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Sample records for offering obstetrical care

  1. Barriers to formal emergency obstetric care services' utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essendi, Hildah; Mills, Samuel; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Access to appropriate health care including skilled birth attendance at delivery and timely referrals to emergency obstetric care services can greatly reduce maternal deaths and disabilities, yet women in sub-Saharan Africa continue to face limited access to skilled delivery services. This study relies on qualitative data collected from residents of two slums in Nairobi, Kenya in 2006 to investigate views surrounding barriers to the uptake of formal obstetric services. Data indicate that slum dwellers prefer formal to informal obstetric services. However, their efforts to utilize formal emergency obstetric care services are constrained by various factors including ineffective health decision making at the family level, inadequate transport facilities to formal care facilities and insecurity at night, high cost of health services, and inhospitable formal service providers and poorly equipped health facilities in the slums. As a result, a majority of slum dwellers opt for delivery services offered by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who lack essential skills and equipment, thereby increasing the risk of death and disability. Based on these findings, we maintain that urban poor women face barriers to access of formal obstetric services at family, community, and health facility levels, and efforts to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality among the urban poor must tackle the barriers, which operate at these different levels to hinder women's access to formal obstetric care services. We recommend continuous community education on symptoms of complications related to pregnancy and timely referral. A focus on training of health personnel on "public relations" could also restore confidence in the health-care system with this populace. Further, we recommend improving the health facilities in the slums, improving the services provided by TBAs through capacity building as well as involving TBAs in referral processes to make access to services timely. Measures can also be

  2. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore...... barriers to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services by women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya. Methods: A facility-based qualitative study was conducted between November and December 2010. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women who experienced...... decision to seek care and in reaching an appropriate care facility. The "first" delay was due to lack of birth preparedness, including failure to identify a health facility for delivery services regardless of antenatal care and to seek care promptly despite recognition of danger signs. The "second" delay...

  3. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  4. Partograph utilization and associated factors among obstetric care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: An Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in June, 2013 on 403 obstetric care providers. A pre-tested and structured ... Being a midwife by profession, on job training, knowledge and attitude of obstetric care providers were factors affecting partograph utilization. Providing on job training for providers ...

  5. Assessment of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE ... Nigeria's high maternal mortality has been attributed to poor utilization of obstetric care services to handle ... Poor obstetric outcome in middle and low-income ... Evidence also showed that access to.

  6. Obstetric care of new European migrants in Scotland: an audit of antenatal care, obstetric outcomes and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, J K; Gorman, D R; Dundas, K; Sim, J

    2010-08-01

    There has been a twelve-fold increase in the number of New European migrants giving birth in Lothian between 2004 and 2007. The objective of this study was to audit obstetric care standards in Lothian for new migrants and recommend service improvements. A retrospective audit of 114/136 (84%) obstetric case records of new European migrants giving birth in Lothian hospitals in 2006 was conducted. Assessment was against care standards for antenatal booking, antenatal attendance and interpretation. Obstetric outcomes were audited against the general population. Eighty percent were primiparous. Fifty five percent had booked by the end of week 14. Mean birth weights and lengths of stay were similar to the general population. Intervention rates were 23% for Caesarean Sections (C/S) and 17% for instrumental deliveries (versus 27% and 19% respectively in the general population). Epidural or spinal anaesthesia was used for 57% compared to 50% of the general population. The interpretation services (ITS) were used infrequently. Full compliance with antenatal and interpretation standards was not achieved for this population. ITS was most commonly used to meet the needs of healthcare professionals, rather than as a routine. While there were no significant differences in maternity outcomes, poor communication did affect care.

  7. Obstetric care: competition or co-operation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Meijer, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of co-operation within maternity and obstetric care between midwives, general practitioners (GPs) and obstetricians. DESIGN: descriptive correlational study. SETTING: The Netherlands. Policy is towards more co-operation between

  8. The tremendous cost of seeking hospital obstetric care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsana, Kaosar

    2004-11-01

    In Bangladesh, maternal mortality is estimated to be 320 per 100,000 live births, among the highest in the world, and most deliveries in rural areas occur at home. Women with obstetric complications fear to seek hospital care for various reasons; one of which is the tremendous cost. This paper shows how cost impedes rural, poor women's access to emergency obstetric care. The data are from a larger ethnographic study of childbirth practices in 2000--01 in Apurbabari village, the adjacent sub-district health complex and more distant tertiary hospitals at district level. Families had to spend what for them added up to a fortune for a caesarean section and other surgery, medicines, laboratory investigations, blood transfusion, food, travel and other expenses. Corruption in the form of demands for under-the-table payments to obtain these aspects of essential care is rife. Adequate resources should be allocated to the different health facilities, including for emergency obstetric treatment. Thana health complexes (sub-district hospitals) should be upgraded to provide comprehensive obstetric care. The system for prescribing drugs should be reformed and the causes of corruption investigated and addressed. Hospital care should not be allowed to further impoverish the poor. Addressing these issues will help to encourage rural, poor women to seek skilled delivery and post-partum care, particularly in emergency situations.

  9. Patient Satisfaction with Virtual Obstetric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugeisen, Bethann Mangel; Mou, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Introduction The importance of patient satisfaction in US healthcare is increasing, in tandem with the advent of new patient care modalities, including virtual care. The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction of obstetric patients who received one-third of their antenatal visits in videoconference ("Virtual-care") compared to those who received 12-14 face-to-face visits in-clinic with their physician/midwife ("Traditional-care"). Methods We developed a four-domain satisfaction questionnaire; Virtual-care patients were asked additional questions about technology. Using a modified Dillman method, satisfaction surveys were sent to Virtual-care (N = 378) and Traditional-care (N = 795) patients who received obstetric services at our institution between January 2013 and June 2015. Chi-squared tests of association, t-tests, logistic regression, and ANOVA models were used to evaluate differences in satisfaction and self-reported demographics between respondents. Results Overall satisfaction was significantly higher in the Virtual-care cohort (4.76 ± 0.44 vs. 4.47 ± 0.59; p Virtual-care selection (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8; p Virtual-care respondents was not significantly impacted by the incorporation of videoconferencing, Doppler, and blood pressure monitoring technology into their care. The questionnaire demonstrated high internal consistency as measured by domain-based correlations and Cronbach's alpha. Discussion Respondents from both models were highly satisfied with care, but those who had selected the Virtual-care model reported significantly higher mean satisfaction scores. The Virtual-care model was selected by significantly more women who already have children than those experiencing pregnancy for the first time. This model of care may be a reasonable alternative to traditional care.

  10. Emergency obstetric care in a rural district of Burundi: What are the surgical needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E De Plecker

    Full Text Available In a rural district hospital in Burundi offering Emergency Obstetric care-(EmOC, we assessed the a characteristics of women at risk of, or with an obstetric complication and their types b the number and type of obstetric surgical procedures and anaesthesia performed c human resource cadres who performed surgery and anaesthesia and d hospital exit outcomes.A retrospective analysis of EmOC data (2011 and 2012.A total of 6084 women were referred for EmOC of whom 2534(42% underwent a major surgical procedure while 1345(22% required a minor procedure (36% women did not require any surgical procedure. All cases with uterine rupture(73 and extra-uterine pregnancy(10 and the majority with pre-uterine rupture and foetal distress required major surgery. The two most prevalent conditions requiring a minor surgical procedure were abortions (61% and normal delivery (34%. A total of 2544 major procedures were performed on 2534 admitted individuals. Of these, 1650(65% required spinal and 578(23% required general anaesthesia; 2341(92% procedures were performed by 'general practitioners with surgical skills' and in 2451(96% cases, anaesthesia was provided by nurses. Of 2534 hospital admissions related to major procedures, 2467(97% were discharged, 21(0.8% were referred to tertiary care and 2(0.1% died.Overall, the obstetric surgical volume in rural Burundi is high with nearly six out of ten referrals requiring surgical intervention. Nonetheless, good quality care could be achieved by trained, non-specialist staff. The post-2015 development agenda needs to take this into consideration if it is to make progress towards reducing maternal mortality in Africa.

  11. Migrants and obstetrics in Austria--applying a new questionnaire shows differences in obstetric care and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberaigner, Willi; Leitner, Hermann; Oberaigner, Karin; Marth, Christian; Pinzger, Gerald; Concin, Hans; Steiner, Horst; Hofmann, Hannes; Wagner, Teresa; Mörtl, Manfred; Ramoni, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Immigration plays a major role in obstetrics in Austria, and about 18 % of the Austrian population are immigrants. Therefore, we aimed to (1) test the feasibility of a proposed questionnaire for assessment of migrant status in epidemiological research and (2) assess some important associations between procedures and outcomes in obstetrics and migration in selected departments in Austria. We adapted a standardized questionnaire to the main immigration groups in Austria. Information on country of origin, length of residence in Austria and German-language ability was collected from eight selected obstetrics departments. Of the 1,971 questionnaires, 1,873 questionnaires of singleton births were selected and included in the analysis. We analyzed a total of 1,873 parturients with singleton births, of which 35 % had migrant status, 12 % were from ex-Yugoslavia, 12 % were from Turkey, and 12 % were from other countries. The proportion of parturients having their first care visit after the 12th week of pregnancy was higher in migrant groups (19 %). Smoking was highest in the migrants from ex-Yugoslavia (21 %). Vaginal delivery was more frequent in migrants from ex-Yugoslavia (78 %) and Turkey (83 %) than in nonmigrants (71 %) and episiotomy was more frequently performed in migrants from other countries. All differences are statistically significant. Administration of a standardized questionnaire for assessment of migrant status in obstetric departments in Austria was shown to be feasible. We assessed differences in obstetric care and outcome and consequently recommend that action should be initiated in Austria toward harmonizing obstetric procedures among the migrant and the nonmigrant groups and toward minimizing risk factors.

  12. Obstetric critical care services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    time of their first pregnancy, and assisted reproductive technology that has made it ... transport between levels of care, unavailability of blood and blood products ... 0.24%. Severe obstetric haemorrhage, hypertension and sepsis were the most ...

  13. Obstetric risk avoidance: Will anyone be offering obstetrics in private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By the end of the decade indemnifying obstetric risk will probably be too expensive for doctors in private practice. Non-indemnified doctors will be unable or unwilling to do private deliveries; however, women will still fall pregnant and require delivery. These women will inevitably be forced to deliver in provincial facilities, ...

  14. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives.

  15. Posttraumatic stress and depression may undermine abuse survivors' self-efficacy in the obstetric care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Natalie R; Tirone, Vanessa; Lillis, Teresa A; Holmgreen, Lucie; Chen-McCracken, Allison; Hobfoll, Stevan E

    2017-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) are associated with increased risk of obstetric complications among pregnant survivors of trauma, abuse and interpersonal violence, but little is known about how PTS affects women's actual experiences of obstetric care. This study investigated the rate at which abuse history was detected by obstetricians, whether abuse survivors experienced more invasive exams than is typically indicated for routine obstetric care, and whether psychological distress was associated with abuse survivors' sense of self-efficacy when communicating their obstetric care needs. Forty-one pregnant abuse survivors completed questionnaires about abuse history, current psychological distress and self-efficacy for communicating obstetric care needs and preferences. Electronic medical records (EMRs) were reviewed to examine frequency of invasive prenatal obstetric procedures (e.g. removal of clothing for external genital examination, pelvic exams and procedures) and to examine the detection rate of abuse histories during the initial obstetric visit. The majority of participants (83%) reported at least one past incident of violent physical or sexual assault. Obstetricians detected abuse histories in less than one quarter of cases. Nearly half of participants (46%) received invasive exams for non-routine reasons. PTS and depression symptoms were associated with lower self-efficacy in communicating obstetric care preferences. Women most at risk for experiencing distress during their obstetric visits and/or undergoing potentially distressing procedures may also be the least likely to communicate their distress to obstetricians. Results are discussed with implications for improving screening for abuse screening and distress symptoms as well as need for trauma-sensitive obstetric practices.

  16. Rural-urban inequity in unmet obstetric needs and functionality of emergency obstetric care services in a Zambian district

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phiri, Selia Ng'Anjo; Fylkesnes, Knut; Moland, Karen Marie

    2016-01-01

    . Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 as part of the 'Response to Accountable priority setting for Trust in health systems' (REACT) project. Data on all childbirths that occurred in emergency obstetric care facilities in 2010 were obtained retrospectively. Sources of information included...... registers from maternity ward admission, delivery and operation theatre, and case records. Data included age, parity, mode of delivery, obstetric complications, and outcome of mother and the newborn. An approach using estimated major obstetric interventions expected but not done in health facilities...

  17. Obstetric critical care services in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladness Nethathe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than half of all global maternal deaths occur in Africa. A large percentage of these deaths are preventable, and lack of access to adequate critical care facilities is a contributing factor. There are limited published data on the clinical and management challenges presented by the critically ill obstetric patient admitted to the intensive care unit in our setting, and more data are required in order to better define the critical care needs of this group of patients.

  18. Obstetric care in Brazil: An analysis of the situation

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    Marcia de Freitas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the situation of obstetric care in Brazil. Methods:Analysis of data from the Ministry of Health: Information System onMortality; Information System on Live Births; Information System onAmbulatory Care of the Brazilian Unified Health System; InformationSystem on Hospital Care of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Otherssource of data: the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics.Results: Maternal mortality rate was 50.83/100000 live births in Brazil.Prenatal care in the Northern and Northeastern regions of the countrypresented the lowest number of prenatal care appointments (27% ofpregnant women with less than 3 appointments. Premature labor wasthe main diagnosis for hospital admission before delivery. The numberof obstetric beds exceeds the population demand throughout the country.The main causes of maternal deaths were direct causes. Conclusions:Maternal mortality rate in Brazil is high and the main causes of deathsare preventable and related to medical and non-medical factors.

  19. Contemporary Obstetric Triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Edward Allen; Kaminski, Robert; Simhan, Hygriv; Beigi, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The role of obstetric triage in the care of pregnant women has expanded significantly. Factors driving this change include the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, improved methods of testing for fetal well-being, increasing litigation risk, and changes in resident duty hour guidelines. The contemporary obstetric triage facility must have processes in place to provide a medical screening examination that complies with regulatory statues while considering both the facility's maternal level of care and available resources. This review examines the history of the development of obstetric triage, current considerations in a contemporary obstetric triage paradigm, and future areas for consideration. An example of a contemporary obstetric triage program at an academic medical center is presented. A successful contemporary obstetric triage paradigm is one that addresses the questions of "sick or not sick" and "labor or no labor," for every obstetric patient that presents for care. Failure to do so risks poor patient outcome, poor patient satisfaction, adverse litigation outcome, regulatory scrutiny, and exclusion from federal payment programs. Understanding the role of contemporary obstetric triage in the current health care environment is important for both providers and health care leadership. This study is for obstetricians and gynecologists as well as family physicians. After completing this activity, the learner should be better able to understand the scope of a medical screening examination within the context of contemporary obstetric triage; understand how a facility's level of maternal care influences clinical decision making in a contemporary obstetric triage setting; and understand the considerations necessary for the systematic evaluation of the 2 basic contemporary obstetric questions, "sick or not sick?" and "labor or no labor?"

  20. Comparative study analysing women's childbirth satisfaction and obstetric outcomes across two different models of maternity care

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    Conesa Ferrer, Ma Belén; Canteras Jordana, Manuel; Ballesteros Meseguer, Carmen; Carrillo García, César; Martínez Roche, M Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the differences in obstetrical results and women's childbirth satisfaction across 2 different models of maternity care (biomedical model and humanised birth). Setting 2 university hospitals in south-eastern Spain from April to October 2013. Design A correlational descriptive study. Participants A convenience sample of 406 women participated in the study, 204 of the biomedical model and 202 of the humanised model. Results The differences in obstetrical results were (biomedical model/humanised model): onset of labour (spontaneous 66/137, augmentation 70/1, p=0.0005), pain relief (epidural 172/132, no pain relief 9/40, p=0.0005), mode of delivery (normal vaginal 140/165, instrumental 48/23, p=0.004), length of labour (0–4 hours 69/93, >4 hours 133/108, p=0.011), condition of perineum (intact perineum or tear 94/178, episiotomy 100/24, p=0.0005). The total questionnaire score (100) gave a mean (M) of 78.33 and SD of 8.46 in the biomedical model of care and an M of 82.01 and SD of 7.97 in the humanised model of care (p=0.0005). In the analysis of the results per items, statistical differences were found in 8 of the 9 subscales. The highest scores were reached in the humanised model of maternity care. Conclusions The humanised model of maternity care offers better obstetrical outcomes and women's satisfaction scores during the labour, birth and immediate postnatal period than does the biomedical model. PMID:27566632

  1. Obstetric violence according to obstetric nurses

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    Michelle Gonçalves da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to report the experience of obstetric nurses on the obstetric violence experienced, witnessed and observed during their professional careers. This study is based on an account of experience of working in several health institutions such as basic health units, private and public hospitals, located in São Paulo, Brazil, in a period 5-36 years of technical training and professional experience from 1977 to 2013. The technique to expose the professional experiences was brainstorming. The results were divided into violent utterances of health professionals to patients, unnecessary and/or iatrogenic experiences procedures performed by health professionals and the institutional unpreparedness with unstructured environment. It is concluded that through the speeches of the obstetric nurses there are several obstetric violence experienced and witnessed in their work routines, with differences between two types of delivery care: evidence-based obstetrics and traditional care model.

  2. Partograph utilization and associated factors among obstetric care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of maternal deaths which can be reduced by proper utilization of partograph during labor. Methods: An Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in June, 2013 on 403 obstetric care providers. A pre-test- ed and structured ...

  3. Obstetric intensive care admissions at a tertiary hospital in Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mortality of between 1 and 5%,[2,12] while others have reported .... ICU, and the need for a critical care specialist should be considered. ... Madan I, Jain NJ, Grotegut C, Nelson D, Dandolu V. Characteristics of obstetric intensive care.

  4. Using the unmet obstetric needs indicator to map inequities in life-saving obstetric interventions at the local health care system in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Dubourg, Dominique; Makokha, Anselimo

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundDeveloping countries with high maternal mortality need to invest in indicators that not only provide information about how many women are dying, but also where, and what can be done to prevent these deaths. The unmet Obstetric Needs (UONs) concept provides this information. This concept...... was applied at district level in Kenya to assess how many women had UONs and where the women with unmet needs were located.MethodsA facility based retrospective study was conducted in 2010 in Malindi District, Kenya. Data on pregnant women who underwent a major obstetric intervention (MOI) or died...... in facilities that provide comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) services in 2008 and 2009 were collected. The difference between the number of women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications and those who received care was quantified. The main outcome measures in the study were...

  5. Access barriers to obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2017-06-06

    Since 2000, the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals, which included a goal to improve maternal health by the end of 2015, has facilitated significant reductions in maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, despite more focused efforts made especially by low- and middle-income countries, targets were largely unmet in sub-Saharan Africa, where women are plagued by many challenges in seeking obstetric care. The aim of this review was to synthesise literature on barriers to obstetric care at health institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. This review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases were electronically searched to identify studies on barriers to health facility-based obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa, in English, and dated between 2000 and 2015. Combinations of search terms 'obstetric care', 'access', 'barriers', 'developing countries' and 'sub-Saharan Africa' were used to locate articles. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies were considered. A narrative synthesis approach was employed to synthesise the evidence and explore relationships between included studies. One hundred and sixty articles met the inclusion criteria. Currently, obstetric care access is hindered by several demand- and supply-side barriers. The principal demand-side barriers identified were limited household resources/income, non-availability of means of transportation, indirect transport costs, a lack of information on health care services/providers, issues related to stigma and women's self-esteem/assertiveness, a lack of birth preparation, cultural beliefs/practices and ignorance about required obstetric health services. On the supply-side, the most significant barriers were cost of services, physical distance between health facilities and service users' residence, long waiting times at health

  6. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care in Gambia's main referral hospital: women-users' testimonies

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    Sundby Johanne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction of maternal mortality ratio by two-thirds by 2015 is an international development goal with unrestricted access to high quality emergency obstetric care services promoted towards the attainment of that goal. The objective of this qualitative study was to assess the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care services in Gambia's main referral hospital. Methods From weekend admissions a group of 30 women treated for different acute obstetric conditions including five main diagnostic groups: hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, dystocia, sepsis and anemia were purposively selected. In-depth interviews with the women were carried out at their homes within two weeks of discharge. Results Substantial difficulties in obtaining emergency obstetric care were uncovered. Health system inadequacies including lack of blood for transfusion, shortage of essential medicines especially antihypertensive drugs considerably hindered timely and adequate treatment for obstetric emergencies. Such inadequacies also inflated the treatment costs to between 5 and 18 times more than standard fees. Blood transfusion and hypertensive treatment were associated with the largest costs. Conclusion The deficiencies in the availability of life-saving interventions identified are manifestations of inadequate funding for maternal health services. Substantial increase in funding for maternal health services is therefore warranted towards effective implementation of emergency obstetric care package in The Gambia.

  7. Obstetric patients' health-related quality of life before and after intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pia, Seppänen; Reijo, Sund; Tero, Ala-Kokko; Mervi, Roos; Jukka, Uotila; Mika, Helminen; Tarja, Suominen

    2018-03-23

    Intensive care admissions during pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum period are relatively well investigated. However, very little is known about these obstetric patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after critical care. The objective of this study was to assess obstetric patients' HRQoL before intensive care admission (baseline) and at 6 months after discharge (follow-up) DESIGN: This was a retrospective database study. In a 5-year period, the data of all women admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during pregnancy, delivery, or up to 42 days postpartum were analysed. Four multidisciplinary ICUs of Finnish University hospitals participated. The HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) instrument with utility score (EQsum) and visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS). A total of 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. Of these, 99 (35%) completed the EQ-5D questionnaires both at baseline and follow-up, and 65 of them (23%) completed EQ-VAS. The comparison of patients' EQsum scores before intensive care admission and after discharge showed that patients' HRQoL remained good (0.970 vs 0.972) (max 1.0) or increased (0.788 vs 0.982) in 80.8% of the patients. Patients reported improved overall health on the EQ-VAS at 6 months follow-up (EQ-VAS mean, 71.86 vs 88.20; p ≤ 0.001) (max 100). However, 19.2% of the patients had lower HRQoL (EQsum mean 0.987 vs 0.798) at follow-up. Following intensive care, 15% of the patients had more pain/discomfort, and 11% expressed more depression/anxiety. Multiparous patients were more likely to suffer from worsened depression/anxiety (p = 0.024). In the majority of the obstetric patients, HRQoL at 6 months follow-up remained good or had increased from baseline. However, nearly one-fifth of the patients had impaired HRQoL after discharge. Thus, intensive care management should take in to consideration follow-up program after intensive care of ICU-admitted obstetric

  8. Knowledge and perceptions of quality of obstetric and newborn care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim Quality of service delivery for maternal and newborn health in Malawi is influenced by human resource shortages and knowledge and care practices of the existing service providers. We assessed Malawian healthcare providers' knowledge of management of routine labour, emergency obstetric care and emergency ...

  9. Linking household and health facility surveys to assess obstetric service availability, readiness and coverage: evidence from 17 low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyangarara, Mufaro; Chou, Victoria B; Creanga, Andreea A; Walker, Neff

    2018-06-01

    Improving access and quality of obstetric service has the potential to avert preventable maternal, neonatal and stillborn deaths, yet little is known about the quality of care received. This study sought to assess obstetric service availability, readiness and coverage within and between 17 low- and middle-income countries. We linked health facility data from the Service Provision Assessments and Service Availability and Readiness Assessments, with corresponding household survey data obtained from the Demographic and Health Surveys and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys. Based on performance of obstetric signal functions, we defined four levels of facility emergency obstetric care (EmOC) functionality: comprehensive (CEmOC), basic (BEmOC), BEmOC-2, and low/substandard. Facility readiness was evaluated based on the direct observation of 23 essential items; facilities "ready to provide obstetric services" had ≥20 of 23 items available. Across countries, we used medians to characterize service availability and readiness, overall and by urban-rural location; analyses also adjusted for care-seeking patterns to estimate population-level coverage of obstetric services. Of the 111 500 health facilities surveyed, 7545 offered obstetric services and were included in the analysis. The median percentages of facilities offering EmOC and "ready to provide obstetric services" were 19% and 10%, respectively. There were considerable urban-rural differences, with absolute differences of 19% and 29% in the availability of facilities offering EmOC and "ready to provide obstetric services", respectively. Adjusting for care-seeking patterns, results from the linking approach indicated that among women delivering in a facility, a median of 40% delivered in facilities offering EmOC, and 28% delivered in facilities "ready to provide obstetric services". Relatively higher coverage of facility deliveries (≥65%) and coverage of deliveries in facilities "ready to provide obstetric

  10. Non-physician providers of obstetric care in Mexico: Perspectives of physicians, obstetric nurses and professional midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeMaria Lisa M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico 87% of births are attended by physicians. However, the decline in the national maternal mortality rate has been slower than expected. The Mexican Ministry of Health’s 2009 strategy to reduce maternal mortality gives a role to two non-physician models that meet criteria for skilled attendants: obstetric nurses and professional midwives. This study compares and contrasts these two provider types with the medical model, analyzing perspectives on their respective training, scope of practice, and also their perception and/or experiences with integration into the public system as skilled birth attendants. Methodology This paper synthesizes qualitative research that was obtained as a component of the quantitative and qualitative study that evaluated three models of obstetric care: professional midwives (PM, obstetric nurses (ON and general physicians (GP. A total of 27 individual interviews using a semi-structured guide were carried out with PMs, ONs, GPs and specialists. Interviews were transcribed following the principles of grounded theory, codes and categories were created as they emerged from the data. We analyzed data in ATLAS.ti. Results All provider types interviewed expressed confidence in their professional training and acknowledge that both professional midwives and obstetric nurses have the necessary skills and knowledge to care for women during normal pregnancy and childbirth. The three types of providers recognize limits to their practice, namely in the area of managing complications. We found differences in how each type of practitioner perceived the concept and process of birth and their role in this process. The barriers to incorporation as a model to attend birth faced by PMs and ONs are at the individual, hospital and system level. GPs question their ability and training to handle deliveries, in particular those that become complicated, and the professional midwifery model particularly as it relates to

  11. Provider report of the existence of detection and care of perinatal depression: quantitative evidence from public obstetric units in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Filipa de; Place, Jean Marie; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Rivera-Rivera, Leonor; Billings, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    To provide evidence on perinatal mental healthcare in Mexico. Descriptive and bivariate analyses of data from a cross-sectional probabilistic survey of 211 public obstetric units. Over half (64.0%) of units offer mental healthcare; fewer offer perinatal depression (PND) detection (37.1%) and care (40.3%). More units had protocols/guidelines for PND detection and for care, respectively, in Mexico City-Mexico state (76.7%; 78.1%) than in Southern (26.5%; 36.4%), Northern (27.3%; 28.1%) and Central Mexico (50.0%; 52.7%). Protocols and provider training in PND, implementation of brief screening tools and psychosocial interventions delivered by non-clinical personnel are needed.

  12. Working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers: a critical incident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipeta, Effie; Bradley, Susan; Chimwaza-Manda, Wanangwa; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2016-08-26

    Malawi continues to experience critical shortages of key health technical cadres that can adequately respond to Malawi's disease burden. Difficult working conditions contribute to low morale and frustration among health care workers. We aimed to understand how obstetric care staff perceive their working relationships with managers. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in health facilities in Malawi between October and December 2008. Critical Incident Analysis interviews were done in government district hospitals, faith-based health facilities, and a sample of health centres' providing emergency obstetric care. A total of 84 service providers were interviewed. Data were analyzed using NVivo 8 software. Poor leadership styles affected working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers. Main concerns were managers' lack of support for staff welfare and staff performance, lack of mentorship for new staff and junior colleagues, as well as inadequate supportive supervision. All this led to frustrations, diminished motivation, lack of interest in their job and withdrawal from work, including staff seriously considering leaving their post. Positive working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers are essential for promoting staff motivation and positive work performance. However, this study revealed that staff were demotivated and undermined by transactional leadership styles and behavior, evidenced by management by exception and lack of feedback or recognition. A shift to transformational leadership in nurse-manager relationships is essential to establish good working relationships with staff. Improved providers' job satisfaction and staff retentionare crucial to the provision of high quality care and will also ensure efficiency in health care delivery in Malawi.

  13. Eliminating abusive 'care': A criminal law response to obstetric violence in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Pickles, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the disrespectful, abusive and violent maternity care that many South African people face. It identifies this conduct as a human rights violation and argues that intentional abusive maternity care should be labelled as obstetric violence, a specific form of gender-based violence, and that it should be criminalised. This approach reflects a nascent global trend to act against obstetric violence, and draws inspiration from statutory crimes introduced in Venezuela and Mexic...

  14. Obstetric Fistula “Disease” and Ensuing Care: Patients' Views in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    views on obstetric fistula trauma and care in order to implement an effective holistic care ... problems despite surgical success has been .... Appendix 1: Participants socio-medical characteristics at the end of the study ..... pain during childbirth and post-surgery stories, but ... pain only when moving, and others no pain at all.

  15. A systematic review of essential obstetric and newborn care capacity building in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Bhuinneain, G M; McCarthy, F P

    2015-01-01

    Progress in maternal survival in sub-Saharan Africa has been poor since the Millennium Declaration. This systematic review aims to investigate the presence and rigour of evidence for effective capacity building for Essential Obstetric and Newborn Care (EONC) to reduce maternal mortality in rural, sub-Saharan Africa, where maternal mortality ratios are highest globally. MEDLINE (1990-January 2014), EMBASE (1990-January 2014), and the Cochrane Library were included in our search. Key developing world issues of The Lancet and the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, African Ministry of Health websites, and the WHO reproductive health library were searched by hand. Studies investigating essential obstetric and newborn care packages in basic and comprehensive care facilities, at community and institutional level, in rural sub-Saharan Africa were included. Studies were included if they reported on healthcare worker performance, access to care, community behavioural change, and emergency obstetric and newborn care. Data were extracted and all relevant studies independently appraised using structured abstraction and appraisal tools. There is moderate evidence to support the training of healthcare workers of differing cadres in the provision of emergency obstetric and newborn services to reduce institutional maternal mortality and case-fatality rates in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Community schemes that sensitise and enable access to maternal health services result in a modest rise in facility birth and skilled birth attendance in this rural setting. Essential Obstetric and Newborn Care has merit as an intervention package to reduce maternal mortality in rural sub-Saharan Africa. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. Geographical, Ethnic and Socio-Economic Differences in Utilization of Obstetric Care in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke G Posthumus

    Full Text Available All women in the Netherlands should have equal access to obstetric care. However, utilization of care is shaped by demand and supply factors. Demand is increased in high risk groups (non-Western women, low socio-economic status (SES, and supply is influenced by availability of hospital facilities (hospital density. To explore the dynamics of obstetric care utilization we investigated the joint association of hospital density and individual characteristics with prototype obstetric interventions.A logistic multi-level model was fitted on retrospective data from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (years 2000-2008, 1.532.441 singleton pregnancies. In this analysis, the first level comprised individual maternal characteristics, the second of neighbourhood SES and hospital density. The four outcome variables were: referral during pregnancy, elective caesarean section (term and post-term breech pregnancies, induction of labour (term and post-term pregnancies, and birth setting in assumed low-risk pregnancies.Higher hospital density is not associated with more obstetric interventions. Adjusted for maternal characteristics and hospital density, living in low SES neighbourhoods, and non-Western ethnicity were generally associated with a lower probability of interventions. For example, non-Western women had considerably lower odds for induction of labour in all geographical areas, with strongest effects in the more rural areas (non-Western women: OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.77-0.80, p<0.001.Our results suggest inequalities in obstetric care utilization in the Netherlands, and more specifically a relative underservice to the deprived, independent of level of supply.

  17. Barriers to obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa--a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2015-04-23

    Since the launch of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the United Nations in 2000, the global community has intensified efforts to reduce adverse maternal health outcomes, especially, in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite these efforts, there is an increasing concern that the decline in maternal deaths has been less than optimal, even for women who receive birthing care in health facilities. High maternal deaths have been attributed to a variety of issues such as poor quality of care, inadequate resources, poor infrastructure, and inaccessibility to healthcare services. In other words, even in settings where they are available, many women do not receive life-saving obstetric care, when needed, despite the fact that basic and comprehensive obstetric care is widely recognized as a key to meeting maternal health goals. It is important to understand the common challenges that this developing region is facing in order to ensure a more rapid decline in adverse maternal health outcomes. The aim of this review is to synthesize literature on barriers to obstetric care at health institutions which focuses on sub-Saharan Africa, the region that is most affected by severe maternal morbidity and mortality. This review follows guidelines by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) checklist. An electronic search of published literature will be conducted to identify studies which examined barriers to health facility-based obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases will be searched. Published articles in English, dated between 2000 and 2014, will be included. Combinations of search terms such as obstetric care, access, barriers, developing countries, and sub-Saharan Africa will be used to locate related articles, and eligible ones retained for data abstraction. A narrative synthesis approach will be employed to synthesize the evidence and explore

  18. The impact of emergency obstetric care training in Somaliland, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Charles; Adegoke, Adetoro; Hofman, Jan; Ismail, Fouzia M; Ahmed, Fatuma M; van den Broek, Nynke

    2012-06-01

    To provide and evaluate in-service training in "Life Saving Skills - Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care" in order to improve the availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Somaliland. In total, 222 healthcare providers (HCPs) were trained between January 2007 and December 2009. A before-after study was conducted using quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate trainee reaction and change in knowledge, skills, and behavior, in addition to functionality of healthcare facilities, during and immediately after training, and at 3 and 6 months post-training. The HCPs reacted positively to the training, with a significant improvement in 50% of knowledge and 100% of skills modules assessed. The HCPs reported improved confidence in providing EmOC. Basic and comprehensive EmOC healthcare facilities provided 100% of expected signal functions-compared with 43% and 56%, respectively, at baseline-with trained midwives performing skills usually performed by medical doctors. Lack of drugs, supplies, medical equipment, and supportive policy were identified as barriers that could contribute to nonuse of new skills and knowledge acquired. The training impacted positively on the availability and quality of EmOC and resulted in "up-skilling" of midwives. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns and determinants of care seeking for obstetric complications in rural northwest Bangladesh: analysis from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shegufta S; Labrique, Alain B; Craig, Ian M; Wakil, Mohammad Abdul; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Ali, Hasmot; Mehra, Sucheta; Wu, Lee; Shaikh, Saijuddin; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2015-04-18

    In communities with low rates of institutional delivery, little data exist on care-seeking behavior for potentially life-threatening obstetric complications. In this analysis, we sought to describe care-seeking patterns for self-reported complications and near misses in rural Bangladesh and to identify factors associated with care seeking for these conditions. Utilizing data from a community-randomized controlled trial enrolling 42,214 pregnant women between 2007 and 2011, we used multivariable multinomial logistic regression to explore the association of demographic and socioeconomic factors, perceived need, and service availability with care seeking for obstetric complications or near misses. We also used multivariable multinomial logistic regression to analyze the factors associated with care seeking by type of obstetric complication (eclampsia, sepsis, hemorrhage, and obstructed labor). Out of 9,576 women with data on care seeking for obstetric complications, 77% sought any care, with 29% (n = 2,150) visiting at least one formal provider and 70% (n = 5,149) visiting informal providers only. The proportion of women seeking at least one formal provider was highest among women reporting eclampsia (57%), followed by hemorrhage (28%), obstructed labor (22%), and sepsis (17%) (p s literacy (RRR of 1.21; 95% CI of [1.05-1.42]), and women's employment (RRR of 1.10; 95% CI of [1.01-1.18]) were significantly associated with care seeking from formal providers. Service factors including living less than 10 kilometers from a health facility (RRR of 1.16; 95% CI of [1.05-1.28]) and facility availability of comprehensive obstetric services (RRR of 1.25; 95% CI of 1.04-1.36) were also significantly associated with seeking care from formal providers. While the majority of women reporting obstetric complications sought care, less than a third visited health facilities. Improvements in socioeconomic factors such as maternal literacy, coupled with improved geographic access and

  20. Oocyte Donation Pregnancies- Non-Disclosure of Oocyte Recipient Status to Obstetric Care Providers and Perinatal Outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-11-01

    Oocyte donation pregnancies- non-disclosure of oocyte recipient (OR) status to obstetric care providers and perinatal outcomes.Many studies report a higher rate of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and severe pre-eclampsia (PET) in OR pregnancies. The objective is to determine the rates of non-disclosure of OR pregnancy to obstetric care providers and also the rates of perinatal complications.

  1. Knowledge and utilization of partograph among obstetric care givers in public health institutions of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisma Engida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, there was an estimated number of 287,000 maternal deaths in 2010. Eighty five percent (245,000 of these deaths occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. Among the causes of these deaths were obstructed and prolonged labour which could be prevented by cost effective and affordable health interventions like the use of the partograph. The Use of the partograph is a well-known best practice for quality monitoring of labour and subsequent prevention of obstructed and prolonged labour. However, a number of cases of obstructed labour do happen in health facilities due to poor quality of intrapartum care. Methods A cross-sectional quantitative study assessed knowledge and utilization of partograph among obstetric care givers in public health institutions of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia using a structured interviewer administered questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with knowledge and use of partograph among obstetric care givers. Results Knowledge about the partograph was fair: 189 (96.6% of all the respondents correctly mentioned at least one component of the partograph, 104 (53.3% correctly explained the function of alert line and 161 (82.6% correctly explained the function of action line. The study showed that 112 (57.3% of the obstetric care givers at public health institutions reportedly utilized partograph to monitor mothers in labour. The utilization of the partograph was significantly higher among obstetric care givers working in health centres (67.9% compared to those working in hospitals (34.4% [Adjusted OR = 3.63(95%CI: 1.81, 7.28]. Conclusions A significant percentage of obstetric care givers had fair knowledge of the partograph and why it is necessary to use it in the management of labour and over half of obstetric care givers reported use of the partograph to monitor mothers in labour. Pre-service and

  2. Nursing In Front Of Technology As A Care Fundament On UTI Obstetric/Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Caxias de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an article about the historical evolution of nursing, emphasizing conceptual and reflexive aspects about the impact of technology on the care process in Obstetrical/Neonatal ICU. Although the technology has contributed to the survival pregnant / premature infants extremes and very low weight in recent years, reveals at times a mechanical and impersonal service, a counterpoint to ethical and human issues. A critical-reflexive discussion is proposed under the use of technology in obstetric and neonatal intensive care, highlighting their implications and adaptations to maternal and child needs. It was concluded that what determines whether a technology is good or bad, if it dehumanises, depersonalises or objectifies care is the way in which it is used, making it necessary to improve and update health professionals. In this reflexive exercise, new ways of caring will be rethought, using art, sensitivity and creativity in the appropriation and humanization of technologies.   Descriptors: Nursing Informatics. Information Technology. Nursing Care. Maternal Health. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal.

  3. Provider report of the existence of detection and care of perinatal depression: quantitative evidence from public obstetric units in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide evidence on perinatal mental healthcare in Mexico. Materials and methods. Descriptive and bivariate analyses of data from a cross-sectional probabilistic survey of 211 public obstetric units. Results. Over half (64.0% of units offer mental healthcare; fewer offer perinatal depression (PND detection (37.1% and care (40.3%. More units had protocols/guidelines for PND detection and for care, respectively, in Mexico City-Mexico state (76.7%; 78.1% than in Southern (26.5%; 36.4%, Northern (27.3%; 28.1% and Central Mexico (50.0%; 52.7%. Conclusion. Protocols and provider training in PND, implementation of brief screening tools and psychosocial interventions delivered by non-clinical personnel are needed.      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21149/spm.v58i4.8028

  4. Quality of care in the management of major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, S N

    2012-02-01

    Substandard care is reported to occur in a large number of cases of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). A prospective audit was carried out by a multidisciplinary team at our hospital over a one year period to assess the quality of care (QOC) delivered to women experiencing MOH. MOH was defined according to criteria outlined in the Scottish Audit of Maternal Morbidity (SAMM). 31 cases were identified yielding an incidence of 3.5\\/1000 deliveries. The predominant causes were uterine atony 11 (35.4%), retained products of conception 6 (19.3%) and placenta praevia\\/accreta 6 (19.3%). Excellent initial resuscitation and monitoring was noted with a high level of senior staff input. Indicators of QOC compared favourably with the SAMM. Areas for improvement were identified. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of detailed prospective data collection in MOH in a busy Dublin obstetric unit with a view to developing a national audit. Standardization of definitions allows for international comparisons.

  5. U.S. Navy Women's Satisfaction With Obstetric and Gynecologic Medical Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burr, R

    1997-01-01

    There are more than 55,000 women on active duty in the U.S. Navy. Previous research has shown that women utilize health care services at higher rates than men, and that obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN...

  6. Attitudes toward surrogacy among doctors working in reproductive medicine and obstetric care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfelt, Camilla; Armuand, Gabriela; Wånggren, Kjell; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2018-03-07

    To investigate attitudes and opinions towards surrogacy among physicians working within obstetrics and reproductive medicine in Sweden. Physicians working within medically assisted reproduction (MAR), antenatal care and obstetrics were invited to participate in a cross-sectional nationwide survey study. The study-specific questionnaire measured attitudes and experiences in three domains: attitudes towards surrogacy, assessment of prospective surrogate mothers, and antenatal and obstetric care for surrogate mothers. Of the 103 physicians who participated (response rate 74%), 63% were positive or neutral towards altruistic surrogacy being introduced in Sweden. However, only 28% thought that it should be publicly financed. Physicians working at fertility clinics were more positive towards legalization as well as public financing of surrogacy compared than were those working within antenatal and delivery care. The majority of the physicians agreed that surrogacy involves the risk of exploitation of women's bodies (60%) and that there is a risk that the commissioning couple might pay the surrogate mother "under the table" (82%). They also expressed concerns about potential surrogate mothers not being able to understand fully the risks of entering pregnancy on behalf of someone else. There is a relatively strong support among physicians working within obstetrics and reproductive medicine for the introduction of surrogacy in Sweden. However, the physicians expressed concerns about the surrogate mothers' health as well as the risk of coercion. Further discussions about legalization of surrogacy should include views from individuals within a wide field of different medical professions and laymen. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. The Role of Quality Obstetric Care Services on Reducing Maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study recommends that, special initiative should be done to bring changes on reducing maternal mortality, such as ensure essential equipments and ... Enforcement in providing quality of obstetric care services in maternal health services especially in rural areas where majority of people in Tanzania reside is not an ...

  8. The state of emergency obstetric care services in Nairobi informal settlements and environs: Results from a maternity health facility survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliku Teresa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge with estimates exceeding 1,000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in some countries. Successful prevention of maternal deaths hinges on adequate and quality emergency obstetric care. In addition to skilled personnel, there is need for a supportive environment in terms of essential drugs and supplies, equipment, and a referral system. Many household surveys report a reasonably high proportion of women delivering in health facilities. However, the quality and adequacy of facilities and personnel are often not assessed. The three delay model; 1 delay in making the decision to seek care; 2 delay in reaching an appropriate obstetric facility; and 3 delay in receiving appropriate care once at the facility guided this project. This paper examines aspects of the third delay by assessing quality of emergency obstetric care in terms of staffing, skills equipment and supplies. Methods We used data from a survey of 25 maternity health facilities within or near two slums in Nairobi that were mentioned by women in a household survey as places that they delivered. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Permission was also sought from the Ministry of Health and the Medical Officer of Health. Data collection included interviews with the staff in-charge of maternity wards using structured questionnaires. We collected information on staffing levels, obstetric procedures performed, availability of equipment and supplies, referral system and health management information system. Results Out of the 25 health facilities, only two met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (both located outside the two slums while the others provided less than basic emergency obstetric care. Lack of obstetric skills, equipment, and supplies hamper many facilities from providing lifesaving emergency obstetric procedures. Accurate estimation of burden

  9. Seeking what matters: determinants of clients' satisfaction in obstetric care services in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moazzam; Qazi, Muhammad Suleman; Seuc, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the dimensions of the service quality in the public hospitals and evaluate the determinants of client satisfaction in obstetric health in the context of Pakistan. The present research evaluates the application of an integrated client satisfaction model that draws mainly from the original SERVQUAL framework in obstetric health services. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in four public district hospitals in Pakistan, enrolling 1101 clients attending obstetric health care services. Measures of service quality and determinants of client satisfaction were factor-analysed and multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis. The client satisfaction increased significantly with increases in respondent's age, number of children, number of visits and with decrease in educational status. Factor analysis revealed five service quality dimensions; and multiple regression analysis showed that all five dimensions of service quality in obstetric care were significant in explaining client satisfaction. The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction was provider communication with clients, followed by responsiveness and discipline. Interventions aimed at improving client provider interaction would not only advance the clinical provision of services, butwould also result in greater patient satisfaction with the services provided, leading to higher levels of facility utilization and continuity of care. Better client provider interaction can be accomplished at hospital's level through focused training of all cadre of service providers sensitizing them on clients' needs. Results also showed that the proposed framework is a valid and flexible instrument in assessing and monitoring service quality and enabling staff to identify where improvements are needed, from the clients' perspective.

  10. Implementation and Effects of Risk-Dependent Obstetric Care in the Netherlands (Expect Study II): Protocol for an Impact Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Montfort, Pim; Willemse, Jessica Ppm; Dirksen, Carmen D; van Dooren, Ivo Ma; Meertens, Linda Je; Spaanderman, Marc Ea; Zelis, Maartje; Zwaan, Iris M; Scheepers, Hubertina Cj; Smits, Luc Jm

    2018-05-04

    Recently, validated risk models predicting adverse obstetric outcomes combined with risk-dependent care paths have been made available for early antenatal care in the southeastern part of the Netherlands. This study will evaluate implementation progress and impact of the new approach in obstetric care. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a study evaluating the impact of implementing risk-dependent care. Validated first-trimester prediction models are embedded in daily clinical practice and combined with risk-dependent obstetric care paths. A multicenter prospective cohort study consisting of women who receive risk-dependent care is being performed from April 2017 to April 2018 (Expect Study II). Obstetric risk profiles will be calculated using a Web-based tool, the Expect prediction tool. The primary outcomes are the adherence of health care professionals and compliance of women. Secondary outcomes are patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. Outcome measures will be established using Web-based questionnaires. The secondary outcomes of the risk-dependent care cohort (Expect II) will be compared with the outcomes of a similar prospective cohort (Expect I). Women of this similar cohort received former care-as-usual and were prospectively included between July 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015 (Expect I). Currently, women are being recruited for the Expect Study II, and a total of 300 women are enrolled. This study will provide information about the implementation and impact of a new approach in obstetric care using prediction models and risk-dependent obstetric care paths. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4143; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4143 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6t8ijtpd9). ©Pim van Montfort, Jessica PPM Willemse, Carmen D Dirksen, Ivo MA van Dooren, Linda JE Meertens, Marc EA Spaanderman, Maartje Zelis, Iris M Zwaan, Hubertina CJ Scheepers, Luc JM Smits. Originally published in JMIR

  11. Geographical, Ethnic and Socio-Economic Differences in Utilization of Obstetric Care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthumus, Anke G; Borsboom, Gerard J; Poeran, Jashvant; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2016-01-01

    All women in the Netherlands should have equal access to obstetric care. However, utilization of care is shaped by demand and supply factors. Demand is increased in high risk groups (non-Western women, low socio-economic status (SES)), and supply is influenced by availability of hospital facilities (hospital density). To explore the dynamics of obstetric care utilization we investigated the joint association of hospital density and individual characteristics with prototype obstetric interventions. A logistic multi-level model was fitted on retrospective data from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (years 2000-2008, 1.532.441 singleton pregnancies). In this analysis, the first level comprised individual maternal characteristics, the second of neighbourhood SES and hospital density. The four outcome variables were: referral during pregnancy, elective caesarean section (term and post-term breech pregnancies), induction of labour (term and post-term pregnancies), and birth setting in assumed low-risk pregnancies. Higher hospital density is not associated with more obstetric interventions. Adjusted for maternal characteristics and hospital density, living in low SES neighbourhoods, and non-Western ethnicity were generally associated with a lower probability of interventions. For example, non-Western women had considerably lower odds for induction of labour in all geographical areas, with strongest effects in the more rural areas (non-Western women: OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.77-0.80, pNetherlands, and more specifically a relative underservice to the deprived, independent of level of supply.

  12. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was "ad hoc" and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful 'template' for other vaccines.

  13. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan--a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Zuhal; Brekke, Mette

    2013-05-06

    Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled "the worst country in which to be a mom" in Save the Children's World's Mothers' Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi's phenomenological analysis. Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and transportation problems led to underuse of available care

  14. Assessment of surgical and obstetrical care at 10 district hospitals in Ghana using on-site interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fizan; Choo, Shelly; Hesse, Afua A J; Abantanga, Francis; Sory, Elias; Osen, Hayley; Ng, Julie; McCord, Colin W; Cherian, Meena; Fleischer-Djoleto, Charles; Perry, Henry

    2011-12-01

    For most of the population in Africa, district hospitals represent the first level of access for emergency and essential surgical services. The present study documents the number and availability of surgical and obstetrical care providers as well as the types of surgical and obstetrical procedures being performed at 10 first-referral district hospitals in Ghana. After institutional review board and governmental approval, a study team composed of Ghanaian and American surgeons performed on-site surveys at 10 district hospitals in 10 different regions of Ghana in August 2009. Face-to-face interviews were conducted documenting the numbers and availability of surgical and obstetrical personnel as well as gathering data relating to the number and types of procedures being performed at the facilities. A total of 68 surgical and obstetrical providers were interviewed. Surgical and obstetrical care providers consisted of Medical Officers (8.5%), nurse anesthetists (6%), theatre nurses (33%), midwives (50.7%), and others (4.5%). Major surgical cases represented 37% of overall case volumes with cesarean section as the most common type of major surgical procedure performed. The most common minor surgical procedures performed were suturing of lacerations or episiotomies. The present study demonstrates that there is a substantial shortage of adequately trained surgeons who can perform surgical and obstetrical procedures at first-referral facilities. Addressing human resource needs and further defining practice constraints at the district hospital level are important facets of future planning and policy implementation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Views of senior health personnel about quality of emergency obstetric care: A qualitative study in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonofua, Friday; Randawa, Abdullahi; Ogu, Rosemary; Agholor, Kingsley; Okike, Ola; Abdus-Salam, Rukayat Adeola; Gana, Mohammed; Abe, Eghe; Durodola, Adetoye; Galadanci, Hadiza

    2017-01-01

    Late arrival in hospital by women experiencing pregnancy complications is an important background factor leading to maternal mortality in Nigeria. The use of effective and timely emergency obstetric care determines whether women survive or die, or become near-miss cases. Healthcare managers have the responsibility to deploy resources for implementing emergency obstetric care. To determine the nature of institutional policies and frameworks for managing obstetric complications and reducing maternal deaths in Nigeria. Thirty-six hospital managers, heads of obstetrics department and senior midwives were interviewed about hospital infrastructure, resources, policies and processes relating to emergency obstetric care, whilst allowing informants to discuss their thoughts and feelings. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed using Atlas ti 6.2software. Hospital managers are aware of the seriousness of maternal mortality and the steps to improve maternal healthcare. Many reported the lack of policies and specific action-plans for maternal mortality prevention, and many did not purposely disburse budgets or resources to address the problem. Although some reported that maternal/perinatal audit take place in their hospitals, there was no substantive evidence and no records of maternal/perinatal audits were made available. Respondents decried the lack of appropriate data collection system in the hospitals for accurate monitoring of maternal mortality and identification of appropriate remediating actions. Healthcare managers are handicapped to properly manage the healthcare system for maternal mortality prevention. Relevant training of healthcare managers would be crucial to enable the development of strategic implementation plans for the prevention of maternal mortality.

  16. Pattern and determinants of obstetric complications among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of antenatal care visits also significantly predicted the likelihood of obstetric complications. Binomial logistic regression analysis predicted that the more the number of antenatal care visits the less likely the occurrence of obstetric complications, with 4 or more visits reducing obstetric complications 14 times.

  17. Obstetric care providers' knowledge, practice and associated factors towards active management of third stage of labor in Sidama Zone, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenaw, Zelalem; Yohannes, Zemenu; Amano, Abdela

    2017-09-07

    Active management of third stage of labor played a great role to prevent child birth related hemorrhage. However, maternal morbidity and mortality related to hemorrhage is high due to lack of knowledge and skill of obstetric care providers 'on active management of third stage of labor. Our study was aimed to assess knowledge, practice and associated factors of obstetric care providers (Midwives, Nurses and Health officers) on active management of third stage of labor in Sidama Zone, South Ethiopia. An institution based cross sectional study design was conducted from December 1-30 /2015 among midwives, nurses and health officers. Simple random sampling technique was used to get the total of 528 participants. Data entry was done using EPI Info 3.5.1 and exported to SPSS version 20.0 software package for analysis. The presence of association between independent and dependent variables was assessed using odds ratio with 97% confidence interval by applying logistic regression model. Of the 528 obstetric care providers 37.7% and 32.8% were knowledgeable and skilled to manage third stage of labor respectively. After controlling for possible confounding factors, the result showed that pre/in service training, being midwife and graduation year were found to be the major predictors of proper active management of third stage of labor. The knowledge and practice of obstetric care providers towards active management of third stage of labor can be improved with appropriate interventions like in-service trainings. This study also clearly showed that the level of knowledge and practice of obstetric care providers to wards active management of third stage of labor needs immediate attention of Universities and health science colleges better to revise their obstetrics course contents, health institutions and zonal health bureau should arrange trainings for their obstetrics care providers to enhance skill.

  18. Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleto, Ayele; Chojenta, Catherine; Mussa, Abdulbasit; Loxton, Deborah

    2018-04-16

    Nearly 15% of all pregnancies end in fatal perinatal obstetric complications including bleeding, infections, hypertension, obstructed labor, and complications of abortion. Between 1990 and 2015, an estimated 10.7 million women died due to obstetric complications. Almost all of these deaths (99%) happened in developing countries, and 66% of maternal deaths were attributed to sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases of maternal mortalities can be prevented through provision of evidence-based potentially life-saving signal functions of emergency obstetric care. However, different factors can hinder women's ability to access and use emergency obstetric services in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, the aim of this review is to synthesize current evidence on barriers to accessing and utilizing emergency obstetric care in sub-Saharan African. Decision-makers and policy formulators will use evidence generated from this review in improving maternal healthcare particularly the emergency obstetric care. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and Maternity and Infant Care will be searched for studies using predefined search terms. Articles published in English language between 2010 and 2017 with quantitative and qualitative design will be included. The identified papers will be assessed for meeting eligibility criteria. First, the articles will be screened by examining their titles and abstracts. Then, two reviewers will review the full text of the selected articles independently. Two reviewers using a standard data extraction format will undertake data extraction from the retained studies. The quality of the included papers will be assessed using the mixed methods appraisal tool. Results from the eligible studies will be qualitatively synthesized using the narrative synthesis approach and reported using the three delays model. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist will be employed to present the findings. This

  19. Review of emergency obstetric care interventions in health facilities in the Upper East Region of Ghana: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Onanjiri, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; McCann, Terence V

    2018-03-15

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is most prevalent in resource-poor settings such as sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia. In sub-Saharan Africa, Ghana is one of the countries still facing particular challenges in reducing its maternal morbidity and mortality. Access to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) interventions has been identified as a means of improving maternal health outcomes. Assessing the range of interventions provided in health facilities is, therefore, important in determining capacity to treat obstetric emergencies. The aim of this study was to examine the availability of emergency obstetric care interventions in the Upper East Region of Ghana. A cross-sectional survey of 120 health facilities was undertaken. Status of emergency obstetric care was assessed through an interviewer administered questionnaire to directors/in-charge officers of maternity care units in selected facilities. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Eighty per cent of health facilities did not meet the criteria for provision of emergency obstetric care. Comparatively, private health facilities generally provided EmOC interventions less frequently than public health facilities. Other challenges identified include inadequate skill mix of maternity health personnel, poor referral processes, a lack of reliable communication systems and poor emergency transport systems. Multiple factors combine to limit women's access to a range of essential maternal health services. The availability of EmOC interventions was found to be low across the region; however, EmOC facilities could be increased by nearly one-third through modest investments in some existing facilities. Also, the key challenges identified in this study can be improved by enhancing pre-existing health system structures such as Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS), training more midwifery personnel, strengthening in-service training and implementation of referral audits as part of health service

  20. Obstetric Performance Recallaccuracy (OPERa) amonga low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... Accurate obstetric history is of utmost importance in prenatal care to ensure optimal maternal fetal outcomes. ... Primiparous and multiparous women, who accessed antenatal care in a rural Mission Hospital over a two-year period, had their past obstetric histories recorded in a pro ...

  1. Too few staff, too many patients: a qualitative study of the impact on obstetric care providers and on quality of care in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Susan; Kamwendo, Francis; Chipeta, Effie; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; de Pinho, Helen; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2015-03-21

    Shortages of staff have a significant and negative impact on maternal outcomes in low-income countries, but the impact on obstetric care providers in these contexts is less well documented. Despite the government of Malawi's efforts to increase the number of human resources for health, maternal mortality rates remain persistently high. Health workers' perceptions of insufficient staff or time to carry out their work can predict key variables concerning motivation and attrition, while the resulting sub-standard care and poor attitudes towards women dissuade women from facility-based delivery. Understanding the situation from the health worker perspective can inform policy options that may contribute to a better working environment for staff and improved quality of care for Malawi's women. A qualitative research design, using critical incident interviews, was used to generate a deep and textured understanding of participants' experiences. Eligible participants had performed at least one of the emergency obstetric care signal functions (a) in the previous three months and had experienced a demotivating critical incident within the same timeframe. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Eighty-four interviews were conducted. Concerns about staff shortages and workload were key factors for over 40% of staff who stated their intention to leave their current post and for nearly two-thirds of the remaining health workers who were interviewed. The main themes emerging were: too few staff, too many patients; lack of clinical officers/doctors; inadequate obstetric skills; undermining performance and professionalism; and physical and psychological consequences for staff. Underlying factors were inflexible scheduling and staff allocations that made it impossible to deliver quality care. This study revealed the difficult circumstances under which maternity staff are operating and the professional and emotional toll this exacts. Systems failures and inadequate human resource

  2. Availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) among public and private health facilities in rural northwest Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shegufta S; Labrique, Alain B; Ali, Hasmot; Hanif, Abu A M; Klemm, Rolf D W; Mehra, Sucheta; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2015-01-31

    Although safe motherhood strategies recommend that women seek timely care from health facilities for obstetric complications, few studies have described facility availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC). We sought to describe and compare availability and readiness to provide EmOC among public and private health facilities commonly visited for pregnancy-related complications in two districts of northwest Bangladesh. We also described aspects of financial and geographic access to healthcare and key constraints to EmOC provision. Using data from a large population-based community trial, we identified and surveyed the 14 health facilities (7 public, 7 private) most frequently visited for obstetric complications and near misses as reported by women. Availability of EmOC was based on provision of medical services, assessed through clinician interviews and record review. Levels of EmOC availability were defined as basic or comprehensive. Readiness for EmOC provision was based on scores in four categories: staffing, equipment, laboratory capacity, and medicines. Readiness scores were calculated using unweighted averages. Costs of C-section procedures and geographic locations of facilities were described. Textual analysis was used to identify key constraints. The seven surveyed private facilities offered comprehensive EmOC compared to four of the seven public facilities. With 100% representing full readiness, mean EmOC readiness was 81% (range: 63%-91%) among surveyed private facilities compared to 67% (range: 48%-91%) in public facilities (p = 0.040). Surveyed public clinics had low scores on staffing and laboratory capacity (69%; 50%). The mean cost of the C-section procedure in private clinics was $77 (standard deviation: $16) and free in public facilities. The public sub-district facilities were the only facilities located in rural areas, with none providing comprehensive EmOC. Shortages in specialized staff were listed as the main barrier to EmOC provision in

  3. Can private obstetric care be saved in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Howarth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the question of whether private obstetric care in South Africa (SA can be saved in view of the escalation in medical and legal costs brought about by a dramatic increase in medical negligence litigation. This question is assessed with reference to applicable medical and legal approaches. The crux of the matter is essentially a question of affordability. From a medical perspective, it seems that the English system (as articulated by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists as well as American perspectives may be well suited to the SA situation. Legal approaches are assessed in the context of the applicable medicolegal framework in SA, the present nature of damages and compensation with reference to obstetric negligence liability, as well as alternative options (no-fault and capping of damages to the present system based on fault. It is argued, depending on constitutional considerations, that a system of damages caps for noneconomic damages seems to be the most appropriate and legally less invasive system in conjunction with the establishment of a state excess insurance fund.

  4. Geographical Accessibility to Obstetric and Neonatal Care and its Effect on Early Neonatal Mortality in Colombia, 2012-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Rojas Gualdrón

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The distribution of health resources influences early neonatal mortality, granting access to obstetric care which is a major public health problem. However, the geographical dimension of this influence has not been studied in Colombia. Objective: To describe the geographical accessibility to obstetric and neonatal care beds and its association with early neonatal mortality in Colombia and its municipalities. Method:An ecological study at municipal level was carried out. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression and a geographically weighted regression (GWR were used to explore statistical and spatial associations. Results: The municipalities in Colombia with Higher mortality tend to have lower geographical accessibility to obstetric and neonatal beds after controlling the fertility and economic characteristics of these municipalities. This association is significant only in municipalities of the west coast. The strength of this association decreases in inner municipalities. Discussion: The centralization of obstetric and neonatal beds in major municipalities around the central region leaves municipalities with high risk of mortality underserved. The decentralization of obstetric and neonatal healthcare resources is a mandatory issue in order to reduce geographical disparities in mortality and to improve neonatal survival, and a healthy beginning of life.

  5. How obstetric settings can help address gaps in psychiatric care for pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byatt, Nancy; Cox, Lucille; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Kini, Nisha; Biebel, Kathleen; Sankaran, Padma; Swartz, Holly A; Weinreb, Linda

    2018-03-13

    To elucidate (1) the challenges associated with under-recognition of bipolar disorder in obstetric settings, (2) barriers pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder face when trying to access psychiatric care, and (3) how obstetric settings can identify such women and connect them with mental health services. Structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 pregnant and postpartum women recruited from obstetric practices who scored ≥ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder I, II, or not otherwise specified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Quantitative analyses included descriptive statistics. Interviews were transcribed, and resulting data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Most participants (n = 19, 79.17%) did not have a clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder documented in their medical records nor had received referral for treatment during pregnancy (n = 15, 60%). Of participants receiving pharmacotherapy (n = 14, 58.33%), most were treated with an antidepressant alone (n = 10, 71.42%). Most medication was prescribed by an obstetric (n = 4, 28.57%) or primary care provider (n = 7, 50%). Qualitative interviews indicated that participants want their obstetric practices to proactively screen for, discuss and help them obtain mental health treatment. Women face challenges in securing mental health treatment appropriate to their bipolar illness. Obstetric providers provide the bulk of medical care for these women and need supports in place to (1) better recognize bipolar disorder, (2) avoid inappropriate prescribing practices for women with undiagnosed bipolar disorder, and (3) ensure women are referred to specialized treatment when needed.

  6. A systematic review of the effectiveness of training in emergency obstetric care in low-resource environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lonkhuijzen, L.; Dijkman, A.; van Roosmalen, J.; Zeeman, G.; Scherpbier, A.

    Background Training of healthcare workers can play an important role in improving quality of care, and reducing maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of training programmes aimed at improving emergency obstetric care in low-resource environments.

  7. Existence and functionality of emergency obstetric care services at district level in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Kombe, Yeri; Dubourg, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on emergency obstetric care (EmOC) is limited in Kenya, where only partial data from sub-national studies exist. The EmOC process indicators have also not been integrated into routine health management information system to monitor progress in safe motherhood interventions both...

  8. Quality Assurance Practices in Obstetric Care: A Survey of Hospitals in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Lee, Henry C; Dueñas, Grace Villarin; Gregory, Kimberly D; Grossetta Nardini, Holly K; Pettker, Christian M; Illuzzi, Jessica L; Xu, Xiao

    2018-02-01

    To assess hospital practices in obstetric quality management activities and identify institutional characteristics associated with utilization of evidence-supported practices. Data for this study came from a statewide survey of obstetric hospitals in California regarding their organization and delivery of perinatal care. We analyzed responses from 185 hospitals that completed quality assurance sections of the survey to assess their practices in a broad spectrum of quality enhancement activities. The association between institutional characteristics and adoption of evidence-supported practices (ie, those supported by prior literature or recommended by professional organizations as beneficial for improving birth outcome or patient safety) was examined using bivariate analysis and appropriate statistical tests. Most hospitals regularly audited adherence to written protocols regarding critical areas of care; however, 77.7% and 16.8% reported not having written guidelines on diagnosis of labor arrest and management of abnormal fetal heart rate, respectively. Private nonprofit hospitals were more likely to have a written protocol for management of abnormal fetal heart rate (P=.002). One in 10 hospitals (9.7%) did not regularly review cases with significant morbidity or mortality, and only 69.0% regularly tracked indications for cesarean delivery. Moreover, 26.3%, 14.3%, and 8.7% of the hospitals reported never performing interprofessional simulations for eclampsia, shoulder dystocia, or postpartum hemorrhage, respectively. Teaching status was associated with more frequent simulations in these three areas (P≤.04 for all), while larger volume was associated with more frequent simulations for eclampsia (P=.04). Hospitals in California engage in a wide range of practices to assure or improve quality of obstetric care, but substantial variation in practice exists among hospitals. There is opportunity for improvement in adoption of evidence-supported practices.

  9. The need to include obstetric nurses in prenatal care visits in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Aparecida Lagrosa Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate, with a qualitative approach, the role of Obstetric Nurses at the primary level of care given to women’s health as a vital component of the multidisciplinary team, which today is fundamental for providing care, prevention as well as health education and promotion, especially in programs whose activities are geared towards primary care of pregnant, parturient, and puerpera women. Methods: Brazilian laws and the determinations of Nursing Councils in reference to the activities of the obstetric nurse were researched, including the nurse’s responsibilities and limits. The bibliographic search was conducted in health-related journals, lay publications, and the Internet. Results: The conflicts between professional physicians and nurses were discussed. Conclusions: It was concluded that the activities of the nurse, conducting low-risk prenatal clinical visits in the basic healthcare network, has legal and ethical support and provides true benefit to the clients.

  10. FORUM Obstetric risk avoidance: Will anyone be offering obstetrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performing deliveries in private practice by the end of the decade?' If the answer to the ... Insurance companies, although offering an insurance product, also ... deliver in provincial facilities, shifting the workload and liability to the state.

  11. Obstetric Outcomes and Delivery-Related Health Care Utilization and Costs Among Pregnant Women With Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Tyler N. A.; Heisler, Michele; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among pregnant women with multiple chronic conditions. We used 2013–2014 data from the National Inpatient Sample to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among women with no chronic conditions, 1 chronic condition, and multiple chronic conditions. Women with multiple chronic conditions were at significantly higher risk than women with 1 chronic condition or no chronic conditions across all outcomes measured. High-value strategies are needed to improve birth outcomes among vulnerable mothers and their infants. PMID:29420168

  12. Strategies to reduce blood product utilization in obstetric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neb, Holger; Zacharowski, Kai; Meybohm, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) aims to improve patient outcome and safety by reducing the number of unnecessary RBC transfusions and vitalizing patient-specific anemia reserves. Although PBM is increasingly recognized as best clinical practice in elective surgery, implementation of PBM is restrained in the setting of obstetrics. This review summarizes recent findings to reduce blood product utilization in obstetric practice. PBM-related evidence-based benefits should be urgently adopted in the field of obstetric medicine. Intravenous iron can be considered a safe, effective strategy to replenish iron stores and to correct both pregnancy-related and hemorrhage-related iron deficiency anemia. In addition to surgical techniques and the use of uterotonics, recent findings support early administration of tranexamic acid, fibrinogen and a coagulation factor concentrate-based, viscoelastically guided practice in case of peripartum hemorrhage to manage coagulopathy. In patients with cesarean section, autologous red cell blood salvage may reduce blood product utilization, although its use in this setting is controversial. Implementation of PBM in obstetric practice offers large potential to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements of allogeneic blood products, even though large clinical trials are lacking in this specific field. Intravenous iron supplementation may be suggested to increase peripartum hemoglobin levels. Additionally, tranexamic acid and point-of-care-guided supplementation of coagulation factors are potent methods to reduce unnecessary blood loss and blood transfusions in obstetrics.

  13. Accounts of severe acute obstetric complications in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shegufta S; Labrique, Alain B; Ullah, Barkat; Ali, Hasmot; Rashid, Mahbubur; Mehra, Sucheta; Jahan, Nusrat; Shamim, Abu A; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2011-10-21

    As maternal deaths have decreased worldwide, increasing attention has been placed on the study of severe obstetric complications, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labor, to identify where improvements can be made in maternal health. Though access to medical care is considered to be life-saving during obstetric emergencies, data on the factors associated with health care decision-making during obstetric emergencies are lacking. We aim to describe the health care decision-making process during severe acute obstetric complications among women and their families in rural Bangladesh. Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure from a large community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, we nested a qualitative study to document barriers to timely receipt of medical care for severe obstetric complications. We conducted 40 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with women reporting severe acute obstetric complications and purposively selected for conditions representing the top five most common obstetric complications. The interviews were transcribed and coded to highlight common themes and to develop an overall conceptual model. Women attributed their life-threatening experiences to societal and socioeconomic factors that led to delays in seeking timely medical care by decision makers, usually husbands or other male relatives. Despite the dominance of male relatives and husbands in the decision-making process, women who underwent induced abortions made their own decisions about their health care and relied on female relatives for advice. The study shows that non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants were the first-line providers for women in all categories of severe complications. Coordination of transportation and finances was often arranged through mobile phones, and referrals were likely to be provided by village doctors. Strategies to increase timely and appropriate care seeking for severe obstetric complications may

  14. Accounts of severe acute obstetric complications in Rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Shegufta S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As maternal deaths have decreased worldwide, increasing attention has been placed on the study of severe obstetric complications, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labor, to identify where improvements can be made in maternal health. Though access to medical care is considered to be life-saving during obstetric emergencies, data on the factors associated with health care decision-making during obstetric emergencies are lacking. We aim to describe the health care decision-making process during severe acute obstetric complications among women and their families in rural Bangladesh. Methods Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure from a large community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, we nested a qualitative study to document barriers to timely receipt of medical care for severe obstetric complications. We conducted 40 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with women reporting severe acute obstetric complications and purposively selected for conditions representing the top five most common obstetric complications. The interviews were transcribed and coded to highlight common themes and to develop an overall conceptual model. Results Women attributed their life-threatening experiences to societal and socioeconomic factors that led to delays in seeking timely medical care by decision makers, usually husbands or other male relatives. Despite the dominance of male relatives and husbands in the decision-making process, women who underwent induced abortions made their own decisions about their health care and relied on female relatives for advice. The study shows that non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants were the first-line providers for women in all categories of severe complications. Coordination of transportation and finances was often arranged through mobile phones, and referrals were likely to be provided by village doctors. Conclusions Strategies to increase timely

  15. Neither Medicine Nor Health Care Staff Members Are Violent By Nature: Obstetric Violence From an Interactionist Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño Morales, Ximena; Enciso Chaves, Laura Victoria; Yepes Delgado, Carlos Enrique

    2018-05-01

    This study sought to understand the meaning that women place on the health care practices carried out during labor. We used techniques from Grounded Theory such as coding, categorization, and constant comparison. A total of 18 interviews were conducted with 16 women who had given birth at least once in Colombia. Based on our results, we argue that obstetric violence is an expression of violence during the provision of health care, which occurs in a social environment favoring the development of power relationships between patients and health care staff. Its origin might lie in a health care system whose political and economic foundations encourage inequality on the basis of the patients' purchasing power. We conclude that rethinking and redefining the concept of obstetric violence is essential for understanding its nature and having an impact on it.

  16. The critically ill obstetric patient - Recent concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU present a challenge to an intensivist because of normal physiological changes associated with pregnancy and puerperium, the specific medical diseases peculiar to pregnancy and the need to take care of both the mother and the foetus. Most common causes of admission to an ICU for obstetric patients are eclampsia, severe preeclampsia, haemorrhage, congenital and valvular heart disease, septic abortions, severe anemia, cardiomyopathy and non-obstetric sepsis. The purpose of this review is to present the recent concepts in critical care management of obstetric patients with special focus mainly on ventilatory strategies, treatment of shock and nutrition. The details regarding management of individual diseases would not be discussed as these would be beyond the purview of this article. In addition, some specific issues of importance while managing such patients would also be highlighted.

  17. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area.

  18. Obstetric risks for women with epilepsy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W; Norwitz, Errol R; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Pennell, Page B; Druzin, Maurice; Robinson, Julian N; Gordon, Jacki C

    2007-11-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE) face particular challenges during their pregnancy. Among the several obstetric issues for which there is some concern and the need for further investigation are: the effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiepileptic drugs on pregnancy outcome and, conversely, the effects of pregnancy and hormonal neurotransmitters on seizure control and antiepileptic drug metabolism. Obstetric concerns include preclampsia/eclampsia, preterm delivery, placental abruption, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and small-for-date babies in WWE whether or not they are taking antiepileptic drugs. The role of nutritional health elements, including body mass index, caloric and protein intake, vitamins and iron, and phytoestrogens, warrants further study. During the course of obstetric management, there is a need for a fuller understanding by neurologists of the risk-benefit calculations for various types and frequencies of fetal imaging, including CT, MRI, and ultrasound, as well as for the screening standards of care. As part of the Health Outcomes in Pregnancy and Epilepsy (HOPE) project, this expert panel provides a brief overview of these concerns, offers some approaches to management, and outlines potential areas for further investigation. More detailed information and guidelines are available elsewhere.

  19. A rapid assessment of the availability and use of obstetric care in Nigerian healthcare facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Erim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As part of efforts to reduce maternal deaths in Nigeria, pregnant women are being encouraged to give birth in healthcare facilities. However, little is known about whether or not available healthcare facilities can cope with an increasing demand for obstetric care. We thus carried out this survey as a rapid and tactical assessment of facility quality. We visited 121 healthcare facilities, and used the opportunity to interview over 700 women seeking care at these facilities. FINDINGS: Most of the primary healthcare facilities we visited were unable to provide all basic Emergency Obstetric Care (bEmOC services. In general, they lack clinical staff needed to dispense maternal and neonatal care services, ambulances and uninterrupted electricity supply whenever there were obstetric emergencies. Secondary healthcare facilities fared better, but, like their primary counterparts, lack neonatal care infrastructure. Among patients, most lived within 30 minutes of the visited facilities and still reported some difficulty getting there. Of those who had had two or more childbirths, the conditional probability of a delivery occurring in a healthcare facility was 0.91 if the previous delivery occurred in a healthcare facility, and 0.24 if it occurred at home. The crude risk of an adverse neonatal outcome did not significantly vary by delivery site or birth attendant, and the occurrence of such an outcome during an in-facility delivery may influence the mother to have her next delivery outside. Such an outcome during a home delivery may not prompt a subsequent in-facility delivery. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, reducing maternal deaths in Nigeria will require attention to both increasing the number of facilities with high-quality EmOC capability and also assuring Nigerian women have access to these facilities regardless of where they live.

  20. Current applications of big data in obstetric anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpner, Thomas T; Bauer, Melissa E; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2017-06-01

    The narrative review aims to highlight several recently published 'big data' studies pertinent to the field of obstetric anesthesiology. Big data has been used to study rare outcomes, to identify trends within the healthcare system, to identify variations in practice patterns, and to highlight potential inequalities in obstetric anesthesia care. Big data studies have helped define the risk of rare complications of obstetric anesthesia, such as the risk of neuraxial hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. Also, large national databases have been used to better understand trends in anesthesia-related adverse events during cesarean delivery as well as outline potential racial/ethnic disparities in obstetric anesthesia care. Finally, real-time analysis of patient data across a number of disparate health information systems through the use of sophisticated clinical decision support and surveillance systems is one promising application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit. 'Big data' research has important implications for obstetric anesthesia care and warrants continued study. Real-time electronic surveillance is a potentially useful application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit.

  1. Improving Staff Communication and Transitions of Care Between Obstetric Triage and Labor and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Kathleen; Teel, Joseph; Nicholls, Erika; Lee, Daniel D; Colwill, Alyssa Covelli; Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2018-03-01

    To improve staff perception of the quality of the patient admission process from obstetric triage to the labor and delivery unit through standardization. Preassessment and postassessment online surveys. A 13-bed labor and delivery unit in a quaternary care, Magnet Recognition Program, academic medical center in Pennsylvania. Preintervention (n = 100), postintervention (n = 52), and 6-month follow-up survey respondents (n = 75) represented secretaries, registered nurses, surgical technicians, certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, maternal-fetal medicine fellows, anesthesiologists, and obstetric and family medicine attending and resident physicians from triage and labor and delivery units. We educated staff and implemented interventions, an admission huddle and safety time-out whiteboard, to standardize the admission process. Participants were evaluated with the use of preintervention, postintervention, and 6-month follow-up surveys about their perceptions regarding the admission process. Data tracked through the electronic medical record were used to determine compliance with the admission huddle and whiteboards. A 77% reduction (decrease of 49%) occurred in the perception of incomplete patient admission processes from baseline to 6-month follow-up after the intervention. Postintervention and 6-month follow-up survey results indicated that 100% of respondents responded strongly agree/agree/neutral that the new admission process improved communication surrounding care for patients. Data in the electronic medical record indicated that compliance with use of admission huddles and whiteboards increased from 50% to 80% by 6 months. The new patient admission process, including a huddle and safety time-out board, improved staff perception of the quality of admission from obstetric triage to the labor and delivery unit. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Providers' Perceptions of Challenges in Obstetrical Care for Somali Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalana N. Lazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This pilot study explored health care providers’ perceptions of barriers to providing health care services to Somali refugee women. The specific aim was to obtain information about providers’ experiences, training, practices and attitudes surrounding the prenatal care, delivery, and management of women with Female Genital Cutting (FGC. Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 obstetricians/gynecologists and nurse midwives in Columbus, Ohio. Results. While providers did not perceive FGC as a significant barrier in itself, they noted considerable challenges in communicating with their Somali patients and the lack of formal training or protocols guiding the management of circumcised women. Providers expressed frustration with what they perceived as Somali patients' resistance to obstetrical interventions and disappointment with a perception of mistrust from patients and their families. Conclusion. Improving the clinical encounter for both patients and providers entails establishing effective dialogue, enhancing clinical and cultural training of providers, improving health literacy, and developing trust through community engagement.

  3. A "Prepaid Package" for Obstetrics: Effect on Teaching and Patient Care in a University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip E.

    1976-01-01

    The changing social milieu has removed the charity patient but not the need for a teaching population. The University Hospital's program is described, in which patients prepaid a fixed, single fee for all obstetrics-related care through the third post partum day. (LBH)

  4. An Examination of Women Experiencing Obstetric Complications Requiring Emergency Care: Perceptions and Sociocultural Consequences of Caesarean Sections in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rasheda; Sultana, Marzia; Bilkis, Sayeda; Koblinsky, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and socioeconomic postpartum consequences of women who experience obstetric complications and require emergency obstetric care (EmOC), particularly in resource-poor countries such as Bangladesh where historically there has been a strong cultural preference for births at home. Recent increases in the use of skilled birth attendants show socioeconomic disparities in access to emergency obstetric services, highlighting the need to examine birthing preparation and perceptions of EmOC, including caesarean sections. Twenty women who delivered at a hospital and were identified by physicians as having severe obstetric complications during delivery or immediately thereafter were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used for selecting the women. The study was carried out in Matlab, Bangladesh, during March 2008–August 2009. Data-collection methods included in-depth interviews with women and, whenever possible, their family members. The results showed that the women were poorly informed before delivery about pregnancy-related complications and medical indications for emergency care. Barriers to care-seeking at emergency obstetric facilities and acceptance of lifesaving care were related to apprehensions about the physical consequences and social stigma, resulting from hospital procedures and financial concerns. The respondents held many misconceptions about caesarean sections and distrust regarding the reason for recommending the procedure by the healthcare providers. Women who had caesarean sections incurred high costs that led to economic burdens on family members, and the blame was attributed to the woman. The postpartum health consequences reported by the women were generally left untreated. The data underscore the importance of educating women and their families about pregnancy-related complications and preparing families for the possibility of caesarean section. At the same time, the health

  5. Obstetric vesico-vaginal fistula is preventable by timely recognition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of obstetric fistula should include universal access to maternity care, recognition and timely correction of abnormal progress of labour and punctilious attention to bladder care to avoid post-partum urinary retention. Key words: Obstetric fistula, Risk factors, Pathophysiology, Post-partum urinary retention ...

  6. Integrated System for Monitoring and Prevention in Obstetrics-Gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robu, Andreea; Gauca, Bianca; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2016-01-01

    A better monitoring of pregnant women, mainly during the third trimester of pregnancy and an easy communication between physician and patients are very important for the prevention and good health of baby and mother. The paper presents an integrated system as support for the Obstetrics - Gynaecology domain consisting in two modules: a mobile application, ObGynCare, dedicated to the pregnant women and a new component of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System dedicated to the physicians for a better monitoring of the pregnant women. The mobile application informs the pregnant women about their status, permits them to introduce glycaemia and weight values and has as option pulse and blood pressure acquisition from a smart sensor and provides results in a graphic format. It also provides support for easy patient-doctor communication related to any health problems. ObGyn Care offers nutrition recommendations and gives the pregnant women the possibility to enter a social space of common interests using social networks (Facebook) to exchange useful and practical information. Data collected from patients and from sensor are stored on the cloud and the physician may access the information and analyse it. The extended module of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System already developed supports the physicians to visualize weekly, monthly, or on a trimester, the patient data and to discuss with her through the chat module. The mobile application is in test by pregnant women and medical personnel.

  7. The emergence of a global right to health norm--the unresolved case of universal access to quality emergency obstetric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Rachel; Ooms, Gorik

    2014-02-27

    The global response to HIV suggests the potential of an emergent global right to health norm, embracing shared global responsibility for health, to assist policy communities in framing the obligations of the domestic state and the international community. Our research explores the extent to which this global right to health norm has influenced the global policy process around maternal health rights, with a focus on universal access to emergency obstetric care. In examining the extent to which arguments stemming from a global right to health norm have been successful in advancing international policy on universal access to emergency obstetric care, we looked at the period from 1985 to 2013 period. We adopted a qualitative case study approach applying a process-tracing methodology using multiple data sources, including an extensive literature review and limited key informant interviews to analyse the international policy agenda setting process surrounding maternal health rights, focusing on emergency obstetric care. We applied John Kingdon's public policy agenda setting streams model to analyse our data. Kingdon's model suggests that to succeed as a mobilising norm, the right to health could work if it can help bring the problem, policy and political streams together, as it did with access to AIDS treatment. Our analysis suggests that despite a normative grounding in the right to health, prioritisation of the specific maternal health entitlements remains fragmented. Despite United Nations recognition of maternal mortality as a human rights issue, the relevant policy communities have not yet managed to shift the policy agenda to prioritise the global right to health norm of shared responsibility for realising access to emergency obstetric care. The experience of HIV advocates in pushing for global solutions based on right to health principles, including participation, solidarity and accountability; suggest potential avenues for utilising right to health based

  8. The traditional healer in obstetric care: A persistent wasted opportunity in maternal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Allotey, Pascale; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    Traditional medical systems in low income countries remain the first line service of choice, particularly for rural communities. Although the role of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) is recognised in many primary health care systems in low income countries, other types of traditional practitioners have had less traction. We explored the role played by traditional healers in northern Ghana in managing pregnancy-related complications and examined their relevance to current initiatives to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. A grounded theory qualitative approach was employed. Twenty focus group discussions were conducted with TBAs and 19 in-depth interviews with traditional healers with expertise in managing obstetric complications. Traditional healers are extensively consulted to manage obstetric complications within their communities. Their clientele includes families who for either reasons of access or traditional beliefs, will not use modern health care providers, or those who shop across multiple health systems. The traditional practitioners claim expertise in a range of complications that are related to witchcraft and other culturally defined syndromes; conditions for which modern health care providers are believed to lack expertise. Most healers expressed a willingness to work with the formal health services because they had unique knowledge, skills and the trust of the community. However this would require a stronger acknowledgement and integration within safe motherhood programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Waiting for attention and care: birthing accounts of women in rural Tanzania who developed obstetric fistula as an outcome of labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a physically and socially disabling obstetric complication that affects about 3,000 women in Tanzania every year. The fistula, an opening that forms between the vagina and the bladder and/or the rectum, is most frequently caused by unattended prolonged labour, often associated with delays in seeking and receiving appropriate and adequate birth care. Using the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of care (AAAQ) concept and the three delays model, this article provides empirical knowledge on birth care experiences of women who developed fistula after prolonged labour. Methods We used a mixed methods approach to explore the birthing experiences of women affected by fistula and the barriers to access adequate care during labour and delivery. Sixteen women were interviewed for the qualitative study and 151 women were included in the quantitative survey. All women were interviewed at the Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania in Dar es Salaam and Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza. Results Women experienced delays both before and after arriving at a health facility. Decisions on where to seek care were most often taken by husbands and mothers-in-law (60%). Access to health facilities providing emergency obstetric care was inadequate and transport was a major obstacle. About 20% reported that they had walked or were carried to the health facility. More than 50% had reported to a health facility after two or more days of labour at home. After arrival at a health facility women experienced lack of supportive care, neglect, poor assessment of labour and lack of supervision. Their birth accounts suggest unskilled birth care and poor referral routines. Conclusions This study reveals major gaps in access to and provision of emergency obstetric care. It illustrates how poor quality of care at health facilities contributes to delays that lead to severe birth injuries, highlighting the need to ensure women's rights to

  10. Waiting for attention and care: birthing accounts of women in rural Tanzania who developed obstetric fistula as an outcome of labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mselle Lilian T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstetric fistula is a physically and socially disabling obstetric complication that affects about 3,000 women in Tanzania every year. The fistula, an opening that forms between the vagina and the bladder and/or the rectum, is most frequently caused by unattended prolonged labour, often associated with delays in seeking and receiving appropriate and adequate birth care. Using the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of care (AAAQ concept and the three delays model, this article provides empirical knowledge on birth care experiences of women who developed fistula after prolonged labour. Methods We used a mixed methods approach to explore the birthing experiences of women affected by fistula and the barriers to access adequate care during labour and delivery. Sixteen women were interviewed for the qualitative study and 151 women were included in the quantitative survey. All women were interviewed at the Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania in Dar es Salaam and Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza. Results Women experienced delays both before and after arriving at a health facility. Decisions on where to seek care were most often taken by husbands and mothers-in-law (60%. Access to health facilities providing emergency obstetric care was inadequate and transport was a major obstacle. About 20% reported that they had walked or were carried to the health facility. More than 50% had reported to a health facility after two or more days of labour at home. After arrival at a health facility women experienced lack of supportive care, neglect, poor assessment of labour and lack of supervision. Their birth accounts suggest unskilled birth care and poor referral routines. Conclusions This study reveals major gaps in access to and provision of emergency obstetric care. It illustrates how poor quality of care at health facilities contributes to delays that lead to severe birth injuries, highlighting the need

  11. Waiting for attention and care: birthing accounts of women in rural Tanzania who developed obstetric fistula as an outcome of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mselle, Lilian T; Kohi, Thecla W; Mvungi, Abu; Evjen-Olsen, Bjørg; Moland, Karen Marie

    2011-10-21

    Obstetric fistula is a physically and socially disabling obstetric complication that affects about 3,000 women in Tanzania every year. The fistula, an opening that forms between the vagina and the bladder and/or the rectum, is most frequently caused by unattended prolonged labour, often associated with delays in seeking and receiving appropriate and adequate birth care. Using the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of care (AAAQ) concept and the three delays model, this article provides empirical knowledge on birth care experiences of women who developed fistula after prolonged labour. We used a mixed methods approach to explore the birthing experiences of women affected by fistula and the barriers to access adequate care during labour and delivery. Sixteen women were interviewed for the qualitative study and 151 women were included in the quantitative survey. All women were interviewed at the Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania in Dar es Salaam and Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza. Women experienced delays both before and after arriving at a health facility. Decisions on where to seek care were most often taken by husbands and mothers-in-law (60%). Access to health facilities providing emergency obstetric care was inadequate and transport was a major obstacle. About 20% reported that they had walked or were carried to the health facility. More than 50% had reported to a health facility after two or more days of labour at home. After arrival at a health facility women experienced lack of supportive care, neglect, poor assessment of labour and lack of supervision. Their birth accounts suggest unskilled birth care and poor referral routines. This study reveals major gaps in access to and provision of emergency obstetric care. It illustrates how poor quality of care at health facilities contributes to delays that lead to severe birth injuries, highlighting the need to ensure women's rights to accessible, acceptable and adequate

  12. Point-of-care lactate and creatinine analysis for sick obstetric patients at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasmacher, S A; Bonongwe, P; Stones, W

    2016-03-01

    To achieve good outcomes in critically ill obstetric patients, it is necessary to identify organ dysfunction rapidly so that life-saving interventions can be appropriately commenced. However, timely access to clinical chemistry results is problematic, even in referral institutions, in the sub-Saharan African region. Reliable point-of-care tests licensed for clinical use are now available for lactate and creatinine. We aimed to assess whether implementation of point-of-care testing for lactate and creatinine is feasible in the obstetric unit at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) in Blantyre, Malawi, by obtaining the opinions of clinical staff on the use of these tests in practice. During a two-month evaluation period nurse-midwives, medical interns, clinical officers, registrars, and consultants were given the opportunity to use StatStrip® and StatSensor® (Nova Biomedical, Waltham, USA) devices, for lactate and creatinine estimation, as part of their routine clinical practice in the obstetric unit. They were subsequently asked to complete a short questionnaire. Thirty-seven questionnaires were returned by participants: 22 from nurse-midwives and the remainder from clinicians. The mean satisfaction score for the devices was 7.6/10 amongst clinicians and 8.0/10 amongst nurse-midwives. The majority of participants stated that the obstetric high dependency unit (HDU) was the most suitable location for the devices. For lactate, 31 participants strongly agreed that testing should be continued and 24 strongly agreed that it would influence patient management. For creatinine, 29 strongly agreed that testing should be continued and 28 strongly agreed that it would influence their patient management. Twenty participants strongly agreed that they trust point-of-care devices. Point-of-care clinical chemistry testing was feasible, practical, and well received by staff, and was considered to have a useful role to play in the clinical care of sick obstetric patients at

  13. Morbidity and mortality associated with obstetric hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.B.; Shaikh, S.; Shaikh, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Obstetric hysterectomy still complicates a substantial number of pregnancies in third world countries and is a significant cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. This study was carried out to evaluate in our setup the frequency of obstetric hysterectomy, its indication, risk factors, complication, morbidity, mortality and avoidable factors. Methods: A descriptive study of all patients who under went obstetric hysterectomy was conducted from May 1, 2004 to October 31, 2005 at Gynaecology and Obstetric Unit-II, III of Liaquat University of Medical and Health Science Hospital, Hyderabad. After collecting the data on pre-designed proforma the data was fed to SPSS in the form of frequency distribution tables and percentages were calculated. Statistical analysis of data was performed by using Chi-square test. The level of significance was taken as p<0.05. Results: During the study time period there were total 6495 deliveries and 41 cases of obstetric hysterectomy were identified, giving a frequency of 0.63% or 1 in 158 deliveries. Most of patients were from rural areas (82.92%), un-booked 73.17%), uneducated (95%), lower socio economical class (92.69%), 25-29 years age (48.78%) multiparae (56.10%), have to travel a distance of <100 km to reach hospital and referred late (51%) by health care providers (doctors). Majority of hysterectomies were performed due to ruptured uteri (51.21%). There were 5 maternal and 26 perinatal deaths; all were due to severity of conditions necessitating hysterectomy. Conclusion: Incidence of obstetric hysterectomy in our woman is very high. The reason being many avoidable factors such as high parity, inadequate maternity and family planning services, lack of proper referral system, un-booked status, mismanaged labour, illiteracy on the part of woman herself, family and health care providers are not taken care of during pregnancy, labour and puerperium. (author)

  14. Resistance of Mayan Women against Obstetric Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Flores, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Mayan women are often victims of obstetric violence in the Yucatan Peninsula. Obstetric violence is defined as violence women experience by health officials or midwives during birth. This article will examine five different communities within the states of Yucatan, Campeche, and Quintana Roo in Mexico and compare and contrast activism efforts against obstetric violence among Mayan women. Mayan women are organizing to create unions for midwives, workshops on reproductive rights and health care...

  15. Evaluation of an Intervention to Improve Essential Obstetric and Newborn Care Access and Quality in Cotopaxi, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Edward; Hermida, Jorge; Hill, Kathleen; Sloan, Nancy; Chavez, Mario; Gonzalez, Daniel; Freire, Juana Maria; Gudino, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in health-care utilization, disadvantages persist among rural, less educated, and indigenous populations in Ecuador. The United States Agency for International Development-funded Cotopaxi Project created a provincial-level network of health services, including community agents to improve access, quality, and coordination of essential obstetric and newborn care. We evaluated changes in participating facilities compared to non-participating controls. The 21 poorest parishes (third-level administrative unit) in Cotopaxi were targeted from 2010 to 2013 for a collaborative health system performance improvement. The intervention included service reorganization, integration of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) with formal supervision, community outreach and education, and health worker technical training. Baseline ( n  = 462) and end-line ( n  = 412) household surveys assessed access, quality and use of care, and women's knowledge and practices. TBAs' knowledge and skills were assessed from simulations. Chart audits were used to assess facility obstetric and newborn care quality. Provincial government data were used for change in neonatal mortality between intervention and non-intervention parishes using weighted linear regression. The percentage of women receiving a postnatal visit within first 2 days of delivery increased from 53 to 81 in the intervention group and from 70 to 90 in the comparison group ( p  ≤ 0.001). Postpartum/counseling on newborn care increased 18% in the intervention compared with 5% in the comparison group ( p  ≤ 0.001). The project increased community and facility care quality and improved mothers' health knowledge. Intervention parishes experienced a nearly continual decline in newborn mortality between 2009 and 2012 compared with an increase in control parishes ( p  ≤ 0.001). The project established a comprehensive coordinated provincial-level network of health services and strengthened links

  16. Evaluation of an intervention to improve essential obstetric and newborn care access and quality in Cotopaxi, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Broughton

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite improvements in health care utilization, disadvantages persist among rural, less educated and indigenous populations in Ecuador. The USAID-funded Cotopaxi Project created a provincial-level network of health services, including community agents to improve access, quality and coordination of essential obstetric and newborn care. We evaluated changes in participating facilities compared to non-participating controls. MethodsThe 21 poorest parishes (third-level administrative unit in Cotopaxi were targeted from 2010-2013 for a collaborative health system performance improvement. The intervention included service reorganization, integration of traditional birth attendants with formal supervision, community outreach and education, and health worker technical training.Baseline (n=462 and end-line (n=412 household surveys assessed access, quality and use of care and women's knowledge and practices. Traditional birth attendants’ knowledge and skills were assessed from simulations. Chart audits were used to assess facility obstetric and newborn care quality. Provincial government data were used for change in neonatal mortality between intervention and non-intervention parishes using weighted linear regression. Results The percentage of women receiving a post-natal visit within first 2 days of delivery increased from 53% to 81% in the intervention group and from 70% to 90% in the comparison group (p≤0.001. Postpartum/counseling on newborn care increased 18% in the intervention compared with 5% in the comparison group (p≤0.001. The project increased community and facility care quality and improved mothers’ health knowledge. Intervention parishes experienced a nearly continual decline in newborn mortality between 2009 and 2012 compared with an increase in control parishes (p≤0.001.ConclusionsThe project established a comprehensive coordinated provincial-level network of health services and strengthened links between community

  17. Humanização no contexto da formação em obstetrícia Humanization in the context of obstetric training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Nussenzweig Hotimsky

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available O artigo propõe uma reflexão acerca do tema da humanização do parto no contexto da formação em obstetrícia, fundamentalmente instigada pela contribuição de uma etnografia do processo de ensino-aprendizagem em medicina nessa área. As técnicas de pesquisa utilizadas foram observação participante, entrevistas semi-estruturadas e pesquisa documental. Apresenta-se o material etnográfico produzido no acompanhamento de um curso oferecido pelo Departamento de Obstetrícia e Ginecologia de conceituada faculdade de medicina em São Paulo e de visitas de seus alunos a serviços públicos de "assistência humanizada" e suas repercussões no ensino da atenção ao parto. Chama atenção que os embates em torno da noção de humanização contrapõem modelos de atenção apresentados nas visitas àqueles serviços ao existente no Hospital-Escola e, ainda, a modelos ideais propostos por seus professores. A discussão também põe em pauta o próprio ideal de profissão e seu campo de competências. Neste sentido, as visitas e suas repercussões constituíram também uma oportunidade de consolidação de uma identidade coletiva em formação. A dificuldade de lidar com o pluralismo de propostas de conduta, objetivo da disciplina em pauta, impede, da perspectiva do ensino, a formação do pensamento crítico e a maior autoconfiança na tomada de decisão.The article discusses humanization in the context of Obstetric training, instigated by contributions from ethnography on the process of learning medicine in this field. Research techniques utilized include participant observation, primary source analysis, and in-depth interviews. Ethnographic material was produced while accompanying a course offered by the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of a renown São Paulo medical school and visits by students to public services offering "humanized care" in birth, as part of its curricular activities. Repercussions of these visits in class are also

  18. Training of midwives in advanced obstetrics in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolo, Obed; Clack, Alice; Gibson, Hannah; Lewis, Naomi; Southall, David P

    2016-05-01

    The shortage of doctors in Liberia limits the provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care. In a pilot project, two midwives were trained in advanced obstetric procedures and in the team approach to the in-hospital provision of advanced maternity care. The training took two years and was led by a Liberian consultant obstetrician with support from international experts. The training took place in CB Dunbar Maternity Hospital. This rural hospital deals with approximately 2000 deliveries annually, many of which present complications. In February 2015 there were just 117 doctors available in Liberia. In the first 18 months of training, the trainees were involved with 236 caesarean sections, 35 manual evacuations of products of conception, 25 manual removals of placentas, 21 vaginal breech deliveries, 14 vacuum deliveries, four repairs of ruptured uteri, the management of four cases of shoulder dystocia, three hysterectomies, two laparotomies for ruptured ectopic pregnancies and numerous obstetric ultrasound examinations. The trainees also managed 41 cases of eclampsia or severe pre-eclampsia, 25 of major postpartum haemorrhage and 21 of shock. Although, initially they only assisted senior doctors, the trainees subsequently progressed from direct to indirect supervision and then to independent management. To compensate for a shortage of doctors able to undertake comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care, experienced midwives can be taught to undertake advanced obstetric care and procedures. Their team work with doctors can be particularly valuable in rural hospitals in resource-poor countries.

  19. Caseload midwifery compared to standard or private obstetric care for first time mothers in a public teaching hospital in Australia: a cross sectional study of cost and birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Sally K; Welsh, Alec; Hall, Bev; Hartz, Donna; Lainchbury, Anne; Bisits, Andrew; White, Jan; Tracy, Mark B

    2014-01-24

    In many countries midwives act as the main providers of care for women throughout pregnancy, labour and birth. In our large public teaching hospital in Australia we restructured the way midwifery care is offered and introduced caseload midwifery for one third of women booked at the hospital. We then compared the costs and birth outcomes associated with caseload midwifery compared to the two existing models of care, standard hospital care and private obstetric care. We undertook a cross sectional study examining the risk profile, birth outcomes and cost of care for women booked into one of the three available models of care in a tertiary teaching hospital in Australia between July 1st 2009 December 31st 2010. To control for differences in population or case mix we described the outcomes for a cohort of low risk first time mothers known as the 'standard primipara'. Amongst the 1,379 women defined as 'standard primipara' there were significant differences in birth outcome. These first time 'low risk' mothers who received caseload care were more likely to have a spontaneous onset of labour and an unassisted vaginal birth 58.5% in MGP compared to 48.2% for Standard hospital care and 30.8% with Private obstetric care (p 1590.91 less than Standard hospital care per woman (p women in the study who received caseload care. Cost reduction appears to be achieved through reorganising the way care is delivered in the public hospital system with the introduction of Midwifery Group Practice or caseload care. The study also highlights the unexplained clinical variation that exists between the three models of care in Australia.

  20. Validity of a hospital-based obstetric register using medical records as reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Johansen, Nanna Roed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from hospital-based registers and medical records offer valuable sources of information for clinical and epidemiological research purposes. However, conducting high-quality epidemiological research requires valid and complete data sources. OBJECTIVE: To assess completeness...... and validity of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - using a national register and medical records as references. METHODS: We assessed completeness of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - by linking data from all women registered in the Obstetric Database...... Database therefore offers a valuable source for examining clinical, administrative, and research questions....

  1. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future.

  2. OBSTETRIC RENAL FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari

    2015-11-01

    common reasons were pregnancy induced hypertension, HELLP syndrome and obstetric haemorrhage and resulted in high risk condition for fetal and maternal mortality. The most effective measures still remain the careful prevention and the aggressive management of the obstetric complications. Ideal care for women with acute renal failure in pregnancy or post-partum requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes maternal-fetal medicine, critical care medicine, nephrology and neonatology specialties.

  3. Rural Tanzanian women's awareness of danger signs of obstetric complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindmark Gunilla

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Awareness of the danger signs of obstetric complications is the essential first step in accepting appropriate and timely referral to obstetric and newborn care. The objectives of this study were to assess women's awareness of danger signs of obstetric complications and to identify associated factors in a rural district in Tanzania. Methods A total of 1118 women who had been pregnant in the past two years were interviewed. A list of medically recognized potentially life threatening obstetric signs was obtained from the responses given. Chi- square test was used to determine associations between categorical variables and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with awareness of obstetric danger signs. Results More than 98% of the women attended antenatal care at least once. Half of the women knew at least one obstetric danger sign. The percentage of women who knew at least one danger sign during pregnancy was 26%, during delivery 23% and after delivery 40%. Few women knew three or more danger signs. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis having secondary education or more increased the likelihood of awareness of obstetric danger signs six-fold (OR = 5.8; 95% CI: 1.8–19 in comparison with no education at all. The likelihood to have more awareness increased significantly by increasing age of the mother, number of deliveries, number of antenatal visits, whether the delivery took place at a health institution and whether the mother was informed of having a risks/complications during antenatal care. Conclusion Women had low awareness of danger signs of obstetric complications. We recommend the following in order to increase awareness of danger signs of obstetrical complications: to improve quality of counseling and involving other family members in antenatal and postnatal care, to use radio messages and educational sessions targeting the whole community and to intensify

  4. Reducing neonatal mortality in India: critical role of access to emergency obstetric care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Rammohan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal mortality currently accounts for 41% of all global deaths among children below five years. Despite recording a 33% decline in neonatal deaths between 2000 and 2009, about 900,000 neonates died in India in 2009. The decline in neonatal mortality is slower than in the post-neonatal period, and neonatal mortality rates have increased as a proportion of under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality rates are higher among rural dwellers of India, who make up at least two-thirds of India's population. Identifying the factors influencing neonatal mortality will significantly improve child survival outcomes in India. METHODS: Our analysis is based on household data from the nationally representative 2008 Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. We use probit regression techniques to analyse the links between neonatal mortality at the household level and households' access to health facilities. The probability of the child dying in the first month of birth is our dependent variable. RESULTS: We found that 80% of neonatal deaths occurred within the first week of birth, and that the probability of neonatal mortality is significantly lower when the child's village is closer to the district hospital (DH, suggesting the critical importance of specialist hospital care in the prevention of newborn deaths. Neonatal deaths were lower in regions where emergency obstetric care was available at the District Hospitals. We also found that parental schooling and household wealth status improved neonatal survival outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the main causes of neonatal deaths in India--preterm deliveries, asphyxia, and sepsis--requires adequacy of specialised workforce and facilities for delivery and neonatal intensive care and easy access by mothers and neonates. The slow decline in neonatal death rates reflects a limited attention to factors which contribute to neonatal deaths. The suboptimal quality and coverage of Emergency

  5. Substandard emergency obstetric care - a confidential enquiry into maternal deaths at a regional hospital in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Bjarke Lund; Elsass, Peter; Nielsen, Brigitte Bruun

    2010-01-01

    for major substandard care. Hospital based maternal deaths between 2006 and 2008 (35 months) were included. Of 68 registered maternal deaths sufficient information for reviewing was retrieved for 62 cases (91%). As a supplement, in-depth interviews with staff about the underlying causes of substandard care...... in 46 (74%) of the 62 cases reviewed. During the same time period MDA identified substandard care in 18 cases. Staff perceived poor organization of work and lack of training as important causes for substandard care. Local MDA was considered useful although time-consuming and sometimes threatening......, and staff dedication to the process was questioned. CONCLUSION: Quality assurance of emergency obstetric care might be strengthened by supplementing internal MDA with external CE....

  6. Antinuclear antibody testing in obstetric patients | Afman | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess possible associations between the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and pregnancy outcome in order to determine the significance of this test in obstetric practice. Methods. A case-control study was performed on 408 patients admitted to an obstetric high care unit and on whom ANA testing ...

  7. Determinants of obstetric fistula in Ethiopia. Asrat Atsedeweyn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... factors for obstetrics fistula include early age at pregnan- cy, short stature, illiteracy, poverty, not attending antenatal care, and rural place of residence or living far away from a health facility14. Tesfaye17 used the Cox proportional hazard analysis to evaluate time to recovery of obstetric fistula at Yirgalem.

  8. Obstetrical ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics may provide fuel for legal action. While most legal implications of this relatively new imaging modality are purely speculative, some have already given rise to legal action. Several situations will likely provide a basis for the courts to find against the physician. The failure to perform a sonogram when clinically indicated will most likely be the strongest plaintiff argument. Other major concerns include the use and availability of state-of-the-art equipment, as well as interpretation of the scans by a trained physician. Obstetrical ultrasound is usually performed by a radiologist or obstetrician. However, many physicians performing these examinations have had little or no formal training in the field. While this is now being remedied by the respective board examines who require a certain amount of training, it may not be enough. When ultrasound-related cases reach the courts, the involved physicians will most likely be regarded as experts in the field and, therefore, will be held to a very high standard of care. This would be difficult to achieve without formal training. At the present time, the American Board of Radiology requires more training time in ultrasound than the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

  9. The Influence of Individual and Contextual Socioeconomic Status on Obstetric Care Utilization in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Population-based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde Aremu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal health care utilization continues to focus on the agenda of health care planners around the world, with high attention being paid to the developing countries. The devastating effect of maternal death at birth on the affected families is untold. This study examines the utilization of obstetric care in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: We have used the nationally representative data from the 2007. Democratic Republic of Congo Demographic and Health Survey. Multilevel regression analysis has been applied to a nationally representative sample of 6,695 women, clustered around 299 communities in the country. Results: The results show that there are variations in the use of antenatal care and delivery care. Individual-level characteristics, such as women′s occupation and household wealth status are shown to be associated with the use of antenatal care. Uptake of facility-based delivery has been seen to be dependent on the household wealth status, women′s education, and partner′s education. The effect of the neighborhoods′ socioeconomic disadvantage on the use of antenatal care and facility-based delivery are the same. Women from highly socioeconomically disadvantaged communities, compared to their counterparts from less socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods, are less likely to utilize both the antenatal services and healthcare facility for child delivery. The result of this study has shown that both individual and contextual socioeconomic status play an important role in obstetric care uptake. Conclusion: Thus, intervention aimed at improving the utilization of obstetrics care should target both the individual economic abilities of the women and that of their environment when considering the demand side.

  10. Time-to-recovery from obstetric fistula and associated factors: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EPHA USER33

    potential risk factors associated with time to recovery of patients from obstetric fistula. Methods: An ... maternal health service and emergency obstetric care are contributing ..... process that causes the fistula may also lead to further destruction ...

  11. The utility of bedside simulation for training in critical care obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Jean-Ju; Lee, Colleen; Goffman, Dena

    2018-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades, the maternal mortality ratio in the United States has doubled from 7.4/100,000 live births in 1986 to 14.5/100,000 today. Despite great advances in health care, increasing rates of maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States have prompted calls to action to reverse this disturbing trend. Assisted reproductive technology has allowed women to delay childbearing to more advanced ages, resulting in a greater number of pregnancies complicated by one or more of the diseases associated with aging, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension. The obesity epidemic, increasing rates of chronic diseases affecting pregnancy, steadily rising cesarean delivery rate with resulting complications, and medical advances allowing women with rare, but serious diseases to conceive contribute to rising maternal morbidity and mortality rates. Obstetric critical care simulation training may result in improved multidisciplinary teamwork and patient outcomes; and fewer medical and communication errors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Communication in obstetrics: where and when it matters | Obimbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although most clinical outcomes in obstetrics are generally good, poor and inaccurate communication may lead to unwanted obstetrics complications and medico-legal litigation. Effective communication therefore, is an important and integral part of holistic approach to good patient care and management. We present a case ...

  13. Role of telephone triage in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Nirvana Afsordeh; Magann, Everett F; Rhoads, Sarah J; Ivey, Tesa L; Williams, Donna J

    2012-12-01

    The telephone has become an indispensable method of communication in the practice of obstetrics. The telephone is one of the primary methods by which the patient makes her appointments and contacts her health care provider for advice, reassurance, and referrals. Current methods of telephone triage include personal at the physicians' office, telephone answering services, labor and delivery nurses, and a dedicated telephone triage system using algorithms. Limitations of telephone triage include the inability of the provider to see the patient and receive visual clues from the interaction and the challenges of obtaining a complete history over the telephone. In addition, there are potential safety and legal issues with telephone triage. To date, there is insufficient evidence to either validate or refute the use of a dedicated telephone triage system compared with a traditional system using an answering service or nurses on labor and delivery. Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians. After completing this CME activity, physicians should be better able to analyze the scope of variation in telephone triage across health care providers and categorize the components that go into a successful triage system, assess the current scope of research in telephone triage in obstetrics, evaluate potential safety and legal issues with telephone triage in obstetrics, and identify issues that should be addressed in any institution that is using or implementing a system of telephone triage in obstetrics.

  14. Obstetric acute renal failure 1956-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, J H; Ellis, C M; Parsons, F M

    1989-06-01

    A total of 142 women with severe acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from obstetric causes was treated by dialysis at a single centre from 1956 to 1987. One-year survival was 78.6%, which compares favourably with other causes of ARF. Abortion, haemorrhage and preclampsia comprised 95% of cases, with survival being best (82.9%) with abortion. Survival was adversely affected by increasing age. Acute cortical necrosis (12.7% of patients) carried 100% mortality after 6 years. Follow-up of survivors showed normal renal function up to 31 years following ARF; 25-year patient survival was 71.6%. Improvements in obstetric care and the disappearance of illegal abortions have resulted in a dramatic decline in the incidence of obstetric ARF.

  15. A descriptive study of women presenting to an obstetric triage unit with no prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Erin; Morris, Margaret; Heaman, Maureen

    2014-03-01

    To describe women presenting to an obstetric triage unit with no prenatal care (PNC), to identify gaps in care, and to compare care provided to World Health Organization (WHO) standards. We reviewed the charts of women who gave birth at Women's Hospital in Winnipeg and were discharged between April 1, 2008, and March 31, 2011, and identified those whose charts were coded with ICD-10 code Z35.3 (inadequate PNC) or who had fewer than 2 PNC visits. Three hundred eighty-two charts were identified, and sociodemographic characteristics, PNC history, investigations, and pregnancy outcomes were recorded. The care provided was compared with WHO guidelines. One hundred nine women presented to the obstetric triage unit with no PNC; 96 (88.1%) were in the third trimester. Only 39 women (35.8%) received subsequent PNC, with care falling short of WHO standards. Gaps in PNC included missing time-sensitive screening tests, mid-stream urine culture, and Chlamydia and gonorrhea testing. The mean maternal age was 26.1 years, and 93 women (85.3%) were multigravidas. More than one half of the women (51.4%) were involved with Child and Family Services, 64.2% smoked, 33.0% drank alcohol, and 32.1% used illicit drugs during pregnancy. Two thirds of the women (66.2%) lived in inner-city Winnipeg. Only 63.0% of neonates showed growth appropriate for gestational age. Two pregnancies ended in stillbirth; there was one neonatal death, and over one third of the births were preterm. Most women who present with no PNC do so late in pregnancy, proceed to deliver with little or no additional PNC, and have high rates of adverse outcomes. Thus, efforts to improve PNC must focus on facilitating earlier entry into care. This would also improve compliance with WHO guidelines for continuing care. Treatment protocols could improve gaps in obtaining urine culture and in Chlamydia and gonorrhea testing.

  16. An early stage evaluation of the Supporting Program for Obstetric Care Underserved Areas in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Baeg Ju; Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jin Yong

    2014-06-01

    "The Supporting Program for Obstetric Care Underserved Areas (SPOU)" provides financial aids to rural community (or district) hospitals to reopen prenatal care and delivery services for regions without obstetrics and gynecology clinics or hospitals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early stage effect of the SPOU program. The proportion of the number of birth through SPOU was calculated by each region. Also survey was conducted to investigate the extent of overall satisfaction, elements of dissatisfaction, and suggestions for improvement of the program; 209 subjects participated from 7 to 12 December, 2012. Overall, 20% of pregnant women in Youngdong (71 cases) and Gangjin (106 cases) used their community (or district) hospitals through the SPOU whereas Yecheon (23 cases) was 8%; their satisfaction rates were high. Short distance and easy accessibility was the main reason among women choosing community (or district) hospital whereas the reasons of not selecting the community (or district) hospital were favor of the outside hospital's facility, system, and trust in the medical staffs. The SPOU seems to be currently effective at an early stage. However, to successfully implement this program, the government should make continuous efforts to recruit highly qualified medical staffs and improve medical facility and equipment.

  17. Obstetric care quality indicators and outcomes based on the degree of acculturation of immigrants-results from a cross-sectional study in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Matthias; Borde, Theda; Brenne, Silke; Ramsauer, Babett; Hinkson, Larry; Henrich, Wolfgang; Razum, Oliver; Breckenkamp, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    Acculturation is a complex, multidimensional process involving the integration of the traditional norms, values, and lifestyles of a new cultural environment. It is, however, unclear what impact the degree of acculturation has on obstetric outcomes. Data collection was performed in 2011 and 2012 at three obstetric tertiary centers in Berlin, Germany. Standardized interviews (20-30 min.) were performed with support of evaluated questionnaires. The primary collected data were then linked to the perinatal data recorded at the individual clinics provided from the obstetric centers which correspond with the routinely centralized data collected for quality assurance throughout Germany. The questionnaire included questions on sociodemographic, health care, and migrant-related aspects. Migrant women and women with a migration background were assessed using the Frankfurt Acculturation Scale, a one-dimensional measurement tool to assess the degree of acculturation (15 items on language and media usage as well as integration into social networks). In summary, 7100 women were available for the survey (response rate of 89.6%) of which 3765 (53%) had a migration background. The probability of low acculturation is significantly (p relationships between the degree of acculturation and obstetric parameters show no significant differences for prematurity, 5 min.-Apgar values > 7, arterial umbilical cord pH values > 7.00 and admissions to the neonatal unit. In Berlin, among migrant women a low degree of acculturation may have an unfavorable effect on the utilization of pregnancy care provision. However, there were no relevant differences in obstetric outcome parameters in relation to the degree of acculturation within the migrant population of Berlin.

  18. Barriers to obstetric fistula treatment in low-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Zoë; Bellows, Ben; Bach, Rachel; Warren, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    To identify the barriers faced by women living with obstetric fistula in low-income countries that prevent them from seeking care, reaching medical centres and receiving appropriate care. Bibliographic databases, grey literature, journals, and network and organisation websites were searched in English and French from June to July 2014 and again from August to November 2016 using key search terms and specific inclusion and exclusion criteria for discussion of barriers to fistula treatment. Experts provided recommendations for additional sources. Of 5829 articles screened, 139 were included in the review. Nine groups of barriers to treatment were identified: psychosocial, cultural, awareness, social, financial, transportation, facility shortages, quality of care and political leadership. Interventions to address barriers primarily focused on awareness, facility shortages, transportation, financial and social barriers. At present, outcome data, though promising, are sparse and the success of interventions in providing long-term alleviation of barriers is unclear. Results from the review indicate that there are many barriers to fistula treatment, which operate at the individual, community and national levels. The successful treatment of obstetric fistula may thus require targeting several barriers, including depression, stigma and shame, lack of community-based referral mechanisms, financial cost of the procedure, transportation difficulties, gender power imbalances, the availability of facilities that offer fistula repair, community reintegration and the competing priorities of political leadership. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. How Should Trainees Respond in Situations of Obstetric Violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubashkin, Nicholas; Minckas, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    Argentina passed a law for humanized birth in 2004 and another law against obstetric violence in 2009, both of which stipulate the rights of women to achieve respectful maternity care. Clinicians and women might still be unaware of these laws, however. In this article, we discuss the case of a fourth-year medical student who, while visiting Argentina from the United States for his obstetric rotation, witnesses an act of obstetric violence. We show that the student's situation can be understood as one of moral distress and argue that, in this specific instance, it would be appropriate for the student to intervene by providing supportive care to the patient. However, we suggest that medical schools have an obligation to better prepare students for rotations conducted abroad. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  20. What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know About Measles and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    From January 1 to April 3, 2015, 159 people from 18 states and the District of Columbia were reported as having measles. Most cases are part of an outbreak linked to a California amusement park. Because measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000, most U.S. clinicians are unfamiliar with the condition. We reviewed information on the current outbreak, measles manifestations, diagnostic methods, treatment, and infection-control recommendations. To identify information on measles and pregnancy, we reviewed reports with 20 or more measles cases during pregnancy that included data on effects on pregnant women or pregnancy outcomes. These reports were identified through MEDLINE from inception through February 2015 using the following strategy: (((pregnan*) AND measles) AND English[Language]) NOT review[Publication Type]. Reference lists also were reviewed to identify additional articles. Pregnant women infected with measles are more likely to be hospitalized, develop pneumonia, and die than nonpregnant women. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and low birth weight, are associated with maternal measles; however, the risk of congenital defects does not appear to be increased. No antiviral therapy is available; treatment is supportive. Early identification of possible cases is needed so that appropriate infection control can be instituted promptly. The recent measles outbreak highlights the role that obstetric health care providers play in vaccine-preventable illnesses; obstetrician–gynecologists should ensure that patients are up to date on all vaccines, including measles-containing vaccines, and should recommend and ideally offer a measles-containing vaccine to women without evidence of measles immunity before or after pregnancy. PMID:25899422

  1. Institutional violence and quality of service in obstetrics are associated with postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Karina Junqueira de; Rattner, Daphne; Gubert, Muriel Bauermann

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the association between institutional violence in obstetrics and postpartum depression (PP depression) and the potential effect of race, age, and educational level in this outcome. This is a cross-sectional study about the health care conditions for the maternal and child population of the Federal District, Brazil, carried out in 2011. The study has used a probabilistic sample of 432 women, whose children were aged up to three months, stratified by clusters. Indicators of institutional violence and demographic characteristics have been used in a logistic regression model to estimate the probability of occurrence of postpartum depression. The model has identified a high prevalence of postpartum depression, being it higher among non-white women and adolescent females, besides having a strong positive association between the several indicators of obstetric violence and postpartum depression. Positive interactions on a multiplicative scale have also been observed between: violence by negligence by health care professionals and race and age; physical violence from health care professionals and age; and, verbal violence from health care professionals and race. The indicators adopted to reflect institutional violence in obstetric care are positively associated with postpartum depression, which calls for a reflection on the need to make the health care protocols adequate to the precepts of the Brazilian humanization of childbirth care policies and changes in the obstetric care model.

  2. Institutional violence and quality of service in obstetrics are associated with postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Junqueira de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between institutional violence in obstetrics and postpartum depression (PP depression and the potential effect of race, age, and educational level in this outcome. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study about the health care conditions for the maternal and child population of the Federal District, Brazil, carried out in 2011. The study has used a probabilistic sample of 432 women, whose children were aged up to three months, stratified by clusters. Indicators of institutional violence and demographic characteristics have been used in a logistic regression model to estimate the probability of occurrence of postpartum depression. RESULTS The model has identified a high prevalence of postpartum depression, being it higher among non-white women and adolescent females, besides having a strong positive association between the several indicators of obstetric violence and postpartum depression. Positive interactions on a multiplicative scale have also been observed between: violence by negligence by health care professionals and race and age; physical violence from health care professionals and age; and, verbal violence from health care professionals and race. CONCLUSIONS The indicators adopted to reflect institutional violence in obstetric care are positively associated with postpartum depression, which calls for a reflection on the need to make the health care protocols adequate to the precepts of the Brazilian humanization of childbirth care policies and changes in the obstetric care model.

  3. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Keywords: Obstetric fistula, mental ill health, Group Psychotherapy, South Sudan. Résumé. L'objectif de cette étude est de déterminer l'impact du groupe thérapie psychologique (GPT) sur la ... This conflict led to destruction of many social.

  4. Barriers to obstetric care among maternal near-misses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (pre-existing medical disease or recurrent miscarriage) or may be caused by pregnancy itself, gestational hypertension or obstetric haemorrhage. ... A serious complication may progress rapidly to a life-threatening situation. Access and ..... complicated pregnancy, mothers should also be counselled about future pregnancy ...

  5. Surgical emergencies in obstetrics and gynaecology in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Hanoon P; Dahal, Prerana; Rai, Rubina; Budhathoki, ShyamSundar

    2013-01-01

    The management of Obstetrics and Gynaecological Emergency is directed at the preservation of life, health, sexual function and the perpetuation of fertility. Main aim of the study was to access the burden of Surgical Emergency in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and their course of management at BPKIHS. A total of 314 women presenting at the emergency admission room of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of BPKIHS over two years, who required surgical intervention were included in this hospital based descriptive study. Clinical assessment and routine laboratory investigations were performed in all cases. All patients who presented with shock were resuscitated and surgery was done at earliest possible time. The age of patients ranged from 15- 55 years with approximately 43% in the 25-34 years category. Ninety two percent of them were married. Among the unmarried, 64% came with problems related to unsafe abortion. About 61% of females presenting as acute surgical abdomen had ruptured ectopic pregnancy, 7.64% had twisted ovarian cyst, and 6.26% had haemoperitoneum and pyoperitoneum following vaginal hysterectomies, total abdominal hysterectomies and caesarean section. Almost half (47.8%) of the cases underwent salphingectomy. Women present with wide range of complaints and conditions in the admission room of Obstetrics and Gynecology department of BPKIHS. Skilled clinicians, immediate investigation facilities and experienced specialty Obstetrical and Gynaecological surgeons are the main backbone of the emergency case management and saving lives. Study indicates there is need of some prospective study to establish the causes of rising trend in Ectopic Pregnancies.

  6. Litigation in Obstetrics: a Lesson Learnt and a Lesson to Share

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Min Chou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A perfect baby is the expectation of all parents, and a perfect outcome is the mission of obstetrics. Every obstetrician dreads to hear that there is an unexpected maternal mortality and/or severe fetal injury at the hospital. The role of a perceived public expectation of perfection in obstetric medicine reflects a belief that bad outcomes in obstetrics should not be tolerated and that every maternal-fetal injury merits financial compensation and punishment. What has brought these troubling times to obstetric medicine? The drivers behind malpractice crises are the four leading interest groups in the medical-legal debate: pregnant patients and their environment (husband, parents, relatives, friends, legislators, and the media, health-care providers, insurance companies, and trial attorneys. Litigation in obstetrics is the result of a complex of events when malpractice (presumed or real impacts on the attitude of pregnant women and their environment. In such complexity, information is mandatory but may often be misinterpreted. If messages are not tailored to the receiver's capacity, communicating well with the pregnant patient becomes crucial. Therefore, to reduce medical-legal issues in obstetrics, increasing attention and an applicable standard of obstetric care to avoid negligence and medical errors should go along with better communication with pregnant women. Communication should be clear, targeted, effective, flexible, and empathic to share a common language and decisions. This review briefly presents and discusses some of the most frequently encountered medical-legal claim cases in obstetric practice. In-depth review of pregnancy-related deaths and major morbidities can help determine strategies needed to continue making pregnancy safer.

  7. Complications of gynecologic and obstetric management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.; Newton, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the incidence, diagnosis and management of complications associated with interventions used in gynecology and obstetrics. These are encountered in all phases of gynecologic and therapeutic procedures, radiation therapy, drug therapy and pre- and post-treatment care

  8. Effectiveness of advertising availability of prenatal ultrasound on uptake of antenatal care in rural Uganda: A cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, William; Anguyo, Geoffrey; Meaney, Christopher; Yuan Kong, Ling; Malhame, Isabelle; Pace, Romina; Sodhi, Sumeet; Silverman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In rural Uganda pregnant women often lack access to health services, do not attend antenatal care, and tend to utilize traditional healers/birth attendants. We hypothesized that receiving a message advertising that "you will be able to see your baby by ultrasound" would motivate rural Ugandan women who otherwise might use a traditional birth attendant to attend antenatal care, and that those women would subsequently be more satisfied with care. A cluster randomized trial was conducted across eight rural sub-counties in southwestern Uganda. Sub-counties were randomized to a control arm, with advertisement of antenatal care with no mention of portable obstetric ultrasound (four communities, n = 59), or an intervention arm, with advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound. Advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound was further divided into intervention A) word of mouth advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound and antenatal care (one communitity, n = 16), B) radio advertisement of only antenatal care and word of mouth advertisement of antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound (one community, n = 7), or C) word of mouth + radio advertisement of both antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound (two communities, n = 75). The primary outcome was attendance to antenatal care. 159 women presented to antenatal care across eight sub-counties. The rate of attendance was 65.1 (per 1000 pregnant women, 95% CI 38.3-110.4) where portable obstetric ultrasound was advertised by radio and word of mouth, as compared to a rate of 11.1 (95% CI 6.1-20.1) in control communities (rate ratio 5.9, 95% CI 2.6-13.0, padvertising antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound by radio attendance was significantly improved. This study suggests that women can be motivated to attend antenatal care when offered the concrete incentive of seeing their baby.

  9. Obstetrical nursing and health education: contributions to the experience of process of parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Silveira de Quadros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the contributions of obstetrical nursing to health education activities aimed at the parturition process. Methods: qualitative research conducted with ten hospitalized puerperal women who had vaginal delivery in a maternity ward. Results: two categories emerged from the data of this research: Weaknesses of prenatal care for pregnant women and The obstetrical nurse as potentiator of humanized care. Conclusion: obstetrical nursing, through educational work, strives to promote a reframing of the process of parturition, rescuing parturition as a physiological process, and emphasizing the use of natural resources in the evolution of labor and delivery.

  10. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  11. Marketing the nursing practice of obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, P Z

    1991-01-01

    This article offers nurses a conceptual framework for marketing their skills and discusses how that framework can be applied to obstetric nursing practice. A thorough understanding of the framework presented will provide maternity nurses with the foundation they need to participate effectively in a marketing plan. Examples of the application of the framework to specific clinical situations are examined.

  12. Information, support, and follow-up offered to women who experienced severe maternal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Mary; Conroy, Molly; Filoche, Sara; MacDonald, E Jane; Geller, Stacie E; Lawton, Beverley

    2018-06-01

    To determine what information, support, and follow-up were offered to women who had experienced severe maternal morbidity (SMM). The present retrospective case review included patients who experienced SMM (admission to intensive care during pregnancy or up to 42 days postpartum) who had previously been reviewed for potential preventability as part of a nationwide New Zealand study performed between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Data were audited to ascertain documented evidence of an event debrief or explanation; referral to social support and/or mental health services; a detailed discharge letter; and a follow-up appointment with a specialist. Of 257 patients who experienced SMM, 23 (8.9%) were offered all four components of care, 99 (38.5%) an event debrief, 102 (39.7%) a referral to social support and/or mental health services, 148 (57.6%) a detailed discharge letter, and 131 (51.0%) a follow-up appointment. Many women who had experienced SMM did not receive explanatory information about their illness, an offer of psychosocial support, or a follow-up appointment prior to discharge from hospital. It is incumbent on clinicians and the maternity care system to improve these aspects of care for all women experiencing a potentially life-changing SMM event to minimize the risk and burden of long-term mental illness. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  13. Bio Psycho Social Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, KM; van de Wiel, Henricus

    2017-01-01

    This book will assist the reader by providing individually tailored, high-quality bio-psycho-social care to patients with a wide range of problems within the fields of obstetrics, gynaecology, fertility, oncology, and sexology. Each chapter addresses a particular theme, issue, or situation in a

  14. Obstetrical violence: activism on social networkin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Hecker Luz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal birth in contemporaneity is discussed and the three models of birth care are presented, accordingly to categorization proposed by the north-American anthropologist Davis-Floyd, pointing out the consequences of the technocratic model, which has become hegemonic in contemporary societies, naturalizing obstetrical violence. The problematic is contextualized to Brazilian reality, with the analyses of the blog Cientista que virou mãe making it evident that Brazilian women on social media are articulating themselves in order to defend and give visibility to initiatives of natural and humanized birth, acting against obstetrical violence. It is concluded that Internet tools have allowed a pioneer mobilization in respecting women’s reproductive rights in Brazil, turning blogs into a potential hegemonic alternative way to reach more democratic forms of social organization. In addition to denaturalize the obstetrical violence, the bloggers also act aiming to pave the way for the humanistic approach and to motivate planned home birth initiatives.

  15. Midwives and obstetric nurses in the Brazilian Unified Health System and Primary Health Care: for a systemic and progressive incorporation

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Henrique Norman; Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a proposal for a gradual and systemic incorporation of midwives and obstetric nurses into the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) and Primary Health Care (PHC). The proposal was born from contact with the British experience, based on midwives, which is briefly described. In Brazil, these professionals would progressively take over the prenatal, delivery and postpartum care for pregnant women of usual risk in a region, in partnership with the PHC tea...

  16. Invisible wounds: obstetric violence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Tello, Farah

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been growing public attention to a problem many US health institutions and providers disclaim: bullying and coercion of pregnant women during birth by health care personnel, known as obstetric violence. Through a series of real case studies, this article provides a legal practitioner's perspective on a systemic problem of institutionalized gender-based violence with only individual tort litigation as an avenue for redress, and even that largely out of reach for women. It provides an overview of the limitations of the civil justice system in addressing obstetric violence, and compares alternatives from Latin American jurisdictions. Finally, the article posits policy solutions for the legal system and health care systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Destructive operations--a vanishing art in modern obstetrics: 25 year experience at a tertiary care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Pooja; Chopra, Seema; Kalpdev, Arun; Jain, Vanita; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir

    2011-05-01

    Destructive operations have a limited role in modern day obstetrics. In the developed countries, obstetrics has become so advanced that these instruments have actually been put away. However, in developing countries like India, these procedures have a limited role where obstructed labor still continues to plague thousands of women every year and accounts for 8% of maternal deaths. This study was planned to define the changing role of destructive operations in obstetrics over the years as more number of abdominal deliveries are conducted in modern day obstetrics than these procedures. A retrospective analysis of destructive operations performed at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, over a span of 25 years, between 1983 and 2007, was carried out. Of a total of 85,952 deliveries in PGIMER in these 25 years, there were 25,474 cesarean deliveries (29.63%), and 8,826 (10.26%) operative vaginal deliveries. The total number of destructive operations performed was 230 (0.26%). There were 202 craniotomies (87.8%), 13 decapitations (5.7%), 8 eviscerations (3.6%) and 7 cleidotomies (2.9%). There should be an individualized approach to each case of obstructed labor. The health care provider has to decide on the options available to him to deliver the mother by the safest route without causing morbidity and mortality. If the fetus is dead, a destructive procedure can be considered in place of abdominal-route delivery which carries considerable risk to the debilitated mother in neglected labor.

  18. [A proposal for introduction of Europeristat-compatible information system aiming a unified quality control of obstetrical and perinatological care in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkő, Péter

    2016-05-01

    It is a regrettable deficiency in the Hungarian healthcare that the culture and the system of quality control of cure have not been formed (except for a few subspecialties, units or wards). If hospital wards do not have a national, professionally unified and modern information system presenting the most important quantity and quality indicators of their medicinal activity annually, a stable basis for definition of future tasks is absent. The author puts forward a proposal for the establishment of the information systems for different professional fields. On the basis of experience of perinatological information system operating for over 3 decades in Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén county, he also proposes introduction of a nationally unified, Europeristat-compatible information system following Tauffer-statistics which may serve as a uniform quality control of obstetrics and perinatological care, as well as introduction of its base, the dataform "TePERA" (Form of Obstetrics and Perinatological Care Risk).

  19. Domestic violence in the pregnant patient: obstetric and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L; Liebschutz, J

    1998-10-01

    Every day, obstetric providers treat patients experiencing domestic violence. Domestic violence can have both dramatic and subtle impacts on maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. This article enumerates patient risk factors for and obstetric consequences of domestic violence. It describes adaptations to the assessment and treatment of pregnancy complications occurring in the context of domestic violence and presents behavioral interventions that can be performed within existing obstetric care delivery systems. Behavioral interventions include assessments of a patient's readiness for change and her emotional responses to the violence. Obstetric interventions include an assessment of risk of physical harm to a pregnant woman and her fetus from domestic violence. Interviewing techniques include educating the patient about the effects of abuse and, over time, validating a patient's efforts to change. Reliance on a team approach and use of community resources are emphasized. All of these mechanisms enable obstetric providers to assist pregnant women in taking steps to end the abuse.

  20. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranti Suresh Vora

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public–private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods: Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA method. Results: Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive

  1. The dominance of the private sector in the provision of emergency obstetric care: studies from Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Mariano; Vora, Kranti; De Costa, Ayesha

    2016-07-07

    India has experienced a steep rise in institutional childbirth. The relative contributions of public and private sector facilities to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has not been studied in this setting. This paper aims to study in three districts of Gujarat state, India:(a) the availability of EmOC facilities in the public and private sectors; (b) the availability and distribution of human resources for birth attendance in the two sectors; and (c) to benchmark the above against 2005 World Health Report benchmarks (WHR2005). A cross-sectional survey of obstetric care facilities reporting 30 or more births in the last three months was conducted (n = 159). Performance of EmOC signal functions and availability of human resources were assessed. EmOC provision was dominated by private facilities (112/159) which were located mainly in district headquarters or small urban towns. The number of basic and comprehensive EmOC facilities was below WHR2005 benchmarks. A high number of private facilities performed C-sections but not all basic signal functions (72/159). Public facilities were the main EmOC providers in rural areas and 40/47 functioned at less than basic EmOC level. The rate of obstetricians per 1000 births was higher in the private sector. The private sector is the dominant EmOC provider in the state. Given the highly skewed distribution of facilities and resources in the private sector, state led partnerships with the private sector so that all women in the state receive care is important alongside strengthening the public sector.

  2. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  3. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China.

  4. [Rapid Response obstetrics Team at Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social,enabling factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Torres, Javier; González-Izquierdo, José de Jesús; Ruíz-Rosas, Roberto Aguli; Cruz-Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers and enablers for the implementation of Rapid Response Teams in obstetric hospitals. The enabling factors were determined at Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) MATERIAL AND METHODS: An observational, retrospective study was conducted by analysing the emergency obstetric reports sent by mobile technology and e-mail to the Medical Care Unit of the IMSS in 2013. Frequency and mean was obtained using the Excel 2010 program for descriptive statistics. A total of 164,250 emergency obstetric cases were reported, and there was a mean of 425 messages per day, of which 32.2% were true obstetric emergencies and required the Rapid Response team. By e-mail, there were 73,452 life threatening cases (a mean of 6 cases per day). A monthly simulation was performed in hospitals (480 in total). Enabling factors were messagés synchronisation among the participating personnel,the accurate record of the obstetrics, as well as the simulations performed by the operational staff. The most common emergency was pre-eclampsia-eclampsia with 3,351 reports, followed by obstetric haemorrhage with 2,982 cases. The enabling factors for the implementation of a rapid response team at IMSS were properly timed communication between the central delegation teams, as they allowed faster medical and administrative management and participation of hospital medical teams in the process. Mobile technology has increased the speed of medical and administrative management in emergency obstetric care. However, comparative studies are needed to determine the statistical significance. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  5. Moral implications of obstetric technologies for pregnancy and motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Drawing on sociological and anthropological studies, the aim of this article is to reconstruct how obstetric technologies contribute to a moral conception of pregnancy and motherhood, and to evaluate that conception from a normative point of view. Obstetrics and midwifery, so the assumption, are value-laden, value-producing and value-reproducing practices, values that shape the social perception of what it means to be a "good" pregnant woman and to be a "good" (future) mother. Activities in the medical field of reproduction contribute to "kinning", that is the making of particular social relationships marked by closeness and special moral obligations. Three technologies, which belong to standard procedures in prenatal care in postmodern societies, are presently investigated: (1) informed consent in prenatal care, (2) obstetric sonogram, and (3) birth plan. Their widespread application is supposed to serve the moral (and legal) goal of effecting patient autonomy (and patient right). A reconstruction of the actual moral implications of these technologies, however, reveals that this goal is missed in multiple ways. Informed consent situations are marked by involuntariness and blindness to social dimensions of decision-making; obstetric sonograms construct moral subjectivity and agency in a way that attribute inconsistent and unreasonable moral responsibilities to the pregnant woman; and birth plans obscure the need for a healthcare environment that reflects a shared-decision-making model, rather than a rational-choice-framework.

  6. Anaesthetic and Obstetric challenges of morbid obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic and Obstetric challenges of morbid obesity in caesarean ... in morbidly obese parturient that had caesarean delivery in a Nigerian tertiary care centre. ... This mirrors a World Health Organisation report published in the World Health ...

  7. A case-control study of the risk factors for obstetric fistula in Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Wall, L; Belay, Shewaye; Haregot, Tesfahun; Dukes, Jonathan; Berhan, Eyoel; Abreha, Melaku

    2017-12-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that there were no differences between patients with obstetric fistula and parous controls without fistula. A unmatched case-control study was carried out comparing 75 women with a history of obstetric fistula with 150 parous controls with no history of fistula. Height and weight were measured for each participant, along with basic socio-demographic and obstetric information. Descriptive statistics were calculated and differences between the groups were analyzed using Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test where appropriate, and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test, along with backward stepwise logistic regression analyses to detect predictors of obstetric fistula. Associations with a p value divorce/separation, and lived in more impoverished circumstances than controls. Fistula patients had worse reproductive histories, with greater numbers of stillbirths/abortions and higher rates of assisted vaginal delivery and cesarean section. The final logistic regression model found four significant risk factors for developing an obstetric fistula: age at marriage (OR 1.23), history of assisted vaginal delivery (OR 3.44), lack of adequate antenatal care (OR 4.43), and a labor lasting longer than 1 day (OR 14.84). Our data indicate that obstetric fistula results from the lack of access to effective obstetrical services when labor is prolonged. Rural poverty and lack of adequate transportation infrastructure are probably important co-factors in inhibiting access to needed care.

  8. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes in IVF versus ICSI-conceived pregnancies at a tertiary care center--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Kazem; Ott, Johannes; Stoegbauer, Lucia; Pietrowski, Detlef; Frantal, Sophie; Walch, Katharina

    2013-08-31

    Although most pregnancies after IVF result in normal healthy outcomes, an increased risk for a number of obstetric and neonatal complications, compared to naturally conceived pregnancies, has been reported. While there are many studies that compare pregnancies after assisted reproductive techniques with spontaneously conceived pregnancies, fewer data are available that evaluate the differences between IVF and ICSI-conceived pregnancies. The aim of our present study was, therefore, to compare obstetric and perinatal outcomes in pregnancies conceived after in vitro fertilization (IVF) versus intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI). Three-hundred thirty four women who had become pregnant after an IVF or ICSI procedure resulted in a total of 530 children referred between 2003 und 2009 to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical University of Vienna, a tertiary care center, and were included in this retrospective cohort study. We assessed maternal and fetal parameters in both groups (IVF and ICSI). The main study outcomes were preterm delivery, the need for neonatal intensive care, and congenital malformations. Moreover, we compared the course of pregnancy between both groups and the occurrence of complications that led to maternal hospitalization during pregnancy. There were 80 children conceived via ICSI and 450 children conceived via IVF.Mean gestational age was significantly lower in the ICSI group (p = 0.001). After ICSI, the birth weight (p = 0.008) and the mean APGAR values after 1 minute and after 10 minutes were lower compared to that of the IVF group (p = 0.016 and p = 0.047, respectively). Moreover, ICSI-conceived children had to be hospitalized more often at a neonatal intensive care unit (p = 0.004). There was no difference in pH of the umbilical artery or in major congenital malformations between the two groups. Pregnancy complications (i.e., premature rupture of membranes, cervical insufficiency, and premature

  9. Measuring unmet obstetric need at district level: how an epidemiological tool can affect health service organization and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindo, Gabriel; Dubourg, Dominique; Marchal, Bruno; Blaise, Pierre; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    A national retrospective survey on the unmet need for major obstetric surgery using the Unmet Obstetric Need Approach was carried out in Mali in 1999. In Koutiala, the district health team decided to carry on the monitoring of the met need for several years in order to assess their progress over time. The first prospective study, for 1999, estimated that more than 100 women in need of obstetric care never reached the hospital and probably died as a consequence. This surprising result shocked the district health team and the resulting increased awareness of service deficits triggered operational measures to tackle the problem. The Unmet Obstetric Need study in Koutiala district was implemented without financial support and only limited external technical back-up. The appropriation of the study by the district team for solving local problems of access to obstetric care may have contributed to the success of the experience. Used as a health service management tool, the study and its results started a dialogue between the hospital staff and both health centre staff and community representatives. This had not only the effect of triggering consideration of coverage, but also of quality of obstetric care. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  10. Obstetric complications: does training traditional birth attendants make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia E. Bailey

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effect that a training intervention for traditional birth attendants (TBAs in Guatemala had on the detection of obstetric complications, the referral of patients with complications to the formal health care system, and, ultimately, those patients' utilization of essential obstetric care services. Methods. Using a quasi-experimental design, a surveillance system of births was implemented to collect population-based information from 3 518 women between 1990 and 1993. All women were interviewed postpartum by physicians. There were three key independent variables in our study: 1 geographical area (intervention community and non-intervention community, 2 time in relation to the training intervention (before or after, and 3 presence or absence of a TBA at the time of the complication. The key dependent variables for women interviewed were 1 development of an obstetric complication, 2 detection of the problem by the TBA, 3 referral to a health facility, 4 compliance with referral, and 5 use of services. Results. The incidence of postpartum complications decreased after the intervention, controlling for intervention community. On the other hand, after the intervention TBAs were less likely to recognize most maternal complications, and referral rates did not increase significantly. The likelihood of using health care services increased six-fold among women who were not attended by TBAs, and no increase was observed among those who were attended by TBAs. Conclusion. Training TBAs may have had a positive effect on the rate, detection, and referral of postpartum complications. However, the evidence is less convincing for overall increases in the detection of complications, in referral to the formal health care system, and in the utilization of essential obstetric services among women attended by TBAs.

  11. Quality of comprehensive emergency obstetric care through the lens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Availability of structure indicators were graded excellent and good except for long gloves, misoprostol, ergometrin and parenteral cefuroxime that were graded low. A total of 1,216 records were abstracted for process analysis. The median (IQR) for the: six variables of obstetric history was five (4-5); five variables of ...

  12. Obstetric violence: A Latin American legal response to mistreatment during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caitlin R; Jerez, Celeste; Klein, Karen; Correa, Malena; Belizán, José M; Cormick, Gabriela

    2018-05-04

    Over the last several years, a new legal construct has emerged in Latin America that encompasses elements of quality of obstetric care and mistreatment of women during childbirth - both issues of global maternal health import. Termed "obstetric violence," this legal construct refers to disrespectful and abusive treatment that women may experience from health care providers during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period, as well as other elements of poor quality care, such as failure to adhere to evidence-based best practices. This new legal term emerged out of concerted efforts by women's groups and networks, feminists, professional organizations, international and regional bodies, and public health agents and researchers to improve the quality of care that women receive across the region. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Home birth without skilled attendants despite millennium villages project intervention in Ghana: insight from a survey of women's perceptions of skilled obstetric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakua, Emmanuel Kweku; Sevugu, Justice Thomas; Dzomeku, Veronica Millicent; Otupiri, Easmon; Lipkovich, Heather R; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2015-10-07

    Skilled birth attendance from a trained health professional during labour and delivery can prevent up to 75% of maternal deaths. However, in low- and middle-income rural communities, lack of basic medical infrastructure and limited number of skilled birth attendants are significant barriers to timely obstetric care. Through analysis of self-reported data, this study aimed to assess the effect of an intervention addressing barriers in access to skilled obstetric care and identified factors associated with the use of unskilled birth attendants during delivery in a rural district of Ghana. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from June to August 2012 in the Amansie West District of Ghana among women of reproductive age. Multi-stage, random, and population proportional techniques were used to sample 50 communities and 400 women for data collection. Weighted multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with place of delivery. A total of 391 mothers had attended an antenatal care clinic at least once for their most recent birth; 42.3% of them had unskilled deliveries. Reasons reported for the use of unskilled birth attendants during delivery were: insults from health workers (23.5%), unavailability of transport (21.9%), and confidence in traditional birth attendants (17.9%); only 7.4% reported to have had sudden labour. Other factors associated with the use of unskilled birth attendants during delivery included: lack of partner involvement aOR = 0.03 (95% CI; 0.01, 0.06), lack of birth preparedness aOR = 0.05 (95% CI; 0.02, 0.13) and lack of knowledge of the benefits of skilled delivery aOR = 0.37 (95% CI; 0.11, 1.20). This study demonstrated the importance of provider-client relationship and cultural sensitivity in the efforts to improve skilled obstetric care uptake among rural women in Ghana.

  14. Obstetric outcome with low molecular weight heparin therapy during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, J

    2012-01-01

    This was a prospective study of women attending a combined haematology\\/obstetric antenatal clinic in the National Maternity Hospital (2002-2008). Obstetric outcome in mothers treated with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was compared to the general obstetric population of 2006. There were 133 pregnancies in 105 women. 85 (63.9%) received prophylactic LMWH and 38 (28.6%) received therapeutic LMWH in pregnancy. 10 (7.5%) received postpartum prophylaxis only. The perinatal mortality rate was 7.6\\/1000 births. 14 (11.3%) women delivered preterm which is significantly higher than the hospital population rate (5.7%, p<0.05). Despite significantly higher labour induction rates (50% vs 29.2% p<0.01), there was no difference in CS rates compared to the general hospital population (15.4% vs 18.9%, NS). If carefully managed, these high-risk women can achieve similar vaginal delivery rates as the general obstetric population.

  15. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management in rural areas: a case of Rukungiri district, Western Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogwang Simon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality is a major public health problem worldwide especially in low income countries. Most causes of maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric complications. Maternal mortality ratio remains high in Rukungiri district, western Uganda estimated at 475 per 100,000 live births. The objectives were to identify types of community involvement and examine factors influencing the level of community involvement in the management of obstetric emergencies. Methods We conducted a descriptive study during 2nd to 28th February 2009 in rural Rukungiri district, western Uganda. A total of 448 heads of households, randomly selected from 6/11 (54.5% of sub-counties, 21/42 (50.0% parishes and 32/212 (15.1% villages (clusters, were interviewed. Data were analysed using STATA version 10.0. Results Community pre-emergency support interventions available included community awareness creation (sensitization while interventions undertaken when emergency had occurred included transportation and referring women to health facility. Community support programmes towards health care (obstetric emergencies included establishment of community savings and credit schemes, and insurance schemes. The factors associated with community involvement in obstetric emergency management were community members being employed (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.02 - 3.54 and rating the quality of maternal health care as good (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.19 - 4.14. Conclusions Types of community involvement in obstetric emergency management include practices and support programmes. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management is influenced by employment status and perceived quality of health care services. Policies to promote community networks and resource mobilization strategies for health care should be implemented. There is need for promotion of community support initiatives including health insurance schemes and self help associations; further community

  16. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. Obstetric violence according to obstetric nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Gonçalves da Silva; Michelle Carreira Marcelino; Lívia Shélida Pinheiro Rodrigues; Rosário Carcaman Toro; Antonieta Keiko Kakuda Shimo

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to report the experience of obstetric nurses on the obstetric violence experienced, witnessed and observed during their professional careers. This study is based on an account of experience of working in several health institutions such as basic health units, private and public hospitals, located in São Paulo, Brazil, in a period 5-36 years of technical training and professional experience from 1977 to 2013. The technique to expose the professional experiences was brainstorm...

  18. Causes and consequences of obstetric fistula in Ethiopia: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nigusse Tollosa, Mengistu Asnake Kibret

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObstetric fistula (OF is one of the major potential complications of childbirth mostly young women in developing countries including Ethiopia. Though few scientific studies have been conducted related to its causes and consequences, it is challenging to find a comprehensive figure about obstetric fistula in Ethiopia. Therefore, this paper sought that to review the causes and consequences of obstetric fistula in Ethiopia. A number of relevant obstetrics and gynaecology websites and journals were reviewed. Google, Pubmed, and Hinari searching engines were used to find out relevant references. Year of publication, location, language and its type of publication were the inclusion criteria used for reviewing literatures. It is observed that obstetric fistula has been a major burdened mainly for women in the rural Ethiopian and its causes and consequences are very deep and diverse. The great majority of obstetric fistula causes in Ethiopia is due to Obstetric labour. Distance to the health care facility, transportation access, economic factors (poverty, poor knowledge related to the problem, poor health seeking behaviour of the affected women and age at first marriage are the other triggering factors. Stigma and discrimination of obstetric fistula patients by their husbands and families, economic dependency and psychological disorder are often mentioned as consequences for OF patients in Ethiopia.

  19. Predictors of maternal mortality among critically ill obstetric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    et al.,15 that absence of prenatal care was a predictor of maternal mortality in critically ill obstetric patients, the booking status in this study was not a predictor of mortality. This could be because the delay in recognition of the need for ICU care and delays in presentation could have removed the otherwise expected beneficial ...

  20. GerOSS (German Obstetric Surveillance System). A Project to Improve the Treatment of Obstetric Rare Diseases and Complications Using a Web Based Documentation and Information Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlage, S; Grüßner, S; Lack, N; Franz, H B G

    2015-01-01

    Severe and very rare obstetric complications (e.g. eclampsia, postpartum haemorrhage or uterine rupture), typically culminate in a chaotic, uncontrollable sequence of events. Outcome for mother and child depends on whether doctors and midwives are able to quickly take correct decisions and initiate optimal treatment. GerOSS (German Obstetric Surveillance System) aims at generating deeper insight into relevant risk factors to improve diagnosis and treatment of severe complications during pregnancy and delivery. As such it is primarily conceived as a system for quality improvement and less as a register. Another focus is the provision of an information and communication platform for dissemination of these insights. Finally, incidences of selected rare obstetric events may be derived. These rare events are monitored for two to five years in Lower Saxony, Bavaria and Berlin. Quantitative analyses of aggregate data are complemented with in depth case based anonymised evaluations by experts. The temporal sequence of measures taken as well as the management of care is inspected. Participants receive a feedback of comments on the synopsis of individual cases. Aggregate data results are published and made available through the GerOSS platform. A scientific advisory committee ensures the link with the professional scientific bodies. A comparison within INOSS (International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems) allows additional insights into the treatment of obstetric rare diseases and complications. More reliable estimates of the incidence of such events can be computed and compared within a larger database. Following the implementation in three federal states in Germany in 2010, participation in GerOSS-Project has increased to 100% of all hospitals with a delivery unit in Lower Saxony, 30% in Bavaria and 80% in Berlin. Feasibility of the project is shown by successful implementation of GerOSS. Quantitative analyses enable construction of risk profiles (e.g. for the

  1. Obstetric outcomes after fresh versus frozen-thawed embryo transfers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Matheus; Valle, Marcello; Sampaio, Marcos; Geber, Selmo

    2018-05-21

    To evaluate if there are differences in the risks of obstetric outcomes in IVF/ICSI singleton pregnancies when compared fresh to frozen-thawed embryo transfers (FET). This was a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the obstetric outcomes in singleton pregnancies after FET and fresh embryo transfer. The outcomes included in this study were pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), pre-eclampsia, placenta previa, and placenta accreta. The search yielded 654 papers, 6 of which met the inclusion criteria and reported on obstetric outcomes. When comparing pregnancies that arose from FET or fresh embryo transfer, there was an increase in the risk of obstetric complications in pregnancies resulting from FET when compared to those emerging from fresh embryo transfers in PIH (aOR 1.82; 95% CI 1.24-2.68), pre-eclampsia (aOR 1.32, 95% CI 1.07, 1.63), and placenta accreta (aOR 3.51, 95% CI 2.04-6.05). There were no significant differences in the risk between the FET and fresh embryo transfer groups when evaluating placenta previa (aOR 0.70; 95% CI 0.46-1.08). The obstetric outcomes observed in pregnancies arising from ART may differ among fresh and FET cycles. Thus, when evaluating to perform a fresh embryo transfer or a freeze-all cycle, these differences found in obstetric outcomes between fresh and FET should be taken into account. The adverse obstetric outcomes after FET found in this study emphasize that the freeze-all policy should not be offered to all the patients, but should be offered to those with a clear indication of the benefit of this strategy.

  2. Effectiveness of community based Safe Motherhood promoters in improving the utilization of obstetric care. The case of Mtwara Rural District in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushi, Declare; Mpembeni, Rose; Jahn, Albrecht

    2010-04-01

    In Tanzania, maternal mortality ratio remains unacceptably high at 578/100,000 live births. Despite a high coverage of antenatal care (96%), only 44% of deliveries take place within the formal health services. Still, "Ensure skilled attendant at birth" is acknowledged as one of the most effective interventions to reduce maternal deaths. Exploring the potential of community-based interventions in increasing the utilization of obstetric care, the study aimed at developing, testing and assessing a community-based safe motherhood intervention in Mtwara rural District of Tanzania. This community-based intervention was designed as a pre-post comparison study, covering 4 villages with a total population of 8300. Intervention activities were implemented by 50 trained safe motherhood promoters (SMPs). Their tasks focused on promoting early and complete antenatal care visits and delivery with a skilled attendant. Data on all 512 deliveries taking place from October 2004 to November 2006 were collected by the SMPs and cross-checked with health service records. In addition 242 respondents were interviewed with respect to knowledge on safe motherhood issues and their perception of the SMP's performance. Skilled delivery attendance was our primary outcome; secondary outcomes included antenatal care attendance and knowledge on Safe Motherhood issues. Deliveries with skilled attendant significantly increased from 34.1% to 51.4% (rho utilization of obstetric care and a skilled attendant at delivery. This improvement is attributed to the SMPs' home visits and the close collaboration with existing community structures as well as health services.

  3. Effectiveness of advertising availability of prenatal ultrasound on uptake of antenatal care in rural Uganda: A cluster randomized trial.

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    William Cherniak

    Full Text Available In rural Uganda pregnant women often lack access to health services, do not attend antenatal care, and tend to utilize traditional healers/birth attendants. We hypothesized that receiving a message advertising that "you will be able to see your baby by ultrasound" would motivate rural Ugandan women who otherwise might use a traditional birth attendant to attend antenatal care, and that those women would subsequently be more satisfied with care. A cluster randomized trial was conducted across eight rural sub-counties in southwestern Uganda. Sub-counties were randomized to a control arm, with advertisement of antenatal care with no mention of portable obstetric ultrasound (four communities, n = 59, or an intervention arm, with advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound. Advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound was further divided into intervention A word of mouth advertisement of portable obstetric ultrasound and antenatal care (one communitity, n = 16, B radio advertisement of only antenatal care and word of mouth advertisement of antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound (one community, n = 7, or C word of mouth + radio advertisement of both antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound (two communities, n = 75. The primary outcome was attendance to antenatal care. 159 women presented to antenatal care across eight sub-counties. The rate of attendance was 65.1 (per 1000 pregnant women, 95% CI 38.3-110.4 where portable obstetric ultrasound was advertised by radio and word of mouth, as compared to a rate of 11.1 (95% CI 6.1-20.1 in control communities (rate ratio 5.9, 95% CI 2.6-13.0, p<0.0001. Attendance was also improved in women who had previously seen a traditional healer (13.0, 95% CI 5.4-31.2 compared to control (1.5, 95% CI 0.5-5.0, rate ratio 8.7, 95% CI 2.0-38.1, p = 0.004. By advertising antenatal care and portable obstetric ultrasound by radio attendance was significantly improved. This study suggests that women can

  4. Obstetrical referrals by traditional birth attendants.

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    Mustafa, Rozina; Hashmi, Haleema; Mustafa, Rubina

    2012-01-01

    In Pakistan 90% of births are conducted by TBA's. In most cases, TBA's are unable to diagnose the complications and are often unable to take decisions on timely referral. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, nature and outcome of life threatening obstetrical conditions in referrals by Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs). This Observational, Descriptive study was conducted from January to December 2007, in the obstetrical unit of Fatima Hospital, Baqai Medical University, a tertiary care community based hospital. The study included patients referred by TBA's who developed life threatening obstetric conditions (LTOCs). Total 64 patients were referred by TBA's. The prevalence was 7.8%. Out of them, 53 (82.8%) patients admitted with life threatening obstetric conditions. The near-miss morbidities and mortalities were 45 (84.9%) and 8 (15%) respectively. Maternal mortality to Near-miss morbidity ratio was 1:6. Obstructed labour caused near-miss morbidity in 32 (60.3%) patients with no mortality. Postpartum haemorrhage as life threatening condition developed in 16 (30.1%) patients with 10 (18.8%) near-miss morbidities and 6 (11.3%) mortalities. Puerperal sepsis accounted for 1 (1.88%) near-miss morbidity and 2 (3.76%) mortalities. The mortality index for puerperal sepsis is (66.6%) almost double of postpartum haemorrhage (37.5%). Mortality to near miss morbidity ratio is high. Misidentification and late referrals of complicated cases by TBA's were responsible for near-miss morbidities and mortalities.

  5. Obstetric significance of fetal craniofacial duplication. A case report.

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    Chervenak, F A; Pinto, M M; Heller, C I; Norooz, H

    1985-01-01

    Craniofacial duplication (diprosopus) is a rare form of conjoined twins. Whenever fetal hydrocephalus is diagnosed, a careful search for other anomalies, such as diprosopus, is mandatory. The obstetric management depends upon the time of the diagnosis.

  6. Barriers to obstetric care among maternal near-misses | Soma-Pillay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred maternal near-misses were prospectively identified using the World Health Organization criteria. ... The above causes were also the most important factors causing delays for the leading causes of maternal near-misses – obstetric haemorrhage, hypertension/pre-eclampsia, and medical and surgical conditions.

  7. Obstetric referrals from a rural clinic to a community hospital in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Srirama; Taylor, Kathryn K; Murphy, Blair M; Rodas, Dairamise; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D

    2015-11-01

    referrals between health care facilities are important in low-resource settings, particularly in maternal and child health, to transfer pregnant patients to the appropriate level of obstetric care. Our aim was to characterise the obstetrical referrals from a rural clinic to a community referral hospital in Honduras, to identify barriers in effective transport/referral, and to describe subsequent patient outcomes. we performed a descriptive retrospective study of patients referred during a 9-month period. We reviewed patient charts to review diagnosis, referral, and treatment times at both sites to understand the continuity of care. ninety-two pregnant patients were referred from the rural clinic to the community hospital. Twenty six pregnant patients (28%) did not have complete and accurate medical records and were excluded from the study. The remaining 66 patients were our study population. Of the 66 patients, 54 (82%) received antenatal care with an average of 5.5±2.4 visits. The most common diagnoses requiring referral were non-reassuring fetal status, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and preterm labour. The time spent in the rural clinic until transfer was 7.35±8.60 hours, and transport times were 4.42±1.07 hours. Of the 66 women transferred, 24 (36%) had different primary diagnoses and 16 (24%) had additional diagnoses after evaluation in the community hospital, whereas the remaining 26 (40%) had diagnoses that remained the same. No system was in place to give feedback to the referring clinic doctors regarding their primary diagnoses. our results demonstrate challenges seen in obstetric transport from a rural clinic to a community hospital in Honduras. Further research is needed for reform of emergency obstetric care management, targeting both healthcare personnel and medical referral infrastructure. The example of Honduras can be taken to motivate change in other resource-limited areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Obstetric care and method of delivery in Mexico: results from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey.

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    Ileana Heredia-Pi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the current clinical, socio-demographic and obstetric factors associated with the various types of delivery strategies in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study based on the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT of 6,736 women aged 12 to 49 years. Delivery types discussed in this paper include vaginal delivery, emergency cesarean section and planned cesarean section. Using bivariate analyses, sub-population group differences were identified. Logistic regression models were applied, including both binary and multinomial outcome variables from the survey. The logistic regression results identify those covariates associated with the type of delivery. RESULTS: 53.1% of institutional births in the period 2006 through 2012 were vaginal deliveries, 46.9% were either a planned or emergency cesarean sections. The highest rates of this procedure were among women who reported a complication during delivery (OR: 4.21; 95%CI: 3.66-4.84, between the ages of 35 and 49 at the time of their last child birth (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 2.02-3.20 and women receiving care through private healthcare providers during delivery (OR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.84-3.03. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of different socio-demographic and obstetric profiles among women who receive care for vaginal or cesarean delivery, are supported by the findings of the present study. The frequency of vaginal delivery is higher in indigenous women, when the care provider is public and, in women with two or more children at time of the most recent child birth. Planned cesarean deliveries are positively associated with years of schooling, a higher socioeconomic level, and higher age. The occurrence of emergency cesarean sections is elevated in women with a diagnosis of a health issue during pregnancy or delivery, and it is reduced in highly marginalized settings.

  9. Obstetric care and method of delivery in Mexico: results from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Servan-Mori, Edson E; Wirtz, Veronika J; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Lozano, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    To identify the current clinical, socio-demographic and obstetric factors associated with the various types of delivery strategies in Mexico. This is a cross-sectional study based on the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) of 6,736 women aged 12 to 49 years. Delivery types discussed in this paper include vaginal delivery, emergency cesarean section and planned cesarean section. Using bivariate analyses, sub-population group differences were identified. Logistic regression models were applied, including both binary and multinomial outcome variables from the survey. The logistic regression results identify those covariates associated with the type of delivery. 53.1% of institutional births in the period 2006 through 2012 were vaginal deliveries, 46.9% were either a planned or emergency cesarean sections. The highest rates of this procedure were among women who reported a complication during delivery (OR: 4.21; 95%CI: 3.66-4.84), between the ages of 35 and 49 at the time of their last child birth (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 2.02-3.20) and women receiving care through private healthcare providers during delivery (OR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.84-3.03). The existence of different socio-demographic and obstetric profiles among women who receive care for vaginal or cesarean delivery, are supported by the findings of the present study. The frequency of vaginal delivery is higher in indigenous women, when the care provider is public and, in women with two or more children at time of the most recent child birth. Planned cesarean deliveries are positively associated with years of schooling, a higher socioeconomic level, and higher age. The occurrence of emergency cesarean sections is elevated in women with a diagnosis of a health issue during pregnancy or delivery, and it is reduced in highly marginalized settings.

  10. Community awareness about risk factors, presentation and prevention and obstetric fistula in Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamba, Nassar; Kaye, Dan K; Mbalinda, Scovia N

    2013-12-10

    Obstetric fistula is a worldwide problem that is devastating for women in developing countries. The cardinal cause of obstetric fistula is prolonged obstructed labour and delay in seeking emergency obstetric care. Awareness about obstetric fistula is still low in developing countries. The objective was to assess the awareness about risk factors of obstetric fistulae in rural communities of Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Eastern Uganda. A qualitative study using focus group discussion for males and females aged 18-49 years, to explore and gain deeper understanding of their awareness of existence, causes, clinical presentation and preventive measures for obstetric fistula. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. The majority of the women and a few men were aware about obstetric fistula, though many had misconceptions regarding its causes, clinical presentation and prevention. Some wrongly attributed fistula to misuse of family planning, having sex during the menstruation period, curses by relatives, sexually transmitted infections, rape and gender-based violence. However, others attributed the fistula to delays to access medical care, induced abortions, conception at an early age, utilization of traditional birth attendants at delivery, and some complications that could occur during surgical operations for difficult deliveries. Most of the community members interviewed were aware of the risk factors of obstetric fistula. Some respondents, predominantly men, had misconceptions/myths about risk factors of obstetric fistula as being caused by having sex during menstrual periods, poor usage of family planning, being a curse.

  11. Simulation training for emergency obstetric and neonatal care in Senegal preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, M; Moreira, P M; Faye-Dieme, M E; Ndiaye-Gueye, M D; Gassama, O; Kane-Gueye, S M; Diouf, A A; Niang, M M; Diadhiou, M; Diallo, M; Dieng, Y D; Ndiaye, O; Diouf, A; Moreau, J C

    2017-06-01

    To describe a new training approach for emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) introduced in Senegal to strengthen the skills of healthcare providers. The approach was based on skills training according to the so-called "humanist" method and on "lifesaving skills". Simulated practice took place in the classroom through 13 clinical stations summarizing the clinical skills needed for EmONC. Evaluation took place in all phases, and the results were recorded in a database to document the progress of each learner. This approach was used to train 432 providers in 10 months and to document the increase in each participants' technical achievements. The combination of training with the "learning by doing" model ensured that providers learned and mastered all EmONC skills and reduced the missed learning opportunities observed in former EmONC training sessions. Assessing the impact of training on EmONC indicators and introducing this learning modality in basic training are the two major challenges we currently face.

  12. Perceived Health System Causes of Obstetric Fistula from Accounts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    of Affected Women in Rural Tanzania: A Qualitative Study. 1*. Lilian T. .... achieved after 16 interviews, where answers from women .... delivery is crucial for safety of the future mothers and their ..... among obstetric care givers in public health.

  13. [Study on the first translated obstetrics book Tai chan ju yao (Essentials in Obstetrics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M

    2018-01-28

    In 1893, Wan Tsun-mo translated and published Tai chan ju yao ( Essentials in Obstetrics ), the first monograph of western obstetrics in modern China, symbolizing the independence of obstetrics from such maternal and child books as Fu ying xin shuo and Fu ke jing yun tu shuo , which occupies an important position in the history of the development of modern Chinese obstetrics. The book introduced anatomy, physiology, pathology, embryology, diagnostics, surgery, pharmacology and other knowledge of obstetrics in a catechismal form, and had a detailed discussion of such advanced obstetrical technologies as antiseptic, anesthesia, forceps and cesarean section for the first time.Judging from the content and translation of Tai chan ju yao , this book has already possessed the basic knowledge system of modern obstetrics, though the translation appeared to be somewhat jerky and not elegant and the terminology needing to be further improved, it was not only used as an important medium for the introduction of obstetrical knowledge, but also of great clinical value.However, its influence was so weak that later researchers seldom mentioned this book.

  14. Impact of a low-technology simulation-based obstetric and newborn care training scheme on non-emergency delivery practices in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Anna; Kestler, Edgar; Dettinger, Julia C; Zelek, Sarah; Holme, Francesca; Walker, Dilys

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effect of a low-technology simulation-based training scheme for obstetric and perinatal emergency management (PRONTO; Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) on non-emergency delivery practices at primary level clinics in Guatemala. A paired cross-sectional birth observation study was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 clinics (nine pairs of intervention and control clinics) from June 28 to August 7, 2013. Outcomes included implementation of practices known to decrease maternal and/or neonatal mortality and improve patient care. Overall, 25 and 17 births occurred in intervention and control clinics, respectively. Active management of the third stage of labor was appropriately performed by 20 (83%) of 24 intervention teams versus 7 (50%) of 14 control teams (P=0.015). Intervention teams implemented more practices to decrease neonatal mortality than did control teams (P<0.001). Intervention teams ensured patient privacy in 23 (92%) of 25 births versus 11 (65%) of 17 births for control teams (P=0.014). All 15 applicable intervention teams kept patients informed versus 6 (55%) of 11 control teams (P=0.001). Differences were also noted in teamwork; in particular, skill-based tools were used more often at intervention sites than control sites (P=0.012). Use of PRONTO enhanced non-emergency delivery care by increasing evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, and teamwork. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Obstetrics in a Time of Violence: Mexican Midwives Critique Routine Hospital Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher Dixon, Lydia

    2015-12-01

    Mexican midwives have long taken part in a broader Latin American trend to promote "humanized birth" as an alternative to medicalized interventions in hospital obstetrics. As midwives begin to regain authority in reproductive health and work within hospital units, they come to see the issue not as one of mere medicalization but of violence and violation. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with midwives from across Mexico during a time of widespread social violence, my research examines an emergent critique of hospital birth as a site of what is being called violencia obstétrica (obstetric violence). In this critique, women are discussed as victims of explicit abuse by hospital staff and by the broader health care infrastructures. By reframing obstetric practices as violent-as opposed to medicalized-these midwives seek to situate their concerns about women's health care in Mexico within broader regional discussions about violence, gender, and inequality. © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association.

  16. ‘Essential but not always available when needed’ – an interview study of physicians’ experiences and views regarding use of obstetric ultrasound in Tanzania

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    Annika Åhman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The value of obstetric ultrasound in high-income countries has been extensively explored but evidence is still lacking regarding the role of obstetric ultrasound in low-income countries. Objective: We aimed to explore experiences and views among physicians working in obstetric care in Tanzania, on the role of obstetric ultrasound in relation to clinical management. Design: A qualitative study design was applied. Data were collected in 2015, through 16 individual interviews with physicians practicing in obstetric care at hospitals in an urban setting in Tanzania. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Use of obstetric ultrasound in the management of complicated pregnancy was much appreciated by participating physicians, although they expressed considerable concern about the lack of ultrasound equipment and staff able to conduct the examinations. These limitations were recognized as restricting physicians’ ability to manage complications adequately during pregnancy and birth. Better availability of ultrasound was requested to improve obstetric management. Concerns were also raised regarding pregnant women's lack of knowledge and understanding of medical issues which could make counseling in relation to obstetric ultrasound difficult. Although the physicians perceived a positive attitude toward ultrasound among most pregnant women, occasionally they came across women who feared that ultrasound might harm the fetus. Conclusions: There seems to be a need to provide more physicians in antenatal care in Tanzania with ultrasound training to enable them to conduct obstetric ultrasound examinations and interpret the results themselves. Physicians also need to acquire adequate counseling skills as counseling can be especially challenging in this setting where many expectant parents have low levels of education. Providers of obstetric care and policy makers in Tanzania will need to take measures to ensure appropriate

  17. The value of decision tree analysis in planning anaesthetic care in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, J H; Evans, S A

    2016-08-01

    The use of decision tree analysis is discussed in the context of the anaesthetic and obstetric management of a young pregnant woman with joint hypermobility syndrome with a history of insensitivity to local anaesthesia and a previous difficult intubation due to a tongue tumour. The multidisciplinary clinical decision process resulted in the woman being delivered without complication by elective caesarean section under general anaesthesia after an awake fibreoptic intubation. The decision process used is reviewed and compared retrospectively to a decision tree analytical approach. The benefits and limitations of using decision tree analysis are reviewed and its application in obstetric anaesthesia is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring movement towards improved emergency obstetric care in rural Kenya with implementation of the PRONTO simulation and team training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Julia C; Kamau, Stephen; Calkins, Kimberly; Cohen, Susanna R; Cranmer, John; Kibore, Minnie; Gachuno, Onesmus; Walker, Dilys

    2018-02-01

    As the proportion of facility-based births increases, so does the need to ensure that mothers and their newborns receive quality care. Developing facility-oriented obstetric and neonatal training programs grounded in principles of teamwork utilizing simulation-based training for emergency response is an important strategy for improving the quality care. This study uses 3 dimensions of the Kirkpatrick Model to measure the impact of PRONTO International (PRONTO) simulation-based training as part of the Linda Afya ya Mama na Mtoto (LAMMP, Protect the Health of mother and child) in Kenya. Changes in knowledge of obstetric and neonatal emergency response, self-efficacy, and teamwork were analyzed using longitudinal, fixed-effects, linear regression models. Participants from 26 facilities participated in the training between 2013 and 2014. The results demonstrate improvements in knowledge, self-efficacy, and teamwork self-assessment. When comparing pre-Module I scores with post-training scores, improvements range from 9 to 24 percentage points (p values strategic goals was high: 95.8% of the 192 strategic goals. Participants rated the PRONTO intervention as extremely useful, with an overall score of 1.4 out of 5 (1, extremely useful; 5, not at all useful). Evaluation of how these improvements affect maternal and perinatal clinical outcomes is forthcoming. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Obstetric controversies in thyroidology

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    Ambika Gopalakrishnan Unnikrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that thyroid disorders commonly affect women. The care of pregnant women affected by thyroid disease is an important clinical challenge for endocrinologists. Hypothyroidism is the commonest problem, and maternal hypothyroxinemia has been linked to adverse feto-maternal outcomes. This article would discuss the controversy regarding first-trimester thyroid hormone deficiency and fetal brain development. Certain obstetric controversies in the management of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, including the indications of TSH receptor antibody measurements and fetal thyroid status monitoring would also be discussed.

  20. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafson, Irene; Currie, Jane; O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Woolf, Katherine; Griffin, Ann

    2017-06-02

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and 'peri-attrition' - a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work-life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work-life balance and poor personal support.

  1. The International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems (INOSS): benefits of multi-country studies of severe and uncommon maternal morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Marian

    2014-02-01

    The International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems (INOSS) is a multi-country collaboration formed to facilitate studies of uncommon and severe complications of pregnancy and childbirth. Collaborations such as INOSS offer many benefits in the study of rare complications. The use of uniform case definitions, common datasets, specifically collected detailed data and prospectively agreed comparative and combined analyses all add to the validity of studies and their utility to guide policy and clinical practice and hence improve the quality of care. Such multi-national collaborations allow for the conduct of robust studies less subject to many of the biases attributed to typical observational studies. For very rare conditions such collaborations may provide the only route to providing high quality evidence to guide practice. Clinicians and researchers conducting studies into rare and severe complications should consider working through a network such as INOSS to maximize the value of their research. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Audit of emergency obstetric referrals from a secondary level hospital in Haryana, North India

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    Shashi Kant

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The maternal mortality ratio in India is high. An effective emergency obstetric care (EmOC strategy has been identified as a priority to reduce maternal deaths. Since the capacity of different levels of public health facilities to provide EmOC is varied, an effective referral system is crucial. However, few studies have evaluated the functioning and quality of referral systems in India. A systematic monitoring of referrals helps to identify current gaps in the provision of essential obstetric care. Objective: This study was conducted to identify the medical and logistic reasons for emergency obstetric referrals from a subdistrict hospital (SDH. Methods: An audit of emergency referrals during the period January 2015–December 2015 was carried out. Records of all obstetric patients referred from the maternity ward during the study period were reviewed. Results: The referral rate was found to be 31.7%. Preterm labor (30.6%, pregnancy-induced hypertension (17%, and fetal distress (10.6% were the main reasons for referral. Deficiencies were found in critical determinants of functionality, that is, nonavailability of emergency cesarean, neonatal care unit, and blood bank. Conclusions: The referral rate at the SDH was high. Lack of workforce and infrastructural facilities led to referrals of women who ought to have been managed at this level of the hospital.

  3. Tanzanian lessons in using non-physician clinicians to scale up comprehensive emergency obstetric care in remote and rural areas

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    Nyamtema Angelo S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With 15-30% met need for comprehensive emergency obstetrical care (CEmOC and a 3% caesarean section rate, Tanzania needs to expand the number of facilities providing these services in more remote areas. Considering severe shortage of human resources for health in the country, currently operating at 32% of the required skilled workforce, an intensive three-month course was developed to train non-physician clinicians for remote health centres. Methods Competency-based curricula for assistant medical officers' (AMOs training in CEmOC, and for nurses, midwives and clinical officers in anaesthesia and operation theatre etiquette were developed and implemented in Ifakara, Tanzania. The required key competencies were identified, taught and objectively assessed. The training involved hands-on sessions, lectures and discussions. Participants were purposely selected in teams from remote health centres where CEmOC services were planned. Monthly supportive supervision after graduation was carried out in the upgraded health centres Results A total of 43 care providers from 12 health centres located in 11 rural districts in Tanzania and 2 from Somalia were trained from June 2009 to April 2010. Of these 14 were AMOs trained in CEmOC and 31 nurse-midwives and clinical officers trained in anaesthesia. During training, participants performed 278 major obstetric surgeries, 141 manual removal of placenta and evacuation of incomplete and septic abortions, and 1161 anaesthetic procedures under supervision. The first 8 months after introduction of CEmOC services in 3 health centres resulted in 179 caesarean sections, a remarkable increase of institutional deliveries by up to 300%, decreased fresh stillbirth rate (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1-1.7 and reduced obstetric referrals (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1-0.4. There were two maternal deaths, both arriving in a moribund condition. Conclusions Tanzanian AMOs, clinical officers, and nurse-midwives can be trained as

  4. Factors influencing modes of transport and travel time for obstetric care: a mixed methods study in Zambia and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Emma; Vail, Daniel; Austin-Evelyn, Katherine; Greeson, Dana; Atuyambe, Lynn M; Macwan'gi, Mubiana; Kruk, Margaret E; Grépin, Karen A

    2016-04-01

    Transportation is an important barrier to accessing obstetric care for many pregnant and postpartum women in low-resource settings, particularly in rural areas. However, little is known about how pregnant women travel to health facilities in these settings. We conducted 1633 exit surveys with women who had a recent facility delivery and 48 focus group discussions with women who had either a home or a facility birth in the past year in eight districts in Uganda and Zambia. Quantitative data were analysed using univariate statistics, and qualitative data were analysed using thematic content analysis techniques. On average, women spent 62-68 min travelling to a clinic for delivery. Very different patterns in modes of transport were observed in the two countries: 91% of Ugandan women employed motorized forms of transportation, while only 57% of women in Zambia did. Motorcycle taxis were the most commonly used in Uganda, while cars, trucks and taxis were the most commonly used mode of transportation in Zambia. Lower-income women were less likely to use motorized modes of transportation: in Zambia, women in the poorest quintile took 94 min to travel to a health facility, compared with 34 for the wealthiest quintile; this difference between quintiles was ∼50 min in Uganda. Focus group discussions confirmed that transport is a major challenge due to a number of factors we categorized as the 'three A's:' affordability, accessibility and adequacy of transport options. Women reported that all of these factors had influenced their decision not to deliver in a health facility. The two countries had markedly different patterns of transportation for obstetric care, and modes of transport and travel times varied dramatically by wealth quintile, which policymakers need to take into account when designing obstetric transport interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Addressing the third delay: implementing a novel obstetric triage system in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, David M; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K; Ramaswamy, Rohit; Bryce, Fiona; Floyd, Liz; Olufolabi, Adeyemi; Tetteh, Cecilia; Owen, Medge D

    2018-01-01

    Institutional delivery has been proposed as a method for reducing maternal morbidity and mortality, but little is known about how referral hospitals in low-resource settings can best manage the expected influx of patients. In this study, we assess the impact of an obstetric triage improvement programme on reducing hospital-based delay in a referral hospital in Accra, Ghana. An Active Implementation Framework is used to describe a 5-year intervention to introduce and monitor obstetric triage capabilities. Baseline data, collected from September to November 2012, revealed significant delays in patient assessment on arrival. A triage training course and monitoring of quality improvement tools occurred in 2013 and 2014. Implementation barriers led to the construction of a free-standing obstetric triage pavilion, opened January 2015, with dedicated midwives. Data were collected at three time intervals following the triage pavilion opening and compared with baseline including: referral indications, patient and labour characteristics, waiting time from arrival to assessment and the documentation of a care plan. An obstetric triage improvement programme reduced the median (IQR) patient waiting time from facility arrival to first assessment by a midwife from 40 min (15-100) to 5 min (2-6) (p<0.001) over the 5-year intervention. The triage pavilion enhanced performance resulting in the elimination of previous delays associated with the time of admission and disease acuity. Care plan documentation increased from 51% to 96%. Obstetric triage, when properly implemented, reduced delay in a busy, low-resource hospital. The implementation process was sustained under local leadership during transition to a new hospital.

  6. Integration of HIV care into maternal health services: a crucial change required in improving quality of obstetric care in countries with high HIV prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzimbamuto, Farai D; Ray, Sunanda; Mogobe, Keitshokile D

    2013-06-10

    of hemorrhage, hypertension and sepsis. Advocacy for all pregnant HIV-positive women to be on anti-retroviral therapy must extend to improvements in the quality of service offered, better organised obstetric services and integration of clinical HIV care into maternity services. Improved communication and specialist support to peripheral facilities can be facilitated through advances in technology such as mobile phones.

  7. [Prevention and detection of obstetric violence: A need in the Spanish delivery rooms?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Barja, Natalia; Luces Lago, Ana María; Mosquera Pan, Lucía; Tizón Bouza, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The obstetric violence (OV) is the type of violence perpetrated against the pregnant woman through acts such as lack of respect to her autonomy and her freedom to decide. The increasing medicalization of the labour process, seems to be associated to this type of violence. Our objective is to provide health professionals with the necessary knowledge to be able to inform their patients about their rights and recognize those situations that can imply violence during the care process. The literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, Joanna Briggs Institute, UpToDate and CUIDEN. The search was limited to articles published during the last five years. The next medical subject heading were used both in English and Spanish: "humanizing delivery", "obstetrics", "medicalization" and "violence". The performance of harmful practices and the unjustified medicalization of the labour process represent a potential damage to pregnant women by action, violating their rights as a result. To prevent and eradicate this, new lines of less interventionist work are being proposed. As health professionals we should promote the humanization of labour and informs women about the existent legislation, protocols and guidelines that offer adequate information based on the latest evidence and promote their advance role as patients. The health institutions are responsible for initiating this change, by implementing protocols to guide the practice of the health professionals involved in the care of women during labour. These protocols should be based on the WHO recommendations.

  8. Obstetric and Psychiatric Outcomes in a Sample of Saudi Teen-Aged Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy H Balaha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the prevalence of adverse obstetric and psychiatric outcomes among primigravid teenagers compared to adult women in Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia, if given equal antenatal care. METHODS: In this comparative study, 168 cases aged 16.6-19.8 years were compared to 632 cases aged 20-29 years. Data collection was done over a six month period in 2007-08. Demographic, antenatal, intranatal and postnatal obstetric events besides the postnatal psychiatric evaluation were done and analyzed using routine statistical tests with significance at P<0.05. Also risk quantification was done using the odds ratio. RESULTS: Antenatal morbidities (e.g. pregnancy induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, anemia, antepartum hemorrhage did not differ between the two groups. Also, the two groups showed no significant difference regarding cesarean section, low birth weight, preterm delivery and neonatal admission to intensive care units. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders was similar in both groups. The anxiety disorders were significantly higher in the younger age group due to increased prevalence for the post traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. CONCLUSION: Teenage pregnancy receiving adequate antenatal care and ending in live births is not associated with significant adverse obstetric outcomes or major psychopathology in Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 285-290

  9. Effectiveness of community based safe motherhood promoters in improving the utilization of obstetric care. The case of Mtwara Rural District in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Albrecht

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, maternal mortality ratio remains unacceptably high at 578/100,000 live births. Despite a high coverage of antenatal care (96%, only 44% of deliveries take place within the formal health services. Still, "Ensure skilled attendant at birth" is acknowledged as one of the most effective interventions to reduce maternal deaths. Exploring the potential of community-based interventions in increasing the utilization of obstetric care, the study aimed at developing, testing and assessing a community-based safe motherhood intervention in Mtwara rural District of Tanzania. Method This community-based intervention was designed as a pre-post comparison study, covering 4 villages with a total population of 8300. Intervention activities were implemented by 50 trained safe motherhood promoters (SMPs. Their tasks focused on promoting early and complete antenatal care visits and delivery with a skilled attendant. Data on all 512 deliveries taking place from October 2004 to November 2006 were collected by the SMPs and cross-checked with health service records. In addition 242 respondents were interviewed with respect to knowledge on safe motherhood issues and their perception of the SMP's performance. Skilled delivery attendance was our primary outcome; secondary outcomes included antenatal care attendance and knowledge on Safe Motherhood issues. Results Deliveries with skilled attendant significantly increased from 34.1% to 51.4% (ρ Conclusion The study has demonstrated the effectiveness of community-based safe motherhood intervention in promoting the utilization of obstetric care and a skilled attendant at delivery. This improvement is attributed to the SMPs' home visits and the close collaboration with existing community structures as well as health services.

  10. Hospital administrator's perspectives regarding the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D R; Little, M W

    1988-01-01

    Based on responses from 52 hospital administrators, four areas of managerial concern have been addressed, including: (1) decision-making factors; (2) hospital service offerings: current and future; (3) marketing strategy and service priorities; and (4) health care industry challenges. Of the total respondents, 35 percent indicate a Director of Marketing has primary responsibility for making marketing-related decisions in their hospital, and 19 percent, a Vice-President of Marketing, thus demonstrating the increased priority of the marketing function. The continued importance of the physician being the primary market target is highlighted by 70 percent of the administrators feeling physician referrals will be more important regarding future admissions than in the past, compared to only two percent feeling the physicians' role will be less important. Of primary importance to patients selecting a hospital, as perceived by the administrators, are the physician's referral, the patient's previous experience, the hospital's reputation, and the courtesy of the staff. The clear majority of the conventional-care hospitals surveyed offer out-patient surgery, a hospital pharmacy, obstetrics/maternity care, and diabetic services. The future emphasis on expanding services is evidenced by some 50 percent of the hospital administrators indicating they either possibly or definitely plan to offer long-term nursing care, out-patient substance abuse programs, and cancer clinics by 1990. In addition, some one-third of the respondents are likely to expand their offerings to include wellness/fitness centers, in-patient substance abuse programs, remote or satellite primary care clinics, and diabetic services. Other areas having priority for future offerings include services geared specifically toward women and the elderly. Perceived as highest in priority by the administrators regarding how their hospital can achieve its goals in the next three years are market development strategies

  11. Clinical indications and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in departments of obstetrics in Germany: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münstedt, Karsten; Brenken, Anja; Kalder, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    Our earlier study on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods showed that acupuncture, homeopathy, and aromatherapy are available in most obstetrics departments in Germany but it did not evaluate the clinical indications for using CAM. The present study aimed to explore further the effectiveness of CAM use in obstetrics. We sent all departments of obstetrics in North Rhine-Westphalia a questionnaire designed to delineate their use of acupuncture, homeopathy, and aromatherapy during childbirth. It sought details on who provided the CAM therapy (midwife or physician). We asked respondents to indicate on a five-point scale how reasonable or otherwise they would consider the provision of CAM in each of six common problem situations and to estimate for each the proportion of patients given the CAM treatment. Respondents were also asked about the rationale for offering CAM, quality assurance and side effects. Spearman's bivariate correlation, cross-tabulation and Pearson's chi(2) test were used for statistical analysis. About 73.4% (138/187) of the departments responded. Acupuncture and homoeopathy were most widely used. Although obstetricians are responsible for patient care, decisions to provide CAM were largely taken by midwives, and the midwives' belief in the methods' effectiveness and patient demand were the principle motivating factors. Rates of CAM use in the six problem scenarios evaluated were directly related to practitioners' perceptions of the methods' therapeutic effectiveness. CAM methods were widely offered despite the lack of evidence of effectiveness or information on adverse consequences. In Germany, including CAM in the mandatory national quality assurance measures and perinatal surveys would provide valuable information; CAM use elsewhere merits further study.

  12. Psychosocial Characteristics and Obstetric Health of Women Attending a Specialist Substance Use Antenatal Clinic in a Large Metropolitan Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Burns

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper reports the findings comparing the obstetrical health, antenatal care, and psychosocial characteristics of pregnant women with a known history of substance dependence (n=41 and a comparison group of pregnant women attending a general antenatal clinic (n=47. Method. Face-to-face interviews were used to assess obstetrical health, antenatal care, physical and mental functioning, substance use, and exposure to violence. Results. The substance-dependent group had more difficulty accessing antenatal care and reported more obstetrical health complications during pregnancy. Women in the substance-dependent group were more likely to report not wanting to become pregnant and were less likely to report using birth control at the time of conception. Conclusions. The profile of pregnant women (in specialised antenatal care for substance dependence is one of severe disadvantage and poor health. The challenge is to develop and resource innovative and effective multisectoral systems to educate women and provide effective care for both women and infants.

  13. Evaluation of a quality improvement intervention for obstetric and neonatal care in selected public health facilities across six states of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Enisha; Kole, Subir K; Patel, Rachana; Sooden, Ankur; Kharwal, Sanchit; Singh, Rashmi; Rahimzai, Mirwais; Livesley, Nigel

    2017-05-02

    While increase in the number of women delivering in health facilities has been rapid, the quality of obstetric and neonatal care continues to be poor in India, contributing to high maternal and neonatal mortality. The USAID ASSIST Project supported health workers in 125 public health facilities (delivering approximately 180,000 babies per year) across six states to use quality improvement (QI) approaches to provide better care to women and babies before, during and immediately after delivery. As part of this intervention, each month, health workers recorded data related to nine elements of routine care alongside data on perinatal mortality. We aggregated facility level data and conducted segmented regression to analyse the effect of the intervention over time. Care improved to 90-99% significantly (p improving provision of routine care, yet these approaches are underused in the Indian health system. We discuss the implications of this for policy makers.

  14. [Recognition and communication of early preventive services in obstetrics : A qualitative interview study with parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüßmann, Christiane; Stindt, Daniela; Brunke, Jana; Klinkhammer, Ursula; Thyen, Ute

    2016-10-01

    The perception of patients' needs of support and sensitive communication about psychosocial stress all represent new, exacting tasks for nursing staff, midwives, social workers and physicians in obstetrics. As part of Good Start into the Family (GuStaF), a learning and teaching project in a university hospital, we were able to interview parents about their experiences with the intervention. Evaluation of the process of establishing contacts, the communication with professionals in obstetrics and the support offered from the perspective of parents. Qualitative guided interviews with seven families one year after the delivery. Problem areas reported by parents were predominately related to increased parental care and the feeling of being overwhelmed in addition to social stress. Core themes in communication addressed the entry into conversations, which was remembered negatively when advice was perceived as improper, patronizing or stigmatizing, and positively when professionals had listened sensitively and had provided tangible support. Some conversations increased stress. Relating to assistance and support, parents reported both positive and negative experiences. Justness and reliability emerged as particularly important topics. The attendance of families around the time of the delivery poses varying demands upon the hospital staff, not necessarily in keeping with traditional professional attitudes and competencies. Careful attention to the personal physical and emotional well-being of mothers and newborns, non-stigmatizing entry into the conversations, justness of the support and avoiding inconsistencies within the institution and the network all appear to be of great importance.

  15. Effects of obstetric gel on the process and duration of labour in pregnant women: Randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seval, Mehmet Murat; Yüce, Tuncay; Yakıştıran, Betül; Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem; Koç, Acar; Söylemez, Feride

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigated maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women who used obstetric lubricant gels during active labour. This prospective randomised controlled study included 180 pregnant women. Women were randomly assigned to two groups during the first-stage of labour. Pregnant women in the obstetric gel group received standard antepartum care plus vaginal application of obstetric gel. Women in the control group received standard antepartum care without obstetric gel. Mean duration of the second stage of labour was significantly shorter in the obstetric gel group than control group (45 ± 34 min vs. 58 ± 31 min, respectively; p = .005). Mean APGAR values at 5 min were significantly higher in the obstetric gel group (9.5 ± 0.6 vs. 9.2 ± 0.7; p = .0014). Among nulliparous women, mean duration of the second stage of labour was significantly shorter in the gel group than control group (53 ± 52 min vs. 83 ± 45 min, respectively; p = .003). Using obstetric gel at the beginning of the first stage decreases the length of the second stage of labour, particularly in nulliparous women, and may be associated with an improved APGAR score at 5 min. Impact statement A limited number of studies in the literature have demonstrated that obstetric gels shorten the second stage of labour and are protective for the pelvic floor. The results of this study show that using obstetric gel shortens the second stage of labour in only nulliparous, but not multiparous women. In addition, a significant improvement in the 5 min APGAR score was seen in the neonates of women who used obstetric gel. The application of obstetric gels during the labour of nulliparous women may be a useful clinical practice and may have a widespread use in the future.

  16. Freestanding midwifery unit versus obstetric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Møller, Anna Margrethe; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2011-01-01

    low-risk women intending FMU birth and a matched control group of 839 low-risk women intending OU birth were included at the start of care in labour. OU women were individually chosen to match selected obstetric/socio-economic characteristics of FMU women. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main......Objective To compare perinatal and maternal morbidity and birth interventions in low-risk women giving birth in two freestanding midwifery units (FMUs) and two obstetric units (OUs). Design A cohort study with a matched control group. Setting The region of North Jutland, Denmark. Participants 839...... women were significantly less likely to experience an abnormal fetal heart rate (RR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5), fetal–pelvic complications (0.2, 0.05 to 0.6), shoulder dystocia (0.3, 0.1 to 0.9), occipital–posterior presentation (0.5, 0.3 to 0.9) and postpartum haemorrhage >500 ml (0.4, 0.3 to 0...

  17. Obstetric characteristics of two Mayan populations in the highlands of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burket, Brent A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) describe and compare two obstetric Mayan populations in Guatemala, the Tz'utujil and the Kachiquel and (2) evaluate possible associations of demographics, wood fuel use, and obesity with pregnancy/newborn outcomes. This cross-sectional study interviewed participants at the time of routine obstetric ultrasounds at three institutions in Santiago Atitlán and one institution in San Lucas Tolimán. Data were collected from January 2010 to May 2013. Data entry and statistical analysis were performed using EPI Info TM 7.1.2.0 (CDC). The two populations were similar in maternal age, BMI, ownership of a phone, gravidity (number of times a women has been pregnant), history of spontaneous abortions, history of term pregnancies, newborn birth weights, cesarean section rate, and percentage of low-birth-weight newborns (LBW Guatemala. The obstetric characteristics, differences, and similarities between these two Mayan populations should help in policy planning for obstetric care for these two populations and possibly other indigenous populations in Guatemala.

  18. Maternal mortality in the rural Gambia, a qualitative study on access to emergency obstetric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundby Johanne

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality is the vital indicator with the greatest disparity between developed and developing countries. The challenging nature of measuring maternal mortality has made it necessary to perform an action-oriented means of gathering information on where, how and why deaths are occurring; what kinds of action are needed and have been taken. A maternal death review is an in-depth investigation of the causes and circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. The objectives of the present study were to describe the socio-cultural and health service factors associated with maternal deaths in rural Gambia. Methods We reviewed the cases of 42 maternal deaths of women who actually tried to reach or have reached health care services. A verbal autopsy technique was applied for 32 of the cases. Key people who had witnessed any stage during the process leading to death were interviewed. Health care staff who participated in the provision of care to the deceased was also interviewed. All interviews were tape recorded and analyzed by using a grounded theory approach. The standard WHO definition of maternal deaths was used. Results The length of time in delay within each phase of the model was estimated from the moment the woman, her family or health care providers realized that there was a complication until the decision to seeking or implementing care was made. The following items evolved as important: underestimation of the severity of the complication, bad experience with the health care system, delay in reaching an appropriate medical facility, lack of transportation, prolonged transportation, seeking care at more than one medical facility and delay in receiving prompt and appropriate care after reaching the hospital. Conclusion Women do seek access to care for obstetric emergencies, but because of a variety of problems encountered, appropriate care is often delayed. Disorganized health care with lack of prompt response to

  19. "Womb with a View": The Introduction of Western Obstetrics in Nineteenth-Century Siam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Quentin Trais

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the historical confrontation between Western obstetrical medicine and indigenous midwifery in nineteenth-century Siam (Thailand). Beginning with the campaign of medical missionaries to reform Siamese obstetrical care, it explores the types of arguments that were employed in the contest between these two forms of expert knowledge. Missionary-physicians used their anatomical knowledge to contest both particular indigenous obstetrical practices and more generalized notions concerning its moral and metaphysical foundations. At the same time, by appealing to the health and well-being of the consorts and children of the Siamese elite, they gained access to the intimate spaces of Siamese political life. The article contends that the medical missionary campaign intersected with imperial desires to make the sequestered spaces of Siamese political life more visible and accessible to Western scrutiny. It therefore reveals the imbrication of contests over obstetrical medicine and trade diplomacy in the imperial world.

  20. Obstetric airway management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of stomach contents into the lungs during obstetric anesthesia.8 ... Both of the mortalities occurred secondary to solid ... The large number of deaths ... subcategories of patients as a first-line airway device, and are increasingly being ... outline the problems with obstetric airway management, and then focus on a few of the ...

  1. Bio-Psycho-Social Obstetrics and Gynecology : A Competency-oriented Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, K Marieke; van de Wiel, Harry B M

    2017-01-01

    This book will assist the reader by providing individually tailored, high-quality bio-psycho-social care to patients with a wide range of problems within the fields of obstetrics, gynaecology, fertility, oncology, and sexology. Each chapter addresses a particular theme, issue, or situation in a

  2. Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S C

    2000-09-01

    Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process The emotional elements of the nursing labour process are being recognized increasingly. Many commentators stress that nurses' 'emotional labour' is hard and productive work and should be valued in the same way as physical or technical labour. However, the term 'emotional labour' fails to conceptualize the many occasions when nurses not only work hard on their emotions in order to present the detached face of a professional carer, but also to offer authentic caring behaviour to patients in their care. Using qualitative data collected from a group of gynaecology nurses in an English National Health Service (NHS) Trust hospital, this paper argues that nursing work is emotionally complex and may be better understood by utilizing a combination of Hochschild's concepts: emotion work as a 'gift' in addition to 'emotional labour'. The gynaecology nurses in this study describe their work as 'emotionful' and therefore it could be said that this particular group of nurses represent a distinct example. Nevertheless, though it is impossible to generalize from limited data, the research presented in this paper does highlight the emotional complexity of the nursing labour process, expands the current conceptual analysis, and offers a path for future research. The examination further emphasizes the need to understand and value the motivations behind nurses' emotion work and their wish to maintain caring as a central value in professional nursing.

  3. Investing in CenteringPregnancy™ Group Prenatal Care Reduces Newborn Hospitalization Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Amy; Heberlein, Emily C; Glasscock, Leah; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Shea, Karen; Khan, Imtiaz A

    CenteringPregnancy™ group prenatal care is an innovative model with promising evidence of reducing preterm birth. The outpatient costs of offering CenteringPregnancy pose barriers to model adoption. Enhanced provider reimbursement for group prenatal care may improve birth outcomes and generate newborn hospitalization cost savings for insurers. To investigate potential cost savings for investment in CenteringPregnancy, we evaluated the impact on newborn hospital admission costs of a pilot incentive project, where BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid managed care organization paid an obstetric practice offering CenteringPregnancy $175 for each patient who participated in at least five group prenatal care sessions. Using a one to many case-control matching without replacement, each CenteringPregnancy participant was matched retrospectively on propensity score, age, race, and clinical risk factors with five individual care participants. We estimated the odds of newborn hospital admission type (neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] or well-baby admission) for matched CenteringPregnancy and individual care cohorts with four or more visits using multivariate logistic regression. Cost savings were calculated using mean costs per admission type at the delivery hospital. Of the CenteringPregnancy newborns, 3.5% had a NICU admission compared with 12.0% of individual care newborns (p Investing in CenteringPregnancy for 85 patients ($14,875) led to an estimated net savings for the managed care organization of $67,293 in NICU costs. CenteringPregnancy may reduce costs through fewer NICU admissions. Enhanced reimbursement from payers to obstetric practices supporting CenteringPregnancy sustainability may improve birth outcomes and reduce associated NICU costs. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Obstetric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Galushka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the specific features of the course of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in puer-peras with a complicated postpartum period. Subjects and methods. Sixty-seven puerperas with ARDS were examined. Group 1 included 27 puerperas with postpartum ARDS; Group 2 comprised 10 puerperas who had been treated in an intensive care and died; Group 3 consisted of nonobstetric patients with ARDS of various genesis (a control group. Results. In obstetric patients, the baseline oxygenation index was significantly lower than that in the control group. However, Group 1 patients showed a rapid increase in PaO2/FiO2 on days 3—4 of treatment. In the control group, the changes occurred later — on days 5—6. The baseline alveolar-arterial oxygen difference was significantly higher in the obstetric patients than that in the controls. In Group 1, AaDpO2 drastically decreased on days 3—4, which took place in parallel with an increase in the oxygenation index. At the beginning of the study, pulmonary shunting was high in the group of survivors, deceased, and controls. In Group 1, the shunting decreased on days 3—4 whereas in the control group this index normalized later — only by days 6—7. In Group 1, compliance remained lower throughout the observation, but on day 7 there was a significant difference in this index between the deceased, survivors, and controls. Conclusion. Thus, more severe baseline pulmonary gas exchange abnormalities are observed in obstetric patients than in general surgical and traumatological patients; the oxygenation index, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, and pulmonary shunting index more rapidly change in patients with severe obstetric disease in its favorable course than in general surgical and traumatological patients; throughout the observation, thoracopulmonary compliance was less in obstetric patients than in the controls. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, puerperium.

  5. The sonographic appearance and obstetric management of placenta accreta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung CS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Charleen Sze-yan Cheung, Ben Chong-pun ChanDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong KongAbstract: Placenta accreta is a condition of abnormal placental implantation in which the placental tissue invades beyond the decidua basalis. It may invade into or even through the myometrium and adjacent organs, such as the urinary bladder. The incidence has been rising in recent years. It is one of the important obstetric complications nowadays, leading to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. In the past, this condition was often diagnosed at the time of delivery when massive and unexpected hemorrhage occurred. Hysterectomy, associated with significant physical and psychological consequences, was usually the only management option. As more obstetricians have become aware of this condition, early identification with antenatal imaging diagnostic technology has become possible. Ultrasound scan plays an important role in the antenatal diagnosis. Various sonographic features with different specificity and sensitivity have been described in the literature. In equivocal cases, magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful. With such information, more accurate counseling can be offered to the mothers and their families before delivery. The delivery can also be arranged at a favorable time and in an institution where multidisciplinary support is available. Input from a hematologist, interventional radiologist, intensive care physician, urology surgeon, and/or other specialist are desirable. Apart from hysterectomy, various forms of conservative management can also be considered when the diagnosis is made prior to delivery. Fertility can therefore be preserved. After delivery, with or without hysterectomy performed, psychological support to the mothers and their families is essential.Keywords: ultrasonography, hemorrhage, hysterectomy

  6. External Validation Study of First Trimester Obstetric Prediction Models (Expect Study I): Research Protocol and Population Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, Linda Jacqueline Elisabeth; Scheepers, Hubertina Cj; De Vries, Raymond G; Dirksen, Carmen D; Korstjens, Irene; Mulder, Antonius Lm; Nieuwenhuijze, Marianne J; Nijhuis, Jan G; Spaanderman, Marc Ea; Smits, Luc Jm

    2017-10-26

    A number of first-trimester prediction models addressing important obstetric outcomes have been published. However, most models have not been externally validated. External validation is essential before implementing a prediction model in clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a study to externally validate existing first trimester obstetric prediction models, based upon maternal characteristics and standard measurements (eg, blood pressure), for the risk of pre-eclampsia (PE), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), spontaneous preterm birth (PTB), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants, and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants among Dutch pregnant women (Expect Study I). The results of a pilot study on the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment process and the comprehensibility of the Pregnancy Questionnaire 1 are also reported. A multicenter prospective cohort study was performed in The Netherlands between July 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015. First trimester obstetric prediction models were systematically selected from the literature. Predictor variables were measured by the Web-based Pregnancy Questionnaire 1 and pregnancy outcomes were established using the Postpartum Questionnaire 1 and medical records. Information about maternal health-related quality of life, costs, and satisfaction with Dutch obstetric care was collected from a subsample of women. A pilot study was carried out before the official start of inclusion. External validity of the models will be evaluated by assessing discrimination and calibration. Based on the pilot study, minor improvements were made to the recruitment process and online Pregnancy Questionnaire 1. The validation cohort consists of 2614 women. Data analysis of the external validation study is in progress. This study will offer insight into the generalizability of existing, non-invasive first trimester prediction models for various obstetric outcomes in a Dutch obstetric population

  7. Surgical informed consent in obstetric and gynecologic surgeries: experience from a comprehensive teaching hospital in Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshome, Million; Wolde, Zenebe; Gedefaw, Abel; Tariku, Mequanent; Asefa, Anteneh

    2018-05-24

    Surgical Informed Consent (SIC) has long been recognized as an important component of modern medicine. The ultimate goals of SIC are to improve clients' understanding of the intended procedure, increase client satisfaction, maintain trust between clients and health providers, and ultimately minimize litigation issues related to surgical procedures. The purpose of the current study is to assess the comprehensiveness of the SIC process for women undergoing obstetric and gynecologic surgeries. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was undertaken at Hawassa University Comprehensive Specialized Hospital (HUCSH) in November and December, 2016. A total of 230 women who underwent obstetric and/or gynecologic surgeries were interviewed immediately after their hospital discharge to assess their experience of the SIC process. Thirteen components of SIC were used based on international recommendations, including the Royal College of Surgeon's standards of informed consent practices for surgical procedures. Descriptive summaries are presented in tables and figures. Forty percent of respondents were aged between 25 and 29 years. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) had no formal education. More than half (54.3%) of respondents had undergone an emergency surgical procedure. Only 18.4% of respondents reported that the surgeon performing the operation had offered SIC, while 36.6% of respondents could not recall who had offered SIC. All except one respondent provided written consent to undergo a surgical procedure. However, 8.3% of respondents received SIC service while already on the operation table for their procedure. Only 73.9% of respondents were informed about the availability (or lack thereof) of alternative treatment options. Additionally, a majority of respondents were not informed about the type of anesthesia to be used (88.3%) and related complications (87.4%). Only 54.2% of respondents reported that they had been offered at least six of the 13 SIC components used by the

  8. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology

    OpenAIRE

    Gafson, I.; Currie, J.; O Dwyer, S.; Woolf, K.; Griffin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and ‘peri-attrition’ – a term coined to describe the trainee who has...

  9. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebresilase YT

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yenenesh Tadesse Gebresilase Programme Quality Department, Vita, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Abstract: Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors' perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants' understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric

  10. Opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for the obstetric physician: a survey of neonatal and obstetric training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Johnston, L; Lee, C; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2018-04-01

    Our goal was to garner opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians. We sought to evaluate obstacles to neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians and possible solutions for implementation challenges. We distributed a national survey via email to all neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship directors and obstetrics & gynecology residency program directors in the United States. This survey was designed by a consensus method. Ninety-eight (53%) obstetric and fifty-seven (51%) neonatal program directors responded to our surveys. Eighty-eight percent of neonatologists surveyed believe that obstetricians should be neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) certified. The majority of surveyed obstetricians (>89%) believe that obstetricians should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Eighty-six percent of obstetric residents have completed training in NRP, but only 19% of obstetric attendings are NRP certified. Major barriers to NRP training that were identified include time, lack of national requirement, lack of belief it is helpful, and cost. Most obstetric attendings are not NRP certified, but the majority of respondents believe that obstetric providers should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Our study demonstrates that most respondents support a modified neonatal resuscitation course for obstetric physicians.

  11. Asymptomatic bacteriuria & obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy in north Indian women

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Vaishali; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy if left untreated, may lead to acute pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight foetus, etc. Adequate and early treatment reduces the incidence of these obstetric complications. The present study was done to determine presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital of...

  12. Patients' quality assessment of ambulatory obstetric and gynaecological services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, I; Wdowiak, L; Ostrowski, T

    2005-01-01

    The quality could be assessed from two perspectives: internal and external. From the internal perspective the quality means being consistent with particular conditions and standards. The external perspective is based on relative assessment of the product made by a client who is also aware of other competitors' offer. Despite the professional assessment which is focused on providing health services according to medical and managerial correctness, patient's assessment is also relevant. Measuring patient's satisfaction is additional method of health services quality assessment. The aim of the study was to estimate patients' opinion on quality of ambulatory obstetric and gynaecological services. The study was conducted in 11 obstetric and gynaecological out-patient clinics of Lublin in September and October 2003. The study tool was an author's questionnaire. Patients were asked to assess such areas as registration before visit, their relationship with nurses and gynaecologists and other aspects of services provision like intimacy assurance and respecting Patient's Rights. The collected data was statistically analysed. 635 patients took part in the study. The biggest groups in the studied population were women at the age of 20-30 years, married, living in cities and secondary educated. It was found that around half of the population is satisfied and 2.2% of them are unsatisfied with the fact that they have chosen particular out-patient clinic. More than 70% of women had positive opinion of following aspects influencing general opinion about service quality: politness of reception desk staff, opening hours, the length of time before a patient is seen by the specialist, intimacy assurance and respect for Patient's Rights in the practice. 80% of patients were satisfied with the relationship with nurses and 3.3% were unsatisfied with it. Eight patients out of ten were satisfied with gynaecological care, less than 2% were unsatisfied. The studied women had also high opinion

  13. Local health workers’ perceptions of substandard care in the management of obstetric hemorrhage in rural Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltman Jogchum Jan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify factors contributing to the high incidence of facility-based obstetric hemorrhage in Thyolo District, Malawi, according to local health workers. Methods Three focus group discussions among 29 health workers, including nurse-midwives and non-physician clinicians (‘medical assistants’ and ‘clinical officers’. Results Factors contributing to facility-based obstetric hemorrhage mentioned by participants were categorized into four major areas: (1 limited availability of basic supplies, (2 lack of human resources, (3 inadequate clinical skills of available health workers and (4 substandard referrals by traditional birth attendants and lack of timely self-referrals of patients. Conclusion Health workers in this district mentioned important community, system and provider related factors that need to be addressed in order to reduce the impact of obstetric hemorrhage.

  14. Economic evaluation of emergency obstetric care training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wilson-Jones, Megan; Madaj, Barbara; van den Broek, Nynke

    2017-12-04

    Training healthcare providers in Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) has been shown to be effective in improving their capacity to provide this critical care package for mothers and babies. However, little is known about the costs and cost-effectiveness of such training. Understanding costs and cost-effectiveness is essential in guaranteeing value-for-money in healthcare spending. This study systematically reviewed the available literature on cost and cost-effectiveness of EmOC trainings. Peer-reviewed and grey literature was searched for relevant papers published after 1990. Studies were included if they described an economic evaluation of EmOC training and the training cost data were available. Two reviewers independently searched, screened, and selected studies that met the inclusion criteria, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer. Quality of studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards statement. For comparability, all costs in local currency were converted to International dollar (I$) equivalents using purchasing power parity conversion factors. The cost per training per participant was calculated. Narrative synthesis was used to summarise the available evidence on cost effectiveness. Fourteen studies (five full and nine partial economic evaluations) met the inclusion criteria. All five and two of the nine partial economic evaluations were of high quality. The majority of studies (13/14) were from low- and middle-income countries. Training equipment, per diems and resource person allowance were the most expensive components. Cost of training per person per day ranged from I$33 to I$90 when accommodation was required and from I$5 to I$21 when training was facility-based. Cost-effectiveness of training was assessed in 5 studies with differing measures of effectiveness (knowledge, skills, procedure cost and lives saved) making comparison difficult. Economic evaluations of EmOC training are limited. There is a

  15. Predictors of acceptance of offered care management intervention services in a quality improvement trial for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisey, Marwa; Mittman, Brian; Pearson, Marjorie; Connor, Karen I; Chodosh, Joshua; Vassar, Stefanie D; Nguyen, France T; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2012-10-01

    Care management approaches have been proven to improve outcomes for patients with dementia and their family caregivers (dyads). However, acceptance of services in these programs is incomplete, impacting effectiveness. Acceptance may be related to dyad as well as healthcare system characteristics, but knowledge about factors associated with program acceptance is lacking. This study investigates patient, caregiver, and healthcare system characteristics associated with acceptance of offered care management services. This study analyzed data from the intervention arm of a cluster randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive dementia care management intervention. There were 408 patient-caregiver dyads enrolled in the study, of which 238 dyads were randomized to the intervention. Caregiver, patient, and health system factors associated with participation in offered care management services were assessed through bivariate and multivariate regression analyses. Out of the 238 dyads, 9 were ineligible for this analysis, leaving data of 229 dyads in this sample. Of these, 185 dyads accepted offered care management services, and 44 dyads did not. Multivariate analyses showed that higher likelihood of acceptance of care management services was uniquely associated with cohabitation of caregiver and patient (p management participation could result in increased adoption of successful programs to improve quality of care. Using these factors to revise both program design as well as program promotion may also benefit external validity of future quality improvement research trials. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Knowledge of obstetric danger signs among child bearing age women in Goba district, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogale, Daniel; Markos, Desalegn

    2015-03-29

    Awareness of the danger signs of obstetric complications is the essential first step in accepting appropriate and timely referral to obstetric and newborn care. Ethiopia is a country where maternal morbidity and mortality is high and little is known about knowledge level of reproductive age women on obstetric danger signs. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge of obstetric danger signs among mothers delivered in the last 12 months in Goba district, Ethiopia. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Goba district. The study included 562 recently delivered women from 9 kebeles (the smallest administrative unit). A safe motherhood questionnaire developed by the Maternal and Neonatal Program of JHPIEGO, an affiliate of John Hopkins University was used to collect data. Binary and multiple logistic regressions were done to explore factors determining maternal knowledge on obstetric danger signs. Variables having P-value of less than or equal to 0.05 on binary logistic regression were the candidate for multiple logistic regressions. Statistical significance was declared at P < 0.05. One hundred seventy nine (31.9%), 152 (27%) and 124 (22.1%) of study participants knew at least three key danger signs during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period, respectively. As compared to women who did not attended Anti Natal Care service during their pregnancy, those who attend ANC were 2.56 times and 2.54 times more likely to know obstetric danger signs during pregnancy and child birth (AOR = 2.56 and 95% CI: 1.24-5.25) and (AOR = 2.54 and 95% CI: 1.14-5.66), respectively. This study showed low level of knowledge of obstetric danger signs during pregnancy, child birth and postpartum period among women in Goba district. This indicates the large proportions of pregnant women who do not have the knowledge are likely to delay in deciding to seek care. ANC follow up was a significant factor for knowledge about obstetric danger signs occurring during

  17. Physician and patient attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine in obstetrics and gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the U.S., complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is most prevalent among reproductive age, educated women. We sought to determine general attitudes and approaches to CAM among obstetric and gynecology patients and physicians. Methods Obstetrician-gynecologist members of the American Medical Association in the state of Michigan and obstetric-gynecology patients at the University of Michigan were surveyed. Physician and patient attitudes and practices regarding CAM were characterized. Results Surveys were obtained from 401 physicians and 483 patients. Physicians appeared to have a more positive attitude towards CAM as compared to patients, and most reported routinely endorsing, providing or referring patients for at least one CAM modality. The most commonly used CAM interventions by patients were divergent from those rated highest among physicians, and most patients did not consult with a health care provider prior to starting CAM. Conclusion Although obstetrics/gynecology physicians and patients have a positive attitude towards CAM, physician and patients' view of the most effective CAM therapies were incongruent. Obstetrician/gynecologists should routinely ask their patients about their use of CAM with the goal of providing responsible, evidence-based advice to optimize patient care.

  18. Maternal and neonatal outcome in obstetric cholestasis: a comparison of early versus late term delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjum, N.; Babar, N.; Sheikh, S.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate maternal and neonatal outcome in Obstetric Cholestasis (OC) in early versus late term delivery. Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Aga khan hospital for women (AKHW) Karimabad, Karachi, from 1st Jan, 2011 to 31st Oct, 2012. Patient and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. All patients of OC with singleton pregnancy, admitted for labor induction between Jan 2011 to Oct 2012 were included in the study. At or after 37 week of gestation, patient is offered labor induction. Patients were divided in two groups as in early term delivery (Group A) and late term delivery (Group B). Early term delivery is taken from 37+o to 37+6 and late term delivery at or after 38 weeks of gestation. The demographic, laboratory and clinical data of these patients were collected from their medical record. Maternal and neonatal outcome were analyzed using SPSS version 19. Results: The study found that in obstetric cholestasis patients admitted for labor induction, the risk of caesarean delivery was higher in group A (before 38 weeks) as compared to group B (after 38 weeks). There was no difference in postpartum hemorrhage and drop in hemoglobin between two groups. Obstetric cholestasis was not associated with adverse perinatal outcome such as intrauterine death (IUD), low Apgar Scores, respiratory distress and neonatal intensive care admission in both the groups. However more cases of neonatal jaundice were observed in babies born after 38 weeks. Conclusion: OC patients who deliver after 38 weeks of gestation have a higher chance of vaginal delivery without increasing the risk of IUD. (author)

  19. [Obstetric hysterectomy. Incidence, indications and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Juan A Reveles; Rivera, Geannyne Villegas; Higareda, Salvador Hernández; Páez, Fernando Grover; Vega, Carmen C Hernández; Segura, Agustin Patiño

    2008-03-01

    Obstetric hysterectomy is indicated when patient's life is at risk, and it is a procedure that requires a highly experienced and skilled medical team to solve any complication. To identify incidence, indications, and complications of obstetric hysterectomy within a high-risk population. Transversal, retrospective study from July 1st 2004 to June 30 2006 at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Ginecoobstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente, IMSS. There were reviewed 103 patient' files with obstetric hysterectomy. Incidence was calculated, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, indications, and complications of obstetric hysterectomy identified and expressed in frequency, percentages, and central tendency measurements. Incidence of obstetric hysterectomy was 8 cases within every 1,000 obstetric consultation. Age average was 31.1 +/- 5.1 years. 72.8% had cesarean surgery history. Main indication was placenta previa associated with placenta accreta (33%), followed by uterine hypotony (22.3%). Complications were hypovolemic shock (56.3%), and vesical injuries (5.8%). There were no maternal deaths. Cesarean history induces higher obstetric hysterectomy incidence in women with high-risk pregnancy, due to its relation to placentation disorders, as placenta previa that increases hemorrhage possibility, and thus, maternal morbidity and mortality.

  20. Obstetric outcome of teenage pregnancy in Kano, North-Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omole-Ohonsi, A; Attah, R A

    2010-01-01

    teenage pregnancies are regarded as high risk, because they often occur outside marriage. There is the need to evaluate the outcome of teenage pregnancies in a predominantly Islamic society like Kano where most occur within marriage, and timely prenatal care is usually available to most of them. to review the obstetric outcome of teenage primigravida in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. a retrospective case-control study of 500 booked teenage primigravidae, who delivered in our labour ward from January 2002 to December 2005 (study group) was performed. Their obstetric outcome was compared with that of an equal number of booked primigravidae aged 20-34 years, who met the recruitment criteria and delivered immediately after a selected teenage mother (control group). The study variables of interest were the demographic characteristics of the women in the two groups, antenatal/intrapartum complications and neonatal outcome. there were no significant differences in the mean birth weight, mean gestational age at delivery, mean height and perinatal mortality between the two groups, but mean maternal weight and body mass index (BMI) were higher among the older women. The teenage mothers had increased incidence of preterm labour and low birth weight infants (P teenage mothers. the results of this study show that teenage mothers who receive good family and community support, timely quality antenatal care and deliver in the hospital, should expect similar obstetric outcome to that of their older peers.

  1. Obstetrical and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedrahíta-Gutiérrez, Dany Leandro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and compare the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor, and to determine whether such analgesia is associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Methodology: Comparative, retrospective, descriptive study, between January and November 2014, that included 502 healthy patients with normal pregnancies, out of which 250 received obstetric analgesia. The groups were compared as to maternal and perinatal outcomes. Results: Young, single and nulliparous mothers predominated; delivery was vaginal in 86 % of the cases, and by caesarean section in 14 %. Obstetric analgesia was associated with longer duration of the second stage of labor, instrumental delivery and cesarean section due to arrest of dilatation or fetal bradycardia; however, it was not related with higher incidence of postpartum hemorrhage or adverse perinatal outcomes such as meconium-stained amniotic fluid, Apgar under 5 at one minute or under 7 at 5 minutes, the need for neonatal resuscitation or for admission to NICU. Conclusion: Obstetric analgesia increases the duration of the second stage of labor and can increase the rate of caesarean sections and instrumental delivery, but it is not associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Therefore, its use in labor is justified.

  2. Aplastic anemia during pregnancy: a review of obstetric and anesthetic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Perez, Efrain; Hermesch, Amy C; Barbour, Linda A; Hawkins, Joy L

    2018-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematologic condition occasionally presenting during pregnancy. This pathological process is associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Obstetric and anesthetic management is challenging, and treatment requires a coordinated effort by an interdisciplinary team, in order to provide safe care to these patients. In this review, we describe the current state of the literature as it applies to the complexity of aplastic anemia in pregnancy, focusing on pathophysiologic aspects of the disease in pregnancy, as well as relevant obstetric and anesthetic considerations necessary to treat this challenging problem. A multidisciplinary-team approach to the management of aplastic anemia in pregnancy is necessary to coordinate prenatal care, optimize maternofetal outcomes, and plan peripartum interventions. Conservative transfusion management is critical to prevent alloimmunization. Although a safe threshold-platelet count for neuraxial anesthesia has not been established, selection of anesthetic technique must be evaluated on a case-to-case basis. PMID:29535558

  3. Getting women to hospital is not enough: a qualitative study of access to emergency obstetric care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchforth, E; van Teijlingen, E; Graham, W; Dixon-Woods, M; Chowdhury, M

    2006-06-01

    To explore what happened to poor women in Bangladesh once they reached a hospital providing comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and to identify support mechanisms. Mixed methods qualitative study. Large government medical college hospital in Bangladesh. Providers and users of EmOC. Ethnographic observation in obstetrics unit including interviews with staff and women using the unit and their carers. Women had to mobilise significant financial and social resources to fund out of pocket expenses. Poorer women faced greater challenges in receiving treatment as relatives were less able to raise the necessary cash. The official financial support mechanism was bureaucratic and largely unsuitable in emergency situations. Doctors operated a less formal "poor fund" system to help the poorest women. There was no formal assessment of poverty; rather, doctors made "adjudications" of women's need for support based on severity of condition and presence of friends and relatives. Limited resources led to a "wait and see" policy that meant women's condition could deteriorate before help was provided. Greater consideration must be given to what happens at health facilities to ensure that (1) using EmOC does not further impoverish families; and (2) the ability to pay does not influence treatment. Developing alternative finance mechanisms to reduce the burden of out of pocket expenses is crucial but challenging. Increased investment in EmOC must be accompanied by an increased focus on equity.

  4. Lifesaving emergency obstetric services are inadequate in south-west Ethiopia: a formidable challenge to reducing maternal mortality in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Meseret; Yaya, Yaliso; Gebrehanna, Ewenat; Berhane, Yemane; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2013-11-04

    Most maternal deaths take place during labour and within a few weeks after delivery. The availability and utilization of emergency obstetric care facilities is a key factor in reducing maternal mortality; however, there is limited evidence about how these institutions perform and how many people use emergency obstetric care facilities in rural Ethiopia. We aimed to assess the availability, quality, and utilization of emergency obstetric care services in the Gamo Gofa Zone of south-west Ethiopia. We conducted a retrospective review of three hospitals and 63 health centres in Gamo Gofa. Using a retrospective review, we recorded obstetric services, documents, cards, and registration books of mothers treated and served in the Gamo Gofa Zone health facilities between July 2009 and June 2010. There were three basic and two comprehensive emergency obstetric care qualifying facilities for the 1,740,885 people living in Gamo Gofa. The proportion of births attended by skilled attendants in the health facilities was 6.6% of expected births, though the variation was large. Districts with a higher proportion of midwives per capita, hospitals and health centres capable of doing emergency caesarean sections had higher institutional delivery rates. There were 521 caesarean sections (0.8% of 64,413 expected deliveries and 12.3% of 4,231 facility deliveries). We recorded 79 (1.9%) maternal deaths out of 4,231 deliveries and pregnancy-related admissions at institutions, most often because of post-partum haemorrhage (42%), obstructed labour (15%) and puerperal sepsis (15%). Remote districts far from the capital of the Zone had a lower proportion of institutional deliveries (4% of deliveries, much higher than the average 1.9%). Based on a population of 1.7 million people, there should be 14 basic and four comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities in the Zone. Our study found that only three basic and two comprehensive EmOC service qualifying facilities serve this large

  5. The obstetric nightmare of shoulder dystocia: a tale from two perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most terrifying of obstetric emergencies. In this secondary analysis of two qualitative studies, the experiences of shoulder dystocia are compared and contrasted from two perspectives: the mothers and the labor and delivery nurses. In the first study mothers' experiences of shoulder dystocia and caring for their children with obstetric brachial plexus injuries were explored. The second study explored secondary traumatic stress in labor and delivery nurses due to exposure to traumatic births. Krippendorff's content analysis technique of clustering was used to identify data that could be grouped together into themes. It was striking how similar the perspectives of mothers and their nurses were regarding a shoulder dystocia birth. Four themes emerged from the content analysis of these two data sets: (1) in the midst of the obstetric nightmare; (2) reeling from the trauma that just transpired; (3) enduring heartbreak: the heavy toll on mothers; and (4) haunted by memories: the heavy toll on nurses. Providing emotional support to the mother during shoulder dystocia births and afterward in the postpartum period has been acknowledged. What now needs to be added to best practices for shoulder dystocia are interventions for the nurses themselves. Support for labor and delivery nurses who are involved in this obstetric nightmare is critical.

  6. Hepatitis C in haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M.; Baloch, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the maternal health and fetal outcome in hepatitis C with obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit-I, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Sindh, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: All the women admitted during the study period with different obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were included. On virology screening, hepatitis C screening was done on all. The women with non-haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies were excluded. Studied variables included demographic characteristics, the nature of obstetrical emergency, haemorrhagic conditions and maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: More frequent obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were observed with hepatitis C positive in comparison with hepatitis C negative cases including post-partum haemorrhage in 292 (80.88%) and ante-partum haemorrhage in 69 (19.11%) cases. Associated morbidities seen were disseminated intravascular coagulation in 43 (11.91%) and shock in 29 (8.03%) cases with hepatitis C positive. Fetal still birth rate was 37 (10.24%) in hepatitis C positive cases. Conclusion: Frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality and perinatal mortality was high in obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies with hepatitis C positive cases. (author)

  7. Prevalence of experienced abuse in healthcare and associated obstetric characteristics in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukasse, Mirjam; Schroll, Anne-Mette; Karro, Helle

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence and current suffering of experienced abuse in healthcare, to present the socio-demographic background for women with a history of abuse in healthcare and to assess the association between abuse in healthcare and selected obstetric characteristics. DESIGN: Cross......-sectional study. SETTING: Routine antenatal care in six European countries. POPULATION: In total 6923 pregnant women. METHODS: Cross-tabulation and Pearson's chi-square was used to study prevalence and characteristics for women reporting abuse in healthcare. Associations with selected obstetric factors were...

  8. Access to comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care facilities in three rural districts of Sindh province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Muhammad Shahid; Manzoor, Rabia; Siddiqui, Nasim; Ahmed, Ahsan Maqbool

    2015-11-25

    Pakistan's maternal and child health indicators remain unacceptably high, with a maternal mortality ratio of 276 per 100,000 live births and a neonatal mortality rate of 55 per 1,000 live births. Provision of basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care is mandated by the government; however, coverage, access, and utilisation levels remain unsatisfactory, with the situation in Sindh province being amongst the worst in the country. This study attempted to assess access to comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care (C-EmONC) facilities and barriers hampering access in Sindh. One public sector hospital in each of three districts in Sindh province providing C-EmONC services were selected for a facility exit survey. A cross-sectional household survey and focus group discussions were conducted in the catchment population of these hospitals. Overall, 82% and 96% of those who utilised a public or private C-EmONC facility, respectively, incurred out-of-pocket expenditure. As expected, those living more than 5 km from the facility reported higher mean expenditure than those living within 5 km of the facility. More than half of the respondents (55%) among public sector users and the majority (71%) of private sector users could not afford travel costs. More than one third (35%) of public sector users and about two thirds (64%) of private sector users who could not afford travel costs took loans. The proportion of respondents who took loans was higher among those living more than 5 km of the health facility compared to those living within a 5 km distance. The majority of respondents (70%) in the community survey chose to go to a private sector C-EmONC facility. In addition to poverty, in terms of sociocultural access, religious and ethnic discrimination and the poor attitude of facility staff were amongst the most important barriers to accessing a C-EmONC facility. C-EmONC facilities in both the public and private sectors may simply not be accessible and

  9. Advancing obstetric and neonatal care in a regional hospital in Ghana via continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srofenyoh, Emmanuel; Ivester, Thomas; Engmann, Cyril; Olufolabi, Adeyemi; Bookman, Laurel; Owen, Medge

    2012-01-01

    To reduce maternal and neonatal death at a large regional hospital through the use of quality improvement methodologies. In 2007, Kybele and the Ghana Health Service formed a partnership to analyze systems and patient care processes at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana. A model encompassing continuous assessment, implementation, advocacy, outputs, and outcomes was designed. Key areas for improvement were grouped into "bundles" based on personnel, systems management, and service quality. Primary outcomes included maternal and perinatal mortality, and case fatality rates for hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders. Implementation and outcomes were evaluated tri-annually between 2007 and 2009. During the study period, there was a 34% decrease in maternal mortality despite a 36% increase in patient admission. Case fatality rates for pre-eclampsia and hemorrhage decreased from 3.1% to 1.1% (Pcontinuous quality improvement were developed and employed. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reintegration of Women Post Obstetric Fistula Repair: Experience of Family Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Jarvis; Solina Richter; Helen Vallianatos; Lois Thornton

    2017-01-01

    In northern Ghana, families traditionally function as the main provider of care. The role of family, however, is becoming increasingly challenged with the social shifts in Ghanaian culture moving from extended kinship to nuclear households. This has implications for the care of women post obstetric fistula (OF) repair and their family members who assist them to integrate back into their lives prior to developing the condition. This research is part of a larger critical ethnographic study whic...

  11. How Do Obstetric and Neonatology Teams Communicate Prior to High-Risk Deliveries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Suresh, Gautham K

    2018-01-01

     Improving communication in healthcare improves the quality of care and patient outcomes, but communication between obstetric and neonatal teams before and during a high-risk delivery is poorly studied.  We developed a survey to study communication between obstetric and neonatal teams around the time of a high-risk delivery. We surveyed neonatologists from North America and asked them to answer questions about their institutions' communication practices.  The survey answers revealed variations in communication practices between responders. Most institutions relied on nursing to communicate obstetric information to the neonatal team. Although a minority of institutions used a standardized communication process to summon neonatology team or to communicate in the delivery room, these reported higher rates of information sharing and greater satisfaction with communication between services.  Standardized communication procedures are an underutilized method of communication and have the potential to improve communication around high-risk deliveries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. What European gynaecologists need to master: Consensus on medical expertise outcomes of pan-European postgraduate training in obstetrics & gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Tancredi, Annalisa; Goverde, Angelique J; Velebil, Petr; Feyereisl, Jaroslav; Benedetto, Chiara; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-09-01

    European harmonisation of training standards in postgraduate medical education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology is needed because of the increasing mobility of medical specialists. Harmonisation of training will provide quality assurance of training and promote high quality care throughout Europe. Pan-European training standards should describe medical expertise outcomes that are required from the European gynaecologist. This paper reports on consensus development on the medical expertise outcomes of pan-European training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. A Delphi procedure was performed amongst European gynaecologists and trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, to develop consensus on outcomes of training. The consensus procedure consisted of two questionnaire rounds, followed by a consensus meeting. To ensure reasonability and feasibility for implementation of the training standards in Europe, implications of the outcomes were considered in a working group thereafter. We invited 142 gynaecologists and trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology for participation representing a wide range of European countries. They were selected through the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the European Network of Trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology. Sixty people participated in round 1 and 2 of the consensus procedure, 38 (63.3%) of whom were gynaecologists and 22 (36.7%) were trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology. Twenty-eight European countries were represented in this response. Round 3 of the consensus procedure was performed in a consensus meeting with six experts. Implications of the training outcomes were discussed in a working group meeting, to ensure reasonability and feasibility of the material for implementation in Europe. The entire consensus procedure resulted in a core content of training standards of 188 outcomes, categorised in ten topics. European consensus was developed regarding the medical expertise outcomes of pan-European training in Obstetrics and

  13. How safe is GP obstetrics? An assessment of antenatal risk factors and perinatal outcomes in one rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirke, Andrew B

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one-fifth of Western Australian women deliver their babies in rural and remote regions of the state. The medical workforce caring for these women is predominantly non-specialist GP obstetricians. This article explores how safe is rural GP obstetrics. It reviews one rural obstetric practice in detail. In particular it asks these questions: What are the antenatal risk factors? What are the obstetric outcomes for the mother? What are the obstetric outcomes for the baby? This study is an audit of the author's obstetric practice over a two-year period from July 2007 to June 2009. The audit criteria included all obstetric patients managed by the author through to delivery and immediate post-partum care. Hospital and practice notes for 195 singleton pregnancies were reviewed. Antenatal risk factors, intrapartum events and immediate post-partum events for all patients cared for by the author through to delivery were recorded and compared with averages for Western Australia from published 2007 figures. The maternal population had mean age of 28.5 years, 2.1% were Aboriginal. Body mass index (BMI) at booking was a mean of 27.1 (range 18-40). Those with a BMI > 40 were referred elsewhere. Significant antenatal risks included smoking (14.9%), previous caesarean section (14.4%), hypertension (13.3%), pre-eclampsia (5.1%) and gestational diabetes (8.2%). Intrapartum there were high rates of induction (33.5%), epidural/spinal (34.7%) and shoulder dystocia (3.6%). Type of delivery was predominantly spontaneous vaginal (65.6%), vacuum (14.9%), forceps (2.6%), elective caesarean (9.7%) and non-elective caesarean (8.7%). Post-partum events included post-partum haemorrhage (10.3%), transfusion (1.5%), retained placenta (2.1%), neonatal jaundice (21.1%), neonatal seizures (1.5%) neonatal sepsis (1.5%) and neonatal special care or intensive care (SCU/NICU) admission (9.8%). The audit population was a group of relatively low risk pregnant women. Despite referral of more

  14. MR imaging in gynecology and obstetrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Tontsch, P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.

    2000-01-01

    The toolbook covers the full range of indications for MRI in obstetrics and gynecology. It is the joint work of radiologists and obstetrician-gynecologists and supplies state-of-the-art information needed by doctors in the private practice or a hospital department. Examples from the Table of Contents: Physical principles of MRI, applications and performance aspects. Systematic presentation of diagnostic findings for comparative analysis and assessment. Biological effects and risks. Benign and malignant neoplasms of the mammary glands and the female genital organs. MRI for prenatal care and diagnostic evaluation. New method: MR spectroscopy. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Up-skilling associate clinicians in Malawi in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership: the ETATMBA cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, David R; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Davies, David; Simkiss, Doug; Kamwendo, Francis; Mhango, Chisale; Quenby, Siobhan; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ETATMBA (Enhancing Training And Technology for Mothers and Babies in Africa) project-trained associate clinicians (ACs/clinical officers) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric and neonatal care. This trial aimed to evaluate the impact of training on obstetric health outcomes in Malawi. A cluster randomised controlled trial with 14 districts of Malawi (8 intervention, 6 control) as units of randomisation. Intervention districts housed the 46 ACs who received the training programme. The primary outcome was district (health facility-based) perinatal mortality rates. Secondary outcomes included maternal mortality ratios, neonatal mortality rate, obstetric and birth variables. The study period was 2011-2013. Mortality rates/ratios were examined using an interrupted time series (ITS) to identify trends over time. The ITS reveals an improving trend in perinatal mortality across both groups, but better in the control group (intervention, effect -3.58, SE 2.65, CI (-9.85 to 2.69), p=0.20; control, effect -17.79, SE 6.83, CI (-33.95 to -1.64), p=0.03). Maternal mortality ratios are seen to have improved in intervention districts while worsening in the control districts (intervention, effect -38.11, SE 50.30, CI (-157.06 to 80.84), p=0.47; control, effect 11.55, SE 87.72, CI (-195.87 to 218.98), p=0.90). There was a 31% drop in neonatal mortality rate in intervention districts while in control districts, the rate rises by 2%. There are no significant differences in the other secondary outcomes. This is one of the first randomised studies looking at the effect of structured training on health outcomes in this setting. Notwithstanding a number of limitations, this study suggests that up-skilling this cadre is possible, and could impact positively on health outcomes. ISRCTN63294155; Results.

  16. Obstetric and gynecologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Obstetric and gynecologic imaging has undergone marked changes in the past 10 years, primarily because of the influence of new imaging modalities. The single modality that has most significantly changed the diagnostic approach to obstetric and gynecologic problems is diagnostic ultrasound. The remarkable ability of this technique to display the anatomy of the gravid and nongravid female pelvis without the use of ionizing radiation motivated the development of techniques and instrumentation that have supplanted but not totally replaced many x-ray based examinations. The use of diagnostic ultrasound for the evaluation of obstetric and gynecologic problems is the dominant theme of this chapter. Areas of patient diagnosis and management in which additional imaging techniques, x-rays, or magnetic resonance are used are presented where appropriate

  17. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randive Bharat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC in rural India. Methods Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44 in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42 were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Results Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month. The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Conclusions Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important

  18. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randive, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sarika; Mistry, Nerges

    2012-12-31

    Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in rural India. Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44) in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42) were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS) provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month). The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important influencing factors in determining feasibility and use of

  19. Assessing teamwork performance in obstetrics : a systematic search and review of validated tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Annemarie F.; de Boer, Liza; Kienhorst, Dieneke; Truijens, Sophie E.; van Runnard Heimel, Pieter J.; Oei, S. Guid

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork performance is an essential component for the clinical efficiency of multi-professional teams in obstetric care. As patient safety is related to teamwork performance, it has become an important learning goal in simulation-based education. In order to improve teamwork performance, reliable

  20. Obstetric medicine: Interlinking obstetrics and internal medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Mayo Clinic Hospitals, Division of Hospital Internal Medicine, Rochester, Minn, USA ... Obstetric physicians have a specific role in managing pregnant and postpartum women with ... problems may also affect pregnancy outcomes, with increased risk of ... greatly benefited from good control of her diabetes and hypertension.

  1. The Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes of Teenage Pregnancy in Naresuan University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukhutrpichai, Piriya; Khrutmuang, Dithawut; Chattrapiban, Thanin

    2016-04-01

    It is evident that the incidence of teenage pregnancy has been increasing in the past decades and consequently poses significant problems on maternal and child health. The present study was aimed to compare obstetric and neonatal outcomes between teenage and non-teenage pregnancy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate 957 singleton pregnant women attending labor rooms in Naresuan University Hospital between October 2006 and September 2013 by comparing the pregnancy outcomes of 268 teenage pregnancy (woman age less than 20 years at the first time of antenatal care visit) with 689 non-teenage pregnancy (woman age 20 to 34 years). The obstetrics and neonatal complication was the main outcome of interest. The incidence of teenage pregnancy was 15.24% during seven years of study. As opposed to non-teenage mothers, complete attending antenatal care visit was less likely to be found among teenage mothers, 66.5% vs. 90.5% respectively (p teenage mothers (59.7% vs. 36.4%). The occurrence of cephalo-pelvic disproportion (CPD) seemed to be lower in teenage group as compared to non-teenage group, 14.5% vs. 26.4% (p teenage group, 3.8% vs. 8.4% (p = 0.016). The proportion of preterm birth was found to be higher in teenage pregnancy compared to non-teenage pregnancy (16.2% vs. 5.5%, p teenage pregnancy, 7.1% vs. 3.1% (p = 0.01). Even though obstetric complications were less likely to occur among teenage pregnancies, most of the neonatal untoward consequences were observed in mothers with younger ages. The finding suggests the need of appropriate health care services for teenage mothers as to monitor harmful complications to both mother and her child.

  2. [Obstetric emergency and non-emergency transfers to the university teaching hospital Yalgado ouedraogo of Ouagadougou: A 3-year study of their epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, A; Ouedraogo, C M; Ouedraogo, A; Lankoande, J

    2015-01-01

    to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects of the emergency and non-emergency transfers of obstetric patients to Yalgado Ouédraogo University Hospital Center (UHC-YO) in Ouagadougou. this retrospective descriptive study looked at the outcomes of women transferred, on an emergency basis or not, to the obstetrics department of the UHC-YO. The study population comprised all women transferred to the department during 2010, 2011, and 2012. during the study period, there were 9,806 admissions for obstetric disorders: 43% were transfers. The patients' mean age was 26.11 years [(13-49]. Women transferred from health care facilities within the city of Ouagadougou accounted for 96% of the sample. The leading reason for these transfers - emergency or not - was preeclampsia and eclampsia (24.57%). We recorded a total of 161 maternal deaths, for a mortality rate of 3.9%. Approximately 26.55% of the newborns received immediate intensive care and were then transferred to the neonatology department. maternal and neonatal prognosis is always poor in cases transferred to UHC-YO, despite increased funding for emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Increased population awareness of the importance of prenatal consultation and adequate funding for health care facilities to provide equipment for emergency transfers and staff training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies would probably improve these mortality and morbidity rates.

  3. "Near-miss" obstetric events and maternal deaths in Sagamu, Nigeria: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olusoji J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To determine the frequency of near-miss (severe acute maternal morbidity and the nature of near-miss events, and comparatively analysed near-miss morbidities and maternal deaths among pregnant women managed over a 3-year period in a Nigerian tertiary centre. Methods Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal death which occurred between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2004. Near-miss case definition was based on validated disease-specific criteria, comprising of five diagnostic categories: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. The near-miss morbidities were compared with maternal deaths with respect to demographic features and disease profiles. Mortality indices were determined for various disease processes to appreciate the standard of care provided for life-threatening obstetric conditions. The maternal death to near-miss ratios for the three years were compared to assess the trend in the quality of obstetric care. Results There were 1501 deliveries, 211 near-miss cases and 44 maternal deaths. The total near-miss events were 242 with a decreasing trend from 2002 to 2004. Demographic features of cases of near-miss and maternal death were comparable. Besides infectious morbidity, the categories of complications responsible for near-misses and maternal deaths followed the same order of decreasing frequency. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and haemorrhage were responsible for 61.1% of near-miss cases and 50.0% of maternal deaths. More women died after developing severe morbidity due to uterine rupture and infection, with mortality indices of 37.5% and 28.6%, respectively. Early pregnancy complications and antepartum haemorrhage had the lowest mortality indices. Majority of the cases of near-miss (82.5% and maternal death (88.6% were unbooked for antenatal care and delivery in this hospital. Maternal mortality ratio for the period was 2931.4 per 100

  4. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral, and...

  5. Increasing market share through consumer marketing: a case study in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, V H

    1986-05-01

    Consumers are becoming ever more selective in their choice of health care providers. Hospitals that are aware of local preferences and how to reach and influence consumers will gain a competitive advantage. Outlined in this article are consumer marketing techniques that can be utilized for all product lines. The concept is applied here as a case study in obstetrics.

  6. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilish McAuliffe

    Full Text Available Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential

  7. Developing skills learning in obstetric nursing: approaches between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Maria de Fátima Gomes; Pequeno, Alice Maria Correia; Rodrigues, Dafne Paiva; Carneiro, Cleide; Morais, Ana Patrícia Pereira; Negreiros, Francisca Diana da Silva

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the development of professional skills in an obstetric nursing graduate course. Qualitative research, applying semi-structured interviews with 11 students in the obstetric nursing specialization at the State University of Ceará. Data was submitted to thematic review. According to the subjects, the course offers the development of skills to strengthen and expand the range of activities in obstetric nursing. Despite relying on previous knowledge and experience acquired by the students, there is a gap between the content taught and internship practice, presented as challenges and difficulties faced by the students. The findings suggest a need for curricular revision, incorporating active teaching-learning methodologies, to overcome the disjunction between theory and practice. Students are part of a corpus that is potentially implicated in the construction and transformation of thoughts and values set forth by educational and health institutions, and it is necessary to make changes in political and social organizations, with a focus on providing comprehensive and egalitarian care to the population. Analisar o desenvolvimento de competências profissionais em curso de pós-graduação em Enfermagem Obstétrica. Pesquisa qualitativa, utilizando entrevista semiestruturada com 11 egressos da especialização em Enfermagem Obstétrica da Universidade Estadual do Ceará. Dados submetidos à análise temática. Na ótica dos sujeitos, o curso confere o desenvolvimento de competências que fortalecem e ampliam o campo de atuação da enfermagem obstétrica. Embora resgate o conhecimento prévio dos discentes e as experiências vivenciadas, há distanciamento entre conteúdos ministrados e a prática de estágios, apresentados como desafios e dificuldades enfrentadas pelos egressos. Os achados sugerem revisão curricular, incorporando as metodologias ativas de ensino-aprendizagem, superando a fragmentação entre teoria e prática. Os egressos se constituem em um

  8. Simulation-based team training for multi-professional obstetric care teams to improve patient outcome : a multicentre, cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, A F; van de Ven, J; Schuit, E; van Tetering, Aac; Mol, B W; Oei, S G

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether simulation-based obstetric team training in a simulation centre improves patient outcome. DESIGN: Multicentre, open, cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Obstetric units in the Netherlands. POPULATION: Women with a singleton pregnancy beyond 24 weeks of

  9. Managing Recurring Obstetric Cholestasis With Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfituri, Abdullatif; Ali, Amanda; Shehata, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    Obstetric cholestasis is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with an adverse pregnancy outcome. It is characterized by generalized pruritus, elevated bile acids, and abnormal liver enzymes. Recent publications show that obstetric cholestasis is associated with, and likely to potentiate, the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus. This case describes an unusual pattern of the disease, in which obstetric cholestasis occurred in five consecutive pregnancies with a different course of the disease in the fifth pregnancy. A patient with recurrent cholestasis of pregnancy had worsening disease in her first four pregnancies. In her fifth pregnancy, treatment for gestational diabetes mellitus with metformin was associated with a lowering effect on bile acids and liver enzymes, indicating a possible role for metformin in the management of obstetric cholestasis.

  10. A comparison of medical litigation filed against obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Tomoko; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-10-24

    The aim of this study was to review the typical factors related to physician's liability in obstetrics and gynecology departments, as compared to those in internal medicine and surgery, regarding a breach of the duty to explain. This study involved analyzing 366 medical litigation case reports from 1990 through 2008 where the duty to explain was disputed. We examined relationships between patients, physicians, variables related to physician's explanations, and physician's breach of the duty to explain by comparing mean values and percentages in obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgical departments with the t-test and χ(2) test. When we compared the reasons for decisions in cases where the patient won, we found that the percentage of cases in which the patient's claim was recognized was the highest for both physician negligence, including errors of judgment and procedural mistakes, and breach of the duty to explain, in obstetrics and gynecology departments; breach of the duty to explain alone in internal medicine departments; and mistakes in medical procedures alone in surgical departments (p = 0.008). When comparing patients, the rate of death was significantly higher than that of other outcomes in precedents where a breach of the duty to explain was acknowledged (p = 0.046). The proportion of cases involving obstetrics and gynecology departments, in which care was claimed to be substandard at the time of treatment, and that were not argued as breach of a duty to explain, was significantly higher than those of other evaluated departments (p duty to explain had been breached when seeking patient approval (or not) was significantly higher than in other departments (p = 0.002). It is important for physicians working in obstetrics and gynecology departments to carefully explain the risk of death associated with any planned procedure, and to obtain genuinely informed patient consent.

  11. [Out of hospital deliveries: incidence, obstetrical characteristics and perinatal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, M; Hadar, A; Sheiner, E; Mazor, M

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, women used to deliver their babies at home. In 1927, in England and Wales, 85% of births took place at home. By 1970 the position was reversed. The move from home to institutional delivery has been accompanied by changes in the institutions themselves and in the type of care provider. There are two kinds of out-of-hospital deliveries: 1. Planned home deliveries--women who decide to deliver in their home with the assistance of midwives or other consultant obstetric facilities. Few cases from this group, however, end up in the hospital; 2. Unplanned home deliveries or delivery en-route to the hospital--when women enter the active phase of labor rapidly, resulting in accidental out-of-hospital deliveries. The study aims to review the available literature and to describe the incidence, obstetrical characteristics and perinatal outcome of out-of-hospital deliveries.

  12. Evaluating perinatal outcomes in different levels of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, M.M.J.

    2018-01-01

    The safety of the Dutch obstetric system has been subject of debate for many years. The typical obstetric system in the Netherlands is characterized by a formal distinction between independent midwife-led primary care and obstetrician-led secondary care. Pregnant women who are considered low risk

  13. Future Career Plans and Practice Patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jason; Coolen, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The practice patterns of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists continue to evolve with each new generation of physicians. Diversifying subspecialties, changes in resident duty hours, job market saturation, and desire for work-life balance are playing stronger roles. Professional practice direction and needs assessment may be aided by awareness of future Obstetrics and Gynaecology physician career plans and expectations. The objective of this study was to determine the expected career plans and practice patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents following residency. The SOGC Junior Member Committee administered its third career planning survey to Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents electronically in December 2011. The data collected was statistically analyzed and compared to previous surveys. There were 183 responses giving a response rate of 43%. More than one half of all residents were considering postgraduate training (58%). Projected practice patterns included: 84% maintaining obstetrical practice, 60% locuming, and 50% job-sharing. The majority of residents expected to work in a 6 to 10 person call group (48%), work 3 to 5 call shifts per month (72%), work 41 to 60 hours weekly (69%), and practise in a city with a population greater than 500 000 (45%). Only 18% of residents surveyed were in favour of streaming residency programs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Canadian resident career plan and expected practice pattern assessment remains an important tool for aiding in resource allocation and strategic development of care and training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Julie; Van Eyk, Nancy

    2010-09-01

    To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for obstetrical procedures. Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in obstetrical procedures. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Library on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical procedures. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and articles published from January 1978 to June 2009 were incorporated in the guideline. Current guidelines published by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology were also incorporated. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Implementation of this guideline should reduce the cost and harm resulting from the administration of antibiotics when they are not required and the harm resulting from failure to administer antibiotics when they would be beneficial. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Available evidence does not support the use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce infectious morbidity following operative vaginal delivery. (II-1) 2. There is insufficient evidence to argue for or against the use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce infectious morbidity for manual removal of the placenta. (III) 3. There is insufficient evidence to argue for or against the use of

  15. Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reviewed journal. The Journal is Official Publication of Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria. The journal publishes articles on the subject it provides a forum for the publication of original articles Obstetrics, Gynaecology, ...

  16. Prospective regenerative medicine therapies for obstetric trauma-induced fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Nina; Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton; Day, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a major public health issue that has yet to be adequately addressed. Obstetric trauma and injury to the anal sphincter muscles are the most common cause of fecal incontinence. New therapies are emerging aimed at repair or regeneration of sphincter muscle and restoration of continence. While regenerative medicine offers an attractive option for fecal incontinence there are currently no validated techniques using this approach. Although many challenges are yet to be resolved, the advent of regenerative medicine is likely to offer disruptive technologies to treat and possibly prevent the onset of this devastating condition. This article provides a review on regenerative medicine approaches for treating fecal incontinence and a critique of the current landscape in this area.

  17. Exploring family physicians' reasons to continue or discontinue providing intrapartum care: Qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Marion; Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rodríguez, Charo

    2017-08-01

    To examine the reasons why family physicians continue or discontinue providing intrapartum care in their clinical practice. Qualitative descriptive study. Two hospitals located in a multicultural area of Montreal, Que, in November 2011 to June 2012. Sixteen family physicians who were current or former providers of obstetric care. Data were collected using semistructured qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Three overarching themes that help create understanding of why family doctors continue to provide obstetric care were identified: their attraction, often initiated by role models early in their careers, to practising complete continuity of care and accompanying patients in a special moment in their lives; the personal, family, and organizational pressures experienced while pursuing a family medicine career that includes obstetrics; and their ongoing reflection about continuing to practise obstetrics. The practice of obstetrics was very attractive to family physician participants whether they provided intrapartum care or decided to stop. More professional support and incentives might help keep family doctors practising obstetrics. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  18. Access to Obstetric Care and Children's Health, Growth and Cognitive Development in Vietnam: Evidence from Young Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Tina; Preen, David B; Newnham, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Background The impact of birth with poor access to skilled obstetric care such as home birth on children's long term development is unknown. This study explores the health, growth and cognitive development of children surviving homebirth in the Vietnam Young Lives sample during early childhood. Methods The Young Lives longitudinal cohort study was conducted in Vietnam with 1812 children born in 2001/2 with follow-up at 1, 5, and 8 years. Data were collected on height/weight, health and cognitive development (Peabody Picture Vocabulary test). Statistical models adjusted for sociodemographic and pregnancy-related factors. Results Children surviving homebirth did not have significantly poorer long-term health, greater stunting after adjusting for sociodemographic/pregnancy-related factors. Rural location, lack of household education, ethnic minority status and lower wealth predicted greater stunting and poorer scores on Peabody Vocabulary test. Conclusions Social disadvantage rather than homebirth influenced children's health, growth and development.

  19. Active offer of health services in French in Ontario: Analysis of reorganization and management strategies of health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanova, Elina; Bonneville, Luc; Bouchard, Louise

    2018-01-01

    The availability of health services in French is not only weak but also inexistent in some regions in Canada. As a result, estimated 78% of more than a million of Francophones living in a minority situation in Canada experience difficulties accessing health care in French. To promote the delivery of health services in French, publicly funded organizations are encouraged to take measures to ensure that French-language services are clearly visible, available, easily accessible, and equivalent to the quality of services offered in English. This study examines the reorganization and management strategies taken by health care organizations in Ontario that provide health services in French. Review and analysis of designation plans of a sample of health care organizations. Few health care organizations providing services in French have concrete strategies to guarantee availability, visibility, and accessibility of French-language services. Implementation of the active offer of French-language services is likely to be difficult and slow. The Ontario government must strengthen collaboration with health care organizations, Francophone communities, and other key actors participating in the designation process to help health care organizations build capacities for the effective offer of French-language services. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Knowledge and Skills of Healthcare Providers in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia before and after Competency-Based Training in Emergency Obstetric and Early Newborn Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Charles A; Kerr, Robert; Madaj, Barbara; Mdegela, Mselenge; Kana, Terry; Jones, Susan; Lambert, Jaki; Dickinson, Fiona; White, Sarah; van den Broek, Nynke

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare provider training in Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmOC&NC) is a component of 65% of intervention programs aimed at reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. It is important to evaluate the effectiveness of this. We evaluated knowledge and skills among 5,939 healthcare providers before and after 3-5 days 'skills and drills' training in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmOC&NC) conducted in 7 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Zimbabwe) and 2 Asian countries (Bangladesh, Pakistan). Standardised assessments using multiple choice questions and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) were used to measure change in knowledge and skills and the Improvement Ratio (IR) by cadre and by country. Linear regression was performed to identify variables associated with pre-training score and IR. 99.7% of healthcare providers improved their overall score with a median (IQR) increase of 10.0% (5.0% - 15.0%) for knowledge and 28.8% (23.1% - 35.1%) for skill. There were significant improvements in knowledge and skills for each cadre of healthcare provider and for each country (phealthcare providers working in maternity wards in both sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Additional support and training is needed for use of the partograph as a tool to monitor progress in labour. Further research is needed to assess if this is translated into improved service delivery.

  1. Childbirth in ancient Rome: from traditional folklore to obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todman, Donald

    2007-04-01

    In ancient Rome, childbirth was a hazardous event for both mother and child with high rates of infant and maternal mortality. Traditional Roman medicine centred on folklore and religious practices, but with the development of Hippocratic medicine came significant advances in the care of women during pregnancy and confinement. Midwives or obstetrices played an important role and applied rational scientific practices to improve outcomes. This evolution from folklore to obstetrics was a pivotal point in the history of childbirth.

  2. Experiences of social support among women presenting for obstetric fistula repair surgery in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis AC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexis C Dennis1 Sarah M Wilson1–3 Mary V Mosha4 Gileard G Masenga4 Kathleen J Sikkema1,5,6 Korrine E Terroso1 Melissa H Watt1 1Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, 2Department of Veterans Affairs, Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, 3Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Moshi, Tanzania; 5Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa Objective: An obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury resulting in uncontrollable leakage of urine and/or feces and can lead to physical and psychological challenges, including social isolation. Prior to and after fistula repair surgery, social support can help a woman to reintegrate into her community. The aim of this study was to preliminarily examine the experiences of social support among Tanzanian women presenting with obstetric fistula in the periods immediately preceding obstetric fistula repair surgery and following reintegration.Patients and methods: The study used a mixed-methods design to analyze cross-sectional surveys (n=59 and in-depth interviews (n=20.Results: Women reported widely varying levels of social support from family members and partners, with half of the sample reporting overall high levels of social support. For women experiencing lower levels of support, fistula often exacerbated existing problems in relationships, sometimes directly causing separation or divorce. Many women were assertive and resilient with regard to advocating for their fistula care and relationship needs.Conclusion: Our data suggest that while some women endure negative social experiences following an obstetric fistula and require additional resources and services, many women report high levels of social support from family members and partners, which may be harnessed to improve the holistic

  3. Association study of obstetrical complication and depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the correlation between obstetrical complications and depressive disorder.Methods:Depressive disorder probands and their adult sibling were diagnosed using CCMD-3 criteria.Obstetrical data from maternal reports were scored,applying published scales that take into account number and severity of complication.Results:The scores of obstetric complication and prenatal complications and low birth weight were significantly worse in probands than siblings without depressive disorders.Conclusion:Results suggest obstetric complications are etiologically significant in depressive disorder.

  4. Cross-sectional survey of knowledge of obstetric danger signs among women in rural Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ania; Lacour, Oriane; Scaringella, Stefano; Herinianasolo, Josea; Benski, Anne Caroline; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Vassilakos, Pierre; Petignat, Patrick; Schmidt, Nicole Christine

    2018-02-05

    Antenatal care (ANC) has the potential to identify and manage obstetric complications, educate women about risks during pregnancy and promote skilled birth attendance during childbirth. The aim of this study was to assess women's knowledge of obstetric danger signs and factors associated with this knowledge in Ambanja, Madagascar. It also sought to evaluate whether the participation in a mobile health (mHealth) project that aimed to provide comprehensive ANC to pregnant women in remote areas influenced women's knowledge of obstetric danger signs. From April to October 2015, a non-random, convenience sample of 372 women in their first year postpartum were recruited, including 161 who had participated in the mHealth project. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Knowledge of at least one danger sign varied from 80.9% of women knowing danger sign(s) in pregnancy, to 51.9%, 50.8% and 53.2% at delivery, postpartum and in the newborn, respectively. Participation in the mHealth intervention, higher household income, and receipt of information about danger signs during pregnancy were associated with knowledge of danger signs during delivery, in bivariate analysis; only higher household income and mHealth project participation were independently associated. Higher educational attainment and receipt of information about danger signs in antenatal care were associated with significantly higher odds of knowing danger sign(s) for the newborn in both bivariate and multivariate analysis. Knowledge of obstetric danger signs is low. Information provision during pregnancy and with mHealth is promising. This trial was retrospectively registered at the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Register (identifier ISRCTN15798183 ; August 22, 2015).

  5. Urinary tract infection among obstetric fistula patients at Gondar University Hospital, northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondimeneh, Yitayih; Muluye, Dagnachew; Alemu, Abebe; Atinafu, Asmamaw; Yitayew, Gashaw; Gebrecherkos, Teklay; Alemu, Agersew; Damtie, Demekech; Ferede, Getachew

    2014-01-17

    Many women die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. In developing countries particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, where access to emergency obstetrical care is often limited, obstetric fistula usually occurs as a result of prolonged obstructed labour. Obstetric fistula patients have many social and health related problems like urinary tract infections (UTIs). Despite this reality there was limited data on prevalence UTIs on those patients in Ethiopia. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, drug susceptibility pattern and associated risk factors of UTI among obstetric fistula patients at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from January to May, 2013 at Gondar University Hospital. From each post repair obstetric fistula patients, socio-demographic and UTIs associated risk factors were collected by using a structured questionnaire. After the removal of their catheters, the mid-stream urine was collected and cultured on CLED. After overnight incubation, significant bacteriuria was sub-cultured on Blood Agar Plate (BAP) and MacConkey (MAC). The bacterial species were identified by series of biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done by disc diffusion method. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. A total of 53 post repair obstetric fistula patients were included for the determination of bacterial isolate and 28 (52.8%) of them had significant bacteriuria. Majority of the bacterial isolates, 26 (92.9%), were gram negative bacteria and the predominant ones were Citrobacter 13 (24.5%) and E. coli 6 (11.3%). Enterobacter, E.coli and Proteus mirabilis were 100% resistant to tetracycline. Enterobacter, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsella pneumonia, Klebsella ozenae and Staphylococcus aureus were also 100% resistant to ceftriaxone. The prevalence of bacterial isolates in obstetric fistula patients was high and majority of the isolates were gram

  6. Obstetric and Neonatal Outcome in PCOS with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Foroozanfard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There are some metabolic similarities between women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS; it is still uncertain, however, to what extent coexistence GDM and PCOS affects pregnancy outcome. The present study was designed to determine the obstetric and neonatal outcome in PCOS with GDM.A case-control study was conducted involving 261 GDM women. Thirty hundred-one cases had PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria and the other thirty hundred cases (control group were women without PCOS. The subjects in each group were evaluated regarding obstetric and those women whose documentation's were complete entered the study.In present study, women with PCOS and GDM had more than twofold increased odds of preeclampsia (p = 0.003, CI = 1.56-5.01, and OR = 2.8 and PIH (p= 0.04, CI = 1.28-4.5, and OR= 2.4. Maternal PCOS and GDM were also associated with threefold increased odds of neonatal hypoglycemia (p= 0.004, CI= 1.49-6.58, and OR= 3.13.Our finding emphasized that pregnant PCOS patients should be followed carefully for the occurrence of various pregnancy and neonatal complications including hypertension and hypoglycemia. We suggested that these neonates should be given more care regarding hypoglycemia symptoms.

  7. Obstetric and Neonatal Outcome in PCOS with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Mansouri, Fariba; Bazarganipour, Fatemeh

    2014-03-01

    There are some metabolic similarities between women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); it is still uncertain, however, to what extent coexistence GDM and PCOS affects pregnancy outcome. The present study was designed to determine the obstetric and neonatal outcome in PCOS with GDM. A case-control study was conducted involving 261 GDM women. Thirty hundred-one cases had PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria and the other thirty hundred cases (control group) were women without PCOS. The subjects in each group were evaluated regarding obstetric and those women whose documentation's were complete entered the study. In present study, women with PCOS and GDM had more than twofold increased odds of preeclampsia (p = 0.003, CI = 1.56-5.01, and OR = 2.8) and PIH (p= 0.04, CI = 1.28-4.5, and OR= 2.4). Maternal PCOS and GDM were also associated with threefold increased odds of neonatal hypoglycemia (p= 0.004, CI= 1.49-6.58, and OR= 3.13). Our finding emphasized that pregnant PCOS patients should be followed carefully for the occurrence of various pregnancy and neonatal complications including hypertension and hypoglycemia. We suggested that these neonates should be given more care regarding hypoglycemia symptoms.

  8. Obstetric Patients Who Select and Those Who Refuse Medical Students' Participation in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 222 obstetrics patients assisted by medical clerkship students from the University of Vermont and 78 who refused student participation found privacy the primary motivation for refusal and a desire to contribute to students' education a primary reason for accepting student participation. Patients frequently erroneously anticipated the…

  9. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  10. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  11. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    OpenAIRE

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent ...

  12. Applying the Maternal Near Miss Approach for the Evaluation of Quality of Obstetric Care: A Worked Example from a Multicenter Surveillance Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Maerrawi Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess quality of care of women with severe maternal morbidity and to identify associated factors. Method. This is a national multicenter cross-sectional study performing surveillance for severe maternal morbidity, using the World Health Organization criteria. The expected number of maternal deaths was calculated with the maternal severity index (MSI based on the severity of complication, and the standardized mortality ratio (SMR for each center was estimated. Analyses on the adequacy of care were performed. Results. 17 hospitals were classified as providing adequate and 10 as nonadequate care. Besides almost twofold increase in maternal mortality ratio, the main factors associated with nonadequate performance were geographic difficulty in accessing health services (P<0.001, delays related to quality of medical care (P=0.012, absence of blood derivatives (P=0.013, difficulties of communication between health services (P=0.004, and any delay during the whole process (P=0.039. Conclusions. This is an example of how evaluation of the performance of health services is possible, using a benchmarking tool specific to Obstetrics. In this study the MSI was a useful tool for identifying differences in maternal mortality ratios and factors associated with nonadequate performance of care.

  13. Obstetric danger signs and factors affecting health seeking behaviour among the Kassena-Nankani of Northern Ghana: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborigo, Raymond A; Moyer, Cheryl A; Gupta, Mira; Adongo, Philip B; Williams, John; Hodgson, Abraham; Allote, Pascale; Engmann, Cyril M

    2014-09-01

    Improving community members' knowledge of obstetric danger signs is one strategy for increasing the use of skilled care during pregnancy and the puerperium. This study explored knowledge of obstetric danger signs among a range of community members, examined the sources of their information, and the perceived factors that affect health seeking behaviour in rural northern Ghana. We conducted 72 in-depth interviews and 18 focus groups with community members. All interactions were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using NVivo 9.0. Community members demonstrated knowledge of a wide range of obstetric danger signs, including excessive bleeding, stomach aches, waist pains, vomiting and fever. Pregnant women learn about danger signs from a range of providers, and regular contact with formal providers typically coincided with increased knowledge of danger signs. Traditional remedies for problems in obstetrics are plentiful and cultural beliefs often restrict the use of allopathic medicine. Increasing knowledge of obstetric danger signs is necessary but not sufficient to overcome cultural preferences for traditional treatments for pregnancy danger signs.

  14. Referral practices and perceived barriers to timely obstetric care among Ugandan traditional birth attendants (TBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keri, L; Kaye, D; Sibylle, K

    2010-03-01

    To assess current beliefs, knowledge and practices of Ugandan traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and their pregnant patients regarding referral of obstructed labors and fistula cases. Six focus groups were held in rural areas surrounding Kampala, the capital city of Uganda. While TBAs, particularly those with previous training, appear willing to refer problematic pregnancies and labors, more serious problems exist that could lessen any positive effects of training. These problems include reported abuse by doctors and nurses, and seeing fistula as a disease caused by hospitals. Training of TBAs can be helpful to standardize knowledge about and encourage timely emergency obstetric referrals, as well as increase knowledge about the causes and preventions of obstetric fistula. However, for full efficacy, training must be accompanied by greater collaboration between biomedical and traditional health personnel, and increased infrastructure to prevent mistreatment of pregnant patients by medical staff.

  15. 'No thanks'-reasons why pregnant women declined an offer of cystic fibrosis carrier screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, L; Massie, J; Lewis, S; McClaren, B; Collins, V; Delatycki, M B

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess attitudes and opinions of women declining the offer of cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier screening through a population-based programme in Victoria, Australia. Between December 2009 and May 2011, women declining an offer of CF carrier screening were invited to participate in a questionnaire-based study. Recruitment was at two private obstetric ultrasound clinics and two private obstetric practices in Melbourne. Of the participants (n = 54), the majority were well educated (76%), aged 30-34 years (54%), with a household income of >AUD$100,000 (76%). Compared to those who accepted screening (reported in a previous study) (Ioannou et al., Public Health Genomics 13:449-56, 2010), knowledge levels were significantly lower in participants declining screening (t = 3.32, p < 0.01). The main reasons for declining screening were having no family history of CF (58%) and not considering a termination of pregnancy for CF (53%). Providers and consumers should be informed that most children born with autosomal-recessive conditions such as CF have no family history of the condition.

  16. Inpatient Obstetric Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital: A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Organization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bergeron, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    This study attempts to compare, analyze, and recommend the most efficient model with which to deliver inpatient obstetrics and gynecological services to the served population of Irwin Army Community Hospital...

  17. Geographic Access Modeling of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Kigoma Region, Tanzania: Transportation Schemes and Programmatic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi No; Schmitz, Michelle M; Serbanescu, Florina; Dynes, Michelle M; Maro, Godson; Kramer, Michael R

    2017-09-27

    Access to transportation is vital to reducing the travel time to emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) for managing complications and preventing adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. This study examines the distribution of travel times to EmONC in Kigoma Region, Tanzania, using various transportation schemes, to estimate the proportion of live births (a proxy indicator of women needing delivery care) with poor geographic access to EmONC services. The 2014 Reproductive Health Survey of Kigoma Region identified 4 primary means of transportation used to travel to health facilities: walking, cycling, motorcycle, and 4-wheeled motor vehicle. A raster-based travel time model was used to map the 2-hour travel time catchment for each mode of transportation. Live birth density distributions were aggregated by travel time catchments, and by administrative council, to estimate the proportion of births with poor access. Of all live births in Kigoma Region, 13% occurred in areas where women can reach EmONC facilities within 2 hours on foot, 33% in areas that can be reached within 2 hours only by motorized vehicles, and 32% where it is impossible to reach EmONC facilities within 2 hours. Over 50% of births in 3 of the 8 administrative councils had poor estimated access. In half the councils, births with poor access could be reduced to no higher than 12% if all female residents had access to motorized vehicles. Significant differences in geographic access to EmONC in Kigoma Region, Tanzania, were observed both by location and by primary transportation type. As most of the population may only have good EmONC access when using mechanized or motorized vehicles, bicycles and motorcycles should be incorporated into the health transportation strategy. Collaboration between private transportation sectors and obstetric service providers could improve access to EmONC services among most populations. In areas where residents may not access EmONC facilities within 2 hours

  18. U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval: slow advances in obstetric care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Deborah A; Powers, Barbara; Hickok, Durlin

    2010-04-01

    The process for drug approval in the United States is complex and time-consuming. There are comparatively few drugs with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications for obstetric use in this country at this time; however, several are under development. We review the process for drug approval and recount the approval histories of obstetric drugs reviewed in the recent past. We also outline the current status of two progestational agents that are under development. For a variety of reasons, including a small market compared with others such as cardiology or oncology, and the potential of being drawn into medical-legal litigation, sponsors are disinclined to pursue drug development for obstetric purposes in this country. We compare the procedures for review and approval of drugs in the United States with those in Europe, and note that recent changes within the FDA may result in not only more drugs being approved but also changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Special programs to facilitate drug development and reforms to modernize the process and improve safety are discussed. These may result in changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Obstacles such as funding and liability are also discussed.

  19. Maternal infibulation and obstetrical outcome in Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsart, Anne-Frederique; N'guyen, Thai-Son; Ali Hadji, Rachid; Caillet, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the relation between female genital mutilation and obstetric outcome in an East African urban clinic with a standardized care, taking into account medical and socioeconomic status. This was a cohort study conducted in Djibouti between October 1, 2012 and April 30, 2014. Overall 643 mothers were interviewed and clinically assessed for the presence of female genital mutilation. The prevalence of obstetric complications by infibulation status was included in a multivariate stepwise regression model. Overall, 29 of 643 women did not have any form of mutilation (4.5%), as opposed to 238 of 643 women with infibulation (37.0%), 369 with type 2 (57.4%), and 7 with type 1 mutilation (1.1%).Women with a severe type of mutilation were more likely to have socio-economic and medical risk factors. After adjustment, the only outcome that was significantly related with infibulation was the presence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid with an odds ratio of 1.58 (1.10-2.27), p value=0.014. Infibulation was not related with excess perinatal morbidity in this setting with a very high prevalence of female genital mutilation, but future research should concentrate on the relation between infibulation and meconium.

  20. The economic impact of rural family physicians practicing obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Daniel M; Hooper, Dwight E; McDonald, John T; Love, Michael W; Tucker, Melanie T; Parton, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    The economic impact of a family physician practicing family medicine in rural Alabama is $1,000,000 a year in economic benefit to the community. The economic benefit of those rural family physicians practicing obstetrics has not been studied. This study was designed to determine whether there was any added economic benefit of rural family physicians practicing obstetrics in rural, underserved Alabama. The Alabama Family Practice Rural Health Board has funded the University of Alabama Family Medicine Obstetrics Fellowship since its beginning in 1986. Family medicine obstetrics fellowship graduates who practice obstetrics in rural, underserved areas were sent questionnaires and asked to participate in the study. The questions included the most common types and average annual numbers of obstetrics/gynecological procedures they performed. Ten physicians, or 77% of the graduates asked to participate in the study, returned the questionnaire. Fourteen common obstetrics/gynecological procedures performed by the graduates were identified. A mean of 115 deliveries were performed. The full-time equivalent reduction in family medicine time to practice obstetrics was 20%. A family physician practicing obstetrics in a rural area adds an additional $488,560 in economic benefit to the community in addition to the $1,000,000 from practicing family medicine, producing a total annual benefit of $1,488,560. The investment of $616,385 from the Alabama Family Practice Rural Health Board resulted in a $399 benefit to the community for every dollar invested. The cumulative effect of fellowship graduates practicing both family medicine and obstetrics in rural, underserved areas over the 26 years studied was $246,047,120. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  1. Barriers to Implementing Evidence-Based Intrapartum Care: A Descriptive Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravani, Mina; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Zarean, Ellahe; Bahrami, Masod

    2016-02-01

    Evidence based practice is an effective strategy to improve the quality of obstetric care. Identification of barriers to adaptation of evidence-based intrapartum care is necessary and crucial to deliver high quality care to parturient women. The current study aimed to explore barriers to adaptation of evidence-based intrapartum care from the perspective of clinical groups that provide obstetric care in Iran. This descriptive exploratory qualitative research was conducted from 2013 to 2014 in fourteen state medical training centers in Iran. Participants were selected from midwives, specialists, and residents of obstetrics and gynecology, with a purposive sample and snowball method. Data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and analyzed according to conventional content analysis. Data analysis identified twenty subcategories and four main categories. Main categories included barriers were related to laboring women, persons providing care, the organization environment and health system. The adoption of evidence based intrapartum care is a complex process. In this regard, identifying potential barriers is the first step to determine and apply effective strategies to encourage the compliance evidence based obstetric care and improves maternity care quality.

  2. Physician's gender, communication style, patient preferences and patient satisfaction in gynecology and obstetrics: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Review of studies published in the last 10 years about women seeking gynecological- or obstetrical care and physician's gender in relation to patient preferences, differences in communication style and patient satisfaction. METHODS: Studies were identified by searching the online

  3. Perfil das admissões em uma unidade de terapia intensiva obstétrica de uma maternidade brasileira Admission profile in an obstetrics intensive care unit in a maternity hospital of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Maria Ramos de Amorim

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever a experiência de três anos com terapia intensiva em obstetrícia em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva em setor que permite que obstetras continuem conduzindo as pacientes obstétricas criticamente enfermas. MÉTODOS: estudo avaliando 933 pacientes atendidas na UTI obstétrica do Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP de setembro de 2002 a fevereiro de 2005. As variáveis foram idade, paridade, diagnóstico de admissão, época da admissão, diagnósticos e complicações durante o internamento, procedimentos invasivos empregados e resultado final. RESULTADOS: as três principais causas de internamento foram hipertensão (87%, hemorragia obstétrica (4,9% e infecção (2,1%. A idade média foi 25 anos e 65% dos partos, cesarianas. Anemia foi achado freqüente (58,4%. Outros diagnósticos: insuficiência renal, doença tromboembólica, cardiopatia, edema agudo de pulmão, sepse, choque hemorrágico. Das 814 pacientes admitidas com hipertensão associada à gestação, 65% tinham pré-eclâmpsia grave, 16% pré-eclâmpsia leve e 11% eclâmpsia. Síndrome HELLP ocorreu em 46%. Ventilação mecânica foi necessária em 3,6% e hemotransfusão em 17%. A duração média do internamento foi cinco dias (1-41. A taxa de óbito foi 2,4%. CONCLUSÕES: a taxa de morte foi relativamente baixa, sugerindo que uma UTI conduzida por obstetras pode ser uma estratégia factível para reduzir a mortalidade materna.OBJECTIVES: to describe a three-year experience with obstetric Intensive Care Units (ICU, a unit allowing obstetricians to continue to care for critically ill obstetrics patients. METHODS: the study evaluated all admissions (933 to the Obstetric ICU, in the Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP, from September 2002 to February 2005. Age, parity, diagnosis, admission time, diagnosis during ICU stay, associated complications, invasive procedures utilized, and final outcome were analyzed. RESULTS

  4. Social determinants and maternal exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric patients with severe maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Taft, Angela; McDonald, Susan; Pollock, Wendy; Roque Henriquez, Joel Christian

    2016-11-28

    Maternal mortality is a potentially preventable public health issue. Maternal morbidity is increasingly of interest to aid the reduction of maternal mortality. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are an important part of the global burden of maternal morbidity. Social determinants influence health outcomes of pregnant women. Additionally, intimate partner violence has a great negative impact on women's health and pregnancy outcome. However, little is known about the contextual and social aspects of obstetric patients treated in the ICU. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of the social determinants and exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric patients admitted to an ICU. A systematic search will be conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, LILACS and SciELO from 2000 to 2016. Studies published in English and Spanish will be identified in relation to data reporting on social determinants of health and/or exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric women, treated in the ICU during pregnancy, childbirth or within 42 days of the end of pregnancy. Two reviewers will independently screen for study eligibility and data extraction. Risk of bias and assessment of the quality of the included studies will be performed by using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. Data will be analysed and summarised using a narrative description of the available evidence across studies. This systematic review protocol will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Since this systematic review will be based on published studies, ethical approval is not required. Findings will be presented at La Trobe University, in Conferences and Congresses, and published in a peer-reviewed journal. CRD42016037492. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. How virtual reality may enhance training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letterie, Gerard S

    2002-09-01

    Contemporary training in obstetrics and gynecology is aimed at the acquisition of a complex set of skills oriented to both the technical and personal aspects of patient care. The ability to create clinical simulations through virtual reality (VR) may facilitate the accomplishment of these goals. The purpose of this paper is 2-fold: (1) to review the circumstances and equipment in industry, science, and education in which VR has been successfully applied, and (2) to explore the possible role of VR for training in obstetrics and gynecology and to suggest innovative and unique approaches to enhancing this training. Qualitative assessment of the literature describing successful applications of VR in industry, law enforcement, military, and medicine from 1995 to 2000. Articles were identified through a computer-based search using Medline, Current Contents, and cross referencing bibliographies of articles identified through the search. One hundred and fifty-four articles were reviewed. This review of contemporary literature suggests that VR has been successfully used to simulate person-to-person interactions for training in psychiatry and the social sciences in a variety of circumstances by using real-time simulations of personal interactions, and to launch 3-dimensional trainers for surgical simulation. These successful applications and simulations suggest that this technology may be helpful and should be evaluated as an educational modality in obstetrics and gynecology in two areas: (1) counseling in circumstances ranging from routine preoperative informed consent to intervention in more acute circumstances such as domestic violence or rape, and (2) training in basic and advanced surgical skills for both medical students and residents. Virtual reality is an untested, but potentially useful, modality for training in obstetrics and gynecology. On the basis of successful applications in other nonmedical and medical areas, VR may have a role in teaching essential elements

  6. Prenatal Care for Pregnant Adolescents in a Public High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Marjorie; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of pregnant adolescents were studied using a retrospective analysis of obstetrical summary to demonstrate the relationship of the availability of a comprehensive, program of prenatal care in a public school setting to the achievement of early and continuous prenatal care, and to the minimizing of obstetrical complications. (JMF)

  7. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sáez-López

    Full Text Available Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (p<0.0001. Sixty-five percent of the strains were ampicillin-resistant. The E. coli isolates causing obstetric infections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001. The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the

  8. [Burnout syndrome in medical and obstetric perception of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado-Cucarella, Sheila; Penagos-Corzo, Julio C; Casas-Arellano, Marco Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Obstetric violence involves a violation of reproductive rights of women during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum. It has been associated with lack of empathy and emotional discomfort of physicians. To identify the perceptions of obstetric violence and to determine the possible relationship with burnout syndrome. We evaluated 29 physicians whose scope of work relates to obstetrics and gynecology. The evaluation instruments were: a) questionnaire on professional perception that collects demographic information, situations of perceived obstetric violence, major concerns of physicians in their professional work, and includes an scale about level of job satisfaction, b) the Maslach Burnout inventory, and c) Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. The most prevalent obstetric violence situations perceived were: medical malpractice and harmful practices (10/29), discrimination (10/29), rude treatment and verbal attacks (11/29). Seventeen participants reported lack of information on obstetric violence and not have tools to cope with this problem. Regarding the burnout syndrome, it was associated with several items of the scale of empathy and with the scale of job satisfaction. This study shows the importance of providing knowledge and tools to deal with obstetric violence and stress management to prevent such situations on medical practices.

  9. Obstetric Thromboprophylaxis: The Swedish Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelle G. Lindqvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric thromboprophylaxis is difficult. Since 10 years Swedish obstetricians have used a combined risk estimation model and recommendations concerning to whom, at what dose, when, and for how long thromboprophylaxis is to be administrated based on a weighted risk score. In this paper we describe the background and validation of the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis in women with moderate-high risk of VTE, that is, at similar or higher risk as the antepartum risk among women with history of thrombosis. The risk score is based on major risk factors (i.e., 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolism. We present data on the efficacy of the model, the cost-effectiveness, and the lifestyle advice that is given. We believe that the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis aid clinicians in providing women at increased risk of VTE with effective and appropriate thromboprophylaxis, thus avoiding both over- and under-treatment.

  10. FOETOMATERNAL OUTCOME OF OBSTETRIC CHOLESTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mishra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric cholestasis is a disorder of liver function commonly occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy. Clinical characters of this disorder include unexplained maternal pruritus, most common site being palms and soles, altered liver functions (elevated serum transaminases and increased fasting serum bile acids (>10 micro mol/L in previously healthy pregnant women. The incidence is variable geographically from 0.1% to 15.6% all over the world. The aetiology of this condition is not fully understood. Its pathogenesis is related to increased sex hormone synthesis, environmental factors and genetic predisposition. Obstetric cholestasis can lead to increased foetal morbidity and mortality with regards to preterm delivery, neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, foetal distress and sudden intrauterine foetal death. Treatment of the disease focus on relieving symptoms and signs. The aim of the study is to evaluate the pregnancy and foetal outcome of pregnant women with obstetric cholestasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted in M.K.C.G. Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur from February 2015 to May 2017. Inclusion Criteria- All patients having pruritus during course of pregnancy with biochemical evidence of raised liver function tests attending antenatal clinic or labour room. Exclusion Criteria- 1 Pregnant women without pruritus; 2 Pregnant women having other liver diseases. RESULTS The incidence of obstetric cholestasis was 0.6%. Majority of cases were primigravida (72.9%. Positive family history was present in 11.4% of cases. Majority of cases (77.1% had normal vaginal delivery. 22.9% of cases had caesarean section. Primary postpartum haemorrhage occurred in only 2.9% of cases. CONCLUSION Obstetric cholestasis can be managed by improving the circulating bile acid level, targeting the cause of pruritus and optimising the time of delivery as a result of which we can reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Assessment of mothers’ satisfaction with the care of maternal care in Specialized Educational-Medical Centers in obstetrics and gynecological disease in Northwest, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Taghavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients satisfaction includes the assessment of healthcare which she/he received. This study aims at assessment of mothers’ satisfaction with the care of maternal care in Specialized Educational-Medical Centers in obstetrics and gynecological disease in Northwest, Iran. Methods: In an analytic-descriptive cross-sectional study, 1000 female patients who admitted in educational-medical centers of Northwest were studied during a 2 years period (2010-2012. They asked to fill a 34-item closed-answer questionnaire (ranking from very unsatisfied to very satisfied responses following their discharge. Validity of the questionnaire was improved by gynecologist’s experts comments, and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by test-retest methods (α = 0.946. Results: The satisfaction score (satisfied or very satisfied responses were 61.2, 55.8, 61.8 and 59.5 percent for admitting process, primary care services, treatments and therapeutic interventions and overall, respectively. The satisfaction score for access to doctors was highest in the morning and lowest at the night shifts. The satisfaction score about the personnel’s behavior was lowest during the night shifts. The satisfaction score about the residents’ behavior was highest for the morning shifts. There was no significant difference between the three working shifts regarding psychological feelings, humanitarian respect, and issues like nutrition and private and public hygiene. There was a significant direct correlation between the mean score of satisfaction and patients’ age (Spearman’s rho = 0.117, P < 0.001. Conclusion: The satisfaction level of patients hospitalized in Northwest of Iran's Hospitals was intermediate. Planning new strategies in this regard with emphasis on the main limitations may improve the satisfaction rate in the future.

  12. Are recent graduates enough prepared to perform obstetric skills in their rural and compulsory year? A study from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Del Hierro, Galo; Remmen, Roy; Verhoeven, Veronique; Van Royen, Paul; Hendrickx, Kristin

    2014-07-31

    The aim of this study was to assess the possible mismatch of obstetrical skills between the training offered in Ecuadorian medical schools and the tasks required for compulsory rural service. Primary care, rural health centres in Southern Ecuador. A total of 92 recent graduated medical doctors during their compulsory rural year. A web-based survey was developed with 21 obstetrical skills. The questionnaire was sent to all rural doctors who work in Loja province, Southern Ecuador, at the Ministry of Health (n=92). 'importance of skills in rural practice' with a five-point Likert-type scale (1= strongly disagree; 5= strongly agree); and 'clerkship experience' using a nominal scale divided in five levels: level 1 (not seen, not performed) to level 5 (performed 10 times or more). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to observe associations. A negative correlation was found in the skills: 'episiotomy and repair', 'umbilical vein catheterisation', 'speculum examination', 'evaluation of cervical dilation during active labour', 'neonatal resuscitation' and 'vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery'. For instance 'Episiotomy and repair' is important (strongly agree and agree) to 100% of respondents, but in practice, only 38.9% of rural doctors performed the task three times and 8.3% only once during the internship, similar pattern is seen in the others. In this study we have noted the gap between the medical needs of populations in rural areas and training provided during the clerkship experiences of physicians during their rural service year. It is imperative to ensure that rural doctors are appropriately trained and skilled in the performance of routine obstetrical duties. This will help to decrease perinatal morbidity and mortality in rural Ecuador. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Are recent graduates enough prepared to perform obstetric skills in their rural and compulsory year? A study from Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez del Hierro, Galo; Remmen, Roy; Verhoeven, Veronique; Van Royen, Paul; Hendrickx, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the possible mismatch of obstetrical skills between the training offered in Ecuadorian medical schools and the tasks required for compulsory rural service. Setting Primary care, rural health centres in Southern Ecuador. Participants A total of 92 recent graduated medical doctors during their compulsory rural year. Primary and secondary outcomes measures A web-based survey was developed with 21 obstetrical skills. The questionnaire was sent to all rural doctors who work in Loja province, Southern Ecuador, at the Ministry of Health (n=92). We measured two categories ‘importance of skills in rural practice’ with a five-point Likert-type scale (1= strongly disagree; 5= strongly agree); and ‘clerkship experience’ using a nominal scale divided in five levels: level 1 (not seen, not performed) to level 5 (performed 10 times or more). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to observe associations. Results A negative correlation was found in the skills: ‘episiotomy and repair’, ‘umbilical vein catheterisation’, ‘speculum examination’, ‘evaluation of cervical dilation during active labour’, ‘neonatal resuscitation’ and ‘vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery’. For instance ‘Episiotomy and repair’ is important (strongly agree and agree) to 100% of respondents, but in practice, only 38.9% of rural doctors performed the task three times and 8.3% only once during the internship, similar pattern is seen in the others. Conclusions In this study we have noted the gap between the medical needs of populations in rural areas and training provided during the clerkship experiences of physicians during their rural service year. It is imperative to ensure that rural doctors are appropriately trained and skilled in the performance of routine obstetrical duties. This will help to decrease perinatal morbidity and mortality in rural Ecuador. PMID:25082424

  14. Accounting for abortion: Accomplishing transnational reproductive governance through post-abortion care in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Siri

    2018-06-01

    Reproductive governance operates through calculating demographic statistics that offer selective truths about reproductive practices, bodies, and subjectivities. Post-abortion care, a global reproductive health intervention, represents a transnational reproductive regime that establishes motherhood as women's primary legitimate reproductive status. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Senegal between 2010 and 2011, I illustrate how post-abortion care accomplishes reproductive governance in a context where abortion is prohibited altogether and the US is the primary bilateral donor of population aid. Reproductive governance unfolds in hospital gynecological wards and the national health information system through the mobilization and interpretation of post-abortion care data. Although health workers search women's bodies and behavior for signs of illegal abortion, they minimize police intervention in the hospital by classifying most post-abortion care cases as miscarriage. Health authorities deploy this account of post-abortion care to align the intervention with national and global maternal health policies that valorize motherhood. Although post-abortion care offers life-saving care to women with complications of illegal abortion, it institutionalizes abortion stigma by scrutinizing women's bodies and masking induced abortion within and beyond the hospital. Post-abortion care reinforces reproductive inequities by withholding safe, affordable obstetric care from women until after they have resorted to unsafe abortion.

  15. Prevalence of experienced abuse in healthcare and associated obstetric characteristics in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasse, Mirjam; Schroll, Anne-Mette; Karro, Helle; Schei, Berit; Steingrimsdottir, Thora; Van Parys, An-Sofie; Ryding, Elsa Lena; Tabor, Ann

    2015-05-01

    To assess the prevalence and current suffering of experienced abuse in healthcare, to present the socio-demographic background for women with a history of abuse in healthcare and to assess the association between abuse in healthcare and selected obstetric characteristics. Cross-sectional study. Routine antenatal care in six European countries. In total 6923 pregnant women. Cross-tabulation and Pearson's chi-square was used to study prevalence and characteristics for women reporting abuse in healthcare. Associations with selected obstetric factors were estimated using multiple logistic regression analysis. Abuse in healthcare, fear of childbirth and preference for birth by cesarean section. One in five pregnant women attending routine antenatal care reported some lifetime abuse in healthcare. Prevalence varied significantly between the countries. Characteristics for women reporting abuse in healthcare included a significantly higher prevalence of other forms of abuse, economic hardship and negative life events as well as a lack of social support, symptoms of post-traumatic stress and depression. Among nulliparous women, abuse in healthcare was associated with fear of childbirth, adjusted odds ratio 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.12) for severe abuse in healthcare. For multiparous women only severe current suffering from abuse in healthcare was significantly associated with fear of childbirth, adjusted odds ratio 4.04 (95% CI 2.08-7.83). Current severe suffering from abuse in healthcare was significantly associated with the wish for cesarean section, and counselling for fear of childbirth for both nulli- and multiparous women. Abuse in healthcare among women attending routine antenatal care is common and for women with severe current suffering from abuse in healthcare, this is associated with fear of childbirth and a wish for cesarean section. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  17. Assessing teamwork performance in obstetrics: A systematic search and review of validated tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Annemarie F; de Boer, Liza; Kienhorst, Dieneke; Truijens, Sophie E; van Runnard Heimel, Pieter J; Oei, S Guid

    2017-09-01

    Teamwork performance is an essential component for the clinical efficiency of multi-professional teams in obstetric care. As patient safety is related to teamwork performance, it has become an important learning goal in simulation-based education. In order to improve teamwork performance, reliable assessment tools are required. These can be used to provide feedback during training courses, or to compare learning effects between different types of training courses. The aim of the current study is to (1) identify the available assessment tools to evaluate obstetric teamwork performance in a simulated environment, and (2) evaluate their psychometric properties in order to identify the most valuable tool(s) to use. We performed a systematic search in PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE to identify articles describing assessment tools for the evaluation of obstetric teamwork performance in a simulated environment. In order to evaluate the quality of the identified assessment tools the standards and grading rules have been applied as recommended by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Committee on Educational Outcomes. The included studies were also assessed according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) levels of evidence. This search resulted in the inclusion of five articles describing the following six tools: Clinical Teamwork Scale, Human Factors Rating Scale, Global Rating Scale, Assessment of Obstetric Team Performance, Global Assessment of Obstetric Team Performance, and the Teamwork Measurement Tool. Based on the ACGME guidelines we assigned a Class 3, level C of evidence, to all tools. Regarding the OCEBM levels of evidence, a level 3b was assigned to two studies and a level 4 to four studies. The Clinical Teamwork Scale demonstrated the most comprehensive validation, and the Teamwork Measurement Tool demonstrated promising results, however it is recommended to further investigate its reliability. Copyright © 2017

  18. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Eastern and Central Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOGECA) is a peer reviewed quarterly journal published by Kenya Obstetrical and Gynaecological Society (KOGS). It publishes: original work in all aspects related to obstetrics and gynaecology, reviews related to obstetrics and gynaecology and ...

  19. A multi disciplinary obstetric emergency training programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, Mary

    2012-09-01

    The Rotunda Hospital (Dublin) obstetric emergency training programme (RHOET) was designed, in 2008, to meet the ongoing education and training needs of the local multidisciplinary team. Prior to its implementation, senior midwives attended the advanced life support in obstetrics (ALSO) course, and many of the obstetricians attended the Management of obstetric emergencies and trauma (MOET) and\\/or ALSO courses. Attendance at these off site courses meant that the only opportunity for team training was the informal and ad hoc \\'drills and skills\\' that took place in the birthing suite. This paper documents our journey since RHOET was implemented.

  20. Signal functions for emergency obstetric care as an intervention for reducing maternal mortality: a survey of public and private health facilities in Lusaka District, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, Tannia; Chongwe, Gershom; Vwalika, Bellington; Sitali, Lungowe

    2017-09-06

    Zambia's maternal mortality ratio was estimated at 398/100,000 live births in 2014. Successful aversion of deaths is dependent on availability and usability of signal functions for emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Evidence of availability, usability and quality of signal functions in urban settings in Zambia is minimal as previous research has evaluated their distribution in rural settings. This survey evaluated the availability and usability of signal functions in private and public health facilities in Lusaka District of Zambia. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015 at 35 public and private health facilities. The Service Availability and Readiness Assessment tool was adapted and administered to overall in-charges, hospital administrators or maternity ward supervisors at health facilities providing maternal and newborn health services. The survey quantified infrastructure, human resources, equipment, essential drugs and supplies and used the UN process indicators to determine availability, accessibility and quality of signal functions. Data on deliveries and complications were collected from registers for periods between June 2013 and May 2014. Of the 35 (25.7% private and 74.2% public) health facilities assessed, only 22 (62.8%) were staffed 24 h a day, 7 days a week and had provided obstetric care 3 months prior to the survey. Pre-eclampsia/ eclampsia and obstructed labor accounted for most direct complications while postpartum hemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal deaths. Overall, 3 (8.6%) and 5 (14.3%) of the health facilities had provided Basic and Comprehensive EmONC services, respectively. All facilities obtained blood products from the only blood bank at a government referral hospital. The UN process indicators can be adequately used to monitor progress towards maternal mortality reduction. Lusaka district had an unmet need for BEmONC as health facilities fell below the minimum UN standard

  1. Obstetric complications as risk factors for schizophrenia spectrum psychoses in offspring of mothers with psychotic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvisaari, Jaana M; Taxell-Lassas, Virpi; Pankakoski, Maiju; Haukka, Jari K; Lönnqvist, Jouko K; Häkkinen, Laura T

    2013-09-01

    Obstetric complications have predicted future development of schizophrenia in previous studies, but they are also more common in mothers with schizophrenia. The aims of this study were to compare the occurrence of obstetric complications in children of mothers with schizophrenia spectrum psychoses and control children, and to investigate whether obstetric complications predicted children's psychiatric morbidity. The Helsinki High-Risk (HR) Study monitors females born between 1916 and 1948 and treated for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in Helsinki psychiatric hospitals, their offspring born between 1941 and 1977, and controls. We examined information on obstetric complications and neonatal health of 271 HR and 242 control offspring. We compared the frequency of obstetric complications and neonatal health problems in the HR group vs controls and in HR children who later developed psychotic disorders vs healthy HR children. A Cox regression model was used to assess whether problems in pregnancy or delivery predicted psychiatric morbidity within the HR group. Few differences between HR and control offspring were found in obstetric complications. Within the HR group, infections (hazard rate ratio [HRR] 3.73, 95% CI 1.27-11.01), hypertension during pregnancy (HRR 4.10, 95% CI 1.15-14.58), and placental abnormalities (HRR 4.09, 95% CI 1.59-10.49) were associated with elevated risk of schizophrenia spectrum psychoses. Common medical problems during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum psychoses in offspring of mothers with schizophrenia spectrum psychoses. These results underline the role of the prenatal period in the development of schizophrenia and the importance of careful monitoring of pregnancies of mothers with psychotic disorder.

  2. Perceived Changes to Obstetric Care and the Integration of Personal and Professional Life as a Pregnant Prenatal Genetic Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietzler, Jennifer L; Birkeland, Laura E; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2018-02-08

    The impact of practicing as a prenatal genetic counselor while pregnant is unclear given the limited amount of published literature on this issue. To address this gap in knowledge, a total of 215 current and past prenatal genetic counselors provided insights regarding this personal yet professional juncture through completion of an online survey that allowed for both close-ended and open-ended responses. While participants agreed that experiencing pregnancy affected their perspectives and counseling in several ways, this paper focuses on one particular finding-that of the changes in their own obstetric care perceived by genetic counselors while working within the prenatal setting and being pregnant themselves. As a result of these changes, considerations about when to disclose a pregnancy to colleagues along with how to integrate personal and professional needs as a pregnant prenatal genetic counselor surfaced. Additional findings, practice implications, and research recommendations are discussed.

  3. Local health workers' perceptions of substandard care in the management of obstetric hemorrhage in rural Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, Jogchum Jan; van den Akker, Thomas; Bwirire, Dieudonne; Korevaar, Anneke; Chidakwani, Richard; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2013-01-01

    Background: To identify factors contributing to the high incidence of facility-based obstetric hemorrhage in Thyolo District, Malawi, according to local health workers. Methods: Three focus group discussions among 29 health workers, including nurse-midwives and non-physician clinicians ('medical

  4. Local health workers' perceptions of substandard care in the management of obstetric hemorrhage in rural Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, J.J.; van den Akker, T.; Bwirire, D.; Korevaar, A.; Chidakwani, R.; van Lonkhuijzen, L.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To identify factors contributing to the high incidence of facility-based obstetric hemorrhage in Thyolo District, Malawi, according to local health workers.Methods: Three focus group discussions among 29 health workers, including nurse-midwives and non-physician clinicians ('medical

  5. [Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia in Switzerland in 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetsch-Rast, G; Schneider, M C; Siegemund, M

    2002-02-01

    This survey investigated the common practice of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Swiss hospitals and evaluated the influence of the Swiss interest group for obstetric anaesthesia. In March 1999 we submitted 145 questionnaires to all Swiss hospitals providing an obstetric service. The rate of epidural analgesia (EA) was higher in large hospitals (> 1,000 births/year) than in small services. EA was maintained by continuous infusion techniques in 53% of the responding hospitals. For elective caesarean section, spinal anaesthesia (SA) and EA were performed in 77% and 16% of the patients, respectively. General anaesthesia (5%) was only used in small hospitals (interest group for obstetric anaesthesia, as well as the expectations of pregnant women, increased the numbers of regional anaesthesia compared with the first survey in 1992.

  6. Variation in intrapartum referral rates in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands: A discrete choice experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, P.M.; Otten, W.; Boxem-Tiemessen, J.C.; Jonge, A. de; Pal-de Bruin, K.M. van der; Scheepers, P.L.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective in midwife-led care models of maternity care, midwives are responsible for intrapartum referrals to the obstetrician or obstetric unit, in order to give their clients access to secondary obstetric care. This study explores the influence of risk perception, policy on routine labour

  7. Variation in intrapartum referral rates in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands: a discrete choice experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, P.M.; Otten, W.; Boxem-Tiemessen, J.C.G.; de Jonge, A.; de Bruin, K.; Scheepers, P.L.H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: in midwife-led care models of maternity care, midwives are responsible for intrapartum referrals to the obstetrician or obstetric unit, in order to give their clients access to secondary obstetric care. This study explores the influence of risk perception, policy on routine labour

  8. The efficacy and safety of inflatable obstetric belts for management of the second stage of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Hee; Lee, Gun Ho; Park, Young Bae; Jun, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Hahn, Won Bo; Park, Sang Won; Park, Hee Jin; Cha, Dong Hyun

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of inflatable obstetric belts on uterine fundal pressure in the management of the second stage of labor. One hundred twenty-three nulliparas with a singleton cephalic pregnancy at term were randomized. Standard care was performed in the control group, and uterine fundal pressure by the Labor Assister (Baidy M-420/Curexo, Inc., Seoul, Korea) was utilized in addition to standard care in the active group. The Labor Assister is an inflatable obstetric belts that synchronized to apply uniform fundal pressure during a uterine contraction. The 62 women in the active group spent less time in the second stage of labor when compared to the 61 women in the control group (41.55+/-30.39 min vs. 62.11+/-35.99 min). There was no significant difference in perinatal outcomes between the two groups. In conclusion, the uterine fundal pressure exerted by the Labor Assister reduces the duration of the second stage of labor without attendant complications.

  9. Obstetric outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and isolated polycystic ovaries undergoing in vitro fertilization: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hei Lok Tiffany; Hui, Pui Wah; Li, Hang Wun Raymond; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective cohort study evaluated the obstetric outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and isolated polycystic ovaries (PCO) undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. We studied 104 women with PCOS, 184 with PCO and 576 age-matched controls undergoing the first IVF treatment cycle between 2002 and 2009. Obstetric outcomes and complications including gestational diabetes (GDM), gestational hypertension (GHT), gestational proteinuric hypertension (PET), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), gestation at delivery, baby's Apgar scores and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were reviewed. Among the 864 patients undergoing IVF treatment, there were 253 live births in total (25 live births in the PCOS group, 54 in the PCO group and 174 in the control group). The prevalence of obstetric complications (GDM, GHT, PET and IUGR) and the obstetric outcomes (gestation at delivery, birth weight, Apgar scores and NICU admissions) were comparable among the three groups. Adjustments for age and multiple pregnancies were made using multiple logistic regression and we found no statistically significant difference among the three groups. Patients with PCO ± PCOS do not have more adverse obstetric outcomes when compared with non-PCO patients undergoing IVF treatment.

  10. Simulation laboratories for training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian R; Gherman, Robert B; Satin, Andrew J

    2003-08-01

    Simulations have been used by the military, airline industry, and our colleagues in other medical specialties to educate, evaluate, and prepare for rare but life-threatening scenarios. Work hour limits for residents in obstetrics and gynecology and decreased patient availability for teaching of students and residents require us to think creatively and practically on how to optimize their education. Medical simulations may address scenarios in clinical practice that are considered important to know or understand. Simulations can take many forms, including computer programs, models or mannequins, virtual reality data immersion caves, and a combination of formats. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to a potential role for medical simulation in obstetrics and gynecology. We briefly describe an example of how simulation may be incorporated into obstetric and gynecologic residency training. It is our contention that educators in obstetrics and gynecology should be aware of the potential for simulation in education. We hope this commentary will stimulate interest in the field, lead to validation studies, and improve training in and the practice of obstetrics and gynecology.

  11. Birth attendance and magnitude of obstetric complications in Western Kenya: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liambila, Wilson N; Kuria, Shiphrah N

    2014-09-08

    Skilled birth attendance is critical in the provision of child birth related services. Yet, literature is scanty on the outcomes of child birth related complications in situations where majority of women deliver under the care of non-skilled birth attendants compared to those who are assisted by skilled providers. The study sought to assess the nature of childbirth related complications among the skilled and the non-skilled birth attendants in Western Kenya. A case-control study was conducted among women aged 15-49 years at the household. Controls were individually matched to cases on the basis of age and socio-economic status. A total of 294 cases and 291 controls were interviewed. Data were collected on various demographic and socio-economic characteristics and women's perception on the quality of care. All independent variables were analysed initially in bivariate models and those that were significantly associated with obstetric complications were included in multiple logistic regression model in order to control for confounding factors. Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals, were computed to show the association between the occurrence, magnitude and the extent to which child birth related complications were managed. Demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the cases and controls were similar. About 52% of the deliveries were assisted by skilled birth attendants while non-skilled providers attended to 48% of them. The odds of the occurrence of obstetric complications were greater among the women who were attended to by skilled providers in health facilities: adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.32 (CI 0.95, 1.84) than among those who were assisted by unskilled birth attendants, AOR 0.76 (CI 0.55, 1.06). Undignified care, high delivery and transport costs and fear of hospital procedures such as HIV tests and mishandling of the placenta were cited as some of the barriers to facility deliveries. Skilled birth attendants in facilities were associated

  12. Perinatal outcomes of low-risk planned home and hospital births under midwife-led care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraizumi, Yoshie; Suzuki, Shunji

    2013-11-01

    It has not been extensively studied whether planned home and planned hospital births under primary midwife-led care increase risk of adverse events among low-risk women in Japan. A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare perinatal outcome between 291 women who were given primary midwife-led care during labor and 217 women who were given standard obstetric shared care. Among 291 women with primary midwife-led care, 168 and 123 chose home deliver and hospital delivery, respectively. Perinatal outcomes included length of labor of 24 h or more, augmentation of labor pains, delivery mode, severe perineal laceration, postpartum hemorrhage of 1000 mL or more, maternal fever of 38°C or more and neonatal asphyxia (Apgar score, home delivery (34 vs 21%, P = 0.011). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse perinatal outcomes between women with obstetric shared care and women with primary midwife-led care (regardless of being hospital delivery or home delivery). Approximately one-quarter of low-risk women with primary midwife-led care required obstetric care during labor or postpartum. However, primary midwife-led care during labor at home and hospital for low-risk pregnant women was not associated with adverse perinatal outcomes in Japan. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. The major clinical determinants of maternal death among obstetric near-miss patients: a tertiary centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, Y.; Yilmaz, E.; Celik, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the characteristics of obstetric near-miss patients to clarify the major risk factors of maternal mortality. Methods: From among the patients referred to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inonu University of Medical Sciences, Turkey, between August 1, 2010 and March 1, 2012, electronic records of obstetric near-miss cases were retrospectively analysed. The obstetric and demographic characteristics of cases that were successfully treated (Group 1) as well as cases with maternal death (Group 2) were analysed and compared. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 2687 cases handled during the study period, 95 (3.53%) were of the near-miss nature. The most frequently encountered underlying aetiology was severe preeclampsia (n=55; 57.89%) and haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count syndrome (n=20; 21.1%). These were followed by cases of postpartum bleeding (n=18; 18.9%). Maternal mortality occurred in 10 (10.5%) patients, representing Group 2. The amount of haemorrhage and blood transfused were significantly higher in the group. Maternal mortality cases had also significantly longer duration of intensive care unit admission. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and immediate management of the complications noted by the study can be the most important measures to prevent the occurrence of mortality. (author)

  14. Teaching obstetric ultrasound at Mulago Hospital - Kampala, Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... basic obstetric ultrasound. Keywords: Ultrasound; obstetric; teaching; Uganda; low-resource; curriculum. .... tic and hands-on training were provided by one trainer. (HKA) who at the time .... any formal teaching session. Additionally, the study ...

  15. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which

  16. Michigan Health & Hospital Association Keystone Obstetrics: a statewide collaborative for perinatal patient safety in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Knox, G Eric; Martin, Morgan; George, Chris; Watson, Sam R

    2011-12-01

    Preventable harm to mothers and infants during labor and birth is a significant patient safety and professional liability issue. A Michigan Health & Hospital Association Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality Obstetric Collaborative Project involved perinatal teams from 15 Michigan hospitals during an 11-month period in 2009. The purpose of the project was to promote safe care practices during labor and birth using the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP). Consistent with the CUSP model, this project's components included assessing and promoting a culture of safety; interdisciplinary team building; case review; learning from defects through multiple methods of education; team and individual coaching and peer encouragement; administrative support for the establishment of a fundamental safety infrastructure; and ongoing evaluation of care processes and outcomes. Study measures included 32 components of a perinatal patient infrastructure, 6 care processes during labor and birth, and 4 neonatal outcomes. Significant improvements were found in the safety culture (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire), the perinatal patient safety infrastructure components, and all care processes. Although the project was successful, getting buy-in from all members of the clinical team in each hospital for all of the measures was challenging at times. There was initial resistance to some of the measures and their various expected aspects of care. For example, some of the clinicians were initially reluctant to adopt the recommended standardized oxytocin protocol. Peer encouragement and unit-based feedback on progress in minimizing early elective births proved useful in many hospitals. A CUSP in obstetrics can be beneficial in improving the care of mothers and infants during labor and birth.

  17. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-López, Emma; Guiral, Elisabet; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Villanueva, Sonia; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Teixidó, Irene; Pericot, Anna; Figueras, Francesc; Palacio, Montse; Cobo, Teresa; Bosch, Jordi; Soto, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (pinfections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001). The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the aetiological link between maternal carriage and obstetric and subsequent puerperal infections.

  18. Impact of surgery on quality of life of women with obstetrical fistula: a qualitative study in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Désalliers, Julie; Paré, Marie-Eve; Kouraogo, Salam; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-07-01

    Obstetric fistula, caused by traumatic delivery and patient lack of access to obstetric care, is an important public health concern in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. This research focuses on the experience of women living with obstetric fistula in Burkina Faso as well as their reintegration into community after surgery. This project was funded by the Mères du Monde en Santé (MMS) Foundation and conducted in collaboration with the Boromo Hospital. A qualitative approach based on grounded theory and using the principles of participative action research (PAR) was used with semidirected interviews prior to surgery and follow-up interviews 1-2 years after surgery directly in the women's village of origin. Thirty-nine participants were recruited between 2012 and 2015. The results point to circumstances leading to obstetric fistula development: poverty, gender inequality in terms of decision making, healthcare-system deficiencies, and lack of services for referral and treatment of this condition. Our results reinforce the knowledge about the social and psychological repercussions of fistula by exploring the concepts of gossips, shame and self-exclusion as powerful mechanisms of exclusion, but they also show that social support was conserved for several women through their journey with this disease. There was complete social rehabilitation within the community after surgery; however, persistent barriers in term of anxiety regarding obstetric future and economic insecurity were present. Early recruitment for surgery and prevention are the main objectives when attempting to reduce the impact of obstetric fistula and facilitate patient reintegration. Improvements in local and governmental public health policies are required.

  19. [The emergence of obstetrical mechanism: From Lucy to Homo sapiens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémondière, P; Thollon, L; Marchal, F

    2017-03-01

    The evolutionary history of modern birth mechanism is now a renewed interest in obstetrical papers. The purpose of this work is to review the literature in paleo-obstetrical field. Our analysis focuses on paleo-obstetrical hypothesis, from 1960 to the present day, based on the reconstruction of fossil pelvis. Indeed, these pelvic reconstructions usually provide an opportunity to make an obstetrical assumption in our ancestors. In this analysis, we show that modern birth mechanism takes place during the emergence of our genus 2 million years ago. References are made to human specificities related to obstetrical mechanism: exclusive bipedalism, increase of brain size at birth, metabolic cost of the pregnancy and deep trophoblastic implantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF OBSTETRIC OUTCOME IN TEENAGE PREGNANCY AND OLDER PREGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Valsaladevi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Younger age pregnancy of the group 18 years to 19 years is characterized by adverse maternal outcomes like anaemia, hypertension, low birth weight babies and intra uterine growth restriction. A comparative retrospective study on the obstetric outcome in teenage mothers and older women was carried out. Data for the study was obtained from a hospital where considerable teenage pregnancy is reported. Evidence obtained in this study regarding antenatal complications and birth weight shows that good antenatal care and support by family and caregivers can bring down the incidence of anaemia and low birth weight babies in teenage pregnancy. The aim of the study is to compare the obstetric outcome of pregnancy in teenagers and older women in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study conducted in Government Medical College, Manjeri, Malappuram, Kerala, India for a period of three months from March 2017 to May 2017. This is a teaching hospital with annual delivery rate of around 3500. Obstetric outcome of young mothers in the age group 18 -19 years were compared to older women (20-38 years delivering in the same hospital. A total of 843 deliveries were considered, out of which 87 belonged to teenage group. They were compared in terms of social and educational data, age, number of pregnancy, antenatal care, complications, mode of delivery, birth weight, episiotomy and perineal tears. RESULTS The incidence of teenage pregnancy was fairly high. (10.3% Most of them were in their first pregnancy. A significant number of teenage pregnant mothers (72.4% had completed higher secondary education as compared to (27.6% in older women. Contrary to many prior studies, teenage pregnancies showed less anaemia (6.9% versus 12% and lesser incidence of low birth weight babies in comparison to older women. Preterm birth was higher in teenage group (33.1% and incidence of hypertensive disorders and intrauterine growth

  1. Considerations about our approach to obstetric psychoprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, R; Volpe, B; Sichel, M P; Sandri, M; Sbrignadello, C; Fede, T

    1983-01-01

    Usually the term "obstetric psychoprophylaxis" refers to a specific method or technique. We prefer to consider it as a procedure that involves on one side the woman, the child and its family, and on the other the services entitled to give pre- and post-natal assistance. In order to realize this, a reformation of our methodological parameters and a critical analysis of the results obtained are required. In the courses of obstetric psychoprophylaxis that are held in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Padua we take into consideration the following themes: - Methodological approach - Professional training of the staff - Significance of psychosocial culture in the management of the pregnancy by the health services.

  2. The economic costs of intrapartum care in Tower Hamlets: A comparison between the cost of birth in a freestanding midwifery unit and hospital for women at low risk of obstetric complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Liz; Patel, Nishma; Keeler, Michelle; Rocca-Ihenacho, Lucia; Macfarlane, Alison J

    2017-02-01

    to compare the economic costs of intrapartum maternity care in an inner city area for 'low risk' women opting to give birth in a freestanding midwifery unit compared with those who chose birth in hospital. micro-costing of health service resources used in the intrapartum care of mothers and their babies during the period between admission and discharge, data extracted from clinical notes. the Barkantine Birth Centre, a freestanding midwifery unit and the Royal London Hospital's consultant-led obstetric unit, both run by the former Barts and the London NHS Trust in Tower Hamlets, a deprived inner city borough in east London, England, 2007-2010. maternity records of 333 women who were resident in Tower Hamlets and who satisfied the Trust's eligibility criteria for using the Birth Centre. Of these, 167 women started their intrapartum care at the Birth Centre and 166 started care at the Royal London Hospital. women who planned their birth at the Birth Centre experienced continuous intrapartum midwifery care, higher rates of spontaneous vaginal delivery, greater use of a birth pool, lower rates of epidural use, higher rates of established breastfeeding and a longer post-natal stay, compared with those who planned for care in the hospital. The total average cost per mother-baby dyad for care where mothers started their intrapartum care at the Birth Centre was £1296.23, approximately £850 per patient less than the average cost per mother and baby who received all their care at the Royal London Hospital. These costs reflect intrapartum throughput using bottom up costing per patient, from admission to discharge, including transfer, but excluding occupancy rates and the related running costs of the units. the study showed that intrapartum throughput in the Birth Centre could be considered cost-minimising when compared to hospital. Modelling the financial viability of midwifery units at a local level is important because it can inform the appropriate provision of these

  3. Incidence and predictors of obstetric and fetal complications in women with structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hagen, Iris M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Donvito, Valentina; Liptai, Csilla; Morissens, Marielle; Murphy, Daniel J; Galian, Laura; Bazargani, Nooshin Mohd; Cornette, Jérôme; Hall, Roger; Johnson, Mark R

    2017-10-01

    Women with cardiac disease becoming pregnant have an increased risk of obstetric and fetal events. The aim of this study was to study the incidence of events, to validate the modified WHO (mWHO) risk classification and to search for event-specific predictors. The Registry Of Pregnancy And Cardiac disease is a worldwide ongoing prospective registry that has enrolled 2742 pregnancies in women with known cardiac disease (mainly congenital and valvular disease) before pregnancy, from January 2008 up to April 2014. Mean age was 28.2±5.5 years, 45% were nulliparous and 33.3% came from emerging countries. Obstetric events occurred in 231 pregnancies (8.4%). Fetal events occurred in 651 pregnancies (23.7%). The mWHO classification performed poorly in predicting obstetric (c-statistic=0.601) and fetal events (c-statistic=0.561). In multivariable analysis, aortic valve disease was associated with pre-eclampsia (OR=2.6, 95%CI=1.3 to 5.5). Congenital heart disease (CHD) was associated with spontaneous preterm birth (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.2 to 2.7). Complex CHD was associated with small-for-gestational-age neonates (OR=2.3, 95%CI=1.5 to 3.5). Multiple gestation was the strongest predictor of fetal events: fetal/neonatal death (OR=6.4, 95%CI=2.5 to 16), spontaneous preterm birth (OR=5.3, 95%CI=2.5 to 11) and small-for-gestational age (OR=5.0, 95%CI=2.5 to 9.8). The mWHO classification is not suitable for prediction of obstetric and fetal events in women with cardiac disease. Maternal complex CHD was independently associated with fetal growth restriction and aortic valve disease with pre-eclampsia, potentially offering an insight into the pathophysiology of these pregnancy complications. The increased rates of adverse obstetric and fetal outcomes in women with pre-existing heart disease should be highlighted during counselling. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  4. Epidemiology and outcomes of pregnancy and obstetric complications in trauma in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaloglu, Emir; McDonnell, Declan; Chu, Justin; Lecky, Fiona; Porter, Keith

    2016-01-01

    To understand the epidemiology of pregnancy and obstetric complications encountered in the management of pregnant trauma patients. Retrospective analysis of national trauma registry for recording of pregnancy status or obstetric complication in cases of trauma. Sub-division of patient cohort by severity of trauma and stage of pregnancy. Comparison of data sets between pregnant trauma patients and age-matched non-pregnant female trauma patients to determine patterns of injury and impact upon clinical outcomes. National registry data for the United Kingdom. For the five year period between 2009 and 2014, a total of 15,140 female patients, aged between 15 years old and 50 years old were identified within the trauma registry. A record of pregnancy was identified in 173 patients (1.14%) from within this cohort. Mechanisms of injury within the cohort of pregnant trauma patients saw increased rate of vehicular collision and interpersonal violence, especially penetrating trauma. Higher abbreviated injury scores were recorded for the abdominal region in pregnancy than in the non-pregnant cohort. Maternal mortality rates were seen to be higher, when compared with the non-pregnant trauma patient. Foetal survival rate from this series was 56% following trauma. Foetal death in pregnant trauma patients most frequently occurred in the 2nd trimester. No cases of isolated foetal survival were recorded following maternal trauma. Trauma to pregnant patients is rare in the United Kingdom, encountered in 1% of female trauma patients of child bearing age. Observations in altered mechanisms of injury and clinical outcomes were recorded. This provides useful information regarding the clinical management of pregnant trauma patients and offers potential areas to investigate to optimise their care, as well as to focus injury prevention measures. IV--Case series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The sonographic appearance and obstetric management of placenta accreta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Charleen Sze-yan; Chan, Ben Chong-pun

    2012-01-01

    Placenta accreta is a condition of abnormal placental implantation in which the placental tissue invades beyond the decidua basalis. It may invade into or even through the myometrium and adjacent organs, such as the urinary bladder. The incidence has been rising in recent years. It is one of the important obstetric complications nowadays, leading to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. In the past, this condition was often diagnosed at the time of delivery when massive and unexpected hemorrhage occurred. Hysterectomy, associated with significant physical and psychological consequences, was usually the only management option. As more obstetricians have become aware of this condition, early identification with antenatal imaging diagnostic technology has become possible. Ultrasound scan plays an important role in the antenatal diagnosis. Various sonographic features with different specificity and sensitivity have been described in the literature. In equivocal cases, magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful. With such information, more accurate counseling can be offered to the mothers and their families before delivery. The delivery can also be arranged at a favorable time and in an institution where multidisciplinary support is available. Input from a hematologist, interventional radiologist, intensive care physician, urology surgeon, and/or other specialist are desirable. Apart from hysterectomy, various forms of conservative management can also be considered when the diagnosis is made prior to delivery. Fertility can therefore be preserved. After delivery, with or without hysterectomy performed, psychological support to the mothers and their families is essential. PMID:23239929

  6. Current obstetrical practice and umbilical cord prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, I M; Mercer, B M; Sibai, B M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of current obstetrical practice to the occurrence and complications of umbilical cord prolapse. Maternal and neonatal charts of 87 pregnancies complicated by true umbilical cord prolapse during a 5-year period were reviewed. Twin gestation and noncephalic presentations were common features (14 and 41%, respectively). Eighty-nine percent (77) of infants were delivered by cesarean section of which 29% were classical and 88% were primary. The mean gestational age at delivery was 34.0 +/- 6.0 weeks, and the mean birth weight was 2318 +/- 1159 g. Obstetrical intervention preceded 41 (47%) cases (the obstetrical intervention group): amniotomy (9), scalp electrode application (4), intrauterine pressure catheter insertion (6), attempted external cephalic version (7), expectant management of preterm premature rupture of membranes (14), manual rotation of the fetal head (1), and amnioreduction (1). There were 11 perinatal deaths. Thirty-three percent of the infants (32) had a 5-min Apgar score < 7 and 34% had a cord pH < 7.20. Neonatal seizures, intracerebral hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, hyaline membrane disease, persistent fetal circulation, sepsis, assisted ventilation, and perinatal mortality were comparable in the "obstetrical intervention" and "no-intervention" groups. Most of the neonatal complications occurred in infants < 32 weeks' gestation. We conclude that obstetrical intervention contributes to 47% of umbilical cord prolapse cases; however, it does not increase the associated perinatal morbidity and mortality.

  7. What European gynaecologists need to master : Consensus on medical expertise outcomes of pan-European postgraduate training in obstetrics & gynaecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Tancredi, Annalisa; Goverde, Angelique J; Velebil, Petr; Feyereisl, Jaroslav; Benedetto, Chiara; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    OBJECTIVE: European harmonisation of training standards in postgraduate medical education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology is needed because of the increasing mobility of medical specialists. Harmonisation of training will provide quality assurance of training and promote high quality care throughout

  8. Intimate Partner Violence Against Pregnant Women: Study About The Repercussions On The Obstetric And Neonatal Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driéli Pacheco Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This observational, descriptive and analytic study aimed to identify the prevalence of IPV cases among pregnant women and classify them according to the type and frequency; identify the obstetric and neonatal results and their associations with the intimate partner violence (IPV occurrence in the current pregnancy. It was developed with 232 pregnant women who had prenatal care at a public maternity hospital. Data were collected via structured interview and in the patients’ charts and analyzed through the statistic software SAS® 9.0. Among the participants, 15.5% suffered IPV during pregnancy, among that 14.7% suffered psychological violence, 5.2% physical violence and 0.4% sexual violence. Women who did not desire the pregnancy had more chances of suffering IPV (p<0.00; OR=4.32 and 95% CI [1.77 – 10.54]. With regards to the obstetric and neonatal repercussions, there was no statistical association between the variables investigated. Thus, for the study participants there were no negative obstetric and neonatal repercussions related to IPV during pregnancy.

  9. Exploring the effectiveness of obstetrics and gynecology information systems in hospitals of a developing country: A qualitative content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Babamohamadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrics and gynecology information systems are designed to replace paper charts, interact with other clinical wards of hospital, and to better care for patients. This qualitative study was performed to explore the perception of midwives about the effectiveness of information systems. In this qualitative study, data were collected through semistructured and in-depth interviews and analyzed by content analysis and constant comparison method. Participants were 15 midwives from obstetrics and gynecology units of affiliated hospitals of Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Purposeful sampling method was used and continued until data saturation. The several themes that emerged from the interviews were divided into strength and weak points. Strength points included the facilitating the recording of information, reduction of costs and time, and the weakness points were repetition of tasks, low computer literacy of the staff, system restrictions on recording and editing, the unavailability of system and reduced the role of midwives in patient care. Midwives were faced with challenges in the use of information systems indicating the lack of quality of the information system. It seems that reinforcing strength points and resolving hardware and software problems can increase obstetrics and gynecology staff’s acceptance of this information system and reduce their cultural resistance toward it.

  10. 21st European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The 21st European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology took place in Antwerp 5-8 May 2010. The congress provided the participants with an overview of recent scientific and clinical developments throughout the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, and these are summarized in this article....

  11. Students’ Scientific Circle of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Polishchuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The students’ scientific circle is the kind of teaching obstetrics and gynaecology in a higher medical institution. The circle is an elective form of learning that allows the students to get deeper knowledge of a subject and to perfect themselves in the issues of diagnostics in obstetrics and gynaecology as well as to acquaint themselves with basic medical techniques. It helps identify students who are capable of scientific research and allows the students to improve their ability to analytical perception of professional information, the ability to present it to the audience, ask and answer the questions publicly. The article presents the results of practical and research activities of obstetric and gynaecologic section of the students’ scientific circle of Ivano-Frankivsk National Medical University.

  12. Training initiatives for essential obstetric care in developing countries: a 'state of the art' review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, S; Murray, S F

    2000-12-01

    Increased international awareness of the need to provide accessible essential or emergency obstetric and newborn care in developing countries has resulted in the recognition of new training needs and in a number of new initiatives to meet those needs. This paper reviews experience in this area so far. The first section deals with some of the different educational approaches and teaching methods that have now been employed, ranging from the traditional untheorized 'chalk and talk', to competency-based training, to theories of adult learning, problem solving and transferable skills. The second section describes a range of different types of indicators and data sources (learner assessments, user and community assessments, trainer assessments and institutional data) that have been used in the assessment of the effectiveness of such training. The final section of the paper draws together some of the lessons. It considers evaluation design issues such as the inclusion of medium and long term evaluation, the importance of methods that allow for the detection of iatrogenic effects of training, and the roles of community randomized trials and 'before, during and after' studies. Issues identified for the future include comparative work, how to keep training affordable, and where training ought to lie on the continuum between straightforward technical skills acquisition and the more complex learning processes required for demanding professional work.

  13. Measures of reducing obstetric emergencies hysterectomy incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guo-ping; Wang, Bao-lian; Wang, Yan-hong

    2016-03-01

    To study the obstetric emergency hysterectomy which can reduce the incidence of measures. In maternity of Xinxiang Central Hospital, the total number of deliveries cases has been up to 50,526 in 20 years, of which 48 cases were retrospectively analyzed for the clinical data of Emergency uterine surgery cases. Cases underwent obstetric emergency hysterectomy accounted for 0.095% of total deliveries (48/50 526), in which 11 cases of vaginal delivery, 37 cases of cesarean section. The indications for surgery: 27 cases were cased by placental factors accounted for 56.25%; 14 cases of uterine inertia, accounting for 29.17%; uterine rupture in 4 cases, accounting for 8.33%; 3 cases of coagulopathy, accounting for 6.25%. Where the maternal placental factors hysterectomy is the most common (69.70%, 23/33) and the predominant factor is early maternal uterine inertia (60.00%, 9/15). There are 74.09% (20/27) of patients with placental abnormalities history of previous cesarean section or uterine surgery. The major risk factors leading to obstetric emergency hysterectomy is placental factors. Preventing the occurrence of placental abnormalities planting actively can effectively reduce the rate of obstetric hysterectomy.

  14. The Rural Obstetric Workforce in US Hospitals: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Casey, Michelle M.; Hung, Peiyin; Han, Xinxin; Prasad, Shailendra; Moscovice, Ira S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the types and combinations of clinicians who are delivering babies in rural hospitals, their employment status, the relationship between hospital birth volume and staffing models, and the staffing challenges faced by rural hospitals. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of 306 rural hospitals in 9 states: Colorado, Iowa, Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, from November 2013-March 2014 to assess their obstetric workforce. Bivariate associations between hospitals’ annual birth volume and obstetric workforce characteristics were examined, as well as qualitative analysis of workforce changes and staffing challenges. Findings Hospitals with lower birth volume (< 240 births per year) are more likely to have family physicians and general surgeons attending deliveries, while those with a higher birth volume more frequently have obstetricians and midwives attending deliveries. Reported staffing challenges include scheduling, training, census fluctuation, recruitment and retention, and intra-hospital relationships. Conclusions Individual hospitals working in isolation may struggle to address staffing challenges. Federal and state policy makers, regional collaboratives, and health care delivery systems can facilitate solutions through programs such as telehealth, simulation training, and interprofessional education. PMID:25808202

  15. The effect of implementation strength of basic emergency obstetric and newborn care (BEmONC) on facility deliveries and the met need for BEmONC at the primary health care level in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruneh, Gizachew Tadele; Karim, Ali Mehryar; Avan, Bilal Iqbal; Zemichael, Nebreed Fesseha; Wereta, Tewabech Gebrekiristos; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi; Keweti, Zinar Nebi; Kebede, Zewditu; Betemariam, Wuleta Aklilu

    2018-05-02

    Basic emergency obstetric and newborn care (BEmONC) is a primary health care level initiative promoted in low- and middle-income countries to reduce maternal and newborn mortality. Tailored support, including BEmONC training to providers, mentoring and monitoring through supportive supervision, provision of equipment and supplies, strengthening referral linkages, and improving infection-prevention practice, was provided in a package of interventions to 134 health centers, covering 91 rural districts of Ethiopia to ensure timely BEmONC care. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in measuring program implementation strength to evaluate public health gains. To assess the effectiveness of the BEmONC initiative, this study measures its implementation strength and examines the effect of its variability across intervention health centers on the rate of facility deliveries and the met need for BEmONC. Before and after data from 134 intervention health centers were collected in April 2013 and July 2015. A BEmONC implementation strength index was constructed from seven input and five process indicators measured through observation, record review, and provider interview; while facility delivery rate and the met need for expected obstetric complications were measured from service statistics and patient records. We estimated the dose-response relationships between outcome and explanatory variables of interest using regression methods. The BEmONC implementation strength index score, which ranged between zero and 10, increased statistically significantly from 4.3 at baseline to 6.7 at follow-up (p < .05). Correspondingly, the health center delivery rate significantly increased from 24% to 56% (p < .05). There was a dose-response relationship between the explanatory and outcome variables. For every unit increase in BEmONC implementation strength score there was a corresponding average of 4.5 percentage points (95% confidence interval: 2.1-6.9) increase in

  16. Who delivers where? The effect of obstetric risk on facility delivery in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Sandra; Gon, Giorgia; Cavallaro, Francesca L; Graham, Wendy; Woodd, Susannah

    2017-09-01

    Skilled attendance at birth is key for the survival of pregnant women. This study investigates whether women at increased risk of maternal and newborn complications in four East African countries are more likely to deliver in a health facility than those at lower risk. Demographic and Health Survey data for Kenya 2014, Rwanda 2014-15, Tanzania 2015-16 and Uganda 2011 were used to study women with a live birth in the three years preceding the survey. A three-level obstetric risk index was created using known risk factors. Generalised linear Poisson regression was used to investigate the association between obstetric risk and facility delivery. We analysed data from 13 119 women across the four countries of whom 42-45% were considered at medium risk and 12-17% at high risk, and the remainder were at low risk. In Rwanda, 93% of all women delivered in facilities but this was lower (59-66%) in the other three countries. There was no association between a woman's obstetric risk level and her place of delivery in any country; greater wealth and more education were, however, independently strongly associated with facility delivery. In four East African countries, women at higher obstetric risk were not more likely to deliver in a facility than those with lower risk. This calls for a renewed focus on antenatal risk screening and improved communication on birth planning to ensure women with an increased chance of maternal and newborn complications are supported to deliver in facilities with skilled care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Comparing the Efficacy of Triple Nerve Transfers with Nerve Graft Reconstruction in Upper Trunk Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kathleen M; Power, Hollie A; Olson, Jaret L; Morhart, Michael J; Harrop, A Robertson; Watt, M Joe; Chan, K Ming

    2017-10-01

    Upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury can cause profound shoulder and elbow dysfunction. Although neuroma excision with interpositional sural nerve grafting is the current gold standard, distal nerve transfers have a number of potential advantages. The goal of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes and health care costs between nerve grafting and distal nerve transfers in children with upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury. In this prospective cohort study, children who underwent triple nerve transfers were followed with the Active Movement Scale for 2 years. Their outcomes were compared to those of children who underwent nerve graft reconstruction. To assess health care use, a cost analysis was also performed. Twelve patients who underwent nerve grafting were compared to 14 patients who underwent triple nerve transfers. Both groups had similar baseline characteristics and showed improved shoulder and elbow function following surgery. However, the nerve transfer group displayed significantly greater improvement in shoulder external rotation and forearm supination 2 years after surgery (p The operative time and length of hospital stay were significantly lower (p the overall cost was approximately 50 percent less in the nerve transfer group. Triple nerve transfer for upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury is a feasible option, with better functional shoulder external rotation and forearm supination, faster recovery, and lower cost compared with traditional nerve graft reconstruction. Therapeutic, II.

  18. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Núñez J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jónathan Hernández-Núñez,1 Magel Valdés-Yong21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Alberto Fernández-Valdés, Santa Cruz del Norte, Mayabeque, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Luis Díaz Soto, Habana del Este, La Habana, CubaAbstract: The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.Keywords: proteomic techniques, obstetrics, diagnosis, prediction

  19. Reintegration of Women Post Obstetric Fistula Repair: Experience of Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Kimberly; Richter, Solina; Vallianatos, Helen; Thornton, Lois

    2017-01-01

    In northern Ghana, families traditionally function as the main provider of care. The role of family, however, is becoming increasingly challenged with the social shifts in Ghanaian culture moving from extended kinship to nuclear households. This has implications for the care of women post obstetric fistula (OF) repair and their family members who assist them to integrate back into their lives prior to developing the condition. This research is part of a larger critical ethnographic study which explores a culture of reintegration. For this article, we draw attention to the findings related to the experience of family caregivers who care for women post OF repair in northern Ghana. It is suggested that although family caregivers are pleased to have their family member return home, there are many unanticipated physical, emotional, and economic challenges. Findings lead to recommendations for enhancing the reintegration process and the need for adequate caregiving support.

  20. Abdominal Fascial Closure in Obstetrics: Comparison of Outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Midline laparotomies are in common use in obstetrics for caesarean section and other obstetric laparotomies. Current challenges in this surgical approach include the best approach to the repair of the abdominal wall incision, the optimal suture material for its fascial repair and poor cosmetic outcome of the scar ...

  1. A Contemporary Analysis of Medicolegal Issues in Obstetric Anesthesia Between 2005 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, Vesela P; Brovman, Ethan Y; Greenberg, Penny; Song, Ellen; Palanisamy, Arvind; Urman, Richard D

    2018-05-10

    Detailed reviews of closed malpractice claims have provided insights into the most common events resulting in litigation and helped improve anesthesia care. In the past 10 years, there have been multiple safety advancements in the practice of obstetric anesthesia. We investigated the relationship among contributing factors, patient injuries, and legal outcome by analyzing a contemporary cohort of closed malpractice claims where obstetric anesthesiology was the principal defendant. The Controlled Risk Insurance Company (CRICO) is the captive medical liability insurer of the Harvard Medical Institutions that, in collaboration with other insurance companies and health care entities, contributes to the Comparative Benchmark System database for research purposes. We reviewed all (N = 106) closed malpractice cases related to obstetric anesthesia between 2005 and 2015 and compared the following classes of injury: maternal death and brain injury, neonatal death and brain injury, maternal nerve injury, and maternal major and minor injury. In addition, settled claims were compared to the cases that did not receive payment. χ, analysis of variance, Student t test, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for comparison between the different classes of injury. The largest number of claims, 54.7%, involved maternal nerve injury; 77.6% of these claims did not receive any indemnity payment. Cases involving maternal death or brain injury comprised 15.1% of all cases and were more likely to receive payment, especially in the high range (P = .02). The most common causes of maternal death or brain injury were high neuraxial blocks, embolic events, and failed intubation. Claims for maternal major and minor injury were least likely to receive payment (P = .02) and were most commonly (34.8%) associated with only emotional injury. Compared to the dropped/denied/dismissed claims, settled claims more frequently involved general anesthesia (P = .03), were associated with delays in care (P = .005

  2. Increasing Number and Proportion of Adverse Obstetrical Outcomes among Women Living with HIV in the Ottawa Area: A 20-Year Clinical Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Buchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence and associated risks with adverse obstetrical outcomes among women living with HIV are not well measured. The objective of this study was to longitudinally investigate the prevalence and correlates of adverse obstetrical outcomes among women with HIV. Methods. This 20-year (1990–2010 clinical case series assessed the prevalence of adverse obstetrical outcomes among pregnant women with HIV receiving care at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH. General estimating equation modeling was used to identify factors independently associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes, while controlling for year of childbirth clustering. Results. At TOH, there were 127 deliveries among 94 women (1990–2010: 22 preterm births, 9 births with low birth weight, 12 births small for gestational age, and 4 stillbirths. Per year, the odds of adverse obstetrical outcomes increased by 15% (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.03–1.30. Psychiatric illness (AOR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.12–6.24, teen pregnancy (AOR: 3.35, 95% CI: 1.04–1.46, and recent immigrant status (AOR: 7.24, 95% CI: 1.30–40.28 were the strongest correlates of adverse obstetrical outcomes. Conclusions. The increasing number and proportion of adverse obstetrical outcomes among pregnant women with HIV over the past 20 years highlight the need for social supports and maternal and child health interventions, especially among adolescents, new immigrants, and those with a history of mental illness.

  3. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sepsis. (9) Any other obstetrical condition that, by definition, constitutes an emergency circumstance. ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency care requirements. 732.16 Section 732... MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical and Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.16 Emergency care requirements...

  4. Self-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, N E

    2010-10-01

    Economic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre.

  5. [Obstetrical APS: Is there a place for additional treatment to aspirin-heparin combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinian, A; Kayem, G; Cohen, J; Carbillon, L; Abisror, N; Josselin-Mahr, L; Bornes, M; Fain, O

    2017-01-01

    Obstetrical APS is defined by thrombosis and/or obstetrical morbidity associated with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies. The aspirin and low molecular weighted heparin combination dramatically improved obstetrical outcome in APS patients. Several factors could be associated with obstetrical prognosis, as previous history of thrombosis, associated SLE, the presence of lupus anticoagulant and triple positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies. Obstetrical APS with isolated recurrent miscarriages is mostly associated with isolated anticardiolipids antibodies and have better obstetrical outcome. The pregnancy loss despite aspirin and heparin combination define the refractory obstetrical APS, and the prevalence could be estimated to 20-39%. Several other treatments have been used in small and open labeled studies, as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, plasma exchanges and hydroxychloroquine to improve the obstetrical outcome. Some other drugs as eculizumab and statins could also have physiopathological rational, but studies are necessary to define the place of these various drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Addressing Obstetrical Challenges at 12 Rural Ugandan Health Facilities: Findings from an International Ultrasound and Skills Development Training for Midwives in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnevey, Christina; Kawooya, Michael; Tumwesigye, Tonny; Douglas, David; Sams, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Like much of Sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda is facing significant maternal and fetal health challenges. Despite the fact that the majority of the Uganda population is rural and the major obstetrical care provider is the midwife, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding rural health facilities' and midwives' knowledge of ultrasound technology and perspectives on important maternal health issues such as deficiencies in prenatal services. A survey of the current antenatal diagnostic and management capabilities of midwives at 12 rural Ugandan health facilities was performed as part of an international program initiated to provide ultrasound machines and formal training in their use to midwives at antenatal care clinics. The survey revealed that the majority of pregnant women attend less than the recommended minimum of four antenatal care visits. There were significant knowledge deficits in many prenatal conditions that require ultrasound for early diagnosis, such as placenta previa and macrosomia. The cost of providing ultrasound machines and formal training to 12 midwives was $6,888 per powered rural health facility and $8,288 for non-powered rural health facilities in which solar power was required to maintain ultrasound. In order to more successfully meet Millennium Development Goal 4 (reduce child mortality), 5 (improve maternal health) and 6 (combat HIV) through decreasing maternal to child transmission of HIV, the primary healthcare provider, which is the midwife in Uganda, must be competent at the diagnosis and management of a wide spectrum of obstetrical challenges. A trained ultrasound-based approach to obstetrical care is a cost effective method to take on these goals.

  7. Knowledge of obstetric fistula prevention amongst young women in urban and rural Burkina Faso: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aduragbemi O Banke-Thomas

    Full Text Available Obstetric fistula is a sequela of complicated labour, which, if untreated, leaves women handicapped and socially excluded. In Burkina Faso, incidence of obstetric fistula is 6/10,000 cases amongst gynaecological patients, with more patients affected in rural areas. This study aims to evaluate knowledge on obstetric fistula among young women in a health district of Burkina Faso, comparing rural and urban communities. This cross-sectional study employed multi-stage sampling to include 121 women aged 18-20 years residing in urban and rural communities of Boromo health district. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to compare differences between the groups and to identify predictors of observed knowledge levels. Rural women were more likely to be married (p<0.000 and had higher propensity to teenage pregnancy (p=0.006. The survey showed overall poor obstetric fistula awareness (36%. Rural residents were less likely to have adequate preventive knowledge than urban residents [OR=0.35 (95%-CI, 0.16-0.79]. This effect was only slightly explained by lack of education [OR=0.41 (95%-CI, 0.18-0.93] and only slightly underestimated due to previous pregnancy [OR=0.27 (95%-CI, 0.09-0.79]. Media were the most popular source of awareness amongst urban young women in contrast to their rural counterparts (68% vs. 23%. Most rural young women became 'aware' through word-of-mouth (68% vs. 14%. All participants agreed that the hospital was safer for emergency obstetric care, but only 11.0% believed they could face pregnancy complications that would require emergency treatment. There is urgent need to increase emphasis on neglected health messages such as the risks of obstetric fistula. In this respect, obstetric fistula prevention programs need to be adapted to local contexts, whether urban or rural, and multi-sectoral efforts need to be exerted to maximise use of other sectoral resources and platforms, including existing routine

  8. Why older adults may decline offers of post-acute care services: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Justine S; Ritter, Ashley Z; Flores, Emilia J; Nock, Rebecca H; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    The most common post-acute care (PAC) services available to patients after hospital discharge include home care, skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, inpatient rehabilitation, and hospice. Patients who need PAC and receive services have better outcomes, however almost one-third of those offered services decline. Little research exists on PAC decision-making and why patients may decline services. This qualitative descriptive study explored the responses of thirty older adults to the question: "Can you, from the patient point of view, tell me why someone would not want post hospital care?" Three themes emerged. Participants may decline due to 1) previous negative experiences with PAC, or 2) a preference to be home. Some participants stated, "I'd be there" and would not decline services. Participants also discussed 3) why other patients might decline PAC which included patients' past experiences, lack of understanding/preconceived ideas, and preferences. Clinical implications include assessing patients' knowledge and experience before providing recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adverse obstetric outcomes during delivery hospitalizations complicated by suicidal behavior among US pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Smoller, Jordan W; Avillach, Paul; Cai, Tianxi; Williams, Michelle A

    2018-01-01

    The effects of suicidal behavior on obstetric outcomes remain dangerously unquantified. We sought to report on the risk of adverse obstetric outcomes for US women with suicidal behavior at the time of delivery. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of delivery hospitalizations from 2007-2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. From the same hospitalization record, International Classification of Diseases codes were used to identify suicidal behavior and adverse obstetric outcomes. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using logistic regression. Of the 23,507,597 delivery hospitalizations, 2,180 were complicated by suicidal behavior. Women with suicidal behavior were at a heightened risk for outcomes including antepartum hemorrhage (aOR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.47-3.74), placental abruption (aOR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.17-3.66), postpartum hemorrhage (aOR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.61-3.37), premature delivery (aOR = 3.08; 95% CI: 2.43-3.90), stillbirth (aOR = 10.73; 95% CI: 7.41-15.56), poor fetal growth (aOR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10-2.62), and fetal anomalies (aOR = 3.72; 95% CI: 2.57-5.40). No significant association was observed for maternal suicidal behavior with cesarean delivery, induction of labor, premature rupture of membranes, excessive fetal growth, and fetal distress. The mean length of stay was longer for women with suicidal behavior. During delivery hospitalization, women with suicidal behavior are at increased risk for many adverse obstetric outcomes, highlighting the importance of screening for and providing appropriate clinical care for women with suicidal behavior during pregnancy.

  10. Reintegration of Women Post Obstetric Fistula Repair: Experience of Family Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Jarvis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In northern Ghana, families traditionally function as the main provider of care. The role of family, however, is becoming increasingly challenged with the social shifts in Ghanaian culture moving from extended kinship to nuclear households. This has implications for the care of women post obstetric fistula (OF repair and their family members who assist them to integrate back into their lives prior to developing the condition. This research is part of a larger critical ethnographic study which explores a culture of reintegration. For this article, we draw attention to the findings related to the experience of family caregivers who care for women post OF repair in northern Ghana. It is suggested that although family caregivers are pleased to have their family member return home, there are many unanticipated physical, emotional, and economic challenges. Findings lead to recommendations for enhancing the reintegration process and the need for adequate caregiving support.

  11. Understanding motivators and barriers of hospital-based obstetric and pediatric health care worker influenza vaccination programs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Jane L; Shrestha, Lexa; Collins, Joanne E; Marshall, Helen S

    2016-07-02

    Understanding motivators and barriers of health care worker (HCW) vaccination programs is important for determining strategies to improve uptake. The aim of this study was to explore key drivers and HCW decision making related to recommended vaccines and seasonal influenza vaccination programs. We used a qualitative approach with semi-structured one-to-one interviews with 22 HCWs working at a tertiary pediatric and obstetric hospital in South Australia. A thematic analysis and coding were used to examine data. Key motivators that emerged included: sense of responsibility, convenience and ease of access, rotating trolleys, the influenza vaccine being free, basic knowledge about influenza and influenza vaccination, peer pressure, personal values and family culture, as well as the culture of support for the program. Personal decisions were the major barrier to HCWs receiving the influenza vaccine which were predominantly self-protection related or due to previous experience or fear of adverse reactions. Other barriers that emerged were misconceptions about the influenza vaccine, needle phobia and privacy concerns. This study identified both attitudinal and structural barriers that could be addressed to improve uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine.

  12. Ultrasound in obstetric anaesthesia: a review of current applications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ecimovic, P

    2010-07-01

    Ultrasound equipment is increasingly used by non-radiologists to perform interventional techniques and for diagnostic evaluation. Equipment is becoming more portable and durable, with easier user-interface and software enhancement to improve image quality. While obstetric utilisation of ultrasound for fetal assessment has developed over more than 40years, the same technology has not found a widespread role in obstetric anaesthesia. Within the broader specialty of anaesthesia; vascular access, cardiac imaging and regional anaesthesia are the areas in which ultrasound is becoming increasingly established. In addition to ultrasound for neuraxial blocks, these other clinical applications may be of value in obstetric anaesthesia practice.

  13. The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmorn, Lotte B.; Petersen, Kathrine B; Jakobsson, Maija

    2015-01-01

    by using International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision codes on diagnoses and the Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee Classification of Surgical Procedure codes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of the studied complications and possible risk factors among parturients in the Nordic countries. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: To assess the rates and characteristics of women with complete uterine rupture, abnormally invasive placenta, peripartum hysterectomy, and severe blood loss at delivery in the Nordic countries. DESIGN: Prospective, Nordic collaboration. SETTING: The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study...... (NOSS) collected cases of severe obstetric complications in the Nordic countries from April 2009 to August 2012. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Cases were reported by clinicians at the Nordic maternity units and retrieved from medical birth registers, hospital discharge registers, and transfusion databases...

  14. QUARITE (quality of care, risk management and technology in obstetrics): a cluster-randomized trial of a multifaceted intervention to improve emergency obstetric care in Senegal and Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alexandre; Fournier, Pierre; Fraser, William; Haddad, Slim; Traore, Mamadou; Diop, Idrissa; Gueye, Mouhamadou; Gaye, Alioune; Couturier, François; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Beaudoin, François; Lalonde, André; Hatem, Marie; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2009-09-18

    Maternal and perinatal mortality are major problems for which progress in sub-Saharan Africa has been inadequate, even though childbirth services are available, even in the poorest countries. Reducing them is the aim of two of the main Millennium Development Goals. Many initiatives have been undertaken to remedy this situation, such as the Advances in Labour and Risk Management (ALARM) International Program, whose purpose is to improve the quality of obstetric services in low-income countries. However, few interventions have been evaluated, in this context, using rigorous methods for analyzing effectiveness in terms of health outcomes. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the ALARM International Program (AIP) in reducing maternal mortality in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Secondary goals include evaluation of the relationships between effectiveness and resource availability, service organization, medical practices, and satisfaction among health personnel. This is an international, multi-centre, controlled cluster-randomized trial of a complex intervention. The intervention is based on the concept of evidence-based practice and on a combination of two approaches aimed at improving the performance of health personnel: 1) Educational outreach visits; and 2) the implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews. The unit of intervention is the public health facility equipped with a functional operating room. On the basis of consent provided by hospital authorities, 46 centres out of 49 eligible were selected in Mali and Senegal. Using randomization stratified by country and by level of care, 23 centres will be allocated to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. The intervention will last two years. It will be preceded by a pre-intervention one-year period for baseline data collection. A continuous clinical data collection system has been set up in all participating centres. This, along with the inventory of

  15. Blood transfusion in obstetrics: attitude and perceptions of pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstetrics haemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable maternal deaths worldwide. Blood transfusion is pivotal to death reduction, but are the women aware of its importance? Objectives: The study investigated the view of a population of pregnant women on obstetrics related blood transfusion. Methods: ...

  16. The role of interventional radiology in obstetric and gynaecology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed; Hon, Lye Quen; Upponi, Sara S.; Foley, Peter; Warakaulle, Dinuke R.; Uberoi, Raman

    2010-01-01

    Interventional radiology is continuing to reshape current practice in many specialties of clinical care. It is a relatively new and innovative branch of medicine in which physicians treat diseases non-operatively through small catheters guided to the target by fluoroscopic and other imaging modalities. The aim is to provide image-guided, minimally invasive alternatives to traditional surgical and medical procedures in suitable cohorts of patients. Procedures which previously required major surgery can now be performed by interventional radiologists, sometimes on an outpatient basis, with little patient discomfort. In this review, we highlight the importance of interventional radiology in treating a comprehensive range of obstetric and gynaecological pathologies.

  17. Care during labor and birth for the prevention of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths: a systematic review and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to estimate the effect of various childbirth care packages on neonatal mortality due to intrapartum-related events (“birth asphyxia”) in term babies for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Methods We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies or reviews of childbirth care packages as defined by United Nations norms (basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care, skilled care at birth). We also reviewed Traditional Birth Attendant (TBA) training. Data were abstracted into standard tables and quality assessed by adapted GRADE criteria. For interventions with low quality evidence, but strong GRADE recommendation for implementation, an expert Delphi consensus process was conducted to estimate cause-specific mortality effects. Results We identified evidence for the effect on perinatal/neonatal mortality of emergency obstetric care packages: 9 studies (8 observational, 1 quasi-experimental), and for skilled childbirth care: 10 studies (8 observational, 2 quasi-experimental). Studies were of low quality, but the GRADE recommendation for implementation is strong. Our Delphi process included 21 experts representing all WHO regions and achieved consensus on the reduction of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths by comprehensive emergency obstetric care (85%), basic emergency obstetric care (40%), and skilled birth care (25%). For TBA training we identified 2 meta-analyses and 9 studies reporting mortality effects (3 cRCT, 1 quasi-experimental, 5 observational). There was substantial between-study heterogeneity and the overall quality of evidence was low. Because the GRADE recommendation for TBA training is conditional on the context and region, the effect was not estimated through a Delphi or included in the LiST tool. Conclusion Evidence quality is rated low, partly because of challenges in undertaking RCTs for obstetric interventions, which are considered standard of care. Additional challenges for evidence interpretation

  18. Care during labor and birth for the prevention of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths: a systematic review and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Neil F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to estimate the effect of various childbirth care packages on neonatal mortality due to intrapartum-related events (“birth asphyxia” in term babies for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies or reviews of childbirth care packages as defined by United Nations norms (basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care, skilled care at birth. We also reviewed Traditional Birth Attendant (TBA training. Data were abstracted into standard tables and quality assessed by adapted GRADE criteria. For interventions with low quality evidence, but strong GRADE recommendation for implementation, an expert Delphi consensus process was conducted to estimate cause-specific mortality effects. Results We identified evidence for the effect on perinatal/neonatal mortality of emergency obstetric care packages: 9 studies (8 observational, 1 quasi-experimental, and for skilled childbirth care: 10 studies (8 observational, 2 quasi-experimental. Studies were of low quality, but the GRADE recommendation for implementation is strong. Our Delphi process included 21 experts representing all WHO regions and achieved consensus on the reduction of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths by comprehensive emergency obstetric care (85%, basic emergency obstetric care (40%, and skilled birth care (25%. For TBA training we identified 2 meta-analyses and 9 studies reporting mortality effects (3 cRCT, 1 quasi-experimental, 5 observational. There was substantial between-study heterogeneity and the overall quality of evidence was low. Because the GRADE recommendation for TBA training is conditional on the context and region, the effect was not estimated through a Delphi or included in the LiST tool. Conclusion Evidence quality is rated low, partly because of challenges in undertaking RCTs for obstetric interventions, which are considered standard of care. Additional challenges for

  19. The Pattern and Obstetric Outcome of Hypertensive Disorders of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is need for strengthening of communication and referral systems in the healthcare. KEY WORDS: Hypertensive disorders, pattern, obstetrics outcome. Erratum Note: Mbachu 1, Udigwe GO, Okafor CI, Umeonunihu OS, Ezeama C, Eleje GU on the article “The Pattern and Obstetric Outcome of Hypertensive Disorders of ...

  20. Retrospective cohort study of the effects of obesity in early pregnancy on maternal weight gain and obstetric outcomes in an obstetric population in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2013-08-01

    .63, abnormal Apgar scores (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.46–4.93, and newborn special care admissions (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.0–3.29.Conclusion: Early pregnancy obesity was associated with a wide range of adverse fetomaternal outcomes, and could be a genuine risk factor for increased pregnancy-related morbidity and/or mortality in this population. Interventions to reduce prepregnancy obesity could therefore be useful in this low-resource African setting.Keywords: obesity, early pregnancy, maternal weight gain, obstetric outcomes

  1. [Centralization in obstetrics: pros and cons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, V M; Ramb, S

    1996-01-01

    Possible advantages and disadvantages of a general centralization of German obstetric facilities are analysed in the study. The need for centralization of risk cases, especially premature births (regionalization) is pointed out. Centralization appears appropriate, since every fifth maternity unit in Germany (19.78%) has 300 or fewer deliveries per year. This one fifth of perinatal clinics accounts for 6.3% of all deliveries (N = 49450). There are appreciable differences between the old and new federal states (Bundesländer): in the recently acceded federal states, 48.7% of all perinatal clinics have deliveries of 300 and less per year. This group of perinatal clinics accounts for 29% of all deliveries in the new federal states. We have carried out a survey of the mother's attitude to centralization: out of 416 patients in the Detmold women's hospital whose mean age was 29.0 +/- 4.2 years, 90.4% were not in favor of general centralization of obstetrics. 43% were also against a centralization of risk cases (regionalization). 75% of the women surveyed objected to centralized obstetrics because of the 'possible absence of the family', the 'possible absence of students and trainees' (44.9%), the 'unfamiliarity with staff and premises' (41.8%) and 'fear of anonymity' (44.5%). The majority of all women (84.1%) did not want to have a drive more than 20 km to an obstetrics center. Fear of 'delivery in a taxi'(78.6%), the 'fear that the husband will come too late to the delivery' (65.4%) and that the 'overall course of the delivery might not be adequate for reasons of time'. The presence of a pediatrics department in conjunction with the perinatal clinic was rated very positively (93%). It is concluded from the data and further juridical considerations that centralization of risk cases (regionalization) is indispensable in the near future and that somewhat more further into the future decentralization should be carried out by closing obstetrics departments with substantially

  2. Maternal morbid obesity and obstetric outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to review pregnancy outcomes in morbidly obese women who delivered a baby weighing 500 g or more in a large tertiary referral university hospital in Europe. METHODS: Morbid obesity was defined as a BMI > or =40.0 kg\\/m2 (WHO). Only women whose BMI was calculated at their first antenatal visit were included. The obstetric out-comes were obtained from the hospital\\'s computerised database. RESULTS: The incidence of morbid obesity was 0.6% in 5,824 women. Morbidly obese women were older and were more likely to be multigravidas than women with a normal BMI. The pregnancy was complicated by hypertension in 35.8% and diabetes mellitus in 20.0% of women. Obstetric interventions were high, with an induction rate of 42.1% and a caesarean section rate of 45.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that maternal morbid obesity is associated with an alarmingly high incidence of medical complications and an increased level of obstetric interventions. Consideration should be given to developing specialised antenatal services for morbidly obese women. The results also highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of prepregnancy interventions in morbidly obese women.

  3. Obstetric complications and asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B; Pekkanen, J; Järvelin, M R

    2000-01-01

    Studies have shown that perinatal factors are associated with childhood asthma. The current analyses examined the association between obstetric complications and risk of asthma at the age of 7 years using a prospectively population-based birth cohort in northern Finland. Results indicated that obstetric complications were associated with a higher risk of asthma among children. Those children who were administered special procedures at birth, i.e., cesarean section, vacuum extraction, and other procedures, including use of forceps, manual auxiliary, and extraction breech, had an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for asthma of 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.92), 1.32 (95% CI 0.80-2.19), and 2.14 (95% CI 1.06-4.33), respectively, as compared to children who were delivered normally. Children who had a lower Apgar score at the first and the fifth minute after birth also had a higher risk as compared to those who had an Apgar score of 9-10. The results encourage further evaluation of the association between obstetric complications and risk of asthma among children in other populations, and further exploration of possible mechanisms underlying the association.

  4. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-01

    Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most ... for delivery from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 in obstetric ward of the Hospital. ... applying improved surgical techniques and improving infection prevention ...

  5. Obstetric interventions for babies born before 28 weeks of gestation in Europe: results of the MOSAIC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollée, L A A; Cuttini, M; Delmas, D

    2009-01-01

    to Intensive Care for Very Preterm Babies in Europe' (MOSAIC) project. POPULATION: All births from 22 to 29 weeks of gestation (n = 4146) in 2003, excluding terminations of pregnancy. METHODS: Comparison of three obstetric interventions (antenatal corticosteroids, antenatal transfer and caesarean section...... as a composite score of these three interventions. Outcomes included stillbirth, in-hospital mortality and intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) grades III and IV and/or periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). RESULTS: There were large differences between regions in interventions...... the composite intervention score and mortality. No association was observed at 26-27 weeks. For survivors at 24-25 weeks, the intervention score was associated with higher rates of BPD, but not with IVH or PVL. CONCLUSIONS: There are large differences between European regions in obstetric practices at the lower...

  6. Patient safety culture in obstetrics and gynecology and neonatology units: the nurses' and the midwives' opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeliene, Janina; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Nadisauskiene, Ruta Jolanta; Tameliene, Rasa; Kudreviciene, Ausrele; Nedzelskiene, Irena; Macijauskiene, Jurate

    2018-04-22

    Patients treated in health care facilities that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology are especially vulnerable. Large multidisciplinary teams of physicians, multiple invasive and noninvasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the use of advanced technologies increase the probability of adverse events. The evaluation of knowledge about patient safety culture among nurses and midwives working in such units and the identification of critical areas at a health care institution would reduce the number of adverse events and improve patient safety. The aim of the study was to evaluate the opinion of nurses and midwives working in clinical departments that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology about patient safety culture and to explore potential predictors for the overall perception of safety. We used the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) to evaluate nurses' and midwives' opinion about patient safety issues. The overall response rate in the survey was 100% (n = 233). The analysis of the dimensions of safety on the unit level showed that the respondents' most positive evaluations were in the Organizational Learning - Continuous Improvement (73.2%) and Feedback and Communication about Error (66.8%) dimensions, and the most negative evaluations in the Non-punitive Response to Error (33.5%) and Staffing (44.6%) dimensions. On the hospital level, the evaluation of the safety dimensions ranged between 41.4 and 56.8%. The percentage of positive responses in the outcome dimensions Frequency of Events Reported was 82.4%. We found a significant association between the outcome dimension Frequency of Events Reported and the Hospital Management Support for Patient Safety and Feedback and Communication about Error Dimensions. On the hospital level, the critical domains in health care facilities that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology were Teamwork

  7. Asymptomatic bacteriuria & obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy in north Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vaishali; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2013-04-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy if left untreated, may lead to acute pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight foetus, etc. Adequate and early treatment reduces the incidence of these obstetric complications. The present study was done to determine presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy. A prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital of north India. Pregnant women till 20 wk (n=371) and between 32 to 34 wk gestation (n=274) having no urinary complaints were included. Their mid stream urine sample was sent for culture and sensitivity. Women having > 10 [5] colony forming units/ml of single organism were diagnosed positive for ASB and treated. They were followed till delivery for obstetric outcome. Relative risk with 95% confidence interval was used to describe association between ASB and outcome of interest. ASB was found in 17 per cent pregnant women till 20 wk and in 16 per cent between 32 to 34 wk gestation. Increased incidence of preeclamptic toxaemia (PET) [RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-7.97], preterm premature rupture of membrane (PPROM)[RR 3.63, 45% CI 1.63-8.07], preterm labour (PTL) [RR 3.27, 95% CI 1.38-7.72], intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)[RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-79], low birth weight (LBW) [RR1.37, 95% CI 0.71-2.61] was seen in late detected women (32-34 wk) as compared to ASB negative women, whereas no significant difference was seen in early detected women (till 20 wk) as compared to ASB negative women. Early detection and treatment of ASB during pregnancy prevents complications like PET, IUGR, PTL, PPROM and LBW. Therefore, screening and treatment of ASB may be incorporated as routine antenatal care for safe motherhood and healthy newborn.

  8. Asymptomatic bacteriuria & obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy in north Indian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vaishali; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy if left untreated, may lead to acute pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight foetus, etc. Adequate and early treatment reduces the incidence of these obstetric complications. The present study was done to determine presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital of north India. Pregnant women till 20 wk (n=371) and between 32 to 34 wk gestation (n=274) having no urinary complaints were included. Their mid stream urine sample was sent for culture and sensitivity. Women having > 105 colony forming units/ml of single organism were diagnosed positive for ASB and treated. They were followed till delivery for obstetric outcome. Relative risk with 95% confidence interval was used to describe association between ASB and outcome of interest. Results: ASB was found in 17 per cent pregnant women till 20 wk and in 16 per cent between 32 to 34 wk gestation. Increased incidence of preeclamptic toxaemia (PET) [RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-7.97], preterm premature rupture of membrane (PPROM)[RR 3.63, 45% CI 1.63-8.07], preterm labour (PTL) [RR 3.27, 95% CI 1.38-7.72], intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)[RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-79], low birth weight (LBW) [RR1.37, 95% CI 0.71-2.61] was seen in late detected women (32-34 wk) as compared to ASB negative women, whereas no significant difference was seen in early detected women (till 20 wk) as compared to ASB negative women. Interpretation & conclusions: Early detection and treatment of ASB during pregnancy prevents complications like PET, IUGR, PTL, PPROM and LBW. Therefore, screening and treatment of ASB may be incorporated as routine antenatal care for safe motherhood and healthy newborn. PMID:23703344

  9. PROVISION OF THE DUTY SERVICE IN GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Takač

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duty service of gyecology and obstetrics in Slovenia is organized on the regional basis and consists of ten regional hospitals, two hospitals for gynecology and obstetrics and two university clinical centres. Methods: Heads of hospitals where duty service is performed, have answered the questionnaires about the doctors who perform duty service. Results: Specialists and trainees in gynecology and obstetrics perform duty service on 21 posts and on 6 on-call posts. In Slovenia there are 287 active specialists in gynecology and obstetrics. 139 (48.4% among them are active on the primary level (outpatient clinics and 148 (51.6% in the hospitals and both clinical centres. Among hospital gynecologists and obstetricians 54 (36.5% of them are older than 55 years. Conclusions: Duty service of gyecology and obstetrics in Slovenia does not meet legislation criteria regard- ing doctors’ work time. Adequate changes for increasing the number of available doctors for duty service are proposed.

  10. 'Safe', yet violent? Women's experiences with obstetric violence during hospital births in rural Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sreeparna; Mishra, Arima; Jacob, Suraj

    2017-11-03

    The majority of maternal health interventions in India focus on increasing institutional deliveries to reduce maternal mortality, typically by incentivising village health workers to register births and making conditional cash transfers to mothers for hospital births. Based on over 15 months of ethnographically informed fieldwork conducted between 2015 and 2017 in rural Assam, the Indian state with the highest recorded rate of maternal deaths, we find that while there has been an expansion in institutional deliveries, the experience of childbirth in government facilities is characterised by obstetric violence. Poor and indigenous women who disproportionately use state facilities report both tangible and symbolic violence including iatrogenic procedures such as episiotomies, in some instances done without anaesthesia, improper pelvic examinations, beating and verbal abuse during labour, with sometimes the shouting directed at accompanying relatives. While the expansion of institutional deliveries and access to emergency obstetric care is likely to reduce maternal mortality, in the absence of humane care during labour, institutional deliveries will continue to be characterised by the paradox of "safe" births (defined as simply reducing maternal deaths) and the deployment of violent practices during labour, underscoring the unequal and complex relationship between the bodies of the poor and reproductive governance.

  11. User fee exemptions and excessive household spending for normal delivery in Burkina Faso: the need for careful implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameur Amal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Parliament of Burkina Faso passed a policy to reduce the direct costs of obstetric services and neonatal care in the country’s health centres, aiming to lower the country’s high national maternal mortality and morbidity rates. Implementation was via a “partial exemption” covering 80% of the costs. In 2008 the German NGO HELP launched a pilot project in two health districts to eliminate the remaining 20% of user fees. Regardless of any exemptions, women giving birth in Burkina Faso’s health centres face additional expenses that often represent an additional barrier to accessing health services. We compared the total cost of giving birth in health centres offering partial exemption versus those with full exemption to assess the impact on additional out-of-pocket fees. Methods A case–control study was performed to compare medical expenses. Case subjects were women who gave birth in 12 health centres located in the Dori and Sebba districts, where HELP provided full fee exemption for obstetric services and neonatal care. Controls were from six health centres in the neighbouring Djibo district where a partial fee exemption was in place. A random sample of approximately 50 women per health centre was selected for a total of 870 women. Results There was an implementation gap regarding the full exemption for obstetric services and neonatal care. Only 1.1% of the sample from Sebba but 17.5% of the group from Dori had excessive spending on birth related costs, indicating that women who delivered in Sebba were much less exposed to excessive medical expenses than women from Dori. Additional out-of-pocket fees in the full exemption health districts took into account household ability to pay, with poorer women generally paying less. Conclusions We found that the elimination of fees for facility-based births benefits especially the poorest households. The existence of excessive spending related to direct costs of

  12. Humanitarian obstetric care for refugees of the Syrian war. The first 6 months of experience of Gynécologie Sans Frontières in Zaatari Refugee Camp (Jordan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchghoul, Hanane; Hornez, Emmanuel; Duval-Arnould, Xavier; Philippe, Henri-Jean; Nizard, Jacky

    2015-07-01

    To report the first 6 months of experience of a nongovernmental-organization-managed obstetric care unit in a war refugee camp, with problems encountered and solutions implemented. Prospective observational study of the maternity activity of Gynécologie Sans Frontières (GSF). GSF's maternity unit, in Zaatari camp (Jordan). All pregnant women among Syrian refugees who came to the unit for delivery. The GSF's maternity unit is a light structure built with three tents, permitting low-risk pregnancy care and childbirth. Emergency cesarean deliveries were performed in the Moroccan army field hospital. High-risk pregnancies were transferred to Al Mafraq or Amman Hospital (Jordan) after assessment. Delivery characteristics, indications for referral. From September 2012 to February 2013, 371 women attended the unit and 299 delivered in it. Delivery rates increased from 5/month to 112/month over the period. Mean gestational age at birth was 39(+3) gestational weeks (SD = 1.9). Median birthweight was 3100 g (25-75% interquartile range 2840-3430 g). Spontaneous vaginal deliveries were dominant and the major maternal complication was postpartum hemorrhage (n = 13). Eighty-two women were referred to Al Mafraq or Amman hospitals, mainly for preterm labor (32%) and congenital malformations (11%). We managed one case of stillbirth. Maternal mortality did not occur. Despite the difficulties of war, high-risk pregnant women were properly identified, permitting referrals when required. Cooperation with other nongovernmental organizations, including the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, was essential for the management of situations at risk of complications and to contain perinatal and maternal mortality. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Development of a Unifying Target and Consensus Indicators for Global Surgical Systems Strengthening: Proposed by the Global Alliance for Surgery, Obstetric, Trauma, and Anaesthesia Care (The G4 Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil; Scott, John W; Gause, Colin D; Meheš, Mira; Hsiung, Grace; Prelvukaj, Albulena; Yanocha, Dana; Baumann, Lauren M; Ahmed, Faheem; Ahmed, Na'eem; Anderson, Sara; Angate, Herve; Arfaa, Lisa; Asbun, Horacio; Ashengo, Tigistu; Asuman, Kisembo; Ayala, Ruben; Bickler, Stephen; Billingsley, Saul; Bird, Peter; Botman, Matthijs; Butler, Marilyn; Buyske, Jo; Capozzi, Angelo; Casey, Kathleen; Clayton, Charles; Cobey, James; Cotton, Michael; Deckelbaum, Dan; Derbew, Miliard; deVries, Catherine; Dillner, Jeanne; Downham, Max; Draisin, Natalie; Echinard, David; Elneil, Sohier; ElSayed, Ahmed; Estelle, Abigail; Finley, Allen; Frenkel, Erica; Frykman, Philip K; Gheorghe, Florin; Gore-Booth, Julian; Henker, Richard; Henry, Jaymie; Henry, Orion; Hoemeke, Laura; Hoffman, David; Ibanga, Iko; Jackson, Eric V; Jani, Pankaj; Johnson, Walter; Jones, Andrew; Kassem, Zeina; Kisembo, Asuman; Kocan, Abbey; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Lane, Robert; Latif, Asad; Levy, Barbara; Linos, Dimitrios; Linz, Peter; Listwa, Louis A; Magee, Declan; Makasa, Emmanuel; Marin, Michael L; Martin, Claude; McQueen, Kelly; Morgan, Jamie; Moser, Richard; Neighbor, Robert; Novick, William M; Ogendo, Stephen; Omigbodun, Akinyinka; Onajin-Obembe, Bisola; Parsan, Neil; Philip, Beverly K; Price, Raymond; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Ratel, Marjorie; Reynolds, Cheri; Roser, Steven M; Rowles, Jackie; Samad, Lubna; Sampson, John; Sanghvi, Harshadkumar; Sellers, Marchelle L; Sigalet, David; Steffes, Bruce C; Stieber, Erin; Swaroop, Mamta; Tarpley, John; Varghese, Asha; Varughese, Julie; Wagner, Richard; Warf, Benjamin; Wetzig, Neil; Williamson, Susan; Wood, Joshua; Zeidan, Anne; Zirkle, Lewis; Allen, Brendan; Abdullah, Fizan

    2017-10-01

    After decades on the margins of primary health care, surgical and anaesthesia care is gaining increasing priority within the global development arena. The 2015 publications of the Disease Control Priorities third edition on Essential Surgery and the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery created a compelling evidenced-based argument for the fundamental role of surgery and anaesthesia within cost-effective health systems strengthening global strategy. The launch of the Global Alliance for Surgical, Obstetric, Trauma, and Anaesthesia Care in 2015 has further coordinated efforts to build priority for surgical care and anaesthesia. These combined efforts culminated in the approval of a World Health Assembly resolution recognizing the role of surgical care and anaesthesia as part of universal health coverage. Momentum gained from these milestones highlights the need to identify consensus goals, targets and indicators to guide policy implementation and track progress at the national level. Through an open consultative process that incorporated input from stakeholders from around the globe, a global target calling for safe surgical and anaesthesia care for 80% of the world by 2030 was proposed. In order to achieve this target, we also propose 15 consensus indicators that build on existing surgical systems metrics and expand the ability to prioritize surgical systems strengthening around the world.

  14. Ultrasonogram in obstetric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, K. B.; Song, C. H.; Lee, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of 535 cases of sonogram from Mar. 1, 1979 to Oct. 30, 1979 in obstetric field at Department of Radiology and Ob. and Gy. Eul-Ji General Hospital. We present these cases: normal pregnancy, missed abortion, twin pregnancy, hydatidiform mole and ectopic pregnancy, with brief review of literature.

  15. Reflections of Civil and Criminal Liability in Obstetrical Violence Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carvalho Veloso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric violence is characterized by the imposition of interventions harmful to the physical and psychological integrity of pregnant women, perpetrated by health professionals and institutions (public and private in which such women are assisted. This paper aims to discuss the civil and criminal liability in cases of obstetric violence, from the judgments of the Supreme Court (STF, Superior Court of Justice (STJ and the Courts of Justice (TJs of the Rio Grande do Sul State and Minas Gerais, in order to identify the nature of the punishment and characterization of obstetric violence.

  16. Evidence-informed obstetric practice during normal birth in China: trends and influences in four hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of international organizations, professional groups and individuals are promoting evidence-informed obstetric care in China. We measured change in obstetric practice during vaginal delivery that could be attributed to the diffusion of evidence-based messages, and explored influences on practice change. Methods Sample surveys of women at postnatal discharge in three government hospitals in Shanghai and one in neighbouring Jiangsu province carried out in 1999, repeated in 2003, and compared. Main outcome measures were changes in obstetric practice and influences on provider behaviour. "Routine practice" was defined as more than 65% of vaginal births. Semi-structured interviews with doctors explored influences on practice. Results In 1999, episiotomy was routine at all four hospitals; pubic shaving, rectal examination (to monitor labour and electronic fetal heart monitoring were routine at three hospitals; and enema on admission was common at one hospital. In 2003, episiotomy rates remained high at all hospitals, and actually significantly increased at one; pubic shaving was less common at one hospital; one hospital stopped rectal examination for monitoring labour, and the one hospital where enemas were common stopped this practice. Mobility during labour increased in three hospitals. Continuous support was variable between hospitals at baseline and showed no change with the 2003 survey. Provider behaviour was mainly influenced by international best practice standards promoted by hospital directors, and national legislation about clinical practice. Conclusion Obstetric practice became more evidence-informed in this selected group of hospitals in China. Change was not directly related to the promotion of evidence-based practice in the region. Hospital directors and national legislation seem to be particularly important influences on provider behaviour at the hospital level.

  17. Potential Medicaid Cost Savings from Maternity Care Based..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicaid pays for about half the births in the United States, at very high cost. Compared to usual obstetrical care, care by midwives at a birth center could reduce...

  18. Moving beyond disrespect and abuse: addressing the structural dimensions of obstetric violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michelle; Santos, Mário Jds; Ruiz-Berdún, Dolores; Rojas, Gonzalo Leiva; Skoko, Elena; Gillen, Patricia; Clausen, Jette A

    2016-05-01

    During recent decades, a growing and preoccupying excess of medical interventions during childbirth, even in physiological and uncomplicated births, together with a concerning spread of abusive and disrespectful practices towards women during childbirth across the world, have been reported. Despite research and policy-making to address these problems, changing childbirth practices has proved to be difficult. We argue that the excessive rates of medical interventions and disrespect towards women during childbirth should be analysed as a consequence of structural violence, and that the concept of obstetric violence, as it is being used in Latin American childbirth activism and legal documents, might prove to be a useful tool for addressing structural violence in maternity care such as high intervention rates, non-consented care, disrespect and other abusive practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The perception of midwives regarding psychosocial risk assessment during antenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M. Mathibe-Neke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physiological and psychological changes caused by pregnancy may increase a woman’s vulnerability to depression, which may in turn have adverse effects on both maternal and foetal wellbeing. Inadequate psychosocial risk assessment of women by midwives may lead to lack of psychosocial support during pregnancy and childbirth. Pregnant women who lack psychosocial support may experience stress, anxiety and depression that could possibly affect foetal wellbeing. Objective:The objective of this study was toexplore and describe the perception of psychosocial risk assessment and psychosocial care by midwives providing antenatal care to pregnant women. Method: An interpretive and descriptive qualitative approach was adopted. Three focus group interviews were conducted with midwives working in three Maternal Obstetric Units in Gauteng Province, using a semi-structured interview guide. The constant comparison data analysis approach was used. Results:Findings revealed that midwives are aware of and have encountered a high prevalence of psychosocial problems in pregnant women. Furthermore, they acknowledged the importance of psychosocial care for pregnant women although they stated that they were not equipped adequately to offer psychosocial assessment and psychosocial care. Conclusion:The findings provided a basis for incorporation of psychosocial care into routine antenatal care.

  20. Teaching Guatemalan traditional birth attendants about obstetrical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kimberly; Dowling, Donna; Mettler, Gretchen

    2018-06-01

    Guatemala's Maternal Mortality Rate is 65th highest in the world at 120 deaths per 100,000 births. Contributing to the problem is traditional birth attendants (TBAs) attend most births yet lack knowledge about obstetrical emergencies. Government trainings in existence since 1955 have not changed TBA knowledge. Government trainings are culturally insensitive because they are taught in Spanish with written material, even though most TBAs are illiterate and speak Mayan dialects. The purpose of the observational study was to evaluate the effect of an oral training, that was designed to be culturally sensitive in TBAs' native language, on TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. one hundred ninety-one TBAs participated. The study employed a pretest-posttest design. A checklist was used to compare TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies before and after the training. the mean pretest score was 5.006±SD 0.291 compared to the mean posttest score of 8.549±SD 0.201. Change in knowledge was a P value of 0.00. results suggest an oral training that was designed to be culturally sensitive in the native language improved TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. Future trainings should follow a similar format to meet the needs of illiterate audiences in remote settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. Results 105 responses were received (20% response rate. These indicated strong support (90% from both full-time (FT and part-time (PT trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Conclusions Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  2. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Amanda; Clements, Sarah; Kingston, Ashley; Abbott, Jason

    2012-01-10

    Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. 105 responses were received (20% response rate). These indicated strong support (90%) from both full-time (FT) and part-time (PT) trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  3. Obstetrical APS : Is there a place for hydroxychloroquine to improve the pregnancy outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekinian, Arsene; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Masseau, Agathe; Tincani, Angela; De Caroli, Sara; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Ruffatti, Amelia; Ambrozic, Ales; Botta, Angela; Le Guern, Véronique; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth; Nicaise-Roland, Pascale; Carbonne, Bruno; Carbillon, Lionel; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The use of the conventional APS treatment (the combination of low-dose aspirin and LMWH) dramatically improved the obstetrical prognosis in primary obstetrical APS (OAPS). The persistence of adverse pregnancy outcome raises the need to find other drugs to improve obstetrical outcome.

  4. [Obstetric Nurses: contributions to the objectives of the Millennium Development Goals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Thamiza da Rosa Dos; Zamberlan, Cláudia; Quadros, Jacqueline Silveira de; Grasel, Jessica Torres; Moro, Adriana Subeldia Dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To characterize and analyze assistance to labor and delivery performed by residents in Obstetric Nursing. Quantitative and retrospective study of 189 normal births attended by residents in Obstetric Nursing in the period between July 2013 and June 2014 in a maternity hospital located in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. Data collection took place by gathering information from medical records and the analysis was performed using descriptive statistics. It was found the wide use of non-invasive and non-pharmacological pain relief and freedom of position during labor. It is noteworthy that 55.6% of women have not undergone any obstetric intervention. It was possible to identify that the Nursing Residency Program allows the reduction of obstetrical interventions, reflecting directly in the improvement of maternal health.

  5. Patient satisfaction with home-birth care in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the necessary elements in an obstetric system of home confinements is well-organized postnatal home care. In The Netherlands home care assistants assist midwives during home delivery, they care for the new mother as well as the newborn baby, instruct the family on infant health care and carry

  6. Is Communication Improved With the Implementation of an Obstetrical Version of the World Health Organization Safe Surgery Checklist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindappagari, Shravya; Guardado, Amanda; Goffman, Dena; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Lee, Colleen; Schonfeld, Sara; Angert, Robert; McGowan, Andrea; Bernstein, Peter S

    2016-09-08

    Communication failures are consistently seen as a root cause of preventable adverse outcomes in obstetrics. We assessed whether use of an Obstetric Safe Surgery Checklist for cesarean deliveries (CDs), based on the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist, can improve communication; reduce team member confusion about urgency of the case; and decrease documentation discrepancies among nursing, obstetric, anesthesia, and pediatric staff. Retrospective review of 600 CDs on our 2 labor and delivery suites before and after the introduction of 2 consecutive versions of our obstetric safe surgery checklist (100 cases in each cohort) was undertaken. The first version was released in 2010, and after modifications based on initial findings, our current version was released in 2014. One hundred consecutive CDs were identified from each of the 3 periods at each hospital, and charts for those patients and newborns were abstracted. Notes by obstetricians, nurses, anesthesiologists, and pediatricians were reviewed. We compared the rates of agreement in the documentation of the indication for the CD between the different members of the team. Chi-square analyses were performed. Complete agreement among the 4 specialties in the documented indication for CD before introduction of our initial safe surgery checklist was noted in 59% (n = 118) of cases. After initial checklist introduction, agreement decreased to 43% (n = 86; P = 0.002). We then modified our checklist to include indication for CD and level of urgency and changed our policy to include pediatric staff participation in the timeout. Agreement in a subsequent chart review increased to 80% (n = 160), significantly better than in our initial analysis (P < 0.001) and our interim review (P < 0.001). The greatest improvement in agreement was observed between obstetricians and pediatricians. Implementation of a safe surgery checklist can improve communication at CDs, but care should be taken when implementing checklists because they can have

  7. Controversies concerning the antiphospholipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Cabrera, Dulce María Albertina; Rodriguez-Jaimes, Claudia; Acevedo-Gallegos, Sandra; Gallardo-Gaona, Juan Manuel; Velazquez-Torres, Berenice; Ramírez-Calvo, José Antonio

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications associated with the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β 2 glycoprotein-i antibodies, and/or lupus anticoagulant. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies associated with recurrent miscarriage, stillbirth, fetal growth restriction and premature birth. The diversity of the features of the proposed placental antiphospholipid antibodies fingerprint suggests that several disease processes may occur in the placentae of women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in the form of immune responses: inflammatory events, complement activation, angiogenic imbalance and, less commonly, thrombosis and infarction. Because of the disparity between clinical and laboratory criteria, and the impact on perinatal outcome in patients starting treatment, we reviewed the aspects of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome related to obstetric complications and seronegative antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and their treatment in obstetrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Workforce planning and training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Kristufkova, Alexandra; Boyon, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE(S): To describe the infrastructural differences in training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (ObGyn) across Europe. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive web-based survey of 31 national ObGyn trainee societies representing the 30 member countries of the European Network of Trainees in Obstetrics and G...

  9. Obstetric Risk Factors and Subsequent Mental Health Problems in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies suggest that obstetric complications are associated with several child psychiatric conditions. In planning for child psychiatric services it is important to monitor patterns of morbidity and associated risk factors. Identifying obstetric risk factors in a newly opened child psychiatric clinic population with ...

  10. [Selective embolization to treat obstetric hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer Puchol, M D; Lanciego, C; Esteban, E; Ciampi, J J; Edo, M A; Ferragud, S

    2014-01-01

    To describe cases of obstetric hemorrhage that have called for selective intra-arterial embolization and the different embolization techniques used. To assess the clinical outcomes and postprocedural fertility. We studied 27 women with obstetric hemorrhage. In 24 patients, embolization was performed by catheterizing both uterine arteries and in 2 patients only one uterine artery was catheterized (pseudoaneurysm). The materials used for embolization consisted of Spongostan in 17/27, particles in 9/27, and coils in 1/27. Clinical follow-up included an analysis of early and late complications and of postprocedural fertility. Hemorrhage was classified as primary (25/27) or secondary (2/27). The cause of bleeding was vaginal delivery (20), cesarean sections (5), abortion (1), and cervical ectopic pregnancy (1). The initial technical success rate was 100% and the clinical success rate was 92.6% (25 of the 27 patients). Bleeding ceased and the outcome was satisfactory in 25 patients. During clinical follow-up ranging from one to seven years, 23 patients had normal menstruation and 6 patients completed 7 full-term pregnancies. Intra-arterial embolization for obstetric hemorrhage leads to good outcomes and few complications and it preserves fertility. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Being the parent of a ventilator-assisted child: perceptions of the family-health care provider relationship when care is offered in the family home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Berit; Lindblad, Britt-Marie

    2013-11-01

    The number of medically fragile children cared for at home is increasing; however, there are few studies about the professional support these families receive in their homes. The aim of the study was to understand the meanings that parents had about the support they received from health care professionals who offered care for their ventilator-assisted child in the family home. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used. Data included the narratives of five mother-father couples living in Sweden who were receiving professional support for their ventilator-assisted child. The findings indicate that receiving professional support meant being at risk of and/or exposed to the exercise of control over family privacy. The professional support system in the families' homes worked more by chance than by competent and sensible planning. In good cases, caring encounters were characterized by a mutual relationship where various occupational groups were embraced as a part of family life. The findings are discussed in light of compassionate care, exercise of power, and the importance of holistic educational programs.

  12. [Intimate partner violence against pregnant women: study about the repercussions on the obstetric and neonatal results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Driéli Pacheco; Gomes-Sponholz, Flávia Azevedo; Stefanelo, Juliana; Nakano, Ana Márcia Spanó; Monteiro, Juliana Cristina Dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    This observational, descriptive and analytic study aimed to identify the prevalence of IPV cases among pregnant women and classify them according to the type and frequency; identify the obstetric and neonatal results and their associations with the intimate partner violence (IPV) occurrence in the current pregnancy. It was developed with 232 pregnant women who had prenatal care at a public maternity hospital. Data were collected via structured interview and in the patients' charts and analyzed through the statistic software SAS® 9.0. Among the participants, 15.5% suffered IPV during pregnancy, among that 14.7% suffered psychological violence, 5.2% physical violence and 0.4% sexual violence. Women who did not desire the pregnancy had more chances of suffering IPV (pobstetric and neonatal repercussions, there was no statistical association between the variables investigated. Thus, for the study participants there were no negative obstetric and neonatal repercussions related to IPV during pregnancy.

  13. Undergraduate paramedic student psychomotor skills in an obstetric setting: An evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenson, Shane; Mills, Jason

    2018-01-01

    The clinical education of paramedic students is an international concern. In Australia, student placements are commonly undertaken with local district ambulance services, however these placements are increasingly limited. Clinical placements within inter-professional settings represent an innovative yet underdeveloped area of investigation. This paper addresses that gap by reporting a pilot evaluation of paramedic student clinical placements in a specialised obstetrics setting. Using a case study approach, the evaluation aimed to identify paramedic psychomotor skills that could be practised in this setting, and understand the nature of key learning events. A purposive sample of paramedic students was recruited following completion of the obstetrics placement. A combination of student reflection and assessed psychomotor skills data were collected from clinical placement logs. Content analysis of all data was conducted inductively and deductively, as appropriate. Findings indicated a comprehensive range of psychomotor skills can be practised in this setting, with over thirty psychomotor skills identified directly related to the paramedic curriculum; and seven psychomotor skills indirectly related. The themes finding confidence in maternity care, watching the experts, and putting theory into practice provide narrative insight into the clinical learning experience of paramedic students in this setting. Further research is recommended to build upon this pilot. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The long term economic impact of severe obstetric complications for women and their children in Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick G C Ilboudo

    Full Text Available This study investigates the long term economic impact of severe obstetric complications for women and their children in Burkina Faso, focusing on measures of food security, expenditures and related quality of life measures. It uses a hospital based cohort, first visited in 2004/2005 and followed up four years later. This cohort of 1014 women consisted of two main groups of comparison: 677 women who had an uncomplicated delivery and 337 women who experienced a severe obstetric complication which would have almost certainly caused death had they not received hospital care (labelled a "near miss" event. To analyze the impact of such near miss events as well as the possible interaction with the pregnancy outcome, we compared household and individual level indicators between women without a near miss event and women with a near miss event who either had a live birth, a perinatal death or an early pregnancy loss. We used propensity score matching to remove initial selection bias. Although we found limited effects for the whole group of near miss women, the results indicated negative impacts: a for near miss women with a live birth, on child development and education, on relatively expensive food consumption and on women's quality of life; b for near miss women with perinatal death, on relatively expensive foods consumption and children's education and c for near miss women who had an early pregnancy loss, on overall food security. Our results showed that severe obstetric complications have long lasting consequences for different groups of women and their children and highlighted the need for carefully targeted interventions.

  15. Committee Opinion No. 726: Hospital Disaster Preparedness for Obstetricians and Facilities Providing Maternity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale catastrophic events and infectious disease outbreaks highlight the need for disaster planning at all community levels. Features unique to the obstetric population (including antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and neonatal care) warrant special consideration in the event of a disaster. Pregnancy increases the risks of untoward outcomes from various infectious diseases. Trauma during pregnancy presents anatomic and physiologic considerations that often can require increased use of resources such as higher rates of cesarean delivery. Recent evidence suggests that floods and human-influenced environmental disasters increase the risks of spontaneous miscarriages, preterm births, and low-birth-weight infants among pregnant women. The potential surge in maternal and neonatal patient volume due to mass-casualty events, transfer of high-acuity patients, or redirection of patients because of geographic barriers presents unique challenges for obstetric care facilities. These circumstances require that facilities plan for additional increases in necessary resources and staffing. Although emergencies may be unexpected, hospitals and obstetric delivery units can prepare to implement plans that will best serve maternal and pediatric care needs when disasters occur. Clear designation of levels of maternal and neonatal care facilities, along with establishment of a regional network incorporating hospitals that provide maternity services and those that do not, will enable rapid transport of obstetric patients to the appropriate facilities, ensuring the right care at the right time. Using common terminology for triage and transfer and advanced knowledge of regionalization and levels of care will facilitate disaster preparedness.

  16. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Chamat Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Methods Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005 including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR, maternal near miss ratio (MNMR, mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. Results There were 28 025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100 000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52% and haemorrhage (34% were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60% while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%. Most cases (93% were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%, primary (5% and secondary (10% healthcare unites and private practices (11%. 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Conclusion Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to

  17. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerie, Yara; Almerie, Muhammad Q; Matar, Hosam E; Shahrour, Yasser; Al Chamat, Ahmad Abo; Abdulsalam, Asmaa

    2010-10-19

    Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss) is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005) including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR), maternal near miss ratio (MNMR), mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. There were 28,025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100,000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52%) and haemorrhage (34%) were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60%) while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%). Most cases (93%) were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%), primary (5%) and secondary (10%) healthcare unites and private practices (11%). 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to prevent/manage post-partum haemorrhage and training health

  18. [Analysis of obstetric-pediatric care in the perinatal period. Are births before 31 weeks' gestation in level 2B maternity units avoidable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, I; Roussel, A; Olieric, M-F; Feldmann, M; Wallerich, Y; Trabelsi, N; Miton, A; Zuily-Lamy, C; Valdès, V; Fresson, J

    2017-12-01

    Regionalization of perinatal care has been developed to improve the survival of preterm babies. The mortality rate is higher among very premature infants born outside level-3 maternity units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the preventability of these very premature births occurring outside recommendations within level-2B maternity units. The secondary objective was to describe the care of premature infants between 23 and 24 weeks. This is a single-center retrospective qualitative study of the care delivery pathways. Thirty-one deliveries in which the fetus was alive between 23 and 30 weeks+6 days occurred in a level-2B maternity unit in Thionville, France, between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2015. After oral presentation of the cases, a level 2-3 multidisciplinary committee of experts in Lorraine evaluated the preventability criteria and reasons, and divided the deliveries into three groups: (i) birth in level-2B institutions avoidable, (ii) inevitable with factors related to the mother or the organization of care, (iii) with no inevitable factors. Out of the 31 deliveries included, the committee classified six deliveries as preventable, 14 as inevitable with factors, and 11 as inevitable with no factors. The criteria for preventability of birth in a level-2B unit were underestimation of maternal and fetal risk, an erroneous initial estimate of term or preterm labor, and two births in the upper limits of the French recommendations for in utero transfer. Nineteen of the 35 premature infants before 31 weeks' gestation died, 16 children were transferred to a level-3 maternity ward, and 16 children were allowed to go home. Analysis of the obstetrical-pediatric care course by an expert committee determined the preventability of the average birth and prematurity in level-2B maternity units in Lorraine for a small but significant number of cases. The local regionalization of neonatal care could be improved by the application of this method of analysis to

  19. Prevention of shoulder dystocia: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate an obstetric maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poujade, Olivier; Azria, Elie; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Davitian, Carine; Khater, Carine; Chatel, Paul; Pernin, Emilie; Aflak, Nizar; Koskas, Martin; Bourgeois-Moine, Agnès; Hamou-Plotkine, Laurence; Valentin, Morgane; Renner, Jean-Paul; Roy, Carine; Estellat, Candice; Luton, Dominique

    2018-08-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a major obstetric emergency defined as a failure of delivery of the fetal shoulder(s). This study evaluated whether an obstetric maneuver, the push back maneuver performed gently on the fetal head during delivery, could reduce the risk of shoulder dystocia. We performed a multicenter, randomized, single-blind trial to compare the push back maneuver with usual care in parturient women at term. The primary outcome, shoulder dystocia, was considered to have occurred if, after delivery of the fetal head, any additional obstetric maneuver, beginning with the McRoberts maneuver, other than gentle downward traction and episiotomy was required. We randomly assigned 522 women to the push back maneuver group (group P) and 523 women to the standard vaginal delivery group (group S). Finally, 473 women assigned to group P and 472 women assigned to group S delivered vaginally. The rate of shoulder dystocia was significantly lower in group P (1·5%) than in group S (3·8%) (odds ratio [OR] 0·38 [0·16-0·92]; P = 0·03). After adjustment for predefined main risk factors, dystocia remained significantly lower in group P than in group S. There were no significant between-group differences in neonatal complications, including brachial plexus injury, clavicle fracture, hematoma and generalized asphyxia. In this trial in 945 women who delivered vaginally, the push back maneuver significantly decreased the risk of shoulder dystocia, as compared with standard vaginal delivery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. QUARITE (quality of care, risk management and technology in obstetrics: a cluster-randomized trial of a multifaceted intervention to improve emergency obstetric care in Senegal and Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaye Alioune

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal and perinatal mortality are major problems for which progress in sub-Saharan Africa has been inadequate, even though childbirth services are available, even in the poorest countries. Reducing them is the aim of two of the main Millennium Development Goals. Many initiatives have been undertaken to remedy this situation, such as the Advances in Labour and Risk Management (ALARM International Program, whose purpose is to improve the quality of obstetric services in low-income countries. However, few interventions have been evaluated, in this context, using rigorous methods for analyzing effectiveness in terms of health outcomes. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the ALARM International Program (AIP in reducing maternal mortality in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Secondary goals include evaluation of the relationships between effectiveness and resource availability, service organization, medical practices, and satisfaction among health personnel. Methods/Design This is an international, multi-centre, controlled cluster-randomized trial of a complex intervention. The intervention is based on the concept of evidence-based practice and on a combination of two approaches aimed at improving the performance of health personnel: 1 Educational outreach visits; and 2 the implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews. The unit of intervention is the public health facility equipped with a functional operating room. On the basis of consent provided by hospital authorities, 46 centres out of 49 eligible were selected in Mali and Senegal. Using randomization stratified by country and by level of care, 23 centres will be allocated to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. The intervention will last two years. It will be preceded by a pre-intervention one-year period for baseline data collection. A continuous clinical data collection system has been set up in all

  1. Accessing Safe Deliveries in Tanzania (IMCHA) | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Few healthcare workers are trained to offer emergency obstetrical care, so timely ... With better access to skilled care and emergency services, the project aims to ... training program as it relates to health service delivery and health outcomes.

  2. Training in motivational interviewing in obstetrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina L; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    -adherent interventions). Furthermore, the participants asked fewer closed and more open questions before training in motivational interview. In the assessment of proficiency and competency, most of the participants scored higher after the training in motivational interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Training in motivational......OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a three day training course in motivational interviewing which is an approach to helping people to change could improve the communication skills of obstetric healthcare professionals in their interaction with obese pregnant women. DESIGN: Intervention study. SETTING......: The Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: Eleven obstetric healthcare professionals working with obese pregnant women underwent a three day course in motivational interviewing techniques and were assessed before- and after training to measure the impact on their overall performance as well as the effect...

  3. The learning environment in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship: an exploratory study of students' perceptions before and after the clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher-Lind, Laura E; Chang, Katherine; Blanco, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    For reasons that remain not entirely clear, Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clerkships often exhibit comparatively higher rates of medical student mistreatment. To explore perceptions of our local learning environment, focus groups were held with students yet to start (pre-students) and students having completed (post-students) their Ob/Gyn clerkship. Topics of discussion included learning expectations and experiences, perceptions of mistreatment, and suggestions for improving the learning environment and student treatment. Using a naturalistic approach, we conducted a conventional content analysis to identify emergent themes. Nine pre-students and nine post-students participated. While pre-students anticipated being actively engaged, they also expected - based on peer accounts - to be subject to an unwelcoming learning environment on the Ob/Gyn clerkship, despite working hard to become team members. Due to patient advocacy and protection concerns, post-students reported low levels of student involvement and, subsequently, an overall passive learning experience. Students from both groups offered valuable suggestions for improving the learning environment and student treatment. The sensitive nature of Ob/Gyn clinical encounters may lead to overprotective behaviors that contribute to students feeling mistreated and excluded from patient care and team membership. Students' experiences during Ob/Gyn clerkships could be improved by better balancing patient advocacy and student involvement. Practical implications to address these issues are offered.

  4. General practitioners and their role in maternity care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    During the last century the perception of pregnancy and childbirth has changed from a normal, physiological life-event to a potentially dangerous condition. Maternity care has become more and more obstetrical care, focussed on pathology and complications. The involvement of general practitioners

  5. Assessing obstetric patient experience: a SERVQUAL questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Francesca; Narayan, Harini

    2013-01-01

    Across health services, there is a drive to respond to patient feedback and to incorporate their views into service improvement. The SERVQUAL method has been used in several clinical settings to quantify whether services meet patient expectations. However, work has been limited in the obstetric population. This paper seeks to address these issues. This study used an adapted SERVQUAL questionnaire to assess a reconfigured antenatal clinic service. The most important care aspects, as rated by patients, were used to construct the SERVQUAL questions. The questionnaire was administered to eligible women in two parts. The first was completed before their first hospital antenatal appointment and the second either at home (a postal-chasing exercise) or while waiting for their next appointment. Only fully completed questionnaires (both parts) were analysed. Service strengths included staff politeness, patient respect and privacy. Areas for improvement included hand cleanliness, women's involvement in decision making and communicating risk. However, the low variability in patient responses makes concrete conclusions difficult and methodological issues complicate evaluating hand cleanliness. The new antenatal clinic service received low negative weighted and un-weighted overall scores. The SERVQUAL measure was developed from patient feedback and used to further improve services. The SERVQUAL-based measure allowed an internal evaluation of patient experience and highlighted areas for improvement. However, without validation, the questionnaire cannot be used as an outcome measure and variation between published SERVQUAL questionnaires makes comparisons difficult. This highlights an important balance in patient evaluation measures--between locally responsive and externally comparable. The SERVQUAL approach allows healthcare teams to evaluate patient experience, while accounting for variation in their expectations and priorities. The study highlights several areas that are

  6. Management of Marfan Syndrome during pregnancy: A real world experience from a Joint Cardiac Obstetric Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanna C E-S; Cauldwell, Matthew; Patel, Roshni R; Uebing, Anselm; Curry, Ruth A; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Swan, Lorna

    2017-09-15

    Pregnancy in Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is associated with increased maternal risk of cardiovascular events. Given the maternal and genetic risks, pre-conception counselling is essential to facilitate informed choices. Multidisciplinary antenatal care with regular imaging is mandatory and best delivered through a Joint Cardiac Obstetric Service (JCOS). The aim of this study was to compare the care delivered in a JCOS against recognised international standards (European Society of Cardiology (ESC)). Pregnancies in women with MFS from 2005 to 2015 were identified from our institutional database. Patient records were reviewed and practice assessed against pre-determined standards based on ESC guidelines. There were 23 pregnancies in 15 women with MFS. 13/23 (57%) occurred in women with aortic dilatation at baseline. There were 3 important maternal cardiac events (type A dissection; deterioration in left ventricular function; significant left ventricular and progressive aortic dilatation). Four women did not have access to expert pre-conception counselling. These women were all referred to the JCOS late in established pregnancy. Imaging was often delayed and only 7/23 cases (30%) met the standard for minimum frequency of echocardiographic surveillance. Only 12/23 (52%) had pre-conception imaging of the whole aorta with CT/MRI. Distal aortic dilatation was identified in 7/23 cases but none of these underwent further MRI evaluation during pregnancy. Despite having a dedicated JCOS, our data show that facilitating complete obstetric and cardiac care for this group remains challenging. Education of local care providers and timely referral for expert pre-conception counselling in a JCOS are key. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Obstetric Emergencies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwochei, Desire N; Halpern, Stephen; Balki, Mrinalini

    2017-06-01

    Team-based training and simulation can improve patient safety, by improving communication, decision making, and performance of team members. Currently, there is no general consensus on whether or not a specific assessment tool is better adapted to evaluate teamwork in obstetric emergencies. The purpose of this qualitative systematic review was to find the tools available to assess team effectiveness in obstetric emergencies. We searched Embase, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar for prospective studies that evaluated nontechnical skills in multidisciplinary teams involving obstetric emergencies. The search included studies from 1944 until January 11, 2016. Data on reliability and validity measures were collected and used for interpretation. A descriptive analysis was performed on the data. Thirteen studies were included in the final qualitative synthesis. All the studies assessed teams in the context of obstetric simulation scenarios, but only six included anesthetists in the simulations. One study evaluated their teamwork tool using just validity measures, five using just reliability measures, and one used both. The most reliable tools identified were the Clinical Teamwork Scale, the Global Assessment of Obstetric Team Performance, and the Global Rating Scale of performance. However, they were still lacking in terms of quality and validity. More work needs to be conducted to establish the validity of teamwork tools for nontechnical skills, and the development of an ideal tool is warranted. Further studies are required to assess how outcomes, such as performance and patient safety, are influenced when using these tools.

  8. Obstetrical ultrasound data-base management system by using personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee; Kim, Soo Nyung

    1993-01-01

    A computer program which performs obstetric calculations on Clipper Language using the data from ultrasonography was developed for personal computer. It was designed for fast assessment of fetal development, prediction of gestational age, and weight from ultrasonographic measurements which included biparietal diameter, femur length, gestational sac, occipito-frontal diameter, abdominal diameter, and etc. The Obstetrical-Ultrasound Data-Base Management System was tested for its performance. The Obstetrical-Ultrasound Data-Base Management System was very useful in patient management with its convenient data filing, easy retrieval of previous report, prompt but accurate estimation of fetal growth and skeletal anomaly and production of equation and growth curve for pregnant women

  9. [Japanese who affected modern medicine in Taiwan: obstetrics and gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Tung

    2009-12-01

    This text describes the leaders who established the modem obstetrics and gynecology for Taiwan. during the Japan-colonizing period (1895-1945). These leaders are Mr. Kawasoye, M., Mr. Mukae K., and Mr. Magara M. The lives of these leaders were different, but they all strongly contributed to the development of modem obstetrics and gynecology in Taiwan. With regard to the passage of time, Mr. Kawasoye contributed the initial efforts, Mr. Mukae worked during the flourishing period of the clinic; and Mr. Magara worked during the mature period, emphasizing research. These three periods are closely correlated with the course of the development of modem obstetrics and gynecology in Taiwan.

  10. Multidisciplinary training in perineal care during labor and delivery for the reduction of anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Gundry, Rowan; Young, Helen; Naguib, Adel

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the introduction of a multidisciplinary intrapartum perineal-care training program reduced the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in patients undergoing vaginal deliveries. A prospective observational cohort study enrolled women undergoing vaginal deliveries at a district general hospital maternity unit in the United Kingdom between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014. All women experiencing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during the study period were identified and the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries before (2012-2013) a multidisciplinary training program was implemented was compared with the rate after (2013-2014) implementation using logistic regression analysis. The study enrolled 4920 patients. Following the implementation of the training program, the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries decreased from 4.8% to 3.1% of vaginal deliveries (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.493-0.899; P = 0.008). The integration of intrapartum perineal-care training into mandatory annual staff training was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intimate Partner Violence Against Pregnant Women: Study About The Repercussions On The Obstetric And Neonatal Results

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Driéli Pacheco; Gomes-Sponholz, Flávia Azevedo; Stefanelo, Juliana; Nakano, Ana Márcia Spanó; Monteiro, Juliana Cristina dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    This observational, descriptive and analytic study aimed to identify the prevalence of IPV cases among pregnant women and classify them according to the type and frequency; identify the obstetric and neonatal results and their associations with the intimate partner violence (IPV) occurrence in the current pregnancy. It was developed with 232 pregnant women who had prenatal care at a public maternity hospital. Data were collected via structured interview and in the patients’ charts and analyze...

  12. Intimate Partner Violence Against Pregnant Women: Study About The Repercussions On The Obstetric And Neonatal Results

    OpenAIRE

    Driéli Pacheco Rodrigues; Flávia Azevedo Gomes-Sponholz; Juliana Stefanelo; Ana Márcia Spanó Nakano; Juliana Cristina dos Santos Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    This observational, descriptive and analytic study aimed to identify the prevalence of IPV cases among pregnant women and classify them according to the type and frequency; identify the obstetric and neonatal results and their associations with the intimate partner violence (IPV) occurrence in the current pregnancy. It was developed with 232 pregnant women who had prenatal care at a public maternity hospital. Data were collected via structured interview and in the patients’ charts and a...

  13. [Inequality in primary care interventions in maternal and child health care in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Tirado-Gómez, Laura Leticia; López-Cervantes, Malaquías

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the principal indicators associated with maternal mortality and mortality in children under 1 year of age and evaluate coverage levels and variability among the federative entities of Mexico. Eight interventions in maternal and child primary health care (variables) were studied: complete vaccination series, measles vaccine, and pentavalent vaccine in children under 1 year of age; early breast-feeding; prenatal care with at least one check-up by trained staff; prevalence of contraceptive use among married women of reproductive age; obstetric care in delivery by trained staff; and the administration of tetanus toxoid (TT) to pregnant women. The average and standard deviation of national coverage for each variable was calculated. Within each federative entity the proportion of municipalities with high, medium, and low marginalization was determined. States were ranked by the proportion of municipalities with high marginalization (highest to lowest) and divided into quintiles. Absolute inequality was measured using the observed difference and relative inequality, using the ratio of each variable studied. The average national coverage for the eight variables studied ranged from 86.5% to 97.5%, with administration of TT to pregnant women the lowest and administration of measles vaccine to children under 1 year of age the highest. Obstetric care in delivery, prevalence of contraceptive use, and prenatal checkup were the variables with less equitable coverage. In states with higher levels of marginalization, activities dependent on a structured health system-e.g., obstetric care in delivery-showed lower levels of coverage compared to preventive activities not requiring costly inputs or infrastructure-e.g., early breast-feeding. Interventions exhibiting greater inequity are associated with the lack of medical infrastructure and are more accentuated in federative entities with higher levels of marginalization. Greater public health expenditure is urgently needed

  14. Defining Remoteness from Health Care: Integrated Research on Accessing Emergency Maternal Care in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn A Myers

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The causes of maternal death are well known, and are largely preventable if skilled health care is received promptly. Complex interactions between geographic and socio-cultural factors affect access to, and remoteness from, health care but research on this topic rarely integrates spatial and social sciences. In this study, modeling of travel time was integrated with social science research to refine our understanding of remoteness from health care. Travel time to health facilities offering emergency obstetric care (EmOC and population distribution were modelled for a district in eastern Indonesia. As an index of remoteness, the proportion of the population more than two hours estimated travel time from EmOC was calculated. For the best case scenario (transport by ambulance in the dry season, modelling estimated more than 10,000 fertile aged women were more than two hours from EmOC. Maternal mortality ratios were positively correlated with the remoteness index, however there was considerable variation around this relationship. In a companion study, ethnographic research in a subdistrict with relatively good access to health care and high maternal mortality identified factors influencing access to EmOC, including some that had not been incorporated into the travel time model. Ethnographic research provided information about actual travel involved in requesting and reaching EmOC. Modeled travel time could be improved by incorporating time to deliver request for care. Further integration of social and spatial methods and the development of more dynamic travel time models are needed to develop programs and policies to address these multiple factors to improve maternal health outcomes.

  15. Committee Opinion No. 726 Summary: Hospital Disaster Preparedness for Obstetricians and Facilities Providing Maternity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale catastrophic events and infectious disease outbreaks highlight the need for disaster planning at all community levels. Features unique to the obstetric population (including antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and neonatal care) warrant special consideration in the event of a disaster. Pregnancy increases the risks of untoward outcomes from various infectious diseases. Trauma during pregnancy presents anatomic and physiologic considerations that often can require increased use of resources such as higher rates of cesarean delivery. Recent evidence suggests that floods and human-influenced environmental disasters increase the risks of spontaneous miscarriages, preterm births, and low-birth-weight infants among pregnant women. The potential surge in maternal and neonatal patient volume due to mass-casualty events, transfer of high-acuity patients, or redirection of patients because of geographic barriers presents unique challenges for obstetric care facilities. These circumstances require that facilities plan for additional increases in necessary resources and staffing. Although emergencies may be unexpected, hospitals and obstetric delivery units can prepare to implement plans that will best serve maternal and pediatric care needs when disasters occur. Clear designation of levels of maternal and neonatal care facilities, along with establishment of a regional network incorporating hospitals that provide maternity services and those that do not, will enable rapid transport of obstetric patients to the appropriate facilities, ensuring the right care at the right time. Using common terminology for triage and transfer and advanced knowledge of regionalization and levels of care will facilitate disaster preparedness.

  16. An investigation of the relationship between autonomy, childbirth practices, and obstetric fistula among women in rural Lilongwe District, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Julika Ayla; Kandodo, Jonathan; Sclafani, Joseph; Raine, Susan; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; Norris, Alison; Norris-Turner, Abigail; Chemey, Elly; Beckham, John Michael; Khan, Zara; Chunda, Reginald

    2017-06-19

    Obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury caused by prolonged obstructed labor that results in destruction of the tissue wall between the vagina and bladder. Although obstetric fistula is directly caused by prolonged obstructed labor, many other factors indirectly increase fistula risk. Some research suggests that many women in rural Malawi have limited autonomy and decision-making power in their households. We hypothesize that women's limited autonomy may play a role in reinforcing childbirth practices that increase the risk of obstetric fistula in this setting by hindering access to emergency care and further prolonging obstructed labor. A medical student at Baylor College of Medicine partnered with a Malawian research assistant in July 2015 to conduct in-depth qualitative interviews in Chichewa with 25 women living within the McGuire Wellness Centre's catchment area (rural Central Lilongwe District) who had received obstetric fistula repair surgery. This study assessed whether women's limited autonomy in rural Malawi reinforces childbearing practices that increase risk of obstetric fistula. We considered four dimensions of autonomy: sexual and reproductive decision-making, decision-making related to healthcare utilization, freedom of movement, and discretion over earned income. We found that participants had limited autonomy in these domains. For example, many women felt pressured by their husbands, families, and communities to become pregnant within three months of marriage; women often needed to seek permission from their husbands before leaving their homes to visit the clinic; and women were frequently prevented from delivering at the hospital by older women in the community. Many of the obstetric fistula patients in our sample had limited autonomy in several or all of the aforementioned domains, and their limited autonomy often led both directly and indirectly to an increased risk of prolonged labor and fistula. Reducing the prevalence of fistula in Malawi

  17. [Anesthesia in obstetrics: Tried and trusted methods, current standards and new challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranke, P; Annecke, T; Bremerich, D H; Hanß, R; Kaufner, L; Klapp, C; Ohnesorge, H; Schwemmer, U; Standl, T; Weber, S; Volk, T

    2016-01-01

    Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia have some specific aspects, which in particular are directly related to pathophysiological alterations during pregnancy and also to the circumstance that two or even more individuals are always affected by complications or therapeutic measures. This review article deals with some evergreens and hot topics of obstetric anesthesia and essential new knowledge on these aspects is described. The article summarizes the talks given at the 16th symposium on obstetric anesthesia organized by the Scientific Committee for Regional Anaesthesia and Obstetric Anaesthesia within the German Society of Anaesthesiology. The topics are in particular, special features and pitfalls of informed consent in the delivery room, challenges in education and training in obstetric anesthesia, expedient inclusion of simulation-assisted training and further education on risk minimization, knowledge and recommendations on fasting for the delivery room and cesarean sections, monitoring in obstetric anesthesia by neuraxial and alternative procedures, the possibilities and limitations of using ultrasound for lumbal epidural catheter positioning in the delivery room, recommended approaches in preparing peridural catheters for cesarean section, basic principles of cardiotocography, postoperative analgesia after cesarean section, the practice of early bonding in the delivery room during cesarean section births and the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  18. Associated Factors and Quality of Care Received among Maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    discussions with health staff to assess care received and factors leading to death. A total of 43 maternal deaths ... department with bed capacity of 105, one ..... evidence for emergency obstetric care. ... Planning; 15(2): 170-176. 13. Ray S ...

  19. Inherited thrombophilia in women with poor aPL-related obstetric history: prevalence and outcomes. Survey of 208 cases from the European Registry on Obstetric Antiphospholipid Syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Ferrer-Oliveras, Raquel; Esteve-Valverde, Enrique; Ruffatti, Amelia; Tincani, Angela; Lefkou, Elmina; Bertero, Maria Tiziana; Espinosa, Gerard; Coloma, Emmanuel; de Carolis, Sara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Canti, Valentina; Picardo, Elisa; Fredi, Micaela; Mekinian, Arsene

    2016-08-01

    To analyse the prevalence and effects of inherited thrombophilic disorders (ITD) on maternal-foetal outcomes in cases of antiphospholipid antibody related to obstetric complications. Women with obstetric complaints who tested positive for aPL and with inherited thrombophilia were prospectively and retrospectively included. ITD data were available in 208 of 338: 147 had obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (OAPS) and 61 aPL-related obstetric morbidity (OMAPS). 24.1% had ITD. Laboratory categories I and IIa were more related to OAPS-ITD and IIb and IIc to OMAPS-ITD. No significant differences in obstetric complaints were observed. Regarding ITD carriers, treatment rates were higher in OAPS than in OMAPS for LMWH and LDA plus LMWH (P=.002). Cases with aPL-related OAPS/OMAPS showed no differences in maternal-foetal outcomes regardless of the presence of one ITD. Maternal thrombotic risk was low, with ITD-positive cases included. Registry data concur with Sydney criteria, whereby aPL-ITD-positive patients are classified as having antiphospholipid syndrome. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Perfil de mulheres admitidas em uma UTI obstétrica por causas não obstétricas Profile of women admitted at an obstetric ICU due to non-obstetric causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Andrade Lima Coêlho

    2012-04-01

    during the pregnancy-puerperal cycle for non-obstetric causes in the obstetric intensive care unit (ICU of a tertiary hospital in northeastern Brazil. METHODS: A descriptive study, analyzing the participants from a bidirectional cohort study was conducted between January 2005 and October 2010. A total of 500 patients admitted during the pregnancy-puerperal cycle due to non-obstetric causes in an obstetric ICU in northeastern Brazil were included; cases of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD, ectopic pregnancy, death or ICU stay lasting < 24 hours, and lack of signed informed consent form (ICF were excluded. The biological, sociodemographic, obstetric, and clinical variables were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi-Info 3.5.3. RESULTS: Of 5,078 obstetric admissions in the service, 500 patients (9.8% were due to non-obstetric causes. The mean age was 25.9 years, the predominant ethnicity was mixed-race (68.9%, and mean BMI was 27.5. In 79.9% of cases, women had a partner, and schooling over eight years was observed in 49.2%. The main clinical diagnoses seen at ICU admission were heart disease, deep vein thrombosis (DVT, urinary tract infection (UTI, asthma, acute pulmonary edema (APE, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Central access was used in 10.2% of patients, 11% were on mechanical ventilation, 20.4% received blood transfusions, and 4.0% of the patients died. CONCLUSION: Women admitted at the obstetric ICU due to non-obstetric causes represent a significant number of patients in this sector. They are mostly young women, and the main admission diagnoses were cardiovascular, respiratory, and infectious diseases, with a fatality rate of 4%.

  1. Improved obstetric safety through programmatic collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Dena; Brodman, Michael; Friedman, Arnold J; Minkoff, Howard; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare safety and quality are critically important issues in obstetrics, and society, healthcare providers, patients and insurers share a common goal of working toward safer practice, and are continuously seeking strategies to facilitate improvements. To this end, 4 New York City voluntary hospitals with large maternity services initiated a unique collaborative quality improvement program. It was facilitated by their common risk management advisors, FOJP Service Corporation, and their professional liability insurer, Hospitals Insurance Company. Under the guidance of 4 obstetrics and gynecology departmental chairmen, consensus best practices for obstetrics were developed which included: implementation of evidence based protocols with audit and feedback; standardized educational interventions; mandatory electronic fetal monitoring training; and enhanced in-house physician coverage. Each institution developed unique safety related expertise (development of electronic documentation, team training, and simulation education), and experiences were shared across the collaborative. The collaborative group developed robust systems for audit of outcomes and documentation quality, as well as enforcement mechanisms. Ongoing feedback to providers served as a key component of the intervention. The liability carrier provided financial support for these patient safety innovations. As a result of the interventions, the overall AOI for our institutions decreased 42% from baseline (January-June 2008) to the most recently reviewed time period (July-December 2011) (10.7% vs 6.2%, p Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  2. Shoulder dystocia in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianidis, Athanasios F; Smit, Marrit; Van Roosmalen, Jos

    2016-02-01

    In the Netherlands, low-risk pregnancies are managed by midwives in primary care. Despite strict definitions of low risk, obstetric complications can occur. Midwives seldom encounter uncommon labour complications, but are sufficiently trained to manage these. We assessed neonatal and maternal outcome after management of shoulder dystocia in primary midwifery care. In this 2-year prospective cohort study from April 2008 to April 2010, primary-care midwives, who participated in an obstetric emergency course, reported all obstetric complications. Main outcome was neonatal and maternal outcome. In sixty-four cases of shoulder dystocia McRoberts was the first maneuver in 42/64 (65.6%) cases with a success rate of 23.8%. All-fours maneuver was most frequently used as the second maneuver (24/45; 53.3%). No neonatal mortality occurred, none of the infants suffered from hypoxic ischemic injury, two (3.1%) had transient brachial plexus injuries, two (3.1%) had fractured clavicles and one (1.6%) had a fractured humerus. Eight (12.5%) neonates were successfully resuscitated because of birth asphyxia. All infants fully recovered. In neonates with immediate adverse outcome significantly more maneuvers were used compared with those without adverse neonatal outcome (p = 0.02). Postpartum hemorrhage occurred in 2/64 (3.1%) women, deep vaginal lacerations in 2/64 (3.1%), perineal tears in 23/64 (35.9%). No anal sphincter injuries occurred. McRoberts and all-fours maneuvers are widely used by primary-care midwives in the management of shoulder dystocia. Low rates of adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes were observed in cases of shoulder dystocia up to 6 weeks postpartum. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy: Obstetrical prognosis according to the type of APS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delesalle, C; de Vienne, C; Le Hello, C; Verspyck, E; Dreyfus, M

    2015-05-01

    The objective of our study was to compare treatment-based obstetrical outcomes in women with either thrombotic or obstetrical antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This was a historical cohort study conducted between 1998 and 2009 in 23 patients who had a total of 83 pregnancies. The syndrome was diagnosed using the 2006 Sapporo criteria. Thirty-one of these 83 pregnancies were valid before the diagnosis was made. A live infant was born in 22% of them, the infant being small for gestational age in 26% of cases. The fetus died in utero in a further 26% of cases. Pregnancies were subdivided into 2 groups depending on whether the initial event leading to APS diagnosis was obstetrical or thrombotic. Treatment (aspirin and low molecular weight heparin) was based on this classification: the latter was given in a curative dose for thrombotic events, in a preventive dose for obstetrical events. No fetal loss was observed when treatment was administered according to the protocol. Nevertheless, 20% of the pregnancies with obstetrical APS were complicated by smallness for gestational age and only 38% of the infants were live births. More than 87% of the thrombotic forms treated were free of complications and led to birth of a living child. Appropriate treatment appears to improve the prognosis for pregnancies in patients with APS. These patients are nevertheless at increased risk of an obstetrical event and require close monitoring, especially in obstetrical manifestations, which appear to have a poorer prognosis. Multidisciplinary follow-up by an experienced team is essential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. What's new and novel in obstetric anesthesia? Contributions from the 2003 scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, L C

    2005-04-01

    THE PREGNANT PATIENT: Age; maternal disease; prophylactic antibiotics; gastroesophageal reflux; obesity; starvation; genotyping; coagulopathy; infection; substance abuse; altered drug responses in pregnancy; physiological changes of pregnancy. THE FETUS: Fetal monitoring; intrauterine surgery. THE NEWBORN: Breastfeeding; maternal infection, fever, and neonatal sepsis evaluation. OBSTETRIC COMPLICATIONS: Embolic phenomena; hemorrhage; preeclampsia; preterm delivery. OBSTETRIC MANAGEMENT: External cephalic version and cervical cerclage; elective cesarean delivery; fetal malpresentation; vaginal birth after cesarean delivery; termination of pregnancy. OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: Analgesia for labor and delivery; anesthesia for cesarean delivery; anesthesia for short obstetric operations; complications of anesthesia. MISCELLANEOUS: Consent; ethics; history; labor support; websites/books/leaflets/journal announcements.

  5. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Can banks offer digital keys for health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, John

    2013-01-01

    In the quest to implement electronic health care records, health care stakeholders have uncovered an elephant in the room - how to implement patient identity and integrity solutions. Without this, linking the unique records of an individual is impossible. An inaccurate record can be dangerous for prescribing treatment. Yet many consider a unique patient identifier as an unacceptable privacy risk. Medical banking, or the convergence of banking and heath IT systems, is spawning new ideas that could impact on this difficult area. This article suggests that new forms of efficiency in payment processing may yield a common, cross-industry technology platform for managing digital identity by banks. Redefining a bank based on core competencies, the article looks at three areas: (1) the "identity theft arms race"; (2) innovations in payment processing; and (3) consumer engagement, and suggests that, as banking and health care systems converge, digital identity may become the new money. This realization may find banks fully engaged in helping health care to overcome the challenge of patient identity and integrity.

  7. The effectiveness of a cardiometabolic prevention program in general practices offering integrated care programs including a patient tailored lifestyle treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, M.; Eppink, L.; Nielen, M.; Badenbroek, I.; Stol, D.; Schellevis, F.; Wit, N. de

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: Selective cardio-metabolic prevention programs (CMP) may be especially effective in well-organized practices. We studied the effect of a CMP program in the academic primary care practices of the Julius Health Centers (JHC) that offer integrated cardiovascular disease management

  8. Evaluation of trainees' ability to perform obstetrical ultrasound using simulation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalouhi, Gihad E; Bernardi, Valeria; Gueneuc, Alexandra; Houssin, Isabelle; Stirnemann, Julien J; Ville, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of trainee's ability in obstetrical ultrasound is a time-consuming process, which requires involving patients as volunteers. With the use of obstetrical ultrasound simulators, virtual reality could help in assessing competency and evaluating trainees in this field. The objective of the study was to test the validity of an obstetrical ultrasound simulator as a tool for evaluating trainees following structured training by comparing scores obtained on obstetrical ultrasound simulator with those obtained on volunteers and by assessing correlations between scores of images and of dexterity given by 2 blinded examiners. Trainees, taking the 2013 French national examination for the practice of obstetrical ultrasound were asked to obtain standardized ultrasound planes both on volunteer pregnant women and on an obstetrical ultrasound simulator. These planes included measurements of biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and femur length as well as reference planes for cardiac 4-chamber and outflow tracts, kidneys, stomach/diaphragm, spine, and face. Images were stored and evaluated subsequently by 2 national examiners who scored each picture according to previously established quality criteria. Dexterity was also evaluated and subjectively scored between 0 and 10. The Raghunathan's modification of Pearson, Filon's z, Spearman's rank correlation, and analysis of variance tests were used to assess correlations between the scores by the 2 examiners and scores of dexterity and also to compare the final scores between the 2 different methods. We evaluated 29 trainees. The mean dexterity scores in simulation (6.5 ± 2.0) and real examination (5.9 ± 2.3) were comparable (P = .31). Scores with an obstetrical ultrasound simulator were significantly higher than those obtained on volunteers (P = .027). Nevertheless, there was a good correlation between the scores of the 2 examiners judging on simulation (R = 0.888) and on volunteers (R = 0.873) (P = .81). An

  9. Integrating psychology and obstetrics for medical students: shared labour ward teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, B E; McIntyre, J A

    1993-01-01

    Two studies relating to the inclusion of psycho-social issues in the training of obstetricians are reported here. The first reports on the extent to which currently practising obstetricians have received training in these aspects. The second explored the value of an innovative teaching approach combining psychological and obstetric training for medical students in the labour ward. A postal survey with responses from 220 obstetricians and paediatricians revealed that little information on psychological aspects of obstetric practice had been included in their undergraduate or postgraduate training or obtained from voluntary continuing education programmes. Experience was the primary source of training in these subjects. The second study explored the impact of joint psychological and obstetric teaching ward rounds for medical students. Students attending these integrated sessions reported being better prepared for the psycho-social aspects of obstetrics and showed a greater awareness of cross-cultural differences in needs of women during birth.

  10. PRONTO training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dilys M; Cohen, Susanna R; Estrada, Fatima; Monterroso, Marcia E; Jenny, Alisa; Fritz, Jimena; Fahey, Jenifer O

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, rating, and potential impact of PRONTO, a low-tech and high-fidelity simulation-based training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies and teamwork using the PartoPants low-cost birth simulator. A pilot project was conducted from September 21, 2009, to April 9, 2010, to train interprofessional teams from 5 community hospitals in the states of Mexico and Chiapas. Module I (teamwork, neonatal resuscitation, and obstetric hemorrhage) was followed 3 months later by module II (dystocia and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia) and an evaluation. Four elements were assessed: acceptability; feasibility and rating; institutional goal achievement; teamwork improvement; and knowledge and self-efficacy. The program was rated highly both by trainees and by non-trainees who completed a survey and interview. Hospital goals identified by participants in the module I strategic-planning sessions were achieved for 65% of goals in 3 months. Teamwork, knowledge, and self-efficacy scores improved. PRONTO brings simulation training to low-resource settings and can empower interprofessional teams to respond more effectively within their institutional limitations to emergencies involving women and newborns. Further study is warranted to evaluate the potential impact of the program on obstetric and neonatal outcome. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge and Utilization of the Partograph among obstetric care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study assessed knowledge and utilization of the partograph among health care workers in southwestern Nigeria. Respondents were selected by multi-stage sampling method from primary, secondary and tertiary levels of care. 719 respondents comprising of CHEWS - 110 (15.3%), Auxiliary Nurses - 148 ...

  12. A Pain Beyond Childbirth: Obstetrical Violence In Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artenira da Silva e Silva Sauaia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric violence is a type of gender violence and it implies violation of human rights, characterized by the imposition of harmful interventions to the physical and psychological integrity of pregnant women, perpetrated by health professionals and institutions (public and private in which such women are assisted. Thus, this paper has as the purpose to discuss obstetric violence as well as its characterization through the judgments of the Supreme Federal Court (STF and the Superior Court of Justice (STJ. The judgments with more evidence about the theme were selected and discussed.

  13. Reproductive health and cyber (mis)representations: a content analysis of obstetrics and gynecology residency program websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Angel M; Jackson, Courtney B; Martin, Sarah B

    2008-08-01

    Our study examines the ways in which obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residency programs describe abortion training opportunities and policies on their websites. From November 2006 through February 2007, we reviewed the websites of 246 accredited US Ob/Gyn residency programs for the presence of 16 categories of general program information as well as references to 10 reproductive health topics, including abortion. For programs that provided abortion training information, we cataloged those aspects of abortion care detailed on the website. After exporting data to Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), we conducted descriptive statistical analyses and used analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests to compare the proportion of programs that included various website content areas. Although over two thirds of program websites provide general curricular information, only 23.5% (n=58) make any reference to abortion. Programs at institutions with a Fellowship in Family Planning are more likely to provide information about family planning (ptraining opportunities and 17 programs (6.9%) provide information on abortion training policies. The comprehensiveness of Ob/Gyn residency program websites varies considerably. Enhancing the general information and abortion training content of institutional websites offers programs an opportunity to better meet the needs of prospective residents.

  14. Quality of Care: A Review Of Maternal Deaths In A Regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    emergency obstetric care services to prevent further maternal deaths. (Afr J Reprod Health 2015; 19[3]: 68-76). Keywords: Maternal death, Review, Quality of care, Sub-saharan Africa, Ghana .... technology, adequate human resource, health.

  15. [Husband's presence at childbirth in light of obstetric psychoprophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioma-Markowska, Urszula; Sipiński, Adam; Majerczyk, Iwona; Selwet, Monika; Kuna, Anna; Machura, Mariola

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary obstetric psychoprophylaxis gives prospective parents wide opportunities to prepare to the pregnancy period and delivery. It is educationally-minded and points the importance to modify the life style, introduces exercises accompanied by the relative during the pregnancy and delivery. The survey portrays husband's--child father's role in obstetric psychoprophylaxis. The importance to continue the psychoprophylaxis in the delivery room was spotted in the survey, too. The continuation might be reached by close relative's presence.

  16. Obstetrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasound will remain the primary modality for evaluating the obstetrical patient. MRI, however, is a useful adjunct when sonography cannot provide sufficient information. Currently, the use of MRI is limited to late pregnancy with the following indications: (a) evaluation of marginal placenta previa; (b) determination of IUGR; (c) assessment of cervical effacement; (d) fetal anomalies of the CNS; and (e) evaluation of concomitant maternal neoplasms. Specific advantages of MRI include: 1. Provision of crucial information in patients with a medical or surgical condition that ordinarily would require ionizing radiation. 2. Provision of important data about fetal anomalies and growth and development when sonography is limited by oligohydramnios or maternal obesity. 3. Confirmation of fetal anomalies when US is equivocal. 4. Demonstration of maternal pelvic structures when US is unsuccessful due to overlying bowel gas or obesity. 5. Pelvimetry without ionizing radiation

  17. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score for Evaluating Organ Failure and Outcome of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Obstetric Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Oliveira-Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the performance of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score in cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM. Design. Retrospective study of diagnostic validation. Setting. An obstetric intensive care unit (ICU in Brazil. Population. 673 women with SMM. Main Outcome Measures. mortality and SOFA score. Methods. Organ failure was evaluated according to maximum score for each one of its six components. The total maximum SOFA score was calculated using the poorest result of each component, reflecting the maximum degree of alteration in systemic organ function. Results. highest total maximum SOFA score was associated with mortality, 12.06 ± 5.47 for women who died and 1.87 ± 2.56 for survivors. There was also a significant correlation between the number of failing organs and maternal mortality, ranging from 0.2% (no failure to 85.7% (≥3 organs. Analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC confirmed the excellent performance of total maximum SOFA score for cases of SMM (AUC = 0.958. Conclusions. Total maximum SOFA score proved to be an effective tool for evaluating severity and estimating prognosis in cases of SMM. Maximum SOFA score may be used to conceptually define and stratify the degree of severity in cases of SMM.

  18. Modification of Obstetric Emergency Simulation Scenarios for Realism in a Home-Birth Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Janelle; Andrighetti, Tia; Benton, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Clinical competency and clear communication are essential for intrapartum care providers who encounter high-stakes, low-frequency emergencies. The challenge for these providers is to maintain infrequently used skills. The challenge is even more significant for midwives who manage births at home and who, due to low practice volume and low-risk clientele, may rarely encounter an emergency. In addition, access to team simulation may be limited for home-birth midwives. This project modified existing validated obstetric simulation scenarios for a home-birth setting. Twelve certified professional midwives (CPMs) in active home-birth practice participated in shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage simulations. The simulations were staged to resemble home-birth settings, supplies, and personnel. Fidelity (realism) of the simulations was assessed with the Simulation Design Scale, and satisfaction and self-confidence were assessed with the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale. Both utilized a 5-point Likert scale, with higher scores suggesting greater levels of fidelity, participant satisfaction, and self-confidence. Simulation Design Scale scores indicated participants agreed fidelity was achieved for the home-birth setting, while scores on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning indicated high levels of participant satisfaction and self-confidence. If offered without modification, simulation scenarios designed for use in hospitals may lose fidelity for home-birth midwives, particularly in the environmental and psychological components. Simulation is standard of care in most settings, an excellent vehicle for maintaining skills, and some evidence suggests it results in improved perinatal outcomes. Additional study is needed in this area to support home-birth providers in maintaining skills. This pilot study suggests that simulation scenarios intended for hospital use can be successfully adapted to the home-birth setting. © 2016 by

  19. Food Insecurity Screening in Pediatric Primary Care: Can Offering Referrals Help Identify Families in Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Clement J; Rhodes, Erinn T; Kreatsoulas, Catherine; Cox, Joanne E; Fleegler, Eric W

    2017-07-01

    To describe a clinical approach for food insecurity screening incorporating a menu offering food-assistance referrals, and to examine relationships between food insecurity and referral selection. Caregivers of 3- to 10-year-old children presenting for well-child care completed a self-administered questionnaire on a laptop computer. Items included the US Household Food Security Survey Module: 6-Item Short Form (food insecurity screen) and a referral menu offering assistance with: 1) finding a food pantry, 2) getting hot meals, 3) applying for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and 4) applying for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Referrals were offered independent of food insecurity status or eligibility. We examined associations between food insecurity and referral selection using multiple logistic regression while adjusting for covariates. A total of 340 caregivers participated; 106 (31.2%) reported food insecurity, and 107 (31.5%) selected one or more referrals. Forty-nine caregivers (14.4%) reported food insecurity but selected no referrals; 50 caregivers (14.7%) selected one or more referrals but did not report food insecurity; and 57 caregivers (16.8%) both reported food insecurity and selected one or more referrals. After adjustment, caregivers who selected one or more referrals had greater odds of food insecurity compared to caregivers who selected no referrals (adjusted odds ratio 4.0; 95% confidence interval 2.4-7.0). In this sample, there was incomplete overlap between food insecurity and referral selection. Offering referrals may be a helpful adjunct to standard screening for eliciting family preferences and identifying unmet social needs. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A measurement tool to assess culture change regarding patient safety in hospital obstetrical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth Milne, J; Bendaly, Nicole; Bendaly, Leslie; Worsley, Jill; FitzGerald, John; Nisker, Jeff

    2010-06-01

    Clinical error in acute care hospitals can only be addressed by developing a culture of safety. We sought to develop a cultural assessment survey (CAS) to assess patient safety culture change in obstetrical units. Interview prompts and a preliminary questionnaire were developed through a literature review of patient safety and "high reliability organizations," followed by interviews with members of the Managing Obstetrical Risk Efficiently (MOREOB) Program of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Three hundred preliminary questionnaires were mailed, and 21 interviews and 9 focus groups were conducted with the staff of 11 hospital sites participating in the program. To pilot test the CAS, 350 surveys were mailed to staff in participating hospitals, and interviews were conducted with seven nurses and five physicians who had completed the survey. Reliability analysis was conducted on four units that completed the CAS prior to and following the implementation of the first MOREOB module. Nineteen values and 105 behaviours, practices, and perceptions relating to patient safety were identified and included in the preliminary questionnaire, of which 143 of 300 (47.4%) were returned. Among the 220 cultural assessment surveys returned (62.9%), six cultural scales emerged: (1) patient safety as everyone's priority; (2) teamwork; (3) valuing individuals; (4) open communication; (5) learning; and (6) empowering individuals. The reliability analysis found all six scales to have internal reliability (Cronbach alpha), ranging from 0.72 (open communication) to 0.84 (valuing individuals). The CAS developed for this study may enable obstetrical units to assess change in patient safety culture.

  1. Morbidity And Mortality Following Emergency Obstetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morbidity And Mortality Following Emergency Obstetric Hysterectomy In Calabar, Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... in 15 (33.3%) of the case and hysterectomy for puerperal sepsis was an indication in 3 (6.7%) of the cases

  2. Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in antenatal women with bad obstetric history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintapalli, Suryamani; Padmaja, I Jyothi

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of fetal death is one of the tragedies that confront the physician providing obstetric care. Among the various agents associated with infections of pregnancy, viruses are the most important followed by bacteria and protozoa. Among protozoal infections in pregnancy, toxoplasmosis is reported to have a high incidence, sometimes causing fetal death. The study was intended to observe the seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis in pregnant women presenting with bad obstetric history (BOH). A total of 92 antenatal women were included in the study (80 in the study group and 12 in control group). The study group comprised of antenatal women with BOH in the age group of 20-35 years. Antenatal women with Rh incompatibility, pregnancy induced hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal disorders and syphilis were not included in the study. The control group included women in reproductive age group without BOH. All the samples were screened by enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) for Toxoplasma specific Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. Of the 80 antenatal women in the study group, 36 (45%) were seropositive for Toxoplasma specific IgG antibodies (P habits, illiteracy, socio-economic status and residential status were also studied. We conclude that toxoplasmosis during pregnancy causes congenital fetal infection with possible fetal loss. ELISA was found to be a sensitive serological test for diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis in pregnant women with BOH. Major cause of fetal loss in BOH cases in the study group was abortion.

  3. Obstetric outcomes of patients with abortus imminens in the first trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrenos, Ayşe Nur; Cakir Gungor, Ayse Nur; Gulerman, Cavidan; Cosar, Emine

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to find out the effect of abortus imminens (AI) on obstetric outcomes of pregnancies which continued beyond the 24th week of gestation. In this prospective study, 309 patients with AI were divided into high-risk group (with a risk factor for spontaneous abortus) (n = 92) and low-risk group (without a risk factor) (n = 217). The control group (n = 308) was chosen randomly. In AI group, preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), cesarean section (C/S) delivery, postpartum uterine atony and need of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) rates were significantly higher than control group. Gestational diabetes mellitus, PPROM, still birth, low APGAR scores were seen more frequently in the high-risk patients than in the control group. Furthermore in the high-risk group, preterm delivery, malpresentation, C/S delivery and need of NICU were increased much more than in the low-risk group. Gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, oligo/polyhydramniosis, intrauterine growth retardation, placenta previa, abruption of placenta, chorioamnionitis, congenital abnormalities, delivery induction, cephalopelvic disproportion, fetal distress and manual removal of placenta were not different among the groups. Patients with AI history, especially with high-risk factors can have adverse obstetric and neonatal results. So their antenatal follow-up has to be done cautiously for the early signs and symptoms of these complications.

  4. Does Uterine Fibroid Adversely Affect Obstetric Outcome of Pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend S. Saleh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fibroid is the most common benign tumor of the uterus and if associated with pregnancy may adversely affect the outcome of pregnancy. Objective of the present study was to assess the obstetric outcome (maternal and fetal in pregnancy with fibroid. Methods. A prospective observational study was performed over a period from May 2015 to August 2017 at Obstetrics and Gynecology Department in Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt. 64 pregnant patients with >2 cm fibroid were taken in the study. Routine fundamental investigations were done for all. They were followed during antenatal period clinically and scanned by ultrasonogram which was done at booking visit and during subsequent visits to assess the change in the size of the fibroid and other obstetric complications. Maternal age, parity, size of fibroid, complications during pregnancy, and mode of delivery were noted. Results. 64 pregnant patients with uterine fibroids were recruited; 47 of them completed the study to the end. The average age was 31.80±3.27 years, body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] was 24.67±2.46, primigravida was 23.4%, multigravida was 76.6%, duration of menstrual cycle/day was 29.68±3.10, and duration of menstrual period/day was 6.46±1.12. The percentage of spontaneous conception was 59.57% and 40.43% for using assisted reproductive technology. The results of obstetric outcome were spontaneous abortion in 2%, premature delivery in 27.7%, and delivery at 37–41 weeks of pregnancy in 70.2%. The mode of delivery was vaginal delivery in 15% and cesarean sections in 85%. Also, 34% had threatened miscarriage, 21% had preterm labor, 2% had antepartum bleeding in the form of placenta previa, 4% had abdominal pain needing admission, one of them underwent laparotomy and was diagnosed as red degeneration, 2 (4% had postpartum hemorrhage, and only one needed blood transfusion. Cesarean sections were done in

  5. Improving communication between obstetric and neonatology teams for high-risk deliveries: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Kelly, Frances C; Weber, Emily M; Moore, Merle L; Gokulakrishnan, Ganga; Hagan, Joseph L; Brand, M Colleen; Gallegos, Jennifer O; Levy, Barbara E; Fortunov, Regine M

    2017-01-01

    Summoning is a key component of communication between obstetrics and neonatal resuscitation team (NRT) in advance of deliveries. A paging system is a commonly used summoning tool. The timeliness and information contained in the page help NRT to optimally prepare for postdelivery infant care. Our aim was to increase the frequency that summoning pages contained gestational age and reason for NRT attendance to >90%. At baseline, 8% of pages contained gestational age and 33% of pages contained a reason for NRT attendance. Sequential Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were used as our model for quality improvement. During the 8-month improvement period, the per cent of pages increased to 97% for gestational age and 97% for reason for NRT attendance. Measures of page timeliness, our balancing measure, did not change. Summoning communication between obstetric and NRT is crucial for optimal perinatal outcomes. The active involvement of all stakeholders throughout the project resulted in the development of a standardised paging tool and a more informative paging process, which is a key communication tool used in many centres.

  6. Obstetric medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Balbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric assistance made major advances in the last 20 years: improved surgical technique allows quicker caesarean sections, anaesthesiology procedures such as peripheral anaesthesia and epidural analgesia made safer operative assistance, remarkably reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, neonatology greatly improved the results of assistance to low birth weight newborns. A new branch of medicine called “obstetric medicine” gained interest and experience after the lessons of distinguished physicians like Michael De Swiet in England. All together these advances are making successful pregnancies that 20 years ago would have been discouraged or even interrupted: that’s what we call high risk pregnancy. High risk of what? Either complications of pregnancy on pre-existing disease or complications of pre-existing disease on pregnancy. Nowadays, mortality in pregnancy has a medical cause in 80% of cases in Western countries (Confidential Enquiry on Maternal Deaths, UK, 2004. DISCUSSION The background is always changing and we have to take in account of: increase of maternal age; widespread use of assisted fertilization techniques for treatment of infertility; social feelings about maternity desire with increasing expectations from medical assistance; immigration of medically “naive” patients who don’t know to have a chronic disease, but apt and ready to conceive; limited knowledge of feasibility of drug use in pregnancy which may induce both patients and doctors to stopping appropriate drug therapy in condition of severe disease. Preconception counseling, planning the pregnancy, wise use of drugs, regular follow-up throughout the pregnancy and, in selected cases, preterm elective termination of pregnancy may result in excellent outcome both for mother and foetus. CONCLUSIONS Highly committed and specifically trained physicians are required to counsel these patients and to plan their treatment before and during pregnancy.

  7. Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    is associated with a decrease in the probability of performing a C-section from 2.3 to 3.7 percentage points (7–11.6%) with no consequences for medical complications or neonatal outcomes. The impact can be explained by a reduction in the discretion of obstetric decision-making rather than by patient cream......Using inpatient discharge records from the Italian region of Piedmont, we estimate the impact of an increase in malpractice pressure brought about by experience-rated liability insurance on obstetric practices. Our identification strategy exploits the exogenous location of public hospitals in court...... districts with and without schedules for noneconomic damages. We perform difference-in-differences analysis on the entire sample and on a subsample which only considers the nearest hospitals in the neighborhood of court district boundaries. We find that the increase in medical malpractice pressure...

  8. Association of Group Prenatal Care in US Family Medicine Residencies With Maternity Care Practice: A CERA Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Wendy B; Tong, Sebastian T; LeFevre, Nicholas M

    2017-03-01

    Group prenatal care has been shown to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes. With increasing adaption of group prenatal care by family medicine residencies, this model may serve as a potential method to increase exposure to and interest in maternity care among trainees. This study aims to describe the penetration, regional and program variations, and potential impacts on future maternity care practice of group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies. The CAFM Educational Research Alliance (CERA) conducted a survey of all US family medicine residency program directors in 2013 containing questions about maternity care training. A secondary data analysis was completed to examine relevant data on group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies and maternity care practice patterns. 23.1% of family medicine residency programs report provision of group prenatal care. Programs with group prenatal care reported increased number of vaginal deliveries per resident. Controlling for average number of vaginal deliveries per resident, programs with group prenatal care had a 2.35 higher odds of having more than 10% of graduates practice obstetrics and a 2.93 higher odds of having at least one graduate in the past 5 years enter an obstetrics fellowship. Residency programs with group prenatal care models report more graduates entering OB fellowships and practicing maternity care. Implementing group prenatal care in residency training can be one method in a multifaceted approach to increasing maternity care practice among US family physicians.

  9. [Crisis management during obstetric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2009-05-01

    Obstetric crisis includes hemorrhagic shock, embolisms and difficult airway. Life will be rapidly threatened with disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure or systemic inflammatory response syndrome in these crises. In the face of the crisis, repeated evaluation of parturients and differential diagnosis are necessary along with fetal heart monitoring. For evaluation of bleeding, one should notice that the visual estimation of vaginal bleeding does not reflect the extent of intravascular volume deficit. Treatments for hemorrhagic shock include fluid replacement, blood transfusion as well as fresh frozen plasma, platelet, anticoagulants, anti-thrombin III, and protease inhibitors. When bleeding is still uncontrollable, arterial embolization or hysterectomy will be considered. Embolic disorders are another cause of maternal mortality. The signs and symptoms are all similar (dyspnea, cyanosis and sudden cardiovascular collapse). Strategies against the embolism will be basically symptomatic therapy. The physiological change with pregnancy results in the need of careful pre-anesthetic airway evaluation for parturients. A difficult or failed intubation drill is also extremely important. Recently, laryngeal mask airway has been successfully used in these parturients. During resuscitation of a pregnant woman, left uterine displacement is essential. For a patient who has not responded after 4 to 5 minutes of ACLS, immediate cesarean delivery should be considered.

  10. Obstetrical complications of endometriosis, particularly deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Inversetti, Annalisa; Schimberni, Matteo; Viganò, Paola; Giorgione, Veronica; Candiani, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few years, a new topic in the field of endometriosis has emerged: the potential impact of the disease on pregnancy outcomes. This review aims to summarize in detail the available evidence on the relationship between endometriosis, particularly deep endometriosis (DE), and obstetrical outcomes. Acute complications of DE, such as spontaneous hemoperitoneum, bowel perforation, and uterine rupture, may occur during pregnancy. Although these events represent life-threatening conditions, they are rare and unpredictable. Therefore, the current literature does not support any kind of prophylactic surgery before pregnancy to prevent such complications. Results on the impact of DE on obstetrical outcomes are debatable and characterized by several limitations, including small sample size, lack of adjustment for confounders, lack of adequate control subjects, and other methodologic flaws. For these reasons, it is not possible to draw conclusions on this topic. The strongest evidence shows that DE is associated with higher rates of placenta previa; for other obstetrical outcomes, such as miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm birth and hypertensive disorders, results are controversial. Although it is unlikely that surgery of DE may modify the impact of the disease on the course of pregnancy, no study has yet investigated this issue. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ‘Women think pregnancy management means obstetric ultrasound’: Vietnamese obstetricians’ views on the use of ultrasound during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Edvardsson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore Vietnamese obstetricians’ experiences and views on the role of obstetric ultrasound in clinical management of complicated pregnancy and in situations where maternal and fetal health interests conflict. Design: Seventeen obstetricians in northern Vietnam were interviewed as part of the CROss-Country Ultrasound Study (CROCUS project in 2013. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants described ultrasound as a central tool in prenatal care, although they called for increased training and resources to prevent inappropriate management. A prevailing overuse driven by women's request and increased commercialisation was described. Other clinical examinations were seen as being disregarded by women in favour of ultrasound, resulting in missed opportunities for identifying potential pregnancy complications. The use of ultrasound for sex selection purposes raised concern among participants. Visualisation of human features or heartbeat during ultrasound was commonly described as the point where the fetus became regarded as a ‘person’. Women were said to prioritise fetal health interests over their own health, particularly if a woman had difficulties becoming pregnant or had undergone assisted fertilisation. The woman's husband and his family were described as having an important role in decision-making in situations of maternal and fetal health conflicts. Conclusions: This study provides insight into issues surrounding ultrasound use in contemporary Vietnam, some of which may be specific to this low-income context. It is clear that ultrasound has become a central tool in prenatal care in Vietnam and that it has also been embraced by women. However, there seems to be a need to balance women's demands for obstetric ultrasound with better recognition of the valuable contribution to be made by the full range of clinical examinations in pregnancy, along with a more strategic allocation of

  12. Reasons for delay in decision making and reaching health facility among obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse patients in Gondar University hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefris, Mulat; Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Terefe, Kiros; Gelagay, Abebaw Addis; Adigo, Azmeraw; Amare, Selamawit; Lazaro, Dorothy; Berhe, Aster; Baye, Chernet

    2017-08-22

    Obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse remain highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where women have poor access to modern health care. Women having these problems tend to stay at home for years before getting treatment. However, information regarding the reasons contributing to late presentation to treatment is scarce, especially at the study area. The objective of this study was to assess the reasons whywomen with obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse at Gondar University Hospital delay treatment. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 women. Delay was evaluated by calculating symptom onset and time of arrival to get treatment at Gondar University Hospital. Regression analysis was conducted to elicit predictors of delay for treatment. Of the total 384 participants, 311 (80.9%) had pelvic organ prolapse and 73(19.1%) obstetric fistula. The proportion of women who delayed treatment of pelvic organ prolapse was 82.9% and that of obstetric fistula 60.9%. Fear of disclosing illness due to social stigma (AOR = 2; 1.03, 3.9) and lack of money (AOR = 1.97; 1.01, 3.86) were associated with the delay of treatment for pelvic organ prolapse,while increasing age (AOR =1.12; 1.01, 1.24) and divorce (AOR = 16.9; 1.75, 165.5) were were responsible for delaying treatment forobstetric fistula. A large numberof women with pelvic organ prolapse and obstetric fistula delayed treatment. Fear of disclosure due to social stigma and lack of moneywere the major factors that contributed to thedelay to seek treatment for pelvic organ prolapse,while increasing age and divorce were the predictors for delaying treatment for obstetric fistula.

  13. Obstetric X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwachi, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Radiography of the pelvis should never be taken to diagnose early pregnancy, because of potential hazards of radiation damage to the growing foetus. the only indication occurs in the last week of pregnancy (37 weeks). Obstetric X-ray will help you answer like confirmation of malposition,multiple pregnancies; fetal abnormalities e.g. hydrocephalus, foetal disposition. The choice of radiographic projection will help give foetal presentation, disposition as well as foetal maturity. The search pattern helps you determine maternal and spine deformity, foetal spine and head , foetal presentation and any other anomalies

  14. The impact of birthplace on women's birth experiences and perceptions of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Sandall, Jane

    2012-01-01

    in two freestanding midwifery units (FMU) and two obstetric units (OU) in north Denmark, all pursuing an ideal of high-quality, humanistic and patient-centred care. As part of a matched cohort study, a postal questionnairensurvey was undertaken. Two hundred and eighteen low-risk women in FMU care......, admitted between JanuaryeOctober 2006, and an obstetrically/socio-demographically matched control group of 218 low-risk women admitted to an OU were invited to participate. Three hundred and seventy-five women (86%) responded. Birth experience and satisfaction with care were rated significantly more...... positively by FMU than by OU women. Significantly better results for FMU care were also found for specific patient-centred care elements (support, participation in decision-making, attentiveness to psychological needs and to wishes for birth, information, and for women’s feeling of being listened to...

  15. Teaching veterinary obstetrics using three-dimensional animation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Jakob; Buchanan, M Flint; Moore, James N; White, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    In this three-year study, test scores for students taught veterinary obstetrics in a classroom setting with either traditional media (photographs, text, and two-dimensional graphical presentations) were compared with those for students taught by incorporating three-dimensional (3D) media (linear animations and interactive QuickTime Virtual Reality models) into the classroom lectures. Incorporation of the 3D animations and interactive models significantly increased students' scores on essay questions designed to assess their comprehension of the subject matter. This approach to education may help to better prepare students for dealing with obstetrical cases during their final clinical year and after graduation.

  16. Obstetrical complications in people at risk for developing schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ballon, Jacob S; Seeber, Katherine; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2007-01-01

    Many factors have been associated with the development of schizophrenia, yet few studies have looked at these same factors in individuals considered at risk for schizophrenia, but who have not yet reached diagnostic threshold. The rate of obstetrical complications was assessed as part of a comprehensive battery in subjects at risk (N=52), or in the first episode of schizophrenia (N=18), and in normal comparison subjects (N=43). The rate of obstetrical complications was increased in the at ris...

  17. [Gynecology and obstetrics in Ancient Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M

    1992-10-01

    Gods and Goddesses were invoked by the Romans for the termination of a good delivery. Diana, Juno, Lucina and Cybele were the preferred ones. Sterility was sometimes treated by the whip of the Lupercali of ministers of Pan. The first doctors in Rome were coming from Greece. Celsus, Pliny the Elder were encyclopedists, Rufus an anatomist, Dioscorides a pharmacologist. Archigenes, Aretaeus and Antyllus surgeons. Soranus from Ephesus, was the first to recommend podalic version. His works was a long time buried in a profound oblivion and discovered by scholars during the nineteenth century. Galen was looked as the most famous medical man after Hippocrates. During the Roman Empire of Occident (Byzantine Empire), Oribasius, Aurelianus Caelius, Moschion and above all Aetius and Paul of Aegina wrote many works which were many times plagiarized. Roman laws concerning public health were severe. Midwives took an important action in the care of pregnant women. Roman poets as Plautus, Terence, Lucilius, Catullus, Virgil, Tibullus, Ovid and Martial were many times concerned in their writings with gynecologic or obstetric subjects. Children were easily forsaken. Three Emperors, Trajan, Marcus-Aurelius and Alexander Severius, a writer, Aulu-Gelles, and a rhetor, Quintilian, took protection of them.

  18. [Obstetric management in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Luna, Rogelio; Miranda-Araujo, Osvaldo

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a disease of poor prognosis when is associated with pregnancy. A maternal mortality of 30-56% and a neonatal survival of approximately 85% is reported. Surveillance of patients with severe pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy must be multidisciplinary, to provide information and optimal treatment during and after gestation. Targeted therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy significantly reduces mortality. The critical period with respect to mortality, is the first month after birth. Propose an algorithm for management during pregnancy for patients with severe pulmonary hypertension who want to continue with it. The recommendations established with clinical evidence for patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and pregnancy are presented: diagnosis, treatment, obstetrics and cardiology management, preoperative recommendations for termination of pregnancy, post-partum care and contraception. The maternal mortality remains significantly higher in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and pregnancy, in these cases should be performed multidisciplinary management in hospitals that have experience in the management of this disease and its complications.

  19. A cost effective small hospital in Bangladesh: what it can mean for emergency obstetric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, C; Chowdhury, Q

    2003-04-01

    home treatment, or 2 for tetanus immunization of pregnant women. Sixty-two percent of the DALYS saved came from emergency obstetric care (EmOC) related activities. We conclude that cost effective basic hospital service can be added to immunization, family planning and other basic health services now available in countries like Bangladesh with a very low increase in total cost and that the benefits which would accrue, particularly for maternal and perinatal mortality, would be great.

  20. Preferences for a third-trimester ultrasound scan in a low-risk obstetric population: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Fiona A; Crealey, Grainne E; Alderdice, Fiona A; McElnay, James C

    2015-10-01

    Establish maternal preferences for a third-trimester ultrasound scan in a healthy, low-risk pregnant population. Cross-sectional study incorporating a discrete choice experiment. A large, urban maternity hospital in Northern Ireland. One hundred and forty-six women in their second trimester of pregnancy. A discrete choice experiment was designed to elicit preferences for four attributes of a third-trimester ultrasound scan: health-care professional conducting the scan, detection rate for abnormal foetal growth, provision of non-medical information, cost. Additional data collected included age, marital status, socio-economic status, obstetric history, pregnancy-specific stress levels, perceived health and whether pregnancy was planned. Analysis was undertaken using a mixed logit model with interaction effects. Women's preferences for, and trade-offs between, the attributes of a hypothetical scan and indirect willingness-to-pay estimates. Women had significant positive preference for higher rate of detection, lower cost and provision of non-medical information, with no significant value placed on scan operator. Interaction effects revealed subgroups that valued the scan most: women experiencing their first pregnancy, women reporting higher levels of stress, an adverse obstetric history and older women. Women were able to trade on aspects of care and place relative importance on clinical, non-clinical outcomes and processes of service delivery, thus highlighting the potential of using health utilities in the development of services from a clinical, economic and social perspective. Specifically, maternal preferences exhibited provide valuable information for designing a randomized trial of effectiveness and insight for clinical and policy decision makers to inform woman-centred care. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Provider-associated factors in obstetric interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, M.; Heres, M. H.; Hart, A. A.; van der Veen, F.; Treffers, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess which factors influence provider-associated differences in obstetric interventions. STUDY DESIGN: A survey of obstetricians and co-workers in a sample consisting of 38 Dutch hospitals was taken, using a questionnaire that contained questions about personal and hospital-policy

  2. [The sociological survey of syndrome of professional burnout in physicians of obstetrics department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novgorodova, U R

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of emotional burnout is a condition of emotional, psychic, physical exhaustion developed as a result of chronic unresolved stress at working place. The development of the given syndrome is specific for altruistic professions where care of people prevails (social workers, physicians, medical nurses, teachers, etc.). In ICD-10 the syndrome of burnout is described under rubric Z.73.0 as “a state of total exhaustion”. Nowadays, physicians and other medical workers found oneself least socially protected in social economic and professional aspects. This is conditioned by low level of salary, significant decreasing of quality of life, increasing of professional responsibility and also by intensification of contradictions between professional and moral duty and possibilities of rendering of medical care to population. The recent studies demonstrate that this condition can be developed in 30-50% of physicians. Also, it is established that age, marital status, had no effect on emotional burnout. The emotional burnout is developing in more degree in females than in males. Also, females are lacking relationship between motivation (satisfaction with remuneration of labor) and development of syndrome in the presence of relationship between significance of work as motivation for activities, satisfaction with professional progression. Those who experience deficiency of autonomy (“super-controlled personalities”) are more subjected to burnout. The study was carried out to determine syndrome of professional burnout in physicians of obstetrics department of large (160 beds) obstetric institution the Yakurskaia municipal clinical hospital with purpose offurther implementation of measures of prevention and correction. The presence of syndrome of burnout effects negatively on both psychophysical general state of particular workers and functioning of medical institution on the whole.

  3. Compliance with the CONSORT checklist in obstetric anaesthesia randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, S H; Darani, R; Douglas, M J; Wight, W; Yee, J

    2004-10-01

    The Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) checklist is an evidence-based approach to help improve the quality of reporting randomised controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine how closely randomised controlled trials in obstetric anaesthesia adhere to the CONSORT checklist. We retrieved all randomised controlled trials pertaining to the practice of obstetric anaesthesia and summarised in Obstetric Anesthesia Digest between March 2001 and December 2002 and compared the quality of reporting to the CONSORT checklist. The median number of correctly described CONSORT items was 65% (range 36% to 100%). Information pertaining to randomisation, blinding of the assessors, sample size calculation, reliability of measurements and reporting of the analysis were often omitted. It is difficult to determine the value and quality of many obstetric anaesthesia clinical trials because journal editors do not insist that this important information is made available to readers. Both clinicians and clinical researchers would benefit from uniform reporting of randomised trials in a manner that allows rapid data retrieval and easy assessment for relevance and quality.

  4. Validity of a questionnaire measuring the world health organization concept of health system responsiveness with respect to perinatal services in the Dutch obstetric care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooy, Jacoba; Valentine, Nicole B; Birnie, Erwin; Vujkovic, Marijana; de Graaf, Johanna P; Denktaş, Semiha; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2014-12-03

    The concept of responsiveness, introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses non-clinical aspects of health service quality that are relevant regardless of provider, country, health system or health condition. Responsiveness refers to "aspects related to the way individuals are treated and the environment in which they are treated" during health system interactions. This paper assesses the psychometric properties of a newly developed responsiveness questionnaire dedicated to evaluating maternal experiences of perinatal care services, called the Responsiveness in Perinatal and Obstetric Health Care Questionnaire (ReproQ), using the eight-domain WHO concept. The ReproQ was developed between October 2009 and February 2010 by adapting the WHO Responsiveness Questionnaire items to the perinatal care context. The psychometric properties of feasibility, construct validity, and discriminative validity were empirically assessed in a sample of Dutch women two weeks post partum. A total of 171 women consented to participation. Feasibility: the interviews lasted between 20 and 40 minutes and the overall missing rate was 8%. Construct validity: mean Cronbach's alphas for the antenatal, birth and postpartum phase were: 0.73 (range 0.57-0.82), 0.84 (range 0.66-0.92), and 0.87 (range 0.62-0.95) respectively. The item-own scale correlations within all phases were considerably higher than most of the item-other scale correlations. Within the antenatal care, birth care and post partum phases, the eight factors explained 69%, 69%, and 76% of variance respectively. Discriminative validity: overall responsiveness mean sum scores were higher for women whose children were not admitted. This confirmed the hypothesis that dissatisfaction with health outcomes is transferred to their judgement on responsiveness of the perinatal services. The ReproQ interview-based questionnaire demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties to describe the quality of perinatal care in the

  5. District health manager and mid-level provider perceptions of practice environments in acute obstetric settings in Tanzania: a mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'ang'a, Njoki; Byrne, Mary Woods; Kruk, Margaret E; Shemdoe, Aloisia; de Pinho, Helen

    2016-08-08

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the capacity of human resources for health (HRH) managers to create positive practice environments that enable motivated, productive, and high-performing HRH is weak. We implemented a unique approach to examining HRH management practices by comparing perspectives offered by mid-level providers (MLPs) of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Tanzania to those presented by local health authorities, known as council health management teams (CHMTs). This study was guided by the basic strategic human resources management (SHRM) component model. A convergent mixed-method design was utilized to assess qualitative and quantitative data from the Health Systems Strengthening for Equity: The Power and Potential of Mid-Level Providers project. Survey data was obtained from 837 mid-level providers, 83 of whom participated in a critical incident interview whose aim was to elicit negative events in the practice environment that induced intention to leave their job. HRH management practices were assessed quantitatively in 48 districts with 37 members of CHMTs participating in semi-structured interviews. The eight human resources management practices enumerated in the basic SHRM component model were implemented unevenly. On the one hand, members of CHMTs and mid-level providers agreed that there were severe shortages of health workers, deficient salaries, and an overwhelming workload. On the other hand, members of CHMTs and mid-level providers differed in their perspectives on rewards and allocation of opportunities for in-service training. Although written standards of performance and supervision requirements were available in most districts, they did not reflect actual duties. Members of CHMTs reported high levels of autonomy in key HRH management practices, but mid-level providers disputed the degree to which the real situation on the ground was factored into job-related decision-making by CHMTs. The incongruence in perspectives offered by members of CHMTs

  6. Brucellosis in pregnancy: clinical aspects and obstetric outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Gustavo; Espinoza, Miguel; D'Onadio, Guery; Saona, Pedro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis with high morbidity in humans. This disease has gained interest recently due to its re-emergence and potential for weaponization. Pregnant women with this disease can develop severe complications. Its association with adverse obstetric outcomes is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetric outcomes of brucellosis in pregnancy. Cases of pregnant women with active brucellosis seen at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia from 1970 to 2012 were reviewed. Diagnostic criteria were a positive agglutination test and/or positive blood/bone marrow culture. Presentation and outcomes data were collected. The Chi-square test was used for nominal variables. A p-value of brucellosis in 6.4%. The most common treatment was aminoglycosides plus rifampicin (42.2% of cases). Complication rates decreased if treatment was started within 2 weeks of presentation (p brucellosis in pregnancy reported in the literature. Brucella presents adverse obstetric outcomes including fetal and maternal/neonatal death. Cases with unexplained spontaneous abortion should be investigated for brucellosis. Prompt treatment is paramount to decrease the devastating outcomes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... minimum printing cost of about 150 copies for authors and advertising organization ... Nonmembers: Please send change of address information to subscriptions@ ... The entire contents of the Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ...

  8. "Women come here on their own when they need to": prenatal care, authoritative knowledge, and maternal health in Oaxaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesia, P M

    1996-06-01

    Physiological and anatomical concepts about reproduction held by traditional midwives in Southern Oaxaca differ considerably from those of biomedicine. Government training courses for traditional midwives disregard these deep-seated differences, and also the underlying conceptual rationale of ethno-obstetrics. These courses constantly reinforce and actively promote the biomedical model of care. But rural midwives, despite these training courses, do not substantially change their obstetrical vision and ways. The strength of their own authoritative knowledge, fully shared by the women and men of their communities, allows them to continue their traditional style of care, despite pressures to conform to biomedical values, beliefs, and practices. Suggestions for a mutual accommodation of biomedical and midwifery approaches to prenatal care include training medical personnel in ethno-obstetric techniques and rationales, teaching midwives basic medical interventions, addressing in intervention programs all social actors participating in reproductive decision making, and adopting an interdisciplinary approach that includes nonmedical aspects of maternal care.

  9. Nuclear medicine in obstetrics and gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The role of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy in obstetrics and gynecology are reviewed. A brief history of the development of nuclear medicine is given along with a discussion of basic concepts. Finally a more detailed overview with graphs and pictures is presented for specific techniques

  10. Geographical access to care at birth in Ghana: a barrier to safe motherhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gething Peter W

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate facility-based care at birth is a key determinant of safe motherhood but geographical access remains poor in many high burden regions. Despite its importance, geographical access is rarely audited systematically, preventing integration in national-level maternal health system assessment and planning. In this study, we develop a uniquely detailed set of spatially-linked data and a calibrated geospatial model to undertake a national-scale audit of geographical access to maternity care at birth in Ghana, a high-burden country typical of many in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We assembled detailed spatial data on the population, health facilities, and landscape features influencing journeys. These were used in a geospatial model to estimate journey-time for all women of childbearing age (WoCBA to their nearest health facility offering differing levels of care at birth, taking into account different transport types and availability. We calibrated the model using data on actual journeys made by women seeking care. Results We found that a third of women (34% in Ghana live beyond the clinically significant two-hour threshold from facilities likely to offer emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC classed at the ‘partial’ standard or better. Nearly half (45% live that distance or further from ‘comprehensive’ EmONC facilities, offering life-saving blood transfusion and surgery. In the most remote regions these figures rose to 63% and 81%, respectively. Poor levels of access were found in many regions that meet international targets based on facilities-per-capita ratios. Conclusions Detailed data assembly combined with geospatial modelling can provide nation-wide audits of geographical access to care at birth to support systemic maternal health planning, human resource deployment, and strategic targeting. Current international benchmarks of maternal health care provision are inadequate for these purposes because

  11. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdok, Hilde; Cronie, Doug; van der Speld, Cecile; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Jonge, Ank; Rijnders, Marlies; de Graaf, Irene; Schellevis, François G; Verhoeven, Corine J

    2017-11-01

    High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care system and whether they expect a new system of integrated maternity care to affect their experienced job autonomy. A cross-sectional survey. The Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire was used to assess experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals. Data were collected in the Netherlands in 2015. 799 professionals participated of whom 362 were primary care midwives, 240 obstetricians, 93 clinical midwives and 104 obstetric nurses. The mean score for experienced job autonomy was highest for primary care midwives, followed by obstetricians, clinical midwives and obstetric nurses. Primary care midwives scored highest in expecting to lose their job autonomy in an integrated care system. There are significant differences in experienced job autonomy between maternity care professionals. When changing the maternity care system it will be a challenge to maintain a high level of experienced job autonomy for professionals. A decrease in job autonomy could lead to a reduction in job related wellbeing and in satisfaction with care among pregnant women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.