in combination, depending on the estimator used. We found no policy impacts on satisfaction with health conditions. The benefits provided by the two programs may be insufficient to raise well-being in the population as a whole; alternatively, the outcomes may have been measured too soon after the policies were implemented.

  8. Health impact: longitudinal analysis of employment at middle and old age in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    GONZÁLEZ-GONZÁLEZ, César; WONG, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    We use longitudinal data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study to analyze the relationship between health and labor force participation of population aged 50 years and older in Mexico. The results confirm that health, measured through chronic diseases and difficulty to perform activities of daily living, has a powerful influence on labor force participation. We also find important differences by gender; hypertension and diabetes have effects in both, men and women; heart disease and stroke only in men. We provide concrete evidence on economic participation and highlight the importance of public policies to create adequate jobs for the population at middle and old age. PMID:25722646

  9. fMRI subsequent source memory effects in young, middle-aged and old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, Selene; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Trejo-Morales, Patricia; Pasaye-Alcaraz, Erick Humberto; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Salgado-Lujambio, Perla; Sosa-Ortiz, Ana Luisa

    2015-03-01

    The ability to remember the spatial context in which our experiences occur declines linearly across the adult lifespan. However, little is known about whether this source memory decline is associated with neural activity changes. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans were recorded in young, middle-aged and old adults to investigate brain activity variations across the adult lifespan during encoding of subsequent spatial source memory retrieval. Twelve healthy individuals of both sexes were enrolled in each age group. During encoding, participants performed natural/artificial judgment of images of common objects that were randomly presented in one of the quadrants of the screen. During retrieval, the images presented at encoding were randomly mixed with new ones and displayed at the center of the screen. Participants judged whether each image was new or old and, if an image was old, they were instructed to indicate in which quadrant the image was presented in the encoding session. The contrast between study items that were later recognized and assigned a correct source judgment with those whose sources were subsequently forgotten revealed that positive subsequent memory effects disappear by middle age in the left medial orbitofrontal gyrus and appear in the left superior occipital gyrus. This under-recruitment and over-recruitment brain activity was also present in old adults. The results allowed us to identify the specific brain regions that first fail to encode spatial information into an episodic representation during the adult lifespan.

  10. Conflicting notions of citizenship in old age: An analysis of an activation practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Susan; Horstman, Klasien; Jansen, Maria; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Ageing societies and increasing healthcare expenditures are inducing Western welfare states to reform their care arrangements. In a qualitative research project, we explored how citizenship in old age is constructed in a public innovative care practice situated in the southern part of the Netherlands: the shaping of 'life cycle robust neighbourhoods'. Life cycle robustness entails a further not formally defined ideal of age-friendly places, enabling older adults to live independently for longer periods of time. Participation is being presented as an important element towards life cycle robustness. We used ethnographic methods to understand different constructions of citizenship in old age. We analysed documents and interviewed local policymakers and civil servants, managers and directors in the fields of housing, care and welfare, professionals working for these organisations, and older adults living (independently) in these neighbourhoods (n=73). Additionally, we observed formal and informal meetings and organised focus groups. Our findings demonstrate conflicting notions of old age. Policymakers and civil servants, managers and directors, professionals, and even representatives of older adults share a belief an activation policy is necessary, although they differ in how they interpret this need. Policymakers and civil servants are convinced that societal and financial incentives necessitate current reforms, managers and directors talk about quality and organisational needs, while professionals mainly strive to empower older adults (as citizens). Simultaneously, older adults try to live their lives as independent as possible. We argue that, whereas old age became a distinct category in the last century, we now recognise a new period in which this category is being more and more de-categorised.

  11. Quality of life and attitudes to ageing in Turkish older adults at old people's homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Mehmet; Dikmetaş, Elif

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate quality of life (QOL) and attitudes to ageing in Turkish older adults at two old people's homes (nursing homes) and to explain relationship between QOL and attitudes to ageing. This study is a quantitative and descriptive exploratory study of QOL and attitudes to ageing of older adults in nursing homes in a developing country. Two international data measurement tools were used for data collection. Data measurement instruments in this study are The World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD) and the WHO - Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire (AAQ). The WHOQOL-OLD module consists of 24 items assigned to six facets (sensory abilities, autonomy, past, present and future activities, social participation, death and dying and intimacy) AAQ consists of 24 items classified in three domains (psychosocial loss, physical change and psychological growth) with eight items each. The Turkish version of the WHOQOL-OLD and AAQ was administered to 120 older (>65 years) adults living in two old people's homes in Samsun Province, Turkey. This study was conducted and planned between on 1 November 2011 and on 31 November, 2011. The results indicated that there was significant relationship between QOL and attitudes to ageing of older adults. In this study, the highest significant relationship is between psychological growth subscale of attitudes to ageing and sensory abilities subscale of QOL (r = 0.579; P ageing had a significant and positive relationship (r = 0.408; P ageing (psychosocial loss, physical change and psychological growth) were significant predictors for QOL in older adults in Turkey. It was found that the gender does not affect overall QOL in older adults. However, happiness is significant variable for overall QOL in this study. The results suggest that QOL is a complex, multidimensional concept that should be studied at different levels of analysis in Turkey and other developing countries

  12. Infant motor development and cognitive performance in early old age: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poranen-Clark, Taina; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri; Osmond, Clive; Rantanen, Taina; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G

    2015-06-01

    Motor development and cognitive development in childhood have been found to be fundamentally interrelated, but less is known about the association extending over the life course. The aim of this study was to examine the association between early motor development and cognitive performance in early old age. From men and women belonging to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, who were born between 1934 and 1944 and resided in Finland in 1971, 1279 participated in cognitive performance tests (CogState®, version 3.0.5) between 2001 and 2006 at an average age of 64.2 years (SD 3.0). Of these, age at first walking extracted from child welfare clinic records was available for 398 participants. Longer reaction times in cognitive tasks measuring simple reaction time (SRT), choice reaction time (CRT), working memory (WM), divided attention (DA), and associated learning (AL) indicated poorer cognitive performance. Adjustment was made for sex, age at testing, father's occupational status and own highest attained education, and occupation in adulthood. Average age of learning to walk was 12.2 months (SD 2.1). After adjusting for covariates, earlier attainment of learning to walk was associated with shorter reaction times in cognitive performance tasks (SRT 10.32 % per month, 95 % CI 0.48-21.12, p = 0.039; CRT 14.17 % per month, 95 % CI 3.75-25.63, p = 0.007; WM 15.14 % per month, 95 % CI 4.95-26.32, p = 0.003). People who learned to walk earlier had better cognitive performance in early old age. The earlier attainment of motor skills may track over to early old age and possibly reflect greater cognitive reserve in older age.

  13. A new wrinkle on old skin: the role of elastic fibres in skin ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, A K; Sherratt, M J; Griffiths, C E M; Watson, R E B

    2010-10-01

    Cutaneous ageing is the result of two distinct, biological processes which may occur concurrently: (i) the passage of time, termed intrinsic ageing and (ii) environmental influences, termed extrinsic ageing. Intrinsic ageing of the skin is a slow process which causes changes in tissue structure and impairs function in the absence of additional biological, chemical and physical factors. The clinical features of intrinsically aged skin are not usually evident until old age when, although smooth and unblemished, the skin surface appears pale and is characterized by fine wrinkles with occasional exaggerated expression lines. Functionally, intrinsically aged skin is dry and less elastic than more youthful skin. In contrast, extrinsically aged skin is exemplified by deep, coarse wrinkles, mottled hyperpigmentation and a marked loss of elasticity and recoil. The two major environmental influences which induce extrinsic ageing are: (i) chronic exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (termed photoageing) and (ii) smoking. This review discusses the changes associated with the ageing process in the skin, with particular emphasis on the role played by the elastic fibre network in maintaining dermal function. The review concludes with a discussion of a short-term assay for independent assessment of the efficacy of anti-ageing cosmetic products using the elastic fibre component fibrillin-1 as a biomarker of extracellular matrix repair.

  14. Influence of Paternal Age on Assisted Reproduction Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    We Will Retrospectively Assess Our Databases in Our Clinic; Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad in Valencia (Spain); Searching for Assisted Reproduction Procedures; IUI Standard IVF/ICSI Cycles and Ovum Donation IVF/ICSI Cycles; Who Were Referred to Our Unit to Cryopreserve Sperm During the Period; From January 2000 to December 2006

  15. Frequency of development of bacterial vaginitis in symptomatic and asymptomatic women of reproductive age, aged 18 – 45 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ioannidou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the current study was to investigate the frequency of development of bacterial vaginitis (BV in women of reproductive age, aged 18 to 45 years old. Those women undertook a microbiological examination of vaginal secretion either in the context of preventive control or because of the appearance of clinical symptoms.Material and method: A microbiological test of vaginal secretion was done in 500 women of reproductive age, aged 18 to 45 years old. Those women came for examination, either in the context of preventive control or because they had disturbing symptoms in the genital area. The following factors were recorded: age, existence of clinical symptoms such as itching, burning, excessive vaginal secretion, pain, as well as history of vaginitis. During the sample intake, the presence of pathological secretion, rush or pain were recorded. The diagnosis of bacterial vaginitis was based on the Amsel’s criteria.Results: Out of the 500 women of reproductive age, BV was detected to 145 (29% and 33% of them were asymptomatic. 86,2% of the women reported excessive smelly vaginal secretion. Furthermore, 95,8% of women were found with excessive vaginal secretion and last but not least in 73% of women, pain was detected. History of vaginitis was reported by the 83,3% of women with BV.Conclusion: It can be argued that BV was detected in a great number of women of reproductive age. The high percentages of asymptomatic women with BV, as well as the serious complications, and the fact that BV constitutes a predisposition factor for infection with HIV, impose the application of preventive laboratory control in order to avoid bacterial vaginitis.

  16. Self and identity in advanced old age: validation of theory through longitudinal case analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, P G; Ivani-Chalian, C; Robinson, M

    1999-10-01

    Case studies drawn from a 20-year longitudinal study of aging were examined for the support they provide to two theoretical viewpoints on the self in later life: one focusing on management of self-esteem, the other on development of identity as story. The five cases selected for scrutiny represented diverse trajectories of self-esteem. They furnished ample illustrations of certain key aspects of both theories, including assimilative processes of coping, depression related to absence of accommodation, maintenance of life story themes, and life review processes. They did not, however, give strong support to the dichotomy, drawn within both theoretical models, between younger and older old age. Examples of accommodation, disengagement, and self-transcendence, hypothesized to typify advanced old age, were relatively few in number and emerged only toward the very end of life. It is argued that examination of prototypical cases provides a useful approach to validating and developing theory. A conclusion drawn from this study is that more analysis should be carried out on the lives of persons who exemplify the theoretically ideal characteristics of advanced old age.

  17. Old age security in rural China: there is a long way to go

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Bao-zhen; ZHOU Lu-lin; Y John Mei

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the current developments and challenges confronted by old age security in rural China.Data sources This study is based on the data from PubMed,Elsevier,Wiley,EBSCO,EMBASE,SCI Expanded,ProQuest,Google,and CNKI which is the most informative database in Chinese.Study selection Articles were selected with the search terms "rural","China","old","older",or "elder","elderly",or "aged","aging","security","culture","value","medical insurance" or "community based medical insurance" or "cooperative medical scheme".Related websites and yearbooks were searched as well.Results The socio-economic development has made the burden of traditional care for the rural elderly heavier than ever,and new challenges are emerging in rural communities,such as poor economic,deteriorating natural environment and health crisis.Conclusions The governments should improve the scale and caliber of rural old age security and strengthen regulations with great efforts in developing the rural economy and protecting the natural environment of rural communities.

  18. Natural and artefactual aneuploidy in human lymphocytes in extreme old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhava, T; Khmaladze, E; Lokhadze, T; Buadze, T

    2008-04-01

    At present it is generally believed that aging is accompanied by an increase in the numbers of cells with altered chromosome sets. However, the problem of aneuploidy in extreme old age (80 years and over) has hardly been subjected to systematic investigation. The purpose of this study was to examine quantitative chromosome changes and relationship between "artefactual" and "natural" aneuploidy in subjects from 80 to 114 years of age using karyotype analyses. Chromosomes were studied in 1136 karyotypes of relatively round metaphases from 40 lymphocyte cultures obtained from 40 apparently normal subjects aged from 80 to 114 ( including 26 men and 14 women). 964 karyotypes from 48 donors aged 20 to 48 served as control. Lymphocytes were cultivation by modification method (Lezhava, 2006). It is suggested that the probability of natural aneuploidy rises substantially among elderly women; while that of artefactual aneuploidy is increased among elderly men; the problem of natural aneuploidy in males remains unclear.

  19. The meaning of having to live with cancer in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomé, B; Esbensen, B A; Dykes, A-K

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about how older people with cancer experience their life situation. To increase the understanding of how illness is experienced in older people with cancer, the aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of living with cancer in old age. The hermeneutic phenomenological method...... and illness. To provide individual support and appropriate care to older people with cancer it is important for health care professionals to identify and take care of disabilities and to support the reorientation in the disintegrated life situation. It is also important to have preparedness to meet the old...... person's thoughts about death. Thus, it is important to encourage the old person to describe her/his illness experience to increase understanding about what is meaningful for her/him....

  20. Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technologies for Mobility and Their Implications for Active Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Correia Martins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Active ageing is defined as the process of optimizing opportunities for physical, social and mental health to enable older people to actively take part in society without discrimination and to enjoy independence and good quality of life. The World Health Organization assumed this to be a process for increasing and maintaining an individual’s participation in activities to enhance his/her quality of life. In this survey, the authors addressed the following question: is assistive technology (AT for mobility contributing to enhancement of lifelong capacity and performance? Method: From June 2015 until February 2016, 96 community dwelling adults, AT users for mobility (powered wheelchairs, manual wheelchairs, lower limb prostheses, walkers, crutches and canes, aged 45–97, mean 67.02 ± 14.24 years old, 56.3% female, were interviewed using the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (P-PIADS, the Activities and Participation Profile related to Mobility (APPM and demographics, clinical and questions about AT use and training. Results and Discussion: The participants’ profiles revealed moderate limitation and restrictions in participation, measured by the APPM (2.03. Most participants displayed a positive impact from AT; average scores obtained from the P-PIADS subscales were: Self-esteem 0.62, Competency 1.11 and Adaptability 1.10. The P-PIADS total was 0.96, with the powered wheelchair users scoring the highest (1.53 and the walker users scoring the lowest (0.73. All subscales and the P-PIADS total were positively correlated with the activities and participation profile. There was no relation between age and the psychosocial impact of AT or activities and participation profile. These results encourage the authors to follow up with these participants for a lifelong intervention. To accomplish that aim, currently, the protocol is implemented at the AT prescribing centers in Coimbra, Portugal in order to assess the impact of AT on

  1. Survey for late-onset hypogonadism among old and middle-aged males in Shanghai communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Sun; Guo-Qing Liang; Xiang-Feng Chen; Ping Ping; Wen-Liang Yao; Shi-Jun Zhang; Bo Wang; Ying-Hao Sun; Zheng Li

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to investigate late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in old and middle-aged males in Shanghai communities,using symptom score evaluation systems and measurements of sex hormone levels.One thousand cases of males aged 40-70 years were investigated.The aging male symptoms (AMS) scale and androgen deficiency in aging males (ADAM) questionnaire were used at the beginning of the investigation,followed by measurement of the sex hormone-related factors (total testosterone (TT),free testosterone (fT),sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and bioavailability of testosterone (Bio-T)).There were 977 valid questionnaires.The LOH-positive rates shown by AMS and ADAM were 59.88% and 84.65%,respectively; values increased with the age of the patients.There were 946 results related to sex hormone measurements,which showed the following results:TT was not related to aging (P>0.05); levels of SHBG increased with age; and fT and Bio-T decreased with age.There was a significant difference in fT between LOH-positive and LOH-negative patients,as shown by the ADAM.In summary,TT levels were not related to aging,even though SHBG did increase while fT and Bio-T decreased with aging.Clinically,the diagnosis of LOH cannot be based on serum TT level.

  2. Healthy ageing and home: the perspectives of very old people in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixsmith, J; Sixsmith, A; Fänge, A Malmgren; Naumann, D; Kucsera, C; Tomsone, S; Haak, M; Dahlin-Ivanoff, S; Woolrych, R

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on in-depth research, using a grounded theory approach, to examine the ways in which very old people perceive healthy ageing in the context of living alone at home within urban settings in five European countries. This qualitative study was part of a cross-national project entitled ENABLE-AGE which examined the relationship between home and healthy ageing. Interviews explored the notion of healthy ageing, the meaning and importance of home, conceptualisations of independence and autonomy and links between healthy ageing and home. Data analysis identified five ways in which older people constructed healthy ageing: home and keeping active; managing lifestyles, health and illness; balancing social life; and balancing material and financial circumstances. Older people reflected on their everyday lives at home in terms of being engaged in purposeful, meaningful action and evaluated healthy ageing in relation to the symbolic and practical affordances of the home, contextualised within constructions of their national context. The research suggests that older people perceive healthy ageing as an active achievement, created through individual, personal effort and supported through social ties despite the health, financial and social decline associated with growing older. The physicality and spatiality of home provided the context for establishing and evaluating the notion of healthy ageing, whilst the experienced relationship between home, life history and identity created a meaningful space within which healthy ageing was negotiated.

  3. Multiple unit activity recorded longitudinally in rats from pubescence to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmo, H P; Malmo, R B

    1982-01-01

    Longitudinal multiple unit activity (MUA) recordings of excellent quality over time periods as long as 26 months are described. The validity of the method was demonstrated by showing persistence of specific and idiosyncratic MUA responses to controlled sensory stimulation over these long time periods. This longitudinal MUA method was used to study level of localization neuronal activity as a function of aging. In agreement with deoxyglucose data from Sokoloff's laboratory, we found significant age-related declines in inferior and superior colliculi. In addition, our results showed the advantage of a longitudinal method over a cross-sectional one in following progressive changes into old age. The further declines in midbrain MUA level (though not in forebrain level) from middle age to old age that we observed were highly significant. The deoxyglucose method, on the other hand, had failed to show this kind of progression in those midbrain sites, probably because of a survival effect, a common sampling artifact in cross-sectional studies of aging.

  4. The survival effect in memory: does it hold into old age and non-ancestral scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Lau, Karen P L; Truong, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The survival effect in memory refers to the memory enhancement for materials encoded in reference to a survival scenario compared to those encoded in reference to a control scenario or with other encoding strategies. The current study examined whether this effect is well maintained in old age by testing young (ages 18-29) and older adults (ages 65-87) on the survival effect in memory for words encoded in ancestral and/or non-ancestral modern survival scenarios relative to a non-survival control scenario. A pilot study was conducted to select the best matched comparison scenarios based on potential confounding variables, such as valence and arousal. Experiment 1 assessed the survival effect with a well-matched negative control scenario in both young and older adults. The results showed an age-equivalent survival effect across an ancestral and a non-ancestral modern survival scenario. Experiment 2 replicated the survival effect in both age groups with a positive control scenario. Taken together, the data suggest a robust survival effect that is well preserved in old age across ancestral and non-ancestral survival scenarios.

  5. Aging and physical mobility in group-housed Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Carol A; Willard, Stephanie L; Register, Thomas C; Bennett, Allyson J; Pierre, Peter J; Laudenslager, Mark L; Kitzman, Dalane W; Childers, Martin K; Grange, Robert W; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    While indices of physical mobility such as gait speed are significant predictors of future morbidity/mortality in the elderly, mechanisms of these relationships are not understood. Relevant animal models of aging and physical mobility are needed to study these relationships. The goal of this study was to develop measures of physical mobility including activity levels and gait speed in Old World monkeys which vary with age in adults. Locomotor behaviors of 21 old ([Formula: see text] = 20 yoa) and 24 young ([Formula: see text] = 9 yoa) socially housed adult females of three species were recorded using focal sample and ad libitum behavior observation methods. Self-motivated walking speed was 17% slower in older than younger adults. Likewise, young adults climbed more frequently than older adults. Leaping and jumping were more common, on average, in young adults, but this difference did not reach significance. Overall activity levels did not vary significantly by age, and there were no significant age by species interactions in any of these behaviors. Of all the behaviors evaluated, walking speed measured in a simple and inexpensive manner appeared most sensitive to age and has the added feature of being least affected by differences in housing characteristics. Thus, walking speed may be a useful indicator of decline in physical mobility in nonhuman primate models of aging.

  6. Vascular Calcification in Uremia: New-Age Concepts about an Old-Age Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of aging, and major contributor to the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), is the progressive structural and functional deterioration of the arteries and concomitant accrual of mineral. Vascular calcification (VC) was long viewed as a degenerative age-related pathology that resulted from the passive deposition of mineral in the extracellular matrix; however, since the discovery of "bone-related" protein expression in calcified atherosclerotic plaques over 20 years ago, a plethora of studies have evoked the now widely accepted view that VC is a highly regulated and principally cell-mediated phenomenon that recapitulates many features of physiologic ossification. Central to this theory are changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype and viability, thought to be driven by chronic exposure to a number of dystrophic stimuli characteristics of the uremic state. Here, dedifferentiated synthetic VSMCs are seen to spawn calcifying matrix vesicles that actively seed mineralization of the arterial matrix. This review provides an overview of the major epidemiological, histological, and molecular aspects of VC in the context of CKD, and a counterpoint to the prevailing paradigm that emphasizes the primacy of VSMC-mediated mechanisms. Particular focus is given to the import of protein and small molecule inhibitors in regulating physiologic and pathological mineralization and the emerging role of mineral nanoparticles and their interplay with proinflammatory processes.

  7. Learning styles in old age: an aged between research participants of a university opened for seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Andrade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is known that learning refers to how beings acquire new knowledge, develop skills and change behavior. Thus, knowing the learning styles of individuals is important, both for those who learn how to teach. In this sense, this research project aimed to describe the sociodemographic characteristics of the sample, identify the predominant learning styles of these individuals and see if there is a correlation between learning styles with sociodemographic variables. The sample consisted of 248 elderly participants in the study "Continuing Education - Benefits of the Open University of the Third Age EACH USP", funded by the National Institute for Educational Studies and Research Teixeira (INEP| Ministry of Education. We used a protocol that included sociodemographic questionnaire and the Learning Style Inventory (Learning Style Inventory - LSI by David A. Kolb. Descriptive analysis and inferential analysis. The dominant learning style was the assimilator and identified the association between learning styles of older people and sex (p = 0.0372, age (p = 0.0450, schooling for males (p = 0.0155 and sex for seniors with even the elementary school level (p = 0.0166. The results of this study are in line with theoretical perspectives and findings in the literature with regard to sample characteristics and learning styles identified. Future studies should be conducted in order to investigate more about the topic of learning in the elderly.

  8. The meaning of having to live with cancer in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomé, B; Esbensen, B A; Dykes, A-K;

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about how older people with cancer experience their life situation. To increase the understanding of how illness is experienced in older people with cancer, the aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of living with cancer in old age. The hermeneutic phenomenological method...... as described by van Manen and referred to as 'phenomenology of praxis' was used. Ten persons (seven women and three men) aged 75 and over, who had a diagnosis of cancer and who had just completed cancer treatment, were interviewed in their own homes. The analysis revealed a life world affected to varying...... and illness. To provide individual support and appropriate care to older people with cancer it is important for health care professionals to identify and take care of disabilities and to support the reorientation in the disintegrated life situation. It is also important to have preparedness to meet the old...

  9. The politics of old age : older people's interest organisations in the Irish context

    OpenAIRE

    DOYLE, MARTHA

    2011-01-01

    The participation of older people's interest organisations in the policy process has been promoted in international fora and at national level in the majority of established democracies throughout the world. Despite this, remarkably little academic attention has been given to the work of these organisations. The limited extant literature tends to focus almost exclusively on the politics of old age in the context of macro political and global economic forces. This thesis seeks to addresses thi...

  10. Serum Thyroid Function, Mortality and Disability in Advanced Old Age: The Newcastle 85+ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Salman; Yadegarfar, Mohammad E.; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Kingston, Andrew; Collerton, Joanna; Visser, Theo J.; Kirkwood, Tom B.; Jagger, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Context: Perturbations in thyroid function are common in older individuals but their significance in the very old is not fully understood. Objective: This study sought to determine whether thyroid hormone status and variation of thyroid hormones within the reference range correlated with mortality and disability in a cohort of 85-year-olds. Design: A cohort of 85-year-old individuals were assessed in their own homes (community or institutional care) for health status and thyroid function, and followed for mortality and disability for up to 9 years. Setting and Participants: Six hundred and forty-three 85-year-olds registered with participating general practices in Newcastle and North Tyneside, United Kingdom. Main Outcomes: All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and disability according to thyroid disease status and baseline thyroid hormone parameters (serum TSH, FT4, FT3, and rT3). Models were adjusted for age, sex, education, body mass index, smoking, and disease count. Results: After adjustment for age and sex, all-cause mortality was associated with baseline serum rT3 and FT3 (both P < .001), but not FT4 or TSH. After additional adjustment for potential confounders, only rT3 remained significantly associated with mortality (P = .001). Baseline serum TSH and rT3 predicted future disability trajectories in men and women, respectively. Conclusions: Our study is reassuring that individuals age 85 y with both subclinical hypothyroidism and subclinical hyperthyroidism do not have a significantly worse survival over 9 years than their euthyroid peers. However, thyroid function tests did predict disability, with higher serum TSH levels predicting better outcomes. These data strengthen the argument for routine use of age-specific thyroid function reference ranges. PMID:27552542

  11. Old Age and Spirituality - Metanoia, "The second half of life" according to Carl Gustav Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pereira Gaeta Arcuri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the possibility of old age as human development, since the second half of life is the period of spiritual growth. Jung is a classic illustration of metanoia showing what connects and what distinguishes the second half of life. It is as if the focus change and a shift occurred. The focus may be because the ego does not find this place the foundation that once experienced as a solid foundation, and is directed to the Self.

  12. [Demographic aging and social security. The insufficiency of old age pensions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham Chande, R

    1993-01-01

    The demographic transition is leading to demographic aging in Mexico, as lower fertility and greater life expectancy combine to produce absolute and percentage increases in the elderly population. Concern is growing about satisfying the material needs of the elderly population. Only a few developed countries are able to furnish adequate pensions to their retired workers through social security systems. In Mexico, class inequity is a greater determinant of the level of pension coverage than is generational solidarity. Mexico's 1990 census showed that the population of 81,250,000 was comprised of 24,517,000 economically active and 56,733,000 inactive persons. Of the 24,517,000 economically active, 7,282,000 mostly lower level employees and laborers were affiliated only with the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). 2,308,000 were covered by the IMSS and one of the complementary pension systems sponsored by the largest and most organized private companies. 2,629,000 were entitled to pensions through public sector employment and 584,000 through quasipublic employment. The remaining 11,571,000 had no rights to a pension. In other words, 47% of the labor force was not covered by any retirement pension system. 375,000 of the 5,007,000 persons over age 60 in the economically inactive population had some sort of pension from the IMSS. In 1990, 92% received the minimum pension, equivalent to 70% of the minimum salary. 229,000 had an IMSS pension and a complementary private pension. 196,000 pensioners in the public sector received an average pension of 1.5 times the minimum salary. 66,000 retired workers in quasipublic enterprises received pensions with automatic adjustments for inflation that frequently equaled 20 times the minimum salary. The total number of recipients of pensions of all types was 888,000,leaving 4,119,000 persons over 60 with no pension. Because of the deficiencies of the social security system, families must continue to be the institution that aids

  13. The Future of Social Work in Aging: “Everything Old is New Again”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy P. Kropf

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available With the aging of the baby boom generation, the number of older adults in the US will increase substantially. Using a biopsychosocial framework, this article presents cutting-edge of older adulthood and considers emerging roles of social workers with older adults and their families. Research, education, and policy perspectives that will advance social work knowledge, skills and resources in aging are proposed. Social work as a profession is challenged to lead the way in making “everything old new again.”

  14. A Study Tour of Old-age Insurance Systems In Switzerland and France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>A Chinese delegation of leaders from provincial and municipal departments of civil affairs and retired cadres and homes for the aged visited Switzerland and France from April 18 to 28,and attended a seminar on the old-age insurance system in Switzerland.The visit,to learn of the successful experience of developed European countries,was made at the invitation of the Swiss-Chinese Association and the China-Spain Association of International Culture and Friendship and organized by the CPAFFC.

  15. Widowhood, solitude and sexuality in old age: confronting and overcoming mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Montes de Oca Zavala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Widowhood is usually associated to negative aspects of life mainly when the people involved are in old age. However, depending on the moment this phase of life is faced, it is possible to activate certain mechanisms allowing confrontation and reorganization of life. This article presents, from an exploratory, qualitative and analytical perspective, three case studies in the state of Mexico showing how widowhood is seen, whatit means in old age, its social and economic impacts, as well as its discourses and antidiscoursesgenerated from the subjects analyzed so as to overcome solitude, isolation, the need for afection and love that go beyond what family and children provide for. Sexuality is seen from a critical perspective and it is an element that stands out both in the narrative of such three cases and when compared to the traditional view that analyses widowhood and old age. This article is composed of a bibliographic review, objectives, methodology and a section of final results and reflections.

  16. Age-specific average head template for typically developing 6-month-old infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa F Akiyama

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid anatomical changes that occur within the brain structure in early human development and the significant differences between infant brains and the widely used standard adult templates, it becomes increasingly important to utilize appropriate age- and population-specific average templates when analyzing infant neuroimaging data. In this study we created a new and highly detailed age-specific unbiased average head template in a standard MNI152-like infant coordinate system for healthy, typically developing 6-month-old infants by performing linear normalization, diffeomorphic normalization and iterative averaging processing on 60 subjects' structural images. The resulting age-specific average templates in a standard MNI152-like infant coordinate system demonstrate sharper anatomical detail and clarity compared to existing infant average templates and successfully retains the average head size of the 6-month-old infant. An example usage of the average infant templates transforms magnetoencephalography (MEG estimated activity locations from MEG's subject-specific head coordinate space to the standard MNI152-like infant coordinate space. We also created a new atlas that reflects the true 6-month-old infant brain anatomy. Average templates and atlas are publicly available on our website (http://ilabs.washington.edu/6-m-templates-atlas.

  17. Venerable or vulnerable: ageing and old age in JRR Tolkien's The lord of the rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B; Clarfield, A Mark

    2007-06-01

    An underappreciated aspect of The lord of the rings (TLOTR) by JRR Tolkien is in how the author dealt with death, longevity and ageing in the work. During his early years, Tolkien endured first the passing of both parents and then the deaths of most of his friends during the First World War. It was not surprising that a search for the meaning of life and death became a preoccupation of Tolkien. Tolkien's Roman Catholic faith underpinned his thoughts about mortality. He also found solace in Northern myths that held that there was intrinsic worth to courage in the face of our inevitable demise. Along with his colleague, CS Lewis, he took an opposing stand to JBS Haldane, Olaf Stapledon and other precursors of transhumanists, who felt that bioengineering would allow us to extend human life span virtually without limit. Although Tolkien acknowledged the urge to try to escape our mortality, TLOTR is a story about accepting the need to let go with all of the attendant regrets and sorrow.

  18. Valuation of Life in Old and Very Old Age: The Role of Sociodemographic, Social, and Health Resources for Positive Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopp, Daniela; Rott, Christoph; Oswald, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Valuation of life (VOL) represents a construct capturing active attachment to life put forward by M. P. Lawton (e.g., 1999). As old and very old individuals may differ in terms of endorsement and with respect to what makes a life worth living, the present study investigated whether mean levels and the explanatory value of…

  19. The Incorporation of the School Age Group of 16-18 Years Old in Gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Alfred Nela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific research of this paper focuses on the involvement of the school age group 16-18 years old in sports betting games impacted by beliefs on luck and social groups. For the collection of data literature is utilized, questionnaires are distributed and also focus groups were conducted. The assumptions of the assignment are: a The involvement of school age group 16-18 years in sports betting games are manners learned from their comrades, b The school age group 16-18 years old attribute to fate the participation in sports betting games. Over 64% of responses manifest that they have learned the rules from their companions. The revelations and questionnaire responses argue that over 45% of students in their classes play sports bets, and 34% think that the phenomena of sports betting depends on luck. The major part of this age group do not practice and believe in fortunate rituals or activities. The acquired data reflect that the extent of involvement of this age group is in substantial dimensions. We suggest that the decision-making bodies and service providers should develop strategies in order to reduce the phenomenon.

  20. Telomere diminution as a cause of immune failure in old age: an unfashionable demurral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A

    2000-02-01

    The hypothesis that cellular proliferation leads to telomere shortening, which in turn leads to replicative failure, which in turn leads to a failure of immune function in aged individuals, is here evaluated against the published evidence about the nature and pace of immune decline in animals and humans. Although the evidence is strong that telomere shortening in late-passage human lymphocyte and non-lymphocytic cell lines induces a state in which the cells can no longer divide, there is no compelling evidence to suggest that replicative senescence of this kind is an important contributor to immune deficiency in old age. On the contrary, the accelerated pace of immune decline in mice and rats, whose telomeres are much longer than those of humans, argues strongly that the factors that pace age-dependent immune decline do not include telomere shortening. In addition, three subsidiary arguments - (a) the decline with age in naive T cell proliferation despite their relatively long telomeres; (b) the preservation of T cell proliferation in Werner's syndrome patients despite their cell lines' proclivity to replicative senescence in vitro; and (c) the ability of PMA and ionomycin to stimulate proliferation in T cells from old donors, but not in late-passage T celt lines - all support the conclusion that aging of the immune system in living animals is not a consequence of the kind of replicative senescence typically caused by short telomeres in vitro.

  1. Impact of physical and mental health on life satisfaction in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; de Craen, Antonius J. M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely assumed that poor health lowers life satisfaction when ageing. Yet, research suggests this relationship is not straightforward. This study investigated how older people evaluate their life when facing disease and disabilities. METHODS: The Leiden 85-plus Study......, a prospectively followed cohort of a cohort of a middle-sized city in the Netherlands, all aged 85 years, that was age-representative of the general population, was used. Those with severe cognitive dysfunction were excluded (n = 501). Comorbidities, physical performance, cognitive function, functional status....... CONCLUSION: Poor physical health was hardly related to lower life satisfaction, whereas poor mental health was strongly related to lower life satisfaction. This indicates that mental health has a greater impact on life satisfaction at old age than physical health, and that physical health is less relevant...

  2. Age dating of old field stars: Challenges from the uncertain efficiency of atomic diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaris, M.

    2016-09-01

    Age-dating the Milky Way stellar populations plays a major role in studies of galaxy formation and evolution. Ages of old stars that represent the fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation are particular important. Current spectroscopic surveys provide effective temperature, surface gravity and photospheric composition of large samples of Milky Way stars, and these data can be used to determine stellar ages by employing stellar evolution models. Here it is shown how current uncertainties on the efficiency of atomic diffusion in the interiors of low-mass metal poor stars can affect the derived ages at the level of several 10 %. Asteroseismic constraints on the stellar masses can reduce these errors and in the limit of high accuracy can indirectly constrain the efficiency of diffusion in the interiors of these stars.

  3. Work strain in midlife and old age disability: A longitudinal study with 23 years of follow up.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghamari, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Increasing parts of the world are facing ageing societies with growing figures of morbidity and disability. Focus of attention for European countries is directed towards prevention of old age impairment. As considerable time is spent at work, preventative psychosocial work environment measures could be entry points for a healthier ageing. The aims of this study are to i) explore the impact of mid-life work strain on old age disability ii) to examine the independent effects of the work strain ...

  4. Influencing factors analysis of spontaneous knee joint osteoarthritis among middle aged and old aged pople in Xi'an

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Kun-zheng; DANG Xiao-qian; BAI Chuan-yi; WANG Chun-sheng; SHI ZHi-bin; MA Shu-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To explore the prevalence rate of knee joint osteoarthritis and its pathogenetic features among the middle-aged and old aged people in the urban and rural area of Xi'an. Methods: From May to October 2005, 1 538 Han nationality above 40 years in Xi'an were investigated according to stratified and cluster random sampling. The same questionnaire was delivered to subjects who had been given normotopia and lateral position radiographic examination in both knees. Excluded from etiological arthritis, some subjects with clinical symptoms and a radiographic grade (beyond Kellgren & Lawrence grade Ⅱ ) were finally diagnosed as spontaneous knee joint osteoarthritis. All analyses were performed with SPSS 13.0 and t test, U test. Single factor analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze dates. Results: The total prevalence of spontaneous knee joint osteoarthritis was 12. 1% with 2.5% and 2.1% for right and left knees, respectively. The prevalence of knee joint osteoarthritis in women was 2.5 times of that in men (17.2% vs 6.8%, P=0.000). the osteophyte prevalence in women was 2.3 times of that in men (26.5% vs 11.4%, P=0.000). The prevalence of knee joint osteoarthritis and osteophyte increased with the growth of age. So did the symptomatic knee, except for the age group of 56-60 years and 66-70 years. The prevalence of symptomatic knee joint for urban area was significantly higher than that for rural area (56. 3% vs 45.3%, P=0.003). In women, the prevalence of knee joint osteoarthritis increased significantly with the increasing of body mass index, which had not been observed in men. Female and obesity are the risk factors for osteoarthritis, but bean and its products and meat could prevent the osteoarthritis. Conclusion: Old age, female and obesity serve as risk factors for knee joint osteoarthritis.

  5. 20 CFR 404.313 - What are delayed retirement credits and how do they increase my old-age benefit amount?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... do they increase my old-age benefit amount? 404.313 Section 404.313 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Old-Age, Disability, Dependents' and Survivors' Insurance Benefits; Period of Disability Old-Age and Disability Benefits §...

  6. Ill or just old? Towards a conceptual framework of the relation between ageing and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westendorp Rudi GJ

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Is this person ill or just old? This question reflects the pondering mind of a doctor while interpreting the complaints of an elderly person who seeks his help. Many doctors think that ageing is a non-disease. Accordingly, various attempts have been undertaken to separate pathological ageing from normal ageing. However, the existence of a normal ageing process distinct from the pathological processes causing disease later in life can be questioned. Discussion Ageing is the accumulation of damage to somatic cells, leading to cellular dysfunction, and culminates in organ dysfunction and an increased vulnerability to death. Analogously, chronic diseases initiate early in life and their development is slow before they become clinically apparent and culminate in disability or death. The definition of disease is also subject to current opinions and scientific understanding and usually, it is an act of individual creativity when physical changes are recognised as symptoms of a new disease. New diseases, however, are only rarely really new. Most new diseases have gone undiagnosed because their signs and symptoms escaped recognition or were interpreted otherwise. Many physical changes in the elderly that are not yet recognised as a disease are thus ascribed to normal ageing. Therefore, the distinction between normal ageing and disease late in life seems in large part arbitrary. Summary We think that normal ageing cannot be separated from pathological processes causing disease later in life, and we propose that the distinction is avoided.

  7. Ill or just old? Towards a conceptual framework of the relation between ageing and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaks, Gerbrand J; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2003-12-19

    Is this person ill or just old? This question reflects the pondering mind of a doctor while interpreting the complaints of an elderly person who seeks his help. Many doctors think that ageing is a non-disease. Accordingly, various attempts have been undertaken to separate pathological ageing from normal ageing. However, the existence of a normal ageing process distinct from the pathological processes causing disease later in life can be questioned. Ageing is the accumulation of damage to somatic cells, leading to cellular dysfunction, and culminates in organ dysfunction and an increased vulnerability to death. Analogously, chronic diseases initiate early in life and their development is slow before they become clinically apparent and culminate in disability or death. The definition of disease is also subject to current opinions and scientific understanding and usually, it is an act of individual creativity when physical changes are recognised as symptoms of a new disease. New diseases, however, are only rarely really new. Most new diseases have gone undiagnosed because their signs and symptoms escaped recognition or were interpreted otherwise. Many physical changes in the elderly that are not yet recognised as a disease are thus ascribed to normal ageing. Therefore, the distinction between normal ageing and disease late in life seems in large part arbitrary. We think that normal ageing cannot be separated from pathological processes causing disease later in life, and we propose that the distinction is avoided.

  8. Bone age assessment for young children from newborn to 7-year-old using carpal bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed based on features extracted from phalangeal regions of interest (ROI) in a digital hand atlas, which can assess bone age of children from ages 7 to 18 accurately. Therefore, in order to assess the bone age of children in younger ages, the inclusion of carpal bones is necessary. In this paper, we developed and implemented a knowledge-based method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and morphological feature analysis. Fuzzy classification was then used to assess the bone age based on the selected features. Last year, we presented carpal bone segmentation algorithm. This year, research works on procedures after carpal bone segmentation including carpal bone identification, feature analysis and fuzzy system for bone age assessment is presented. This method has been successfully applied on all cases in which carpal bones have not overlapped. CAD results of total about 205 cases from the digital hand atlas were evaluated against subject chronological age as well as readings of two radiologists. It was found that the carpal ROI provides reliable information in determining the bone age for young children from newborn to 7-year-old.

  9. Vulnerability of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons to kainate-induced excitotoxic injury during old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashok K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S

    2009-08-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons expressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) considerably decline in number during old age. Studies in young adult animals further suggest that hippocampal GAD-67+ interneuron population is highly vulnerable to excitotoxic injury. However, the relative susceptibility of residual GAD-67+ interneurons in the aged hippocampus to excitotoxic injury is unknown. To elucidate this, using both adult and aged F344 rats, we performed stereological counting of GAD-67+ interneurons in different layers of the dentate gyrus and CA1 & CA3 sub-fields, at 3 months post-excitotoxic hippocampal injury inflicted through an intracerebroventricular administration of kainic acid (KA). Substantial reductions of GAD-67+ interneurons were found in all hippocampal layers and sub-fields after KA-induced injury in adult animals. Contrastingly, there was no significant change in GAD-67+ interneuron population in any of the hippocampal layers and sub-fields following similar injury in aged animals. Furthermore, the stability of GAD-67+ interneurons in aged rats after KA was not attributable to milder injury, as the overall extent of KA-induced hippocampal principal neuron loss was comparable between adult and aged rats. Interestingly, because of the age-related disparity in vulnerability of interneurons to injury, the surviving GAD-67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus remained comparable to that observed in the injured adult hippocampus despite enduring significant reductions in interneuron number with aging. Thus, unlike in the adult hippocampus, an excitotoxic injury to the aged hippocampus does not result in significantly decreased numbers of GAD-67+ interneurons. Persistence of GAD-67+ interneuron population in the injured aged hippocampus likely reflects an age-related change in the response of GAD-67+ interneurons to excitotoxic hippocampal injury. These results have implications towards understanding mechanisms underlying the

  10. The Relative and Absolute Ages of Old Globular Clusters in the LCDM Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele; Padoan, Paolo; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-08-01

    Old globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way have ages of about 13 Gyr, placing their formation time in the reionization epoch. We propose a novel scenario for the formation of these systems based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high redshift (z\\gt 6). First-generation stars are formed as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass {M}{{h}}˜ {10}8 {M}⊙ ) by undergoing a major merger within its cooling timescale (˜150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring a new supply of pristine gas to the halo center, creating conditions that can trigger new episodes of star formation. The dark-matter halo around the GC is then stripped during assembly of the host-galaxy halo. Minihalo merging is efficient only in a short redshift window, set by the {{Λ }}{CDM} parameters, allowing us to make a strong prediction on the age distribution for old GCs. From cosmological simulations, we derive an average merging redshift z> =9 and a narrow distribution {{Δ }}z=2, implying average GC age =13.0+/- 0.2 {Gyr} including ˜0.2 Gyr of star formation delay. Qualitatively, our scenario reproduces other general old GC properties (characteristic masses and number of objects, metallicity versus galactocentric radius anticorrelation, radial distribution), but unlike age, these generally depend on details of baryonic physics. In addition to improved age measurements, direct validation of the model at z˜ 10 may be within reach with ultradeep gravitationally lensed observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. Mineral composition of and the relationships between them of human basal ganglia in very old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Ke, Lining; Ongkana, Nutcharin; Sinthubua, Apichat; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2013-01-01

    Trace elements and the relationships among them were investigated by direct chemical analysis in three basal ganglia regions in very old age individuals and age- and gender-related differences were assessed. After ordinary dissections at Nara Medical University were finished, the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus belonging to the basal ganglia were removed from the identical cerebra of the subjects who consisted of 22 men and 23 women, ranging in age from 70 to 101 years (average age = 83.3 ± 7.5 years). After incineration with nitric acid and perchloric acid, the element contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. It was found that the Ca, P, and Mg contents increased significantly in the putamen with aging and the Mg content increased significantly in the globus pallidus with aging, but no elements increased significantly in the caudate nucleus with aging. Regarding the relationships among elements in the basal ganglia, extremely significant direct correlations were found among the Ca, P, and Mg contents in the putamen. These results suggested that slight calcification occurred in the putamen in very old age. With regard to seven elements of Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, Fe, and Na, it was examined whether there were significant correlations among the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus. It was found that there were extremely significant direct correlations among all of the three basal ganglia in the P content. Likewise, with regard to the Fe content, there were extremely or very significant direct correlations among all of the three basal ganglia. Regarding the gender difference in elements, it was found that the Ca content of the caudate nucleus was significantly higher in women than in men.

  12. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  13. Targeting senescent cells enhances adipogenesis and metabolic function in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Palmer, Allyson K; Ding, Husheng; Weivoda, Megan M; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; White, Thomas A; Sepe, Anna; Johnson, Kurt O; Stout, Michael B; Giorgadze, Nino; Jensen, Michael D; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L

    2015-12-19

    Senescent cells accumulate in fat with aging. We previously found genetic clearance of senescent cells from progeroid INK-ATTAC mice prevents lipodystrophy. Here we show that primary human senescent fat progenitors secrete activin A and directly inhibit adipogenesis in non-senescent progenitors. Blocking activin A partially restored lipid accumulation and expression of key adipogenic markers in differentiating progenitors exposed to senescent cells. Mouse fat tissue activin A increased with aging. Clearing senescent cells from 18-month-old naturally-aged INK-ATTAC mice reduced circulating activin A, blunted fat loss, and enhanced adipogenic transcription factor expression within 3 weeks. JAK inhibitor suppressed senescent cell activin A production and blunted senescent cell-mediated inhibition of adipogenesis. Eight weeks-treatment with ruxolitinib, an FDA-approved JAK1/2 inhibitor, reduced circulating activin A, preserved fat mass, reduced lipotoxicity, and increased insulin sensitivity in 22-month-old mice. Our study indicates targeting senescent cells or their products may alleviate age-related dysfunction of progenitors, adipose tissue, and metabolism.

  14. Magnified effects of the COMT gene on white-matter microstructure in very old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, Goran; Lövdén, Martin; Laukka, Erika J; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Keller, Lina; Graff, Caroline; Köhncke, Ylva; Li, Tie-Qiang; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2015-09-01

    Genetic factors may partly account for between-person differences in brain integrity in old age. Evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the dopaminergic system is implicated in the modulation of white-matter integrity. We investigated whether a genetic variation in the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism, which influences dopamine availability in prefrontal cortex, contributes to interindividual differences in white-matter microstructure, as measured with diffusion-tensor imaging. In a sample of older adults from a population-based study (60-87 years; n = 238), we found that the COMT polymorphism affects white-matter microstructure, indexed by fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity, of several white-matter tracts in the oldest age group (81-87 years), although there were no reliable associations between COMT and white-matter microstructure in the two younger age groups (60-66 and 72-78 years). These findings extend previous observations of magnified genetic effects on cognition in old age to white-matter integrity.

  15. Age and Abundance Discrimination in Old Stellar Populations Using Mid-Ultraviolet Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Dorman, B; Rood, R T; Dorman, Ben; Connell, Robert W. O'; Rood, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    The restframe mid-ultraviolet spectral region (2000-3200 A) is important in analyzing the stellar populations of the "red envelope" systems observed at high redshifts. Here, we explore the usefulness of the mid-UV for determining ages and abundances of old populations. A mid-UV to optical/IR wavelength baseline provides good separation of population components because the main sequence turnoff dominates the integrated light between 2500 and 4000 A. We find a six magnitude difference in the mid-UV continuum level over the metallicity range -1.5 < log Z/Z_o < +0.5 and a comparable difference (per unit log t) for ages in the range 4-16 Gyr. Logarithmic derivatives of mid-UV colors with respect to age or metal abundance are 3-10 times larger than for the UBV region. Most of the spectral information on old populations therefore resides below 4000 A. We investigate the capability of UBV and mid-UV broad-band colors to separately determine age and abundance, taking into account precision in the color measureme...

  16. [Obesity in old age and its importance for functionality and frailty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojzischke, Julia; Diekmann, Rebecca; Bauer, Jürgen M

    2016-10-01

    In later life a high body mass index (BMI) is associated with the lowest age-related mortality rate. The BMI range used by the World Health Organization (WHO) to classify overweight, a BMI of 25-30 kg/m(2), can be regarded as normal weight in old age; nevertheless, obesity is associated with an increased risk of disability and of a deterioration in physical functionality, particularly among older age groups. This relationship to obesity has also been established for frailty. For this reason, a reduction in weight may be appropriate under functional aspects if BMI values exceed 30 kg/m(2); however, such a decision cannot be made on the basis of an individual BMI alone. The functional status, body composition, comorbidities and, in particular the life perspectives of the patient should also be taken into consideration. If weight loss is intended, it must always be performed under strict medical supervision involving optimized protein intake, a carefully calculated moderate reduction in calories and adequate physical training. In the case of chronically ill elderly patients, weight reduction is not usually appropriate. Restrictive diets of any kind should principally be critically viewed in old age because even temporary inadequate energy intake may lead to accelerated deterioration of muscle and bone structure.

  17. "Old sertaneja song": narrating a backcountry life story about aging process in homosexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Alessandro Neman do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary times, the discussions about aging become very relevant as a consequence of the increased visibility of the old age issues presented in daily life. Many investigations and statistics bring out the growing number of people entering the so-called third age. This reality is mobilizing all social spheres in order to produce interventional strategies in agreement with the specificities required by this population, as far as what this public can revert back to the society. However, most of these studies seek to identify and locate this population in plans of life that can often suggest the reification of norms and stereotypes that delimit what become old mean or just discuss the practice of medical care. This paper invests in questioning of modes of subjectification and lifestyles, from the intersections between generation (aging, homosexuality (sexuality and gender and territoriality (provincial town. It presents an analysis of a life story from the perspective of cultural studies and sexualities and gender to capture the subjective lines which construct subjects and discourses, indicating social practices, modes of subjectification and social, historical, political and cultural conjunctures of determined contexts.

  18. Decrease of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia: Chance to increase anticipated life expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivojević Biljana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the level and structure of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia with an aim to determine the intensity of realized changes and to provide an answer to how much they are significant and to approach the positive trends noted in developed countries in the latest period. Although it was insufficiently represented in the demographic analysis, the analysis of mortality in old people is gaining importance in the world. Apart from the reasons which result from the increase in the number of old people and thus their greater participation in the total number of deceased, enviable results have been achieved in decreasing old age mortality, which are more and more in focus of interest. While earlier research reported on the dominant influence of the decrease of younger age mortality to the increase of the expectation of life at birth, recent analysis precisely confirm the importance of decreasing mortality in old people. In mortality conditions from 1997/98, an additional 13.4 years of life in average is expected for men in Yugoslavia, and 15.2 for women. During more than five decades, the anticipated life expectancy for people over the age of 65 increased for only 1.2 years for men and 1.9 years for women. Out of that, the greatest increase was realized in the period 1950/51 - 1960/61 in both sexes. A small decrease in the average life expectancy was marked with men in the period 1960/61 - 1970/71, and with women in the latest period. Otherwise, all up to the eighties, the annual rate of increase was considerably lower than the rate of increase for zero year. It was only in the period 1980/81-1990/91 that faster growth had an anticipated life expectancy for the 65 years old. However, during the nineties unfavorable changes continued with the older, especially, female population. When comparing the values of the average life expectancy for people over 65 in Yugoslavia with corresponding values in developed countries, the lagging in

  19. [AAL: Ambient Assisted Living Assistive technologies for healthy ageing and opportunities for medicine and caring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misoch, Sabina

    2015-09-01

    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) summarizes various connected digital networked assisting technologies with the aim to support elderly and chronically ill people and to improve their quality of life. This paper defines the term AAL and shows different fields of application for AAL technologies. It illustrates the role of AAL against the background of the societal and demographic changes, of the expected growth of older people in need of care, and of the ongoing trend of singularisation of elderly. We describe medical application areas with new opportunities for the use of AAL technologies. The article highlights further the importance of the technical acceptance of these technologies by the end users, which we deem to be the most critical factor for the diffusion and use of AAL technologies in the forthcoming years.

  20. Assistive Technologies for Aged Care: Supportive or Empowering?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchada Vichitvanichphong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to explore the potentials of assistive technologies to support seniors’ independent living. The work looks at two salient aspects of utilizing technologies for elderly, namely direct support and empowering technologies. The research undertakes a comprehensive analysis of attempts that have been made through investigation of the literature. For this purpose, a realist review of relevant papers published since 2000 has been conducted. The paper concludes that although much research in this area targets the direct support for older adults, the effective use of technologies to maintain seniors’ physical and cognitive abilities requires further investigations. This can provide avenues of opportunities that would empower seniors for their independent living.

  1. Old ages of two historical Romanian trees assessed by AMS radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrut, Adrian, E-mail: apatrut@gmail.com [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Chemistry, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Reden, Karl F. von [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Geology and Geophysics, NOSAMS Facility, 360 Woods Hole Rd., Mailstop 8, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Lowy, Daniel A. [FlexEl, LLC, 387 Technology Drive, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Patrut, Roxana T. [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Biology and Geology, Gh. Bilascu 44, 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Lucian Vaida, D. [Museum of Border Regiment Nasaud, Granicerilor 19, 425200 Nasaud (Romania); Margineanu, Dragos [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Chemistry, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-01-15

    Two large Romanian poplars are considered to be associated with significant historical events of the past. In order to verify these claims, wood samples collected from the broken trunks of the two poplars were radiocarbon dated by AMS. The oldest radiocarbon dates were found to be 275 {+-} 20 bp for the black poplar of Mocod and 316 {+-} 22 bp for the gray poplar of Rafaila. These values correspond to calibrated ages of 365 {+-} 10 and 465 {+-} 25 years, respectively. The dating results indicate old ages for the two trees, i.e., 455 years for the Mocod poplar and 560 years for the Rafaila poplar. Such age values validate historical information on the two large Romanian trees.

  2. [Being old is occurring later: age-related norms and self-concepts in the second half of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graefe, S; van Dyk, S; Lessenich, S

    2011-10-01

    Our contribution focuses on the question of how aging subjects experience and interpret biographic transitions into old age - specifically against the background of the current sociodiscursive revaluation of the so-called young old. The results of our qualitative interviews with elderly men and women in Germany indicate that the self-description "young elderly" does not play a role in identity-building in higher age, although norms of "active" or "productive aging" are widely accepted by the elderly. On the other hand, notions of "very old age" in need of care appear as something that can barely be integrated into the self-concepts and life plans of the interviewees. The transition from adulthood into the "third" (i.e., old age) stage is, thus, subjectively being postponed by elderly people into the (imagined) very last stage of their lives.

  3. The application of information theory for the estimation of old-age multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokh, David; Stambler, Ilia; Lubart, Emilia; Mizrahi, Eliyahu H

    2017-08-28

    Elderly patients are commonly characterized by the presence of several chronic aging-related diseases at once, or old-age "multimorbidity," with critical implications for diagnosis and therapy. However, at the present there is no agreed or formal method to diagnose or even define "multimorbidity." There is also no formal quantitative method to evaluate the effects of individual or combined diagnostic parameters and therapeutic interventions on multimorbidity. The present work outlines a methodology to provide such a measurement and definition, using information theoretical measure of normalized mutual information. A cohort of geriatric patients, suffering from several age-related diseases (multimorbidity), including ischemic heart disease, COPD, and dementia, were evaluated by a variety of diagnostic parameters, including static as well as dynamic biochemical, functional-behavioral, immunological, and hematological parameters. Multimorbidity was formally coded and measured as a composite of several chronic age-related diseases. The normalized mutual information allowed establishing the exact informative value of particular parameters and their combinations about the multimorbidity value. With the currently intensifying attempts to reduce aging-related multimorbidity by therapeutic interventions into its underlying aging processes, the proposed method may outline a valuable direction toward the formal indication and evidence-based evaluation of effectiveness of such interventions.

  4. Age and gender dependent development of theory of mind in 6 to 8-years old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ines Calero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to attribute different mental states to distinct individuals, or Theory of Mind (ToM, is widely believed to be developed mostly during preschool years. How different factors such as gender, number of siblings or coarse personality traits affect this development is not entirely agreed upon. Here, we introduce a computerized version of the scaled ToM suite of tasks introduced by Wellman and Liu (2004, which allows us to meaningfully test ToM development on children 6 to 8-years old. We find that kids this age are still not entirely proficient in all ToM tasks, and continue to show a progression of performance with age. By testing this age range, too, we are able to observe a significant advantage of girls over boys in ToM performance. Other factors such as number of siblings, birth order, and coarse personality traits show no significant relation with the ToM task results. Finally, we introduce a novel way to quantify the scaling property of the suite involving a sequence of set inclusions and also, a comparison between specially tailored sets of logistic models. These measures confirm the validity of the scale in the 6 to 8-years old range.

  5. Effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantzar, Alexandra; Atti, Anna Rita; Bäckman, Lars; Laukka, Erika J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in old-age depression vary as a function of multiple factors; one rarely examined factor is long-term psychiatric history. We investigated effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression and in remitted persons. In the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen study, older persons (≥60 years) without dementia were tested with a cognitive battery and matched to the Swedish National Inpatient Register (starting 1969). Participants were grouped according to current depression status and psychiatric history and compared to healthy controls (n = 96). Group differences were observed for processing speed, attention, executive functions, and verbal fluency. Persons with depression and psychiatric inpatient history (n = 20) and late-onset depression (n = 49) performed at the lowest levels, whereas cognitive performance in persons with self-reported recurrent unipolar depression (n = 52) was intermediate. Remitted persons with inpatient history of unipolar depression (n = 38) exhibited no cognitive deficits. Heart disease burden, physical inactivity, and cumulative inpatient days modulated the observed group differences in cognitive performance. Among currently depressed persons, those with inpatient history, and late onset performed at the lowest levels. Importantly, remitted persons showed no cognitive deficits, possibly reflecting the extended time since the last admission (m = 15.6 years). Thus, the present data suggest that cognitive deficits in unipolar depression may be more state- than trait-related. Information on profiles of cognitive performance, psychiatric history, and health behaviors may be useful in tailoring individualized treatment.

  6. Housing assets and the socio-economic determinants of health and disability in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan

    2008-09-01

    The influence of socio-economic determinants among the elderly is a complex subject. Although they rely on pension income, the wealth that they have accumulated over their lifetime (primarily housing assets), jointly with housing-related determinants, could have a more significant effect on health production. Hence, owning a house has more potential than income for reducing health inequalities. This study makes use of a representative cross-sectional database on the Spanish population aged 55 or over. Using a continuous variable to measure health and a measure of disabilities in old age, the study explores some socio-economic determinants of health and disability and provides a breakdown of inequalities in socio-economic status and in aggregate individual health. The study's findings indicate that housing equity overrides the effect of income as a determinant of health and (absence of) disability in old age. Furthermore, housing assets account for more than 90% of socio-economic inequalities and 54% of inequalities in disability.

  7. Denture acceptance among newly rehabilitated elderly population in old age homes in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika S Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elders in old age homes are mainly those who have been abandoned by their family and have one or more physical or mental disabilities. It is a major challenge for the dental professional to plan oral health strategy for this group of patients. Aim of the Study: Aim of the present study is to observe and determine the acceptance of new dental prosthesis among the elderly residing as inmates of 3 old age homes in Mangalore City. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a survey proforma. Information regarding their experience with the new denture, 1-month, 3 months and 6 months after denture insertion was gathered. Statistical analysis of the data was done using the Chi-square test with the P < 0.05 considered significant. Results: One hundred and eighty-three residents out of a total of 400 residents in 3 old age homes were denture wearers. Among them, 101 (55.2% were females, and 82 (44.8% were males. Dental prosthesis whether worn regularly, discomfort, retention, cleansing of denture during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be significant satisfaction with the prosthesis, denture adhesives used, food accumulation during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be nonsignificant. Conclusion: The emotional makeup of the patient must be taken into consideration during the entire procedure. We must understand that the success of the prosthesis depends mainly on the patient′s confidence in the dentist rather than the quality of the prosthesis.

  8. The problem of old age in the context of family caring responsibilities

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Recent years show that demographic changes are leading to lengthening of life expectancy, to the extension of old age and consequently to a growing number of elderly people. Research indicates that by the mid-twenty-first century the number of elderly people will increase to 370 million. The constantly growing number of older people means that care of this group of patients acquires a new meaning, especially because most of them will wish to remain under the care of the family. This fact enta...

  9. IS OLD AGE ABSENT? AN APPROXIMATION TO FEMINISMS AND THE GENERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gisele Batista

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Feminist movements are permanently invited to think the category women in a more encompassing manner, enlarging it so as to account for the diversity of Brazilian women. In this article focusing on the issue of generation, we will look at the action of the movements in demanding public policies that benefit women in old age. We will dwell on the manners in which militant actions, during the first decade of the years 2000, were materialized in the elaboration of the I and II National Plans of Public Policies for Women regarding this matter.

  10. Lessons from history: Surviving old age during The Great Depression in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Sarah H; Dunkle, Ruth E

    2013-12-01

    This paper focuses on 30 couples who received a pension and other services from two private trusts in Detroit, Michigan beginning in 1929 or 1930. Results of the qualitative analysis of case files, which contain notes recorded chronologically for 17 of the couples and then surviving spouses, provide a portrait of older couples' lives prior to a partner's death, circumstances surrounding the death, and changes in the social support systems of widows and widowers until their deaths. Close examination of the experiences of these couples is a reminder of how old age and widowhood were experienced prior to the enactment of public pensions and health insurance in the United States.

  11. Association study of FOXO3A SNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena

    2015-01-01

    -old Danes (age 92-93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease......, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3A variation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture...

  12. The Experience of Parenting a Child With Disability in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band-Winterstein, Tova; Avieli, Hila

    2017-07-01

    There are growing numbers of older parents providing ongoing care for adults with disabilities. A parent's aging calls for a redefinition of parental care practices and roles in light of his or her own changing needs. The current study aims to highlight the ways in which aging parents perceive and construct their parental role to adult children with disabilities at this point in their lives. An interpretive phenomenological analysis perspective was used. Data collection was performed through in-depth, semistructured interviews with 20 aging parents of children with developmental disabilities, followed by a content analysis. Four patterns of parental identity emerged: "Being happy is his responsibility; I did my part," embracing aging needs; "I can do part-time worrying," a gradual letting go of parental roles; "I'm worn out, but I keep going. What choice do I have?" bearing the brunt; "I'm an old woman changing diapers," full-time parents. The findings enable a deeper understanding of the various ways in which parents cope with aging alongside caring for an adult child with disability. Hence, this study can serve as a framework for developing tailored and differential intervention methods for these families. As the world's people experience longer life expectancy, of both individuals with disabilities and their parents, nurses' education and practice should be challenged by the double sensitivities of elder's caregiving and address the unique needs of this unique population. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Nicotine enhances stimulus detection performance of middle- and old-aged rats: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilly, D M; Simon, B B; Levin, E D

    2000-04-01

    The effects of nicotine on sustained attention were tested in F344xBN male rats when they were chronologically middle and old aged. The rats (n = 11) were trained in a two-choice, stimulus detection task in which a press of one of two levers was reinforced with food, with the correct lever indicated by the position of a briefly illuminated light. They were tested when they were 24-25 and 34-35 months of age (i.e., at 60-68% and 85-95%, respectively of their expected median life span) after saline or 0.1-0.5 mg/kg doses of nicotine (SC). A significant dose-related improvement in percent correct choices and decrease in choice response times was found at both ages, and there was no significant main effect of age or an age by dose interaction. These results support the position that nicotine can enhance attentional processes in rats throughout their life span. Nicotine and other nicotinic agonists may have efficacy in the treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  14. The influence of socioeconomic, biogeophysical and built environment on old-age survival in a Southern European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana Isabel; Krainski, Elias Teixeira; Autran, Roseanne; Teixeira, Hugo; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; de Pina, Maria de Fátima

    2016-09-01

    Old-age survival is a good indicator of population health and regional development. We evaluated the spatial distribution of old-age survival across Porto neighbourhoods and its relation with physical (biogeophysical and built) and socioeconomic factors (deprivation). Smoothed survival rates and odds ratio (OR) were estimated using Bayesian spatial models. There were important geographical differentials in the chances of survival after 75 years of age. Socioeconomic deprivation strongly impacted old-age survival (Men: least deprived areas OR=1.31(1.05-1.63); Women OR=1.53(1.24-1.89)), explaining over 40% of the spatial variance. Walkability and biogeophysical environment were unrelated to old-age survival and also unrelated to socioeconomic deprivation, being fairly evenly distributed through the city.

  15. Multiplicity and early gestational age contribute to an increased risk of cerebral palsy from assisted conception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Grove, Jakob; Schendel, Diana;

    2010-01-01

    : The risk of CP is increased after both IVF and OI. The increased risk of CP in children born after assisted conception, and in particular IVF, is strongly associated with the high proportion of multiplicity and preterm delivery in these pregnancies. A more widespread use of single embryo transfer warrants....... When we included the intermediate factors multiplicity and gestational age in multivariate models, the risk of CP in assisted conception disappeared. In general, children with CP born after assisted conception had similar CP subtypes and co-morbidities as children with CP born after NC. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: This paper assesses the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in children born after assisted conception compared with children born after natural conception (NC). METHODS: This population based follow-up study included all 588,967 children born in Denmark from 1995 to 2003. Assisted conception...

  16. [Quality of life by limited vision in old age: the example of age-related macula degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, H-W; Heyl, V; Langer, N

    2008-08-01

    Age-related macula degeneration (AMD) is accompanied by considerable consequences regarding the psychosocial quality of life. A considerable body of research literature now indicates, for instance, an increased rate of depression and substantial loss of everyday capabilities in AMD patients. However, inter-individual differences are large and part of the explanation lies in differences in the ability to cope with and detach oneself from aims in life. The negative impact of AMD on the qualify of life is associated with a need for psychosocial support, but this need is barely met at present. A series of studies nevertheless supports the view that successful intervention is possible even with very old patients. In this respect the problems at present have less to do with recognition than with application and implementation.

  17. Old-age income security and private transfers in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkook; Lee, Youngae

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of government income support programs and familial transfers to old-age income security in Korea. This issue is critical, as policy reforms are in progress, and the potential crowding-out effect of government programs on familial transfer is at the center of heated debate. Using the 2006 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging, we found that one-third of the elderly were poor and the contribution of public transfer to income security for the elderly was limited, whereas family, especially children, played a large role both by co-residing and through private transfers. Crowding out is less of a problem for the poor but a sensitive issue for middle-income families.

  18. The influence of general anesthesia and surgery on cognition in old age: A twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedal, Unni; Hansen, Tom G.; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    Introduction: There is a pronounced variation in level of cognitive function and rate of cognitive decline in late life. Results from smaller human and animal studies suggest that exposure to anesthesia may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Using a twin design, the objective of the present...... study was to examine whether exposure to anesthesia and surgery is associated with level of cognitive function in middle and old age. Materials and Methods: The study is based on two population-based surveys comprising 8,503 Danish twins aged 45–102 years at study intake during 1995–2001. Through...... linkage to the Danish National Patient Register, we obtained information on surgeries performed in hospitals in Denmark from 1977 and until study intake. Four exposure groups were defined based on type of surgery (major, minor, knee and hip replacement, other). A cognitive test battery consisting of five...

  19. Protein Intake and Muscle Health in Old Age: From Biological Plausibility to Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Landi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The provision of sufficient amounts of dietary proteins is central to muscle health as it ensures the supply of essential amino acids and stimulates protein synthesis. Older persons, in particular, are at high risk of insufficient protein ingestion. Furthermore, the current recommended dietary allowance for protein (0.8 g/kg/day might be inadequate for maintaining muscle health in older adults, probably as a consequence of “anabolic resistance” in aged muscle. Older individuals therefore need to ingest a greater quantity of protein to maintain muscle function. The quality of protein ingested is also essential to promoting muscle health. Given the role of leucine as the master dietary regulator of muscle protein turnover, the ingestion of protein sources enriched with this essential amino acid, or its metabolite β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate, is thought to offer the greatest benefit in terms of preservation of muscle mass and function in old age.

  20. [Violence in old age: the issue addressed in indexed national journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Anúbes Pereira; Guilam, Maria Cristina Rodrigues; Sousa, Eduardo Sérgio Soares; Marcondes, Willer Baumgarten

    2013-05-01

    One of the consequences of increased life expectancy is the increase in the elderly population in many countries, including Brazil. Considering the vulnerability of this age group and the increasing prevalence of violence against the elderly, there is a pressing need for research and control interventions to minimize the phenomenon. This exploratory and descriptive article conducts an analysis into this topic in indexed Brazilian studies in SciELO, with special emphasis on the last five years. The themes were categorized into: Social construction and conceptualizations, 37.5%; Elderly Care and Protection Policies, 43.75%; and Typology of violence against the elderly, 18.75%. The results show that the Policy of protection of the elderly permeates the majority of discussions about violence in old age and the focus of the researchers' attention is on domestic violence, which needs to be broadened in field research.

  1. Longitudinal association between neighborhood cohesion and depressive mood in old age: A Japanese prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Hiroshi; Nishi, Mariko; Nofuji, Yu; Matsuo, Eri; Taniguchi, Yu; Amano, Hidenori; Yokoyama, Yuri; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Shinkai, Shoji

    2015-07-01

    Despite increasing evidence of the relationship between neighborhood cohesion and depressive mood, little is known about this longitudinal association in old age. This study examined the association between perceived neighborhood cohesion and depressive mood and the stress-buffering effect of perceived neighborhood cohesion on depressive mood among older Japanese people using the 2010 (baseline) and 2012 (follow-up) Hatoyama Cohort Study datasets. We analyzed 655 participants aged 65-84 at baseline. Although perceived neighborhood cohesion at baseline was not associated with depressive mood at follow-up, high neighborhood cohesion partially offset the deleterious effect of anticipated daily stressors on depressive mood. This effect was stronger for long-term residents of the neighborhood. Interventions to strengthen neighborhood cohesion may help reduce the deleterious effect of stressors on older residents' depressive mood.

  2. A velhice, entre o normal e o patológico Old age, normality versus pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Groisman

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Com a ascensão do envelhecimento da população brasileira ao posto de 'problema social', assistimos a um crescimento cada vez maior do número de especialistas dedicados a este 'grupo etário': os geriatras e gerontólogos, que ocupam papel de destaque na formulação das novas formas de gestão da velhice. No entanto, a gerontologia parece ter problemas internos na sua formulação como campo de saber, que parecem comprometer sua consolidação como profissão e seu reconhecimento como disciplina científica. No presente artigo, procuramos chamar atenção para as dificuldades que a gerontologia encontra para delimitar seu campo e definir seu objeto. Sustentamos que tais dificuldades parecem derivar de uma questão central, que é a impossibilidade de serem delimitadas as fronteiras entre o normal e o patológico, na velhice. Por fim, analisamos a questão sob um ponto de vista histórico, à luz do processo de constituição do saber médico sobre o envelhecimento.Since life expectancy of Brazilian population increased and aging was considered a "social problem", there has been a boom of specialists in old age. Gerontologists and geriatricians are now playing a relevant role in setting new trends to the management of issues related to old age. However, gerontology as a field of knowledge seems to have internal questions that apparently hinder its professional consolidation and its scientific recognition. In this article, the author focus the difficulties gerontology has in order to delimitate its field of action and to define the object of its studies. The author argues that such difficulties derive from a central point: the impossibility to delimitate the frontiers between what is normal and what is pathological in old age. He also analyzes the constitution of medical knowledge on aging in a historical perspective.

  3. Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society Nortin M Hadler Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society University of North Carolina Press £24.95 272pp 9780807835067 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    IT IS refreshing to read a book that does not follow the conventional perspective on growing old. From the outset, rheumatologist Nortin Hadler challenges our thinking about ageing and gives a thought-provoking rationale to support his stance.

  4. Vaccination coverage of children aged 4-12 years old in the prefecture of Evritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Getsios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades a huge progress has taken place in the field of the primary prevention of infections and many new vaccines have been introduced in the compulsory vaccination program. There is evidence, however, that immunization coverage against some infectious diseases is not adequate. Aim: It was to investigate the level of immunization coverage of Greek and Immigrants' children aged 4-12 years old in the prefecture of Evritania regarding vaccines against pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus (DTaP, poliomyelitis (IPV and measles–mumps–rubella (MMR. Material and methods: The sample of the study consisted of the pupils of all nursing and elementary schools of the prefecture of Evritania , aged 4-12 years old. Children's personal Health Cards were used to evaluate the adequacy of vaccine doses. X2 was usedfor comparisons. Statistics was processed with SPPS 17.0. Results: The boys of the sample were 469 (51.9% and the girls 434 (48.1%. Full vaccination coverage with DTaP, MMR and IPV was 87.3%, 79.9%, and 97.6% respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between Greek and Immigrants' children. Conclusion: Vaccination coverage against measles, mumps and rubella was inadequate. Immigrants' and Greek children are equally covered. Vaccination coverage with MMR is troublesome.

  5. Social Security for China’s Migrant Workers – Providing for Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “migrant workers” derives from the household registration system of China’s planned economy period. The continued existence of that system conflicts with the development of an integrated labour market. The current social security system, based on household registration and a large number of local pools, discriminates against migrant workers because of their mobility and the lack of mechanisms to transfer benefits between pools. As a result, migrants have made major contributions to China’s economic development but do not get the same benefits as urban residents. Faced with this challenge, China’s government has begun to introduce policy reforms to improve social security for migrants. This article explores this development through a focus on old-age insurance. It analyses the special needs of migrants, the obstacles facing policy development and the proposed solutions. It argues that social justice and social equity require the development of a system that treats all citizens equally, and that the logic of an integrated labour market will ultimately require a unified national system of old-age insurance.

  6. Effects of psychiatric history and cognitive performance in old-age depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra ePantzar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits in old-age depression vary as a function of multiple factors; one rarely examined factor is long-term psychiatric history. We investigated effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression and in remitted persons. In the population-based SNAC-K study, older persons (≥60 years without dementia were tested with a cognitive battery and matched to the Swedish National Inpatient Register (starting 1969. Participants were grouped according to current depression status and psychiatric history and compared to healthy controls (n=96. Group differences were observed for processing speed, attention, executive functions and verbal fluency. Persons with depression and psychiatric inpatient history (n=20 and late-onset depression (n=49 performed at the lowest levels, whereas cognitive performance in persons with self-reported recurrent unipolar depression (n=52 was intermediate. Remitted persons with inpatient history of unipolar depression (n=38 exhibited no cognitive deficits. Heart disease burden, physical inactivity, and cumulative inpatient days modulated the observed group differences in cognitive performance. Among currently depressed persons, those with inpatient history and late onset performed at the lowest levels. Importantly, remitted persons showed no cognitive deficits, possibly reflecting the extended time since the last admission (m=15.6 years. Thus, the present data suggest that cognitive deficits in unipolar depression may be more state- than trait-related. Information on profiles of cognitive performance, psychiatric history, and health behaviors may be useful in tailoring individualized treatment.

  7. The Carina Project. X. On the kinematics of old and intermediate-age stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrizio, M; Nonino, M; Lokas, E L; Ferraro, I; Iannicola, G; Buonanno, R; Cassisi, S; Coppola, G; Dall'Ora, M; Gilmozzi, R; Marconi, M; Monelli, M; Romaniello, M; Stetson, P B; Thévenin, F; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    We present new radial velocity (RV) measurements of old (horizontal branch) and intermediate-age (red clump) stellar tracers in the Carina dwarf spheroidal. They are based on more than 2,200 low-resolution spectra collected with VIMOS at VLT. The targets are faint (20age stellar component shows a well defined rotational pattern around the minor axis. The western and the eastern side of the galaxy differ by +5 and -4 km s-1 when compared with the main RV peak. The old stellar component is characterized by a larger RV dispersion and does not show evidence of RV pattern. We compared the observed RV distribution with N-body simulations for a former disky dwarf galaxy orbit...

  8. Gender differences in old age mortality: roles of health behavior and baseline health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jersey; Bennett, Joan M; Sugisawa, Hidehiro; Kobayashi, Erika; Fukaya, Taro

    2003-06-01

    This research aims to further current understanding of gender differences in old age mortality. In particular, it assesses the relative importance of health behavior and baseline health conditions in predicting the risk of dying, and how their effects differ between elderly men and women. Data for this research came from a prospective study of a national sample of 2,200 older adults in Japan from 1987 to 1999. Hazard rate models were employed to ascertain the interaction effects involving gender and health behavior (i.e., smoking and drinking) and baseline health status. Gender differences in old age mortality in the Japanese are quite pronounced throughout all of our models. In addition, interaction effects of gender and smoking, functional limitation, and cognitive impairment, indicate that females in Japan suffer more from these risk factors than do their male counterparts. Failure to adjust for population heterogeneity may lead to a significant underestimation of female advantage in survival. The inclusion of health behavior and health status measures only offsets a limited proportion of this gender differential. The increased mortality risk due to smoking, functional limitation, and cognitive impairment among elderly Japanese women suggests that narrowing of gender gap in mortality may be due to not only changes in the levels of these risk factors but also their differential effects on men and women.

  9. Gender differentials and old age survival in the Nairobi slums, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rachel; Chepngeno-Langat, Gloria; Evandrou, Maria; Falkingham, Jane

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines gender differentials in survival amongst older people (50+ years) in the Nairobi slums and to the best of our knowledge is the first study of its kind in an urban African setting. The results provide evidence contrary to the expected paradox of poorer self-rated health yet better survival amongst older women. Older women in the Nairobi slums have poorer self-rated health and poorer circumstances across other factors, including disability and socio-economic status. Further, older women in the slums do not have better survival. The conventional female advantage in mortality only becomes apparent after accounting for the cumulative influence of individual characteristics, social networks, health and socio-economic status, suggesting the female advantage in unadjusted old-age mortality does not apply to contexts where women experience significant disadvantage across multiple life domains. This highlights the urgent need to redress the support, status and opportunities available for women across the life course in contexts such as the Nairobi slums. In addition, a greater number of factors differentiate mortality risk amongst men than amongst women, suggesting inequality amongst slum dwelling older men and highlighting the need for gender sensitive interventions which account for the particular needs of both genders in old age.

  10. HYPSOMETRIC EQUATIONS FOR UNMANAGED Eucalyptus spp. IN OLD AGE WITH TECHNIQUES FOR THE INCLUSION OF COVARIATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Marcos Vieira Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish hypsometric equations for unmanaged Eucalyptus spp. in old age. For this purpose we measured the diameter and height of 513 stems distributed in 11 species and the hypsometric relationship was established by six regression models, being selected the one with the best Akaike Information Criterion (AIC, standard error of estimative (Syx, Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test and Residual Graphical Analysis. Subsequently, the best model has undergone the inclusion of the covariates stem quality (Qf and Species (Sp by means of the decomposition of its parameters. Under these conditions, the model of Chapman and Richards showed the best performance in both modeling approaches. When compared both models, we observed a reduction of 71 AIC units and 7.4% in Syx and a significant improvement in all aspects of the residual distribution in the model with covariates. The results show that it is possible to provide hypsometric equations suitable for unmanaged Eucalyptus in old age, with and without addition of covariates, and the last technique has provided significant improvement in the quality of fit of the models.

  11. Denture acceptance among newly rehabilitated elderly population in old age homes in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Mallika S.; Panchaml, Ganesh Shenoy; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Elders in old age homes are mainly those who have been abandoned by their family and have one or more physical or mental disabilities. It is a major challenge for the dental professional to plan oral health strategy for this group of patients. Aim of the Study: Aim of the present study is to observe and determine the acceptance of new dental prosthesis among the elderly residing as inmates of 3 old age homes in Mangalore City. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a survey proforma. Information regarding their experience with the new denture, 1-month, 3 months and 6 months after denture insertion was gathered. Statistical analysis of the data was done using the Chi-square test with the P Dental prosthesis whether worn regularly, discomfort, retention, cleansing of denture during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be significant satisfaction with the prosthesis, denture adhesives used, food accumulation during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be nonsignificant. Conclusion: The emotional makeup of the patient must be taken into consideration during the entire procedure. We must understand that the success of the prosthesis depends mainly on the patient's confidence in the dentist rather than the quality of the prosthesis. PMID:25821384

  12. Women's anxiety in old age and long-term care provision for the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota M

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify the differences in women's anxiety in old age, the expected long-term care provision, and the expected final location for terminal care for the women themselves and for their parents. In addition, we examined factors that related to their anxiety and needs. The subjects were 1,000 women of the Seikatsu Club customer cooperative association in Chiba; 539 responded to our survey. The subjects were more anxious for their parents than for themselves. They more strongly expected long-term care for their parents to be provided by their family than they expected the same for themselves. Although no differences were observed in the expected location for terminal care, most subjects expected their home to be the terminal location. Analysis by the multiple logistic regression model indicated that the following factors were significantly related to the anxiety in old age: age odds ratio [OR = 1.81], employment [OR = 2.25] for women, and planning to live with parents [OR = 2.42], housing conditions [OR = 0.56] for parents. The following factors were significantly related to the expected long-term care provision: age [OR = 2.22] for women, and age [OR = 2.15], living with parents [OR = 3.58], and employment [OR = 2.33] for parents. Age [OR = 2.14] for women, and planning to live with parents [OR = 2.09] for parents were significantly related to the expected final location of terminal care. This survey showed that women expected long-term care for their parents to be provided by their family, while many expected public long-term care services for themselves. This is the biggest difference in women's outlook on long-term care for their parents and for themselves. Multivariate analysis suggested that women aged 40 years or over, who will need long-term care in the future, tended to expect public home care services for themselves. It is virtually certain that the demand for public home care services will increase in the

  13. Executive functions of six-year-old boys with normal birth weight and gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree Yee-Ling Phua

    Full Text Available Impaired fetal development, reflected by low birth weight or prematurity, predicts an increased risk for psychopathology, especially attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Such effects cut across the normal range of birth weight and gestation. Despite the strength of existing epidemiological data, cognitive pathways that link fetal development to mental health are largely unknown. In this study we examined the relation of birth weight (>2500 g and gestational age (37-41 weeks within the normal range with specific executive functions in 195 Singaporean six-year-old boys of Chinese ethnicity. Birth weight adjusted for gestational age was used as indicator of fetal growth while gestational age was indicative of fetal maturity. Linear regression revealed that increased fetal growth within the normal range is associated with an improved ability to learn rules during the intra/extra-dimensional shift task and to retain visual information for short period of time during the delayed matching to sample task. Moreover, faster and consistent reaction times during the stop-signal task were observed among boys born at term, but with higher gestational age. Hence, even among boys born at term with normal birth weight, variations in fetal growth and maturity showed distinct effects on specific executive functions.

  14. Can physical exercise in old age improve memory and hippocampal function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzel, Emrah; van Praag, Henriette; Sendtner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Physical exercise can convey a protective effect against cognitive decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. While the long-term health-promoting and protective effects of exercise are encouraging, it's potential to induce neuronal and vascular plasticity in the ageing brain is still poorly understood. It remains unclear whether exercise slows the trajectory of normal ageing by modifying vascular and metabolic risk factors and/or consistently boosts brain function by inducing structural and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe circuitry-brain areas that are important for learning and memory. Hence, it remains to be established to what extent exercise interventions in old age can improve brain plasticity above and beyond preservation of function. Existing data suggest that exercise trials aiming for improvement and preservation may require different outcome measures and that the balance between the two may depend on exercise intensity and duration, the presence of preclinical Alzheimer's disease pathology, vascular and metabolic risk factors and genetic variability.

  15. Comparison of reasons of admission of young, age 18-30 years old in Intensive Care Unit to young adult, age 31-40 years old due to road accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaios Douloudis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in frequency of admission of young individuals in Intensive Care Units (ICU due to road accidents. The aim of the present study was to compare the reasons of admission of young individuals 18-30 years old to young adults 31-40 years old in ICU due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of individuals 18-40 years old that were hospitalized in ICU due to road accident. Data were collected by the completion of a specially designed clinical protocol for the needs of the research. For the analysis of data the statistical package SPSS 13 was used and the x2 method. Results: 81,2% of the sample-studied were men and 18,8% women. Regarding nationality, 80,1 % were Greek and 19,9% foreigner. 34,6% of the participants were unemployed, 21,2% were working in private sector, 20,1% were free-lancers and 16,2% students. 46,3% of individuals were admitted in ICU after transfer of another hospital. In 69,7% of the participants age 18-30 years old and 74,5% of 31-40 years old road took place accident at night and 77,3% 18-30 years old and 77,0% of 31-40 years old road accident took place on the way to entertainment. The statistical analysis of data showed that : road accidents were the main reason for admission in ICU of young individuals of age 18-30 years old with statistically significant difference compared to those 31-40 years old, p<0,001. Brain injuries as well as admission of motorcycle drivers were more frequent in individuals of age 18-30 years old with statistically significant difference compared to those 31-40 years old, p=0,018 and p=0,041, respectively. On the contrary, admission of car-drivers and those who had consumed alcohol were more frequent in individuals of age 31-40 years old with statistically significant difference compared to group 18-30 years old, p=0,041 and , p<0,001, respectively. Conclusions: More often admitted in ICU motorcycle drivers of

  16. The composition of old age homes in South Africa in relation to the residents and nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Perold

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This research project is the first phase of a larger study aimed at describing and exploring the cost-effective utilisation of nursing personnel in old age homes in South Africa. The aim in the first phase was to describe the composition of the residents and nursing personnel of old age homes in South Africa. An exploratory and descriptive survey was conducted and the data was collected by means of a questionnaire. The questionnaire also included data on the financial implications of utilising professional nursing personnel to manage the care of the frail residents/older persons in old age homes in South Africa. The questionnaires were mailed to 612 old age homes published in the Hospital and Nursing Yearbook of 1997 (100% sample. A total of 145 (23.69% questionnaires were returned and included in the descriptive data analysis. The residents are mainly female (77%, older than 85 years of age, belong to the white race group (83,74% and are highly dependent on nursing care and supervision (69,7%. Old age homes are mainly managed/ controlled by welfare organisations and lay health care workers are utilised to a large extent (42,22% of the nursing workforce to render nursing care to the frail residents. The cost-effective utilisation of nursing personnel (registered and enrolled, as well as the utilisation of lay health workers in old age homes, needs to be critically examined.

  17. Development of an Age Band on the ManuVis for 3-Year-Old Children with Visual Impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, A.M.; Barsingerhorn, A.D.; Overvelde, A.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Boonstra, F.N.; Cox, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To compare fine motor performance of 3-year-old children with visual impairment with peers having normal vision, to provide reference scores for 3-year-old children with visual impairment on the ManuVis, and to assess inter-rater reliability. METHOD: 26 children with visual impairment (mean age

  18. Development of an Age Band on the ManuVis for 3-Year-Old Children with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, A M; Barsingerhorn, A D; Overvelde, A; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M W G; Boonstra, F N; Cox, R F A

    2017-08-01

    To compare fine motor performance of 3-year-old children with visual impairment with peers having normal vision, to provide reference scores for 3-year-old children with visual impairment on the ManuVis, and to assess inter-rater reliability. 26 children with visual impairment (mean age: 3 years 7 months (SD 3 months); 17 boys) and 28 children with normal vision (mean age: 3 years 7 months (SD 4 months); 14 boys) participated in the study. The ManuVis age band for 3-year-old children comprised two one-handed tasks, two two-handed tasks, and a pre-writing task. Children with visual impairment needed more time on all tasks (p visual impairment and normal vision and between half-year age groups. Reference scores are provided for 3-year-old children with visual impairment to identify delayed fine motor development.

  19. Association study of FOXO3A SNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2015-02-01

    FOXO3A variation has repeatedly been reported to associate with human longevity, yet only few studies have investigated whether FOXO3A variation also associates with aging-related traits. Here, we investigate the association of 15 FOXO3A tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1088 oldest-old Danes (age 92-93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3A variation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture risk for carriers of the minor alleles of 8 and 10 SNPs, respectively. These positive directions of effects are in agreement with the positive effects on longevity previously reported for these SNPs. However, when correcting for the test of 9 phenotypes by Bonferroni correction, bone fracture showed borderline significance (P = 0.054), while ADL did not (P = 0.396). Although the single-SNP associations did not formally replicate in another study population of oldest-old Danes (n = 1279, age 94-100), the estimates were of similar direction of effect as observed in the Discovery sample. A pooled analysis of both study populations displayed similar or decreased sized P-values for most associations, hereby supporting the initial findings. Nevertheless, confirmation in additional study populations is needed.

  20. Adequacy of a vegetarian diet at old age (Dutch Nutrition Surveillance System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brants, H A; Löwik, M R; Westenbrink, S; Hulshof, K F; Kistemaker, C

    1990-08-01

    To assess the adequacy of a vegetarian diet at old age, the dietary intake (assessed through dietary history with cross-check) of 44 apparently healthy lacto-(ovo-)vegetarians, aged 65-97 years, was evaluated. Adequacy was assessed by a comparison of nutrient intake with (Dutch) recommendations and by evaluating data on nutritional status. The results were also compared with data of elderly omnivores. In contrast to elderly omnivores, percentages of energy from protein (13%), fat (37%), and carbohydrates (50%) as well as P/S ratio (0.63) were close to or within the range of Dutch guidelines regarding a healthy diet (percentages of energy from protein, fat, and carbohydrates 10-15, 30-35, and 55%, respectively: P/S ratio 0.5-1.0). For most of the micronutrients studied intake was adequate, and nutrient density of the vegetarian diet was higher than of the omnivorous diet. However, the supply of zinc (average daily intake 8.5 and 7.6 mg for men and women, respectively), iron (because of lower bioavailability of nonheme iron), vitamin B12 (women only: intake 2.3 micrograms/day), and water (daily intake less than 1600 ml for 30% of the vegetarians) need special attention, considering the relatively high prevalence of a marginal status of these nutrients. In conclusion, a lacto-(ovo-)vegetarian diet can be adequate at old age, provided that it is carefully planned, especially with respect to the supply of iron, zinc, and vitamin B12.

  1. Association study of FOXO3ASNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    FOXO3Avariation has repeatedly been reported to associate with human longevity, yet only few studies have investigated whether FOXO3Avariation also associates with aging-related traits. Here, we investigate the association of 15 FOXO3Atagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1088 oldest-old Danes (age 92–93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3Avariation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture risk for carriers of the minor alleles of 8 and 10 SNPs, respectively. These positive directions of effects are in agreement with the positive effects on longevity previously reported for these SNPs. However, when correcting for the test of 9 phenotypes by Bonferroni correction, bone fracture showed borderline significance (P = 0.054), while ADL did not (P = 0.396). Although the single-SNP associations did not formally replicate in another study population of oldest-old Danes (n = 1279, age 94–100), the estimates were of similar direction of effect as observed in the Discovery sample. A pooled analysis of both study populations displayed similar or decreased sized P-values for most associations, hereby supporting the initial findings. Nevertheless, confirmation in additional study populations is needed. PMID:25470651

  2. [Longlived examples. Function and formal principles of historical exempla of old age in the early-modern dietetic literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Since antiquity, the exemplum can be proven in numerous types of texts, as it fulfills a notable didactic and rhetorical function: On the one hand it serves to a deductive illustration of common doctrines; on the other it is until the Enlightenment the scientific basis of cognition: in the view of medieval artistotelists, of who FRANCIS BACON was (in a special sense) one of the last champions, the exemplum takes on an inductive function: the sensual perception of the exampla generates the understanding of the universal, as the exemplum always refers to the exemplar, to the original form. Regarding the eminent deductive/inductive significance of the exempla, it is not surprising that they are an essential factor in dietetic literature. Whereas such exemples were very rare in the general literature on health care written by physicians and in specific papers of old-age assistance, they formed an integral part of texts composed for a large public by medical laymen such as (Ps.-) ROGER BACON, MARSILIO FICINO, ALVISE CORNARO or FRANCIS BACON. In these studies, the issue of a natural limit of human life was discussed intensively. In this context the "historical" sources were of high importance, even if, from a todays point of view, their use was completely non-historical. Often their crude instrumentalization and new interpretations can only be understood in the scholarly context of the time: E.g. in debates of specialists with outsiders or when serving as argument for physiological theories and therapeutical regimes. Not until late Renaissance, the historical exemple was replaced by the individual experience. It is striking that most of all historical exemples found in dietetic papers were positive. This humanistic and Christian ideal concept of old age, which completely contradicts the medical reality, had obviously a stronger fascination on the authors of early modern times than the inductive function of negative exempla (which are very important for a rational

  3. The mortality experience of early old-age and disability pensioners from unskilled - and semiskilled labour groups in Fredericia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J; Jeune, B

    1980-01-01

    Survival of early old-age and disability pensioners from unskilled and semiskilled labourers was compared with the employed workers from the same local trade union. All members receiving early old-age or disability pensions during the period October 1, 1969 to September 30, 1973 were assigned to ...... to January 1, 1979. It is emphasized that proper comparison is needed if excess mortality associated with early retirement is to be estimated....

  4. Comparison on three classification techniques for sex estimation from the bone length of Asian children below 19 years old: an analysis using different group of ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, M F; Yusuf, Suhaila M; Kadir, M R Abdul; Haron, H

    2015-02-01

    Sex estimation is used in forensic anthropology to assist the identification of individual remains. However, the estimation techniques tend to be unique and applicable only to a certain population. This paper analyzed sex estimation on living individual child below 19 years old using the length of 19 bones of left hand applied for three classification techniques, which were Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) multilayer perceptron. These techniques were carried out on X-ray images of the left hand taken from an Asian population data set. All the 19 bones of the left hand were measured using Free Image software, and all the techniques were performed using MATLAB. The group of age "16-19" years old and "7-9" years old were the groups that could be used for sex estimation with as their average of accuracy percentage was above 80%. ANN model was the best classification technique with the highest average of accuracy percentage in the two groups of age compared to other classification techniques. The results show that each classification technique has the best accuracy percentage on each different group of age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feature-selective attention in healthy old age: a selective decline in selective attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Cliodhna; Müller, Matthias M

    2014-02-12

    Deficient selection against irrelevant information has been proposed to underlie age-related cognitive decline. We recently reported evidence for maintained early sensory selection when older and younger adults used spatial selective attention to perform a challenging task. Here we explored age-related differences when spatial selection is not possible and feature-selective attention must be deployed. We additionally compared the integrity of feedforward processing by exploiting the well established phenomenon of suppression of visual cortical responses attributable to interstimulus competition. Electroencephalogram was measured while older and younger human adults responded to brief occurrences of coherent motion in an attended stimulus composed of randomly moving, orientation-defined, flickering bars. Attention was directed to horizontal or vertical bars by a pretrial cue, after which two orthogonally oriented, overlapping stimuli or a single stimulus were presented. Horizontal and vertical bars flickered at different frequencies and thereby elicited separable steady-state visual-evoked potentials, which were used to examine the effect of feature-based selection and the competitive influence of a second stimulus on ongoing visual processing. Age differences were found in feature-selective attentional modulation of visual responses: older adults did not show consistent modulation of magnitude or phase. In contrast, the suppressive effect of a second stimulus was robust and comparable in magnitude across age groups, suggesting that bottom-up processing of the current stimuli is essentially unchanged in healthy old age. Thus, it seems that visual processing per se is unchanged, but top-down attentional control is compromised in older adults when space cannot be used to guide selection.

  6. Asset accumulation and transfer for old age: a study on Peruvian and Moroccan migration to Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Population ageing constitutes a major determinant of contemporary international migration, acting both as a push and pull factor in countries of origin and reception. From a micro-perspective, longevity, economic instability and migration are also affecting personal life as well as family organisation and solidarity. The aim of this paper is to focus on the strategies, in individual and family spheres, that migrants and their loved ones develop to accumulate and transfer assets, in order to respond to the demands of the elderly and counteract the uncertainties of advancing age. To capture this reality we conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with Peruvian and Moroccan migrants in Spain, and with returnees and relatives in the two countries of origin between 2006 and 2010. Both cases demonstrate that country contexts, together with personal experiences and family relationships, determine where to stay, and with whom or with what to support oneself as one grows older. More recently, the economic crisis in Spain that is negatively influencing social and migration policies, reducing migrants' economic gains, and placing new burdens on people's shoulders, is affecting these asset accumulation and transfer activities for old age.

  7. Altered function of ventral striatum during reward-based decision making in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mell

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging is associated with a decline in different cognitive domains and local structural atrophy as well as decreases in dopamine concentration and receptor density. To date, it is largely unknown how these reductions in dopaminergic neurotransmission affect human brain regions responsible for reward-based decision making in older adults. Using a learning criterion in a probabilistic object reversal task, we found a learning stage by age interaction in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC during decision making. While young adults recruited the dlPFC in an early stage of learning reward associations, older adults recruited the dlPFC when reward associations had already been learned. Furthermore, we found a reduced change in ventral striatal BOLD signal in older as compared to younger adults in response to high probability rewards. Our data are in line with behavioral evidence that older adults show altered stimulus reward learning and support the view of an altered fronto-striatal interaction during reward-based decision making in old age, which contributes to prolonged learning of reward associations.

  8. The influence of stereotypes about old age on the perception of elderly employees’ labor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makienko Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the problem of increasing retirement age in terms of age discrimination and creating conditions encouraging elderly people to continue to work is discussed. This paper presents a study of stereotypes that affect students of management specialties in Russian institutions of higher education between the ages of 20 to 25 years old. The stereotype is investigated in the context of emotionally colored image of reality simplifying the process of perceiving it. The correlation between the students’ existing stereotypes about elderly people and their perception of older employees has been conducted. As a result, 5 stereotypes that exist in young people have been defined. An analysis of the words chosen by students to describe the elderly shows little diversity in young people’s perception of them. Lexical analysis shows that in the Russian language there are practically no concepts which allow creating a positive image of the elderly. The influence of the stereotypes on the perception of elderly people in terms of employment shows that older specialists are perceived as people with experience and knowledge but these experience and knowledge are irrelevant to the present.

  9. Retrospective analysis of old-age colitis in the Dutch inflammatory bowel disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadithi, Muhammed; Cazemier, Marcel; Meijer, Gerrit-A; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Felt-Bersma, Richel-J; Mulder, Chris-J; Meuwissen, Stephan-Gm; Pena, Amado-Salvador; van Bodegraven, Adriaan-A

    2008-05-28

    To describe the characteristics of Dutch patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first diagnosed above 60 years of age-a disease also known as old-age colitis (OAC) and to highlight a condition that has a similar appearance to IBD, namely segmental colitis associated with diverticular disease (SCAD). A retrospective longitudinal survey of patient demographic and clinical characteristics, disease characteristics, diagnostic methods, management and course of disease was performed. The median follow-up period was 10 years. Of a total of 1100 IBD patients attending the Department of Gastroenterology, 59 (5%) [median age 82 years (range 64-101); 25 male (42%)] were identified. These patients were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (n = 37, 61%), Crohn's disease (n = 14, 24%), and indeterminate colitis (n = 8, 15%). Remission was induced in 40 (68%) patients within a median interval of 6 mo (range 1-21) and immunosuppressive therapy was well tolerated. Histological evaluation based on many biopsy samples and the course of the disease led to other diagnosis, namely SCAD instead of IBD in five (8%) patients. OAC is not an infrequent problem for the gastroenterologist, and should be considered in the evaluation of older patients with clinical features suggestive of IBD. Extra awareness and extensive biopsy sampling are required in order to avoid an erroneous diagnosis purely based on histological mimicry of changes seen in SCAD, when diagnosing IBD in the presence of diverticulosis coli.

  10. The Role of Age and Social Motivation in Developmental Transitions in Young and Old Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eNikitin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two diary studies investigated the role of social approach and avoidance motivation in important developmental transitions in young and old adulthood. Study 1 comprised a sample of young adults (N = 93, M = 21.5 years who moved out of their parental homes. The sample of Study 2 consisted of older adults (N = 69, M = 76.95 years who moved into senior housing. In both studies, participants reported their habitual social approach and avoidance motives as well as their daily social experience and subjective well-being over the course of two weeks. In line with the literature, social approach motives and age were related to higher subjective well-being, whereas social avoidance motives were negatively associated with subjective well-being. Time since the transition was an important moderator of the association between social avoidance motives and negative outcomes. With increasing time from the transition, the negative effects of social avoidance motives decreased. The positive effects of social approach motives remained fairly stable over time. Importantly, age did not moderate any of the associations between social motivation and outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of transition-related instability and age-related stability.

  11. Extroversion, social support and life satisfaction in old age: a mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Cristina G; Rubio, Laura; Rubio-Herrera, Ramona

    2017-05-31

    The aim of this study was twofold: on the one hand to analyze whether extroversion predicts social support in older people, and on the other hand to determine if different types of social support mediate the effect that extroversion has on older people's life satisfaction. The sample comprised 406 community-dwelling older adults (M = 74.88, SD = 6.75) from urban areas of Granada, southern Spain. Extroversion was positively correlated with emotional (r = .23) and with affectionate support (r = .30). Extroversion and all types of social support also positively correlated with life satisfaction. The multiple mediation analysis revealed that when age, gender, marital status and loneliness were controlled, extroversion predicted emotional (B = .008, p fact supportive social relations are crucial for older people's life satisfaction. Also emotional and affectionate support constitutes important explanatory mechanisms of the indirect effect of extroversion on life satisfaction. Personality traits should be considered when interventions aimed at promoting life satisfaction in old age and successful aging are designed.

  12. The Age Peculiarities of 10 to 12 Year-Old School-children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Badmayeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of children’s development transformation from the standpoints of different authors. The changes in the age borders and childhood structure along with their causes are demonstrated. The childhood crisis is described, its place in the child’s development process identified. The author emphasizes the visible discord between the worlds of adults and children: being less involved in upbringing process nowadays, adults appear to be less exact in their attitude to children; their demands lack clearness and specificity. Both teachers and adults demonstrate helplessness and aloofness, which reflects in children’s consciousness and their attitude to adults, and results in the lost sense of responsibility, infantilism, egoism and moral emptiness of growing generation. The author carried out the comparative analysis of age peculiarities of middle class schoolchildren from comprehensive school. Three development stages were singled out for 10 to 12 year-olds: local caprices, rights understanding, and affirmative functional stage. The personality formation trends concerning the modern day school children are outlined, the external and internal factors determining this formation enumerated. The following influencing phenomena are mentioned, in particular: the essential socio-economic changes, fast spreading of mass-media and computer technologies, low level of parental motivation, replacement of the value-normative system (social anomie etc. The necessity of creating socio-pedagogic conditions relating to the age peculiarities of modern school children is substantiated. 

  13. The Age Peculiarities of 10 to 12 Year-Old School-children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Badmayeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of children’s development transformation from the standpoints of different authors. The changes in the age borders and childhood structure along with their causes are demonstrated. The childhood crisis is described, its place in the child’s development process identified. The author emphasizes the visible discord between the worlds of adults and children: being less involved in upbringing process nowadays, adults appear to be less exact in their attitude to children; their demands lack clearness and specificity. Both teachers and adults demonstrate helplessness and aloofness, which reflects in children’s consciousness and their attitude to adults, and results in the lost sense of responsibility, infantilism, egoism and moral emptiness of growing generation. The author carried out the comparative analysis of age peculiarities of middle class schoolchildren from comprehensive school. Three development stages were singled out for 10 to 12 year-olds: local caprices, rights understanding, and affirmative functional stage. The personality formation trends concerning the modern day school children are outlined, the external and internal factors determining this formation enumerated. The following influencing phenomena are mentioned, in particular: the essential socio-economic changes, fast spreading of mass-media and computer technologies, low level of parental motivation, replacement of the value-normative system (social anomie etc. The necessity of creating socio-pedagogic conditions relating to the age peculiarities of modern school children is substantiated. 

  14. An anatomy of old-age disability: Time use, affect and experienced utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriela; Ingenhaag, Michael; Maurer, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Complementing the commonly used concepts of evaluative wellbeing and decision utility, emotional wellbeing and experienced utility are important welfare criteria to assess individuals' subjective wellbeing, especially for valuing health and disability. Yet, almost all empirical evidences on the link between disability and experienced wellbeing come from developed countries. This paper studies the relationship between old-age disability and experienced utility in five low- and middle-income countries. Using data on individual time use and activity-specific affective experiences from an abbreviated version of the Day Reconstruction Method, we document a strong negative association between disability and experienced utility. These differences in experienced utility by disability status are exclusively due to worse activity-specific affective experiences among persons with disabilities. By contrast, disability-related differences in time use provide small compensating effects. Interventions or technologies that facilitate daily life hold most promise to improve experienced utility among persons with disabilities in the developing world.

  15. Life Course Trajectories of Later-Life Cognitive Functions: Does Social Engagement in Old Age Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sojung; Kwon, Eunsun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2017-04-07

    This study identified differential patterns of later-life cognitive function trajectories and examined to what extent life course factors and social engagement are associated with group trajectories. Data came from seven waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS 1998-2010; n = 7374; Observations = 41,051). Latent class growth analysis identified cognitive function trajectory groups, and multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the factors associated with group trajectories. Five heterogeneous trajectories were identified: stable high, stable moderate, stable low, high-to-moderate, and moderate-to-low. Findings suggest that, after adjusting for life course factors, individuals who became volunteers were more likely to belong to one of the two least vulnerable trajectories, stable high or high-to-moderate. Our findings suggest that, despite the cumulative life course factors evident in cognitive decline, social engagement in old age may serve as a potential protective resource.

  16. Prospects for using meloxicam in old-age group patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O N Egorova

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are commonly used in complex therapy for pain syndrome in rheumatology. The paper describes the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of chronic and acute pain. It details the action of cyclooxygenase types 1 and 2 (COG 1 and COG 2, shows the key role of COG 2 in pain induction and transmission. The data of clinical trials of meloxicam that inhibits mainly COG 2 are given. The drug is highly effective in treating rheumatic diseases, particularly in old-age group patients with osteoporosis. The combined use of different meloxicam formulations makes it possible to choose adequate, maximally individualized treatment and to relieve the pain syndrome in the shortest possible time. Among NSAIDs, meloxicam shows an optimum efficacy-safety ratio.

  17. Do fertility control policies affect health in old age? Evidence from China's one-child experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Asadul; Smyth, Russell

    2015-05-01

    How do fertility control policies contribute to the welfare of women, and their husbands, particularly as they get older? We consider whether the reduction in fertility resulting from population control policies has had any effect on the health of elderly parents in China. In particular, we examine the influence of this fertility decline, experienced due to China's one-child policy, on several measures of the health of parents in middle and old age. Overall, our results suggest that having fewer children has a positive effect on self-reported parental health but generally no effect on other measures of health. The results also suggest that upstream financial transfers have a positive effect on several measures of parental health.

  18. Age Is No Longer a Limit: Two Cases of Hepatectomy in Patients Over 90 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugo Uwatoko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common malignant tumor with poor prognosis. The age of patients affected by HCC is considered to be increasing, and several studies have reported significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality after hepatectomy for HCC in elderly patients. However, other studies have reported that the short- and long-term outcomes of surgery for HCC in elderly patients are similar to those in younger patients. Whether the indications for hepatic resection in elderly patients resemble those in younger patients has thus been questioned. We describe two cases of patients over 90 years old who underwent major hepatectomy for HCC, representing the oldest patients in the world to have done so.

  19. Liaison Old Age Psychiatry Service in a Medical Setting: Description of the Newcastle Clinical Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Mukaetova-Ladinska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liaison Old Age Psychiatry services (LOAP have begun to emerge in the UK and further development of the service is supported by the latest health policies. Since qualitative and quantitative studies in this area are lacking, we have undertaken a detailed quantitative prospective review of referrals to the Newcastle LOAP to evaluate the clinical activity of the service. We report high referral rates and turnover for the LOAP service. Reasons for referral are diverse, ranging from requests for level of care and capacity assessments and transfer to other clinical services to management of behaviour, diagnosis, and treatment. We outline the value of a multidisciplinary model of LOAP activity, including the important role of the liaison nursing team, in providing a rapid response, screening, and followup of high number of clinical referrals to the service.

  20. Mondrian and the "boogie woogies": interruption of inner developmental logic or completion in old age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Shalev, A; Rapoport, A

    1993-01-01

    Taking the work of the painter Piet Mondrian as a point of departure, artistic continuity and change are examined from a lifespan developmental perspective. It is argued that decontextualized continuity tends to occur within a given lifestage, whereas contextualized change is apt to emerge during a transition from one lifestage to another. Thus, Mondrian's gradual development of a unique style, predicated on logical, stage-like unfolding, is related to a midlife emphasis on formal structure. From a similar perspective, his dramatic shift away from this inner logic of development in his last work, the Boogie Woogies, is attributed to an ultimate effort in old age to synthesize art and reality, to reconcile a conflict between the laws of art and direct expression of sense experience.

  1. All the things I have - handling one's material room in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Ranada, Asa; Hagberg, Jan-Erik

    2014-12-01

    The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their 'material room' (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after

  2. SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS "HAPPY OLD AGE" AND OPPORTUNITIES OF SOCIAL SERVICES IN ITS PROVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana SPULBER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors examine the anthropological, physiological, socio-psychological, medical background happy old age; analyze the data of a number of domestic and foreign experimental work to identify factors, conditions that ensure comfortable livelihoods of the elderly person. Special attention is paid to the role of the sociogerontological competence of managers of the sanatorium and resort sphere in the creation of socio-cultural gerontology centre environment to ensure a happy old age customers, as well as the traditions of the Kuban Cossacks in relation to older people. A separate section of the article is devoted to the development of the Institute of foster families for older people in the Krasnodar region. Significant place in the article devoted to the analysis of various areas of professional activity of specialists of social service agencies within the community to enhance the revitalization of the manifestation of older people in different types of cultural and educational activities. The article reveals the essence and content of the concept of "socio-gerontological competence of the specialist institution of social service of the population". The authors examine the nature and structural components of the socio-cultural environment gerontology centre (pension sanatorium profile, which is a special kind of communicative space of the Board, determining its existence and prospects of development as a specialized Agency for the elderly.

  3. Seroepidemiology of Human Parvovirus B19 in 5-25 Year Old Age People in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Salimi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Parvovirus B19 (B19 is the only member of the family Parvoviridae associated with human infection. Al­though there are some studies to estimate the immunity to parvovirus in various populations but there is no seroepidemiologi­cal sur­vey from Iran until now thus the age-specific immunity to human parvovirus infection was esti­mated."nMethods:  A subset sample of 1500 study subjects in 2004 after Measles and Rubella mass campaign was selected from the original samples of 5000 sera kept at the Department of Virology in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All sera were tested by a commercial ELISA kit."nResults: Totally, 1303 (86.6% of 1500 study subjects were seropositive for B19 IgG antibody. The seropositive rate of males and females were 85.3% and 88%, respectively (P= 0.129. The overall B19 seropositive rates in rural and urban were 84.3% and 88%, respectively (P= 0.044.  The seropositive rates were found to increase significantly with age and ranged from 79.3% in 5-9 year old group to 93.5% in 20-25 yr old group (P= 0.000."nConclusion: Our results indicate that in spite of high prevalence of B19 antibody the importance of routine diagnosis of B19 infection in order to elucidate the etiology of some unexplained 'exanthemata diseases' especially in measles elimina­tion and eradication phase is needed.

  4. Youth and Old Age Contrast in Nezami’s Images with Respect to Color Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    n Safabakhsh

    2012-05-01

    Old age and Youth are examples of concepts which have been the focus of many poets’ attention and Nezami in particular. These concepts have been beautifully depicted in Nezami’s poems through the color element. The poet has beautifully depicted the young and old generation’s appearance characteristics using his poetic talent and colorful elements of nature. On one hand, white, black and red are examples of the colors used to describe young generation directly or indirectly. On the other hand, old age is described with respect to yellow and white colors. Nezami’s description of youth and old age is well elaborated in this research with aims at analyzing these concepts with regard to the element of color.

  5. It's Not How Old You Are, It's How You Are Old. State Discourse on Successful Ageing in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Mark

    2016-01-01

    According to Asher and Nandy, the global population of seniors will increase to 1.41 million in 2030 and is predicted to further grow to 2 billion by 2050. This will cause a fundamental change in the world's ageing structure, with the number of seniors equal to the child population (0-14 years). Today, seniors are being encouraged to be part of…

  6. It's Not How Old You Are, It's How You Are Old. State Discourse on Successful Ageing in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Mark

    2016-01-01

    According to Asher and Nandy, the global population of seniors will increase to 1.41 million in 2030 and is predicted to further grow to 2 billion by 2050. This will cause a fundamental change in the world's ageing structure, with the number of seniors equal to the child population (0-14 years). Today, seniors are being encouraged to be part of…

  7. The influence of age on health valuations : the older olds prefer functional independence while the younger olds prefer less morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Cynthia S.; Makai, Peter; Boter, Han; Buurman, Bianca M.; de Craen, Anton J.; Rikkert, Marcel G. M. Olde; Donders, Rogier; Melis, Rene J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of geriatric interventions, The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey - Composite Endpoint (TOPICS-CEP) has been developed based on health valuations of older persons and informal caregivers. This study explored the influence of the raters' age on the p

  8. Writing old age Julia Johnson Writing old age (Ed) The Centre for Policy on Ageing and The Open University 87 pp £10 1 90109 755 2 1901097552 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    This book is a set of quirky but interesting papers on how ageing is seen in fiction and other forms of creative writing. Each of the five papers has a distinct and perhaps narrow focus and because of this there may be little appeal to some readers. There is one paper on the poem about the old woman, which has been called Kate (also known as Crabbit Old Woman or Open Your Eyes). This traces the origins and impact of this poem and the poem written in response, sometimes known as The Nurse's Reply. There isa paper on fiction written about residential care and there is then a paper about images of ageing in 1920s fiction followed by one onthe novels of Stanley Middleton. The final paper, and the one I found most appealing, was an account of conversations between Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir in 1974, and a later publication by de Beauvoir. This paper introduces the method of age autobiography.

  9. Pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic radical adrenalectomy and lymph-node dissection for neuroblastoma in a 15-month-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaydah, Nabeel I; Jones, Alex; Elkaissi, Mahmoud; Yu, Zhongxin; Palmer, Blake W

    2014-09-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in children and the most common malignancy in infants, with complete resection being curative in low-stage disease. The previous standard of treatment for many abdominal NBs involving the adrenal gland had been open surgery; however, there have been numerous descriptions of the safety and feasibility of a laparoscopic approach to resect adrenal masses in the pediatric population in benign and malignant disease, including improved cosmetic results, decreased length of stay, decreased surgical morbidity, and comparable oncological outcomes to open surgery. Despite these reported advantages over open surgery, the newer robot-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) offers benefits over the conventional laparoscopic approach that could further improve outcomes and expand the use of minimally invasive surgical approaches for pediatric adrenal masses. RAL offers many additional advantages over conventional laparoscopy, such as 3D visualization, increased range of motion of surgical instruments, tremor control, and a shorter learning curve compared with traditional laparoscopic surgery, while still maintaining the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. The body of literature concerning robot-assisted oncological surgery involving the adrenal gland in children is quite small, and to our knowledge no case reports have been published describing robot-assisted removal of an adrenal NB in a pediatric patient. We present our experience and technique of an RAL approach for lymph-node dissection and radical resection of a low-stage NB involving the adrenal gland with no image-defined risk factors in a 15-month-old infant.

  10. Maternal age and birth defects after the use of assisted reproductive technology in Japan, 2004–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooki S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Syuichi OokiDepartment of Health Science, Ishikawa Prefectural Nursing University, Ishikawa, JapanBackground: Older mothers are becoming more common in Japan. One reason for this is the widespread use of assisted reproductive technology (ART. This study assesses the relationship between maternal age and the risk of birth defects after ART.Methods: Nationwide data on ART between 2004 and 2010 in Japan were analyzed. Diseases that were classified as code Q00-Q99 (ie, congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities in the International Classification of Diseases, tenth edition, were selected. There were 219,185 pregnancies and 153,791 live births in total ART. Of these, 1943 abortions, stillbirths, or live births with birth defects were recorded. Percentage of multiple birth defects in total birth defects, the prevalence, crude relative risk and 95% confidence interval per 10,000 pregnancies and per 10,000 live births were analyzed according to the maternal age class (ie, 25–29, 30–34 (reference, 35–39, and 40+ years.Results: Multiple birth defects were observed among 14% of the 25–29 year old class, and 8% among other classes when chromosomal abnormalities were excluded. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities per pregnancy and per live birth became significantly and rapidly higher in mothers in the age classes of 30–35 and 40+ years. Nonchromosomal birth defects per pregnancy decreased linearly with advanced maternal age, while the number of nonchromosomal birth defects per live birth formed a gradual U-shaped distribution. The prevalence per pregnancy of congenital malformations of the nervous system was significantly lower with advanced maternal age. The relative risk per live birth was significant regarding congenital malformations of the circulatory system for a maternal age of 40+ years. Some other significant associations between maternal age and birth defects were observed.Conclusion: Maternal age is

  11. 20 CFR 404.1401 - What is the interrelationship between the Railroad Retirement Act and the Old-Age, Survivors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Railroad Retirement Act and the Old-Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance Program of the Social Security Act? 404.1401 Section 404.1401 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Interrelationship of Old-Age, Survivors and Disability...

  12. Why are the oldest old less generous? Explanations for the unexpected age-related drop in charitable giving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Wiepking (Pamala); R.N. James III (Russell)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT Previous research has demonstrated that the generally positive relationship between age and the presence of charitable giving becomes negative at the oldest ages. We investigate potential causes of this drop in charitable giving among the oldest old including changes in health,

  13. Falls in old age: pills, the heart and beyond: Withdrawal of drugs and screening for cardiovascular causes in older fallers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Velde (Nathalie)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFall incidents are common in old age, with a rising injury rate with increasing age. Falling is not a diagnosis per se, but a symptom that can result from a number of diseases and abnormalities. However, even though there are abundant studies addressing possible causes of fall inci

  14. Six Forms of Variety in Students' Moral Reasoning: An Age-Old Distinction Enabling New Methods and Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Ylva; Gardelli, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the age-old distinction between decision method and criterion of rightness, commonly employed in normative ethics, was used to attain a detailed understanding of inter- and intrapersonal variety in students' moral reasoning. A total of 24 Swedish students, 12-15 years of age, were interviewed. Inter- and intrapersonal varieties in…

  15. Verbal Self-Instructions in Task Switching: A Compensatory Tool for Action-Control Deficits in Childhood and Old Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kray, Jutta; Eber, Jutta; Karbach, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of verbal self-instructions on age differences in task switching. Task-switching ability, measured as the difference between performance in single-task blocks and in mixed-task blocks in which participants switch between two tasks (mixing costs), increases during childhood and decreases in old age. To measure the…

  16. Death of a child and parental wellbeing in old age: evidence from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chioun; Glei, Dana A; Weinstein, Maxine; Goldman, Noreen

    2014-01-01

    The death of a child is one of the most traumatic events that a parent can experience. The psychological and physical consequences of bereavement are well established, and the consequences are more severe for mothers than fathers. However, little is known about how the death of an adult child affects parental wellbeing in old age or how the deceased child's sex may moderate the association. We use data from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Study of Aging (TLSA) to investigate how the death of a son or a daughter differentially affects the wellbeing of older parents, measured by depressive symptoms and self-rated health. We find that for mothers, a son's death is associated with an increase in depressive symptoms and a decline in self-rated health, but fathers' health is not adversely affected by a son's death. There is little evidence that a daughter's death has a negative effect on either maternal or paternal wellbeing. We situate these findings within their social and cultural contexts and discuss social policies that would reduce gender and health inequality.

  17. Gingival Condition in Children Aged From 6 to 12 Years Old: Clinical and Microbiological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Stella Salgado XAVIER

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the gingival condition and the occurrence of periodontopathogens in 93 children aged from 6 to 12 years old in Araçatuba, Brazil. Method: Clinical examination was performed in accordance to Schour and Massler (1947 while the subgingival plaque samples were obtained though sterilized paper point that were placed into health and inflamed gingival crevice of tooth 54 or 14, 61 or 11, 26, 75 or 35, 82 or 42 and 46, where they were kept for 60 seconds and tranferred to tubes containing 5 ml of thioglicolate broth. Microorganisms were isolated on blood agar and CVE an agar after incubation under anaerobiosis, at 37ºC, for 10 days. The identification of the isolates was based on their morphological, cellular and biochemical features. Results: 91.40% shows gingivitis while 70.97% presented mild gingivitis. Only 8.6% didn’t presented gingivitis. It was verified that the most of children presented mild gengivitis and was had some periodontopathogens. Conclusion: The gingivitis deteriored with age and only F. nucleatum was related with the deterioration of gengival status.

  18. El erotismo en la tercera edad Eroticism related to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Suárez Vasallo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: el erotismo es el elemento de la sexualidad que nos remite a las experiencias identificadas como sexuales, y se identifica con el comportamiento placentero de las experiencias corporales personalmente vívidas y la interacción con otras. OBJETIVOS: identificar algunos aspectos del erotismo en la tercera edad (zonas erógenas, presencia o no de actividad sexual, tipo y frecuencia de relaciones sexuales en los adultos mayores casados. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio descriptivo y de no intervención. La muestra estuvo constituida por 205 adultos mayores que acudieron al policlínico "Aleida Fernández", del municipio La Lisa, en Ciudad de la Habana, durante los meses de enero a mayo de 2008. RESULTADOS: entre los principales resultados tuvimos que el estado civil casado predominó en las mujeres, la principal zona erógena para ambos sexos fueron los genitales, hubo un 57,3 % de mujeres casadas y 70 % de hombres casados con actividad sexual, la frecuencia de las relaciones sexuales que predominó fue la quincenal, y el tipo de relación sexual predominante fue la penetración en adultos mayores casados. CONCLUSIONES: los genitales fueron la principal zona erógena explorada por ambos sexos, la frecuencia de las relaciones sexuales más frecuente fue la quincenal, y el tipo de relación sexual fue la penetración.INTRODUCTION: eroticism is the sexuality element identifying the experiences known the sexual ones by the pleasant behavior of body experiences personally lived and the interaction with others. OBJECTIVES: to identify some features of eroticism in third age (erogenous zones, presence or not of sexual activity, type of frequency of sexual intercourse in married old age persons. METHODS: authors made a descriptive and of non-intervention study. Sample included 205 old age patients seen in "Aleida Fernández" polyclinic of La Lisa municipality in Havana City from January to May, 2008. RESULTS: among the main results we had

  19. Survival of irradiated recipient mice after transplantation of bone marrow from young, old and "early aging" mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Ian; Ilic, Zoran; Scrable, Heidi; Sell, Stewart

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is used to examine survival, hematopoietic stem cell function and pathology in recipients of young and old wild type bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDSCs) as well as cells from p53-based models of premature aging. There is no difference in the long term survival of recipients of 8 week-old p53+/m donor cells compared to recipients of 8 week-old wild-type (WT) donor cells (70 weeks) or of recipients of 16-18 weeks-old donor cells from either p53+/m or WT mice. There is shorter survival in recipients of older versus younger WT donor bone marrow, but the difference is only significant when comparing 8 and 18 week-old donors. In the p44-based model, short term survival/engraftment is significantly reduced in recipients of 11 month-old p44 donor cells compared to 4 week-old p44 or wild type donor cells of either age; mid-life survival at 40 weeks is also significantly less in recipients of p44 cells. BMDSCs are readily detectable within recipient bone marrow, lymph node, intestinal villi and liver sinusoids, but not in epithelial derived cells. These results indicate that recipients of young BMDSCs may survive longer than recipients of old bone marrow, but the difference is marginal at best.

  20. [Fragility and experiencing limits as a chance for development in old age--the meaning of the particular experiences of the aging body for identification and development as focused on the very old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum-Lehmann, Susanne

    2008-06-01

    The main focus of this article is the meaning of particular experiences of the aging body for identity and development with respect to very old age. This experience of embodiment results from a dynamic development between unpleasant experiences of physical aging, positive bodily experiences of the pleasure of living, and reflections on this direct engagement with the aging body. The interaction of those three dimensions requires a constant rebalancing, which, in view of the frail body, becomes increasingly demanding. Beyond one's own experiences with aging through direct engagement with the body, established social relationships give room for an individual's physical nature and support the maintenance of identity and development. People who look after and care for old aged people have to recognize their own embodiment and have to acknowledge their aging body. This applies not only to contact with old aged people, but also requests that the potential for developing one's own identity be recognised. The inclusion of the body in the discourse on the aging process demands a mindset change in social gerontology and for the individual it means to submit oneself to the ethics of embodied existence.

  1. Little evidence for links between memory complaints and memory performance in very old age: longitudinal analyses from the Berlin Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, Ann; Hertzog, Christopher; Gerstorf, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between memory complaint and memory performance were examined in a sample of old-old participants from the Berlin Aging Study (BASE; N = 504, ages 70 to 100, age M = 84.7 at study onset). Participants were measured 4 times over the course of 6 years. Similar to many previous studies, initial cross-sectional memory complaints were predicted by depression and neuroticism, but not memory performance. Subjective age also predicted memory complaint independent of other variables. Latent growth curve models based on age and time in the study revealed that memory complaints did not change in level with age or time, and manifested no reliable random effects (individual differences in change). These models also detected no significant relationship between changes in memory and either initial memory complaint or changes in memory complaint over age or over time. None of the covariates that predicted initial memory complaints were related to changes in memory complaints over time. An autoregressive latent variable model for memory complaints, consistent with a conceptualization of complaints as judgments constructed from beliefs and other influences in the moment, did detect a concurrent effect of memory on memory complaints at the third occasion, controlling on initial complaints. These results suggest that for the oldest-old, changes in memory complaints may not primarily reflect monitoring of actual age-related memory changes, but rather are affected by other variables, including age-based memory stereotypes, neuroticism, depression, and concerns about aging.

  2. Vejez, Sabidurías y Administración Old Age, Wisdom and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castrillón

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ¿Sofofobia¹ en la Administración? Los efectos negativos de las dinámicas económicas y de las prácticas de gestión actuales indican la ausencia de sensatez en múltiples dimensiones de la Administración contemporánea. Con el propósito de contribuir a contrarrestar dichas disfuncionalidades, la primera parte de este artículo exhorta a descubrir la sabiduría inspirada en la vejez, exponiendo diversas ventajas de tal aproximación. La segunda parte, aplica evocaciones concretas de la vejez para abordar problemáticas organizacionales a nivel praxeológico, epistemológico, axiológico y ontológico. Cada una de estas dimensiones, se discute en una sección en la cual se advierten posibles desviaciones patológicas, y donde también se proponen ejemplos y reflexiones de sabiduría derivados de la vejez; que esperamos permitan enriquecer, de manera creativa, las prácticas y teorías de la Administración.Sophophobia² in management? The negative effects caused by economic dynamics and of the current management practices; indicate the absence of prudence in multiple dimensions of contemporary administration. In order to help counter these disfunctions, the first part of this article exhorts readers to discover the wisdom inspired by aging, presenting several advantages of such approximation. The second part of the article, applies concrete evocations of old age to approach organizational problems at different levels: praxeological, epistemological, axiological, and ontological. For each one of these dimensions, there is a section that discusses latent pathological deviations, and also proposes wise examples and reflections related to ageing, which hopefully would enrich, in a creative manner, the theories and practices of administration.

  3. Retrospective analysis of old-age colitis in the Dutch inflammatory bowel disease population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammed Hadithi; Marcel Cazemier; Gerrit A Meijer; Elisabeth Bloemena; Richel J Felt-Bersma; Chris J Mulder; Stephan GM Meuwissen; Amado Salvador Pe(n)a; Adriaan A van Bodegraven

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To describe the characteristics of Dutch patients with chronic.inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first diagnosed above 60 years of age-a disease also known as old-age colitis (OAC) and to highlight a condition that has a similar appearance to IBD,namely segmental colitis associated with diverticular disease (SCAD).METHODS:A retrospective longitudinal survey of patient demographic and clinical characteristics,disease characteristics,diagnostic methods,management and course of disease was performed.The median follow-up period was 10 years.RESULTS:Of a total of 1100 IBD patients attending the Department of Gastroenterology,59 (5%) [median age 82 years (range 64-101);25 male (42%)] were identified.These patients were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (n = 37,61%),Crohn's disease (n = 14,24%),and indeterminate colitis (n = 8,15%).Remission was induced in 40 (68%) patients within a median interval of 6 mo (range 1-21) and immunosuppressive therapy was well tolerated.Histological evaluation based on many biopsy samples and the course of the disease led to other diagnosis,namely SCAD instead of IBD in five (8%) patients.CONCLUSION:OAC is not an infrequent problem for the gastroenterologist,and should be considered in the evaluation of older patients with clinical features suggestive of IBD.Extra awareness and extensive biopsy sampling are required in order to avoid an erroneous diagnosis purely based on histological mimicry of changes seen in SCAD,when diagnosing IBD in the presence of diverticulosis coll.

  4. RNA Editing Genes Associated with Extreme Old Age in Humans and with Lifespan in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, Annibale; Solovieff, Nadia; Kojima, Toshio; Wang, Meng C.; Melista, Efthymia; Meltzer, Micah; Fischer, Sylvia E. J.; Andersen, Stacy; Hartley, Stephen H.; Sedgewick, Amanda; Arai, Yasumichi; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Terry, Dellara F.; Riva, Alberto; Anselmi, Chiara Viviani; Malovini, Alberto; Kitamoto, Aya; Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Steinberg, Martin H.; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Atzmon, Gil; Ruvkun, Gary; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Perls, Thomas T.

    2009-01-01

    Background The strong familiality of living to extreme ages suggests that human longevity is genetically regulated. The majority of genes found thus far to be associated with longevity primarily function in lipoprotein metabolism and insulin/IGF-1 signaling. There are likely many more genetic modifiers of human longevity that remain to be discovered. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we first show that 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RNA editing genes ADARB1 and ADARB2 are associated with extreme old age in a U.S. based study of centenarians, the New England Centenarian Study. We describe replications of these findings in three independently conducted centenarian studies with different genetic backgrounds (Italian, Ashkenazi Jewish and Japanese) that collectively support an association of ADARB1 and ADARB2 with longevity. Some SNPs in ADARB2 replicate consistently in the four populations and suggest a strong effect that is independent of the different genetic backgrounds and environments. To evaluate the functional association of these genes with lifespan, we demonstrate that inactivation of their orthologues adr-1 and adr-2 in C. elegans reduces median survival by 50%. We further demonstrate that inactivation of the argonaute gene, rde-1, a critical regulator of RNA interference, completely restores lifespan to normal levels in the context of adr-1 and adr-2 loss of function. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that RNA editors may be an important regulator of aging in humans and that, when evaluated in C. elegans, this pathway may interact with the RNA interference machinery to regulate lifespan. PMID:20011587

  5. Old stellar population synthesis: new age and mass estimates for Mayall Ⅱ = G1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ma; Richard de Grijs; Zhou Fan; Soo-Chang Rey; Zhen-Yu Wu; Xu Zhou; Jiang-Hua Wu; Zhao-Ji Jiang; Jian-Sheng Chen; Kyungsook Lee; Sangmo Tony Sohn

    2009-01-01

    Mayall Ⅱ = G1 is one of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in M31. Here, we determine its age and mass by comparing multicolor photometry with theo-retical stellar population synthesis models. Based on far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX photometry, broad-band UBV RI, and infrared JHK8 2MASS data, we construct the most extensive spectral energy distribution of G1 to date, spanning the wavelength range from 1538 to 20000A. A quantitative comparison with a variety of simple stellar pop-ulation (SSP) models yields a mean age which is consistent with G1 being among the oldest building blocks of M31 and having formed within ~1.7Gyr after the Big Bang. Irrespective of the SSP model or stellar initial mass function adopted, the resulting mass estimates (of order 107M⊙) indicate that G1 is one of the most massive GCs in the Local Group. However, we speculate that the cluster's exceptionally high mass suggests that it may not be a genuine GC. Our results also suggest that G1 may contain, on average, (1.65±0.63) × 102L⊙ far-ultraviolet-bright, hot, extreme horizontal-branch stars, depend-ing on the adopted SSP model. In addition, we demonstrate that extensive multi-passband photometry coupled with SSP analysis enables one to obtain age estimates for old SSPs that have similar accuracies as those from integrated spectroscopy or resolved stellar pho-tometry, provided that some of the free parameters can be constrained independently.

  6. The impact of body mass index in old age on cause-specific mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hollander, E L; Van Zutphen, M; Bogers, R P; Bemelmans, W J E; De Groot, L C P G M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the association between Body Mass Index (BMI) and cause-specific mortality in older adults and to assess which BMI was associated with lowest mortality. Prospective study. European towns. 1,980 older adults, aged 70-75 years from the SENECA (Survey in Europe on Nutrition and the Elderly: a concerted action) study. BMI, examined in 1988/1989, and mortality rates and causes of death during 10 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards model including both BMI and BMI², accounting for sex, smoking status, educational level and age at baseline showed that BMI was associated with all-cause mortality (p0.3). The lowest all-cause mortality risk was found at 27.1 (95%CI 24.1, 29.3) kg/m², and this risk was increased with statistical significance when higher than 31.4 kg/m² and lower than 21.1 kg/m². The lowest cardiovascular mortality risk was found at 25.6 (95%CI 17.1, 28.4) kg/m², and was increased with statistical significance when higher than 30.9 kg/m². In this study, BMI was associated with all-cause mortality risk in older people. This risk was mostly driven by an increased cardiovascular mortality risk, as no association was found for mortality risk from cancer or respiratory disease. Our results indicate that the WHO cut-off point of 25 kg/m² for overweight might be too low in old age, but more studies are needed to define specific cut-off points.

  7. The value of REM sleep parameters in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from old-age depression and normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykierek, P; Stadtmüller, G; Schramm, P; Bahro, M; van Calker, D; Braus, D F; Steigleider, P; Löw, H; Hohagen, F; Gattaz, W F; Berger, M; Riemann, D

    1998-01-01

    Pseudodementia as a common trait in elderly depressives presents a major problem in gerontopsychiatry, especially for the differential diagnosis between Old-Age Depression (OAD) and Dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT). The present polysomnographic study examined parameters of sleep continuity, sleep architecture, and REM sleep to differentiate DAT from OAD. The investigation was based on the theoretical framework of the cholinergic-aminergic imbalance model of depression, the cholinergic deficit hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease and the reciprocal interaction model of Non-REM/REM sleep regulation, according to which REM sleep parameters should have high discriminative value to differentiate OAD and DAT. We investigated 35 DAT patients, 39 OAD patients and 42 healthy controls for two consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. The DAT patients were in relatively early/mild stages of the disease, the severity of depression in the OAD group was moderate to severe. Depressed patients showed characteristic 'depression-like' EEG sleep alterations, i.e. a lower sleep efficiency, a higher amount of nocturnal awakenings and decreased sleep stage 2. Sleep continuity and architecture in DAT was less disturbed. Nearly all REM sleep measures differentiated significantly between the diagnostic groups. OAD patients showed a shortened REM latency, increased REM density and a high rate of Sleep Onset REM periods (SOREM), whereas in DAT REM density was decreased in comparison to control subjects. REM latency in DAT was not prolonged as expected. To assess the discriminative power of REM sleep variables a series of discriminant analyses were conducted. Overall, 86% of patients were correctly classified, using REM density and REM latency measures. Our findings suggest that REM density as an indicator of phasic activity appears to be more sensitive as a biological marker for the differential diagnosis of OAD and DAT than REM latency. The results support the role of central cholinergic

  8. Episodic and semantic memory functioning in very old age: Explanations from executive functioning and processing speed theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E.J. Spaan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural equation modeling was used to investigate whether age-related episodic and semantic memory impairments are better explained by decline in processing speed or executive functioning (or both, rather than directly in terms of memory components. The models tested were based on an extensive review of the literature on cognitive decline in normal aging, up to very old age. A computerized test battery, measuring episodic memory (free and cued recall; recognition, semantic memory (fluency; naming accuracy and latencies, processing speed and executive functioning, was administered to 234 elderly persons ranging from young-old to very old age (55–96 years. To avoid large variance in response times due to physical instead of cognitive limitations, no motor responses were required from participants. Age-related decline in episodic and semantic memory performance was found to be the consequence of declines in processing speed and executive functioning. Processing speed mainly mediated decline of semantic memory, whereas executive functioning mainly mediated episodic memory decline. The most parsimonious model showed that both processing speed and executive functioning attributed to memory decline but independent from one another. The results suggest that at very old age, the impact of executive dysfunctions on episodic memory performance exceeds the influence of cognitive slowing.

  9. Falling into the Light-using music and poetry as complementary modes of understanding falls in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Clausen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    that a broader understanding of falls in old age in the health care system might help health professionals to understand the complexity of falls and by this inspire older persons to prevent falls in different ways. Using poetry and music in our performance we seek to open up for a broader understanding of falls......: irresponsible behavior, disease, destiny, desire to remain independent in old age, appearing elegant/aesthetical and being physical active. One of the interviews was selected and transformed it into a poem (2-3). The poem was then translated into music by the second author. First we present the six...... understandings of falls in old age then we read the poem and finally a musical interpretation of the poem is performed by song and cello. The music is written for soprano and cello and created with direct inspiration from the poem. The fall is reproduced in a series of descending tones coming back as a "chorus...

  10. Evaluation of a radio based ADL interaction recognition system in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaeuser, J; Diehl-Schmid, J; Lueth, T C

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution the evaluation of a system called "Eventlogger" is presented, which is installed in a day hospital for old age psychiatry. The Eventlogger is a radio based module with an adjustable communication range, able to recognize interaction of the user with objects or with other people. It is intended to function as a monitoring tool for the users' activities. Due to the demographic change monitoring systems for elderly people become more important. In this paper the "simple activities of daily living" (sADL) is introduced as well as the evaluation for the recognition of sADL in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands is presented. Together with the first approaches of post processing for better results it is shown that the system is now ready to be used with patients of the day hospital for old age psychiatry.

  11. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  12. Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in old age: a prospective population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piirtola Maarit

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that the use of any psychotropic and the concomitant use of two or more benzodiazepines are related to an increased risk of fractures in old age. However, also controversial results exist. The aim was to describe associations between the use of a psychotropic drug, or the concomitant use of two or more of these drugs and the risk of fractures in a population aged 65 years or over. Methods This study was a part of a prospective longitudinal population-based study carried out in the municipality of Lieto, South-Western Finland. The objective was to describe gender-specific associations between the use of one psychotropic drug [benzodiazepine (BZD, antipsychotic (AP or antidepressant (AD] or the concomitant use of two or more psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in a population 65 years or over. Subjects were participants in the first wave of the Lieto study in 1990-1991, and they were followed up until the end of 1996. Information about fractures confirmed with radiology reports in 1,177 subjects (482 men and 695 women during the follow-up was collected from medical records. Two follow-up periods (three and six years were used, and previously found risk factors of fractures were adjusted as confounding factors separately for men and women. The Poisson regression model was used in the analyses. Results The concomitant use of two or more BZDs and the concomitant use of two or more APs were related to an increased risk of fractures during both follow-up periods after adjusting for confounding factors in men. No similar associations were found in women. Conclusions The concomitant use of several BZDs and that of several APs are associated with an increase in the risk of fractures in older men. Our findings show only risk relations. We cannot draw the conclusion that these drug combinations are causes of fractures.

  13. Spirituality and caring in old age and the significance of religion - a hermeneutical study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykkje, Linda L R; Eriksson, Katie; Raholm, Maj-Britt

    2013-06-01

    Spirituality is an important part of caring for the whole human being. However, there is lack of consensus about the concept parameter, and there is an ongoing discussion in nursing regarding the relation between religion and spirituality. Spirituality and religion is found to support health and well-being in old age, and this article portrays how older Norwegians understand religion and religious support as part of spirituality and caring. The theoretical framework in this study is Eriksson's caritative caring theory, and the research aim is to broaden the understanding of spirituality from a caring science perspective. The methodology is hermeneutical according to Gadamer. The study is based upon qualitative content analysis of 30 interviews with 17 participants above 74 years, six men and 11 women. The findings portray connectedness with a Higher power, including how Christianity has influenced upon the philosophy of life of the participants, wonders about the end of life/afterlife, and the meaning of religious symbols and rituals. The study also portrays how religious support may foster dignity, especially near the end of life, and experiences and opinions regarding support from nursing personnel. The study concludes that religiousness cannot be separated from spirituality, and that nurses should be able to provide spiritual care to a certain extent. Spiritual care including religious support according to patients' desires may foster health and preserve human dignity.

  14. Evolution of a Neutron Star From its Birth to Old Age

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, M; Pons, J A; Steiner, A W; Reddy, S

    2001-01-01

    The main stages in the evolution of a neutron star, from its birth as a proto-neutron star, to its old age as a cold, catalyzed configuration, are described. A proto-neutron star is formed in the aftermath of a successful supernova explosion and its evolution is dominated by neutrino diffusion. Its neutrino signal is a valuable diagnostic of its internal structure and composition. During its transformation from a hot, lepton-rich to a cold, catalyzed remnant, the possibility exists that it can collapse into a black hole, which abruptly terminates neutrino emissions. The essential microphysics, reviewed herein, that controls its evolution are the equation of state of dense matter and its associated neutrino opacities. Several simulations of the proto-neutron star evolution, involving different assumptions about the composition of dense matter, are described. After its evolution into a nearly isothermal neutron star a hundred or so years after its birth, it may be observable through its thermal emission in X-ra...

  15. A brief history of cancer: age-old milestones underlying our current knowledge database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faguet, Guy B

    2015-05-01

    This mini-review chronicles the history of cancer ranging from cancerous growths discovered in dinosaur fossils, suggestions of cancer in Ancient Egyptian papyri written in 1500-1600 BC, and the first documented case of human cancer 2,700 years ago, to contributions by pioneers beginning with Hippocrates and ending with the originators of radiation and medical oncology. Fanciful notions that soon fell into oblivion are mentioned such as Paracelsus and van Helmont substituting Galen's black bile by mysterious ens or archeus systems. Likewise, unfortunate episodes such as Virchow claiming Remak's hypotheses as his own remind us that human shortcomings can affect otherwise excellent scientists. However, age-old benchmark observations, hypotheses, and practices of historic and scientific interest are underscored, excerpts included, as precursors of recent discoveries that shaped modern medicine. Examples include: Petit's total mastectomy with excision of axillary glands for breast cancer; a now routine practice, Peyrilhe's ichorous matter a cancer-causing factor he tested for transmissibility one century before Rous confirmed the virus-cancer link, Hill's warning of the dangers of tobacco snuff; heralding today's cancer pandemic caused by smoking, Pott reporting scrotum cancer in chimney sweepers; the first proven occupational cancer, Velpeau's remarkable foresight that a yet unknown subcellular element would have to be discovered in order to define the nature of cancer; a view confirmed by cancer genetics two centuries later, ending with Röntgen and the Curies, and Gilman et al. ushering radiation (1896, 1919) and medical oncology (1942), respectively.

  16. Individual and contextual antecedents of workplace aggression in aged care nurses and certified nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Gulyas, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Employees in aged care are at high risk of workplace aggression. Research rarely examines the individual and contextual antecedents of aggression for specific types of workers within these settings, such as nurses and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). The study aimed to explore characteristics of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), negative affectivity (NA) and demographics related to workplace aggression for aged care workers. The survey study was based on 208 nurses and 83 CNAs working within aged care. Data from each group were analysed separately using ordinal regressions. Both aged care nurses and CNAs reported high rates of bullying, external emotional abuse, threat of assault and physical assault. Elements of the JD-R model and individual characteristics were related to aggression types for both groups. Characteristics of the JD-R model, NA and demographics are important in understanding the antecedents of aggression observed among aged care workers.

  17. Why Have the “Cantankerous Old People” Left the Neighborhood? The Representation of Old Age in Serbian Television Commercials – A Repeated Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an attempt to examine to what extent the way in which older members of society are represented in Serbian television commercials has changed in comparison to representations which were present in commercials during the three months in 2009 (Milosavljevic 2010a when the first study was conducted. As was the case in the first study, the focus is on dominant societal attitudes toward old people and old age which were utilized in making the television commercials in question. This was accomplished through analyzing both the positive and the negative stereotypes used to convey meaning in the commercials which were analyzed, as well as through the analysis of the proportional representation of older characters in advertising. The commercials which were analyzed here were broadcasted during the second half of December 2012, January and the first half of February 2013.

  18. Computer-assisted sperm analysis parameters in young fertile sperm donors and relationship with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréour, Thomas; Jean, Miguel; Mirallie, Sophie; Barriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Sperm parameter values have been shown to decline with age, according to conventional sperm analysis. However, the effect of age on sperm kinematic parameters has been rarely studied, especially in young fertile men. Here, we studied Computer-Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA) parameters in a large cohort of men with proven fertility, in order to determine if there is a decline with age in this young fertile population. This retrospective analysis of CASA parameters was conducted on all donors included in the sperm donor programme in the Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) Centre of the University Hospital of Nantes between 2006 and 2009. Sperm concentration, motility, and kinetic parameters were recorded by a HTM-Ceros system and compared in 3 groups of sperm donors according to their age: donors were analyzed. Values for ALH, VCL, LIN, and STR significantly decreased with age. Sperm concentration, motile sperm proportion, and other kinetic parameters did not differ significantly among the groups. The use of CASA allowed the identification of ALH, VCL, LIN, and STR age-related decrease in young men with proven fertility.

  19. Age-related differences in the lifestyle regularity of seniors experiencing bereavement, care-giving, insomnia, and advancement into old-old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Timothy H; Buysse, Daniel J; Hall, Martica; Nofzinger, Eric A; Thompson, Wesley K; Mazumdar, Sati A; Reynolds, Charles F

    2006-01-01

    Compared to younger adults, seniors (> or = 60 yrs) often adopt a highly regular lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptive response to age-related changes in their sleep and circadian rhythms. At baseline, diary measures of lifestyle regularity (SRM-5) were obtained from 104 seniors of three separate groups. Thirty-three subjects were challenged by spousal bereavement or the need to care for a spouse at home with dementia (Challenged); 33 were suffering from formally diagnosed (DSM-IV) insomnia (Insomnia); and 38 were healthy, well-functioning older seniors in the second half of their eighth decade of life or later (Healthy Older). The objective of this study was to determine whether lifestyle regularity increased as a function of age within each of these three senior groups. Overall, age was significantly correlated with SRM-5 (r=0.41, p<0.001), with the SRM score increasing by 0.67 units/decade. The same was true for the Challenged and Insomnia groups, which also showed a significant correlation between SRM and age (Challenged: r=0.48, p<0.01; Insomnia: r=0.36, p<0.05), though with a slightly faster rate of SRM increase in the Challenged (0.95 units/decade) than Insomnia (0.55 units/decade) group. Perhaps there was no correlation between age and SRM (r=0.07, n.s.) in the Healthy Older group due to the small age range, although this group did have a higher overall SRM score than the other two groups (p<0.01). The study thus confirmed that the previously observed increase in lifestyle regularity over the adult lifespan persists into later life. This may represent an adaptive behavioral response that might be used in future therapeutic approaches.

  20. Falls in advanced old age: recalled falls and prospective follow-up of over-90-year-olds in the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "oldest old" are now the fastest growing section of most western populations, yet there are scarcely any data concerning even the common problem of falls amongst the very old. Prospective data collection is encouraged as the most reliable method for researching older people's falls, though in clinical practice guidelines advise taking a history of any recalled falls. This study set out to inform service planning by describing the epidemiology of falls in advanced old age using both retrospectively and prospectively collected falls data. Methods Design: Re-survey of over-90-year-olds in a longitudinal cohort study – cross-sectional interview and intensive 12-month follow-up. Participants and setting: 90 women and 20 men participating in a population-based cohort (aged 91–105 years, in care-homes and community-dwelling recruited from representative general practices in Cambridge, UK Measurements: Prospective falls data were collected using fall calendars and telephone follow-up for one year after cross-sectional survey including fall history. Results 58% were reported to have fallen at least once in the previous year and 60% in the 1-year follow-up. The proportion reported to have fallen more than once was lower using retrospective recall of the past year than prospective reports gathered the following year (34% versus 45%, as were fall rates (1.6 and 2.8 falls/person-year respectively. Repeated falls in the past year were more highly predictive of falls during the following year – IRR 4.7, 95% CI 2.6–8.7 – than just one – IRR 3.6, 95% CI 2.0–6.3, using negative binomial regression. Only 1/5 reportedly did not fall during either the year before or after interview. Conclusion Fall rates in this representative sample of over-90-year-olds are even higher than previous reports from octogenarians. Recalled falls last year, particularly repeated falls, strongly predicted falls during follow-up. Similar proportions

  1. A study on quality of life between elderly people living in old age home and within family setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Panday

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ageing in the new millennium will be greatly influenced by both global and region specific factors, although increasing numbers as well as significant changes in the socio-cultural milieu are responsible for the recent emphasis on studies pertaining to older adults in India. This has resulted in the caregiver issue becoming a growing concern for national policy makers. The family as a single unit is undergoing changes leading to significant adjustments in accommodating and caring for older adults in the family, making them more vulnerable to illness and psychosocial strains in the absence of familial support network. Aim: To assess and compare quality of life (QOL between elderly people living in old age home and within the family setup. Methods and materials: A cross sectional research design was adopted for the study. The study was conducted at two old age homes and two areas of Ranchi - Kantatoli and Kanke. The sample comprised of 80 participants who were further divided into 40 participants from old age homes and 40 participants from family. Tools such as socio-demographic data sheet and QOL scale were administered to obtain the data. Result and conclusion: Findings of this study indicate that QOL was better of those elderly people who were living in old age home in comparison of those elderly people who were living within family setup.

  2. Aerobic exercise prevents age-dependent cognitive decline and reduces anxiety-related behaviors in middle-aged and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrelli, A; Lopez-Costa, J; Goñi, R; Brusco, A; Basso, N

    2012-01-27

    Recent research involving human and animals has shown that aerobic exercise of moderate intensity produces the greatest benefit on brain health and behavior. In this study we investigated the effects on cognitive function and anxiety-related behavior in rats at different ages of aerobic exercise, performed regularly throughout life. We designed an aerobic training program with the treadmill running following the basic principles of human training, and assuming that rats have the same physiological adaptations. The intensity was gradually adjusted to the fitness level and age, and maintained at 60-70% of maximum oxygen consumption (max.VO(2)). In middle age (8 months) and old age (18 months), we studied the cognitive response with the radial maze (RM), and anxiety-related behaviors with the open field (OF) and the elevated plus maze (EPM). Aerobically trained (AT) rats had a higher cognitive performance measured in the RM, showing that exercise had a cumulative and amplifier effect on memory and learning. The analysis of age and exercise revealed that the effects of aerobic exercise were modulated by age. Middle-aged AT rats were the most successful animals; however, the old AT rats met the criteria more often than the middle-aged sedentary controls (SC), indicating that exercise could reverse the negative effects of sedentary life, partially restore the cognitive function, and protect against the deleterious effects of aging. The results in the OF and EPM showed a significant decrease in key indicators of anxiety, revealing that age affected most of the analyzed variables, and that exercise had a prominent anxiolytic effect, particularly strong in old age. In conclusion, our results indicated that regular and chronic aerobic exercise has time and dose-dependent, neuroprotective and restorative effects on physiological brain aging, and reduces anxiety-related behaviors.

  3. Let me guess how old you are: effects of age, gender, and facial expression on perceptions of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkle, Manuel C; Ebner, Natalie C; Lindenberger, Ulman; Riediger, Michaela

    2012-06-01

    Perceptions of age influence how we evaluate, approach, and interact with other people. Based on a paramorphic human judgment model, the present study investigates possible determinants of accuracy and bias in age estimation across the adult life span. For this purpose, 154 young, middle-aged, and older participants of both genders estimated the age of 171 faces of young, middle-aged, and older men and women, portrayed on a total of 2,052 photographs. Each face displayed either an angry, fearful, disgusted, happy, sad, or neutral expression (FACES database; Ebner, Riediger, & Lindenberger, 2010). We found that age estimation ability decreased with age. Older and young adults, however, were more accurate and less biased in estimating the age of members of their own as compared with those of the other age group. In contrast, no reliable own-gender advantage was observed. Generally, the age of older faces was more difficult to estimate than the age of younger faces. Furthermore, facial expressions had a substantial impact on accuracy and bias of age estimation. Relative to other facial expressions, the age of neutral faces was estimated most accurately, while the age of faces displaying happy expressions was most likely underestimated. Results are discussed in terms of methodological and practical implications for research on age estimation.

  4. Old and Not-So-Old: Examining Changes in Forest Ecosystem Carbon Exchange With Stand Age in the Upper Midwest U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, A. R.; Cook, B.; Davis, K. J.; Bolstad, P.; Carey, E.; Martin, J.; Kreller, L.; Wang, W.

    2003-12-01

    Forest stand age is an important determinant of ecosystem carbon uptake. Though there are biometric measurements and ecological models for forests of all ages, there are few stand-scale eddy-flux measurements of net carbon exchange in older forests, though the number is increasing. In order to scale carbon fluxes from sites to regions, where stands of multiple ages may exist, it is necessary to measure to the effect of stand age on carbon exchange. Measuring the effect of stand age on carbon exchange is also necessary when trying to predict future or past carbon exchange (scaling across time). Many researchers have noted that site disturbance history is the fundamental factor in determining carbon uptake by forests over time scales of decades to centuries. The 8,500 ha Sylvania Wilderness in the upper peninsula of Michigan is one of several large tracts of old-growth forest in the Midwest. Trees range from 0-350 years old. Primary species are sugar maple, eastern hemlock and yellow birch. Catastrophic disturbance is rare. A research plot near the wilderness was established in late 2001 to measure the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon and water using eddy-flux, component flux and biometric methods. This site is part of the Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (ChEAS, http://cheas.psu.edu), a loose affiliation of researchers conducting carbon and water research in northern Wisconsin and upper Michigan. Another similar research plot within ChEAS and not far from Sylvania is the Willow Creek mature uplands site. This forest is about 70 years old and the primary species are sugar maple, basswood and green ash. The site had presettlement old-growth vegetation similar to what is currently seen in the Sylvania Wilderness. Thus, the carbon exchange seen at Sylvania may be representative of carbon uptake at Willow Creek had it not been logged in the early 20th century, and may also represent the future (or past) carbon uptake for similar forests in northern Wisconsin

  5. Cognitive and Psychosocial Consequences of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita Among Middle-Aged, Older, and Oldest-Old Adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E; Su, L Joseph; Welsh, David A; Galea, Sandro; Jazwinski, S Michal; Silva, Jennifer L; Erwin, Marla J

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on cognitive and psychosocial functioning among middle-aged (45-64 years), older (65-89 years) and oldest-old adults (90 years and over) in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Analyses of pre- and post-disaster cognitive data showed storm-related decrements in working memory for the middle-aged and older adults, but not for the oldest-old adults. Regression analyses confirmed that measures of social engagement and storm-related disruption significantly predicted pre- to post-disaster differences in short-term and working memory performance for the middle-aged and older adults only. These results are consistent with a burden perspective on post-disaster psychological reactions. Implications for current views of disaster reactions are discussed.

  6. Advance directives and power of attorney for health care in the oldest-old - results of the AgeQualiDe study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Tobias; Rodriguez, Francisca S; Wiese, Birgitt; van der Leeden, Carolin; Heser, Kathrin; Bickel, Horst; In der Schmitten, Jürgen; Koenig, Hans-Helmut; Weyerer, Siegfried; Mamone, Silke; Mallon, Tina; Wagner, Michael; Weeg, Dagmar; Fuchs, Angela; Brettschneider, Christian; Werle, Jochen; Scherer, Martin; Maier, Wolfgang; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2017-04-13

    Completion of advance directives (ADs) and power of attorney (POA) documents may protect a person's autonomy in future health care situations when the individual lacks decisional capacity. As such situations become naturally much more common in old age, we specifically aimed at providing information on (i) the frequency of ADs/POA in oldest-old individuals and (ii) factors associated with having completed ADs/POA. We analyzed data of oldest-old primary care patients (85+ years; including community-dwelling and institutionalized individuals) within the German AgeQualiDe study. Patients were initially recruited via their general practitioners (GPs). We calculated frequencies of ADs and POA for health care with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and used multivariable logistic regression analysis to evaluate the association between having ADs and POA and participants' socio-demographic, cognitive, functional, and health-related characteristics. Among 868 GP patients participating in AgeQualiDe (response = 90.9%), n = 161 had dementia and n = 3 were too exhausted/ill to answer the questions. Out of the remaining 704 (81.1%) dementia-free patients (mean age = 88.7 years; SD = 3.0), 69.0% (95%-CI = 65.6-72.4) stated to having ADs and 64.6% (95%-CI = 61.1-68.2) to having a POA for health care. Individual characteristics did not explain much of the variability of the presence/absence of ADs and POA (regression models: Nagelkerke's R(2) = 0.034/0.051). The most frequently stated reasons for not having ADs were that the older adults trust their relatives or physicians to make the right decisions for them when necessary (stated by 59.4% and 44.8% of those without ADs). Among the older adults with ADs, the majority had received assistance in its preparation (79.0%), most frequently from their children/grandchildren (38.3%). Children/grandchildren were also the most frequently stated group of designated persons (76.7%) for those with a POA for health care. Our

  7. [The new aging society: demographic transition and its effects on old-age insurance and care of the elderly in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T; Flöthmann, E-J

    2013-07-01

    In China, fundamental changes in population development have occurred during the past 50 years. The demographic transition in China required only a few years, while in most European countries this process took several decades. The fertility and mortality rates have declined very quickly, like in Japan and South Korea. China is one of the countries that has passed through the transition process the quickest. In the following article, this development is considered in more detail. Even if the fertility and mortality rates should stabilize at a new low level, which today certainly cannot be conclusively stated, the age effects will persist for the next few decades. The demographic aging during recent years will increase enormously in the coming decades. This development leads to far-reaching social and political challenges. The demographic aging in China is associated with a loss of function of the family. Both developments have a strong impact on the old-age insurance and on old-age care. Only a few years ago did politics and society start to respond with comprehensive reforms. For example, a modern pension system was introduced, but only in urban areas of China. Rural populations are still waiting for such reforms even today. Currently, there is a pilot project to gain experience with a pension system for the entire population. In contrast to the old-age insurance, in China there is very little public interest in old-age care because the elderly have until now been only a matter for the family. In the near future, the changing role of family and demographic aging will require a greater discussion about the care of older people in China.

  8. Osteoporosis and osteoarthrosis in women of uzbek nationality of old age based on digital X-ray and densitometry research

    OpenAIRE

    RUSTAMOVA UMIDA MUKHTAROVNA

    2015-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the association of the two diseases in the age aspect, data, and digital X-ray densitometry studies it was revealed a positive dependence between osteoartrozis and osteoporosis. The results show that the incidence of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis is mainly observed after 40 years, but most often after age 50, whereas the expressed structural radiographic changes of the knee joint bones epimetaphysis are observed more after 60 years old.

  9. Austerity and old-age mortality in England: a longitudinal cross-local area analysis, 2007–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Taylor-Robinson, David; Barr, Ben; Stuckler, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective There has been significant concern that austerity measures have negatively impacted health in the UK. We examined whether budgetary reductions in Pension Credit and social care have been associated with recent rises in mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years and over. Design Cross-local authority longitudinal study. Setting Three hundred and twenty-four lower tier local authorities in England. Main outcome measure Annual percentage changes in mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years or over. Results Between 2007 and 2013, each 1% decline in Pension Credit spending (support for low income pensioners) per beneficiary was associated with an increase in 0.68% in old-age mortality (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.95). Each reduction in the number of beneficiaries per 1000 pensioners was associated with an increase in 0.20% (95% CI: 0.15 to 0.24). Each 1% decline in social care spending was associated with a significant rise in old-age mortality (0.08%, 95% CI: 0.0006–0.12) but not after adjusting for Pension Credit spending. Similar patterns were seen in both men and women. Weaker associations observed for those aged 75 to 84 years, and none among those 65 to 74 years. Categories of service expenditure not expected to affect old-age mortality, such as transportation, showed no association. Conclusions Rising mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years and over were linked to reductions in spending on income support for poor pensioners and social care. Findings suggest austerity measures in England have affected vulnerable old-age adults. PMID:26980412

  10. Frontal Lobe Morphometry with MRI in a Normal Age Group of 6-17 Year-Olds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Morphometric data of the frontal lobe are important for surgical planning of lesions in the frontal lobe and its surroundings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide suitable data for this purpose. Objectives In our study, the morphometric data of mid-sagittal MRI of the frontal lobe in certain age and gender groups of children have been presented. Patients and Methods In a normal age group of 6-17-year-old participants, the length of the line passing through predeterm...

  11. ApoE plasma levels and risk of cardiovascular mortality in old age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Mooijaart

    2006-06-01

    cardiovascular mortality risks as in epsilon3epsilon3 participants were found in epsilon2 and epsilon4 carriers. CONCLUSIONS: In old age, high plasma apoE levels precede an increase of circulating CRP and strongly associates with cardiovascular mortality, independent of APOE genotype and plasma lipids.

  12. The age of the "old red sand" on the coasts of south Fujian and west Guangdong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The sedimentary strata and deposition ages of the "old red sand" distributed along the coasts of south Fujian and west Guangdong are determined by lithostratigraphy, magnetic stratigraphy and earth chemistry combined with TL, ESR and 14C-dating techniques. The research shows that the "old red sand" was aeolian sediments deposited from 55 400 to 9 000 aBP, the last glacial period in the middle and later age of Late Pleistocene. Most of them deposited in two periods of 56-42 ka and 30-10 ka. The "old red sand" deposited in the period of 30-10 ka, the later Würm glacier substage (Q33), developed on the largest scale with the widest distribution.

  13. “Such is life that people get old and change”: Gendered Experiences of Ageing Bodies from Older Persons’ View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Zeman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ageing/aged bodies reflects gender norms and power relations. The paper is based on analysis of four focus groups realized in homes for older and infirm persons with participants older than 65 years. Old age and ageing are not gender neutral phenomenon – perception, experience, interpretation and strategies of managing of ageing/aged body are gendered. For participants tidiness and cleanliness are most important despite gender. Dominant interpretations of focus groups’ participants reflect traditional understanding of gender roles, gender ideals and internalization of gender and age stereotypes: physical appearance is more important to women than to men; beauty and physical attractiveness are reserved for youth; female sexuality is interpreted as burden, obligation and source of pain for women; menopausa is interpreted as beginning of declining; male ageing bodies were interpreted in functional terms. Negative attitudes toward all types of surgical interventions on face and body are dominant and in this aspect participants reject socio-cultural pres- sures for youthful and glamorous looking in old age.

  14. Is Age Kinder to the Initially More Able? Differential Ageing of Verbal Ability in the Healthy Old People in Edinburgh Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Ian; MacLennan, William J.; Starr, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Results from a study of 387 healthy old people studied at baseline and four years later in Edinburgh (Scotland) suggest that, those with higher baseline ability, in higher social-class groups, with more education, and those who are younger are relatively protected from a decline in verbal intelligence, measured by an adult reading test, with age.…

  15. Social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units: staff perceptions within the context of patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, T; Baird, J; Muir-Cochrane, E C

    2015-03-01

    Patient aggression occurs in old age psychiatry and is contrary to their recovery and to the well-being of staff. A favourable social climate can contribute to a reduction in aggression. The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of clinical staff about the social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units. Eighty-five clinicians were recruited from these facilities. They completed a survey questionnaire about the social climate or ward atmosphere of inpatient units. The findings showed that, to some extent, respondents' perceived patient cohesion and mutual support were evident, units were perceived somewhat positively as safe environments for patients and staff, and the ward climate helped meet patients' therapeutic needs. Overall, clinicians were somewhat positive about the social climate of the units, and this has implications for the perception of aggression in old age psychiatry inpatient settings. As there is a direct relationship between social climate and aggression, clinicians should consider adopting a broad-based, person-centred approach to the promotion of a favourable social climate in old age psychiatry inpatient settings.

  16. No Association between Variation in Longevity Candidate Genes and Aging-related Phenotypes in Oldest-old Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Debrabant, Birgit;

    2016-01-01

    additional genes repeatedly considered as candidates for human longevity: APOE, APOA4, APOC3, ACE, CETP, HFE, IL6, IL6R, MTHFR, TGFB1, SIRTs 1, 3, 6; and HSPAs 1A, 1L, 14. Altogether, 1,049 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1,088 oldest-old (age 92-93 years) Danes and analysed...

  17. Psychiatric Morbidity among Elderly People Living in Old Age Homes and in the Community: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disorders such as depression, anxiety, cognitive and psychotic disorders have a high prevalence among elderly. There is some preliminary evidence that life in old age homes is perceived by inmates as more supportive, though the issue is not well studied. Aim: This project is directed towards studying and comparing the psychiatric morbidity and quality of life of elderly people residing in two unique settings: community and old age homes. Method: It is a cross-sectional study where the elderly subjects, 50 each in both the groups, were selected by simple random sampling technique and assessed on Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE, Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in Elderly (IQCODE, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and Quality of life visual analogue scale. Result: On comparison using suitable statistical analysis, there was no significant difference in the total scores on MMSE, IQCODE and quality of life scale across the groups. Depression was present in 22% of people in the community and 36% of old age home inmates. Psychosis was present in 26% of people in the community and 20% of old age home inmates. Conclusion: The psychiatric morbidity is high in elderly irrespective of the setting in which they live.

  18. Examining Dynamic Links between Perceived Control and Health: Longitudinal Evidence for Differential Effects in Midlife and Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infurna, Frank J.; Gerstorf, Denis; Zarit, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Perceived control and health are often closely linked in adulthood and old age. Little is known, however, about their time-ordered interplay at various phases of adult life. By applying dynamic models to four waves of data over 15.5 years from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, we examined time-ordered relations between perceived control and…

  19. Using Prior Knowledge to Aid Teaching and Learning: What Do First-Year Psychology Students Know about Old Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, James

    2007-01-01

    Students attending a lecture usually have a wide range of prior knowledge about the topic in question. Rather than seeing this as a problem, lecturers can take advantage of such differences. This article shows how students' misconceptions about old age were used to inform a lecture on the topic. Prior knowledge can thus be used to aid teaching and…

  20. Meanings of violence in old age: narratives and self-perception of elderly participants in a community center in São Paulo (SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludgleydson F. Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify and describe the meaning of violence and abuse against older adults from six participants in a senior centers of São Paulo/SP, as well as identify their knowledge about the provisions of the elderly statute regarding violence and neglect in old age. The research consisted of semi-structured interviews with open questions. The questions was qualitatively analyzed. The description of cases of violence included the lack of respect in the public transport, the cases reported in the media and family conflicts. Although participants have acknowledged the penalties contained in the elderly statute, they mentioned the need to recognize the elderly as a subject of rights for public policies and assistance, ensuring the autonomy and empowerment of older adults.

  1. Does benign paroxysmal positional vertigo explain age and gender variation in patients with vertigo by mechanical assistance maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu; Jia, Xian-Hao; Tian, Liang; Richard-Vitton, Th

    2014-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common peripheral vestibular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of BPPV in vertigo patients and the characteristics of BPPV in diagnosis and repositioning using mechanical assistance maneuvers and to analyze and summarize the reasons showing these characteristics. Seven hundred and twenty-six patients with vertigo were enrolled in this study. All patients were inspected by TRV armchair (SYNAPSYS, model TRV, France). BPPV patients were identified by the examination results. The characteristics and results using TRV armchair in diagnosis and treatment of BPPV were compared and analyzed. Of 726 vertigo patients, 209 BPPV patients were diagnosed, including 58 men and 151 women, aged from 16 to 87 (mean 52.90 ± 11.93) years. There were significant differences in the proportion of BPPV in male and female vertigo patients (P = 0.0233), but no differences among all age groups (P = 0.3201). Of 209 BPPV patients, 208 cases were repositioned by TRV armchair and no one appeared to have otolithic debris relocated into another canal in the repositioning procedures. 202 cases (97.12 %) were successful and six cases (2.87 %) were effective. None of them failed. This study suggests that BPPV is one of the most common diseases in the young vertigo patients, just like that in the old ones. Female of the species has predilection for BPPV and the site of predilection is the right posterior semicircular canals (PC-BPPV). The results of repositioning are perfect using mechanical assistance maneuvers.

  2. Longitudinal decline of leukocyte telomere length in old age and the association with sex and genetic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Kari; Reynolds, Chandra A; Ploner, Alexander; Gerritsen, Lotte; Hovatta, Iiris; Pedersen, Nancy L; Hägg, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Telomeres are DNA-protein structures at the ends of chromosomes. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) shortening has been associated with advanced age. However, most studies use cross-sectional data, hence, the aim of our study was to model longitudinal trajectories of LTL attrition across 20 years at old age. Assessments of LTL were done by qPCR in SATSA (Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging; N=636 individuals). Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with age were estimated, the latter using latent growth curve analysis. A genetic risk score (GRS) for LTL was further assessed and included in the models. We confirmed an inverse cross-sectional association of LTL with age (B=-0.0022 T/S-ratio; 95% CI: -0.0035, -0.0009, p-value=0.0008). Longitudinal LTL analyses adjusted for sex (1598 samples; ≤5 measurements) suggested modest average decline until 69 years of age but accelerating decline after 69 years, with significant inter-individual variation. Women had on average ~6% T/S-ratio units longer LTL at baseline, and inclusion of the GRS improved the model where four risk alleles was equivalent to the effect size difference between the sexes. In this cohort of old individuals, baseline LTL varied with age, sex and genetic background. The rate of change of LTL accelerated with age and varied considerably between individuals.

  3. No Association between Variation in Longevity Candidate Genes and Aging-related Phenotypes in Oldest-old Danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Debrabant, Birgit; Mengel-From, Jonas; Dato, Serena; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    In this study we explored the association between aging-related phenotypes previously reported to predict survival in old age and variation in 77 genes from the DNA repair pathway, 32 genes from the growth hormone 1/ insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin (GH/IGF-1/INS) signalling pathway and 16 additional genes repeatedly considered as candidates for human longevity: APOE, APOA4, APOC3, ACE, CETP, HFE, IL6, IL6R, MTHFR, TGFB1, SIRTs 1, 3, 6; and HSPAs 1A, 1L, 14. Altogether, 1,049 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1,088 oldest-old (age 92-93 years) Danes and analysed with phenotype data on physical functioning (hand grip strength), cognitive functioning (mini mental state examination and a cognitive composite score), activity of daily living and self-rated health. Five SNPs showed association to one of the phenotypes; however, none of these SNPs were associated with a change in the relevant phenotype over time (7 years of follow-up) and none of the SNPs could be confirmed in a replication sample of 1,281 oldest-old Danes (age 94-100). Hence, our study does not support association between common variation in the investigated longevity candidate genes and aging-related phenotypes consistently shown to predict survival. It is possible that larger sample sizes are needed to robustly reveal associations with small effect sizes.

  4. The temporal relationship between change in symptoms of prolonged grief and posttraumatic stress following old age spousal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connor, Maja; Nickerson, Angela; Aderka, Idan M.

    2015-01-01

    following the death of a loved one. The purpose of this study was to examine the temporal relationship between change in high levels of PGS and PTSS during the first four years following old age spousal loss. Methods: Participants were 237 Danes (40% male; mean age = 73 years, SD = 4.4; range 65-81) who...... bereavement to a greater extent than vice versa. Conclusions: The findings in the present study indicate that changes in PGS may precede and potentially directly impact changes in PTSS following bereavement. This tentative conclusion points to the potential value of targeting PGS in psychological...... interventions at an early point in the long term perspective following old age spousal bereavement....

  5. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measured by optical coherence tomography in Chinese teenagers aged from 13 years old to 18 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To establish a reference range of retinal nerve fiber layer(RNFLthickness by optical coherence tomography(OCTin Chinese teenagers aged from 13 to 18 years old, and investigate its relationship with age, eye side, gender, and ethnic group.METHODS: A total of 402 eyes from 201 normal Chinese aged from 13 to 18 years old were recruited for this study. Optic disk with 3.4mm diameter circle in different global average, quadrant and part-time bit retinal nerve fiber layer thickness(RNFLTwas measured by RNFL thickness average analysis program. Their RNFLT at different part-time bit, quadrant and global average RNFLT around the disc were measured by OCT with 3.4mm diameter circle, using the RNFL thickness average analysis program. The data was analyzed with SPSS statistical 19.0. The influences of several factors(such as age, eye side, gender, and ethnic groupon RNFLT were also analyzed.RESULTS: The global average RNFLT at 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 years old was 108.32±9.42μm, 109.23±9.67μm, 110.36±11.14μm, 111.27±10.21μm, 109.23±9.67μm, 112.11±8.83μm respectively. RNFLT of right eyes was 109.82±8.93μm and of left eyes was 110.33±9.89μm. All of the male's average RNFLT was 110.14±10.02μm, and all of the female's average RNFLT was 109.96±11.22μm. The average RNFLT of Han nationality was 110.22±9.31μm and of non-Han nationality was 109.87±8.65μm. The average RNFLT of all was 110.02±9.87μm, the RNFLT at the superior, nasal, inferior and temporal quadrant was 146.56 ±18.88μm, 76.49±13.28μm, 136.64±16.29μm, 82.01±12.55μm respectively. There was no significant difference in gender, eye side, and ethnic group(all PCONCLUSION: This study has established a normal standard reference of RNFLT and its related indexes by OCT in Chinese teenagers aged 13-18 years old. Gender, age, eye side, and ethnic group have no effect on their RNFLT, which has significant difference with adult's data. And for the diagnosis and follow-up of

  6. Chaotic behavior of light-assisted physical aging in arsenoselenide glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O; Balitska, V; Kozdras, A; Hacinliyan, A S; Skarlatos, Y; Aybar, I Kusbeyzi; Aybar, O O

    2014-12-01

    The theory of strange attractors is shown to be adequately applicable for analyzing the kinetics of light-assisted physical aging revealed in structural relaxation of Se-rich As-Se glasses below glass transition. Kinetics of enthalpy losses is used to determine the phase space reconstruction parameters. Observed chaotic behaviour (involving chaos and fractal consideration such as detrended fluctuation analysis, attractor identification using phase space representation, delay coordinates, mutual information, false nearest neighbours, etc.) reconstructed via the TISEAN program package is treated within a microstructure model describing multistage aging behaviour in arsenoselenide glasses. This simulation testifies that photoexposure acts as an initiating factor only at the beginning stage of physical aging, thus facilitating further atomic shrinkage of a glassy backbone.

  7. Chaotic behavior of light-assisted physical aging in arsenoselenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC “Carat,” 202, Stryjska Str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Balitska, V. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC “Carat,” 202, Stryjska Str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv State University of Vital Activity Safety, 35, Kleparivska str., Lviv 79007 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland); Hacinliyan, A. S. [Department of Physics, Yeditepe University, Atasehir 34755, Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Physics, Bogazici University, Bebek, Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Information Systems and Technologies, Yeditepe University, Atasehir 34755, Istanbul (Turkey); Skarlatos, Y. [Department of Physics, Bogazici University, Bebek, Istanbul (Turkey); Kusbeyzi Aybar, I. [Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology, Yeditepe University, Atasehir 34755, Istanbul (Turkey); Aybar, O. O. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science and Letters, Piri Reis University, Tuzla 34940, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-12-15

    The theory of strange attractors is shown to be adequately applicable for analyzing the kinetics of light-assisted physical aging revealed in structural relaxation of Se-rich As-Se glasses below glass transition. Kinetics of enthalpy losses is used to determine the phase space reconstruction parameters. Observed chaotic behaviour (involving chaos and fractal consideration such as detrended fluctuation analysis, attractor identification using phase space representation, delay coordinates, mutual information, false nearest neighbours, etc.) reconstructed via the TISEAN program package is treated within a microstructure model describing multistage aging behaviour in arsenoselenide glasses. This simulation testifies that photoexposure acts as an initiating factor only at the beginning stage of physical aging, thus facilitating further atomic shrinkage of a glassy backbone.

  8. Enhanced force production in old age is not a far stretch: an investigation of residual force enhancement and muscle architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2013-06-01

    In older adults, isometric force production is enhanced following a voluntary lengthening contraction when compared with isometric force produced at the same muscle length without a prior lengthening contraction. This phenomenon is termed residual force enhancement (RFE), and appears to be related to the age-related maintenance of eccentric (ECC) strength. However, it is unknown whether age-related changes in muscle architecture contribute to greater RFE at short and long muscle lengths in old age. Neuromuscular properties of the knee extensors were assessed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer. Torque was examined in young (26 ± 3 year, n = 11) and old men (77 ± 6 year, n = 11) during brief maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) at 80° and 120° (180° representing full knee extension) and then compared with torque during a steady-state phase at the same joint angle following a maximal voluntary lengthening contraction at 30°/sec over a 60° joint excursion; either from 140 to 80° (long), or from 180 to 120° (short). Ultrasound images were obtained from the vastus lateralis during the isometric phase for each condition. When comparing the ECC torque with the MVC isometric torque, old men had 17% greater ECC:MVC ratios than young men, confirming an age-related maintenance of ECC strength. The extent of RFE was greater at long versus short but independent of age. At rest, old had shorter (∼18%) and less pennated (∼22%) fascicles. However, changes in fascicle length and pennation during contraction did not contribute to RFE in either group. Thus, age-related changes in muscle architecture may not contribute to RFE.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF HEALTH CAPITAL, FRAILTY AND AGING AMONG OLD PEOPLE WITH AND WITHOUT MEANS OF SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauregui JR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This work is a comparative analysis of health capital, frailty and ageing among old people with and without means of support. Material and Methods: Target population are individuals older than 50 years old, Intervention Group have lower socio-economic status and live in slums. Control Group belong to a higher social clas living in an urban population with all the material resources. Results: The data analyzed corresponds to a sample of 448 people. Comparison between both groups was not rendered as significant. Conclusions: In Our observation, populations exposed to hostile environments evidence for decades to be functionally apt to defend themselves from it.

  10. Basal level of autophagy is increased in aging human skin fibroblasts in vitro, but not in old skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirovic, Dino; Nizard, Carine; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular autophagy (AP) is a stress response that is enhanced under conditions of limitation of amino acids, growth factors and other nutrients, and also when macromolecules become damaged, aggregated and fibrillated. Aging is generally accompanied by an increase in intracellular stress due to all the above factors. Therefore, we have compared the basal levels of AP in serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts undergoing aging and replicative senescence in vitro, and ex vivo in the skin biopsies from the photo-protected and photo-exposed area of the arms of 20 healthy persons of young and old ages. Immunofluorescence microscopy, employing antibodies against a specific intracellular microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3) as a well established marker of AP, showed a 5-fold increase in the basal level of LC3 in near senescent human skin fibroblasts. However, no such age-related increase in LC3 fluorescence and AP could be detected in full thickness skin sections from the biopsies obtained from 10 healthy young (age 25 to 30 yr) and 10 old (age 60 to 65 yr) donors. Furthermore, there was no difference in the basal level of LC3 in the skin sections from photo-protected and photo-exposed areas of the arm. Thus, in normal conditions, the aging phenotype of the skin cells in culture and in the body appears to be different in the case of AP.

  11. SOCIO - DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF OLD AGE PEOPLE LIVING IN URBAN & URBAN SLUM AREAS IN MAHARASHTRA, KARAD: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Rahul Salunkhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Aging refers to normal, progressive and irreversible biological changes that occur over an individual’s life span. The advancement of medical science and increased awareness among the people has brought about a sharp decline in mortality and a steady decline in fertility. This has resulted in a worldwide shift in the demographic profile and has led to significant increase in the aged population. About two thirds of all older people are concentrated in the developing world. OBJECTIVES: to study & compare socio - demographic variables of old age people living in Urban & Urban slum areas. MATERIAL & METHODS: all the old age people living in urb a n slum area & rando mly selected one urban area of K arad town were interviewed by using pre structured proforma about socio - demographic variable & compared with each other. OBSERVATIONS: Total 153 from urban & 135 from urban slum were enrolled for the study. Nearly 2/3 rd subjects were above age 65yrs in both areas with more female proportions in slum area than urban area. Significant difference was found with education, occupation & socio - economic status in both areas. CONCLUSION: Ageing is a universal phenomenon, with advanced fertility control, improvement in health and social services life expectancy has increased. Ageing has profound effect on the individual status in the family, the work force, goals and organization of health, social services, policies and practices of the government

  12. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on age-related hepatocyte changes in old male and female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen; Salazar, Veronica; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2004-10-01

    Aging induces changes in several organs, such as the liver, and this process might be due to damage caused by free radicals and inflammatory mediators. The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis shows a reduction with age, and this fact could be associated with some age-related changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GH administration on age-induced alterations in hepatocytes. Two and twenty two month-old male and female Wistar rats were used. Old rats were treated with human recombinant GH for 10 wk. At the end of the treatment, hepatocytes were isolated from the liver and cultured, and different parameters were measured in cells and medium. Plasma IGF-1 was also measured. Aging significantly decreased plasma IGF-1 in males. In females, plasma IGF-1 was also reduced, but not significantly. GH treatment restored plasma IGF-1 levels to values similar to young males. Aging was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and cyclic guanosyl-monophosphate (cGMP), as well as a reduction in adenosyl triphosphate (ATP) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. GH administration partially prevented all these changes in males. In females, some of the parameters were significantly improved by GH (ATP, CO, cGMP), while others showed a tendency to improvement, although differences did not reach significance. In conclusion, GH administration could exert beneficial effects against age-related changes in hepatocytes, mainly in males.

  13. Cognitive impairment and reduced quality of life among old-age groups in Southern Urban India: home-based community residents, free and paid old-age home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, R; McLachlan, C S; Mahadevan, U; Isaac, V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study were (i) to screen for cognitive impairment using Mini-Mental Status Examination among three old-age groups based on dwelling types in Chennai, India i.e. residential paid old-age homes, residential free (charitable) homes and home-based community-dwelling residents; (ii) secondly to investigate factors (demographic, psychological, medical and disability) associated with cognitive impairment in the these old-age; (iii) third, to investigate the independent association between cognitive impairment and health-related quality of life (QOL) among elderly across aged care dwelling types. A total of 499 elderly from three old-age groups were interviewed in this cross-sectional study (173 elderly home-based community-dwellers, 176 paid-home and 150 free-home residents). All the participants were interviewed for their socio-economic condition, medical morbidity, self-reported worry and anxiety, disability and QOL. 42.7% free-home elderly residents were found to have cognitive impairment, whereas 32.4% of paid-home and 21.9% of community-dwelling elderly had cognitive impairment. The residents of free-home were less educated, had lower income and reported higher incidence of worry, anxiety, disability and poor QOL than community-dwelling or paid-home residents. Increasing age, low education, female gender, high blood pressure and disability were associated with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment had significant negative effect on their health-related QOL (b = -0.10, P = 0.01), independent of age, gender, education, chronic illness and dwelling type. The burden of cognitive impairment was high in all aged-care dwelling types in urban India; with free charitable home residents being worse affected. Cognitive impairment was associated with disability and poor health-related QOL in these age-care settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For

  14. Diode laser-assisted transcanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy: the effect of age on the results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrettin Akay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of age on the success of transcanalicular diode laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy (TCDCR. Methods: Seventy patients (70 eyes who underwent transcanalicular diode laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy for the treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction as a primary surgery were included in this retrospective, nonrandomized study. The patients were divided into two groups according to age. Mean ages were 21.3 ± 3.3 in group 1 and 60.3 ± 7.3 in group 2. The records of the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up examinations were evaluated, and the anatomical and functional outcomes were noted. Functional success was defined as the absence of epiphora as indicated by the patient. Anatomical success was determined as patency of the neo-ostium with irrigation. Results: At the 3-month follow-up, 67% cases in group 1 showed anatomical success and 52% showed functional success; in group 2, the rates were 100% and 92%, respectively. Functional and anatomical success rates were the same for both the 6- and 12-month visits; 46% in group 1 and 76% in group 2. The results in group 2 were significantly better at all three follow-up visits (p<0.05. Conclusions: This study clearly showed that the older patients experienced better transcanalicular diode laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy results than the younger patients. The diminished inflammatory response in the older population may be a possible contributing factor to these results.

  15. Social engagement and health in younger, older, and oldest-old adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E; Walker, Erin Jackson; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Volaufova, Julia; LaMotte, Lynn R; Welsh, David A; Su, L Joseph; Jazwinski, S Michal; Ellis, Rebecca; Wood, Robert H; Frisard, Madlyn I

    2013-02-01

    Social support has been shown to influence health outcomes in later life. In this study, we focus on social engagement as an umbrella construct that covers select social behaviors in a life span sample that included oldest-old adults, a segment of the adult population for whom very little data currently exist. We examined relationships among social engagement, positive health behaviors, and physical health to provide new evidence that addresses gaps in the extant literature concerning social engagement and healthy aging in very old adults. Participants were younger (21-59 years), older (60-89 years), and oldest-old (90-97 years) adults (N = 364) in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Linear regression analyses indicated that age, gender, and hours spent outside of the house were significantly associated with self-reported health. The number of clubs and hours outside of home were more important factors in the analyses of objective health status than positive health behaviors, after considering age group and education level. These data strongly suggest that social engagement remains an important determinant of physical health into very late adulthood. The discussion focuses on practical applications of these results including social support interventions to maintain or improve late-life health.

  16. Looking age-appropriate while growing old gracefully: A qualitative study of ageing and body image among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Glen S; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Williamson, Heidi; Christopher, Gary; Harcourt, Diana

    2016-04-01

    Body dissatisfaction can be significantly detrimental to wellbeing. Little is known about older adults' body image, despite the fact that ageing causes unique bodily changes and that sociocultural pressures to resist these changes abound. We conducted six focus groups with a UK community sample of White British and South Asian older adults aged 65-92 years. Thematic analysis highlighted four themes: appearance indicates capability and identity; physical ability trumps appearance; felt pressures to age 'gracefully' while resisting appearance changes; and gender and cultural differences. These findings suggest that older adults' body image can have important implications for their wellbeing and merits researchers' attention.

  17. Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Odessa; Steinbrenner, Gregory; Goldberg, Andrew P; Katzel, Leslie I

    Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

  18. Kinetics of light-assisted physical ageing in S-rich arsenic sulphide glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A KOZDRAS

    2016-08-01

    The obtained results show that kinetics of light-assisted physical ageing in S-rich glasses can be well fitted with stretch-exponential Kohlrausch-type function, in which exponent $\\beta$-values and the effective time relaxationconstant τ depend on the wavelength of incident photons. The obtained $\\beta$-values exhibit well-expressedminimum for the structural relaxation stimulated by light with energy of quanta comparable with the optical gap of the material. This effect is found to be similar to Se-rich glasses.

  19. User-centric design of a personal assistance robot (FRASIER) for active aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padir, Taşkin; Skorinko, Jeanine; Dimitrov, Velin

    2015-01-01

    We present our preliminary results from the design process for developing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute's personal assistance robot, FRASIER, as an intelligent service robot for enabling active aging. The robot capabilities include vision-based object detection, tracking the user and help with carrying heavy items such as grocery bags or cafeteria trays. This work-in-progress report outlines our motivation and approach to developing the next generation of service robots for the elderly. Our main contribution in this paper is the development of a set of specifications based on the adopted user-centered design process, and realization of the prototype system designed to meet these specifications.

  20. Computer-assisted bone age assessment: image preprocessing and epiphyseal/metaphyseal ROI extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietka, E; Gertych, A; Pospiech, S; Cao, F; Huang, H K; Gilsanz, V

    2001-08-01

    Clinical assessment of skeletal maturity is based on a visual comparison of a left-hand wrist radiograph with atlas patterns. Using a new digital hand atlas an image analysis methodology is being developed. To assist radiologists in bone age estimation. The analysis starts with a preprocessing function yielding epiphyseal/metaphyseal regions of interest (EMROIs). Then, these regions are subjected to a feature extraction function. Accuracy has been measured independently at three stages of the image analysis: detection of phalangeal tip, extraction of the EMROIs, and location of diameters and lower edge of the EMROIs. Extracted features describe the stage of skeletal development more objectively than visual comparison.

  1. [Medicine for the elderly or science of old age? Max Bürger's contribution to geriatric medicine and gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Sandra; Bruns, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The fact that, due to demographic changes, gerontology and geriatrics are gaining ever more importance gives rise to more questions regarding the history of the science of aging. Based on unpublished sources and relevant publications by Max Bürger, the doyen of gerontological research in Germany, our contributions trace the beginnings of age research in Germany. Our results confirm Bürger as the dominant expert in this field in the first decades of its emergence. Bürger was primarily interested in basic medical-scientific research, and less in clinical geriatrics. His scientific goal was not to establish a medicine for the elderly but a theory of life changes ("biomorphosis"). From the start, he saw aging as a physiological process--a view that is still valid today. His concept of "biomorphosis", however, did not catch on and reveals a constriction in Bürger's thinking, which was to some extent influenced by Hans Driesch's vitalism. Interdisciplinary approaches are noticeable in the natural sciences rather than the humanities or social sciences. Bürger's research was also influenced by the political system he lived in. During National Socialism, which Bürger joined--at least formally--in 1937, his research into labour economics and aging met with considerable interest in connection with the general mobilisation of resources. East Germany also had an interest in questions of labour productivity in old age and the extension of the working life, which meant that Bürger remained a sought-after physician and scientist up into the 1960s. As he grew older himself, Bürger's initially deficit-oriented view of old age gave way to a more positive presentation that attached greater weight to the resources of old age.

  2. Health Maintenance in Very Old Age : Medical Conditions, Functional Outcome and Nutritional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Huan-Ji

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to provide better understanding of the underlying factors related to health maintenance in very old people, with a focus on medical conditions, functional outcome and nutritional status. Data were gathered from the ELSA 85 project (Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment). The ELSA 85 project was started in 2007 with a population-based survey of 85-year-old individuals (n = 650) residing in Linköping municipality, Sweden. During the study period from 2007 ...

  3. Overweight and obesity in school children aged 5 to 11 years participating in food assistance programs in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lucía Cuevas-Nasu; Bernardo Hernández-Prado; Teresa Shamah-Levy; Eric A. Monterrubio; María del Carmen Morales-Ruan; Lidia B Moreno-Macías

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between overweight and obesity among Mexican school-aged children and participation in the Liconsa milk and the School Breakfast food assistance programs. Material and Methods. Data from 15 003 school-aged children included in the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT 2006) were analyzed. Information on body mass index (BMI) and participation in food assistance programs was obtained. Descriptive analyses were conducted and logistic ...

  4. The Research on Old-age Care Service Patterns%中国养老服务模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜玉

    2014-01-01

    随着社会老龄化程度的不断提高,养老服务越来越受到社会的重视。本文首先对人口老龄化的中国特色进行了研究,接着对我国人口快速老化带来的养老服务问题进行了宏、微观分析,最后提出构建中国特色的养老服务模式:以政府为主导,以社区为依托,以公益性为基础,以转变认识为前提。%With the aging of China’s population,old-age care service raised more and more concerns. Firstly,the paper stud-ied population ageing with Chinese characteristics. Secondly,macro and micro analysis was performed on the problems of service for aged with rapid ageing speed. At last, the paper raised to construct old-age care service patterns with Chinese characteristics, which are government-guidance, community-support, public welfare-basis and cognition change-premise.

  5. Aging: Old Myths versus New Facts. Retirement Preparation Guide No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, U. Vincent

    Since attitudes toward retirement may be influenced by attitudes toward aging, this article is intended to correct some of the myths and misinformation held about human aging. Up-to-date research is drawn on to offer a picture of the aging process and its normal changes. (Author/MLF)

  6. Anthropometry and body composition of youth females aged 13-17 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Simões Pires Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the this study was to analyze and compare anthropometric and body composition index of young females aged 13-17 years old with the studies of Slaughter et al. (1984, Meleski et al. (1982, Thorland et al. (1983 e 1984 and Gaya et al. (1997. For such, were measured the anthorpometric variables height (EST, weight (MC, 4 skinfolds (DC, 3 bone diameters (DO and 2 circumferences (PER, beside the age. The sample were 50 young female (age x =15,8±0,9 years; height x =167,07±6,2 cm and e weight x = 57,97±7kg, being 27 volleyball player and 23 basketball players. To stimate corporal density (D the equation proposed by Thorland et al (1984 was used and the fat percent (%G was obtained by the Lohman (1986 equation. The %G of the other studies was recalculated by the Lohman (1986 equation for comparison with this study. To analyze the data the descriptive statistics was used, beside the “t” test of student for independent group and “t” test for one mean (p RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar e analisar indicadores antropométricos e de composição corporal de jovens do sexo feminino entre 13 e 17 anos, com os estudos de Slaughter et al. (1984, Meleski et al. (1982, Thorland et al. (1983 e 1984, Gaya et al. (1997. Para tal, foram mensuradas as variáveis antropométricas estatura (EST, massa corporal (MC, 4 dobras cutâneas (DC, 3 diâmetros ósseos (DO e 2 perímetros (PER, além do registro da idade. A amostra esteve constituída de 50 jovens (idade x =15,8±0,9 anos; estatura x =167,07±6,2 cm e MC x =57,97±7kg, sendo 27 jogadoras de voleibol e 23 jogadoras de basquetebol. A estimativa da densidade corporal (D foi realizada utilizando a equação proposta por Thorland et al. (1984 e a gordura relativa (%G foi obtida pela equação de Lohman (1986. Os percentuais de gordura dos outros estudos foram recalculados pela equação de Lohman (1986 para comparação com o presente estudo. Para a análise dos dados utilizou

  7. Brand logo recognition by children aged 3 to 6 years. Mickey Mouse and Old Joe the Camel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P M; Schwartz, M P; Richards, J W; Goldstein, A O; Rojas, T H

    1991-12-11

    Little is known about the influence of advertising on very young children. We, therefore, measured product logo recognition by subjects aged 3 to 6 years. Children were instructed to match logos with one of 12 products pictured on a game board. Twenty-two logos were tested, including those representing children's products, adult products, and those for two popular cigarette brands (Camel and Marlboro). Preschools in Augusta and Atlanta, Ga. A convenience sample of 229 children attending preschool. The children demonstrated high rates of logo recognition. When analyzed by product category, the level of recognition of cigarette logos was intermediate between children's and adult products. The recognition rates of The Disney Channel logo and Old Joe (the cartoon character promoting Camel cigarettes) were highest in their respective product categories. Recognition rates increased with age. Approximately 30% of 3-year-old children correctly matched Old Joe with a picture of a cigarette compared with 91.3% of 6-year-old children. Very young children see, understand, and remember advertising. Given the serious health consequences of smoking, the exposure of children to environmental tobacco advertising may represent an important health risk and should be studied further.

  8. Serum thyroid function, mortality and disability in advanced old age: The newcastle 85+ study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, S.H.S. (Simon H.S.); S. Razvi (Salman); Yadegarfar, M.E. (Mohammad E.); C. Martin-Ruiz (Carmen); Kingston, A. (Andrew); J.C. Collerton (Joanna); T.J. Visser (Theo); J.M. Kirkwood (John); C. Jagger (Carol)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Perturbations in thyroid function are common in older individuals but their significance in the very old is not fully understood. Objective: This study sought to determine whether thyroidhormonestatusandvariation of thyroid hormones within the reference range correlated with mor

  9. Growing Old and Staying Young: Population Policy in an Ageing Closed Economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groezen, Bas; Meijdam, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the relation between public pensions, fertility and child care in a closed economy OLG-model with endogenous fertility. It it shown that it is optimal to introduce child allowances if the government redistributes income from the young to the old, and rises when longevity increase

  10. Affective Development in Advanced Old Age: Analyses of Terminal Change in Positive and Negative Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Wiegering, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Late-life development of affect may unfold terminal changes that are driven more by end-of-life processes and not so much by time since birth. This study aimed to explore time-to-death-related effects in measures of affect in a sample of the very old. We used longitudinal data (2 measurement occasions: 2002 and 2003) from 140 deceased…

  11. Executive functions and sustained attention:Comparison between age groups of 19-39 and 40-59 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rosa de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Few studies involving the cognition of middle-aged adults are available in the international literature, particularly investigating the process of cognitive aging, executive components and attention. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are differences in performance on neuropsychological tasks of executive functions and sustained attention between two age groups. Methods: The sample consisted of 87 adults aged from 19 to 59 years old, divided into two groups according to the age variable (younger adults and middle-aged adults. All participants were Brazilian and had no sensory, psychiatric or neurological disorders; subjects also had no history of alcohol abuse, and no self-reported use of illicit drugs or antipsychotics. The neuropsychological instruments administered were the Hayling Test, Trail Making Test, Bells Test and verbal fluency tasks. Results: Groups showed no significant differences in relation to sociodemographic variables, educational level or frequency of reading and writing habits. The younger adult group performed better than the middle-aged group on tasks that involved mainly processing speed, cognitive flexibility and lexical search. Conclusions: These findings serve as a valuable reference for cognitive processing in middle-aged adults, since a large number of comparative studies focus only on the younger and later phases of adulthood. Additional studies are needed to investigate possible interaction between different factors such as age and education.

  12. The Analysis to the Influence of the Mass Athletic Dance on the Middle and old aged Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TangYueYueChunfang; AthleticDepartment

    2005-01-01

    The article gives the analysis to the mass athletic dances and its influence on the health of the middle and old-aged people. The research shows, through contrasting, observing and physiologically analyzing, that there is an improvement in lowering people's blood viscosity and increasing fats catabolism, raising the serum level as well as lowering the serum density, if these people take part in the mass athletic dances regularly for a long time.

  13. Role of social, cultural and economic capitals in perceived quality of life among old age people  in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Deshmukh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out the relationship of collective social, economic, and cultural properties of a population on the perceived quality of life (QOL among old age people. Materials and Methods: In a community-based cross-sectional study, we analyzed information on a representative sample of 900 old age (aged > 60 years from 28 villages in Kollam district of Kerala. " WHO-Quality of Life - BREF questionnaire" was used. Ethical clearance from Institutional Ethics Committee was obtained. The mean scores for "perceived" QOL for domains such as physical health, psychological health, social relations, and control of environments were calculated. The three scales (social capital, cultural capital, and economic capital were standardized using z-score transformation to make them comparable. Using multiple linear regression, we calculated the independent effect of economic capital, social capital, and cultural capital on perceived QOL among old people adjusted for age, sex, and the presence of chronic disease. Results: For overall QOL, only cultural capital contributed significantly. An increase of one unit z-score cultural capital led to three units increase in overall QOL score (β = 3.362; 95% CI: 2.645-4.078. Social capital and cultural capital contributed significantly to the physical health domain of QOL. With one z-score increase in social capital and cultural capital, QOL score of physical health domain increased by 0.2 units (β = 0. 227; 95% CI: 0.020-0.434, and 0.5 (β = 0. 596; 95% CI: 0.384-0.808 units, respectively. Psychological health domain and environmental domain were affected by all three capitals significantly. But, the social relations domain was significantly affected only by cultural capital (β = 0. 576; 95% CI: 0.373-0.779. Conclusion: Hence, the policies for old people should envision retaining our cultural and social norms along with the economic interventions for a better palliative care.

  14. No Place Like Home? Surveillance and What Home Means in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, W Ben; Sixsmith, Andrew; Beringer, Robert

    2016-03-01

    New surveillance technologies like those included in ambient assisted living - such as body-worn and passive environmental sensors, smart interfaces, and communications networks - are being developed to improve the security and safety of "at risk" older people, but ethical questions have been raised about the extent to which they compromise the rights and privacy of the people being monitored. The qualitative study we conducted was designed to help us understand the ways these novel surveillance technologies would influence individuals' everyday experiences of home. Participants felt new forms of surveillance would influence their sense of security, autonomy, and self-confidence, and would alter perceptions of home. The findings emphasize the need to improve our understanding of how ambient assisted living will affect the lives of those being monitored.

  15. Communicating with assistive listening devices and age-related hearing loss: Perceptions of older Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdeen, Lucinda; Fereiro, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Age-related hearing loss can impact adversely on the delivery of primary care and cannot necessarily be remedied by hearing aid technology. A study of 20 older Australians living in a Queensland retirement village and residential hostel complex was undertaken to investigate how communication might be advanced through an assistive listening device (ALD). Most participants were women aged over 85 years; almost all had hearing loss and wore hearing aids. Tests with an ALD found very high levels of satisfaction with understanding speech and sound quality amongst participants. However, few had heard previously of ALDs, all required individualised assistance to fit and use the device and rated ease of use less highly. The findings affirm those of previous studies that ALD technology has a role in communication for older hearing impaired people and for hearing rehabilitation. Its potential to enhance quality of life can be facilitated and promoted through nursing practice, but requires professional and consumer education so that it is not overlooked as a communication option.

  16. UCP3 polymorphisms, hand grip performance and survival at old age: association analysis in two Danish middle aged and elderly cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; Soerensen, Mette; Montesanto, Alberto; Lagani, Vincenzo; Passarino, Giuseppe; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2012-08-01

    An efficient uncoupling process is generally considered to have a protective effect on the aging muscle by slowing down its age-related decay. Genetic polymorphisms in the Uncoupling Protein 3 (UCP3) gene, whose product is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, were suggested to be associated with hand grip (HG) performances in elderly populations. Considering the population specificity of the quality of aging, we aimed to add further support to this evidence by analyzing the association between four SNPs in the UCP3 gene and relative haplotypes in two large cohorts of middle aged (N=708) and oldest old Danes (N=908). We found that the variability at rs1685354 and rs11235972 was associated with HG levels both at single and haplotypic level in both cohorts. Furthermore, taking advantage of large cohort and period survival data of the oldest cohort, we tested the association of each SNP with survival at 10years from the baseline visit. Interestingly, we found that allele A at rs11235972, associated in this cohort with lowest HG scores, influences also the survival patterns, with people carrying this allele showing higher mortality rates. On the whole, our work supports the role of UCP3 gene in functional status and survival at old age.

  17. The impact of a minimum pension on old age poverty and its budgetary cost. Evidence from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Dethier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact on old age poverty and the fiscal cost of universal minimum oldage pensions in Latin America using recent household survey data for 18 countries. Alleviatingold age poverty requires different approach from other age groups and a minimum pension islikely to be the only alternative available. First we measure old age poverty rates for all countries.Second we discuss the design of minimum pensions schemes, means-tested or not, as wellas the disincentive effects that they are expected to have on the economic and social behavior ofhouseholds including labor supply, saving and family solidarity. Third we use the household surveysto simulate the fiscal cost and the impact on poverty rates of alternative minimum pensionschemes in the 18 countries. We show that a universal minimum pension would substantiallyreduce poverty among the elderly except in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay where minimumpension systems already exist and poverty rates are low. Such schemes have much tobe commended in terms of incentives, spillover effects and administrative simplicity but have ahigh fiscal cost. The latter is a function of the age at which benefits are awarded, the prevailinglongevity, the generosity of benefits, the efficacy of means testing, and naturally the fiscal capacityof the country.

  18. Personality traits in old age: measurement and rank-order stability and some mean-level change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, René; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Lothian Birth Cohorts, 1936 and 1921 were used to study the longitudinal comparability of Five-Factor Model (McCrae & John, 1992) personality traits from ages 69 to 72 years and from ages 81 to 87 years, and cross-cohort comparability between ages 69 and 81 years. Personality was measured using the 50-item International Personality Item Pool (Goldberg, 1999). Satisfactory measurement invariance was established across time and cohorts. High rank-order stability was observed in both cohorts. Almost no mean-level change was observed in the younger cohort, whereas Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Intellect declined significantly in the older cohort. The older cohort scored higher on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. In these cohorts, individual differences in personality traits continued to be stable even in very old age, mean-level changes accelerated.

  19. Therapeutic Manipulation of Ageing: Repurposing Old Dogs and Discovering New Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallikarjun, Venkatesh; Swift, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Ageing is a leading risk factor for many debilitating diseases. While age-related diseases have been the subject of over a century of intense investigation, until recently, physiological ageing was considered unavoidable. Pharmacological and genetic studies have since shown that ageing is a malleable process and that its abrogation can prevent its associated diseases. This review summarises a sample of the most promising efforts to deliver the products of ageing research to the clinic. Current efforts include the use of clinically approved drugs that have since been repurposed, as well as the development of novel therapeutics, to target ageing. Furthermore, ongoing research has sought reliable biomarkers of ageing that will accelerate the development of such therapeutics. Development of these technologies will improve quality of late-life and help relieve the enormous stress placed on state healthcare systems by a rapidly ageing global population. Thus, for both medical and socioeconomic reasons, it is imperative that ageing is made to yield to intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatty old hearts: role of cardiac lipotoxicity in age-related cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Drosatos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cardiomyopathy accounts for a significant part of heart failure cases. Imbalance of the energetic equilibrium of the heart along with mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired β-adrenergic receptor signaling contributes in the aggravation of cardiac function in the elderly. In this review article, studies that correlate cardiac aging with lipotoxicity are summarized. The involvement of inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, β-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and mitochondrial dysfunction as underlying mechanisms for the lipid-driven age-related cardiomyopathy are presented with the aim to indicate potential therapeutic targets for cardiac aging.

  1. How old are you, really? Communicating chronic risk through 'effective age' of your body and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalter, David

    2016-08-05

    In communicating chronic risks, there is increasing use of a metaphor that can be termed 'effective-age': the age of a 'healthy' person who has the same risk profile as the individual in question. Popular measures include 'real-age', 'heart-age', 'lung-age' and so on.Here we formally define this concept, and illustrate its use in a variety of areas. We explore conditions under which the years lost or gained that are associated with exposure to risk factors depends neither on current chronological age, nor the period over which the risk is defined. These conditions generally hold for all-cause adult mortality, which enables a simple and vivid translation from hazard-ratios to years lost or gained off chronological age. Finally we consider the attractiveness and impact of this concept.Under reasonable assumptions, the risks associated with specific behaviours can be expressed in terms of years gained or lost off your effective age. The idea of effective age appears a useful and attractive metaphor to vividly communicate risks to individuals.

  2. "You get old. You get invisible": Social isolation and the challenge of communicating with aging women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkner, Tammy J; Weare, Andrea M; Tully, Melissa

    2017-04-04

    Social isolation is a problem facing many older women. Isolation can contribute to poor health as adults age without social support. Increased and tailored communication offers service organizations more opportunities to provide social support to these adults. This research examines perceptions of aging to explore communication behaviors, barriers, and opportunities for improved communication and service provision for aging women. Using data from focus groups and interviews, this study finds that participants from community organizations rely on word of mouth and traditional media to communicate with their aging constituents, despite opportunities to use digital communication and to develop communication plans for this population.

  3. Social position and health in old age: the relevance of different indicators of social position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Holstein, Bjørn E; Osler, Merete;

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: An analysis was undertaken to investigate social inequalities in health among old men and women in relation to five indicators of social position. METHODS: The study is based on a population-based cross-sectional survey among 748 75-year-old men and women, which was performed as clinical...... examinations and interviews in 1989 in Glostrup, a suburban area west of Copenhagen. Social position was measured by vocational education, occupation, social class, income, and housing tenure. Health was measured by number of chronic diseases, tiredness in relation to mobility, need of help in relation...... to mobility, oral health (number of teeth), and well-being (the CES-D Scale). The statistical analysis included bivariate contingency tables and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Two material wealth variables (income and tenure) were consistently related to nearly all health measures while...

  4. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; De Rango, Francesco; Crocco, Paolina; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1) was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking) and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination) status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64-107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979) associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p < 0.022). In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505) in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging.

  5. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Dato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1 was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64–107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979 associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p<0.022. In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505 in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging.

  6. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Automatic bone age assessment for young children from newborn to 7-year-old using carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent J

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed based on features extracted from phalangeal regions of interest (ROI) in a digital hand atlas, which can assess bone age of children from ages 7 to 18 accurately. Therefore, in order to assess the bone age of children in younger ages, the inclusion of carpal bones is necessary. However, due to various factors including the uncertain number of bones appearing, non-uniformity of soft tissue, low contrast between the bony structure and soft tissue, automatic segmentation and identification of carpal bone boundaries is an extremely challenging task. Past research works on carpal bone segmentation were performed utilizing dynamic thresholding. However, due to the limitation of the segmentation algorithm, carpal bones have not been taken into consideration in the bone age assessment procedure. In this paper, we developed and implemented a knowledge-based method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and morphological feature analysis. Fuzzy classification was then used to assess the bone age based on the selected features. This method has been successfully applied on all cases in which carpal bones have not overlapped. CAD results of total about 205 cases from the digital hand atlas were evaluated against subject chronological age as well as readings of two radiologists. It was found that the carpal ROI provides reliable information in determining the bone age for young children from newborn to 7-year-old.

  8. [Fruit and vegetables intake among the Chinese migrant population aged 18 to 59 years old in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Wang, Linhong; Deng, Qian; Zhao, Yinjun; Huang, Zhengjing; Li, Yichong; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Limin

    2014-11-01

    To describe the intake of fruit and vegetables among employed migrant population aged 18 to 59 year-olds in China. Data from the Migrant Population Survey related to China Chronic Disease and Risk Factor Surveillance that conducted in 170 counties/districts in 31 provinces, 2012, was used. Information on non-communicable diseases and related risk factors among migrant population were collected through face-to-face questionnaire interview, physical measurement and lab tests. A total of 48 704 subjects aged 18 to 59 years old were included in our study. Sample was standardized by age and sex. Information on average daily fruit and vegetables intake, prevalence of low fruit and vegetables intake, grouped by sex, age, industries, and education level were analyzed. The average daily intakes of vegetables and fruits were 353.7 (95%CI:351.3-356.2) g and 125.1 (95%CI:123.4-126.9) g respectively, among the employed migrant population aged 18-59 years old in China. Prevalence of low fruit and vegetables intake was 44.1% (95% CI:43.5%-44.6% ) among employed migrant population, 46.2% (95% CI: 45.5%-47.0%)for males and 41.2% (95% CI:40.3%-42.0%)for females (χ(2) = 82.19, P fruit and vegetables intake was the highest among people working in accommodation and restaurants (46.2%, 95%CI:45.0%-47.3%) while the lowest seen among those working in social services (42.5%, 95%CI:41.4%-43.7%,χ(2) = 15.81, P fruit and vegetables intake showed a decrease along with the increase of education levels (χ(2) = 22.29, P fruit and vegetables intake. Being male and with low education level were risk factors linked with the higher prevalence of low fruit and vegetables intake.

  9. Old age and forgoing treatment : a nationwide mortality follow-back study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, Sandra Martins; Pasman, H. Roeline; van der Heide, Agnes; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    Background The ageing of the population raises the need to study forgoing treatment decisions among older people. Aim To describe the incidence and decision-making of forgoing treatment and identify age-related differences. Methods A nationwide study of a stratified sample from the Statistics

  10. Rehearsal strategies during motor-sequence learning in old age : Execution vs motor imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Arjan J. R.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Kamsma, Yvo P. T.; Mulder, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Motor imagery and action-based rehearsal were compared during motor sequence-learning by young adults (M = 25 yr., SD = 3) and aged adults (M = 63 yr., SD = 7). General accuracy of aged adults was lower than that of young adults (F-1,F-28 = 7.37, p = .01) even though working-memory capacity was equi

  11. When Can Insurers Offer Products That Dominate Delayed Old-Age Pension Benefit Claiming?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, E.A.T.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.; Nijman, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    It is common practice for public pension schemes to offer individuals the option to delay benefit claiming until after the normal retirement age and adjust the annual benefit level as a result. This adjustment is often not actuarially neutral with respect to the age at which benefits are claimed. Th

  12. Rehearsal strategies during motor-sequence learning in old age : Execution vs motor imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Arjan J. R.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Kamsma, Yvo P. T.; Mulder, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Motor imagery and action-based rehearsal were compared during motor sequence-learning by young adults (M = 25 yr., SD = 3) and aged adults (M = 63 yr., SD = 7). General accuracy of aged adults was lower than that of young adults (F-1,F-28 = 7.37, p = .01) even though working-memory capacity was equi

  13. Affective and Cardiovascular Responding to Unpleasant Events from Adolescence to Old Age: Complexity of Events Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzus, Cornelia; Muller, Viktor; Wagner, Gert G.; Lindenberger, Ulman; Riediger, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated the "overpowering hypothesis" as a possible explanation for the currently inconclusive empirical picture on age differences in affective responding to unpleasant events. The overpowering hypothesis predicts that age differences in affective responding are particularly evident in highly resource-demanding situations that…

  14. 20 CFR 404.623 - Am I required to file for all benefits if I am eligible for old-age and husband's or wife's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... am eligible for old-age and husband's or wife's benefits? 404.623 Section 404.623 Employees' Benefits... benefits if I am eligible for old-age and husband's or wife's benefits? (a) Presumed filing for husband's... an application for husband's or wife's benefits in the first month of your entitlement to...

  15. O sentido da velhice para homens e mulheres idosos The meaning of old age for elderly men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria das Graças Melo Fernandes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo de natureza qualitativa foi efetivado no grupo de convivência Juventude Acumulada, do bairro popular de Cruz das Armas, do município de João Pessoa-PB. Da pesquisa, participaram dezoito mulheres e doze homens idosos que aceitaram, livremente, participar da investigação. A coleta de dados foi realizada nos meses de abril e maio de 2008, mediante uma entrevista semiestruturada gravada. Na análise do material empírico, utilizamos a abordagem de análise de discurso proposta por Fiorin. No que se refere aos sentidos atribuídos à velhice, verificamos que boa parte dos homens se sentem jovens, "velhos só na idade" ou diante da desvalia social da aposentadoria. Os demais consideram a velhice algo negativo para suas vidas, que ameaça sua autonomia e independência. As mulheres, em sua maioria, expressam e vivem a velhice de modo ambíguo, ou seja, apesar de entenderem a velhice como algo negativo e presente em suas vidas, essa fase do ciclo vital representa, para muitas, uma oportunidade de desfrutar os anos de vida que lhes restam de forma mais livre.This qualitative study was carried out in the coexistence group Juventude Acumulada, in the popular neighborhood Cruz das Armas, city of João Pessoa (Northeastern Brazil. Eighteen elderly women and twelve elderly men freely accepted to participate in the research. Data collection was accomplished in the months of April and May 2008 through a recorded semi-structured interview. In the analysis of the empirical material, the discourse analysis approach proposed by Fiorin was used. Concerning the meanings attributed to old age, it was verified that many men feel young, "old only in age" or due to the social dereliction that may come with retirement. The others view old age as something negative for their lives, something that threatens their autonomy and independence. The majority of the women, in turn, express and live old age in an ambiguous way, that is, although they understand old

  16. Improving Cognitive Function from Children to Old Age: A Systematic Review of Recent Smart Ageing Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Nouchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cognitive functions are important for daily life at any age. One purpose of Smart Ageing is to investigate how to improve cognitive functions. This systematic review evaluates beneficial effects of the intervention on cognitive functions. Method. We conducted a systematic review of intervention studies of improvements of cognitive functions published or in press before December 2013. Because of the heterogeneity of the intervention programs, a systematic and critical review of the interventions and outcomes was conducted instead of a meta-analysis. Results. We identified nine completed and published studies, which were divided into four categories: cognitive training using video game, cognitive training using PC, cognitive training using paper and pencil, and exercise training. Review results showed that various intervention programs can improve cognitive functions such as executive functions, working memory, episodic memory, processing speed, and general cognitive ability/IQ. Conclusions. The systematic review demonstrated that some intervention programs can be effective for improving various aspects of cognitive functioning at any age. Some limitations to this review include its small sample size and heterogeneity of programs and cognitive function measures, in addition to unresolved issues such as transfer of everyday skills and effectiveness for nonhealthy people.

  17. Sleep and Cognitive Performance From Teens To Old Age: More Is Not Better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Anne; Inslicht, Sabra S; Metzler, Thomas J; Mohlenhoff, Brian S; Rao, Madhu N; O'Donovan, Aoife; Neylan, Thomas C

    2017-01-01

    To determine the interaction of age and habitual sleep duration in predicting cognitive performance in a large sample of participants aged 15 to 89 years. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of performance data gathered between January 2012 and September 2013. First-time players (N = 512823) of three internet cognitive training games measuring processing speed, working memory, visuospatial memory, and arithmetic participated in the study. Performance was based on a measure of speed and accuracy for each game. The relationship between performance and self-reported habitual sleep duration was examined in the sample as a whole and across 10-year age groups starting at age 15 and ending at 75 and older. Performance peaked at 7 h of sleep duration for all three games in the sample as a whole, and the decrements in performance for sleep durations greater than 7 h were either comparable or greater in the youngest as compared to the oldest age groups. These findings challenge the hypothesis that deteriorating cognitive performance with long sleep duration is driven by medical comorbidities associated with aging. Further, these data are consistent with an optimal dose model of sleep and suggest that the model for the homeostatic recovery of cognitive function as a function of sleep duration should incorporate a curvilinear decline with longer duration sleep, indicating that there may be a cost to increased sleep. Replication and further research is essential for clarifying the sleep duration-cognition relationship in youth and adults of all ages.

  18. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  19. Heterogeneous effects of old age on human muscle oxidative capacity in vivo: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Liam F; Christie, Anita D; Kent, Jane A

    2016-11-01

    Despite intensive efforts to understand the extent to which skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity changes in older humans, the answer to this important question remains unclear. To determine what the preponderance of evidence from in vivo studies suggests, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of age on muscle oxidative capacity as measured noninvasively by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A secondary aim was to examine potential moderators contributing to differences in results across studies, including muscle group, physical activity status, and sex. Candidate papers were identified from PubMed searches (n = 3561 papers) and the reference lists of relevant papers. Standardized effects (Hedges' g) were calculated for age and each moderator using data from the 22 studies that met the inclusion criteria (n = 28 effects). Effects were coded as positive when older (age, ≥55 years) adults had higher muscle oxidative capacity than younger (age, 20-45 years) adults. The overall effect of age on oxidative capacity was positive (g = 0.171, p < 0.001), indicating modestly greater oxidative capacity in old. Notably, there was significant heterogeneity in this result (Q = 245.8, p < 0.001; I(2) = ∼70%-90%). Muscle group, physical activity, and sex were all significant moderators of oxidative capacity (p ≤ 0.029). This analysis indicates that the current body of literature does not support a de facto decrease of in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in old age. The heterogeneity of study results and identification of significant moderators provide clarity regarding apparent discrepancies in the literature, and indicate the importance of accounting for these variables when examining purported age-related differences in muscle oxidative capacity.

  20. Driving licences and medical screening in old age: Review of literature and European licensing policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Haustein, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Chronological age, per se, seems to be, in the case of mature drivers, only a weak predictor of safe driving performance. However, screening policies based on chronological age are widely used. Nevertheless, lately, more evidence-based policies have been called for. In this paper we first......, investigate the evidence for and against having an age-based driver screening policy in place; second, we map and compare the current driving licensing policies in European Union (EU) member states in order to examine the variation; and third, we draw conclusions based on the literature and the policy mapping...

  1. Combinations of motor measures more strongly predict adverse health outcomes in old age: the rush memory and aging project, a community-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Steven E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Motor impairment in old age is a growing public-health concern, and several different constructs have been used to identify motor impairments in older people. We tested the hypothesis that combinations of motor constructs more strongly predict adverse health outcomes in older people. Methods In total, 949 people without dementia, history of stroke or Parkinson's disease, who were participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project (a longitudinal community-based cohort study, underwent assessment at study entry. From this, three constructs were derived: 1 physical frailty based on grip strength, timed walk, body mass index and fatigue; 2 Parkinsonian Signs Score based on the modified motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; and 3 a motor construct, based on nine strength measures and nine motor performances. Disability and cognitive status were assessed annually. A series of Cox proportional-hazards models, controlling for age, sex and education, were used to examine the association of each of these three constructs alone and in various combinations with death, disability and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Results All three constructs were related (mean r = 0.50, all P Conclusions Physical frailty, parkinsonian signs score and global motor score are related constructs that capture different aspects of motor function. Assessments using several motor constructs may more accurately identify people at the highest risk of adverse health consequences in old age.

  2. Changes in perceptual speed and white matter microstructure in the corticospinal tract are associated in very old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövdén, Martin; Köhncke, Ylva; Laukka, Erika J; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Salami, Alireza; Li, Tie-Qiang; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2014-11-15

    The integrity of the brain's white matter is important for neural processing and displays age-related differences, but the contribution of changes in white matter to cognitive aging is unclear. We used latent change modeling to investigate this issue in a sample of very old adults (aged 81-103 years) assessed twice with a retest interval of 2.3 years. Using diffusion-tensor imaging, we probed white matter microstructure by quantifying mean fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of six major white matter tracts. Measures of perceptual speed, episodic memory, letter fluency, category fluency, and semantic memory were collected. Across time, alterations of white matter microstructure in the corticospinal tract were associated with decreases of perceptual speed. This association remained significant after statistically controlling for changes in white matter microstructure in the entire brain, in the other demarcated tracts, and in the other cognitive abilities. Changes in brain volume also did not account for the association. We conclude that white matter microstructure is a potent correlate of changes in sensorimotor aspects of behavior in very old age, but that it is unclear whether its impact extends to higher-order cognition.

  3. Old maids have more appeal: effects of age and pheromone source on mate attraction in an orb-web spider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Cory

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. In many insects and spider species, females attract males with volatile sex pheromones, but we know surprisingly little about the costs and benefits of female pheromone emission. Here, we test the hypothesis that mate attraction by females is dynamic and strategic in the sense that investment in mate attraction is matched to the needs of the female. We use the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi in which females risk the production of unfertilised egg clutches if they do not receive a copulation within a certain time-frame. Methods. We designed field experiments to compare mate attraction by recently matured (young females with females close to oviposition (old. In addition, we experimentally separated the potential sources of pheromone transmission, namely the female body and the web silk. Results. In accordance with the hypothesis of strategic pheromone production, the probability of mate attraction and the number of males attracted differed between age classes. While the bodies and webs of young females were hardly found by males, the majority of old females attracted up to two males within two hours. Old females not only increased pheromone emission from their bodies but also from their webs. Capture webs alone spun by old females were significantly more efficient in attracting males than webs of younger females. Discussion. Our results suggest that females modulate their investment in signalling according to the risk of remaining unmated and that they thereby economize on the costs associated with pheromone production and emission.

  4. Old maids have more appeal: effects of age and pheromone source on mate attraction in an orb-web spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Anna-Lena; Schneider, Jutta M

    2016-01-01

    Background. In many insects and spider species, females attract males with volatile sex pheromones, but we know surprisingly little about the costs and benefits of female pheromone emission. Here, we test the hypothesis that mate attraction by females is dynamic and strategic in the sense that investment in mate attraction is matched to the needs of the female. We use the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi in which females risk the production of unfertilised egg clutches if they do not receive a copulation within a certain time-frame. Methods. We designed field experiments to compare mate attraction by recently matured (young) females with females close to oviposition (old). In addition, we experimentally separated the potential sources of pheromone transmission, namely the female body and the web silk. Results. In accordance with the hypothesis of strategic pheromone production, the probability of mate attraction and the number of males attracted differed between age classes. While the bodies and webs of young females were hardly found by males, the majority of old females attracted up to two males within two hours. Old females not only increased pheromone emission from their bodies but also from their webs. Capture webs alone spun by old females were significantly more efficient in attracting males than webs of younger females. Discussion. Our results suggest that females modulate their investment in signalling according to the risk of remaining unmated and that they thereby economize on the costs associated with pheromone production and emission.

  5. Mitochondria in the Aging Muscles of Flies and Mice: New Perspectives for Old Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea del Campo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass accompanied by a decrease in muscle strength and resistance and is the main cause of disability among the elderly. Muscle loss begins long before there is any clear physical impact in the senior adult. Despite all this, the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle aging are far from being understood. Recent studies have identified that not only mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction but also mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial calcium uptake could be involved in the degeneration of skeletal muscle mass. Mitochondrial homeostasis influences muscle quality which, in turn, could play a triggering role in signaling of systemic aging. Thus, it has become apparent that mitochondrial status in muscle cells could be a driver of whole body physiology and organismal aging. In the present review, we discuss the existing evidence for the mitochondria related mechanisms underlying the appearance of muscle aging and sarcopenia in flies and mice.

  6. Perceived Autonomy in Old Age scale: Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Polish adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kroemeke

    2015-02-01

    The obtained results indicated very high reliability and accuracy for the Polish adaptation of the SPA. The tool can be used as a predictor and/or indicator of successful aging and life quality of seniors.

  7. The Use of Classification for Problem Solving: A Comparison of Middle and Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Douglas R.; Denney, Nancy Wadsworth

    1973-01-01

    Groups of middle-aged and elderly women were compared on problem solving behavior. Results indicated a decline in the use of classification skills among the elderly and an inability to use constraint-seeking questions. (ST)

  8. Sex differences in cognition are stable over a 10-year period in adulthood and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frias, Cindy M; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Herlitz, Agneta

    2006-01-01

    Sex differences in declarative memory and visuospatial ability are robust in cross-sectional studies. The present longitudinal study examined whether sex differences in cognition were present over a 10-year period, and whether age modified the magnitude of sex differences. Tests assessing episodic and semantic memory, and visuospatial ability were administered to 625 nondemented adults (initially aged 35-80 years), participating in the population-based Betula study at two follow-up occasions. There was stability of sex differences across five age groups and over a 10-year period. Women performed at a higher level than men on episodic recall, face and verbal recognition, and semantic fluency, whereas men performed better than women on a task-assessing, visuospatial ability. Sex differences in cognitive functions are stable over a 10-year period and from 35 to 90 years of age.

  9. THE DYNAMICS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE CHANGE FROM THE OLD ERA TO THE DIGITAL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmila Murtiani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article attempts to discuss why and how English has changed, tracing from particular features such as spelling, vocabulary, grammar, and meaning from Old English era until Modern English, how the people’s attitude toward the changes, and whether these changes ruin or contribute to the development of English as a global language.  As a final remark, this article will also offer a few suggestions on how the phenomenon of language change should be treated particularly on the relation with English language teaching and learning. Key words: language change, form, meaning, attitude

  10. Subfertility factors rather than assisted conception factors affect cognitive and behavioural development of 4-year-old singletons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schendelaar, Pamela; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J.; Seggers, Jorien; Van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-01-01

    Research on cognitive and behavioural development of children born after assisted conception is inconsistent. This prospective study aimed to explore underlying causal relationships between ovarian stimulation, in-vitro procedures, subfertility components and child cognition and behaviour. Participa

  11. Why do I dread looking old?: A test of social identity theory, terror management theory, and the double standard of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M; Teater, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    Outward appearance is one of the means by which age is determined, and fear of looking old may stem from fears about social identity and death. This study explored how social identity theory and terror management theory may help to explain the dread of looking old. University students from the United States, England, and Australia (N = 1,042) completed a questionnaire regarding their attitudes about aging and older adults. Results indicated that sex, age, beliefs about personal aging, and death anxiety explained 30.4% of the variance for participants' dread of looking old. Theoretical hypotheses were supported by our findings.

  12. 325例辅助受孕儿24月龄时精神运动发育水平研究%Psychomotor development at 24 months old in 325 children conceived with use of assisted reproductive technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵倩; 潘琼; 邹小英; 周细中; 张清学; 李宏

    2012-01-01

    [目的] 通过研究辅助受孕儿24月龄时的精神运动发育水平,以评价辅助生殖技术的安全性. [方法] 采用前瞻性对照研究方法,实验组为人工辅助受孕妊娠儿,对照组为自然受孕妊娠儿,将两组人群在母亲年龄、产次、家庭社会阶层、双亲受教育程度等几个方面进行配对,均自母亲孕28周起入组登记定期随访收集相关资料并由经过培训的指定专业人员采用CDCC婴幼儿发育量表定期对其行精神运动发育评估至24月龄,获得智力发育指数及运动发育指数.[结果] 辅助受孕儿童至24月龄时其精神运动发育水平与自然受孕儿童相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05). [结论]辅助受孕儿童24月龄时的精神运动发育水平正常,初步证明我国目前的辅助生殖技术是安全的.%[Objective] To compare the psychomotor development at 24 months old in children born after assisted conception with a control group of children conceived naturally. [Methods] A mached control study was performed on the psychomotor development of 24 months old in children conceived with use of assisted reproductive technology. The control group was matched according to maternal age,parity,social class and level of maternal education. The suitable mothers were invited to participate at 28 weeks of gestation and were followed up to delivery. The children of two groups were followed up to 24 months old and a formal developmental assessment was done with the CDCC Scales of Children Development. [Result] No statistically significant differences were found in the mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor development index (PDI) between study and control groups, as asssessed by the CDCC Scales. (Conclusion] The level of psychomotor development at 24 months old in children born after assisted conception was normal. So the assisted reproductive technology is safety in china.

  13. Small effect of genetic factors on neck pain in old age: a study of 2,108 Danish twins 70 years of age and older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Petersen, Hans Christian; Frederiksen, Henrik;

    2005-01-01

    environmental risk factors (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, disc prolapse, and coronary heart disease) showed no significant additive genetic, dominant genetic, or common environmental effects. CONCLUSION: Genetic factors do not play an important role in the liability to neck pain in persons 70 years......STUDY DESIGN: Classic twin study. OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of neck pain in persons 70 years of age and older. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Previous studies have shown a moderate effect of genetic factors on back pain in the elderly. Genetic influence on neck pain in old age...... is unknown. METHODS: Data on the 1-month prevalence of neck pain from twin pairs participating in the population based Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins formed the basis of this analysis. To assess twin similarity, probandwise concordance rates, odds ratios, and tetrachoric correlations were...

  14. Cognitive Function, Progression of Age-related Behavioral Changes, Biomarkers, and Survival in Dogs More Than 8 Years Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütt, T.; Berendt, M.; Toft, Nils

    2015-01-01

    patted, difficulty finding dropped food and anxiety. Thirty-three percent of dogs with a normal cognitive status progressed to MCI and 22% classified as MCI progressed to CCD during the study period. For 6 dogs diagnosed with CCD, signs of cognitive dysfunction increased with time. A diagnosis of CCD did......BackgroundCanine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative condition dominated by changes in behavioral patterns. Cohort studies investigating cognitive status in dogs are lacking. ObjectivesTo investigate cognitive function, progression of age-related behavioral changes......, survival, and possible biomarkers of CCD in aged dogs. AnimalsFifty-one dogs >8 years old; 21 with no cognitive deficits, 17 with mild cognitive impairments (MCI) and 13 with CCD. MethodsLongitudinal study. Recruitment period of 12 months and an observational period of 24 months including a baseline and 3...

  15. Who are lonely? Loneliness in different age groups (18-81 years old), using two measures of loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaisen, Magnhild; Thorsen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    This study asks if the prevalence of loneliness in the population varies depending on the measures used, with special focus on loneliness among the elderly. The study compares loneliness in different age groups between 18 and 81 years old (N = 14,743) using two measures of loneliness: the (indirect) six-item De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale and a single-item, direct question about loneliness. Data are from the Norwegian LOGG (Life Course, Generation, and Gender) study. We compare the findings on loneliness according to age, gender, health, and partner status. Overall, the two loneliness measures indicate a similar prevalence of loneliness, but attribute loneliness to somewhat different people. When using a direct measure, loneliness is more prevalent among women; when using the (indirect) De Jong Gierveld Scale, loneliness is more prevalent among men. Also, the association between age and loneliness differed when using the direct and the indirect measure.

  16. Cognitive Function, Progression of Age-related Behavioral Changes, Biomarkers, and Survival in Dogs More Than 8 Years Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütt, T.; Berendt, M.; Toft, Nils

    2015-01-01

    patted, difficulty finding dropped food and anxiety. Thirty-three percent of dogs with a normal cognitive status progressed to MCI and 22% classified as MCI progressed to CCD during the study period. For 6 dogs diagnosed with CCD, signs of cognitive dysfunction increased with time. A diagnosis of CCD did......BackgroundCanine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative condition dominated by changes in behavioral patterns. Cohort studies investigating cognitive status in dogs are lacking. ObjectivesTo investigate cognitive function, progression of age-related behavioral changes......, survival, and possible biomarkers of CCD in aged dogs. AnimalsFifty-one dogs >8 years old; 21 with no cognitive deficits, 17 with mild cognitive impairments (MCI) and 13 with CCD. MethodsLongitudinal study. Recruitment period of 12 months and an observational period of 24 months including a baseline and 3...

  17. Analysis of human dentition from Early Bronze Age: 4000-year-old puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przystańska, Agnieszka; Lorkiewicz-Muszyńska, Dorota; Abreu-Głowacka, Monica; Glapiński, Mariusz; Sroka, Alicja; Rewekant, Artur; Hyrchała, Anna; Bartecki, Bartłomiej; Żaba, Czesław; Kulczyk, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the first ever paleodontological investigation of human remains from an archeological site in Central Europe dating from the Early Bronze Age and attributed to the Strzyzow Culture. It corroborates the knowledge gained from archeological, anthropological and genetical investigations. Our study aimed to assess dental status, dental morphology and dental pathologies as well as tooth wear and enamel hypoplasia based on visual inspection and stereomicroscopic investigation. The research was supported by CBCT imaging to obtain digital images and 3D reconstructions as well as 2D radiographs essential for dental age estimation. All of the 191 teeth discovered showed morphological similarity, with adult teeth showing similar color, shape and size. A maxillary molar presenting with a unique root morphology and a mandibular molar with a rare occlusal surface were found. Both permanent and deciduous dentition presented significant tooth wear. A few specimens displayed signs of dental caries, periapical pathology and antemortem tooth loss. Three individuals exhibited linear enamel hypoplasia. CBCT provided high-quality 2D images useful for dental age estimation by non-destructive methods. Estimated dental age correlated with the age estimated by other anthropological methods. In one case, this was crucial because of insufficient material for anthropological analysis. The presented studies have proved that besides the skeleton, teeth can be used as a fundamental tool in assessing the overall health and living conditions of paleopopulations. It would seem that there is potential for considerable development to be made in the research and investigation of paleodontological material using CBCT.

  18. Learning Analytics: The next frontier for computer assisted language learning in big data age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qinglan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning analytics (LA has been applied to various learning environments, though it is quite new in the field of computer assisted language learning (CALL. This article attempts to examine the application of learning analytics in the upcoming big data age. It starts with an introduction and application of learning analytics in other fields, followed by a retrospective review of historical interaction between learning and media in CALL, and a penetrating analysis on why people would go to learning analytics to increase the efficiency of foreign language education. As approved in previous research, new technology, including big data mining and analysis, would inevitably enhance the learning of foreign languages. Potential changes that learning analytics would bring to Chinese foreign language education and researches are also presented in the article.

  19. Predictors of VO2Peak in children age 6- to 7-years-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Hermansen, Bianca; Bugge, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the predictors of aerobic fitness (VO2PEAK) in young children on a population-base. Participants were 436 children (229 boys and 207 girls) aged 6.7 ± 0.4 yrs. VO2PEAK was measured during a maximal treadmill exercise test. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometers....... Total body fat and total fat free mass were estimated from skinfold measurements. Regression analyses indicated that significant predictors for VO2PEAK per kilogram body mass were total body fat, maximal heart rate, sex, and age. Physical activity explained an additional 4-7%. Further analyses showed...... the main contributing factors for absolute values of VO2PEAK were fat free mass, maximal heart rate, sex, and age. Physical activity explained an additional 3-6%....

  20. Successful Aging and Longevity in Older Old Women: The Role of Depression and Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paulson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based in successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop research, this paper investigates cerebrovascular burden (CVB, depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline as threats to longevity. A subsample of stroke-free women over the age of 80 was identified in the Health and Retirement Survey (years 2000–2008. Mortality at 2, 6, and 8 year intervals was predicted using CVB (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and cognitive decline (decline of 1 standard deviation or more on the 35-point Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status over 2 years. At most waves (2002, 2004, and 2006 mortality was predicted by CVB, depressive symptoms, and cognitive drop measured 2 years prior. CVB and depressive symptoms at the 2000 wave predicted mortality at 6 and 8 years. Older women with the greatest longevity had low CVB, robust cognitive functioning, and few depression symptoms, supporting successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop.