WorldWideScience

Sample records for oecd nea csni-specialist

  1. Proceedings of the Second OECD (NEA) CSNI Specialist Meeting on Molten Core Debris-Concrete Interactions

    1992-01-01

    The Second CSNI Specialist Meeting on Molten Core Debris-Concrete Interactions was held at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany on April 1-3, 1992. The status and progress in this field of severe reactor accidents were discussed from researchers around the world including participants from Russia and the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic. The contributions concentrated on two main topics. The first topic is the 'classical' core debris-concrete interaction, both experimental and theoretical. Integral effects and separate effects were addressed in thermal hydraulics and heat transfer, material interaction, and aerosol release during concrete erosion, with some applications to prototypical nuclear power plants. The second topic gaining more and more interest is the possibility of controlling and ending the erosion of the concrete by spreading of the core melt, and/or achieving coolability by the addition of water. In the final session it was concluded that considerable progress has been made in understanding and modelling the important phenomena. For the first topic a broad and generally sufficient experimental data base is existing, allowing further improvement qualification of the theoretical models which at present give reasonable agreement with the most important experimental data. A validation matrix is recommended for final validation of the codes. With respect to fission product release during MCCI measurements show that the releases are significantly less than previously estimated. The relatively new topic of melt coolability deserves further investigations which are already underway at different places or international coordinated efforts

  2. Proceedings of the Second OECD (NEA) CSNI Specialist Meeting on Molten Core Debris-Concrete Interactions

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    The Second CSNI Specialist Meeting on Molten Core Debris-Concrete Interactions was held at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany on April 1-3, 1992. The status and progress in this field of severe reactor accidents were discussed from researchers around the world including participants from Russia and the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic. The contributions concentrated on two main topics. The first topic is the 'classical' core debris-concrete interaction, both experimental and theoretical. Integral effects and separate effects were addressed in thermal hydraulics and heat transfer, material interaction, and aerosol release during concrete erosion, with some applications to prototypical nuclear power plants. The second topic gaining more and more interest is the possibility of controlling and ending the erosion of the concrete by spreading of the core melt, and/or achieving coolability by the addition of water. In the final session it was concluded that considerable progress has been made in understanding and modelling the important phenomena. For the first topic a broad and generally sufficient experimental data base is existing, allowing further improvement qualification of the theoretical models which at present give reasonable agreement with the most important experimental data. A validation matrix is recommended for final validation of the codes. With respect to fission product release during MCCI measurements show that the releases are significantly less than previously estimated. The relatively new topic of melt coolability deserves further investigations which are already underway at different places or international coordinated efforts.

  3. Proceedings of the first OECD (NEA) CSNI-Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents

    Sonnenkalb, Martin

    1992-07-01

    OECD member countries have adopted various accident management measures and procedures. To initiate these measures and control their effectiveness, information on the status of the plant and on accident symptoms is necessary. This information includes physical data (pressure, temperatures, hydrogen concentrations, etc.) but also data on the condition of components such as pumps, valves, power supplies, etc. In response to proposals made by the CSNI - PWG 4 Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) and endorsed by PWG 4, CSNI has decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents. The knowledge-basis for the Specialist Meeting was the paper on 'Instrumentation for Accident Management in Containment'. This technical document (NEA/CSNI/R(92)4) was prepared by the CSNI - Principle Working Group Number 4 of experts on January 1992. The Specialist Meeting was structured in the following sessions: I. Information Needs for Managing Severe Accidents, II. Capabilities and Limitations of Existing Instrumentation, III. Unconventional Use and Further Development of Instrumentation, IV. Operational Aids and Artificial Intelligence. The Specialist Meeting concentrated on existing instrumentation and its possible use under severe accident conditions; it also examined developments underway and planed. Desirable new instrumentation was discussed briefly. The interactions and discussions during the sessions were helpful to bring different perspectives to bear, thus sharpening the thinking of all. Questions were raised concerning the long-term viability of current (or added) instrumentation. It must be realized that the subject of instrumentation to manage severe accidents is very new, and that no international meeting on this topic was held previously. One of the objectives was to bring this important issue to the attention of both safety authorities and experts. It could be seen from several of the presentations and from

  4. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Yamano, Norihiro; Sugimoto, Jun [eds.

    1998-01-01

    The OECD/CSNI Specialists Meeting on Fuel Coolant Interactions (FCI) was held at Tokai-mura in Japan on May 19 through 21, 1997, and attended by 80 participants from 14 countries and one international organizations. In the meeting 36 papers were presented followed by active discussions in six sessions on various aspects of FCI issues, such as reactor application, premixing, propagation/trigger, experiments and code/models. At the end of the Meeting, the participants have reached to the consensus on the summary and recommendations, which consists of the following items; (1) We find no new evidence that would change or violate the conclusion of SERG-2 (1996) that alpha-mode failure is not risk significant. (2) Significant progress has been made since the Santa Barbara meeting (1993). (3) Several areas have been identified, which need further investigations to understand the basic FCI phenomena, and to improve the modeling. (4) We recommend maximizing open communication between various research groups in order to accelerate the resolution of the remaining issues. (5) We recommend that the next specialist meeting be held within 3 to 5 years in order to synthesize the activities described above. (J.P.N.)

  5. OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on fuel coolant interactions: summary and conclusions

    1997-01-01

    Research activities and interest on fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) have been increased and broadened since the last CSNI Specialist Meeting held in January 1993. Significant experimental and analytical research has been performed in many OECD countries and others. The growing international interest is, in large part, due to the emphasis on broader aspects of FCI ranging from melt quenching and coolability to energetic explosions (both in- and ex-vessel), and their relevance and applications to next-generation reactor design as well as accident management strategies. The objectives of the meeting are to review the knowledge and to obtain consensus on the phenomenology of FCI and in predicting FCI behavior in LWRs severe accidents; to identify those areas of FCI phenomena and prediction which are important for reactor safety but still poorly understood and require further study with clear methodologies; to inform the community and the regulatory agencies of the status of FCI issues, especially in the application to accident management and future reactor designs. The various sessions are: reactor applications, pre-mixing, propagation / trigger, experiments

  6. OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety - Summary and Conclusions

    Allelein, Hans-Josef; Boulaud, Denis; Guentay, Salih; Dehbi, Abdelouahab; Hontanon, Esther; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Jones, Alan V.; Koroll, Grant W.; Tinkler, Charles G.; Schaperow, J.; Royen, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The Third OECD Specialist Meeting on Nuclear Aerosols in Reactor Safety was organised in Cologne, Germany, from 15-18 June 1998, in collaboration with the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH. It was attended by sixty-five specialists representing thirteen OECD Member countries and the Commission of the European Communities. Thirty-nine papers were presented, in eight sessions. The meeting was concluded by a general discussion devoted to the following topics: - What has been solved up to the level of plant applications and accident management? - Where is more work needed for plant applications? Over the last eight years significant progress has been made in source term modelling and code development. Results have been consolidated in codes which are being used for plant calculations to address safety issues. For example, two countries used their source term codes last year to assess the impact of heating from deposited fission products on the potential for steam generator tube rupture. Also, another source term code was used to assess the need of sprays for fission product removal in the proposed design of a new type of reactor. Over the next few years, experiments and model development will continue, with more emphasis on application to risk-important severe accident scenarios

  7. Second OECD (NEA) CSNI specialist meeting on molten core debris-concrete interactions

    Alsmeyer, H.

    1992-11-01

    The 37 contributions concentrated on two main topics. The first topic is the 'classical' core debris-concrete interaction, both experimental and theoretical. Integral effects and separate effects were addressed in thermal hydraulics and heat transfer, material interaction, and aerosol release during concrete erosion, with some applications to prototypical nuclear power plants. The second topic is the possibility of controlling and ending the erosion of the concrete by spreading of the core melt, and/or achieving coolability by the addition of water. (orig./HP) [de

  8. OECD/NEA thermochemical database

    Byeon, Kee Hoh; Song, Dae Yong; Shin, Hyun Kyoo; Park, Seong Won; Ro, Seung Gy

    1998-03-01

    This state of the art report is to introduce the contents of the Chemical Data-Service, OECD/NEA, and the results of survey by OECD/NEA for the thermodynamic and kinetic database currently in use. It is also to summarize the results of Thermochemical Database Projects of OECD/NEA. This report will be a guide book for the researchers easily to get the validate thermodynamic and kinetic data of all substances from the available OECD/NEA database. (author). 75 refs.

  9. Activities of OECD NEA CSNI PWG3

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    Activities of OECD NEA are connected with IAEA-IWG LMNPP, IAEA Nuclear safety, CEC-JRC, CEC-DG XI, CEC-DG XII and utilities UNIPEDE and WANO. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) acts through working groups on Fuel Cycle safety; Operating Experiences and Human Factors; Coolant System Behaviour; Integrity of Components and Structures; Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases and Risk Assessment. Korea, Mexico, Hungary and Czech Republic are now members of OECD NEA, and the non OECD Countries like Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Lithuania can participate in workshops but not in regular committee meetings

  10. Overview of OECD/NEA BEPU Programmes

    Amri, Abdallah; Gulliford, Jim; )

    2013-01-01

    The OECD/NEA paved the way for the development and assessment of BEPU for about 40 years, through concrete tasks: International Standard Problems (ISPs), Benchmarking activities, Development of Validation Matrices, Joint Safety Research Projects, and Specialist meetings. Several NEA related Best-Estimate Plus Uncertainties (BEPU) programmes have been successfully completed: Uncertainty Methods Study (UMS), Best-Estimate Methods - Uncertainty and Sensitivity Evaluation (BEMUSE), Safety Margin Assessment and Application (SM2A), Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) Benchmark. New Programmes are underway to address pending issues (e.g., input uncertainties, uncertainties in coupled codes). The present Workshop may highlight new issues to be addressed (e.g., uncertainty analysis for CFD codes). Document available in the slides-form only

  11. CSNI specialist meeting on simulators and plant analyzers

    Miettinen, J.; Holmstroem, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Specialist Meeting on Simulators and Plant Analyzers, held in June 9-12, 1992, in Lappeenranta, Finland, was sponsored by the Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It was organized in collaboration with the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and the Lappeenranta Technical University of Technology (LTKK). All the presented papers were invited and devided into four sessions. In the first session the objectives, requirements and consepts of simulators were discussed against present standards and guidelines. The second session focused on the capabilities of current analytical models. The third session focused on the experiences gained so far from the applications. The final fourth session concentrated on simulators, which are currently under development, and future plans with regard to both development and utilization. At the end of the meeting topics of the meeting were discussed at the panel discussion. Summaries of the sessions and shortened version of the panel discussion are included into the proceeding. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear fuel behavior activities at the OECD/NEA

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The work programme regarding nuclear fuel behavior issues at OECD/NEA is carried out in two sections. The Nuclear Science and Data Bank Division deals with basic phenomena in fuel behavior under normal operating conditions, while the Safety Division concentrates upon regulation and safety issues in fuel behavior. A new task force addressing these latter issues has been set up and will produce a report providing recommendations in this field. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency jointly with the International Atomic Energy Agency established an International Fuel Performance Experiments Database which is operated by the NEA Data Bank. (author). 1 tab.

  13. Nuclear fuel behavior activities at the OECD/NEA

    1997-01-01

    The work programme regarding nuclear fuel behavior issues at OECD/NEA is carried out in two sections. The Nuclear Science and Data Bank Division deals with basic phenomena in fuel behavior under normal operating conditions, while the Safety Division concentrates upon regulation and safety issues in fuel behavior. A new task force addressing these latter issues has been set up and will produce a report providing recommendations in this field. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency jointly with the International Atomic Energy Agency established an International Fuel Performance Experiments Database which is operated by the NEA Data Bank. (author). 1 tab

  14. OECD/NEA activities on the safety of new reactors

    Reig, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency, a member of the OECD family, has as mission, in line with the overall aim of the OECD, to assist Agency's member countries in maintaining and further developing through international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases for a safe, environmentally friendly and economic use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Our members include very advanced nuclear countries and represent a big part of the world's nuclear capacity. In addition, we have a well established and formal relationship with the Russian Federation and the IAEA. Two years ago, the NEA celebrated its 50th anniversary of providing assistance to its member countries in supporting the safe use of nuclear power. Nuclear power will remain a key part of the energy mix for many decades to come and, as such, the NEA looks forward to continuing its value-adding work in the field of nuclear power. Korea joined the NEA in 24 May, 1993. While the NEA is satisfied that we have in place an effective process of work, we are always looking for ways to improve. This is the reason why we have since 1999 a series of strategic plans in order to better focus on the objectives that member countries assign to the Agency for meeting the economical, environmental and societal challenges of the coming years. The important changes that have occurred in the energy and nuclear landscapes, as well as in the OECD framework, are the basis for these revisions insofar as they influence the NEA's role and activities. We are now completing the process for the new Strategic Plan which will apply from 2011 to 2017. Nuclear safety and regulation is and will continue to be the first priority of the Agency. The NEA will assist member countries to continue sharing information, best practices and lessons learned to enhance nuclear safety worldwide

  15. OECD/NEA component operational experience, degradation and ageing project

    Gott, K.; Nevander, O.; Riznic, J.; Lydell, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several OECD Member Countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 - OECD/NEA SCC and Cable Ageing project - (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the 3. Term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. In May 2011, 13 countries signed the CODAP first Term agreement. The first Term (2011-2014) work plan includes the development of a web-based relational event database on passive, metallic components in commercial nuclear power plants, a web-based knowledge base on material degradation, codes and standards relating to structural integrity and national practices for managing material degradation. The work plan also addresses the preparation of Topical Reports to foster technical cooperation and to deepen the understanding of national differences in ageing management. These Topical Reports are in the public domain and available for download on the NEA web site. Published in 2014, a first Topical Report addressed flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel and low alloy steel piping. A second Topical Report addresses operating experience with electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and instrument air (IA) system piping

  16. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques

    Lehner, J [comp.

    1998-09-01

    In the last few years, tremendous advances in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow have been accomplished by the applications of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. The detailed measurements gave new insight to the true nature of local mechanisms of interfacial transfer between phases, interfacial structure and two-phase flow turbulent transfers. These new developments indicate that more accurate and reliable two-phase flow models can be obtained, if focused experiments are designed and performed by utilizing this advanced instrumentation. The purpose of this Specialist Meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques was to review the recent instrumentation developments and the relation between thermal-hydraulic codes and instrumentation capabilities. Four specific objectives were identified for this meeting: bring together international experts on instrumentation, experiments, and modeling; review recent developments in multiphase flow instrumentation; discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, and discuss future directions for instrumentation development, modeling, and experiments.

  17. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques

    Lehner, J.

    1998-09-01

    In the last few years, tremendous advances in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow have been accomplished by the applications of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. The detailed measurements gave new insight to the true nature of local mechanisms of interfacial transfer between phases, interfacial structure and two-phase flow turbulent transfers. These new developments indicate that more accurate and reliable two-phase flow models can be obtained, if focused experiments are designed and performed by utilizing this advanced instrumentation. The purpose of this Specialist Meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques was to review the recent instrumentation developments and the relation between thermal-hydraulic codes and instrumentation capabilities. Four specific objectives were identified for this meeting: bring together international experts on instrumentation, experiments, and modeling; review recent developments in multiphase flow instrumentation; discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, and discuss future directions for instrumentation development, modeling, and experiments

  18. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialists meeting on boron dilution reactivity transients

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to bring together experts involved in the different activities related to boron dilution transients. The experts came from all involved parties, including research organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and utilities. Information was openly shared and discussed on the experimental results, plant and systems analysis, numerical analysis of mixing and probability and consequences of these transients. Regulatory background and licensing implications were also included to provide the proper frame work for the technical discussion. Each of these areas corresponded to a separate session. The meeting focused on the thermal-hydraulic aspects because of the current interest in that subject and the significant amount of new technical information being generated

  19. OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurements techniques: summary and conclusions

    1997-01-01

    This specialist meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurements Techniques was held in Santa Barbara (USA) in 1997 and attracted some 70 participants in ten technical sessions and a session of the round table discussions, with a total of 41 papers. It was intended to bring together the international experts in multi-phase flow instrumentation, experiment and modeling to review the state-of-the-art of the two-phase flow instrumentation methods and to discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities. The following topics were included: Modeling needs and future direction for improved constitutive relations, interfacial area transport equation, and multi-dimensional two-fluid model formulation; local instrumentation developments for void fraction, interfacial area, phase velocities, turbulence, entrainment, particle size, thermal non-equilibrium, shear stress, nucleation, condensation and boiling; global instrumentation developments for void fraction, mass flow, two-phase level, non-condensable concentration, flow regimes, low flow and break flow; relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, future directions for experiments focused on modeling needs and for instrumentation developments

  20. Future direction for implementing the cooperation with OECD/NEA

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Yong Don

    1999-03-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) ia an intergovernmental organization consisting of industrialized countries with shared democratic principles and free market economics. The objectives of the agency are to identify key issues related to nuclear energy and to address these issues as well as to implement joint R and D projects, contributing to the development of nuclear energy as a safe, environmentally-acceptable and economical energy source through cooperation among its participating countries. Appropriate measures to effectively implement international nuclear cooperation and strategies to upgrade Korea's status in the international arena as well as ways to utilize the agency for our benefits through analysis of its policy and current status of the agency as a multilateral nuclear cooperative body are also presented in this report. Analysis of information about the agency's activities and acquisition of capabilities to collect relevant information, coupled with efforts to enhance Korea's status in the international nuclear arena by actively being involved in the international organizations such as OECD/NEA are required to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and establish effective national nuclear policies. This report can be utilized as valuable material not only in establishing national nuclear policy by giving an overview of the report prepared by the high level advisory group on the future of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, who recently wrapped up their activities, but also in promoting the understanding of the agency's activities and the agency's long-term perspective mapped out in 1995. Future plans and strategies for effective implementation of nuclear cooperation with the agency, including ways to participate in the agency's activities, with KAERI taking a leading role, and in the NEA joint R and D projects, ways to strengthen capabilities, to analyze

  1. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    None

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5-7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  2. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5--7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  3. Proceedings of the 2nd CSNI Specialist Meeting on Simulators and Plant Analysers

    Tiihonen, O.

    1999-01-01

    The safe utilisation of nuclear power plants requires the availability of different computerised tools for analysing the plant behaviour and training the plant personnel. These can be grouped into three categories: accident analysis codes, plant analysers and training simulators. The safety analysis of nuclear power plants has traditionally been limited to the worst accident cases expected for the specific plant design. Many accident analysis codes have been developed for different plant types. The scope of the analyses has continuously expanded. The plant analysers are now emerging tools intended for extensive analysis of the plant behaviour using a best estimate model for the whole plant including the reactor and full thermodynamic process, both combined with automation and electrical systems. The comprehensive model is also supported by good visualisation tools. Training simulators with real time plant model are tools for training the plant operators to run the plant. Modern training simulators have also features supporting visualisation of the important phenomena occurring in the plant during transients. The 2nd CSNI Specialist Meeting on Simulators and Plant Analysers in Espoo attracted some 90 participants from 17 countries. A total of 49 invited papers were presented in the meeting in addition to 7 simulator system demonstrations. Ample time was reserved for the presentations and informal discussions during the four meeting days. (orig.)

  4. Review of fast reactor activities at OECD (NEA), March 1979

    Royen, J

    1979-07-01

    In February 1978, OECD(NEA) published an expert group report on 'Nuclear Fuel Cycle Requirements and Supply Considerations, Through the Long Term'. In publishing this report, the Agency sought to fulfil three objectives. First, as a source of data on uranium and fuel cycle services, the report identified future imbalances between supply and demand, and possible areas for international cooperation in the resolution of such problems. Secondly, in examining several alternative nuclear power scenarios through the long term (defined as the year 2025), it showed the comparative needs of advanced reactors for uranium and for supporting services, thereby establishing the basis for further development of uranium resources and specific reactor systems. Finally, as a comprehensive data source, it should provide assistance to those having responsibilities in planning, forecasting, and programme management in areas relating to the fuel cycle. An analysis of alternative reactor strategies in the longer term makes it clear that continued reliance on thermal converters in this period will result in rapid depletion of known uranium resources. Even with dramatic increases in known resources, nuclear power would be able to play only a temporary role in satisfying world energy needs. The use of advanced near-breeders (including those which utilise thorium) can do much to reduce the total rate of depletion of uranium resources, but their requirements will still result in eventual depletion of known resources. On the other hand, breeder reactors would provide a virtually inexhaustible source of energy supply within foreseeable extensions of known uranium resources. In fact, the introduction of breeders in the longer term could, by the year 2025, reduce annual requirements for uranium at or below levels for the year 2000. By the year 2025, the cumulative uranium requirements of the breeder can have reached a plateau, while the cumulative requirements of other reactor strategies would

  5. OECD/NEA Study on the Economics of Long Term Operation of NPP

    Lokhov, Alexey; Cameron, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad Hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (author)

  6. The investigation of the national views for the strategic plan 2005-2009 of OECD/NEA

    Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Lee, K. S.; Yang, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    OECD/NEA has been developing the Strategic Plan of 2005-2009 which will be used as the guidelines of NEA activities for this period. Korean government is of the view that national interests in the cooperation with OECD/NEA become important and are needed to be reflected to this Strategic Plan. We has prepared and suggested Korean proposal for the Strategic Plan of OECD/NEA

  7. Synthesis of the OECD/NEA-PSI CFD benchmark exercise

    Andreani, Michele, E-mail: Michele.andreani@psi.ch; Badillo, Arnoldo; Kapulla, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A benchmark exercise on stratification erosion in containment was conducted using a test in the PANDA facility. • Blind calculations were provided by nineteen participants. • Results were compared with experimental data. • A ranking was made. • A large spread of results was observed, with very few simulations providing accurate results for the most important variables, though not for velocities. - Abstract: The third International Benchmark Exercise (IBE-3) conducted under the auspices of OECD/NEA is based on the comparison of blind CFD simulations with experimental data addressing the erosion of a stratified layer by an off-axis buoyant jet in a large vessel. The numerical benchmark exercise is based on a dedicated experiment in the PANDA facility conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland, using only one vessel. The use of non-prototypical fluids (i.e. helium as simulant for hydrogen, and air as simulant for steam), and the consequent absence of the complex physical effects produced by steam condensation enhanced the suitability of the data for CFD validation purposes. The test started with a helium–air layer at the top of the vessel and air in the lower part. The helium-rich layer was gradually eroded by a low-momentum air/helium jet emerging at a lower elevation. Blind calculation results were submitted by nineteen participants, and the calculation results have been compared with the PANDA data. This report, adopting the format of the reports for the two previous exercises, includes a ranking of the contributions, where the largest weight is given to the time progression of the erosion of the helium-rich layer. In accordance with the limited scope of the benchmark exercise, this report is more a collection of comparisons between calculated results and data than a synthesis. Therefore, the few conclusions are based on the mere observation of the agreement of the various submissions with the test result, and do not

  8. CFD validation in OECD/NEA t-junction benchmark.

    Obabko, A. V.; Fischer, P. F.; Tautges, T. J.; Karabasov, S.; Goloviznin, V. M.; Zaytsev, M. A.; Chudanov, V. V.; Pervichko, V. A.; Aksenova, A. E. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Cambridge Univ.); (Moscow Institute of Nuclar Energy Safety)

    2011-08-23

    and benchmark data. The numerical scheme has a very small scheme diffusion and is the second and the first order accurate in space and time, correspondingly. We compare and contrast simulation results for three computational fluid dynamics codes CABARET, Conv3D, and Nek5000 for the T-junction thermal striping problem that was the focus of a recent OECD/NEA blind benchmark. The corresponding codes utilize finite-difference implicit large eddy simulation (ILES), finite-volume LES on fully staggered grids, and an LES spectral element method (SEM), respectively. The simulations results are in a good agreement with experimenatl data. We present results from a study of sensitivity to computational mesh and time integration interval, and discuss the next steps in the simulation of this problem.

  9. The study for effective utilization on the nuclear information of OECD/NEA

    Ko, H. S.; Oh, K. B.; Lee, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    As a group of nuclear-advanced countries, the OECD/NEA mainly deals with the aspects of science and technology and future policy of nuclear energy. It is very important for us to develop nuclear advanced technology and enhance the global environemnt of nuclear utilization and development through the OECD/NEA. It is required for us to timely obtain and analyse the up-to-date nuclear technology information and to build up a system to collect and distribute nuclear technology information from NEA committees. In this study, measures for effective utilization of the NEA information have been established through the analysis of the activities of the experts meeting in each standing technical committee and of technology information. In this regard, it is also developed a homepage to disseminate reports from NEA Committees participants as one of the strengthening measures

  10. Proceedings of the Second Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs, 23-25 September 2014, OECD-NEA HQ

    Massara, S.; ); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Yang, Jae Ho; Dolley, Evan J.; Rebak, Raul B.; Sowder, Andrew; Cheng, Bo; Kurata, Masaki; Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Li, R.; McClellan, Ken; Nelson, Andy; Carmack, Jon; Harp, Jason; Finck, Phillip; ); Kakicuhi, K.

    2014-09-01

    Under the guidance of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee, the expert group acts as a forum for scientific and technical information exchange on advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The expert group focusses on the fundamental properties and behaviour under normal operations and accident conditions for advanced core materials and components (fuels, cladding, control rods, etc.). The materials considered are applicable to Gen II and Gen III Light Water Reactors, as well as Gen III+ reactors under construction. The objective of the expert group is to define and coordinate a programme of work to help advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide the technical underpinning for the development of advanced LWR fuels with enhanced accident tolerance compared to currently used zircaloy/UO 2 fuel systems, as well as other non-fuel core components with important roles in LWR performance under accident conditions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the Second Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs. Content: 1 - Proposed Agenda; 2 - Expert Group meeting - 23 September 2014: - Introduction and background (S. Massara, OECD-NEA) - Expected outcomes from the TFs meetings scheduled on 24-25 September (K. Pasamehmetoglu, EG Chair, INL); 3 - Task Force 1 (Systems assessment) meeting - 24 September 2014: - Metrics for the Evaluation of LWR Accident Tolerant Fuel (S. Bragg-Sitton, INL); 4 - Task Force 2 (Cladding/core materials) meeting - 24 September 2014: - Summary on SiC Task Force 2 (Clad) meeting (J.H. Yang, KAERI); - Accident Tolerant Advanced Steels Cladding for Commercial Light Water Reactors (E. Dolley, GE); - Molybdenum-Alloy Fuel Cladding Development and Testing - Update from April 2014 NEA ATF Meeting (A. Sowder, EPRI); - Accident Tolerant Control Rod Development in Japan (M. Kurata, JAEA); - IFA-774: The first in-pile test with coated fuel rods (R. Van

  11. Enhancement of international cooperation for utilization of OECD/NEA Data BAnk

    Lee, HaeCho; Chang, JongHwa; Kang, SinBok; Song, TaeGil; Ko, YoungChul; Kim, JinHee; Moon, DongSup; Hwang, HyeSun

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of research is to register Korean computer codes at OECD/NEA Data Bank and to promote cooperation on use of the computer codes and libraries between the international organization and foreign countries. - 10 computer codes related to nuclear industry have been registered at and supplied to OECD/NEA through this project, which is regarded as good example of close international cooperation among the member states of OECD/NEA - This project has provided member states with motives on creating human networks and high level of expertise between domestic code developers and foreign users of the codes - Expert group in the field of nuclear related computer codes is formed in this project, that is also beneficial for Korea in preparation of exporting and marketing nuclear technologies in the world

  12. Enhancement of international cooperation for utilization of OECD/NEA Data BAnk

    Lee, HaeCho; Chang, JongHwa; Kang, SinBok; Song, TaeGil; Ko, YoungChul; Kim, JinHee; Moon, DongSup; Hwang, HyeSun

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of research is to register Korean computer codes at OECD/NEA Data Bank and to promote cooperation on use of the computer codes and libraries between the international organization and foreign countries. - 10 computer codes related to nuclear industry have been registered at and supplied to OECD/NEA through this project, which is regarded as good example of close international cooperation among the member states of OECD/NEA - This project has provided member states with motives on creating human networks and high level of expertise between domestic code developers and foreign users of the codes - Expert group in the field of nuclear related computer codes is formed in this project, that is also beneficial for Korea in preparation of exporting and marketing nuclear technologies in the world.

  13. Activities of the OECD-NEA in the field of fast reactors

    Royen, J.

    1977-01-01

    The OECD-NEA is performing the following activities in the field of fast reactors: Held ad hoc meetings of senior experts on safety, development and economics of LMFBR type reactors; publishing a Nuclear Safety Research Index (the index is now expanded to cover fast reactors) and distribution; collect test computer programmes, as well as neutron data

  14. On-going and some future safety related activities of the OECD/NEA

    Frescura, G.

    2001-01-01

    The CSNI and CNRA structures and current activities of direct relevance to WWERs are presented. The nuclear regulatory challenges arising from economic deregulation like: direct safety challenges, infrastructure issues, increased pressure on regulatory bodies etc. are given. The OECD/NEA initiatives on assuring nuclear safety competence are mentioned

  15. Review of fast reactor activities at OECD (NEA)

    Stephens, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations initiated several reports in 1979. Status reports are published on: the role of fission gas release in case of fuel element failure; reactivity monitoring in a LMFBR at shutdown; increasing the reliability of fast reactor shutdown systems. A report is planned on the interactions between sodium and concrete. LMFBR safety issue that were studied are concerned with containment R and D; natural circulation cooling; and fuel failure modelling. Nuclear Development Division was concerned with Gas cooled fast reactors technology. Nuclear Science Division dealt with fast reactor physics and nuclear data for fast reactors. NEA Data Bank provides technical support and acts as a computer code library and nuclear data centre

  16. OECD/NEA multi-lateral cooperation in the area of structural integrity & aging management

    Breest, A. [Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Gott, K. [MATSAFE AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lydell, B. [SIGMA-PHASE Inc., Vail, AZ (United States); Riznic, J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Several OECD Member Countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation & Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. The OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) acts as an umbrella committee of the Project. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 'OECD/NEA SCC and Cable Ageing project' (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the 3rd Term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. SCAP was enabled by a voluntary contribution from Japan. It was formally launched in June 2006 and officially closed with an international workshop held in Tokyo in May 2010. Majority of the Member Organizations of the two projects were the same, often being represented by the same person. In May 2011, thirteen countries signed the CODAP 1st Term agreement (Canada, Chinese Taipei, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Korea (Republic of), Japan, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United States of America). The 1st Term (2011-2014) work plan includes the preparation of Topical Reports to foster technical cooperation and to deepen the understanding of national differences in ageing management. The Topical Reports constitute CODAP Event Database and Knowledge Base insights reports and as such act as portals for future in-depth studies of

  17. Nuclear model codes and related software distributed by the OECD/NEA Data Bank

    Sartori, E.

    1993-01-01

    Software and data for nuclear energy applications is acquired, tested and distributed by several information centres; in particular, relevant computer codes are distributed internationally by the OECD/NEA Data Bank (France) and by ESTSC and EPIC/RSIC (United States). This activity is coordinated among the centres and is extended outside the OECD area through an arrangement with the IAEA. This article covers more specifically the availability of nuclear model codes and also those codes which further process their results into data sets needed for specific nuclear application projects. (author). 2 figs

  18. Activities of the OECD/NEA Data Bank and its computer program service

    Sartori, E.

    1991-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Data Bank collects, tests and distributes computer programs and numerical data in the field of nuclear energy applications. This activity is coordinated with several similar centres in the United States (NESC, NNDC, RSIC) and outside the OECD are through an arrangement with the IAEA. This valuable information is shared worldwide for the benefit of scientists and engineers working on the safe and economic use of nuclear energy for peaceful applications. This article covers mainly the activities of the computer program service. (author). 4 figs

  19. OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency. 25 years of international cooperation within the framework of the NEA

    Stadie, Klaus B. [OECD, Paris (France). Safety and Regulation

    2015-11-15

    The nuclear atomic association NEA of the OECD, to which 23 western industrial countries belong to, was established 25 years ago (1959) as ''Nuclear Energy Agency'', almost simultaneously with other large international nuclear energy organisations. The NEA undertook special tasks during the international cooperation, which have shifted over time. A special feature today is the cooperation by means of international committees, which are supported by a small own staff of the organisation. The focus points lie within the area of safety and regimentation and on chosen scientific and technical studies.

  20. NEA activities in 1991. 20. Annual report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    1992-01-01

    This annual report gives informations on OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities in 1991. This report is divided into ten chapters: 1 Trends in nuclear power. 2 Nuclear development and the fuel cycle. 3 Nuclear safety and regulation. 4 Radiation protection. 5 Radioactive waste management and disposal. 6 Nuclear science: Reactor physics, nuclear data, NEA data bank. 7 Joint projects and coordinated research programs. 8 Legal affairs. 9 informations programs. 10 relations with non-member countries

  1. State-of-art technology of fuels for burning minor actinides. An OECD/NEA study

    Ogawa, Toru; Konings, R.J.M.; Pillon, S.; Schram, R.P.C.; Verwerft, M.; Wallenius, J.

    2005-01-01

    At OECD/NEA, Working Party on Scientific Issues in Partitioning and Transmutation was formed for 2000-2004, which studied the status and trends of scientific issues in Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T). The study included the scientific and technical issues of fuels and materials, which are related to dedicated systems for transmutation. This paper summarizes the state-of-art technology of the fuels for burning minor actinides (neptunium, americium and curium). (author)

  2. Overview of the burnup credit activities at OECD/NEA/NSC

    Brady Raap, M.C.; Nomura, Y.; Sartori, E.

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes activities of the OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Expert Panel, a subordinate group to the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS). The WPNCS of the OECD/NEA coordinates and carries out work in the domain of criticality safety at the international level. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burnup credit. The activities of the expert panel are aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back-end of the fuel cycle. The main objective of the activities of the OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Expert Panel is to demonstrate that the available criticality safety calculational tools are appropriate for application to burned fuel systems and that a reasonable safety margin can be established. The method established by the expert panel for investigating the physics and predictability of burnup credit is based on the specification and comparison of calculational benchmark problems. A wide range of fuel types, including PWR, BWR, MOX, and VVER fuels, has been or are being addressed by the expert panel. The objective and status of each of these benchmark problems is reviewed in this article. It is important to note that the focus of the expert panel is the comparison of the results submitted by each participant to assess the capability of commonly used code systems, not to quantify the physical phenomena investigated in the comparisons or to make recommendations for licensing action. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs, 3-5 March 2015, OECD-NEA HQ

    Bischoff, Jeremy; Gandrille, Pascal; Forgeron, Thierry; Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Lorrette, Christophe; Valot, C.; Freyss, M.; Braun, J.; Sauder, C.; Moatti, Marie; Waeckel, Nicolas; Ambard, Antoine; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Johnston, Emma; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Kurata, M.; Hallstadius, Lars; Ohta, H.; Ogata, T.; Besmann, T.; Chauvin, Nathalie; Cornet, Stephanie; Massara, S.; Kohyama, Akira; Kishimoto, Hirotatsu; Park, Joon Soo; Nakazato, Naofumi; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Asakura, Yuuki; Kanda, Chisato; Kohyama, Akira; Terrani, Kurt; Katoh, Yutai; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Field, Kevin; Snead, Lance; Hu, Xunxiang; Dryepondt, Sebastien; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Besmann, T.; Steinbrueck, M.; Grosse, M.; Jianu, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Avincola, V.; Ahmad, S.; Tang, C.; Heuser, Brent J.; Sickafus, Kurt; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, B.O.; Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Kim, Young; Rebak, Raul; Dolly, Evan; Dolley, E.J.; Rebak, R.B.; Maloy, Stu; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon-Sik; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Won Jae; Tulenko, James S.; Puide, Mattias; Liu, T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Dupin, N.; Barber, D.; Corcoran, E.; Dumas, J.C.; Hania, R.; Kaye, M.; Turchi, P.

    2015-03-01

    Under the guidance of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee, the expert group acts as a forum for scientific and technical information exchange on advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The expert group focusses on the fundamental properties and behaviour under normal operations and accident conditions for advanced core materials and components (fuels, cladding, control rods, etc.). The materials considered are applicable to Gen II and Gen III Light Water Reactors, as well as Gen III+ reactors under construction. The objective of the expert group is to define and coordinate a programme of work to help advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide the technical underpinning for the development of advanced LWR fuels with enhanced accident tolerance compared to currently used zircaloy/UO 2 fuel systems, as well as other non-fuel core components with important roles in LWR performance under accident conditions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the Third Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs. Content: 1 - Task Force 1 (Systems assessment) meeting, 3-4 March 2015: - French evaluation of ATF Concepts (J. Bischoff, AREVA); - Technology Readiness Levels - TRL - for Fuels (K. Pasamehmetoglu, INL); - TRL-definition for advanced fuel concept applied for commercial LWRs in Japan (M. Kurata, JAEA); - Application of TRLs in NNL (E. Johnston, NNL); - Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuel and Materials (S. Bragg-Sitton, INL); 1a - Definition of the illustrative scenarios: - AREVA's proposal concerning scenario for Accident Tolerant Fuel studies (P. Gandrille); - A Simplified Accident Scenario (L. Hallstadius); - Accident Scenarios for ATF Performance Evaluation of BWR and PWR in Japan (H. Ohta, CRIEPI); 1b - Related NEA activities: - Working Party on Multi-scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Materials for Nuclear Systems - WPMM, Expert

  4. Overview of work at the OECD/Nea data bank for the TDB project

    Mompean, F.

    2002-01-01

    The NEA TDB Project aims at making available a comprehensive, internally consistent and quality-assured chemical thermodynamic database of selected chemical elements in order to meet the specialized modelling requirements for safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal systems. The project was initiated by the NEA in 1984 and reorganized in 1998. During the period 1984-1998 (TDB Project Phase I, TDB-I), reviews on the chemical thermodynamics for the following elements were completed: U, Am and Tc. A further review originating from TDB-I and dealing with data for Np and Pu appeared in print in May 2001. Although not strictly a part of TDB-I, a further collective publication of OECD/NEA [5] is a much-cited reference in the field of aquatic chemistry. The second phase of the TDB Project (TDB Project Phase II, TDB-II) was started in 1998 following an agreement between the following Participating Organisations. (author)

  5. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  6. The OECD/NEA Data Bank, its computer program services and benchmarking activities

    Sartori, E.; Galan, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Data Bank collects, tests and distributes computer programs and numerical data in the field of nuclear energy applications. This activity is coordinated with several similar centres in the United States (ESTSC, NNDC, RSIC) and outside the OECD area through an arrangement with the IAEA. This information is shared worldwide for the benefit of scientists and engineers working on the safe and economic use of nuclear energy. The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee the supervising body of the Data Bank has conducted a series of international computer code benchmark exercises with the aim of verifying the correctness of codes, of building confidence in models used for predicting macroscopic behaviour of nuclear systems and to drive towards refinement of models where necessary. Exercises involving nuclear cross section predictions, in-core reactor physics issues, such as pin cells for different type of reactors, plutonium recycling, reconstruction of pin power within assemblies, core transients, reactor shielding and dosimetry, away from reactor issues such as criticality safety for transport and storage of spent fuel, shielding of radioactive material packages and other problems connected with the back end of the fuel cycle, are listed and the relevant references provided. (author)

  7. Consideration of probabilistic safety objectives in OECD/NEA member countries: Short overview and update

    Versteeg, M.F.; Andrews, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Almost every member country of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) uses probabilistic safety criteria (PSC), in one way or another, for the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. The choice of the PSC, their applicability, and whether or not these PSC are used in a formal and/or legal way, is dependent on the political and regulatory situation. The spectrum of utilization includes the use as design requirements and the use as a regulatory and licensing tool be the authorities. The paper summarises the various PSC applied to the assessment of nuclear power plant in the OECD member countries and presents in more detail the use of PSC on the public health level in the Netherlands, United Kingdom and USA. 10 refs, 1 fig., 6 tabs

  8. Overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA/NSC working party on nuclear criticality safety

    Nouri, A.; Blomquist, R.; Bradyraap, M.; Briggs, B.; Cousinou, P.; Nomura, Y.; Weber, W.

    2003-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) started dealing with criticality-safety related subjects back in the seventies. In the mid-nineties, several activities related to criticality-safety were grouped together into the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety. This working party has since been operating and reporting to the Nuclear Science Committee. Six expert groups co-ordinate various activities ranging from experimental evaluations to code and data inter-comparisons for the study of static and transient criticality behaviours. The paper describes current activities performed in this framework and the achievements of the various expert groups. (author)

  9. Opening Session - Introductory remarks for Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuel. OECD/NEA Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuels, Workshop Expectations

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim; Massara, Simone; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The workshop opened with the welcome address from Th. Dujardin (OECD/NEA), NEA Deputy Director. Th. Dujardin recalled the integrated NEA response to the dramatic Fukushima-Daiichi events performed by three standing technical committees: the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). J. Gulliford (OECD/NEA) placed the workshop in the context of the activities of the Nuclear Science Committee within the framework of the NEA response to Fukushima- Daiichi. K. Pasamehmetoglu (INL, US) explained the main goals of the workshop oriented towards defining requirements for selection among various options during the feasibility phase of the development process, and not towards identifying and proposing design solutions

  10. OECD/NEA benchmark for time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization

    Hou, Jason, E-mail: jason.hou@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Boyarinov, Victor F.; Fomichenko, Peter A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A time-dependent homogenization-free neutron transport benchmark was created. • The first phase, known as the kinetics phase, was described in this work. • Preliminary results for selected 2-D transient exercises were presented. - Abstract: A Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) benchmark for the time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization has been established in order to facilitate the development and assessment of numerical methods for solving the space-time neutron kinetics equations. The benchmark has been named the OECD/NEA C5G7-TD benchmark, and later extended with three consecutive phases each corresponding to one modelling stage of the multi-physics transient analysis of the nuclear reactor core. This paper provides a detailed introduction of the benchmark specification of Phase I, known as the “kinetics phase”, including the geometry description, supporting neutron transport data, transient scenarios in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) configurations, as well as the expected output parameters from the participants. Also presented are the preliminary results for the initial state 2-D core and selected transient exercises that have been obtained using the Monte Carlo method and the Surface Harmonic Method (SHM), respectively.

  11. OECD and NEA countries' national frameworks for nuclear activities

    Kuzeyli, Kaan

    2016-01-01

    To assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, the NEA serves as a forum for sharing and analysing information and experience among its member countries in order to pool and maintain their technical expertise and human infrastructure and to support nuclear activities by providing them with nuclear policy analyses. Comprehensive and effective legal regimes are necessary to help achieve confidence in the peaceful use of nuclear energy. These regimes, whose goals are to protect the public and the natural environment from the risks inherent in such activities, include regulation at a national level, co-operation at bilateral and multilateral levels and international harmonisation of national policies and legislation through adherence to international conventions. Regimes need to be strong enough to set and enforce limits, and flexible enough to keep pace with technological advances and changing public concerns. The NEA collects, analyses and disseminates information on nuclear law in general and on topical nuclear legal issues in particular. Nuclear law is the body of special legal norms created to regulate the conduct of legal or natural persons engaged in activities related to fissionable materials, ionising radiation and exposure to natural sources of radiation. In 1995, the NEA began publishing country profiles entitled Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries - Regulatory and Institutional Frameworks for Nuclear Activities or the 'Grand Orange', a name which was adopted and became widely used because of the colour of the initial cover. Since 2006, these country profiles can be downloaded free online both in English and French from the NEA web site. The NEA endeavours to complement country profiles by publishing online an English, non

  12. Meeting summary of the second CSNI specialist meeting on simulators and plant analyzers - Current Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Simulation

    1998-01-01

    The Second CSNI Specialist Meeting on Simulators and Plant Analyzers: Current Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Simulation was held in Espoo, Finland, from September 29 through October 2, 1997. It was organised by CSNI Principal Working Group on Coolant System Behaviour (PWG2), Task Group on Thermal Hydraulic Applications (TG-THA), in co-operation with Technical Research Centre of Finland. The meeting in Espoo attracted some 90 participants from 17 countries. A total of 49 invited papers were presented in the meeting in addition to 7 simulator system demonstrations. Ample time was reserved for the presentations and informal discussions during the four meeting days. The previous meeting held in Lappeenranta, Finland, in 1992 collected some 85 participants from 12 countries, presenting a total of 40 papers. The meeting was structured into 6 sessions covering the important aspects of development and use of simulators and plant analyzers: Session I: New objectives, Requirements and Concepts. This session covered the progress experienced since the 1. simulator meeting and tried to address the changing role of simulators based on the changes in users' needs and developing possibilities. Session II: Trends in Simulation Technology. This session was reserved for studying the current trends in the simulation technology: software environments, visualisation, simulator configuration tools, programming languages and computer systems. Session III: Training and human factor studies using simulators. This session was created for studying the status of different uses of simulators such as educational simulators, human factor studies and integrated safety assessment in addition to traditional training. Regarding to the severe accidents, a question was raised whether the simulator use should be for training or education. Session IV: Modelling techniques. The session on modelling techniques was included to cover recent developments in the modelling techniques applicable to training

  13. Results of an OECD/NEA comparison of minimum critical values

    Weber, Wolf; Mennerdahl, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    An OECD/NEA expert group has compiled international data on existing minimum critical values for UO 2 -, PuO 2 -, UNH- and PuNH-systems to identify any significant discrepancies in the data and to propose explanations. The paper examines the spread of the compiled data and the influence of the time of generation of the data on the spread. It turns out, that the remarkable spread reduces by omitting values older than five years. Considering only data generated in the last three years, the spread further reduces. The number of cases with a large spread in the reported minimum critical values falls from 28 to four cases, and the smallest and largest data values converge. (author)

  14. Analysis of an OECD/NEA high-temperature reactor benchmark

    Hosking, J. G.; Newton, T. D.; Koeberl, O.; Morris, P.; Goluoglu, S.; Tombakoglu, T.; Colak, U.; Sartori, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes analyses of the OECD/NEA HTR benchmark organized by the 'Working Party on the Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS)', formerly the 'Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles'. The benchmark was specifically designed to provide inter-comparisons for plutonium and thorium fuels when used in HTR systems. Calculations considering uranium fuel have also been included in the benchmark, in order to identify any increased uncertainties when using plutonium or thorium fuels. The benchmark consists of five phases, which include cell and whole-core calculations. Analysis of the benchmark has been performed by a number of international participants, who have used a range of deterministic and Monte Carlo code schemes. For each of the benchmark phases, neutronics parameters have been evaluated. Comparisons are made between the results of the benchmark participants, as well as comparisons between the predictions of the deterministic calculations and those from detailed Monte Carlo calculations. (authors)

  15. The University of Pisa calculations for the Phase I of the OECD/NEA UAM Benchmark

    Ball, M.; Parisi, C.; D'Auria, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the Univ. of Pisa preliminary results for the first exercise of the Phase I of the OECD/NEA Benchmark on the Uncertainty in Analysis and Modeling. The scope of exercise one is to address the uncertainties due to the basic nuclear data as well as the impact of processing the nuclear and covariance data, selection of multi-group structure and self-shielding treatment. DRAGON code and TSUNAMI code were employed, using the available covariance data matrix. The execution of DRAGON calculations required the use of ANGELO and LAMBDA codes for the extension of the covariance matrix from the original SCALE 44 group structure to DRAGON 69 group structure. The uncertainties for the main cross sections were evaluated and are presented here. (authors)

  16. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: Challenge of new realities

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in criticality safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behavior through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data in the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that coordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle

  17. OECD-NEA criticality working group - a status report and the burnup credit challenge

    Whitesides, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    A Working Group established by the organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), Paris, has examined the validity of computational methods used for calculations that evaluate the nuclear criticality safety issues involved in the storage, handling and transportation of fissile materials. The basic goal of this Working Group is to attempt to define and implement a procedure that can be shown to demonstrate the validity of the various computational methods used to make criticality safety calculations. The current activities of the Working Group involve an effort to establish the validity of computational methods used to evaluate the criticality safety of the storage, handling, and transportation of spent light-water-reactor fuel elements in which one seeks to take credit for the fissile material burnup and/or buildup of fission products. (J.P.N.)

  18. A review of the OECD/NEA Study on the economics of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Zarimpas, N.; Stevens, G.H.; Nuclear Energy Agency

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the recent study carried out by OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency on the economics of the nuclear fuel cycle. The investment appraisal method of deriving the lifetime levelised fuel cost required the examination of the entire fuel cycle cash outflow based on component prices. The cash outflows were discounted to a base date using the selected discount rate which was set, for the reference case, at 5 per cent per annum (real). The levelised fuel cycle cost was derived in mills/kWh terms by equating the net present value of the entire fuel cycle cost and the net present value of the total electrical output over the station lifetime, where both have been discounted to the same date. The study's reference fuel cycle options and costs are discussed and a comparison with earlier NEA work is provided. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  19. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: challenge of new realities

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in critically safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behaviour through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that co-ordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle. (authors)

  20. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. OECD/NEA expert group on assay data of spent nuclear fuel

    Rugama, Y.; Gauld, I.; Suyama, Kenya

    2009-01-01

    In the area of criticality safety, management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. The importance of measured isotopic assay data from Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) experiments to validate computer code predictions of spent fuel composition used in safety-related studies has long been recognized by members of the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety). These data are particularly important in criticality analyses related to any application of burnup credit as well as to evaluation of criticality and safety in geologic repositories and fuel cycle applications such as reprocessing. Under the auspices of the WPNCS, an Expert Group on assay data has been formed to share best-practice radiochemical analysis methods, computational analysis procedures and data needs, and isotopic validation data. Through member country collaboration, the database of publicly available spent fuel measurements is being revised and expanded to include more recent measurements, with findings to be documented in a state-of-the-art report. (author)

  2. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III

  3. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA workshop on the relations between seismological data and seismic engineering

    2003-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD-NEA co-ordinates the NEA activities concerning the technical aspects of design, construction and operation of nuclear installations insofar as they affect the safety of such installations. The Integrity and Ageing Working Group (IAGE WG) of the CSNI deals with the integrity of structures and components, and has three sub-groups, dealing with the integrity of metal components and structures, ageing of concrete structures, and the seismic behaviour of structures. The sub-group dealing with the seismic behaviour of structures proposed this workshop. The OECD-NEA workshop on the relations between seismological data and seismic engineering analyses was held on October 17-18, 2002. A field visits in the Izmit area where the fault scarp is still visible was organised on Wednesday October 16, 2002. The Ttirkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, TAEK (Turkish Atomic Energy Agency) in Istanbul, Turkey, hosted the workshop. A recommendation of the OECD workshop on the engineering characterisation of seismic input (hosted by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and organised by Brookhaven National Laboratory on November 15-17, 1999) was to foster the growth of interaction between 'design engineers' and 'ground motion specialists'. The objective of the Istanbul workshop is to address this recommendation. The workshop gave seismologists the opportunity to present observed damages and their related ground motions and design engineers the opportunity to present current techniques used in the evaluation of seismic hazards. Bridging the gap between these two fields was a key objective - this workshop was a forum for bringing together the two communities. In addition, the location of the workshop was particularly interesting and provided possibilities for several of the host country participants to discuss the 1999 Kocaeli earthquake. On the basis of lessons learned from large earthquakes over the last decade, the

  4. The third phase of the OECD/NEA TDB project: TDB III

    Mompean, F.J.; Illemassene, M.; Perrone, J.

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 with a foreseen duration of four years. The main objective of this new phase is to extend the existing critically reviewed database for elements of relevance in radioactive waste management, paying attention to the needs of the various national programmes. Following the decision by the Project Management Board (integrated by representatives of 16 organisations with responsibilities in radioactive waste management in 12 OECD member countries) the elements contemplated in this new phase are Th, Sn and Fe, with a higher priority being allocated to inorganic species and compounds. In addition to the corresponding review teams for these elements, an additional expert team has been constituted to prepare guidelines for the evaluation of thermodynamic data for solid solutions. As was the case in TDB Phase II, the basic project review methodology remains unaltered in TDB III. The Figure illustrates the relationship between the various TDB bodies, with an International Organisation, the OECD NEA, acting as Project Coordinator and linking the independent scientific teams and the project governing bodies. This organizational paradigm has proven successful with the recent completion of the five Phase II Reviews (Update, Ni, Se, Zr and Organic Ligands). The review and expert team activities were started in 2004 (except for Fe, being started in 2005) following an initiation stage. This preliminary stage was designed in order to tailor the team compositions to the existing literature for each element. The first reviews stemming from TDB III are scheduled to appear in published form in 2007. The successful completion of these objectives will add three further reports to the current series of nine volumes (dealing with the chemical thermodynamics of U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni, Se, Zr and compounds and complexes of these elements with oxalate, citrate, EDTA and isa). (authors)

  5. Use of OECD/NEA Data Project Products in Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    Cherkas, G.; Raducu, Gheorghe; Riznic, J.; Yalaoui, S.; Huang, Hui-Wen; Holy, Jaroslav; Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Sandberg, Jorma; Balmain, Michel; Bonnevialle, Anne-Marie; Curnier, Florence; Georgescu, Gabriel; Lanore, Jeanne-Marie; Lindner, Arndt; Fujimoto, Haruo; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Hwang, Taesuk; Jang, Seung-Cheol; Husarcek, Jan; Kovacs, Zoltan; Vazquez, Teresa; Johanson, Gunnar; Liwaang, Bo; Nyman, Ralph; Dang, Vinh; Schoen, Gerhard; Brook, Kevin; Hamblen, David; Siu, Nathan; Sturzebecher, Karl; Tobin, Margaret; Wood, Jeff; Amri, Abdallah; Breest, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)/Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations' (CSNI) Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRISK) is tasked with supporting the improved use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) in risk informed regulation and safety management through the analysis of results and the development of perspectives regarding potentially important risk contributors and associated risk reduction strategies. The task consists of the following major activities: Development, distribution, and completion of survey questionnaires; Analysis of survey questionnaire results at a task workshop; Preparation of the final task report. The main objectives of this task, as proposed by WGRISK and approved by CSNI, are the following: - Identification and characterization of the current uses of OECD data project products and data in support of PSA. In this context, the term 'products' refers to data analysis results, technical reports, and other project outputs. - Identification and characterization of technical and programmatic characteristics that either support or impede use of data project products in PSA. This includes an assessment of which PSA parameters could be potentially estimated from the various data project products and gaps between available product information and PSA data needs. - Identification of recommendations for enhancing the usefulness of data project products and the coordination between WGRISK and the data projects. This task report consists of the following sections: - Chapter 1 Provides a general overview of motivation and approach used for this task. - Chapter 2 Describes scope and objectives of the task. - Chapter 3 Provides an overview of the ICDE, FIRE, OPDE/CODAP, and COMPSIS data projects. For each project, the project objectives, project history, data collection methodology and quality assurance, project status, example PSA Applications, and information related to project participation is provided. - Chapter 4 Describes the

  6. TRACE/PARCS analysis of the OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 BWR stability benchmark

    Kozlowski, T. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA (United States); March-Leuba, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hudson, N.; Woodyatt, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event which culminated in diverging power oscillations with a decay ratio of about 1.4. The event was successfully modeled by the TRACE/PARCS coupled code system, and further analysis of the event is described in this paper. The results show very good agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including the onset of instability, growth of the oscillations (decay ratio) and oscillation frequency. This provides confidence in the prediction of other parameters which are not available from the plant records. The event provides coupled code validation for a challenging BWR stability event, which involves the accurate simulation of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH), and TH/NK. coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of the 3-D coupled systems code TRACE/PARCS to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem was released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (authors)

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities. Japan

    2017-01-01

    The NEA has updated, in coordination with the Permanent Delegation of Japan to the OECD, the report on the Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities in Japan. This country report provides comprehensive information on the regulatory and institutional framework governing nuclear activities in Japan. It provides a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. Content: I - General Regulatory Regime: Introduction; Mining regime; Radioactive substances and equipment; Nuclear installations (Reactor Regulation, Emergency response); Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; Radiological protection; Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safeguards and nuclear security; Transport; Nuclear third party liability. II - Institutional Framework: Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office, Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), The Agency for Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE), Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)); Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Reactor Safety Examination Committee, Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Committee, Radiation Council, Other advisory bodies); Public and semi-public agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation (NDF), Nuclear Waste Management Organisation (NUMO))

  8. TRACE/PARCS validation for BWR stability based on OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 benchmark

    Kozlowski, T.; Roshan, S.; Lefvert, T.; Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A.; Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M.; Netterbrant, C.; March-Leuba, J.; Hudson, N.; Sandervag, O.; Bergman, A.

    2011-01-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event, which culminated in diverging power oscillations with decay ratio greater than 1.3. The event was successfully modeled by TRACE/PARCS coupled code system and the details of the modeling and solution are described in the paper. The obtained results show excellent agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including onset of instability, growth of oscillation (decay ratio) and the oscillation frequency. The event allows coupled code validation for BWR with a real, challenging stability event, which challenges accuracy of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH) and TH/NK coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of 3-D coupled code systems to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem is released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (author)

  9. The activities of the OECD/NEA in the field of earthquake engineering

    Sollogoub, P.; Kitada, Y.; Mathet, E.

    2005-01-01

    The Working Group on the Integrity and Aging of Components and Structures (IAGE) is established under the senior committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD/NEA (Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency). This Committee deals with safety-related R and D aspects. The mandate of this Working Group is to advise the CSNI on the topical basis for management of plant ageing and to propose general principles to maintain the integrity of systems and components. The Working Group is composed of three sub-groups addressing metallic components, concrete structures and the seismic behavior of structures and components. The groups operate through annual plenary meetings, workshops, state-of-the-art reports, topical opinion papers and benchmarks to produce advises to the CSNI. Twenty five high level experts from fifteen countries attend the Seismic Group (safety authorities, researchers, utilities, and representatives from other international organizations (IAEA, EC)). In this paper the scope of activities and recent tasks of the Seismic Group are presented. (authors)

  10. Managing nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry: the contribution of the OECD/NEA

    Royen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Although the safety level of nuclear power plants in OECD countries is very satisfactory and the technologies basic to the resolution of safety issues have advanced considerably, continued nuclear safety research work is necessary to address many of the residual concerns, and it remains an important element in ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the funding levels of national Government safety research programmes have been reduced over recent years. There is concern about the ability of OECD Member countries to sustain an adequate level of nuclear safety research capability. The OECD/NEA has a key role to play in organizing reflection and exchange of information on the most efficient use of available technical resources, and in the international management of nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry. Possible initiatives are mentioned in the paper. (author)

  11. Activities of the AZTLAN team on the OECD/Nea benchmark on fast reactors

    Lopez S, R.; Gomez T, A.; Puente E, F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E.; Arriaga R, L., E-mail: armando.gomez@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    In the present paper, the activities of the AZTLAN Platform Fast Reactor Group on the OECD/Nea Benchmark will be described. The main objective of these activities is to test the group staff and capabilities as well as the domestic code reliability by putting them into test in this exercise with different institutions from around the world. Six different core configurations were treated; these are described in two different versions of the Benchmark document. The main tools used by the group were the Finnish stochastic Monte Carlo code Serpent for full core calculations and macroscopic Cross Sections (X S) generation, and the domestic deterministic code AZNHEX for full core calculations. Different calculations were performed, such as full core calculations under nominal conditions, with control rods fully and partially inserted and with the sodium voided in the active zone as well as different reactivity shift values due to various conditions of radial and axial expansion of the fuel elements and structural material. The results obtained in the full core calculations and most of the reactivity shift calculations obtained by our group were indeed comparable to the ones obtained by different institutions when using similar methodologies. Given these favorable results it can be said that the main objective was met and the group showed their capabilities, as well as its possibility to collaborate with other institutes, placing Mexico in a good position in fast reactor analysis. Future work will continue with the calculations not yet treated and with the new core specifications on the new versions of the Benchmark document. (Author)

  12. OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project phase I: Benchmark of the ignition testing

    Adorni, Martina, E-mail: martina_adorni@hotmail.it [UNIPI (Italy); Herranz, Luis E. [CIEMAT (Spain); Hollands, Thorsten [GRS (Germany); Ahn, Kwang-II [KAERI (Korea, Republic of); Bals, Christine [GRS (Germany); D' Auria, Francesco [UNIPI (Italy); Horvath, Gabor L. [NUBIKI (Hungary); Jaeckel, Bernd S. [PSI (Switzerland); Kim, Han-Chul; Lee, Jung-Jae [KINS (Korea, Republic of); Ogino, Masao [JNES (Japan); Techy, Zsolt [NUBIKI (Hungary); Velazquez-Lozad, Alexander; Zigh, Abdelghani [USNRC (United States); Rehacek, Radomir [OECD/NEA (France)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A unique PWR spent fuel pool experimental project is analytically investigated. • Predictability of fuel clad ignition in case of a complete loss of coolant in SFPs is assessed. • Computer codes reasonably estimate peak cladding temperature and time of ignition. - Abstract: The OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project provided unique thermal-hydraulic experimental data associated with Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) complete drain down. The study conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was successfully completed (July 2009 to February 2013). The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full scale prototypic fashion (electrically heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate severe accident code validation and to reduce modeling uncertainties within the codes. Phase I focused on axial heating and burn propagation in a single PWR 17 × 17 assembly (i.e. “hot neighbors” configuration). Phase II addressed axial and radial heating and zirconium fire propagation including effects of fuel rod ballooning in a 1 × 4 assembly configuration (i.e. single, hot center assembly and four, “cooler neighbors”). This paper summarizes the comparative analysis regarding the final destructive ignition test of the phase I of the project. The objective of the benchmark is to evaluate and compare the predictive capabilities of computer codes concerning the ignition testing of PWR fuel assemblies. Nine institutions from eight different countries were involved in the benchmark calculations. The time to ignition and the maximum temperature are adequately captured by the calculations. It is believed that the benchmark constitutes an enlargement of the validation range for the codes to the conditions tested, thus enhancing the code applicability to other fuel assembly designs and configurations. The comparison of

  13. The Findings from the OECD/NEA/CSNI UMS (Uncertainty Method Study)

    D'Auria, F.; Glaeser, H.

    2013-01-01

    Within licensing procedures there is the incentive to replace the conservative requirements for code application by a 'best estimate' concept supplemented by an uncertainty analysis to account for predictive uncertainties of code results. Methods have been developed to quantify these uncertainties. The Uncertainty Methods Study (UMS) Group, following a mandate from CSNI (Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations) of OECD/NEA (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development / Nuclear Energy Agency), has compared five methods for calculating the uncertainty in the predictions of advanced 'best estimate' thermal-hydraulic codes. Most of the methods identify and combine input uncertainties. The major differences between the predictions of the methods came from the choice of uncertain parameters and the quantification of the input uncertainties, i.e. the wideness of the uncertainty ranges. Therefore, suitable experimental and analytical information has to be selected to specify these uncertainty ranges or distributions. After the closure of the Uncertainty Method Study (UMS) and after the report was issued comparison calculations of experiment LSTF-SB-CL-18 were performed by University of Pisa using different versions of the RELAP 5 code. It turned out that the version used by two of the participants calculated a 170 K higher peak clad temperature compared with other versions using the same input deck. This may contribute to the differences of the upper limit of the uncertainty ranges. A 'bifurcation' analysis was also performed by the same research group also providing another way of interpreting the high temperature peak calculated by two of the participants. (authors)

  14. Safety margin evaluation concepts for plant Up rates and life extension. Results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP)

    Belac, J

    2006-01-01

    This presentation summarizes results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP) aimed to develop generalized safety margin concept and means of its quantification for the process of evaluating plant safety in the frame of plant life extension and power up rating activities to be used by OECD member countries. (author)

  15. OECD/NEA International Benchmark exercises: Validation of CFD codes applied nuclear industry; OECD/NEA internatiion Benchmark exercices: La validacion de los codigos CFD aplicados a la industria nuclear

    Pena-Monferrer, C.; Miquel veyrat, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Chiva Vicent, S.

    2016-08-01

    In the recent years, due, among others, the slowing down of the nuclear industry, investment in the development and validation of CFD codes, applied specifically to the problems of the nuclear industry has been seriously hampered. Thus the International Benchmark Exercise (IBE) sponsored by the OECD/NEA have been fundamental to analyze the use of CFD codes in the nuclear industry, because although these codes are mature in many fields, still exist doubts about them in critical aspects of thermohydraulic calculations, even in single-phase scenarios. The Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) and the Universitat Jaume I (UJI), sponsored by the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), have actively participated in all benchmark's proposed by NEA, as in the expert meetings,. In this paper, a summary of participation in the various IBE will be held, describing the benchmark itself, the CFD model created for it, and the main conclusions. (Author)

  16. IRIS-2012 OECD/NEA/CSNI benchmark: Numerical simulations of structural impact

    Orbovic, Nebojsa; Tarallo, Francois; Rambach, Jean-Mathieu; Sagals, Genadijs; Blahoianu, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    A benchmark of numerical simulations related to the missile impact on reinforced concrete (RC) slabs has been launched in the frame of OECD/NEA/CSNI research program “Improving Robustness Assessment Methodologies for Structures Impacted by Missiles”, under the acronym IRIS. The goal of the research program is to simulate RC structural, flexural and punching, behavior under deformable and rigid missile impact. The first phase called IRIS-2010 was a blind prediction of the tests performed at VTT facility in Espoo, Finland. The two simulations were performed related to two series of tests: (1) two tests on the impact of a deformable missile exhibiting damage mainly by flexural (so-called “flexural tests”) or global response and (2) three tests on the impact of a rigid missile exhibiting damage mainly by punching response (so-called “punching tests”) or local response. The simulation results showed significant scatter (coefficient of variation up to 132%) for both flexural and punching cases. The IRIS-2012 is the second, post-test, phase of the benchmark with the goal to improve simulations and reduce the scatter of the results. Based on the IRIS-2010 recommendations and to better calibrate concrete constitutive models, a series of tri-axial tests as well as Brazilian tests were performed as a part of the IRIS-2012 benchmark. 25 teams from 11 countries took part in this exercise. Majority of participants were part of the IRIS-2010 benchmark. Participants showed significant improvement in reducing epistemic uncertainties in impact simulations. Several teams presented both finite element (FE) and simplified analysis as per recommendations of the IRIS-2010. The improvements were at the level of simulation results but also at the level of understanding of impact phenomena and its modeling. Due to the complexity of the physical phenomena and its simulation (high geometric and material non-linear behavior) and inherent epistemic and aleatory uncertainties, the

  17. IRIS-2012 OECD/NEA/CSNI benchmark: Numerical simulations of structural impact

    Orbovic, Nebojsa, E-mail: nebojsa.orbovic@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Tarallo, Francois [IRSN, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Rambach, Jean-Mathieu [Géodynamique et Structures, Bagneux (France); Sagals, Genadijs; Blahoianu, Andrei [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    A benchmark of numerical simulations related to the missile impact on reinforced concrete (RC) slabs has been launched in the frame of OECD/NEA/CSNI research program “Improving Robustness Assessment Methodologies for Structures Impacted by Missiles”, under the acronym IRIS. The goal of the research program is to simulate RC structural, flexural and punching, behavior under deformable and rigid missile impact. The first phase called IRIS-2010 was a blind prediction of the tests performed at VTT facility in Espoo, Finland. The two simulations were performed related to two series of tests: (1) two tests on the impact of a deformable missile exhibiting damage mainly by flexural (so-called “flexural tests”) or global response and (2) three tests on the impact of a rigid missile exhibiting damage mainly by punching response (so-called “punching tests”) or local response. The simulation results showed significant scatter (coefficient of variation up to 132%) for both flexural and punching cases. The IRIS-2012 is the second, post-test, phase of the benchmark with the goal to improve simulations and reduce the scatter of the results. Based on the IRIS-2010 recommendations and to better calibrate concrete constitutive models, a series of tri-axial tests as well as Brazilian tests were performed as a part of the IRIS-2012 benchmark. 25 teams from 11 countries took part in this exercise. Majority of participants were part of the IRIS-2010 benchmark. Participants showed significant improvement in reducing epistemic uncertainties in impact simulations. Several teams presented both finite element (FE) and simplified analysis as per recommendations of the IRIS-2010. The improvements were at the level of simulation results but also at the level of understanding of impact phenomena and its modeling. Due to the complexity of the physical phenomena and its simulation (high geometric and material non-linear behavior) and inherent epistemic and aleatory uncertainties, the

  18. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  19. State of Art Report for the OECD-NEA Loss-of-Forced Cooling (LOFC) Test Project using HTTR Reactor

    Jun, Ji Su

    2011-05-01

    The OECD/NEA Project is planned to perform the LOFC (Loss Of Forced Cooling) test using the HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) in Japan from 31 March 2011 to 31 March 2013 in order to obtain the data for the code validation of the VHTR safety analysis. Based on the Project Agreement Document, this report gives a description of the HTTR-LOFC test, HTTR test facility, project schedule and deliverable items as the technical state art of the project, and appends the full translation of the project agreement articles on the project management

  20. Proceedings of the Second OECD/NEA Organisation Meeting on Increased Accident Tolerance of Fuels for LWRs

    Massara, Simone; ); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Braase, Lori; Merrill, Brad; Teague, Melissa; Stanek, Chris R.; Montgomery, Robert H.; Ott, Larry J.; Robb, Kevin; Snead, Lance; Farmer, Mitch; Billone, Michael C.; Todosow, Michael; Brown, Nicholas; Brachet, J.C.; Le Flem, M.; Sauder, C.; Idarraga-Trujillo, I.; Michaux, A.; Lorrette, C.; Le Saux, M.; Blanpain, P.; Park, Jeong-Yong; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Weon-Ju; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Liu, T.; Hallstadius, Lars; Lahoda, Ed; Waeckel, N.; Bonnet, J.M.; Vitanza, Carlo; Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Nakamura, Kinya; Dyck, Gary; Inozemtsev, Victor; )

    2013-01-01

    Under the guidance of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee, the expert group acts as a forum for scientific and technical information exchange on advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The expert group focusses on the fundamental properties and behaviour under normal operations and accident conditions for advanced core materials and components (fuels, cladding, control rods, etc.). The materials considered are applicable to Gen II and Gen III Light Water Reactors, as well as Gen III+ reactors under construction. The objective of the expert group is to define and coordinate a programme of work to help advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide the technical underpinning for the development of advanced LWR fuels with enhanced accident tolerance compared to currently used zircaloy/UO 2 fuel systems, as well as other non-fuel core components with important roles in LWR performance under accident conditions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the 2. Meeting on Increased Accident Tolerance of Fuels for LWRs. Content: 1 - Overview of the exchanges after the December-2012 Workshop through the discussion forum established at the OECD-NEA (S. Massara, NEA); 2 - Metrics Development for Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels (S. Bragg-Sitton, INL); 3 - Candidate ATF Clad Technologies and Key Feasibility Issues (L. Snead, ORNL); 4 - CEA studies on nuclear fuel claddings for LWRs enhanced accident tolerant fuel. Some recent results, pending issues and prospects (J.C. Brachet, CEA); 5 - Current status on the accident tolerant fuel development in the Republic of Korea (J.Y. Park, J.H. Chang, KAERI); 6 - The current status of fuel R and D in the P.R. of China (T. Liu, CGN). Session 2: Key elements for a work programme on ATF: 7 - Beneficial characteristics of ATF (metrics) (L. Hallstadius, Westinghouse); 8 - Reactor types of interest (applicability) (L. Ott, ORNL); 9 - Impact on normal operations

  1. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the proceedings of a Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on October 23-25, 1992. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In particular, the International Working Group (IWG) on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (LMNPP) was the IAEA sponsor, and the Principal Working Group 3 (PWG-3) (Primary System Component Integrity) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) was the NEA's sponsor. This meeting was preceded by two prior international activities that were designed to examine the state-of-the-art in fracture analysis capabilities and emphasized applications to the safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities. The first of those two activities was an IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held at the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA) in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 25-27, 1988; the proceedings of that meeting were published 1991.1 The second activity was the CSNI/PWG-3's Fracture Assessment Group's Project FALSIRE (Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments). The proceedings of the FALSIRE workshop that was held in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on May 8-10, 1990, was recently published by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Those previous activities identified capabilities and shortcomings of various fracture analysis methods based on analyses of six available large-scale experiments. Different modes of fracture behavior, which ranged from brittle to ductile, were considered. In addition, geometry, size, constraint and multiaxial effects were considered. While generally good predictive capabilities were demonstrated for brittle fracture, issues were identified relative to predicting fracture behavior at higher

  2. Proceedings of the CSNI Specialist Meeting on Transient Two-Phase Flow - Current Issues in System Thermal Hydraulics

    Reocreux, M; Rubinstein, M C [CEA-IPSN/DRS/SEMAR, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1992-07-01

    The 4. Specialists' Meeting on Transient Two Phase Flow was organized by the Safety Research Department of the French Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute at the request of the OECD Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations. After Toronto in 1976, Paris in 1978 and Pasadena in 1981, the Aix-en-Provence meeting was in keeping with the course of studies initiated by the Thermalhydraulic Systems Behavior Task Group of the Principal Working Group No.2 for discussing the achievements and defining the needs of safety research in accident thermal-hydraulics. 60 Specialists from 14 Countries (Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the USA, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan) attended the meeting, representing a large spectrum of experts from National Safety Authorities, Research Laboratories, Universities, Vendors and Utilities. These specialists had to review the 15-year research period which had elapsed since the last meetings. This period had been characterized by the issuance of the large thermalhydraulic computer codes for LWR accidents, the performance of several hundreds of separate effect tests for the development and the qualification of the physical models, the carrying-out of the large experimental programmes on system loops (up to scale 1) for verifying the computer codes. Although this research was mainly characterized by remarkable success, limitations still exist. In a safety approach, there need to be well identified and handled, and the specialists were asked to exchange their views in order to determine which solutions they expected to be affordable in the future. Safety applications have already started which use these latest research achievements. They raise specific problems such as the use of validation matrices, the evaluation of uncertainties, the identification and the control of unavoidable users' effects. The specialists were required to exchange their experience of applications

  3. Proceedings of the CSNI Specialist Meeting on Transient Two-Phase Flow - Current Issues in System Thermal Hydraulics

    Reocreux, M.; Rubinstein, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The 4. Specialists' Meeting on Transient Two Phase Flow was organized by the Safety Research Department of the French Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute at the request of the OECD Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations. After Toronto in 1976, Paris in 1978 and Pasadena in 1981, the Aix-en-Provence meeting was in keeping with the course of studies initiated by the Thermalhydraulic Systems Behavior Task Group of the Principal Working Group No.2 for discussing the achievements and defining the needs of safety research in accident thermal-hydraulics. 60 Specialists from 14 Countries (Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the USA, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan) attended the meeting, representing a large spectrum of experts from National Safety Authorities, Research Laboratories, Universities, Vendors and Utilities. These specialists had to review the 15-year research period which had elapsed since the last meetings. This period had been characterized by the issuance of the large thermalhydraulic computer codes for LWR accidents, the performance of several hundreds of separate effect tests for the development and the qualification of the physical models, the carrying-out of the large experimental programmes on system loops (up to scale 1) for verifying the computer codes. Although this research was mainly characterized by remarkable success, limitations still exist. In a safety approach, there need to be well identified and handled, and the specialists were asked to exchange their views in order to determine which solutions they expected to be affordable in the future. Safety applications have already started which use these latest research achievements. They raise specific problems such as the use of validation matrices, the evaluation of uncertainties, the identification and the control of unavoidable users' effects. The specialists were required to exchange their experience of applications

  4. NEA activities in 1992. 21. Annual report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    1993-01-01

    This annual report gives informations on OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities in 1992. This report is divided into ten chapters: 1 Trends in nuclear power. 2 Nuclear development and the fuel cycle. 3 Reactor safety and regulation. 4 Radiation protection. 5 Radioactive waste management. 6 Nuclear science. 7 Joint projects. 8 Legal affairs. 9 Informations programs. 10 Relations with non-member countries

  5. OECD/NEA source convergence benchmark program: overview and summary of results

    Blomquist, Roger; Nouri, Ali; Armishaw, Malcolm; Jacquet, Olivier; Naito, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Source Convergence in Criticality Safety Analysis. A set of test problems is presented, some computational results are given, and the effects of source convergence difficulties are described

  6. OECD/NEA source convergence benchmark program. Overview and summary of results

    Blomquist, Roger; Nouri, Ali; Armishaw, Malcolm; Jacquet, Olivier; Naito, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Source Convergence in Criticality Safety Analysis. A set of test problems is presented, some computational results are given, and the effects of source convergence difficulties are described. (author)

  7. Overview of OECD-NEA Nuclear Science and Data Bank Activities

    Gulliford, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Overview: • NEA Areas of Work, Standing Committees; • Nuclear Science & the Data Bank: – Working Parties & Expert Groups; – integral experiments databases; – linked Data Bank/Nuclear Science products. • Reactor Physics and Criticality Integral Experiments: – ICSBEP& IRPhE evaluations; – Database tools (DICE, IDAT, SFCOMPO-X). • Other Activities related to Fast Reactors: – WPRS SFR Task Force; – Nuclear Data, WPEC sub-group on data adjustment; – Fuel Cycle and Materials. • Looking Ahead: – Uncertainty Analysis for transient modelling; – Russian Accession to the NEA and Data Bank; – Impact of Fukushima on Nuclear Science Programmes of Work

  8. OECD/NEA Radiological characterisation in decommissioning - Evaluation of questionnaire. Strategies for Radiological Characterisation used by Decommissioning Projects in OECD Countries

    Thierfeldt, Stefan; Haneke, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of 2011, the Radiological Characterization and Decommissioning Task Group (RCD) of the WPDD of the OECD/NEA has prepared a questionnaire on the characterisation of nuclear facilities that has been circulated among nuclear installations in various OECD countries. The aim of this questionnaire was to gather information on the approaches and methods that are used for radiological characterisation (RC) for systems and components, for buildings and for sites (land), on domestic and international guidance and regulations that govern RC, and on the experience with RC that is already available in the particular country. The number of responses to this questionnaire that were received in the second half of 2011 was very satisfactory, so that a broad overview is now available from the following countries: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom. The presentation deals with the results that were obtained from the evaluation of these questionnaires and gives overviews of the objectives of characterisation, the input data for planning of characterisation, the measurement techniques that were used for metallic structures and components, for buildings and for sites, the data management and QA measures, the obstacles that were encountered, the experience with availability of as-built plans, the regulatory framework and guidelines, and the costs for RC. All information on RC is further broken down with respect to the operational phase (where RC is used for preliminary decommissioning planning), the transition phase (where RC supports decommissioning planning) and the actual decommissioning phase (where RC is needed for dismantling, decontamination and treatment of systems, components, buildings etc.). The presentation also offers conclusions on these subjects. (authors)

  9. Analyses and results of the OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF benchmark phase II. Technical report; Analysen und Ergebnisse zum OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF Benchmark Phase II. Technischer Bericht

    Hannstein, Volker; Sommer, Fabian

    2017-05-15

    The report summarizes the performed studies and results in the frame of the phase II benchmarks of the expert group of used nuclear fuel (EGUNF) of the working party of nuclear criticality safety (WPNCS) of the nuclear energy agency (NEA) of the organization for economic co-operation and development (OECD). The studies specified within the benchmarks have been realized to the full extent. The scope of the benchmarks was the comparison of a generic BWR fuel element with gadolinium containing fuel rods with several computer codes and cross section libraries of different international working groups and institutions. The used computational model allows the evaluation of the accuracy of fuel rod and their influence of the inventory calculations and the respective influence on BWR burnout credit calculations.

  10. NEA activities in 1996. Twenty-fifth annual report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    1997-01-01

    The activity of NEA in 1996 is briefly summarised. The following issues are concerned: trends in nuclear power, nuclear development, reactor safety and regulations, radiation protection, waste management, nuclear science, legal affairs, co-operative projects, relation with non-member countries. (K.A.) (K.A.)

  11. Reactor based plutonium disposition - physics and fuel behaviour benchmark studies of an OECD/NEA experts group

    D'Hondt, P.; Gehin, J.; Na, B.C.; Sartori, E.; Wiesenack, W.

    2001-01-01

    One of the options envisaged for disposing of weapons grade plutonium, declared surplus for national defence in the Russian Federation and Usa, is to burn it in nuclear power reactors. The scientific/technical know-how accumulated in the use of MOX as a fuel for electricity generation is of great relevance for the plutonium disposition programmes. An Expert Group of the OECD/Nea is carrying out a series of benchmarks with the aim of facilitating the use of this know-how for meeting this objective. This paper describes the background that led to establishing the Expert Group, and the present status of results from these benchmarks. The benchmark studies cover a theoretical reactor physics benchmark on a VVER-1000 core loaded with MOX, two experimental benchmarks on MOX lattices and a benchmark concerned with MOX fuel behaviour for both solid and hollow pellets. First conclusions are outlined as well as future work. (author)

  12. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  13. NEA activities in 1993. 22. Annual Report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    1994-01-01

    The titles and themes of the ten chapters of this report on NEA activities are: trends in nuclear energy; nuclear development and the fuel cycle (potential contribution of nuclear energy, policy alternatives, maintaining the nuclear option, prospective); reactor safety and regulation (safety research, regulatory approach, safety assessment, accident phenomenology and management, human factors, international standards); radiation protection (revision of the standards, assessment of the protection, international emergency exercises); radioactive waste management (long term safety assessment, in situ evaluation, other radioactive wastes); nuclear science (role, nuclear data, use of supercomputers, actinide transmutation, NEA Data Bank); joint projects (Three Mile Island vessel investigation, Halden reactor project...); legal affairs (liability aspects...); information programme; relations with non-member countries. 28 figs

  14. Proceedings of the Start-up Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs, 28-29 April 2014, OECD-NEA HQ

    Kurata, Masaki; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Sowder, Andrew; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Zhou, Y.; Forgeron, T.; Guedeney, Ph.; Brachet, J.C.; Michaux, A.; Chauvin, Nathalie; Waeckel, N.; Ambard, A.; Blanpain, P.; Bischoff, J.; Zvonarev, Yu.; Verwerft, M.; Weber, M.; Lambrinou, K.; Koonen, E.; Van Dyck, S.; PETIT, Marc; Cornet, Stephanie; ); YAMAJI, Akifumi; ); Inozemtsev, V.; )

    2014-04-01

    Under the guidance of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee, the expert group acts as a forum for scientific and technical information exchange on advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The expert group focusses on the fundamental properties and behaviour under normal operations and accident conditions for advanced core materials and components (fuels, cladding, control rods, etc.). The materials considered are applicable to Gen II and Gen III Light Water Reactors, as well as Gen III+ reactors under construction. The objective of the expert group is to define and coordinate a programme of work to help advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide the technical underpinning for the development of advanced LWR fuels with enhanced accident tolerance compared to currently used zircaloy/UO 2 fuel systems, as well as other non-fuel core components with important roles in LWR performance under accident conditions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the Start-up Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs. Content: 1 - Final Agenda; 2 - Draft mandate of EGATFL: Discussion of Scope and Objectives (K. Pasamehmetoglu, INL); 3 - Technical updates since the 2. meeting on ATF (28-29 October 2013): - Overview on ATF R and D in Japan (M. Kurata, JAEA); - Update on Development of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel for Light Water Reactors in the United States (S. Bragg-Sitton, INL); - EPRI Update Since the 2. OECD/NEA Meeting on ATF - 28-29 October 2013 (A. Sowder, EPRI); - Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development: KAERI's R and D Status (Y.H. Koo, KAERI); - Accident Tolerant Fuel Research Activities in China General Nuclear Power Corporation - CGN (Y. Zhou, CGN); - ATF R and D Status and Perspectives (Th. Forgeron, CEA); - Proposals of NRC 'Kurchatov Institute' on Contributions to Collaborative Framework on ATF Activity (Y. Zvonarev, NRC KI); - Input to the

  15. The OECD/NEA workshop on the indemnification of nuclear damage in the event of a nuclear accident

    Wagstaff, F.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1993, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) has run the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) Program. The program serves to discuss an effective accident management approach on the basis of a simulated nuclear accident situation together with the states involved and their institutions, and also elaborate measures for its further improvement. At the present time, the INEX Program has reached Phase 3 in which, for the first time, also aspects of liability for the consequences of accidents were included. These aspects were made the subject of a workshop held after an emergency exercise. The scenario covered was based on an INES level-4 accident in the French Gravelines Nuclear Power Station situated close to the French-Belgian border. The workshop dealt with these topics, among others: the application of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability, the Brussels Supplementary Convention, and the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage as well as the Supplementary Compensation Convention of 1997. It was seen that there was a clear need for further discussion, especially to shed more light on the interrelationship of these treaties. (orig.) [de

  16. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: OECD/NEA Nuclear Safety Response and Lessons Learnt

    2013-01-01

    Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, all NEA member countries took early action to ensure and confirm the continued safety of their nuclear power plants and the protection of the public. After these preliminary safety reviews, all countries with nuclear facilities carried out comprehensive safety reviews, often referred to as 'stress tests', which reassessed safety margins of nuclear facilities with a primary focus on challenges related to conditions experienced at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, for example extreme external events and the loss of safety functions, or capabilities to cope with severe accidents. As appropriate, improvements are being made to safety and emergency response systems to ensure that nuclear power plants are capable of withstanding events that lead to loss of electrical power and/or cooling capability. In the weeks following the accident, the NEA immediately began establishing expert groups in the nuclear safety and radiological protection areas, as well as contributing to information exchange with the Japanese authorities and other international organisations. It promptly provided a forum for high-level decision makers and regulators within the G8-G20 frameworks. The NEA actions taken at the international level in response to the accident have been carried out primarily by the three NEA standing technical committees concerned with nuclear and radiation safety issues - the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) - under the leadership of the CNRA. More than two years following the accident, the NEA continues to assist the Japanese authorities in dealing with their nuclear safety and recovery efforts as well as to facilitate international co-operation on nuclear safety and radiological protection matters. It is strongly supporting the establishment of

  17. A study on an establishment for collaboration system with the OECD/NEA by means of the analysis of its main activities related to nuclear safety

    Song, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Park, J. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Oh, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1st February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20th April 1972, when Japan became its first non-European full member. NEA membership today consists of 28 OECD member countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Republic of Korea, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Commission of the European Communities also takes part in the work of the Agency. The mission of the NEA is: o to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, as well as o to provide authoritative assessments and to forge common understandings on key issues, as input to government decisions on nuclear energy policy and to broader OECD policy analyses in areas such as energy and sustainable development. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency performs the work putting emphasis on safety enhancement and regulatory safety. Having Analyzed activities areas of Nuclear Development Committee (NDC), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and drew out cooperation methods relating to nuclear safety regulation with them, it will be helpful economically and technically in meeting with improvement of nuclear safety efficiently

  18. The work and perspective of the OECD/NEA in decommissioning

    O'Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    OECD member countries are increasingly faced with the need to make provisions for dealing with all aspects of dealing with the management of legacy nuclear installations, especially in terms of having in place adequate policies and regulatory frameworks for ensuring both safety and the efficient implementation of the decommissioning projects. Efficiency also requires that funding schemes are capable of providing adequate funds when required, even in the event that issues arise during implementation that were not anticipated during the planning phase. Waste management arrangements may encompass separate disposal routes for different categories of waste, including Very Low Level Waste, and may also include provisions for clearance and recycling. Recent moves in several countries towards establishing new nuclear programmes are bringing decommissioning activities into fresh focus, for reasons of public confidence (i.e. demonstrating that decommissioning can be done). In some instances existing nuclear sites will be used for the construction of new installations, but stakeholder issues are important for these sites as well. Maturing decommissioning experience should also provide lessons that would help in the reduction of lifetime costs for nuclear plants and other facilities. The challenge lying ahead is to establish a framework that will account for growing nuclear industrial activities in competitive, globalized markets, while maintaining and assuring the safety of decommissioning for the public and for workers. Within this context, institutional arrangements, stakeholder issues, costs and funding, waste management and release policies, as well as availability of technologies and skills, need to be kept under review. (authors)

  19. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA/CSNI workshop on the implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques

    Koroll, G.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Rohde, J. [GRS, Koln (Germany); Royen, J. [OECD NEA, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1997-03-01

    The Workshop on the Implementation of Hydrogen Mitigation Techniques was held in Winnipeg, Manitoba,Canada from 1996 May 13 to 15. It was organized in collaboration with the Whiteshell Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Ontario Hydro and the CANDU Owner's Group (COG). Sixty-five experts from twelve OECD Member countries and the Russian Federation attended the meeting. Papers presented in the sessions included topics: accident management and analysis, relevant aspects of hydrogen production, distribution and mixing, engineering, technology, possible side-effects consequences and new designs. The objectives of the Workshop were the following: to establish the state of the art of hydrogen mitigation techniques, with emphasis on igniters and catalytic recombiners; to exchange information on Member countries' strategies in managing hydrogen mitigation, and to establish dialogue as to differences in approach; to determine whether there is now an adequate technical basis for such strategies or whether more work is needed; to exchange information on future plans for implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques.

  20. Improving of health and safety contribution of OECD/NEA Radiation Protection Committee and Public Health

    Lazo, T.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear energy Agency, has, since 1957, been addressing issues in radiological protection through its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). The Committee is made up of regulators and radiation protection experts, with the broad mission to provide timely identification of new and emerging issues, to analyse their possible implications and to recommend or take action to address these issues to further enhance radiation protection regulation and implementation. The regulatory and operational consensus developed by the CRPPH on these emerging issues supports policy and regulation development in Member countries, and disseminates good practice. To best serve the needs of its Member countries, the CRPPH has been focusing its work in recent years on a few key topic areas. These induce the evolution of the system of radiological protection, the advancement of preparedness for nuclear emergency accidents, and the improvement of occupational exposure management at nuclear power plants. With the International Commission on Radiological Protection about to issue new recommendations, due out in 2005, the CRPPH will take advantage of the radiological protection community's recent focus on emerging policy and strategic issues to develop a new CRPPH Collective Opinion. This document, to be published in 2005, will serve the Committee as a guide for its programme of work for the coming 5 to 10 years. (Author) 13 refs

  1. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA/CSNI workshop on the implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques

    Koroll, G.W.; Rohde, J.; Royen, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Workshop on the Implementation of Hydrogen Mitigation Techniques was held in Winnipeg, Manitoba,Canada from 1996 May 13 to 15. It was organized in collaboration with the Whiteshell Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Ontario Hydro and the CANDU Owner's Group (COG). Sixty-five experts from twelve OECD Member countries and the Russian Federation attended the meeting. Papers presented in the sessions included topics: accident management and analysis, relevant aspects of hydrogen production, distribution and mixing, engineering, technology, possible side-effects consequences and new designs. The objectives of the Workshop were the following: to establish the state of the art of hydrogen mitigation techniques, with emphasis on igniters and catalytic recombiners; to exchange information on Member countries' strategies in managing hydrogen mitigation, and to establish dialogue as to differences in approach; to determine whether there is now an adequate technical basis for such strategies or whether more work is needed; to exchange information on future plans for implementation of hydrogen mitigation techniques

  2. Proceedings of the joint WANO/OECD-NEA workshop on pre-stress loss in NPP containments

    1997-01-01

    This joint WANO/OECD-NEA workshop on pre-stress loss in NPP containments started with Opening Remarks (by OECD and EDF) and two presentations on 'Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete: Physical Origins, Practical Measurements', and 'Past, Present and Future Techniques for Predicting Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete'. It was then followed by papers and presentations from 12 countries, which titles are: Assessment of Creep Methodologies for Predicting Prestressing Forces Losses in Nuclear Power Plant Containments; Prestress Behaviour in Belgian NPP Containments; Presentation of Gentilly 2 NPP Containment (abstract only); Containment Structure Monitoring and Prestress Losses; Experience from Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (China); Prestress losses in NPP containments - the EDF experience; Prestress Force Monitoring on the THTR Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel During 19 Years; NPP Containment Design: Evolution and Indian Experience; In-Service Inspections and R and D of PCCVs in Japan; Comparison of Grouted and Un-grouted Tendons in NPP Containments; Prestress Losses in Containment of VVER 1000 Units; Prestressing in Nuclear Power Plants; Anchor Lift-off Measuring System for 37 T 15 Tendons; Monitoring of Stressed-Strained State and Forces in Reinforcing Cables of Prestressed Containment Shells of Nuclear Power Plants; Long-Term In-Service Monitoring of Pre-stressing in Magnox Pre-stressed Concrete Pressure Vessels; The Measurement of Un-bonded Tendon Loads in PCPV and Primary Containment Buildings; The Long Term In-service Performance of Corrosion Protection to Prestressing Tendons in AGR Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessels; Prestress Force Losses in Containments of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. Discussions and a synthesis are also presented

  3. Improving regulatory practices through the OECD-NEA Stress Corrosion Cracking and Cable Ageing Project (SCAP)

    Yamamoto, A.; Huerta, A.; Sekimura, N.; Gott, K.; Koshy, T.

    2012-01-01

    For regulatory authorities, it is important to verify the adequacy of ageing management methods applied by the licensees, based on reliable technical evidence. In order to achieve that goal, 14 NEA member countries joined the SCAP (Project) in 2006 to share knowledge and three more countries joined during the course of the project. The project focused on two important safety issues, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and the degradation of cable insulation, due to their relevance for plant ageing assessments and their implication on inspection practices. The commendable practices identified in the project are intended to strengthen technical approaches to optimize ageing management in the areas of SCC and cable ageing. The SCAP SCC and Cable data- and knowledge bases provided extensive information to benefit all stakeholders in designing, constructing, operating and regulating Nuclear Power Plants and also provide commendable practices applicable to new reactors. The paper presents the product of SCAP work resulting from 4 years of technical interactions and shared knowledge from all participants from June 2006 to June 2010. (author)

  4. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-01-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  5. OECD/NEA International Common Cause Failure Data Exchange (ICDE) project - insights and lessons learnt

    Johanson, G.; Kreuser, A.; Pyy, P.; Rasmuson, D.; Werner, W.

    2006-01-01

    Events initiated by common-cause-failure (CCF) can significantly affect the availability and reliability of nuclear power plant safety systems. In recognition of this, CCF data are systematically collected and analysed in the International Common-Cause Data Exchange (ICDE) Project, which was initiated in August 1994. Since April 1998, the NEA has formally operated the project. Currently eleven countries participate in the project. The ICDE collects all events where two or more identical, redundant components of a group, fulfilling the same function, have failed or were impaired due to a shared cause (ICDE events). Complete CCFs, i. e. failure of all identical, redundant components in the group due to a shared cause are an important subset of the collected data. Currently, data exchange and analysis covers the following components: centrifugal pumps, diesel generators, motor-operated valves, safety and relief valves, check valves, reactor protection system components (level measurement, control rod drives, etc), circuit breakers, and batteries. The main findings of the ICDE reports issued by 2005 show averaged over all components that about two thirds of all complete CCF events involve faulty actions by plant personnel and contractors. The single largest contribution is from faulty testing and maintenance work due to deficient and/or incomplete procedures. Other important causes are insufficient testing and requalification of components or systems after maintenance, repair, modifications or backfitting work, as well as operator errors of commission. The probability that a reported ICDE event is a complete CCF decreases strongly with increasing number of redundant components, demonstrating the effectiveness of redundancy as a powerful defence against CCFs. However, complete CCFs cannot be completely prevented by high redundancy only. (orig.)

  6. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB: Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of ±10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. 155 Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k ∞ also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  7. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB. Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of {+-}10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. {sup 155}Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  8. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO

    DeHart, Mark D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mausolff, Zander [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Weems, Zach [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Popp, Dustin [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Smith, Kristin [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shriver, Forrest [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Goluoglu, Sedat [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Prince, Zachary [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Ragusa, Jean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\\cite{Rattlesnake} and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.

  9. Participation in the international comparison of probabilistic consequence assessment codes organized by OECD/NEA and CEC. Final Report

    Rossi, J.

    1994-02-01

    Probabilistic Consequence Assessment (PCA) methods are exploited not only in risk evaluation but also to study alternative design features, reactor siting recommendations and to obtain acceptable dose criteria by the radiation safety authorities. The models are programmed into computer codes for these kind of assessment. To investigate the quality and competence of different models, OECD/NEA and CEC organized the international code comparison exercise, which was participated by the organizations from 15 countries. There were seven codes participating in the exercise. The objectives of the code comparison exercise were to compare the results by the codes, to contribute to PCA code quality assurance, to harmonize the codes, to provide a forum for discussion on various approaches and to produce the report on the exercise. The project started in 1991 and the results of the calculations were completed in autumn 1992. The international report consists of two parts: the Overview Report for decision makers and the supporting detailed Technical Report. The results of the project are reviewed as an user of the ARANO-programme of VTT and trends of it's further development are indicated in this report. (orig.) (11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.)

  10. DORT-TD/THERMIX solutions for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Pautz, Andreas; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2008-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the PBMR, not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400 MW OECD/NEA/NSC coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate the transient scenarios in the above-mentioned benchmark problem. Steady-state calculations results are compared with selected participants' results as well as transient models in which the diffusion and transport theory solutions of the same code system are directly compared. Several sensitivity studies are also shown in order to determine how much the change in certain parameters influences the overall behaviour of a given transient. It is shown in this paper that DORT-TD/THERMIX is a versatile tool which can be deployed for design and safety analyses of high temperature reactors of pebble-bed type. (authors)

  11. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  12. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ando, Yoshihira [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of k{sub eff}. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of k{sub eff} values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of {+-}1%{delta}k/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within {+-}5% for most cases. (author)

  13. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO

    DeHart, Mark D.; Mausolff, Zander; Weems, Zach; Popp, Dustin; Smith, Kristin; Shriver, Forrest; Goluoglu, Sedat; Prince, Zachary; Ragusa, Jean

    2016-01-01

    One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\\citelesnake) and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.

  14. OECD/NEA WGRisk CAPS on PSA for Advanced Reactors: a summary of questionnaires and answers report

    Ahn, K.I.; Han, S.J.; Han, S.H.; Yang, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Main objectives of the WGRisk CAPS on the probabilistic safety analysis for advanced reactors which was approved by the OECD/NEA CSNI in June 2008, are to 1) characterize the ability of current PSA (Probability Safety Assessment) technology to address key questions regarding the development and licensing of advanced reactor designs; 2) characterize the potential value of advanced PSA methods and tools; and 3) develop recommendations to CSNI for any needed developments. For this purpose, the two following sub-tasks have been set up: -) A survey of participating countries regarding the state of PSA technologies for advanced reactors and -) Organization of an international workshop for detailed follow-up discussions related to the topic. In order to meet the objectives of the CAPS (CSNI Activity Proposal Sheet), the questionnaires to elicit the respondents' viewpoints had been distributed to the WGRisk member countries during the period of 2009 to 2010, and answers from the 12 countries (13 organizations) have been collected until February 2010. This paper summarizes the current status of the answers to the questionnaires and the international status and insights into PSA technologies for advanced reactors. (authors)

  15. Assessment of the uncertainties of COBRA sub-channel calculations by using a PWR type rod bundle and the OECD NEA UAM and the PSBT benchmarks data

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of the uncertainties of COBRA-IIIC thermal-hydraulic analyses of rod bundles is performed for a 5-by-5 bundle representing a PWR fuel assembly. In the first part of the paper the modeling uncertainties are evaluated in the term of the uncertainty of the turbulent mixing factor using the OECD NEA/NRC PSBT benchmark data. After that the uncertainties of the COBRA calculations are discussed performing Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses taking into account the modeling uncertainties and other uncertainties prescribed in the OECD NEA UAM benchmark specification. Both steady-state and transient cases are investigated. The target quantities are the uncertainties of the void distribution, the moderator density, the moderator temperature and the DNBR. We will see that - beyond the uncertainties of the geometry and the boundary conditions - it is very important to take into account the modeling uncertainties in case of bundle or sub-channel thermo-hydraulic calculations.

  16. Proceedings (slides) of the OECD/NEA Workshop on Innovations in Water-cooled Reactor Technologies

    Spiler, Joze; Kim, Sang-Baik; ); Feron, Fabien; Jaervinen, Marja-Leena; Husse, Julien; ); Ferraro, Giovanni; Bertels, Frank; Denk, Wolfgang; Tuomisto, Harri; Golay, Michael; Buongiorno, J.; Todreas, N.; Adams, E.; Briccetti, A.; Jurewicz, J.; Kindfuller, V.; Srinivasan, G.; Strother, M.; Minelli, P.; Fasil, E.; Zhang, J.; Genzman, G.; Epinois, Bertrand de l'; Kim, Shin Whan; Laaksonen, Jukka; Maltsev, Mikhail; Yu, CHongxing; Powell, David; Gorgemans, Julie; Hopwood, Jerry; Bylov, Igor; Bakhmetyev, Alexander M.; Lepekhin, Andrey N.; Fadeev, Yuriy P.; Bruna, Giovanni; Gulliford, Jim; ); Ham-Su, Rosaura; Thevenot, Caroline; GAUTIER, Guy-Marie; MARSAULT, Philippe; PIGNATEL, Jean-Francois; White, Andrew; )

    2015-02-01

    Hitachi's ABWR and ESBWR: safer, simpler, smarter(D. Powell); 17 - Innovations in Reactor Designs (J. Gorgemans); 18 - Innovations in Water-Cooled Technologies: Candu Energy Perspective ( J. Hopwood); 19 - OKBM AFRIKANTOV small modular reactors engineering solutions for safety provision (I. Bylov, A.M. Bakhmetyev, A.N. Lepekhin, Y.P. Fadeev); 20 - NUGENIA Association For GEN II / GEN III R and D (G. Bruna); 21 - Status of NEA Nuclear Science activities related to accident tolerant fuels (J. Gulliford); 22 - Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles S and T (R. Ham-Su); 23 - Main results and lessons of the 10 years innovation research program dedicated to LWR ( C. Thevenot, G.M. Gautier, P. Marsault, J.F. Pignatel); 24 - Offshore Floating Nuclear Power Plant (OFNP) (M. Golay, J. Buongiorno, N. Todreas, E. Adams, A. Briccetti, J. Jurewicz, V. Kindfuller, G. Srinivasan, M. Strother, P. Minelli, E. Fasil, J. Zhang, G. Genzman); 25 - CSNI Research on Safety of Water-Cooled Reactors (A. White)

  17. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning

  18. FLUENT calculations of the hydrogen distribution in a containment during the OECD-NEA THAI HM-2 experiment

    Visser, D.C.; Komen, E.M.J.; Houkema, M.; Siccama, N.B.; Kyttaelae, Juha; Huhtanen, Risto; Takasuo, Eveliina

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen may be released into the containment atmosphere of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident. Locally, high hydrogen concentrations may be reached that can possibly cause fast deflagration or even detonation and put the integrity of the containment at risk. Therefore, the distribution and mixing of hydrogen is an important safety issue for nuclear power plants. Computer codes can be applied to predict the hydrogen distribution in the containment within the course of a hypothetical severe accident and get an estimate of the local hydrogen concentration in the various zones of the containment. In this way the risk associated with the hydrogen safety issue can be determined, and safety related measurements and procedures could be assessed. In order to validate the existing computer codes in the context of hydrogen distribution in the containment of a nuclear power plant, experimental benchmark studies have been performed in the German Thermal-hydraulics, Hydrogen, Aerosols and Iodine (THAI) facility in the framework of the OECD-NEA THAI project. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT the THAI HM-2 test was simulated independently by NRG and VTT. In the first phase of the HM-2 test a stratified hydrogen rich light gas layer was established in the upper part of the THAI containment. In the second phase steam was injected at a lower position inducing a rising plume that gradually dissolved the stratified hydrogen-rich layer from below. Thermo-dynamic phenomena like natural convection, mixing, condensation, heat transfer and distribution in different zones that are expected in severe accidents are involved. The calculated results by NRG and VTT (on hydrogen concentration, temperature, pressure and flow velocity) are compared to the experimental results. The most important differences between the CFD model of NRG and VTT are the computational mesh, condensation model and treatment of the solid

  19. Selected examples on multi physics researches at KFKI AEKI-results for phase I of the OECD/NEA UAM benchmark

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.; Maraczy, C.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency to use best estimate plus uncertainty methods in the field of nuclear energy. This implies the application of best estimate code systems and the determination of the corresponding uncertainties. For the latter one an OECD benchmark was set up. The objective of the OECD/NEA Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modeling (UAM) LWR benchmark is to determine the uncertainties of the coupled reactor physics/thermal hydraulics LWR calculations at all stages. In this paper the AEKI participation in Phase I will be presented. This Phase is dealing with the evaluation of the uncertainties of the neutronic calculations starting from the pin cell spectral calculations up to the stand-alone neutronics core simulations. (Authors)

  20. Establishment of data base files of thermodynamic data developed by OECD/NEA. Pt. 1. Thermodynamic data of Np and Pu

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Sasamoto, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Thermodynamic data base for compounds and complexes of actinides and fission products specialized in modeling requirements for safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal systems are being developed by NEA TDB project of OECD/NEA. In this project, relevant data bases for compounds and complexes of Np and Pu were published in 2001. JNC established the data base files available for geochemical calculation codes using these Np and Pu published data. And this procedure for establishment and contents of data base files are described in this report. These data base files were prepared as the formats of major geochemical codes PHREEQE, PHREEQC, EQ3/6 and Geochemist's workbench. Additionally modification for data in the thermodynamic data base files which had been already published by JNC was also done. This procedure and revised data bases are shown in the appendix of this report. (author)

  1. Establishment of data base files of thermodynamic data developed by OECD/NEA. Pt. 2. Thermodynamic data of Tc, U, Np, Pu and Am with auxiliary species

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Shibata, Masahiro

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic data base for compounds and complexes of actinides and fission products with auxiliary species specialized in modeling requirements for safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems are being developed by NEA TDB project of OECD/NEA. In this project, relevant data bases for compounds and complexes of U, Am, Tc, Np and Pu with auxiliary species were updated and published in 2003. JNC established the data base files available for geochemical calculation codes using these updated data. The procedure for establishment and contents of data base files are described in this report. These data base files were prepared as the formats of major geochemical codes PHREEQE, PHREEQC, EQ3/6 and Geochemist's workbench. Additionally modification for data in the thermodynamic data base files which had been already published by JNC was also done. This procedure and revised data bases are shown in the appendix of this report. (author)

  2. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    Kirk, B.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sartori, E. [OCDE/OECD NEA Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Viedma, L.G. de [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee`s Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community`s computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management.

  3. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    Kirk, B.L.; Sartori, E.; Viedma, L.G. de

    1997-01-01

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee's Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community's computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management

  4. Uranium supply/demand projections to 2030 in the OECD/NEA-IAEA ''Red Book''. Nuclear growth projections, global uranium exploration, uranium resources, uranium production and production capacity

    Vance, Robert

    2009-01-01

    World demand for electricity is expected to continue to grow rapidly over the next several decades to meet the needs of an increasing population and economic growth. The recognition by many governments that nuclear power can produce competitively priced, base load electricity that is essentially free of greenhouse gas emissions, combined with the role that nuclear can play in enhancing security of energy supplies, has increased the prospects for growth in nuclear generating capacity. Since the mid-1960s, with the co-operation of their member countries and states, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have jointly prepared periodic updates (currently every 2 years) on world uranium resources, production and demand. These updates have been published by the OECD/NEA in what is commonly known as the ''Red Book''. The 2007 edition replaces the 2005 edition and reflects information current as of 1 st January 2007. Uranium 2007: Resources, Production and Demand presents, in addition to updated resource figures, the results of a recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry. It contains official data provided by 40 countries (and one Country Report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat) on uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements to 2030 as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues are also presented. (orig.)

  5. OECD/NEA International Conference on Global Nuclear Safety Enhancement Organised in co-operation with the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) of Japan On the Occasion of the 50. Anniversary of Japan Joining the OECD

    Tanaka, Shunichi; Oshima, Kenzo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Echavarri, Luis E.; ); Ostendorff, William C.; Viktorovich Ferapontov, Alexey; Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Yoo, Guk Hee; Lyons, James E.; ); Weightman, Mike; ); Gurria, Angel; ); Ishihara, Hirotaka

    2014-04-01

    On 8 April 2014 in Tokyo, Japan, an international conference on enhancing global nuclear safety was held by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD), in co-operation with the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) of Japan. This document brings together the 12 presentations (slides) given at this conference organized in 3 sessions: 1 - Opening Session: Opening Remarks (S. Tanaka); Statement by L.E. Echavarri; Session 1 - Global Safety Enhancements: USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident (W.C. Ostendorff); Synergy of National and International Regulatory Efforts to Enhance Global Nuclear Safety (A. Viktorovich Ferapontov); Global Safety Enhancements, The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN)'s position (J.L. Lachaume); Nuclear Safety and Security Commission builds up safety and security (G.H. Yoo); Session 2 - Learning from Experience to Improve Safety: Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident and Responses in New Regulatory Requirements (T. Fuketa); NEA Activities to Enhance the Nuclear Regulatory Framework (L.E. Echavarri); Learning from Experience to Improve Safety - its importance, its mechanisms and its challenges (J.E. Lyons); Learning from Experience to Improve Nuclear Safety - A Perspective from the UK (M. Weightman); Conclusions and Closing Remarks (A. Gurria, H. Ishihara)

  6. CIEMAT’s contribution to the phase II of the OECD-NEA RIA benchmark on thermo-mechanical fuel codes performance

    Sagrado, I.C.; Vallejo, I.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    As a part of the international efforts devoted to validate and/or update the current fuel safety criteria, the OECD-NEA has launched a second phase of the RIA benchmark on thermomechanical fuel codes performance. CIEMAT contributes simulating the ten scenarios proposed with FRAPTRAN and SCANAIR. Both codes lead to similar predictions during the heating-up; however, during the cooling-down significant deviations may appear. They are mainly caused by the estimations of gap closure and re-opening and the clad to water heat exchange approaches. The uncertainty analysis performed for the SCANAIR estimations leads to uncertainty ranges below 15% and 28% for maximum temperatures and deformations, respectively. The corresponding sensitivity analysis shows that, in addition to the injected energy, special attention should be paid to fuel thermal expansion and clad yield stress models. (Author)

  7. Source convergence diagnostics using Boltzmann entropy criterion application to different OECD/NEA criticality benchmarks with the 3-D Monte Carlo code Tripoli-4

    Dumonteil, E.; Le Peillet, A.; Lee, Y. K.; Petit, O.; Jouanne, C.; Mazzolo, A.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of the stationarity of Monte Carlo fission source distributions in k eff calculations plays a central role in the ability to discriminate between fake and 'true' convergence (in the case of a high dominant ratio or in case of loosely coupled systems). Recent theoretical developments have been made in the study of source convergence diagnostics, using Shannon entropy. We will first recall those results, and we will then generalize them using the expression of Boltzmann entropy, highlighting the gain in terms of the various physical problems that we can treat. Finally we will present the results of several OECD/NEA benchmarks using the Tripoli-4 Monte Carlo code, enhanced with this new criterion. (authors)

  8. The coupled code system DORT-TD/THERMIX and its application to the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    Pautz, A.; Tyobeka, B.; Ivanov, K.

    2009-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400MW OECD/NEA coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate both the steady-state as well as several transient scenarios in this benchmark problem. (orig.)

  9. CSNI collective statement on support facilities for existing and advanced reactors. The function of OECD/Nea joint projects Nea committee on the safety of nuclear installations (CSNI)

    2008-01-01

    The NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) has recently completed a study on the availability and utilisation of facilities supporting safety studies for current and advanced nuclear power reactors. The study showed that significant steps had been undertaken in the past several years in support of safety test facilities, mainly by conducting multinational joint projects centered on the capability of unique test facilities worldwide. Given the positive experience of the safety research projects, it has been recommended that efforts be made to prioritize technical issues associated with advanced (Generation IV) reactor designs and to develop options on how to efficiently obtain the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research, preparing a gradual extension of safety research beyond the needs set by currently operating reactors. This statement constitutes a reference for future CSNI activities and for safety authorities, R and D centres and industry for internationally co-ordinated research initiatives in the nuclear safety research area. (author)

  10. OECD/NEA BENCHMARK FOR UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN MODELING (UAM FOR LWRS – SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION OF NEUTRONICS CASES (PHASE I

    RYAN N. BRATTON

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM is defined in order to facilitate the development and validation of available uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis methods for best-estimate Light water Reactor (LWR design and safety calculations. The benchmark has been named the OECD/NEA UAM-LWR benchmark, and has been divided into three phases each of which focuses on a different portion of the uncertainty propagation in LWR multi-physics and multi-scale analysis. Several different reactor cases are modeled at various phases of a reactor calculation. This paper discusses Phase I, known as the “Neutronics Phase”, which is devoted mostly to the propagation of nuclear data (cross-section uncertainty throughout steady-state stand-alone neutronics core calculations. Three reactor systems (for which design, operation and measured data are available are rigorously studied in this benchmark: Peach Bottom Unit 2 BWR, Three Mile Island Unit 1 PWR, and VVER-1000 Kozloduy-6/Kalinin-3. Additional measured data is analyzed such as the KRITZ LEU criticality experiments and the SNEAK-7A and 7B experiments of the Karlsruhe Fast Critical Facility. Analyzed results include the top five neutron-nuclide reactions, which contribute the most to the prediction uncertainty in keff, as well as the uncertainty in key parameters of neutronics analysis such as microscopic and macroscopic cross-sections, six-group decay constants, assembly discontinuity factors, and axial and radial core power distributions. Conclusions are drawn regarding where further studies should be done to reduce uncertainties in key nuclide reaction uncertainties (i.e.: 238U radiative capture and inelastic scattering (n, n’ as well as the average number of neutrons released per fission event of 239Pu.

  11. Establishment of data base files of thermodynamic data developed by OECD/NEA. Part 4. Addition of thermodynamic data for iron, tin and thorium

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Thermodynamic data for compounds and complexes of elements with auxiliary species specialized in modeling requirements for safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal systems have been developed by the Thermochemical Data Base (TDB) project of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Recently, thermodynamic data for aqueous complexes, solids and gases of thorium, tin and iron (Part 1) have been published in 2008, 2012 and 2013, respectively. These thermodynamic data have been selected on the basis of NEA’s guidelines which describe peer review and data selection, extrapolation to zero ionic strength, assignment of uncertainty, and temperature correction; therefore the selected data are considered to be reliable. The reliability of selected thermodynamic data of TDB developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-TDB) has been confirmed by comparing with selected data by the NEA. For this comparison, text files of the selected data on some geochemical calculation programs are required. In the present report, the database files for the NEA’s TDB with addition of selected data for iron, tin and thorium to the previous files have been established for use of PHREEQC, Geochemist’s Workbench and EQ3/6. In addition, as an example of confirmation of quality, dominant species in iron TDB were compared in Eh-pH diagram and differences between JAEA-TDB and NEA-TDB were shown. Data base files established in the present study will be at the Website of thermodynamic, sorption and diffusion database in JAEA (http://migrationdb.jaea.go.jp/). A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  12. Proceedings of the OECD-NEA workshop on the evaluation of defects, repair criteria and methods of repair for concrete structures on nuclear power plants

    2002-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD-NEA co-ordinates the NEA activities concerning the technical aspects of design, construction and operation of nuclear installations insofar as they affect the safety of such installations. In 1994, the CSNI approved a proposal to set up a Task Group under its Principal Working Group 3 (recently re-named as the Working Group on Integrity of Components and Structures (IAGE)) to study the need for a programme of international activities in the area of concrete structural integrity and ageing and how such a programme could be organised. The task group reviewed national and international activities in the area of ageing of nuclear power plant concrete structures and the relevant activities of other international agencies. A proposal for a CSNI programme of workshops was developed to address specific technical issues which were prioritised by OECD-NEA task group into three levels of priority: First Priority: loss of prestressing force in tendons of post-tensioned concrete structures; in-service inspection techniques for reinforced concrete structures having thick sections and areas not directly accessible for inspection. Second Priority: viability of development of a performance based database; response of degraded structures (including finite element analysis techniques). Third Priority: instrumentation and monitoring; repair methods; criteria for condition assessment. The working group has progressively worked through the priority list developed during the preliminary study carried out by the Task Group. Currently almost all of the three levels of priority are effectively complete, although in doing so the committee has identified other specific items worthy of consideration. By working logically through the list of priorities the committee has maintained a clarity of purpose which has been important in maintaining efficiency and achieving its objectives. The performance of the group has been

  13. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark - Steady-state results and status

    Reitsma, F.; Han, J.; Ivanov, K.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated. Since only a few pebble-bed HTR experimental facilities or plant data are available the use of code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MW design and a representative set of transient cases is defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well-defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross-sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The OECD benchmark includes steady-state and transients cases. Although the focus of the benchmark is on the modelling of the transient behaviour of the PBMR core, it was also necessary to define some steady-state cases to ensure consistency between the different approaches before results of transient cases could be compared. This paper describes the status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the three steady state exercises defined as a standalone neutronics calculation, a standalone thermal-hydraulic core calculation, and a coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulic simulation. (authors)

  14. Application examples of the reports of the NEA Incident Reporting System of the OECD and evolution of the system

    Libmann, J.

    1989-06-01

    Some reports of the work group no. 1 of the Nuclear Installations Security Committee of NEA, are summarized. An example of the report coding system concerning human factors, is given. The aim of the study is to improve the report contents as well as the coding system. In this case, a fast data selection is possible, and allows an efficient analysis of a particular situation. Moreover, the corrective procedures of the nuclear installation conception or operation can be easily modified, by the national organisations. Due to the improvements in quality, the opinion of the member countries on the incident reporting systems efficiency was enhanced [fr

  15. Improving of health and safety contribution of OECD/NEA Radiation Protection Committee and Public Health; Mejora de la salud publica y la seguridad. contribuciones de la OECD/NEA, comite de Proteccion Radiologia y Salud Publica

    Lazo, T.

    2004-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear energy Agency, has, since 1957, been addressing issues in radiological protection through its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). The Committee is made up of regulators and radiation protection experts, with the broad mission to provide timely identification of new and emerging issues, to analyse their possible implications and to recommend or take action to address these issues to further enhance radiation protection regulation and implementation. The regulatory and operational consensus developed by the CRPPH on these emerging issues supports policy and regulation development in Member countries, and disseminates good practice. To best serve the needs of its Member countries, the CRPPH has been focusing its work in recent years on a few key topic areas. These induce the evolution of the system of radiological protection, the advancement of preparedness for nuclear emergency accidents, and the improvement of occupational exposure management at nuclear power plants. With the International Commission on Radiological Protection about to issue new recommendations, due out in 2005, the CRPPH will take advantage of the radiological protection community's recent focus on emerging policy and strategic issues to develop a new CRPPH Collective Opinion. This document, to be published in 2005, will serve the Committee as a guide for its programme of work for the coming 5 to 10 years. (Author) 13 refs.

  16. International OECD NEA Workshop: Implementation of the EGIRM methodology for presenting of national RW and SF management programmes - Workshop proceedings

    Froment, Ludovic; Volckaert, Geert; Garamszeghy, Mike; Lahodova, Zdena; Ilvonen, Mikko; Petry, Elodie; Matuzas, Vaidas; ); KUGEL, Karin; LaZaR, Istvan; Dionisi, Mario; Kinam, Kwon; De Nood, Michiel; Bennett, Peter; Vahr, Henning R.; Grzegrzolka, Andrzej; Madaj, Krzysztof; Virtopeanu, Cornelia Sabina; Samoylov, Andrey; Vedernikova, Marina; Garcia Neri, Emilio; Quiros Gracian, Maria; Gimholt, Eva; Hedberg, Bengt; Stein, Mario; Garrs, Gareth; James, Martin; Heath, Maurice; Lust, Merle; ); Zaccai, Henri; Ciambrella, Massimo; Kwong, Gloria; Lebedev, Vladimir; Smadja, Lisa; )

    2018-03-01

    The NEA, having developed the methodology with the purpose to harmonize the RW and SF inventories reporting within the presentation of the national RW/SF management strategies and disposal routes proposes wide discussion and practical application of the methodology. The methodology was presented by the EGIRM representatives to invited workshop participants. Four topical sessions were held: Session 1 - RW/SF inventory, management strategy and disposal routes - need to harmonise reporting and presenting. This session aimed at providing an understanding why the methodology development and other relevant activities were started and what is the status of international efforts. Reporting needs for the various international programmes and benefits of a common presentation format were discussed in the session. Session 2 - EGIRM methodology - history of development, background, EGIRM objectives, requirements to the methodology. This session aimed at providing an overview of the methodology development process, objectives achieved and requirements addressed. Session 3 - The methodology in details. This session focussed on all details of the developed methodology explaining the role of each element of the presenting scheme with wide provision of examples. Implementation of the methodology for reporting to different programmes were demonstrated. Session 4 - Practical exercises on the methodology application on prosed examples. This session focussed on practical exercises on the methodology application with examples of hypothetical and some national RW/SF inventories proposed by workshop organisers. This document gathers the available presentations given at this workshop: 1.1 - Review of existing programmes requiring/requesting national SF/RW inventory reporting; requirements to reports; supporting documents (NEA Secretariat, V. LEBEDEV); 1.2 - 'Status and Trends' initiative. Status of project and format of SF/RW inventory reporting (IAEA, M. LUST); 1.3 - Joint

  17. Thermal cycling in LWR components in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    Faidy, Claude; Chapuliot, Stephane; Mathet, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Thermal cycling is a widespread and recurring problem in nuclear power plants worldwide. Several incidents with leakage of primary water inside the containment challenged the integrity of NPPs although no release outside of containment occurred. Thermal cycling was not taken into account at the design stage. Regulatory bodies, utilities and researchers have to address it for their operating plants. It is a complex phenomenon that involves and links thermal hydraulic, fracture mechanic, materials and plant operation. Thermal cycling is connected either to operating transients (low cycle fatigue) or to complex phenomenon like stratification, vortex and mixing (low and high cycle fatigue). The former is covered by existing rules and codes. The latter is partially addressed by national rules and constitutes the subject of this report. In 2002, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) requested the working group on the integrity of reactor components and structures (IAGE WG) to prepare a program of work on thermal cycling to provide information to NEA member countries on operational experience, regulatory policies, countermeasures in place, current status of research and development, and to identify areas where research is needed both at national and international levels. The working group proposed a 3 fold program that covered: - Review of operating experience, regulatory framework, countermeasures and current research; - Benchmark to assess calculation capabilities in NEA member countries for crack initiation and propagation under a cyclic thermal loading, and ultimately to develop screening criteria to identify susceptible components; results of the benchmark were published in 2005; - Organisation of an international conference in cooperation with the EPRI and the USNRC on fatigue of reactor components. This conference reviews progress in the areas and provides a forum for discussion and exchange of information between high level experts. The

  18. OECD/NEA data bank scientific and integral experiments databases in support of knowledge preservation and transfer

    Sartori, E.; Kodeli, I.; Mompean, F.J.; Briggs, J.B.; Gado, J.; Hasegawa, A.; D'hondt, P.; Wiesenack, W.; Zaetta, A.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD/Nuclear Energy Data Bank was established by its member countries as an institution to allow effective sharing of knowledge and its basic underlying information and data in key areas of nuclear science and technology. The activities as regards preserving and transferring knowledge consist of the: 1) Acquisition of basic nuclear data, computer codes and experimental system data needed over a wide range of nuclear and radiation applications; 2) Independent verification and validation of these data using quality assurance methods, adding value through international benchmark exercises, workshops and meetings and by issuing relevant reports with conclusions and recommendations, as well as by organising training courses to ensure their qualified and competent use; 3) Dissemination of the different products to authorised establishments in member countries and collecting and integrating user feedback. Of particular importance has been the establishment of basic and integral experiments databases and the methodology developed with the aim of knowledge preservation and transfer. Databases established thus far include: 1) IRPhE - International Reactor Physics Experimental Benchmarks Evaluations, 2) SINBAD - a radiation shielding experiments database (nuclear reactors, fusion neutronics and accelerators), 3) IFPE - International Fuel Performance Benchmark Experiments Database, 4) TDB - The Thermochemical Database Project, 5) ICSBE - International Nuclear Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluations, 6) CCVM - CSNI Code Validation Matrix of Thermal-hydraulic Codes for LWR LOCA and Transients. This paper will concentrate on knowledge preservation and transfer concepts and methods related to some of the integral experiments and TDB. (author)

  19. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR 400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: transient results - 290

    Strydom, G.; Reitsma, F.; Ngeleka, P.T.; Ivanov, K.N.

    2010-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated, and code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MWth design and a representative set of transient exercises are defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. This paper describes the current status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the six transient exercises, consisting of three Loss of Cooling Accidents, two Control Rod Withdrawal transients, a power load-follow transient, and a Helium over-cooling Accident. The participants' results are compared using a statistical method and possible areas of future code improvement are identified. (authors)

  20. The SKI SITE-94 Project: An International Peer Review Carried out by an OECD/NEA Team of Experts

    Sagar, Budhi; Devillers, C.; Smith, Paul; Laliuex, P.; Pescatore, C.

    1997-10-01

    The recently completed SITE-94 project is an SKI effort directed at building competence and capacity in the assessment of safety of a spent-fuel geologic repository. Emphasis is given to the assimilation of site-specific data, with its associated uncertainties, into the performance assessment. Specific attention is also given to improving the understanding of mechanisms that might compromise canister integrity. This report represents the common views of an International Review Team (IRT) established by the NEA Secretariat, at the request of SKI, to perform a peer review of SITE-94. The basis for the report is the understanding of SITE-94 and its background obtained by IRT in the course of several months of study of SITE-94 documentation, internal discussions and a meeting with SKI in Stockholm. The report is limited to the main findings of IRT. The intended audience of the report is the staff of SKI and, accordingly, the style of the report is suited to a technical audience familiar with the contents of the SITE-94 project

  1. Recent and current activities of the OECD/NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety (NEA/CSNI). Recent and Current Activities of the Working Group on Fuel Safety (NEA/CSNI)

    Petit, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The Working Group on Fuel Safety (WGFS) is part of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the Nuclear Energy Agency and has the main mission of advancing the current understanding and addressing fuel safety issues. Recent and current activities of the working group have addressed mainly the loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the reactivity initiated accident (RIA), the fuel safety criteria and leaking fuel issues, as well as Fukushima-related fuel topics. In the area of LOCA, the group issued different documents, the most notable being a very comprehensive state of the art report [NEA/CSNI/R (2009)15]. Regarding RIA, some documents were finalised and issued in the recent years, as well as a state of the art report [NEA/CSNI/R (2010)1]. The question of leaking fuel and how it is handled in the reactors is an activity that is just starting. Of particular interest to people developing new fuel concepts is the Nuclear Fuel Safety Criteria Technical Review - Second Edition [NEA/CSNI/R (2012)3]. This document provides a broad overview of the numerous criteria used in the NEA member countries to demonstrate to safe use of fuel in light water reactors. The WGFS has started discussions about fuel related issues raised by the Fukushima accident, in particular, hydrogen production. New concepts have been proposed to solve these issues but it appears that these concepts will need to go through a long qualification process to assess their adequacy for the different situations considered in the evaluation of fuel safety, from normal operation to accident conditions

  2. Classification of criticality calculations with correlation coefficient method and its application to OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmarks phase III-A and II-A

    Okuno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A method for classifying benchmark results of criticality calculations according to similarity was proposed in this paper. After formulation of the method utilizing correlation coefficients, it was applied to burnup credit criticality benchmarks Phase III-A and II-A, which were conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Phase III-A benchmark was a series of criticality calculations for irradiated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies, whereas Phase II-A benchmark was a suite of criticality calculations for irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. These benchmark problems and their results were summarized. The correlation coefficients were calculated and sets of benchmark calculation results were classified according to the criterion that the values of the correlation coefficients were no less than 0.15 for Phase III-A and 0.10 for Phase II-A benchmarks. When a couple of benchmark calculation results belonged to the same group, one calculation result was found predictable from the other. An example was shown for each of the Benchmarks. While the evaluated nuclear data seemed the main factor for the classification, further investigations were required for finding other factors. (author)

  3. Research and Activities of OECD/NEA Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF) Project

    Kim, Sung Il; Ha, Kwang Soon; Song, JinHo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The severe accident codes were used to analysis the Fukushima Daiichi accident and give valuable information. In addition, the insufficient part of the code could be revised by comparing the calculation result with the measured data. In this circumstance, working plans have been set up to conduct a Benchmark Study of the Accident progression for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant(BSAF) units 1-3 with the members of the OECD/NEA. The BSAF project was launched in November 2012 with the fifteen organizations of eight countries (France, Germany, Korea, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, the United States, and Japan). The objectives of the project are: - to analyze the Fukushima accident progression. - to raise the understanding of severe accident(SA) phenomena. - to contribute the improvement of methods and models of SA code. - to contribute the status of debris distribution to a future debris removal plan. BSAF phase 2 also has been implemented from April, 2015 and it will be continued to March, 2018. It is more focused on the fission product behavior and source term estimation in phase 2. The phase 2 project implementation period is 3 years from April 2015 to March 2018. The main topic of the BSAF 2 is the fission product behavior in the Fukushima nuclear power plant. In the process of calculation, it is important to know the insufficient models in the code. Furthermore, the model would be applied to the KAERI's severe accident code after making up for the insufficient part.

  4. Safety considerations in design of fast spectrum ads for transuranic or minor actinide burning: a status report on activities of the OECD/Nea expert group

    Wade, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Nuclear Development Committee of the OECD/NEA convened an expert group for a 'Comparative Study of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Fast Reactors (FR) in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles'. The expert group has studied complexes (i.e. energy parks) of fission-based energy production and associated waste management facilities comprised of thermal and fast reactors, and ADS. With a goal to minimise transuranic (TRU) flows to the repository per unit of useful energy provided by the complex, the expert group has studied homogenous and heterogeneous recycle of TRU and minor actinides (MA) in the facilities of the complex using aqueous or dry recycle in single and double strata architectures. In the complexes considered by the expert group the ADS is always assigned a TRU or MA (and sometimes a LLFP) incineration mission - with useful energy production only as a secondary ADS goal to partially offset the cost of its construction and operation. Ancillary issues have also been considered - including ADS safety challenges and strategies for resolving them. This paper reports on the status of the expert group's considerations of ADS safety strategy. (author)

  5. Performance of core exit thermocouple for PWR accident management action in vessel top break LOCA simulation experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA project

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reason of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection. (author)

  6. Verification of NUREC Code Transient Calculation Capability Using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Lee, Hyung Chul; Yoo, Jae Woon

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we verified the NUREC code transient calculation capability using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem. The benchmark problem consists of Part 1, a 2-D problem with given T/H conditions, Part 2, a 3-D problem at HFP condition, Part 3, a 3-D problem at HZP condition, and Part 4, a transient state initiated by a control rod ejection at HZP condition in Part 3. In Part 1, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference solution obtained from DeCART calculation except for the pin power distributions at the rodded assemblies. In Part 2, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference DeCART solutions. In Part 3, some results of NUREC code such as critical boron concentration and core averaged delayed neutron fraction agreed well with the reference PARCS 2G solutions. But the error of the assembly power at the core center was quite large. The pin power errors of NUREC code at the rodded assemblies was much smaller the those of PARCS code. The axial power distribution also agreed well with the reference solution. In Part 4, the results of NUREC code agreed well with those of PARCS 2G code which was taken as the reference solution. From the above results we can conclude that the results of NUREC code for steady states and transient states of the MOX loaded LWR core agree well with those of the other codes

  7. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force (TF1) includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, and identification of fuel performance and system codes applicable to ATF evaluation. The Cladding and Core Materials (TF2) and Fuel Concepts (TF3) task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment task force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (Idaho National Laboratory [INL], U.S.), the Cladding Task Force is chaired by Marie Moatti (Electricite de France [EdF], France), and the Fuels Task Force is chaired by a Masaki Kurata (Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA], Japan). The original Expert Group mandate was established for June 2014 to June 2016. In April 2016 the Expert Group voted to extend the mandate one additional year to June 2017 in order to complete the task force deliverables; this request was subsequently approved by the Nuclear Science Committee. This

  8. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, parametric studies, and selection of system codes. The Cladding and Core Materials and Fuel Concepts task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment Task Force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (INL), while the Cladding Task Force will be chaired by a representative from France (Marie Moatti, Electricite de France [EdF]) and the Fuels Task Force will be chaired by a representative from Japan (Masaki Kurata, Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA]). This report provides an overview of the Systems Assessment Task Force charter and status of work accomplishment.

  9. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force (TF1) includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, and identification of fuel performance and system codes applicable to ATF evaluation. The Cladding and Core Materials (TF2) and Fuel Concepts (TF3) task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment task force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (Idaho National Laboratory [INL], U.S.), the Cladding Task Force is chaired by Marie Moatti (Electricite de France [EdF], France), and the Fuels Task Force is chaired by a Masaki Kurata (Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA], Japan). The original Expert Group mandate was established for June 2014 to June 2016. In April 2016 the Expert Group voted to extend the mandate one additional year to June 2017 in order to complete the task force deliverables; this request was subsequently approved by the Nuclear Science Committee. This

  10. International Expert - OECD/NEA

    Yi, Yong Sun

    2009-11-01

    This report was prepared to describe the activities of Yongsun Yi as a technical secretary for the Generation IV VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) system. The contents of the report are; i) the GIF (Generation IV International Forum); ii) the GIF governance and technical secretariat; iii) the brief description of the VHTR system iv) the activities of Yongsun Yi as the technical secretary for the VHTR system

  11. Erosion of a confined stratified layer by a vertical jet – Detailed assessment of a CFD approach against the OECD/NEA PSI benchmark

    Kelm, S., E-mail: s.kelm@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kapulla, R., E-mail: ralf.kapulla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Allelein, H.-J., E-mail: allelein@lrst.rwth-aachen.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, 52080 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Systematic of a U-RANS approach, capable to be applied at containment scale. • Validation against measured and derived point-wise and field data. • Validation by means of transported quantities (concentration) but also underlying flow field and turbulent kinetic energy. • U-RANS approach yields in overall consistent and plausible results. • But unexpected difference in SST and k–ε identified for free-stream flow. - Abstract: Recently, a blind CFD benchmark exercise was conducted by the OECD/NEA (2013–2014) based on an experiment in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, investigating the turbulent erosion of a stratified helium rich layer in the upper region of the test vessel by means of a vertical air-helium jet impinging from below. In addition to the ‘classical’ pointwise measurements available for similar experiments conducted in the past, significant additional efforts were spent on the experimental characterization of the underlying flow field and turbulent quantities by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the benchmark. This data is well suited for a detailed assessment of the driving jet flow and its interaction with the stratified layer. Both are essential in order to avoid elimination of different errors, which is possible if validation is performed in a global manner. Different impacts on the simulation results, in particular on the jet profile and on the mixing progress, are discussed in this paper. A systematic validation is carried out based on measured and derived quantities. It is identified that e.g. the mesh resolution in the jet and mixing zone has only a minor impact, while small changes in turbulence modeling strategy or the chosen model constants, like Sc{sub t}, significantly affect the simulation results. Finally, the chosen unsteady RANS model represents mixing process consistently in the transient progression and instantaneous flow variables, while an unexpected

  12. The OECD/NEA programme on radon and thoron dosimetry and monitoring: its contribution to the assessment of public exposure to natural radiation

    Ilari, O.; Steinhaeusler, F.

    1984-01-01

    Inhalation of radon, thoron and their daughters is recognised to be the most important pathway to exposure of mankind to natural radiation sources. The progressive understanding of the increasing role of this exposure in the overall radiation detriment to the public and the workers produced an increasing concern in several countries about the problems of dosimetry and measurement of these nuclides. This trend was readily appreciated by NEA, which began an active programme in this field in 1976. The effort of NEA focussed on two main areas, namely (a) development of dosimetric models and study of correlation between exposure and dose (Phase I), and (b) review of principles and techniques of metrology and development of guidance on monitoring (Phase II). (author)

  13. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in reactivity-initiated accident fuel modeling: synthesis of organisation for economic co-operation and development (OECD/nuclear energy agency (NEA benchmark on reactivity-initiated accident codes phase-II

    Olivier Marchand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of OECD/NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety, a RIA fuel-rod-code Benchmark Phase I was organized in 2010–2013. It consisted of four experiments on highly irradiated fuel rodlets tested under different experimental conditions. This benchmark revealed the need to better understand the basic models incorporated in each code for realistic simulation of the complicated integral RIA tests with high burnup fuel rods. A second phase of the benchmark (Phase II was thus launched early in 2014, which has been organized in two complementary activities: (1 comparison of the results of different simulations on simplified cases in order to provide additional bases for understanding the differences in modelling of the concerned phenomena; (2 assessment of the uncertainty of the results. The present paper provides a summary and conclusions of the second activity of the Benchmark Phase II, which is based on the input uncertainty propagation methodology. The main conclusion is that uncertainties cannot fully explain the difference between the code predictions. Finally, based on the RIA benchmark Phase-I and Phase-II conclusions, some recommendations are made. Keywords: RIA, Codes Benchmarking, Fuel Modelling, OECD

  14. Increased Accident Tolerance of Fuels for Light Water Reactors - Workshop Proceedings, OECD/NEA Headquarters, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, 10-12 December 2012

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima accident in March 2011 raised concerns about the safety of current and future nuclear power plants both inside and outside the international nuclear energy community. With a view to learning lessons from this accident a large consensus emerged on the need to strengthen each level of Defence-In-Depth, reinforcing both prevention and mitigation. The fuel performance characteristics identified as being central to increased accident tolerance for long-term loss of coolant include reduced clad-steam reactions, reduced hydrogen production and improved fission product retention. New fuel designs which offered the potential to incorporate these characteristics, while retaining the operational performance of existing designs, would therefore be considered as suitable candidates for further investigation. Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee, a workshop has been organised to bring together international experts from the modelling, safety, operations and regulatory technical disciplines to discuss the various issues related to increased accident tolerance of fuels for Light Water Reactors and to help establish a co-ordinated international approach in this field. The organisation of this workshop was also supported by the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations. These proceedings include all the abstract papers presented at this workshop. The programme was comprised of 4 sessions: - Session 1: Lessons learned from the Fukushima accident; - Session 2: Accident-tolerant fuel design; - Session 3: Reactor operation, safety, fuel cycle constraints, economics and licensing; - Session 4: Synthesis and future programmes. A total of 55 participants from 16 countries attended the workshop, with 26 technical presentations and 2 breakout parallel sessions (one on safety issues, the other on reactor performance, R and D and technological issues). The attendees represented a broad spectrum of stakeholders involved in different nuclear energy

  15. NEA Annual Report 2016

    Magwood, William D. IV

    2017-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an intergovernmental organisation of industrialised countries, based in Paris, France. The OECD is a unique forum in which its 35 member countries work together to create better policies for better lives. The objective of the NEA is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally sound and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. It provides authoritative assessments and forges common understandings on key issues as input to government decisions on nuclear energy policy and to broader OECD analyses in areas such as energy and the sustainable development of low-carbon economies. The NEA co-operates with a range of multilateral organisations, including the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. This 2016 annual report presents: 1 - Message from the Director-General; 2 - The Economic Challenges of Nuclear Energy; 3 - Nuclear Technology in 2016; 4 - NEA Activities by Sector: Nuclear Development; Nuclear Safety and Regulation; Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety; Radioactive Waste Management; Radiological Protection; Nuclear Science; Data Bank; Legal Affairs; 5 - General Information: Information and Communications; Organisational Structure of the NEA; NEA Publications and Brochures Produced in 2016

  16. NEA Workshop on Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making, 17-19 January 2017, OECD Conference Centre, Paris, Room CC9

    Burns, Stephen G.; Yanush, Maryna; Jendroska, Jerzy; Beyens, Marc; Emmerechts, Sam; Touitou-Durand, Florence; Crosland, Martha; Ziakova, Marta; Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; Nuclear Regulation Authority; Ferapontov, Alexey; Hayano, Ryugo; Boyd, Mike; Mayall, Andrew; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Kawabuchi, Hideo; Kuenzi, Pascale; Shaver, Kathryn; Yngve Toernqvist, Johanna; Bjoerklund, Sara; Gerhardsson, Ansi; Kuenzi, Pascale; Birkhaeuser, Philip; Smith, Katherine; Katz, Sharonne; Vanhatalo, Hanna; Thome-Jassaud, Pierre-Franck; Bae, Su Hwan; Straub, Ralf; Gadano, Julian; Wolsink, Maarten; Komendantova, Nadejda; Kalaydjian, Francois; Harrington, Holly; Bouchot, Emmanuel; Runyon, Timothy; Gonzalez Herrero, Eva; Maclachlan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear issues are embedded with broader societal issues such as the environment, risk management, energy and health policies, and sustainability. As such, nuclear projects often generate considerable interest and concern from stakeholders. In this context 'stakeholder' is intended to be taken in its broadest sense and should include concerned public, businesses, economic actors, NGOs, local, regional and national authorities, nuclear regulators, etc. Anyone who has relevant information, experience or concerns may seek to participate in the decision making process, and to interact with other stakeholders. Nuclear regulators, governments, operators, and other decision makers have a responsibility to ensure a high degree of transparency and to make clear and well-reasoned decisions. In this respect, there is an increasing demand for stakeholder involvement, participation and engagement. Across NEA member countries, many different approaches are taken to stakeholder involvement as decisions are made and implemented. Well-informed decisions broadly reflect the input of stakeholder views in a balanced fashion, the achievement of which can be difficult to assess. Attempts to achieve such broad understanding of views and acceptance of resulting decisions are an important part of building public confidence. Additionally, interested citizens, other stakeholders, and non-governmental organisations often call upon decision processes to be conducted in a manner that maintains public confidence. This workshop was not about what decision is made. Rather, it was about decision making processes used to reflect stakeholder concerns and input. How does one effectively involve stakeholders? How does one build and assess public confidence? How can broader stakeholder involvement help decision makers to make well-informed decisions that effectively address stakeholder views? On 17-19 January 2017, the NEA hosted a workshop on Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making

  17. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  18. NEA Annual Report 2014

    2015-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1 February 1958. Current NEA membership consists of 31 countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The European Commission also takes part in the work of the Agency. The mission of the NEA is: - to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes; - to provide authoritative assessments and to forge common understandings on key issues, as input to government decisions on nuclear energy policy and to broader OECD policy analyses in areas such as energy and sustainable development. Specific areas of competence of the NEA include the safety and regulation of nuclear activities, radioactive waste management, radiological protection, nuclear science, economic and technical analyses of the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear law and liability, and public information. The NEA Data Bank provides nuclear data and computer program services for participating countries. In these and related tasks, the NEA works in close collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, with which it has a Co-operation Agreement, as well as with other international organisations in the nuclear field. This document summarizes the 2014 activities of NEA. Content: 1. Message from the Director-General; 2. Nuclear Power in 2014; 3. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident and NEA Follow-up; 4. NEA Activities by Sector: Nuclear Development, Nuclear Safety and Regulation, Radioactive Waste Management, Radiological Protection, Nuclear Science, Data Bank

  19. Proceedings of the first part of a joint OECD(NEA)/CEC workshop on recent advances in reactor accident consequence assessment

    NONE

    1988-02-15

    The first part of the Joint Workshop, organised by the NEA, is focused on the progress achieved in the work of CSNI's GRECA (Group of Experts on Accident Consequences). The program is composed of the following papers. Session 1: characteristics of the Chernobyl release and fallout that affect transport and behaviour of radioactive substances in the environment; Chernobyl accident and hot particles in the fallout; radionuclides associated with colloids and particles in the Chernobyl fallout; source term in the Chernobyl accident; long range transport of radionuclides; parameters in consequence calculations for an urban area. Session 2: review of evaluations concerning radionuclide transfer to foodstuffs via plants in view of the data available after the Chernobyl accident; GRECA review of Chernobyl data on transfer to animal products; Chernobyl accident radiometric data (Cs-137 in fresh water fishes of north Italy lakes); distribution of Cs-137 in water sediment and fish in the Ijsselmeer (Netherlands); uptake in the human body resulting from the Chernobyl accident; radioactivity of people in the nordic countries following the Chernobyl accident; preparations for an international study to evaluate long-range transport models against the Chernobyl accident

  20. Overview of the NEA/OECD Seabed Working Group. An international programme for assessment of the feasibility of disposal of high-level waste in geological formations beneath the ocean

    Anderson, D.R.; Boyer, D.G.; Rueegger, B.; Olivier, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The NEA/OECD Seabed Working Group, a subcommittee of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (whose present membership includes Canada, the CEC, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the USA), is addressing the questions of how best to utilize the resources of the ocean. Since the beginning of time, the oceans have been the 'garbage dumps' of the land masses. Erosional processes continuously tear down mountains and the land and move them into the oceans. Most of the elements in nuclear waste are chemically identical to those being eroded, cycled and deposited in the ocean. Could the ocean's geological formations be used for the disposal of these radioactive wastes. The Seabed Working Group is divided into eight task groups: System Analysis, Site Selection, Sediment and Rock, Engineering Studies, Biology, Physical Oceanography, Waste Form and Canister, and Institutional. Within each of the groups a set of predictive models is being developed, the appropriate properties acquired, and predictions made. Laboratory and in-situ field tests will be conducted to verify the accuracy of the model predictions. The model sections will then be combined into a systems model to yield an estimate of the feasibility, risk and cost of this waste disposal option. The results to date of the technical and environmental feasibility studies of seabed disposal appear to be leading to a conclusion that this is technically feasible. Institutional feasibility is just beginning to be considered. (author)

  1. Status report on developments and cooperation on risk-informed inservice-inspection and non-destructive testing (NDT) qualification in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    Skanberg, Lars

    2005-01-01

    presented at the Workshop have been published in the proceedings referenced NEA/CSNI/R(2004)9. The two reports along with the NRWG-report EUR 21320 are the main source of information for this Status Report on Developments and Cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service-Inspection and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification in OECD-NEA member countries. The report is organized in the following way: introduction to early ISI strategies and Augmented ISI and NDT Qualification; Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI): Development of RI-ISI strategies, RI-ISI Regulatory guidance, Important aspects of RI-ISI, Overview of RI-ISI methods, Comparison of methods, Overview of RI-ISI applications and pilot studies, RI-ISI experience so far, Further evaluations and developments of RI-ISI methodologies; Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification: Development of NDT qualification strategies, NDT-qualification requirements and applications, NDT-qualification experience. Conclusions and recommendations are then given

  2. Risk monitors - The State of the Art in their Development and Use at Nuclear Power Plants - Produced on behalf of IAEA and OECD/NEA WGRisk

    Shepherd, C.H.; Yllera, F.J.; Kaufer, B.; Henneke, D.W.; Gaynor, D.; Sedlak, J.; Evans, M.G.K.; Boneham, P.; Horne, B.; Guymer, P.; Hatfield, M.; Hewitt, J.; Shanley, L.; Sorman, J.; Chao, C.C.; Pullen, R.; Reinhart, F.M.; Lantaron, A.; Huerta, A.; Vojnovic, D.; Hollo, E.; Fukuda, M.; De Gelder, P.; Schulz, R.; Lanore, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a description of the state-of-the-art in the development and use of Risk Monitors at nuclear power plants in the Member States. The work has been carried out jointly by IAEA and OECD WGRisk. The information presented in this report has been obtained from three questionnaires on the development and use of Risk Monitors, software and Regulatory perspectives; from OECD and IAEA Workshops on Risk Monitors; and from IAEA consultants meetings and WGRisk Task Group meetings. Some of the work carried out to produce the report has been funded by the United Kingdom Nuclear Installations Inspectorate. The aim is to produce a report that describes the state of the art in the development of Risk Monitors and their use at nuclear power plants. This will: - define the terminology that relates to Risk Monitors as used in this report, - describe the state of the art in the development and use of Risk Monitors at nuclear power plants, and indicate future developments, - provide information on the software packages available for Risk Monitors, - identify the issues that need to be addressed in the development of a Living PSA for use in a Risk Monitor application and give guidance on how these issues can be resolved, - give information on the issues relating to the design of the Risk Monitor operator interface so that it gives a tool that can be used by all station staff, - discuss the issues that relate to the qualitative and quantitative risk measures addressed by Risk Monitors such as the definition of the Operational Safety Criteria which define the risk levels, the calculation of the Allowed Configuration Time and the definition of the qualitative risk levels that relate to the availability of safety systems, - give insights into the costs involved, the benefits that can be obtained from Risk Monitors and their limitations, and - discuss the regulatory perspective on the use of Risk Monitors to provide risk information that can be used during nuclear power

  3. Status of pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors. Results of the SWG 17, International working party on evaluation coordination of the nuclear science committee, NEA- OECD

    Gruppelaar, H.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Rimpault, G.; Smith, P.; Ignatyuk, A.; Koshcheev, V.; Nikolaev, M.; Thsiboulia, A.; Kawai, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Watanabe, T.; Zukeran, A.; Nakajima, Y.; Matsunobu, H.

    1998-08-01

    Within the framework of the SWG17 benchmark organized by a Working Party of the Nuclear Science Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a comparison of lumped or pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors has been made. Four institutions participated with data libraries based on the JEF2.2, EAF-4.2, BROND-2, FONDL-2.1, ADL-3 and JENDL-3.2 evaluated nuclear data files. Several parameters have been compared with each other: the one-group cross sections and reactivity worths of the lumped nuclide for several partial absorption and scattering cross sections, and the one-group cross sections of the individual fission products. Also graphs of the multi-group cross sections of the lumped nuclide have been compared, as well as graphs of capture cross sections for 27 nuclides. From two contributions based on JEF2.2, it can be concluded that the data processing influences the capture cross section by about 1% and the inelastic scattering cross section by 2%. The differences between the lumped cross sections of the different data libraries are surprisingly small: maximum 6% for capture and 9% for the inelastic scattering. Similar results are obtained for the reactivity effects. Since the reactivity worth of the lumped nuclide is dominated by the capture reaction, the maximum spread in the total reactivity worth is still only 5.3%. There is a systematic difference between total, elastic and capture cross sections of JENDL-3.2 and JEF2.2 of the same order of magnitude. Possible reasons for this discrepancy have been indicated. The one-group capture and inelastic scattering cross sections of most of the important individual fission products differ by less than 10% (root mean square values). Larger differences are observed for unstable nuclides where there is a lack of experimental data. For the (n,2n) group cross sections, which are rather sensitive to the weighting spectrum in the fast energy range, these differences are several tens of percents. The final

  4. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA workshop on seismic risk - Summary and conclusions - Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations PWG3 and PWG5

    2001-01-01

    wider use of seismic PSA technology for design of NPPs. Improvements in methodology and database and examinations of the importance of issues in the following areas will further enhance the usefulness of seismic PSA/Margin studies: - Database and guidance for evaluation of seismic capacities of components (with consideration of differences in design philosophy and practice); - Correlations; - Effect of ageing of structures and components; - Analysis of post-earthquake operator actions; - Use of seismic PSA for identifying effective strategy for accident management; - Risk goal oriented design methodology including the use of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis; - Extension of the scope of seismic PSA to consider unique situations of other operating modes such as low power/shutdown state. It was also pointed out that the importance of seismic risk is strongly dependent on the geological conditions and design practices of countries and that analysts should select appropriate methodology for their objectives and scope of the seismic PSA/Margin studies with consideration of such conditions in their countries. Efforts by countries and international organisations such as NEA to promote international information exchange in the above areas as well as the experiences in applications and reviewing of seismic PSA/Margin studies are highly recommended

  5. 2012 NEA Annual Report

    2013-01-01

    After a message from the Director-General of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA, a semi-autonomous body within the OECD) and an overview of the Fukushima accident and NEA follow-up, this annual report presents the various technical programmes in which the NEA is committed. These programmes deal with nuclear development and the fuel cycle, nuclear safety and regulation, radioactive waste management, radiological protection, nuclear science, data bank, legal affairs, joint projects and other cooperative projects. The report then presents activities of the technical secretariat (Generation IV International Forum or GIF, Multinational Design Evaluation Programme or MDEP), and some general information about the NEA (organisational structure, publications in 2012) and about its activities of information and communication activities, and regarding the relationship between nuclear energy and civil society

  6. Reactor physics activities in NEA member countries

    1990-01-01

    This document is a compilation of National activity reports presented at the thirty-third Meeting of the NEA Committee on Reactor Physics, held at OECD Headquarters, Paris, from 15th - 19th October 1990

  7. NEA annual report 2000

    2000-01-01

    In this 2000 annual report, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), notes that in the medium and long term, the evolution of the nuclear energy programs in OECD countries is likely to be influenced by the implementation of sustainable development policies integrating economic, environmental and socials goals. This report is divided in four chapters. The first one gives general information on nuclear industry. The chapter 2 deals with trends in nuclear power. The chapter 3 gathers technical programs in nuclear development and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and regulation, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear science and data bank, legal affairs, joint projects and other co-operative projects. The last chapter gathers general information on information program, NEA publications, main workshops and seminar and organisation charts of the NEA. (A.L.B.)

  8. Proceedings of a NEA/CSNI-UNIPEDE specialist meeting on improving technical specifications for nuclear power plants

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    This CSNI specialist meeting on improving technical specifications for nuclear power plants is sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency jointly with UNIPEDE. Technical specifications for nuclear power plants are in a way a prescription which has a direct bearing on the success or failure of the particular installation, and on the success or failure of fission energy around the world. It is therefore highly important that these prescriptions are made as clear and as concise as possible and that it distinguishes requirements which are essential for public health and safety, from the many others which are less important accordingly. The conference was held in september 1987 in madrid (Spain); it is composed of about 40 papers grouped into 8 sessions: invited papers (6 papers), international survey results (1 paper), limiting conditions for operation (8 papers), maintenance and testing (4 papers), actions statements and allowed outage times (8 papers), methodology and technical justification (8 papers), future trends and alternative approaches (4 papers), and a final panel

  9. Review of international developments and cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service-Inspection (RI-ISI) and Non-destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification in OECD-NEA member countries- Responses to the questionnaire - CSNI/integrity and ageing working group

    2005-01-01

    In December 2000, the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) agreed to prepare a state-of-the art report addressing the present situation and regulatory aspects in NEA member countries on: - Risk based / risk informed in-service inspections (ISI) developments, - Qualification of NDT system to be used for the inspections. The CSNI gave mandate to the CSNI working group on the Integrity of Components and Structures (IAGE) to prepare the report. In order to get a good basis for compiling the report with an overview on the present situation in OECD countries and regulatory aspects on the further developments of RI-ISI and NDT qualification approaches a questionnaire was prepared. This questionnaire was organised in two parts. The first part addressed used risk based / risk informed ISI approaches and regulatory aspects on the further developments. The second part addressed used NDT qualification approaches and other measures for getting reliable inspection results as well as regulatory aspects on the further developments of qualification approaches. Some parts of the questionnaire addressed topics, which have been dealt with in other European or national programs. Available relevant information from these programs has been also collected. The questionnaire was circulated in 2003 among NEA member countries organisations. Appendix 1 contains the questionnaire. Appendix 2 contains the compilation of responses to the questionnaire. A workshop was organized to complement the questionnaire (NEA/CSNI/R(2004)9 Proceedings of the CSNI Workshop on 'International developments and cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service- Inspection (RI-ISI) and Non-destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification' held in Stockholm, Sweden on 13-14 April 2004 and hosted by SKI). In addition to regulators, licensees, manufacturers and researchers, this workshop gathered international organisations (i.e. EC, IAEA) and the main

  10. NEA activities in 1994

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with the activities in 1994 of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency including : trends in nuclear power, nuclear development and fuel cycle (data, tools, methodologies, nuclear industry and its context, fuel cycle policy, energy policy reviews), reactor safety and regulation (exchange of operating experience and human factors, accident prevention activities, severe-accident phenomenology and management, structural integrity, probabilistic safety assessment, fuel cycle safety, regulatory approaches to severe-accident issues, inspection practices), radiation protection (radiation protection today and tomorrow, application of radiation protection standards, protection of workers, international emergency exercises), radioactive waste management (the philosophical and ethical basis of disposal, safety assessment and site investigations, other radiation waste management activities), nuclear science (scientific studies, validation of working methods, the NEA data bank, projects in support of other NEA programmes), joint projects (the Rasplav project, the Halden reactor project, information system on occupational exposure, decommissioning of nuclear facilities), legal affairs (liability and nuclear safety assistance to Eastern Europe, training seminar on nuclear law, information on nuclear law), information programme (review of Nea information programme, publications programme, a major information forum), and relations with non m ember countries (NEA relations with non-members countries, the Central and Eastern European Countries and New Independent States of the former Soviet Union programme of co-operation and assistance). (O.L.). 22 figs

  11. NEA Annual Report 2011

    2012-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), located in the Paris area in France. The objective of the Agency is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. 2011 was a pivotal year for the NEA and its member countries. The 11 March Tohoku earthquake and tsunami were at the origin of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, with the earthquake having resulted in the loss of offsite power and the tsunami in the loss of onsite emergency power necessary to keep the cooling systems functioning. While the accident itself was not responsible for any casualties, it has affected the lives of thousands of displaced Japanese citizens and caused considerable environmental damage in the surrounding area. At the NEA, monitoring of the accident began immediately as well as working with all members to fully ascertain the technical and regulatory lessons that could be learnt. In that context, on 7-8 June 2011, the NEA hosted in co-operation with the French Presidency of the G8, a ministerial seminar on nuclear safety and a regulatory forum to discuss insights and approaches. The insights gained during the forum have strongly influenced the work of the NEA and also provided valuable input to the IAEA ministerial conference and subsequent action plan. At present, the three NEA standing technical committees most involved in Fukushima follow-up work are the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations. A number of activities are underway in the areas of nuclear regulation, nuclear safety and research, crisis communication, radiological protection, decontamination and

  12. 2013 NEA Annual Report

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), located in the Paris area in France. The objective of the Agency is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. 2013 was a year of continuing progress by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in a number of important areas, marked in particular by an increased scope and reach. Following the accession of the Russian Federation on 1 January 2013, the 31 members of the Agency now account for 90% of installed nuclear power generating capacity in the world, further expanding the significant international role that the NEA can play in the scientific, technological, legal and safety-related aspects of nuclear energy. The NEA is a central part of concerted international efforts to enhance co-operation in the nuclear energy field. As part of these efforts, in 2013 the NEA and the China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA) signed a Joint Declaration on Co-operation in the Field of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. The purpose of this co-operation is to enhance the exchange of experience and information at the international level so as to make nuclear power safer, and to ensure robust scientific, technological and legal bases for its development and use in an environmentally friendly and economical manner. The NEA remains fully committed to these objectives, and in view of ongoing work following the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Agency published in September 2013 a summary of key actions and member country responses entitled The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: OECD/NEA Nuclear Safety Response and Lessons Learnt. NEA actions in response to the accident have primarily been led by the three committees

  13. 2017 NEA Annual Report: Nuclear Power in 2017; Innovation and Education: Necessary Enablers for Sustainable Nuclear Energy, or the Virtuous Circle; NEA Activities by Sector

    2018-01-01

    The NEA Annual Report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for the year ending on 31 December 2017 provides an overview of the status of nuclear power in OECD countries and illustrative descriptions of the Agency's activities and international joint projects. Content: 1 - Message from the Director-General; 2 - Innovation and Education: Necessary Enablers for Sustainable Nuclear Energy, or the Virtuous Circle; 3 - Nuclear Technology in 2017; 4 - NEA Activities by Sector: Nuclear Development, Nuclear Safety and Regulation, Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety, Radiological Protection, Radioactive Waste Management, Nuclear Science, Data Bank, Legal Affairs, 5 - General Information: Information and Communications, Organisational Structure of the NEA, NEA Committee Structure in 2017, NEA Management Structure in 2017, NEA Publications and Brochures Produced in 2017

  14. Cementitious Materials in Safety Cases for Geological Repositories for Radioactive Waste: Role, Evolution and Interactions. A Workshop organised by the OECD/NEA Integration Group for the Safety Case and hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS. Cementitious materials in safety cases for radioactive waste: role, evolution and interactions

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) organised a workshop to assess current understanding on the use of cementitious materials in radioactive waste disposal. The workshop was hosted by the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (Ondraf/Niras), in Brussels, Belgium on 17-19 November 2009. The workshop brought together a wide range of people involved in supporting safety case development and having an interest in cementitious materials: namely, cement and concrete experts, repository designers, scientists, safety assessors, disposal programme managers and regulators. The workshop was designed primarily to consider issues relevant to the post-closure safety of radioactive waste disposal, but also addressed some related operational issues, such as cementitious barrier emplacement. Where relevant, information on cementitious materials from analogous natural and anthropogenic systems was also considered. This report provides a synthesis of the workshop, and summarises its main results and findings. The structure of this report follows the workshop agenda: - Section 2 summarises plenary and working group discussions on the uses, functions and evolution of cementitious materials in geological disposal, and highlights key aspects and discussions points. - Section 3 summarises plenary and working group discussions on interactions of cementitious materials with other disposal system components, and highlights key aspects and discussions points. - Section 4 summarises the workshop session on the integration of issues related to cementitious materials using the safety case. - Section 5 presents the main conclusions from the workshop. - Section 6 contains a list of references. - Appendix A presents the workshop agenda. - Appendix B contains the abstracts and, where provided, technical papers supporting oral presentations at the workshop. - Appendix C contains the abstracts and, where provided, technical

  15. The OECD FIRE database

    Angner, A.; Berg, H.P.; Roewekamp, M.; Werner, W.; Gauvain, J.

    2007-01-01

    Realistic modelling of fire scenarios is still difficult due to the scarcity of reliable data needed for deterministic and probabilistic fire safety analysis. Therefore, it has been recognized as highly important to establish a fire event database on an international level. In consequence, several member countries of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have decided in 2000 to establish the International Fire Data Exchange Project (OECD FIRE) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data related to fire events at nuclear power plants. This paper presents the OECD FIRE project objectives, work scope and current status of the OECD FIRE database after 3 years of operation as well as first preliminary statistical insights gained from the collected data. (orig.)

  16. NEA activities in 1983. 12. Activity report

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1983 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, nuclear development and the fuel cycles nuclear safety technology and licensing, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, legal affairs, nuclear science, joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects, organisation and administration are reviewed

  17. NEA international co-operative projects

    1989-01-01

    This text is consecrated at the international co-operative projects of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of reactor safety (Halden reactor project, Loft project, studies on the damaged Three Mile Island unit-2 reactor, inspection of reactor steel components, incident reporting system) and in the field of radioactive waste management (Stripa project, geochemical data bases, Alligator river project, seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities)

  18. OECD/NEA/CSNI Status Report on Filtered Containment Venting

    Jacquemain, D.; Guentay, S.; Basu, S.; Sonnenkalb, M.; Lebel, L.; Ball, J.; Allelein, H.J.; Liebana Martinez, B.; Eckardt, B.; Losch, N.; Ammirabile, L.; ); Gryffroy, D.; Sallus, L.; Kroes, A.; Rensonnet, T.; Anden, A.; Gyepi-Garbrah, S.; Viktorov, A.; Duspiva, J.; Routamo, T.; Guieu, S.; Hotta, A.; Nakamura, H.; Song, J.H.; Ha, K.S.; Filio, C.; Kuznetsov, M.V.; Kubisova, L.; Nemec, T.; Frid, W.; Loy, D.; Pellini, D.; Zieger, T.; Herranz Puebla, L.; Amri, A.; Kissane, M.; )

    2014-01-01

    This Status Report provides a comprehensive description of safety requirements associated with Filtered Containment Venting Systems (FCVSs) (Chapter 3) and of the status of FCVS implementation (Chapter 4) as provided by the various contributing countries. The different level of detail describing the accident management situation in different countries in relation to FCVS reflects in part the reality of the different levels of the current regulatory and/or technological appraisal of FCVS internationally. Further, the safety requirements differ in various countries being more-or-less prescriptive with FCVS not necessarily explicitly mandated or not considered as the primary measure to prevent containment over-pressurization. The following requirements may be prescribed for FCVS depending on venting strategies and objectives: vent capacity, vent opening and closing pressures, vent timing, venting system design requirements, consideration of possible hydrogen loads, radiological objectives, FCVS decontamination factors (DFs) for radioactive aerosols, for molecular iodine, etc. These are all discussed in detail in the report. A description of the FCV strategies for emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and SAM domains is provided in Chapter 5. FCVS are considered to be an additional system to protect the containment integrity. FCVSs are typically to be used in SAs as part of the overall applied SAM strategy for PWRs and BWRs, while they are also used in DBA for some PHWRs (CANDUs). Operation of a FCVS is also considered in some countries and for some reactor designs for accident management other than countering the long-term over-pressurization of the containment, e.g., for BWRs in the case of loss of heat sink to remove decay heat or to reduce the hydrogen inventory in the containment. Chapter 6 presents the well-known existing filtration technologies e.g., scrubbers, deep-bed filtration and different sorption systems. Details of systems for which information was received from designers can be found in the Appendices of the report. Part of the information concerning the existing filtration-systems performance is proprietary and was not disclosed by FCVS designers. However, two major aspects can be underlined concerning existing systems: - most of the available systems were designed on knowledge-bases which were existing in the late 1980's. Some have been updated depending on the system design and implementation; - and, given the possible extension of the domain of FCVS use, the demonstration of the systems performance should be consequently extended to more challenging conditions. Both aspects are discussed in the report. It was also thought valuable to provide FCVS general design requirements and specific design aspects and recommend state-of-the-art qualification of filter technologies for reliable function and performance of FCVS. This is provided in chapter 7. This chapter, as well as others in the report (particularly chapters 9 and 10), can be used as a guide for FCVS implementation. Source-term (ST) evaluations are factored into accident analysis in different countries. ST evaluation studies presented in Chapter 8 of the report are limited to countries which have done specific ST evaluations in view of FCVS performance and provided detailed information. As for FCVS filtration, besides aerosols, specific attention is being given to organic iodides and iodine-oxide particles as they may contribute significantly to the ST in some accidents. Possible contributions of ruthenium-oxide species to the ST is under investigation in on-going R and D programmes. Filtration of noble gases released through the venting process has been discussed but no reliable technology exists for efficient retention of these species and the benefit of reducing their releases in the environment has to be balanced with drawbacks that could result on-site from radioactivity accumulation in the system designed for their retention. Deterministic consequence analyses show large reduction of radiological impacts and, in studies performed in France and in the US, of radiological costs when comparing effective filtered releases against unfiltered releases. In most countries, calculated reduction of radiological impacts appears sufficient to conclude that FCVS are beneficial to SAM. In the cost/benefits studies performed in the US, these benefits are weighted by the estimated low probability of a SA, and have not been cost-justified. Chapter 9 and 10 describe currently assessed benefits and negative aspects related to FCVS use and the related potential improvements or countermeasures for existing systems. These chapters may also be used to guide the design, implementation and operation of future FCVS to reduce these risks. Generally, all contributing countries recognized through this work the potential benefits of FCVS for emergency response, reduction of the extent of land contamination and health effects and increased social acceptability of nuclear power plant installations. FCVS should, however, be considered in conjunction with other SAM strategies, e.g., no large benefit is expected for containment by-pass scenarios which have to be managed by other SAMM. FCVSs implemented before Fukushima were mainly designed to manage long-term pressure build-up in the containment; new FCVS may perhaps be designed to deal with more challenging conditions. The robustness, the safe use and the reliability of FCVSs for such conditions should be further assessed either to improve existing systems or to propose upgraded design requirements for future systems

  19. Review of Fast Reactor Activities at OECD (NEA)

    Royen, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) has recently increased its activity in LMFBR safety, under the guidance of its Group of Senior Experts on LMFBR Safety R & D. This Group, formed in 1978, consists of CSNI delegates (or alternates) from Member countries sponsoring major research in the field, and the Commission of the European Communities. The Group now oversees the preparation of international status reports on relatively well-developed areas of LMFBR safety technology, and the convening of specialist meetings, expert groups and task forces to aid in investigating and resolving problems in less-evolved safety subjects

  20. OECD/NEA Aagesta decontamination project. Phase 1, final report

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the project is to utilize the four primary loops of the Aagesta reactor to demonstrate decontamination methods for PWR primary systems. The first phase of the project consisted of laboratory scale tests. The methods tested were developed at a) Studsvik Energiteknik AB, Sweden (a soft chemistry). b) Kraftwerk Union AG, Federal Republic of Germany, (two chemistries, one soft and one hard). c) Swiss Federal Institute of Reactor Research (two chemistries, one soft and one hard). d) Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom, (a soft chemistry). The test programme consisted of decontamination tests on steam generator tubing and other active material from Aagesta and a number of operating reactors as well as material compatibility tests on standardized samples of a representative selection of modern PWR primary system materials. Six countries have participated in Phase I of the project - the four countries named above as well as the United States of America and Italy. Studsvik Energiteknik AB was appointed Project leader. The results show that all six processes in general met the acceptance criteria both regarding decontamination and corrosion. The decontamination results with the hard chemistries were rather uneven. (Author)

  1. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety

    1980-10-01

    The technical program, as recorded by these proceedings, includes opening addresses, a panel discussion on 'nuclear aerosol measurement', a panel discussion on 'what remains to be done', six invited review papers, and 33 papers from six different countries grouped into the following topical areas: (1) aerosol source terms (nuclear aerosol formation and characterization, nucleation and condensation, size and composition of primary particles, aerosol source terms for postulated accidents); (2) aerosol processes (correction factors, growth and interaction rates, removal rates); (3) measurement techniques (focused on assessing limits of accuracy and implications for code validation for accident consequence analysis); (4) mathematical and computer modelling; (5) comparison of codes and experiments); and (6) applications (focused on application of aerosol technology to reactor design, sensitivity of results, and implications for radiological consequence assessment for hypothetical accidents)

  2. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety

    NONE

    1980-10-15

    The technical program, as recorded by these proceedings, includes opening addresses, a panel discussion on 'nuclear aerosol measurement', a panel discussion on 'what remains to be done', six invited review papers, and 33 papers from six different countries grouped into the following topical areas: (1) aerosol source terms (nuclear aerosol formation and characterization, nucleation and condensation, size and composition of primary particles, aerosol source terms for postulated accidents); (2) aerosol processes (correction factors, growth and interaction rates, removal rates); (3) measurement techniques (focused on assessing limits of accuracy and implications for code validation for accident consequence analysis); (4) mathematical and computer modelling; (5) comparison of codes and experiments); and (6) applications (focused on application of aerosol technology to reactor design, sensitivity of results, and implications for radiological consequence assessment for hypothetical accidents)

  3. CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings

    1984-08-01

    On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break.

  4. CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings

    1984-08-01

    On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break

  5. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD through its history

    Echavarri, L.

    2008-01-01

    This year, 2008, marks the 50th Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). During these years the Agency has adapted to the evolution of the world energy situation. At the beginning the Agency launches international collaboration projects to establish the technological bases required for nuclear energy, then helps member countries in the construction of nuclear power plants and later analyzes the safety criteria as a consequence of the Three Miles Island and Chernobyl accidents. Based on this experience, the NEA faces the X XI Century prepared to contribute, even more, to a better international collaboration for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of the nuclear energy. (Author)

  6. The NEA and the IAEA: partnering for progress

    Marcus, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation aims to answer the following question: What is the difference between the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? Or, to put it bluntly, why are two international intergovernmental agencies needed in the nuclear field? This careful analysis shows that each agency has different areas of emphasis and different strengths. (A.L.B.)

  7. The NEA thermochemical database project. 30 years of accomplishments

    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Brassinnes, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    The NEA Thermochemical Database (TDB) Project (www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/) provides a database of chemical thermodynamic values treating the most significant elements related to nuclear waste management. The work carried out since the initiation of TDB in 1984 has resulted in the publication of thirteen major reviews and a large set of selected values that have become an international reference in the field, as they are characterized for their accuracy, consistency and high quality. Herein, we describe the basis, scientific principles and organization of the TDB project, together with its evolution from its inception to the present organization as a joint undertaking under Article 5(b) of the Statute of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA).

  8. NEA Data Bank Progress Report 2011-2012

    Matsumoto, K.; Duppont, E.

    2012-01-01

    The Data Bank (DB) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) provides scientists in member countries with reference materials in the field of nuclear energy applications. The services include the compilation, verification, and distribution of nuclear data, chemical thermodynamic data, integral benchmark experiments, as well as computer programs and associated application libraries. The Data Bank also develops and maintains databases and related administration/retrieval tools, including the JANIS display software. The Data Bank works in close co-operation with the Nuclear Science Section, especially in the field of computer codes and associated application libraries benchmarking, integral experiments, nuclear data evaluation co-operation, and knowledge preservation. These activities are in essence international and organised in close collaboration with other main national and international organisations. More information on the NEA Data Bank can be found at www.oecd-nea.org/databank.

  9. NEA Data Bank Progress Report 2010-2011

    2011-01-01

    The OECD NEA Data Bank provides scientist in member countries with reference materials in the field of nuclear energy applications. The services include the compilation, verification, and distribution of nuclear data, chemical thermodynamic data, integral benchmark experiments, as well as computer programs and associated application libraries. The Data Bank also develops and maintains databases and related administration/retrieval tools, including the JANIS display software. The Data Bank works in close co-operation with the Nuclear Science Section, especially in the field of computer codes and associated application libraries benchmarking, integral experiments, nuclear data evaluation co-operation, and knowledge preservation. These activities are in essence international and organised in close collaboration with other main national and international organisations. More information on the NEA Data Bank can be found at www.oecd-nea.org/databank.

  10. Inequality in OECD countries.

    Thévenot, Celine

    2017-08-01

    This article recalls the state of play of inequality levels and trends in OECD countries, with a special focus on Nordic countries. It sheds light on explaining the drivers of the rise in inequality and its economic consequences. It addresses in particular the issue of redistribution through taxes and transfers. It concludes with an overview of policy packages that should be considered to address the issue of rising inequalities.

  11. OECD Halden reactor project

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  12. Eesti loodab peagi OECD liikmekutset / Sirje Rank

    Rank, Sirje, 1966-

    2010-01-01

    OECD on Eesti hindamisel jõudnud lõppjärku, liitumiskutset on oodata maikuus. OECD-le pakub huvi Eesti reformikogemus, e-valitsusega seonduv, oodatud on Eesti seisukohad OECD liitumiskõnelustel Venemaaga. OECD tegevusest

  13. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  14. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  15. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    2000-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  16. Joint IAEA/NEA IRS guidelines

    1997-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants

  17. The programme of OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on the safety of nuclear installations principal working group no. 3 on reactor component integrity

    Schulz, H.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    The programme of the OECD-NEA Principal Working Group No.3 on reactor component integrity is described including the following issues: regular Committee meetings; non-destructive testing; fracture analysis; aging; related activities

  18. OECD Halden Reactor Project

    1988-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor project is an agreement between OECD member countries. It was first signed in 1958 and since then regularly renewed every third year. The activities at the Project is centred around the Halden heavy water rector, the HBWR. The reseach programme comprizes studies of fuel performance under various operating conditions, and the application of computers for process control. The HBWR is equipped for exposing fuel rods to temperatures and pressures, and at heat ratings met in modern BWR's and PWR's. A range of in-core instruments are available, permitting detailed measurements of the reactions of the fuel, including mechanical deformations, thermal behaviour, fission gas release, and corrosion. In the area of computer application, the studies of the communication between operator and process, and the surveillance and control of the reactor core, are of particular interst for reactor operation. 1988 represents the 30th year since the Project was started, and this publication is produced to mark this event. It gives and account of the activities and achievements of the Project through the years 1958-1988

  19. OECD Halden Reactor Project

    1983-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is both the oldest and the only one still in operation of the three major joint undertakings established at the inception of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. This publication has been printed in connection with its twenty-fifth anniversary as an international project. After presentation of the history and organization of the project, a thorough description of the past and present activities in the field of fuel performance and process control and surveillance is given. The projects's fuel testing programme is now focuessed on an investigation to define safety margins under normal operations as well as under various kinds of accident situations. Fuel research is also concerned with the characterisation of long term effects with regard to efficiency, operational safety and mapping of reliability and durability in the case of accidents with loss of coolant. In the field of process control and surveillance, research work is directly linked to the use of computers and colour graphics as tools in the control room. A fullscale simulator-based model and experimental control room has been constructed. The first experiments to be carried out in this laboratory will investigate the advantage of analysing alarms before they are presented to the operator. (RF)

  20. NEA activities in 1986

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the main features of the Agency work during 1986. It deals with the response of NEA to the Chernobyl Accident; trends in Nuclear Power; Nuclear development and the fuel cycle; Nuclear safety research and licensing; radiation protection and waste management; legal affairs, nuclear science; joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects; information programmes; organization and administration

  1. NEA Annual report 1997

    1998-01-01

    The following issues are dealt with: 1997 in perspective. Trends in nuclear power. Technical programmes: Nuclear development and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and regulation, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear science, data bank, legal affairs, joint projects and other cooperative projects. General information: information programme, NEA publications produced in 1997, organization chart of NEA, workshops and meetings held in 1997. (R.P.)

  2. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  3. Summary of OECD survey of education in the nuclear energy field in Finland

    Kalli, H.

    1999-01-01

    This summary is a part of the work in the OECD/NEA/NDC expert group on the survey and analysis of education in the nuclear field. The text will later be published as a country report in the final report by expert group. (author)

  4. NEA 2015 Annual Report

    Magwood, William D. IV; Ha, Jaejoo; Nieh, Ho; Hah, Yeonhee; Siemann, Michael; Gulliford, Jim; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Vasquez-Maignan, Ximena; Gannon-Picot, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 continued to be one of significant change, both in relation to the Agency and the global context within which it operates. As countries around the world plan aggressive nuclear power plant construction programmes, prepare to phase out and decommission plants, or to both build and retire plants simultaneously, issues of economics, waste management, public communication and nuclear safety continue to dominate the global discussion regarding nuclear power. As many countries work to absorb the outcome of the COP21 negotiations at the end of 2015, it is becoming increasingly likely that the future of nuclear power will be determined in great respect by non-traditional suppliers and new entrant countries. As reflected in this year's Annual Report, the NEA completed a significant revision of its management structure, which, it is hoped, will enable it to be more flexible, more efficient and more focused on the issues of greatest concern to its member countries. Our members provided input via the process of developing the new Strategic Plan of the Nuclear Energy Agency: 2017-2022, reaffirming their desire to maintain a sharp focus on nuclear safety as our most important mission area, while also reaffirming the vital importance of the NEA as a leading forum for technology cooperation, economic analysis and scientific investigation. In that respect, the NEA's new role as the institutional home of the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) continues the Agency's coverage of complex issues associated with the deployment of new nuclear power plants. The NEA also launched the Nuclear Innovation 2050 initiative in 2015, through which NEA hopes to develop a coordinated international agenda for priority nuclear technology research and development on issues ranging from advanced fuel cycles to improved technology and methods for decommissioning retired plants. In all, 2015 was a year of both continued success for the NEA and a

  5. Estonia to join OECD / Ella Karapetyan

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2010-01-01

    2010. aasta kevadel tehakse otsus Eesti liitumise kohta OECD-ga. Välisminister Urmas Paet ja OECD peasekretär Angel Gurria allkirjastasid Pariisis privileegide ja immuniteetide lepingu. OECD liikmed

  6. OECD Halden reactor project

    1979-01-01

    This is the nineteenth annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities at the Project during 1978, the last year of the 1976-1978 Halden Agreement. Work continued in two main fields: test fuel irradiation and fuel research, and computer-based process supervision and control. Project research on water reactor fuel focusses on various aspects of fuel behavior under normal, and off-normal transient conditions. In 1978, participating organisations continued to submit test fuel for irradiation in the Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, in instrumented test assemblies designed and manufactured by the Project. Work included analysis of the impact of fuel design and reactor operating conditions on fuel cladding behavior. Fuel performance modelling included characterization of thermal and mechanical behavior at high burn-up, of fuel failure modes, and improvement of data qualification procedures to reduce and quantify error bands on in-reactor measurements. Instrument development yielded new or improved designs for measuring rod temperature, internal pressure, axial neutron flux shape determination, and for detecting cladding defects. Work on computer-based methods of reactor supervision and control included continued development of a system for predictive core surveillance, and of special mathematical methods for core power distribution control

  7. OECD Halden reactor project

    1977-01-01

    The activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1975 are summarized. The period under review is the last year of the three year joint programme which commenced on 1st January, 1973. The main items reported upon are: process supervision and control, test fuel irradiation and fuel research, reactor operations, and administration and finance. The process supervision and control work has been concentrated in two fields: methods development for core surveillance and control, and systems development for operator-process communication. As for fuel test, investigations of the densification phenomenon have continued through irradiations to a maximum of about 16000MWd/tUO 2 . Axial and radial deformations of fuel rods are studied, with the effect of power transients upon the dimensional stability of fuel rods, and fuel-cladding heat transfer and fuel temperature. Thermal models for steady state and transient heat transfer in fuel rods have been developed and the work on thermomechanical models of claddings shows considerable promise

  8. NEA Activities in 1988

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The following topics are developed: trends in nuclear power; nuclear development and the fuel cycle; nuclear safety and licensing; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; legal affairs; nuclear science; NEA joint projects; information programmes

  9. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Activities Related to Fast Reactor Development

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim

    2013-01-01

    • Despite impact of Fukushima, there remains a high level of interest in continued development of advanced nuclear systems and fuel cycles: – better use of natural resources; – minimisation of waste and reduction of constraints on deep geological repositories. • Ambitious R&D programmes on-going at national level in many countries, also through international projects: – expected to lead to development of advanced reactors and fuel cycle facilities. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in field of fast reactor development and related advanced fuel cycles: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  10. Nuclear data activities at the NEA Data Bank

    Hasegawa, A.; Henriksson, H.; Mompean, F.J.; Nordborg, C.; Rugama, Y.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is an international centre of reference for its member countries with respect to basic nuclear tools, such as computer codes and nuclear data. The Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear data. The NEA nuclear data services include the collection of data, validation and distribution of the Nuclear Data libraries via the NEA web-site, offering easy access to databases containing bibliographical and experimental information, as well as evaluated libraries, e.g., the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) library. The selection and distribution of chemical thermodynamic data for radioactive waste management applications is the subject of the Thermochemical Database Project (TDB), supported by 17 organisations in 12 member countries and co-ordinated by the NEA Data Bank. In support of data evaluation, and generation of project oriented data libraries, relevant computer codes in the field of nuclear models, experimental data processing and evaluated data processing are made available to experts with the support of the member countries. Large collections of benchmark experiments for data and code validation are also available from the NEA in areas such as criticality safety (ICSBEP), radiation shielding (SINBAD), fuel performance (IFPE) and reactor physics (IRPhE). The NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) provides a framework for co-operative activities between the six major evaluation projects (BROND, CENDL, Endf, FENDL, JEFF and JENDL). (authors)

  11. Human machine interaction research experience and perspectives as seen from the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    Oewre, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review is given on important safety issues in the field of human machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear organisations such as USNRC, IAEA and the OECD NEA. Further on, a presentation is offered of research activities at the OECD Halden Reactor Project in the field of human machine interaction aiming to clarify some of the issues outlined by the above mentioned organisations. The OECD Halden Reactor Project is a joint undertaking of national nuclear organisations in 19 countries sponsoring a jointly financed research programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency. One of the research areas is the man-machine systems research addressing the operator tasks in a control room environment. The overall objective is to provide a basis for improving today's control rooms through introduction of computer-based solutions for effective and safe execution of surveillance and control functions in normal as well as off-normal plant situations. (author)

  12. Overview of nuclear data activities at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Dupont, E.; Gulliford, J.; Nordborg, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The mission of the NEA is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for the safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. All activities relevant to nuclear data measurements, evaluations and applications are managed by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee through the Nuclear Science section and the Data Bank, which work closely together. This paper gives an overview of current and planned nuclear data activities at the Nuclear Energy Agency through the program of work of the Data Bank in general and of the NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) in particular. (authors)

  13. Evaluated Data Projects at the NEA

    Henriksson, H.; Rugama, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear data. The NEA offers easy access to the main nuclear databases with bibliographical information, evaluated libraries, e.g. the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) library, and experimental data in the EXFOR database, comprising published neutron induced as well as charged particle induced nuclear reaction data. The NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) is established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations and validation. WPEC provides a framework for co-operative activities between six major evaluation projects (BROND, CENDL, Endf, FENDL, JEFF and JENDL). The NEA Data Bank administrates the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the JEFF library. The latest version, JEFF-3.1, was released in May 2005 and it contains a neutron data library, a proton data library and thermal scattering law data. The special purpose library on activation data contains 774 nuclei with over 12600 neutron induced reactions. Included is also radioactive decay data, with 3852 isotopes, and spontaneous and neutron induced fission yield data. The full documentation of the library is being prepared for publication in 2006. Processed JEFF-3.1 data files in ACE format, mainly for reactor physics applications, have been prepared and were distributed in spring 2006 with documentation. The processed files have been validated for criticality calculations, as well as for radiation physics application. The detailed analysis of the validation results will be very useful for improving the accuracy of evaluated data libraries. The display program JANIS has been developed at the NEA, and the latest version (JANIS-2.21) was released in October 2005. JANIS is designed to facilitate the visualisation and

  14. NEA activities in 1981

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1981 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, nuclear safety research and licensing, nuclear law, nuclear development and fuel cycle studies technical co-operation, nuclear science organisation and administration are reviewed

  15. Factors affecting the future of nuclear power in OECD Europe

    Thompson, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of nuclear power in OECD Europe and addresses the prospects for its future over, say, the next quarter century. Most of the data and findings are drawn from studies published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The NEA is a small agency with a rather modest budget whose 27 members are industrialized countries from North America, Asia and Europe. The Agency works to pool the expertise of our member countries to produce technical, economic and legal work of considerable depth and quality addressing issues of common interest to those countries. Our work covers such fields as nuclear science, nuclear power economics, nuclear safety, radiation protection, waste management and nuclear liability. The studies carried out in the framework of the Agency require fewer resources than would be needed by our member countries if they were to pursue them individually, which is especially important at a time of cut-backs in national programmes in such critical areas as nuclear safety research. (author)

  16. NEA Activities in 1990

    1991-01-01

    The 19th Annual Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency contains details of the various NEA programmes, involving the technical and economic aspects of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear safety research and regulation, radiation protection, technological and institutional aspects of radioactive waste management, nuclear third party liability, and public information programmes

  17. The NEA Data Bank

    Coddens, G.

    1983-01-01

    The NEA Data Bank provides the nuclear data and computer programs necessary for reactor design and other calculations over a wide range of nuclear energy applications. The role which the Data Bank plays in international cooperation efforts, and the procedures to follow to obtain data and programs from the Data Bank are described. (Auth.)

  18. NEA Activities in 1987

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the main features of the Agency work during 1987. It deals with trends in nuclear power. Nuclear development and the fuel cycle; nuclear safety and licensing; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; legal affairs; nuclear science; joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects; information programmes; organization and administration

  19. Rasplav. A unique OECD/Russian experimental/analytical program in severe accident management/mitigation

    Speis, T.P.; Behbahani, A.

    1995-01-01

    In 1994 the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (NEA-OECD) sponsored the RASPLAV project in Russia to carry out an integrated program of experiments and analyses to address the conditions under which a degraded/molten core can be retained inside the reactor pressure vessel via cooling of the vessel from outside. The background, the objectives, the technical issues associated with, the utilization of the results and the benefits to the participating countries are discussed, involving Russian partnership with the most advanced OECD member countries in a project which will be carried out at the Kurchatov Institute in Russia. (author). 1 fig

  20. Trend and pattern analysis of operational data through cooperation between OECD countries

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    This papers deals with trend analyses achieved by NEA/OECD countries to assess operational safety experience. It describes the main features of the incident Reporting System operated by NEA to collect relevant safety events from nuclear power plants. It presents the results of exchange methods within Principal Working Group no 1 in charge of operating experience and human factors; the use of preselected IRS incidents is illustrated by the study of losses of containment functions performed by PWGl; some trends resulting from enlarged international exchanges dealing with operational data are highlighted through two examples: reducing scram frequency and improving technical specifications

  1. Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Activities at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    Hill, Ian

    2013-01-01

    NEA is organizing significant activities are ongoing to preserve fast reactor information: – Integral experiments supporting fast reactors; – Often “use it, or lose it”; – Difficult to preserve everything, critical information is identified; – Organisation is a large but important task; – Electronic databases needed to manage the data. • Authoritative Handbooks and state of the art reports: – These tend to be the documents that last. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in fast reactor knowledge preservation: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  2. Trend and pattern analysis of operational data through cooperation between OECD countries

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    This papers deals with trend analyses achieved by NEA/OECD countries to assess operational safety experience. It describes the main features of the Incident Reporting System operated by NEA to collect relevant safety events from nuclear power plants. It presents the results of exchange methods within Principal Working Group n 0 1 in charge of operating experience and human factors; the use of preselected IRS incidents is illustrated by the study of losses of containment functions performed by PWG1; some trends resulting from enlarged international exchanges dealing with operational data are highlighted through two examples: reducing scram frequency and improving technical specifications

  3. Progress report on the management of the NEA ISOE system

    Lazo, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1995-03-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) on 1 January, 1992, to facilitate the communication of dosimetric and ALARA implementation data among nuclear utilities around the world. After two years of operation the System has become a mature interactive network for transfer of data and experience. Currently, 37 utilities from 12 countries, representing 289 power plants, and 12 national regulatory authorities participate in ISOE. Agreements for cooperation also exist between the NEA and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and the Paris Center of the WOrld Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO-PC). In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is acting as a co-sponsor of ISOE for the participation of non-NEA member countries. Three Regional Technical Centres, Europe, Asia, and Non-NEA member countries, serve to administer the system. The ISOE Network is comprised of three data bases and a communications network at several levels. The three ISOE data bases include the following types of information: NEA1 - annual plant dosimetric information; NEA2 - plant operational characteristics for dose and dose rate reduction; and NEA3 - job specific ALARA practices and experiences. The ISOE communications network has matured greatly during 1992 and 1993. In addition to having access to the above mentioned data bases, participants may now solicit information on new subjects, through the Technical Centres, from all other participants on a real-time basis. Information Sheets on these studies are produced for distribution to all participants. In addition, Topical Reports on areas of interest are produced, and Topical Meetings are held annually.

  4. Progress report on the management of the NEA ISOE system

    Lazo, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) on 1 January, 1992, to facilitate the communication of dosimetric and ALARA implementation data among nuclear utilities around the world. After two years of operation the System has become a mature interactive network for transfer of data and experience. Currently, 37 utilities from 12 countries, representing 289 power plants, and 12 national regulatory authorities participate in ISOE. Agreements for cooperation also exist between the NEA and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and the Paris Center of the WOrld Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO-PC). In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is acting as a co-sponsor of ISOE for the participation of non-NEA member countries. Three Regional Technical Centres, Europe, Asia, and Non-NEA member countries, serve to administer the system. The ISOE Network is comprised of three data bases and a communications network at several levels. The three ISOE data bases include the following types of information: NEA1 - annual plant dosimetric information; NEA2 - plant operational characteristics for dose and dose rate reduction; and NEA3 - job specific ALARA practices and experiences. The ISOE communications network has matured greatly during 1992 and 1993. In addition to having access to the above mentioned data bases, participants may now solicit information on new subjects, through the Technical Centres, from all other participants on a real-time basis. Information Sheets on these studies are produced for distribution to all participants. In addition, Topical Reports on areas of interest are produced, and Topical Meetings are held annually

  5. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams, an OECD Nuclear Energy Agency review

    Madic, C.

    1997-01-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, either produced in nuclear fuel cycle or in the past during nuclear weapon production, represent a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected from a better knowledge of the chemistry of these elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide chemistry to review the current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. Recommendations were made for future research and development programs. This article presents briefly the work of the Task Force which will be published soon as an OECD/NEA/NSC Report. (author)

  6. Radioactive waste management and decommissioning at the NEA

    2010-11-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) seeks to assist its member countries in developing safe, sustainable and societally acceptable strategies for the management of all types of radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on the management of long-lived waste and spent fuel and on decommissioning of disused nuclear facilities. The programme of work in these areas is carried out for the most part by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) assisted by three working parties: - The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC). - The Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC). - The Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). Other NEA Committees also have interests in this field: the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) and the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC). The OECD/NEA is at the forefront in addressing both the technical and societal requirements for durable and sustainable waste management and decommissioning solutions. Through the RWMC it provides a neutral forum where policy makers, regulators and implementing organisations can discuss issues of common interest and develop solutions that meet the diverse needs of its member countries

  7. NEA activities in 1989

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the main features of the Agency work during 1989. It deals with trends in nuclear power; nuclear development and the fuel cycle; nuclear safety and licensing; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; legal affairs; nuclear science; joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects; information programmes; organization and administration. A list of workshops, specialist meetings and symposia organized during 1989 and a list of publications and other matter produced in 1989 are included

  8. Misceláneas

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1958-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerando el vivo interés que para los investigadores y eruditos de nuestra historia, y aun para los simples curiosos, tienen siempre los documentos antiguos, impresos o manuscritos, que de alguna manera se relacionan con la evolución social, cultural y política de Colombia, se ha determinado publicar, a partir del presente número del Boletín, una sección de referencia denominada "Misceláneas".

  9. NEA data bank

    1983-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the NEA data bank. The essential programs and data for nuclear energy calculations are available from the Data Bank. The Data Bank's role, in co-operation with other centers, is to protect the technological capital represented by the programs and data in its collection, which is unique in covering nearly the whole field of reactor physics at a single center (Saclay). The compilation and exchange of experimental and evaluated neutron and other nuclear data is carried out through a world-wide information network. The tasks now assigned to the Data Bank are in the areas of computer program packaging, neutron data compilation, assembly and benchmark testing of the Joint Evaluated File (JEF) of neutron cross-section data, and servicing the NEA scientific committees, as well as providing a computer service to the main NEA secretariat. In all areas the emphasis is on developing a ''value added'' element to the incoming data or computer codes, by validation documentation and presentation of information in a convenient standard form. The services offered by the Data Bank and the computers used by the Data Bank are presented

  10. Proceedings of a C.S.N.I. specialist meeting on instrumented pre-cracked Charpy testing

    Wullaert, R A [Fracture Control Corp., 340 South Kellogg Avenue, Suite G, Goleta, California 93017 (United States)

    1981-11-15

    This report presents the status of the testing and data analysis procedures for the instrumented pre-cracked Charpy test with emphasis on the application of the test technique to the nuclear industry. The report (Proceedings) consist of invited technical papers by specialists in the field and a synopsis of the comments, conclusions, and recommendations reached in a workshop session. The CSNl-sponsored and EPRI-hosted meeting confirmed both the popularity of the test technique in the nuclear industry and the problems associated with the test technique due to the lack of a national or international consensus standard. Major emphasis in the meeting was devoted to evaluating the existing industry testing procedure (EPRI procedure) and proposed national standards (ASTM, ASK). The EPRI procedures were considered adequate by specialists concerned with engineering applications, but too restrictive by specialists concerned with research applications. As a result of the conference, a compilation of state-of-the-art papers is now available to code and standard committees. Specific comments concerning test and data analysis procedures, applications in the nuclear industry, and future research areas are also contained in the proceedings

  11. Proceedings of the CSNI specialist meeting on interaction of fire and explosion with ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. Volume II

    1983-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the following areas: (1) experience and experimentation; (2) fire and explosion prevention, protection, and detection; and (3) application of related research

  12. Proceedings of the CSNI specialist meeting on interaction of fire and explosion with ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. Volume I

    1983-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the following areas: (1) fire and explosion perspectives; (2) fire, explosion, and radioactive source terms; and (3) development and verification of codes (a) mathematical and computer simulation and (b) analytical and experimental comparisons

  13. PACTEL OECD project planning (PACO). PACTEL OECD project planning

    Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    OECD launched the SETH project to investigate issues relevant for accident prevention and management and to ensure the existence of integral thermal hydraulic test facilities. The facilities included in the SETH project are PKL from Germany and PANDA from Switzerland. At the early stages of the SETH project an idea was raised to exploit the PACTEL facility in a similar OECD project. Without any external funding the analytical work in the required extent would not be possible within Lappeenranta University of Technology, the party responsible of operating PACTEL. This fact directed the PACO project proposal to be conducted for the SAFIR programme. The aim of the PACO project is to prepare a project proposal to OECD of a PACTEL related project. To attain this objective some preliminary analyses have to be performed to ensure the relevancy of the proposed topic. The low power situation, i.e. midloop state was chosen to be the topic in the PACO studies and project planning basis. The plan is to use PACTEL to examine vertical steam generator behaviour during the midloop operation and the following loss of residual heat removal system transient. Such a possibility is acknowledged with special alterations to PACTEL. The APROS code version 5.04.07 was selected as a tool for the preanalyses. The virtual simulation of the chosen experimental situation would give a preconception on the phenomena to be expected and the progression of the transient. Originally the PACO project was planned to continue only for a few months, ending up with the project proposal to OECD during the summer time 2004. During the pre-calculation process it became obvious that the time expected was not enough to establish good pre-calculation results. The reasons for this relates to time used to learn and adapt the use of the chosen code, improvements and corrections in modelling as well as the code ability to manage the special conditions defined for the project topic. Another aspect on completing a

  14. Selected excerpts from the proceedings of the international symposium on safety cases for deep disposal of radioactive waste: where do we stand? 23-25 January 2007, Paris, France, Organised by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) with the co-operation of the European Commission (EC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    Pescatore, Claudio; ); Ruiz, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Claudio Pescatore from NEA summarised the main results of a workshop organised by the Regulator's Forum in 2006 on Regulating for the Long-Term Safety of Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Workshop participants demonstrated the diversity of regulatory processes and policies across nations, which can be attributed primarily to the diversity of the socio-economic context. It was recommended that instead of focusing solely on the regulator, it is the regulatory system (i.e. a multi-actor societal decision-making process), which should be internationally compared. It was acknowledged that active institutional control cannot be maintained for the lifetime of long-lived waste, and no verifiable guarantee of safety can be provided for times when controls are no longer in place. Therefore, licensing of a geological disposal facility may be seen as an act of trust in the technology and the regulatory system, taken by the current generation on behalf of future generations. Mr Pescatore set forth further conclusions of the workshop, regarding safety indicators, timescales, and overall approaches. Since quantitative indicators characterising the effectiveness of radiological protection, including dose and risk, are no longer good measures of detriment and are subject to high uncertainty in the long-term, emphasis has been shifted to qualitative process/system indicators, for example, indicators related to the Best Available Techniques (BAT). Concerning timescales, workshop participants viewed that our duty to protect future generations does not weaken over time. Our capacity, however, to fulfil this duty is weaker with respect to far future generations. This discrepancy can be handled by recent generations' carrying out duties that can be reasonably performed, while transferring others to subsequent generations, along with resources needed to fulfil them. Since it seems likely that implementing a disposal facility may involve several generations, stepwise decision making

  15. OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project. Final Report

    2010-05-01

    It is important for nuclear power plant designers, operators and regulators to effectively use lessons learned from events occurring at nuclear power plants since, in general, it is impossible to reproduce the event using experimental facilities. In particular, evaluation of the event using accident analysis codes is expected to contribute to improving understanding of phenomena during the events and to facilitate the validation of computer codes through simulation analyses. The information presented in this publication will be of use in future revisions of safety guides on accident analysis. During a fuel crud removal operation on the Paks-2 unit of the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary on 10 April 2003, several fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank under deep water in a service pit connected to the spent fuel storage pool. The first sign of fuel failures was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank. Later, visual inspection revealed that most of the 30 fuel assemblies suffered heavy oxidation and fragmentation. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage had been caused by inadequate cooling. The Paks-2 event was discussed in various committees of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recommendations were made to undertake actions to improve the understanding of the incident sequence and of the consequence this had on the fuel. It was considered that the Paks-2 event may constitute a useful case for a comparative exercise on safety codes, in particular for models devised to predict fuel damage and potential releases under abnormal cooling conditions and the analyses of the Paks-2 event may provide information which is relevant for in-reactor and spent fuel storage safety evaluations. The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was established in 2005 as a joint project between the IAEA and the OECD/NEA. The IAEA

  16. Accomplishing the objectives of NEA in radioactive waste management

    Olivier, J.P.; Stadie, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD in the area of radioactive waste management are to promote studies and improve the data available to support national programmes, to co-ordinate national activities, to promote international projects, and to improve the general level of understanding of waste management issues. The NEA programme concentrates on the disposal of waste and responds to objectives at three levels: sharing of information and organization of joint analytical studies through expert meetings, preparation of technical reports and analysis and dissemination of data; establishment of joint research and development projects designed to support national programmes; and discussion of current issues and strategies, particularly through the Radioactive Waste Management Committee acting as a specialized internatonal forum. The paper discusses, through various specific examples, how the objectives are met. In addition, the paper describes current NEA activities which have not been reported in other papers during the Conference. (author)

  17. The EFF project status and the NEA nuclear data services

    Henriksson, H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12 Blvd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)], E-mail: henriksson@nea.fr; Batistoni, P. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Fischer, U. [Association FZK-Euratom, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Forrest, R. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Kodeli, I.; Nordborg, C. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12 Blvd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2007-10-15

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank participates in the production of data and their distribution to users including the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) library. The JEFF project has evolved from two separate projects, namely the European Fusion File (EFF) and the Joint Evaluated File (JEF), with the release of JEFF-3.1, in May 2005. The NEA also provides tools for the EFF project, such as computer codes for nuclear energy and radiation physics applications. Of special interest for fusion applications are the integral experiments collected in the SINBAD database, with radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments including many fusion neutronics shielding experiments. In this paper an overview will be given of the NEA, and some examples of nuclear data services offered, such as the SINBAD database. JANIS, a display program evaluated and experimental data developed at the NEA will be mentioned briefly. The main emphasis will be given to the EFF project including the contents of the new JEFF-3.1 library, released in May 2005. Examples of recent work are given as well as a discussion on the forth-coming evaluation efforts among the EFF collaborators.

  18. The EFF project status and the NEA nuclear data services

    Henriksson, H.; Batistoni, P.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R.; Kodeli, I.; Nordborg, C.

    2007-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank participates in the production of data and their distribution to users including the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) library. The JEFF project has evolved from two separate projects, namely the European Fusion File (EFF) and the Joint Evaluated File (JEF), with the release of JEFF-3.1, in May 2005. The NEA also provides tools for the EFF project, such as computer codes for nuclear energy and radiation physics applications. Of special interest for fusion applications are the integral experiments collected in the SINBAD database, with radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments including many fusion neutronics shielding experiments. In this paper an overview will be given of the NEA, and some examples of nuclear data services offered, such as the SINBAD database. JANIS, a display program evaluated and experimental data developed at the NEA will be mentioned briefly. The main emphasis will be given to the EFF project including the contents of the new JEFF-3.1 library, released in May 2005. Examples of recent work are given as well as a discussion on the forth-coming evaluation efforts among the EFF collaborators

  19. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  20. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task; SWR Stabilitaetsanalyse: Methodik der Stabilitaetsanalyse und PSI-Ergebnisse zur NEA/NCR Benchmarkaufgabe

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs.

  1. Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries

    Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares the reserve requirements of OECD countries. Reserve requirements are the minimum percentages or amounts of liabilities that depository institutions are required to keep in cash or as deposits with their central banks. To facilitate monetary policy implementation, twenty-four of the thirty OECD countries impose reserve requirements to influence their banking systems’ demand for liquidity. These include twelve OECD countries that are also members of the European Economic and...

  2. The role of the NEA incident reporting system in trend and pattern studies

    Ishack, G.; Iwabuchi, H.

    1990-01-01

    When the Incident Reporting System of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA-IRS) was first instituted in 1980, Members recognized the fact that since the data thus collected only pertains to significant safety-related incidents, the system cannot be used for in-depth statistical analyses. Rather, the NEA-IRS is best suited, in addition to single event assessments, to studies that provide indications related to system, component or human performance; these indications could also initiate trend analyses on more complete data bases. Examples are the generic studies on the Loss of Containment Functions (completed last year) and the Loss of Residual Heat Removal (due for completion this year), and the studies related to the human factor. Another type of use of the IRS data was started last year by the NEA Principal Working Group 1 on Operating Experience and Human Factors (PWG 1) in response to the encouragement of the OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), to make the best use of Operating Experience, notably of information disseminated through the NEA-IRS. These applications consisted of scanning the IRS data base for events that could be of interest to specialized domains such as radiation protection, fracture mechanics and fire protection. In the paragraphs which follow, some highlights of the results of these scans are presented (reference is made at the end of this paper to the reports detailing the results of these applications)

  3. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L.

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs

  4. The EFF Project Status and the NEA Nuclear Data Services

    Henriksson, H.; Kodeli, I.; Nordborg, C.; Forrest, R.; Batistoni, P.; Fischer, U.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear data. Through its activities in the reaction data field, the NEA participates in the production of data and their distribution to its users. The NEA Data Bank administrates the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the Joint Evaluated Fusion and Fission (JEFF) library. The JEFF project has evolved from two separate projects, namely the European Fusion File (EFF) and the Joint Evaluated File (JEF), to JEFF with the latest release of the library, JEFF-3.1, in May 2005. The EFF Project is a collaborative project with work funded by the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA). The tasks within the project comprise new data evaluation and verification of activation and transport data, calculation methods and validation via integral experiments. The EFF project brings together all available expertise in Europe, relating to the nuclear data requirements of existing and future fusion devices. EFF contributed greatly to the successful release of the internationally recognised nuclear data library JEFF-3.1. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) is established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations and validation. WPEC provides a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects, such as the high priority request list that is a collection of experimental data requests of special interest in a certain project, such as JEFF or ITER. The NEA provides also computer program services for nuclear energy and radiation physics applications. Of special interest for fusion applications are the integral experiments, such as SINBAD, with radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments including many fusion neutronics shielding experiments. (author)

  5. Nea study on the impact of advanced fuel cycles on waste management policies

    Cavedon, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out by the ad hoc Expert Group on the Impact of Advanced Fuel Cycles on Waste Management Policies convened under the auspices of the NEA Committee for Technical and Economic Studies on Nuclear Energy Development and the Fuel Cycle (NDC); the Integrated Group on Safety Case from the Radioactive Waste Management Committee provided support in the field of waste repository issues; the Nuclear Science Committee Working Group on Flowsheet Studies also provided some input data. The full report on this study is published as the NEA Report number 5990 - OECD 2006 by OECD Publications - ISBN 92-64-02296-1. The following text is extracted from the Executive Summary of the report. (author)

  6. contemporáneas

    Mynor Fernández Morales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo trata sobre la importancia que tiene la existencia de un portal del conocimiento como una herramienta para la gestión sistemática y el crecimiento armónico de una organización, ya que constituye un instrumento técnico y administrativo, con el cual deberían contar las organizaciones contemporáneas para competir mejor en un mundo cada vez más globalizado inserto en la sociedad postindustrial donde la principal ventaja competitiva la constituye sin duda el conocimiento. Se da énfasis a los aspectos de índole administrativo más que a los de orden técnico, para implementar el portal como una herramienta gerencial que facilite la gestión del conocimiento. Por último, se plantea que su consolidación y buen suceso depende de la existencia de un ambiente colaborativo de los profesionales de la información en la gestión sistemática del conocimiento organizaci

  7. The OECD and Global Governance in Education

    Sellar, Sam; Lingard, Bob

    2013-01-01

    This review essay discusses the history, evolution and development of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and traces the growing impact of its education work. The essay is in four main sections. The first discusses Carrol and Kellow's "The OECD: A Study of Organizational Adaptation" (Edward Elgar) and…

  8. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Kazakhstan

    Pons, Anna; Amoroso, Jeremie; Herczynski, Jan; Kheyfets, Igor; Lockheed, Marlaine; Santiago, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This joint OECD-World Bank report for Kazakhstan forms part of the OECD Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the Review is to explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. School resources are…

  9. Education at a Glance 2010: OECD Indicators

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Across OECD countries, governments are seeking policies to make education more effective while searching for additional resources to meet the increasing demand for education. The 2010 edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" enables countries to see themselves in the light of other countries' performance. It provides a rich, comparable…

  10. Nuclear power plant operating experiences from the IAEA / Nea incident reporting system 2002-2005

    2006-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. The IRS is jointly operated and managed by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a specialized agency within the United Nations System. (author)

  11. Implications of draft ICRP recommendations: the View of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    Magnusson, S.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has taken an active interest in the work being performed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop a new set of general recommendations. As several key junctures, the Nea, through the lead of its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) has performed in-depth analyses of the possible implications that draft ICRP materials, in order to inform policy makers of the regulatory and application implications that would result should draft ICRP Recommendations for a system of radiological protection be published. Comments from the Nea have constructively contributed to the ICRP development process, and it is hoped that the final ICRP recommendations in this area will be developed to best serve the needs of national and international radiation protection policy makers, regulators and implementers. Having assessed and commented on previous drafts, the C.R.P.P.H. has co-ordinated the views of all the relevant standing technical committees within the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide constructive suggestions as to how the text could be usefully improved. Comments were requested from the Nea committees dealing with radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, nuclear regulatory activities, nuclear development and nuclear science. The present paper summarises the results of the C.R.P.P.H. review process related to the new ICRP recommendations. (author)

  12. JANIS: NEA JAva-based Nuclear Data Information System

    Soppera, Nicolas; Bossant, Manuel; Cabellos, Oscar; Dupont, Emmeric; Díez, Carlos J.

    2017-09-01

    JANIS (JAva-based Nuclear Data Information System) software is developed by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, TENDL etc., and also to experimental nuclear data (EXFOR) and bibliographical references (CINDA). It is available as a standalone Java program, downloadable and distributed on DVD and also a web application available on the NEA website. One of the main new features in JANIS is the scripting capability via command line, which notably automatizes plots generation and permits automatically extracting data from the JANIS database. Recent NEA software developments rely on these JANIS features to access nuclear data, for example the Nuclear Data Sensitivity Tool (NDaST) makes use of covariance data in BOXER and COVERX formats, which are retrieved from the JANIS database. New features added in this version of the JANIS software are described along this paper with some examples.

  13. OECD sarjab II samba peatamist / Erik Müürsepp

    Müürsepp, Erik

    2009-01-01

    OECD peab II pensionisamba maksete peatamist taunitavaks. OECD dokumendist, milles vaadeldakse praegu kriisiolukorda sattunud riikide käitumist pensionisüsteemi kujundamisel. Sotsiaalminister Hanno Pevkuri arvamus OECD soovituste kohta

  14. Nuclear legislation. Analytical study. Regulatory and Institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD Member countries. Volume I

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This Volume I of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. (NEA) [fr

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United States

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Special nuclear material; Source material; By-product material; Agreement state programmes); 4. Nuclear installations (Initial licensing; Operation and inspection, including nuclear safety; Operating licence renewal; Decommissioning; Emergency response); 5. Radiological protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 6. Radioactive waste management (High-level waste; Low-level waste; Disposal at sea; Uranium mill tailings; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - FUSRAP); 7. Non-proliferation and exports (Exports of source material, special nuclear material, production or utilisation facilities and sensitive nuclear technology; Exports of components; Exports of by-product material; Exports and imports of radiation sources; Conduct resulting in the termination of exports or economic assistance; Subsequent arrangements; Technology exports; Information and restricted data); 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC; Department of Energy - DOE; Department of Labor - DOL; Department of Transportation - DOT; Environmental Protection Agency - EPA); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: A. Cabinet-level departments (Department of Agriculture; Department of Commerce; Department of Defense - DOD; Department of Health and Human Services - DHHS; Department of the Interior; Department of State); B. Other federal agencies and offices: (Federal Emergency Management Agency - FEMA; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA; Tennessee Valley Authority - TVA; White House offices); C. Semi-public agencies (American National Standards Institute - ANSI; National Academy of Sciences - NAS; National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement - NCRP; National Nuclear Data Center)

  16. OECD/NEA study on economics of the Back-end of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Lokhov, Alexey; Urso, Maria Elena; Cameron, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Recommendations: 1. While there may be reasons to extend the interim storage of SNF, these should not prevent governments from maintaining vigorous efforts towards the establishment of deep geological repositories, thereby addressing legitimate public expectations and fulfilling the “intergenerational equity” principle. 2. Public involvement in the establishment and implementation of the SNF management strategy is considered vital: mechanisms to improve stakeholder participation and transparency should be a high priority. 3. Governments should continue to be vigilant in ensuring that the funding systems adopted are stable and robust and that financial resources accrued by waste producers for the management of their waste will be adequate and available at the time they are needed. The following features are considered essential: – Regular and frequent reviews to allow for newly accrued knowledge on technical aspects and actual fund developments, as well as other qualitative factors (e.g. sociopolitical), to be taken into account, and, importantly, for emerging shortfalls to be swiftly addressed through the necessary corrective actions. – Ring-fencing of funds to ensure that resources are only used for the intended purposes. 4. For countries that are committed to ongoing use or development of nuclear energy, comparisons of the costs of different strategies for managing the back end should be drawn on the basis of the full fuel cycle cost. For countries which are phasing out or have already exited nuclear power, a direct back-end cost comparison may be more appropriate. In any case, assessments made for total or partial FC cost comparisons should be transparent about the assumptions made and the scope of the analysis. 5. In any decision-making process regarding the choice of SNF management strategy, a multicriteria approach should be adopted at the national level that expands the quantitative economic considerations to include qualitative factors. These can have an important (or even determining) influence in the final decision and may also have a direct impact on the costs. 6. Especially where issues of long-term fuel supply and reduction of waste volumes are particularly important (e.g. in countries with larger nuclear programmes) research and development (R&D) on advanced nuclear systems, including FRs, should be supported by governments, since their implementation holds the potential for enhancing the long-term sustainability of nuclear power, notably in relation to management of waste. In this context, further engineering and cost analyses would be important to reduce the uncertainties in the costs of implementing advanced fuel cycle options. 7. International co-operation and sharing of experience for safe, reliable and economic implementation of the back-end strategies should be continued. Given the significant economic costs and expertise required for their realisation, sharing FC facilities and infrastructure would especially benefit countries with small nuclear programmes

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - New Zealand

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities - National Radiation Laboratory - NRL; 2. Advisory bodies - Radiation Protection Advisory Council; 3. Public and semi-public agencies - Research institutes

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Germany

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Definitions; Licensing requirements); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing regime; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Surveillance of installations and activities); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (General; Principal elements of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; Additional radiation protection norms); 7. Radioactive waste management (Atomic Energy Act 2002; Radiation Protection Ordinance; International obligations); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Non-proliferation regime; Physical protection regime); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities: Federal authorities (Federal Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, Federal Minister for Education and Research, Federal Minister of Finance, Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs, Federal Minister for Economy and Technology, Federal Minister of Defence, Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS, Federal Office of Economics and Export Control); Authorities of the Laender; 2. Advisory bodies (Reactor Safety Commission - RSK; Radiation Protection Commission - SSK; Disposal Commission - ESK; Nuclear Technology Committee - KTA); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Technological Surveillance Association - Technische Ueberwachungsvereine-TUV; Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)mbH; Karlsruhe Research Centre - Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe; Juelich Research Centre - Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht - Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH; Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy; The Electron-Synchrotron in Hamburg - Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron-DESY; Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics at Garching/Munich - Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik-IPP; Company for Heavy Ion Research - Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH-GSI; Rossendorf Association for Nuclear Technology and Analysis - Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Anlaytik)

  19. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Finland

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Trade and Industry - KTM; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory bodies (Advisory Committee on Nuclear Energy; Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK; State Nuclear Waste Management Fund)

  20. Joint CEC/OECD(NEA) workshop on recent advances in reactor accident consequence assessment

    Olast, M.; Sinnaeve, J.

    1988-01-01

    The workshop on probabilistic accident consequence assessment techniques and their applications aims at a review of the present knowledge of all the work in this field. This includes the atmospheric dispersion and deposition modelling, with comparison of the different approaches, the exposure pathways with emphasis on post-deposition processes, the health effects with emphasis on the consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data re-evaluation, the countermeasures and their economic consequences, the uncertainty analysis of the models and finally the applications of these models as aids to decision making

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Netherlands

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Fissionable materials, ores, radioactive materials and equipment (Fissionable materials and ores; Radioactive materials and equipment); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of individuals undergoing medical exposure); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment; Minister for Economic Affairs; Minister for Social Affairs and Employment; Minister for Health, Welfare and Sports; Minister for Finance; Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory body - Health Council of the Netherlands; 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG; Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste - COVRA)

  2. OECD/NEA WGFCS Workshop: Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is produced, processed, and stored mainly in industrial-scale facilities. Uranium ores are processed and refined to produce a pure uranium salt stream, Uranium is converted and enriched, nuclear fuel is fabricated (U fuel and U/Pu fuel for the closed cycle option); and spent fuel is stored and reprocessed in some countries (close cycle option). Facilities dedicated to the research and development of new fuel or new processes are also considered as Fuel Cycle Facilities. The safety assessment of nuclear facilities has often been led by the methodology and techniques initially developed for Nuclear Power Plants. As FCFs cover a wide diversity of installations the various approaches of national regulators, and their technical support organizations, for the Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities are also diverse, as are the approaches by their industries in providing safety justifications for their facilities. The objective of the Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety is to advance the understanding for both regulators and operators of relevant aspects of nuclear fuel cycle safety in member countries. A large amount of experience is available in safety assessment of FCFs, which should be shared to develop ideas in this field. To contribute to this task, the Workshop on 'Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives' was held in Toronto, on 27 - 29 September 2011. The workshop was hosted by Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The current proceedings provide summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  3. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  4. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brady, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  5. OECD/NEA SERENA Project for a Resolution of Ex-vessel Steam Explosion Risks

    Hong, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Min, B. T.; Park, I. K.; Ha, K. S.; Hong, S. H.; Song, J. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, H. D.

    2008-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has conducted the TROI (Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water) program for a study on a fuel coolant interaction (FCI) since 2001. More than 50 experiments using several prototypic materials have been carried out so far. SERENA phase 2 project which has been conducting since 1st Oct. 2007 is aimed a the resolution of the uncertainties on the void fraction and the melt composition effect by performing a limited number of well-designed tests with advanced instrumentations to clarify the nature of a prototypic material with mild steam explosion characteristics and to provide innovative experimental data for a computer code validation

  6. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are 149 Sm, 151 Sm, and 155 Gd

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Poland

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Licensing; Registration and monitoring of nuclear materials and radioactive sources; High activity sources); 4. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (The President of the National Atomic Energy Agency - Prezes Panstwowej Agencji Atomistyki (President of the PAA); Minister of Health; Minister of the Environment); 2. Advisory bodies (Council for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection); 3. Public and semi-public bodies (Radioactive Waste Management Plant); 4. Research institutes (Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection; National Centre for Nuclear Research; Institute of Nuclear Physics; Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology; Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion)

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Sweden

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects (The Environmental Code, Environmental impact statement, Permit under the Environmental Code)); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability (The Nuclear Liability Act; Chernobyl legislation); II. Institutional Framework: 1. Ministries with responsibilities concerning nuclear activities (Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications; Ministry of Justice; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Greece

    2015-01-01

    In Greece, there are no nuclear power plants and nuclear energy is not considered as an option in the foreseeable future. There is, however, one nuclear research reactor (in extended shutdown since 2014) and one sub-critical assembly. Radioactive waste originating from medicine, research and industry is classified as low level. Although there is no framework act dealing comprehensively with the different aspects of nuclear energy, there are various laws, decrees and regulations of a more specific nature governing several aspects of nuclear activities. This paper gives information on the general regulatory regime (mining regime, radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment, nuclear installations (licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety, emergency response, trade in nuclear materials and equipment, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear security, transport, nuclear third party liability) and on the institutional framework with the regulatory and supervisory authorities (Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE))

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovak Republic

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Inspection, including Nuclear Safety; Emergency Response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiological Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic - UJD; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of Economy; Ministry of Labour and National Labour Inspectorate); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Ireland

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Radiation protection standards; Emergency response); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government; Minister for Agriculture and Food; Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources; Minister for Finance; Minister for Health and Children; Minister for Defence); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; Food Safety Authority of Ireland)

  12. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  13. International studies on burnup credit criticality safety by an OECD/NEA working group

    Brady, M.C.; Okuno, H.; DeHart, M.D.; Nouri, A.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    The results and conclusions from a six-year study by an international benchmarking group in the comparison of computational methods for evaluating burnup credit in criticality safety analyses is presented. Approximately 20 participants from 12 countries have provided results for most problems. Four detailed benchmark problems for pressurized-water-reactor fuel have been completed. Results from work being finalized, addressing burnup credit for boiling-water-reactor fuel, are discussed, as well as planned activities for additional benchmarks, including mixed-oxide fuels, and other activities

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Switzerland

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Nuclear fuels; Radioactive substances and equipment generating ionising radiation); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Environmental protection; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Council; Federal Assembly; Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications - DETEC; Federal Office of Energy - SFOE; Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - IFSN; Federal Department of Home Affairs - FDHA; Federal Office of Public Health - FOPH; State Secretariat for Education and Research - SER; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission - KNS; Federal Commission for Radiological Protection and Monitoring of the Radioactivity in the Environment; Federal Emergency Organisation on Radioactivity); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Paul-Scherrer Institute - PSI; Fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and for the waste disposal; National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste - Nagra)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  16. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Turkey

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Prime Minister; Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment and Forestry); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority - TAEK; General Directorate for Mineral Research and Exploration - MTA; ETI Mine Works General Management; Turkish Electric Generation and Transmission Corporation - TEAS; Turkish Electricity Distribution Corporation - TEDAS)

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Spain

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trading in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Safeguards and non-proliferation; Physical protection); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade - MITYC; Ministry of the Interior - MIR; Ministry of Economy and the Exchequer - MEH; Ministry of the Environment and Rural and Marine Affairs - MARM); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Safety Council - CSN; Centre for Energy-related, Environmental and Technological Research - CIEMAT; National Energy Commission - CNE; 3. Public capital companies (Enusa Industrias Avanzadas, s.a. - ENUSA; Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, s.a. - ENRESA)

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Japan

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office; Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI; Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport - MLIT; Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology - MEXT); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission - AEC; Nuclear Safety Commission - NSC; Radiation Council; Special Committee on Energy Policy; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA)

  19. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155

  20. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Iceland

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health and Social Security; Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute)

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Belgium

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 4. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 5. Radiological protection; 6. Radioactive waste management; 7. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and physical protection of nuclear material (International aspects; National control and security measures); 8. Transport; 9. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC; Federal Public Service for Home Affairs; Federal Public Service for Economy, SME's, Self-Employed and Energy; Federal Public Service for Employment, Labour and Social Dialogue; Federal Public Service for Defence; Federal Public Service for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Co-operation; Federal Public Planning Service for Science Policy); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Council for Ionizing Radiation of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control; Superior Health Council; Superior Council for Safety, Hygiene and Enhancement of Workplaces; Advisory Committee for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation - CREG)

  2. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Norway

    2001-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Trade governed by nuclear energy legislation; Trade governed by radiation protection legislation; Trade governed by export/import control legislation); 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Ministerial Level (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; Ministry of Trade and Industry; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Other Ministries); B. Subsidiary Level: (The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA; The Norwegian Nuclear Emergency Organisation); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies - Institute for Energy Technology - IFE

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Czech Republic

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear items and spent fuel (Ionising radiation sources; Nuclear items; Spent fuel); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (State Office for Nuclear Safety - SUJB; Ministry of Industry and Trade; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (CEZ, a.s.; National Radiation Protection Institute - NRPI; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority - RAWRA; Diamo; Nuclear Physics Institute - NPI; National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; Nuclear Research Institute Rez, a.s. - NRI)

  4. OECD/NEA and CEC intercalibration and intercomparison programme for Radon

    Solomon, S.B.; Knutson, E.O.

    1991-01-01

    Intercomparison of measurements of radon daughter activity concentration, unattached fraction and aerosol size distribution of radon daughters, was carried out by three of the reference laboratories: Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), US Department of Energy, Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) and US Department of Industry, Bureau of Mines (USBM), over the period March 17 to 21 1986, using the radon test chamber at the Australian Radiation Laboratory in Melbourne. The methodology, protocols and results for these measurements are described in detail. The results showed no systematic differences between the three laboratories, within the limits set by the counting statistics. In intercomparing methods for unattached fraction measurement, two of the reference laboratories (ARL and EML) used the single screen method. Good agreement was obtained between the two laboratories. EML and USBM also used graded screen devices for sizing these so-called unattached radon daughters. At the time of these measurements, the graded screen analysis methods available were of a preliminary nature. The ultrafine aerosol size distributions derived by EML and USBM show reasonable agreement in the position and magnitude of the derived peaks. The results of the measurements of the radon daughter aerosol size distributions between ARL, EML and USBM showed good agreement within the regions of overlap of the instrument response. 16 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  5. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Mexico

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Nuclear terrorism; II. Institutional Framework - The federal government: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Energy; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Labour and Social Security; Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources; Ministry of Communications and Transport); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: (National Nuclear Safety and Safeguards Commission; National Nuclear Research Institute)

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Portugal

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Health; Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education; Ministry of Economy and Innovation; Ministry of Environment and Territorial Planning; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Independent Commission for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - CIPRSN; National Radiation Protection Commission - CNPCR; National Commission for Radiological Emergencies - CNER; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and semi-public agencies

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Luxembourg

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General; 2. Mining; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency measures); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. General Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister of Labour; Other Ministers competent); 2. Advisory bodies (Higher Health Council)

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Italy

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation Protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of the environment); 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Interdepartmental Committee for Economic Planning; Nuclear Safety Agency; Prime Minister; Minister for Economic Development; Minister for Labour and Social Security; Minister for Health; Minister for the Environment; Minister for the Interior; Minister for Transport and Navigation; Minister for Foreign Trade (now incorporated in Ministry for Economic Development); Minister for Education; Treasury Minister; Minister for Universities and for Scientific and Technical Research; Minister for Foreign Affairs; State Advocate General); 2. Advisory bodies (Inter-ministerial Council for Consultation and Co-ordination; Coordinating Committee for Radiation Protection of Workers and the Public; Regional and Provincial Commissions for Public Health Protection Against the Hazards of Ionising Radiation; Technical Commission for Nuclear Safety and Health Protection); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment - ENEA; National Institute of Nuclear Physics - INFN; National Health Service; Electricity Company - ENEL, s.p.a.; Company for the Management of Nuclear Installations (Societa per la Gestione degli Impianti Nucleari - SOGIN); National Environmental Protection and Technical services Agency - APAT)

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - France

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General (The French nuclear power programme and its main players; French nuclear law); 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Nuclear Equipment (Regulatory diversity; Radioactive sources; Medical activities); 4. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Basic nuclear installations - INB; Tax on basic nuclear installations, Additional taxes, Funding nuclear costs; Installations classified for environmental protection purposes (ICPE) using radioactive substances; Nuclear pressure equipment - ESPN; Defence-related nuclear installations and activities - IANID; Emergency plans); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation protection (Protection of the public; Protection of workers; Radiation protection inspectors; Labour inspectors; Protection of individuals in a radiological emergency); 7. Radioactive Waste Management (General regulations; Radioactive waste regulations; Discharge of effluents); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Materials not used for the nuclear deterrent; Materials used for the nuclear deterrent); 9. Transport (Licensing and notification regime: Transport of radioactive materials, Transport of nuclear materials, Transport of radioactive substances between member states of the European Union; Methods of transport: Land transport, Sea transport, Air transport, Transport by post); 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability: 1 Scope (Geographical scope; Installations subject to the nuclear third party liability regime; Transport; Damage covered); 2 General principles of the nuclear third party regime (Legal channelling of liability to the operator; Strict liability; Liability limited in amount; Operator's insurance or financial security; Liability limited in time; Exclusive jurisdiction); 3 Amendments of the Paris and Brussels Conventions; II. Institutional Framework: 1. The Nuclear Safety Authority (President of the Republic: Council for Nuclear Policy, Council for Defence and National Security; Prime Minister: Inter-ministerial Committee for Nuclear or Radiological Emergencies, General Secretariat for Defence and National Security, Euratom Technical Committee, Administration of the CTE is handed to the Atomic Energy Commission, Atomic Energy Committee; Minister for Industry: Nuclear Engineering Terminology and Neology Commission; Minister responsible for Ecology and Energy: Directorate General for Energy and Climate, Directorate General for the Prevention of Risks, Department for Defence, Security and Economic Intelligence; Minister for Research; Minister for Health; Minister for Public Safety: Directorate for Public Safety, Central Office for the Prevention of Organised Crime; Minister for Defence: Council for Nuclear Defence, DSND (Minister responsible for Work, Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Specialised Committees or Boards (Advisory Commission on Major Nuclear Installations; Special Commission for Major Nuclear Installations classified as Secret; Higher Council for Nuclear Safety and Information; Higher Committee for the Transparency of Information on Nuclear Safety); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (The Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, Atomic Energy Committee, Management Board, Administrator-General, High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, Agence ITER-France - AIF, Agence France Nucleaire international - AFNI; Electricite de France - EDF; National Radioactive Waste Management Agency; Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety; National Institute for Nuclear Particle Physics - IN2P3)

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Canada

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction (Licensing system; Offences, compliance and enforcement; Regulatory documents; Other relevant legislation); 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear substances and radiation devices; 4. Nuclear facilities; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (Exports, Other imports); 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Governor in council; Minister of natural resources; Other Ministerial authorities; Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - CNSC); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (National Research Council - NRC; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. - AECL)

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovenia

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Safeguards for nuclear material; 7. Radiation protection; 8. Radioactive waste management; 9. Nuclear security; 10. Transport; 11. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration - SNSA; Slovenian Radiation Protection Administration - SRPA); 2. Advisory bodies; 3. Public and semi-public agencies; 4. Technical support organisations - approved experts

  12. Research on cement-based grouts for the OECD/NEA international Stripa project

    Onofrei, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the work that has been carried out on cement-based by AECL research in Canada. The results indicate that it is possible to manufacture low water content high-performance cement-grouts, the performance of which would be acceptable for at least thousands of years and probably for much longer periods. Moreover, these grouts were shown to have negligible hydraulic conductivity, associated with very low porosity and to be highly leach resistant in repository conditions. (TEC). 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Hungary

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Atomic Energy Co-ordination Council; Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority - HAEA; Minister for Health; Minister for Local Government and Regional Development and Minister for Justice and Law Enforcement; Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development; Minister for Economy and Transport; Minister of Environment Protection and Water Management; Minister for Defence; Minister for Education; President of the Hungarian Mining and Geological Authority; Governmental Co-ordination Committee); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Board); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Institute for Electric Power Research - VEIKI; Atomic Energy Research Institute - AEKI; Institute of Isotopes; Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of Pannon; Hungarian Power Companies Ltd - MVM Zrt.)

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Denmark

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister for the Environment/Minister of Transport and Energy; Minister of Justice; Minister of Defence; National Board of Health; Emergency Management Agency); 2. Advisory bodies (The Danish Ministry of Energy, Supply and Climate and the Danish Energy Agency); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Risoe National Laboratory)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Austria

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime - General Outline: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Federal Authorities - Bund (The Federal Chancellery; The Federal Minister for Women's Affairs and Consumer Protection; The Federal Minister of the Interior; The Federal Minister for Economic Affairs; The Federal Minister of Finance; The Federal Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs; The Federal Minister of Science and Transport; The Federal Minister of Justice; The Federal Minister for the Environment; The Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs) B. Regional Authorities - Laender; C. District Authorities - Bezirksverwaltungsbehorden; 2. Advisory Bodies (Forum for Nuclear Questions, Radiation Protection Commission - SSK); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (The Seibersdorf Austrian Research Centre; The Graz Nuclear Institute; The Nuclear Institute of the Austrian Universities; The Institute of Risk Research, University of Vienna)

  16. Information on the NEA/OECD publication ''Chernobyl: Ten years of radiological and health impact''

    Prochazkova, D.

    1996-01-01

    A synopsis of the title document is presented. The topics treated encompass a description of the accident, radionuclide dispersion and fallout, responses of national governments, radiation dose estimates, health impacts, impacts on agriculture and the environment, potential residual hazards, and lessons learned from the accident. (P.A.)

  17. Selected source term topics. Report to CSNI by an OECD/NEA Group of experts

    1987-04-01

    CSNI Report 136 summarizes the results of the work performed by the Group of Experts on the Source Term and Environmental Consequences (PWG4) during the period extending from 1983 and 1986. This report is complementary to Part 1, 'Technical Status of the Source Term' of CSNI Report 135, 'Report to CSNI on Source Term Assessment, Containment atmosphere control systems, and accident consequences'; it considers in detail a number of very specific issues thought to be important in the source term area. It consists of: an executive summary (prepared by the Chairman of the Group), a section on conclusions and recommendations, and five technical chapters (fission product chemistry in the primary circuit of a LWR during severe accidents; resuspension/re-entrainment of aerosols in LWRs following a meltdown accident; iodine chemistry under severe accident conditions; effects of combustion, steam explosions and pressurized melt ejection on fission product behaviour; radionuclide removal by pool scrubbing), a technical annex and two appendices

  18. The work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on safety and licensing of nuclear installations

    Strohl, P.

    1975-01-01

    The acceleration of nuclear power programmes in OECD Member countries is reflected in the emphasis given by OECD/NEA to its activities in nuclear safety and regulatory matters. Particular effort is devoted to work on radiation protection and radioactive waste management, safety of nuclear installations and nuclear law development. A Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations reviews the state of the art and identifies areas for research and co-ordination of national programmes. A Sub-Committee on Licensing collates information and data on licensing standards and practices of different countries with a view to considering problems of common interest. Comparative studies of various licensing systems and discussions between licensing authorities should help to improve regulatory control of nuclear installations for which there appears to be a need for internationally accepted standards in the long run. (author)

  19. Spanish collaboration in the OECD Halden Reactor Project research on Gadolinia Fuel

    Horvath, M. I.; Jenssen, H. K.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Tverberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants benefit from research and development advances and related technical solutions. One research platform is the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), HRP is a joint undertaking of national organisations in 18 countries sponsoring a jointly financed programme under the auspices of the OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). As a member state, Spain is participating HRP research programs with ENUSA as partner in the fuel research programs. Various experiments are developed and performed also by providing materials, ENUSA collaborates with HRP on various experiments investigating the fuel behaviour, especially on Gd-bearing fuel. 20 years of successful collaboration between HRP and ENUSA is continuing with promising and results to ensure and enhance the safe operation of the Spanish and all other NPPs in the world. (Author) 12 refs.

  20. IAEA/NEA Fuel Incident Notification and Analysis System (FINAS) guidelines

    2006-01-01

    The Fuel Incident Notification and Analysis System (FINAS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of FINAS is to contribute to improving the safety of fuel cycle facilities, which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance, which occur at these facilities. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous NEA FINAS guidelines is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce FINAS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating FCFs. These guidelines have been jointly developed and approved by the NEA/IAEA

  1. Eesti allkirjastas liitumislepingu OECD-ga

    2010-01-01

    Peaminister Andrus Ansip ja OECD peasekretär Angel Gurria allkirjastasid 3. juunil 2010. a. Stenbocki majas Eesti liitumislepingu. Samal päeval kohtus president Toomas Hendrik Ilves Angel Gurriaga Kadriorus

  2. OECD environmental performance reviews: United States

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    This book presents OECD assessments and recommendations regarding the United States' efforts to manage its environment including air, water, nature, and biodiversity; to do this in a sustainable manner; and to do this in co-operation with its global neighbours. In particular, it assesses progress made since 1996, when OECD's previous review on the US was done. 47 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. OECD Reviews of School Resources : Austria 2016

    Theisens, Henno

    2016-01-01

    The effective use of school resources is a policy priority across OECD countries. The OECD Reviews of School Resources explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. The series considers four types of resources: financial resources, such as public funding of individual schools; human resources, such as teachers, school leaders and education administrators; physical resources, such as location, buildin...

  4. Generation 4 and the Nea

    Dujardin, T.

    2002-01-01

    In the previous edition of NEA News, W. D. Magwood of the US Department of Energy (DOE) outlined the future of nuclear energy in the context of the new US national energy policy. He cited the Generation IV initiative as a mechanism to implement a longer-term aspect of this policy. Although initiated in the US, the Generation IV initiative has quickly become an international effort and today ten countries are participating in the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). This article briefly reviews the context of Generation IV and describes NEA involvement in the Generation IV process. (author)

  5. How to access the Nea Data Bank Services

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The OECD/NEA data Bank collects, tests and distributes computer programs and numerical data in the field of nuclear energy applications. These codes cover: cross section and resonance integral calculations, spectrum calculations, generations of group constants and cell problems, static design studies, depletion, fuel management, cost analysis, and power plants economics, radiological safety, hazard and accident analysis, heat transfer and fluid flow, deformation and stress distributions, structural analysis and engineering design studies, gamma heating and shield design, reactor systems analysis, data preparation, processing and management, general mathematical and computing system routines, materials, environmental and earth sciences, electronics, engineering equipment and energy systems studies, chemistry, particles accelerators and high voltage machines, physics, magnetic fusion research

  6. OECD-FIRE PR02. OECD-FIRE database record structure

    Kolar, L.

    2005-12-01

    In the coding guidelines, the scope, format, and details of any record required to input a real fire event at a nuclear reactor unit to the international OECD-FIRE database are described in detail. The database was set up in the OECD-FIRE-PR02 code

  7. Experimental Results of A1.2 Test for OECD-ATLAS Project

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Park, Yu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Rok; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to meet the international interests in the multiple high-risk design extension conditions (DECs) raised after the Fukushima accident, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is operating an OECD/NEA project (hereafter, OECD-ATLAS project) by utilizing a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation). As for a prolonged SBO transient of the OECD-ATLAS project, two tests, named A1.1 and A1.2, were determined to be performed. In particular, passive safety systems are considered as the most promising alternatives to reinforce the safety and reliability of an ultimate heat removal system without any operator actions in the SBO transients. As one of the new safety improvement concepts to mitigate an SBO accident efficiently, a cooling and operational performance of the passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) is investigated in the framework of the OECD-ATLAS project to produce clearer knowledge of the actual phenomena and to provide the best guidelines for accident management. As the second test of the OECD-ATLAS project, the A1.2 test was conducted to simulate a prolonged SBO with asymmetric secondary cooling through the supply of passive auxiliary feedwater only to SG-2. When the collapsed water level of steam generator reached a wide range of 25%, PAFS was actuated. PAFS played a key role in cooling down the primary system by the heat transfer and the natural circulation. With the actuation of PAFS, the fluid temperatures at the core inlet and outlet started to decrease without any excursion of the maximum heater surface temperature in the core. This integral effect test data of A1.2 test can be used to evaluate the prediction capability of existing safety analysis codes and identify any code deficiency for an SBO simulation with an operation of a passive system such as PAFS.

  8. Contribution of the Nea data bank in the field of calculation codes in radiation protection, radio physics and dosimetry

    Kodeli, I.; Sartori, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear energy agency is a specialised agency of OECD (organization economic co-operation and development). These missions are to help its members to keep and improve by international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases necessary to a peaceful use of nuclear energy. Nea includes twenty eight countries. Nea works in collaboration with IAEA. The field of activities concerns the acquisition, validation and distribution of nuclear data, calculation codes and experiments. To help users, it organises conferences and training about the calculation codes that it shares out. (N.C.)

  9. Climate change policies in the OECD

    Staahle, C.

    1993-01-01

    The author focuses on the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development (UNCED), held in 1992 in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, and on carbon taxation. At the UNCED the Framework Convention on Climate Change was signed by 154 countries. This convention is intended to guide policy makers, and takes into account the great differences that exist between countries with regard to their ability to cater and pay for greenhouse gas emission reductions. It is pointed out that since 1985 the share of CO 2 emissions from non-OECD countries has exceeded that of OECD countries. An overview is given of stated OECD targets on CO 2 emission reductions. The global impact of reductions in OECD countries alone will be limited: if all targets are met, global emissions will be growing with 19% in the coming ten years, compared to 22% in a 'business-as-usual' scenario. It was noted that only very few OECD countries have developed action plans or implemented carbon taxes that could make their targets attainable. Details were given on carbon taxes now in place. It is concluded that no progress will be made if developing countries are not included in climate change policies. Also much work remains to be done in developed countries to meet emission reduction or stabilization targets. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. The NEA data bank - an international service centre for computer programs and nuclear data

    Nordborg, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialized agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) based in Paris. The most important purpose of NEA is the promotion of international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear power. Within the Agency a special unit, the so-called Database, allows the 21 member countries to have direct access to nuclear data, chemical data, and computer codes. These countries are Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Special agreements cover exchanges of data and codes with Canada, the United States of America, and IAEA. The NEA Database - maintains those databases which contain basic experimental and evaluated nuclear data, integral nuclear data, computer codes, and chemical thermodynamic data, - uses procedures of assured quality to store and maintain data and codes, - supplies as products internationally validated and licensed data and codes, - offers direct access to these products to scientists and engineers in national laboratories, universities, and in the nuclear industry. The services are available free of charge, and the databases can be accessed via the NEA web site (http://www.nea.fr). (orig.) [de

  11. Procedures for initiation, cost-sharing and management of OECD projects in nuclear safety

    2002-01-01

    The OECD (CSNI) projects aim to produce results relevant for the safe operation of nuclear power plants through international collaborative projects. In general, the projects consist of advanced experimental programmes that are conducted at specialized facilities. At present, the following OECD (CSNI) projects are in operation: - The Halden Project, covering fuel/materials and I and C/Human Factors issues; - The Cabri Project, addressing reactivity transients on high burnup fuels; - The MASCA Project, which deals with in-vessel corium phenomena; - The OLHF Project, dealing with lower head failure mechanisms; - The SETH Project addressing thermal-hydraulics issues, started in 2001; - The MCCI Project on ex-vessel coolability and melt-concrete interaction. There are significant differences among these projects in terms of their motivation, size and scope. The Halden Project and the Cabri Water Loop Project are large undertakings where the host organisations assume full and direct responsibility for the project establishment and administration - as well as for the negotiation with relevant parties on the terms of participation. In the other cases, instead, the NEA secretariat has a more direct responsibility, conferred by the CSNI, in establishing the project technical and financial basis, as well as for its implementation and administration. The objective of this procedure is to provide a common basis for the establishment and management of the OECD projects in the area of nuclear safety. It is a follow-up of a recommendation expressed by the CSNI Bureau during its meeting in October 2001, where the procedures for the establishment and management of the OECD (CSNI) projects in nuclear safety were addressed. While this procedure attempts at defining general guidelines for project initiation, financing and management, one should bear in mind that each project has its own motivation, background and framework. Thus, some degree of flexibility in project structure

  12. Links with NEA activities: Nuclear Data services and WPs

    Cabellos, O.

    2016-01-01

    During the last three years a significant number of international activities have been undertaken on Primary Radiation Damage (PRD): the Expert Group on Primary Radiation Damage belonging to the Working Party on Multi-scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Materials for Nuclear Systems (WPMM- OECD/NEA/NSC), Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections” (IAEA/NDS) and the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion within the Fusion for Energy (F4E) Program. NEA activities related to fuels and structural materials are coordinated by the Working Party on Multi-scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Materials for Nuclear Systems, WPMM. In May 2015, the Expert Group on “Primary Radiation Damage” reviewed the limitation of the NRT-dpa standard, and recommended a new improved standard of primary damage characteristics, the arc-dpa. Recently, the new Expert Group on Structural Materials Modelling (SMM) has been created to enhance efforts on the multiscale modelling approach applied to structural materials, in order to investigate phenomena that can not be studied experimentally, predicting how the nanostructure and the microchemistry changes under irradiation

  13. Overview of the OECD Halden reactor project

    Vitanza, C.

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is an international network dedicated to enhancing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. The project operates under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and aims at addressing and resolving issues relevant to safety as they emerge in the nuclear community. This paper gives a concise presentation of the project's goals and of its technical infrastructure. The paper also contains a brief overview of results from the ongoing programme and of the main issues contemplated for the next three-year programme period (2000-2002). (author)

  14. Manual for IRS Coding. Joint IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience

    2011-01-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). In early 2010, the IAEA and OECD/NEA jointly issued the IRS Guidelines, which described the reporting system and process and gave users the necessary elements to enable them to produce IRS reports to a high standard of quality while retaining the effectiveness of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. The purpose of the present Manual for IRS Coding is to provide supplementary guidance specifically on the coding element of IRS reports to ensure uniform coding of events that are reported through IRS. This Coding Manual does not supersede the IRS Guidelines, but rather, supports users and preparers in achieving a consistent and high level of quality in their IRS reports. Consistency and high quality in the IRS reports allow stakeholders to search and retrieve specific event information with ease. In addition, well-structured reports also enhance the efficient management of the IRS database. This Coding Manual will give specific guidance on the application of each section of the IRS codes, with examples where necessary, of when and how these codes are to be applied. As this reporting system is owned by the Member States, this manual has been developed and approved by the IRS National Coordinators with the assistance of the IAEA and NEA secretariats

  15. Lightcurve of NEA 1993 RA

    Vaduvescu, Ovidiu; Aznar Macias, Amadeo

    2018-01-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 1993 RA was observed with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in full Moon conditions for 8h total during three successive nights (2017 Oct 3-6). The composite lightcurve could be fit by a 3-order period P = 5.64 ± 0.01 h with amplitude of 0.13 mag; other solutions are possible.

  16. Nuclear Energy and Renewables: System Effects in Low-carbon Electricity Systems : Method comments to a NEA report

    Söder, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) released a new report on 29 November 2012. The study recommends that decision-makers should take full electricity system costs into account in energy choices and that such costs should be internalised according to a “generator pays” principle. The study, entitled Nuclear Energy and Renewables: System Effects in Low-carbon Electricity Systems, addresses the increasingly important interactions of variable renewables and dispatchable energy technologies, such as ...

  17. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD through its history; La Agencia de Energia Nuclear de la OCDE, a traves de su historia

    Echavarri, L.

    2008-07-01

    This year, 2008, marks the 50th Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). During these years the Agency has adapted to the evolution of the world energy situation. At the beginning the Agency launches international collaboration projects to establish the technological bases required for nuclear energy, then helps member countries in the construction of nuclear power plants and later analyzes the safety criteria as a consequence of the Three Miles Island and Chernobyl accidents. Based on this experience, the NEA faces the X XI Century prepared to contribute, even more, to a better international collaboration for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of the nuclear energy. (Author)

  18. OECD migration, welfare and skill selectivity

    Pedersen, Peder; Pytlikova, Mariola; Smith, Nina

    into 27 OECD countries over the period of 12 years, 1989-2000. Using a fixed effects panel data model, we analyze the determinants of the migration flows during the latest decade. We study whether there are significant selectivity effects in international migration flows, i.e. whether the countries...

  19. Explaining convergence of oecd welfare states

    Schmitt, C.; Starke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of conditional convergence helps to both better describe and explain the phenomenon. By applying error correction models, we examine conditional convergence of various types of social expenditure in 21 OECD countries between 1980 and 2005. Our empirical findings go beyond the existing literature in two respects...

  20. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Austria 2016

    Nusche, Deborah; Radinger, Thomas; Busemeyer, Marius R.; Theisens, Henno

    2016-01-01

    This report for Austria forms part of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the review is to explore how school resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school…

  1. Renewable energy and macroeconomic efficiency of OECD and non-OECD economies

    Chien, Taichen; Hu, Jin-Li

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes the effects of renewable energy on the technical efficiency of 45 economies during the 2001-2002 period through data envelopment analysis (DEA). In our DEA model, labor, capital stock, and energy consumption are the three inputs and real GDP is the single output. Increasing the use of renewable energy improves an economy's technical efficiency. Conversely, increasing the input of traditional energy decreases technical efficiency. Compared to non-OECD economies, OECD economies have higher technical efficiency and a higher share of geothermal, solar, tide, and wind fuels in renewable energy. However, non-OECD economies have a higher share of renewable energy in their total energy supply than OECD economies

  2. OECD - kvaliteedimärk kogu riigile / Keit Kasemets

    Kasemets, Keit

    2010-01-01

    Majanduskoostöö ja Arengu Organisatsiooni (OECD) liikme staatus loob Eesti majanduspoliitika ja teiste oluliste poliitikate arendamisel uusi võimalusi. OECD faktides, praegused liikmesriigid ja nende liitumisaeg

  3. OECD ukse avamine tooks siia raha / Harry Tuul

    Tuul, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Poola pensionifondid ei taha Eestisse investeerida, sest Eesti ei kuulu Majandusliku Koostöö ja Arengu Organisatsiooni. Vt. samas: OECD liikmeskond; Romet Kreek. OECD ukse avamine tooks siia raha. Kommenteerib Andre Nõmm

  4. IAEA/NEA incident reporting system (IRS). Reporting guidelines. Feedback from safety related operating experience for nuclear power plants

    1998-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. These guidelines have been jointly developed and approved by the NEA/IAEA

  5. Estonia ready to contribute to OECD / Ella Karapetyan

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2010-01-01

    Eestis visiidil viibinud OECD peasekretär Angel Gurria kohtus president Toomas Hendrik Ilvese ja peaminister Andrus Ansipiga. Kohtumistel räägiti Eesti liitumisest OECD-ga. Andrus Ansip ja Angel Gurria kirjutasid alla Eesti ühinemislepingule OECD-ga

  6. Fast burner reactor benchmark results from the NEA working party on physics of plutonium recycle

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a program proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed; fuel cycle scenarios using either PUREX/TRUEX (oxide fuel) or pyrometallurgical (metal fuel) separation technologies were specified. These benchmarks were designed to evaluate the nuclear performance and radiotoxicity impact of a transuranic-burning fast reactor system. International benchmark results are summarized in this paper; and key conclusions are highlighted

  7. Quarterly coal statistics of OECD countries

    1992-04-27

    These quarterly statistics contain data from the fourth quarter 1990 to the fourth quarter 1991. The first set of tables (A1 to A30) show trends in production, trade, stock change and apparent consumption data for OECD countries. Tables B1 to B12 show detailed statistics for some major coal trade flows to and from OECD countries and average value in US dollars. A third set of tables, C1 to C12, show average import values and indices. The trade data have been extracted or derived from national and EEC customs statistics. An introductory section summarizes trends in coal supply and consumption, deliveries to thermal power stations; electricity production and final consumption of coal and tabulates EEC and Japanese steam coal and coking coal imports to major countries.

  8. Resource recovery and recycling in OECD countries

    MacNeil, J.W.

    It was the importance of the economic issues relevant to resource recovery and re-use that prompted OECD to become involved in this general area, and the author proposes in this talk to describe the principal features of the three main approaches to waste management from an economic perspective. These approaches are reduction of waste generation (i.e. birth control) resource recovery and materials recycling or re-use (reincarnation). Most of OECD's work in this area to date has been on the third of these approaches with particular emphasis on the economics of recycling, so somewhat more attention will be devoted to it. Then some conclusions will be drawn concerning possible policy actions to encourage a rational approach to management of this resource.

  9. The contribution of nuclear energy co-operation to a new global age, OECD Headquarters, Paris, 30 September 1998

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Special Session to mark the Fortieth Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), held at the OECD Headquarters in Paris, on 30 September 1998. The conference emphasizes the role of the IAEA in enlarging the contribution of nuclear energy for peace and development, and ensuring that atomic energy is used at a high level of security and exclusively for peaceful purposes. The Agency was never intended to 'promote' nuclear energy in any commercial sense. Its role is to be an objective institution that serves as a centre for international norm development, standard setting, independent analysis, expert advice, technology transfer, and impartial oversight and verification. From this perspective, the Director General offers some views on why the international nuclear co-operation, complemented by regional and national activities, is an indispensable part of way forward, highlighting the following areas: energy, safety, verification, and technology transfer

  10. Broadband and Unbundling Regulations in OECD Countries

    Wallsten, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Broadband penetration and available speeds vary widely across OECD countries. Policymakers around the world, and especially in countries like the U.S. that lag in the rankings, are searching for policies to narrow those gaps. Relatively little empirical work tests possible reasons for these differences. In this paper I test the impacts of regulations and demographics on broadband development in a panel dataset across countries. In addition to adding to the meager empirical literature on broad...

  11. Globalization and Social Justice in OECD Countries

    Björn Kauder; Niklas Potrafke

    2015-01-01

    Social justice is a topic of importance to social scientists and also political decision makers. We examine the relationship between globalization and social justice as measured by a new indicator for 31 OECD countries. The results show that countries that experienced rapid globalization enjoy social justice. When the KOF index of globalization increases by one standard deviation, the social justice indicator increases by about 0.4 points (on a scale from 1 to 10). The policy implication is t...

  12. OECD-NEA’s New Approach to Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety

    Hah, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 in Japan has brought us new challenge to deal with “human” aspects of nuclear safety which have always been crucial elements of safety, but which often receive less attention than technical and equipment issues. The key factors that led to the accident were not only a huge tsunami following a massive earthquake, but also a variety of human failures: organizational decision-making, safety culture of the plant staff and the regulator, training to assure that operators are well prepared for a wide range of possible challenges. In order to fully understand and respond to the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, the OECD-NEA created a new Division of Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety (HANS) which is focusing on the human issues related to nuclear safety. The Division of HANS is responsible for supporting the relevant work programmes of the NEA; fostering greater focus and building expertise in areas vital to effective nuclear safety such as safety culture, personnel training policies and practices; and safety-related public communication and stakeholder engagement. In 2014, NEA produced the Green Booklet on the Characteristics of an Effective Nuclear Regulator noting that the characteristic of “safety focus and safety culture” was one of the four fundamental principles from which all regulatory body actions should be derived. Based on this understanding, in 2015, NEA published the follow up Green Booklet, Safety Culture of an Effective Nuclear Regulatory Body, providing main principles and attributes to be benchmarked for the regulatory bodies to encourage them to enhance their effectiveness as they fulfil their mission to protect public health and safety. Many challenges exist to regulatory bodies’ safety culture which must be recognised, understood and overcome. Continuing collective efforts could help turn these challenges into opportunities to further strengthen the overall health of the safety culture of regulatory

  13. Energy demand in seven OECD countries

    Patry, M.

    1990-01-01

    The intensity of utilization of energy has been declining in all OECD countries since the first oil price shock of 1973. In 1988, the OECD countries were consuming 1.7 billion tonnes of crude oil, that is two hundred million tonnes less than fifteen years ago. From 1974 to 1988, OECD oil consumption decreased at an average annual rate of 1.3% while the GDP of these countries rose by an average of 2.6% per annum. The authors present here a model of sectoral energy demand and interfuel substitution for the G-7 countries: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. The ultimate goal is to determine the relative importance of the contributing factors to the observed reversal in energy consumption per unit of production in these countries. The results they present should be viewed as preliminary. They point in the paper to a number of extensions that should improve the theoretical quality of the modeling effort and the statistical robustness of the results. They are presently expanding the data set to pinpoint more adequately the effects of structural change and conservation

  14. Nuclear legislation analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD member countries. Volume II

    1984-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This volume II of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. This volume also contains tables of international conventions of relevance to the nuclear field. (NEA) [fr

  15. INNOVATION POLICY FEATURES IN THE OECD COUNTRIES

    Ivan Anisimov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyze the innovation policy features in the OECD countries and give the basic framework which defines rights and obligations of intellectual property rights (IPRs owners. Governments play an important role in determining demand-side policies, such as smart regulations, standards, consumer education, taxation and public procurement that can affect innovation. Because demand linked to supply, policies that affect both need to be better harnessed to drive long-term innovation and sustainable growth. Policies to stimulate innovation require taking account of changes in the international economy and the transformation of innovation processes. To transform invention into innovation requires a range of activities. Innovation now encompasses much more than research and development (R&D, albeit R&D remains vitally important. Methodology. The data for the paper is taken from the publications and reports of the European Commission, OECD, World Bank etc. In the paper the descriptive analysis, supported by the quantitative analysis is applied. Results. It is identified that rises in R&D intensity and innovation are driven by such factors: reduction of anti-competitive market regulations, which promotes business R&D and strengthens the incentives for innovations; stable economic conditions and low interest rates which encourage the growth of inno vation activity by creating a low-cost environment for investment in innovation; availability of internal and external finance. Practical implication. It is given the basic legal framework which defines rights and obligations of IPR owners: reviewing exemptions to copyright in the light of the internet’s different uses; clarifying exemptions for research use; promoting an active and open commercialization policy for universities; encouraging the commercialization and monetization of IPR: for example draft licensing contracts, valuation standards; standards: encouraging pooling

  16. Housing market volatility in the OECD area

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    Vector-autoregressive models are used to decompose housing returns in 18 OECD countries into cash flow (rent) news and discount rate (return) news over the period 1970-2011. For the jajority of countries news about future returns is the main driver, and both real interest rates and risk-premia play...... an important role in accounting for housing market volatility. Bivariate cross-country correlations and principal components analyses indicate that part of the return movements have a common factor among the majority of countries. We explain the results in terms of global changes in credit constraints...

  17. IRS Guidelines: Joint IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience

    2010-01-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on lessons learned from operating and construction experience at the international level. This information could be related to issues and events that are related to safety. The purpose of these guidelines is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the effectiveness of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. As this system is owned by the Member States, the IRS Guidelines have been developed and approved by the IRS National Co-ordinators with the assistance of both Secretariats (IAEA/NEA).

  18. The International Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Systems database – TIETHYS: A new NEA validation tool

    Rohatgi, Upendra S.

    2018-07-22

    Nuclear reactor codes require validation with appropriate data representing the plant for specific scenarios. The thermal-hydraulic data is scattered in different locations and in different formats. Some of the data is in danger of being lost. A relational database is being developed to organize the international thermal hydraulic test data for various reactor concepts and different scenarios. At the reactor system level, that data is organized to include separate effect tests and integral effect tests for specific scenarios and corresponding phenomena. The database relies on the phenomena identification sections of expert developed PIRTs. The database will provide a summary of appropriate data, review of facility information, test description, instrumentation, references for the experimental data and some examples of application of the data for validation. The current database platform includes scenarios for PWR, BWR, VVER, and specific benchmarks for CFD modelling data and is to be expanded to include references for molten salt reactors. There are place holders for high temperature gas cooled reactors, CANDU and liquid metal reactors. This relational database is called The International Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Systems (TIETHYS) database and currently resides at Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD and is freely open to public access. Going forward the database will be extended to include additional links and data as they become available. https://www.oecd-nea.org/tiethysweb/

  19. Budgeting and Accounting in OECD Education Systems: A Literature Review. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 128

    Fakharzadeh, Tala

    2016-01-01

    Recent demographic, economic and political trends have drawn attention to the issue of effectiveness and efficiency in the use of resources in the education sector. In the context of the renewed interest for the optimisation of resource use, this paper attempts to review the literature on budgeting and accounting in OECD education systems. The…

  20. Education and Obesity in Four OECD Countries. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 39

    Sassi, Franco; Devaux, Marion; Church, Jody; Cecchini, Michele; Borgonovi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of obesity has been developing in virtually all OECD countries over the last 30 years. Existing evidence provides strong suggestions that such epidemic has affected certain social groups more than others. In particular, education appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of obesity, especially among women. A range of analyses of…

  1. Protective measures adopted in OECD member countries in response to the Chernobyl accident

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines the measures for exposure prevention taken in West European countries following the Chernobyl power plant accident. In particular, the radioactivity regulation levels for foods (derived intervention levels) adopted in these countries are described in detail, citing from the reports of the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health of OECD/NEA (The Radiological Impact of the Chernobyl Accident in OECD Countries) and an scientific seminar held by EC (International Scientific Seminar on Foodstuffs Intervention Levels Following a Nuclear Accident). It is pointed out that these countries rather largely vary in measures taken and the derived intervention levels adopted although the principles for radiation protection which provide the basis for emergency protection measures must be nearly the same in all of the countries. It is necessary to establish consistent standards in each country in consideration of an accident, like the one at Chernobyl, that may have global effects. The ICRP recommendations and IAEA safety guidelines so far are centered on ''near-field'' measures to be taken in areas near an accident site. Thus, studies should be made to establish measures to be taken in areas far from the site. (Nogami, K.)

  2. Energy balances of OECD countries 1970/1982

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The present volume provides standardized energy balance sheets expressed in a common unit of tons of oil equivalent for all OECD Countries. It covers the years 1970 to 1982 year by year and includes many revisions and additions to data previously published. The balances in the present volume are based on data published in OECD Energy Statistics 1971-1981 and OECD Energy Statistics 1981-1982. Tables for each OECD Country include production, import, export, consumption by the different industries, transportation, agriculture, residential sector of the different energies: solid fuels, petroleum, gas, nuclear power and hydroelectricity [fr

  3. Over a decade of nuclear emergency management at the Nea

    Ahier, B.

    2005-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has a long tradition of expertise in the area of nuclear emergency policy, planning, preparedness and management. Through its activities in this field, the Agency offers its member countries unbiased assistance on nuclear preparedness matters, with a view to facilitating improvements in nuclear emergency preparedness strategies and response at the international level. The 1986 Chernobyl accident demonstrated that nuclear accidents can have international consequences, highlighting the need for international co-operation, and leading to improvements in the areas of international communication, information exchange and harmonization of response actions between countries. From its inception, the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters has focused on improving the effectiveness of international nuclear emergency preparedness and management. Part of its work programme is set on exploring and developing new concepts and future procedures to enhance national and international preparedness and response management. A central approach to this has been the preparation and conduct of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series. The role and strategies of exercises and future directions are discussed in this presentation. (A.L.B.)

  4. Participation in benchmark MATIS-H of NEA/OCDE: uses CFD codes applied to nuclear safety. Study of the spacer grids in the fuel elements

    Pena-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S.; Munoz-cobo, J. L.; Vela, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops participation in benchmark MATIS-H, promoted by the NEA / OECD-KAERI, involving the study of turbulent flow in a rod beam with spacers in an experimental installation. Its aim is the analysis of hydraulic behavior of turbulent flow in the subchannels of the fuel elements, essential for the improvement of safety margins in normal and transient operations and to maximize the use of nuclear energy through an optimal design of grids.

  5. Energy Balances of OECD Countries 2012 Edition

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This volume contains data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste presented as comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Complete data are available for 2009 and 2010 and supply estimates are available for the most recent year (i.e.2011). Historical tables summarise production, trade and final consumption data as well as key energy and economic indicators. The book also includes definitions of products and flows, explanatory notes on the individual country data and conversion factors from original units to energy units. More detailed data in original units are published in the 2012 edition of Energy Statistics of OECD Countries, the sister volume of this publication.

  6. Fessenheim simulator for OECD Halden Reactor Project

    Oudot, G.; Bonnissent, B.

    1998-01-01

    A full scope NPP simulator is presently under manufacture by THOMSON TRAINING and SIMULATION (TTandS) in Cergy (France) for the OECD HALDEN REACTOR PROJECT. The reference plant of this simulator is the Fessenheim CP0 PWR power plant operated by the French utility EDF, for which TTandS has delivered a full scope training simulator in mid 1997. The simulator for HALDEN Reactor Project is based on a software duplication of the Fessenheim simulator delivered to EDF, ported on the most recent computers and O.S. available. This paper outlines the main features of this new simulator generation which reaps benefit of the advanced technologies of the SIPA design simulator introduced inside a full scope simulator. This kind of simulator is in fact the synthesis between training and design simulators and offers therefore added technical capabilities well suited to HALDEN needs. (author)

  7. IMMIGRATION GROWTH TENDENCIES IN OECD COUNTRIES

    Imran SARIHASAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immigration became one of the relevant economic topics in recent years. Over the centuries millions of people have migrated, despite the physical, cultural etc. obstacles, to other lands in search of better lives for themselves and their children. In the context of development, globalization and labor market mobility, it is necessary to further analyze the determinants and consequences of migration not only on the host country, but also on the sending country. The increased interest and availability of data keeps this subject in the attention of economists all over the world. In this case an increase in immigration became very significant ıssue for policymakers. The aims of this study are to describe immigration growth tendencies and to answer how much is the average growth rate of foreıgn born population. Thus, in order to measure the native and foreign-born unemployed migrants, twenty-seven OECD countries were used in this research paper.

  8. Vabariigi president kohtus OECD peasekretäriga

    2008-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilves kohtus 12. veebruaril 2008 Tallinnas Majandusliku Koostöö ja Arengu Organisatsiooni (OECD) peasekretäri Angel Gurria'ga, tänades teda panuse eest organisatsiooni laienemispoliitika edendamisel. Ilmunud ka: Meie Kodu 20. veebr. 2008, lk. 3, pealk.: President Ilves kohtus OECD peasekretäriga (Allk. Kristel Peterson)

  9. OECD, "Key Competencies" and the New Challenges of Educational Inequality

    Takayama, Keita

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I develop a critique of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)-based lifelong learning policy discourse with a particular focus on "key competencies" (KCs) and its equity implications for school curricular policies. First, I review the discussion of KCs in the writings by the OECD-affiliated…

  10. Nye OECD-retningslinjer for transfer pricing dokumentation

    Rossing, Christian Plesner

    2015-01-01

    er vedtaget, erstatte det nuværende kapitel V om transfer pricing dokumentation i ‘OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Administrations’. De gældende danske regler for transfer pricing dokumentation baserer sig på de eksisterende OECD-retningslinjer, og det må...

  11. Experimental Results of A1.1 Test for OECD-ATLAS Project

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Park, Yu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Rok; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is operating an OECD/NEA project (hereafter, OECD-ATLAS project) by utilizing a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation). Considering the importance of the SBO scenario and the related accident mitigation measures, a prolonged SBO scenario was selected as the first test subject worthy of investigation in the OECD-ATLAS project as summarized in Table 1. After the Fukushima accident, design extension conditions (DECs) such as an SBO and a total loss of feed water (TLOFW) attracted wide international attention in that such high-risk multiple failure accidents should be revisited from the viewpoint of the reinforcement of the 'defense in depth' concept. In particular, an SBO is one of the most important DECs because a total loss of heat sink can lead to a core melt-down scenario under high pressure without any proper operator action. As for a prolonged SBO transient of the OECD-ATLAS project, two tests, named A1.1 and A1.2, were determined to be performed. In most nuclear power plants (NPPs), a turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater system was designed to remove the decay heat during the early period of an SBO transient. From a conservative point of view, however, it is necessary to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of the NPP when a turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater supply is not available during the initial period of an SBO transient and moreover a mobile pump-driven auxiliary feedwater supply can only become realized in the later period of the scenario. In particular, asymmetric heat removal characteristic through the supply of auxiliary feedwater only to one steam generator has its own peculiar importance in terms of safety analysis code validation. With an aim of considering these safety importance, in the A1.1 test, a prolonged SBO transient was simulated with two temporal phases: Phase (I) for a conservative SBO transient

  12. International co-operation on decommissioning - Achievements of the NEA Co-operative programme 1985-1990

    1992-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is attracting a growing interest in all countries where an increasing number of plants are reaching the end of their operational life and will have to be decommissioned in the next few years. In response to this interest, the NEA set up in 1985 an international programme of technical co-operation between decommissioning projects in eight OECD countries. This report describes the programme and the participating projects, reviews the experiences accumulated during the first five-year term of this international undertaking, and discusses what remains to be done

  13. Human exploration of NEA: why and how?

    Viscio, M. A.; Casacci, C.; Ferro, C.

    The human exploration of multiple deep space destinations, and among them Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), in view of the final challenge of sending astronauts to Mars, represents a current and consistent study domain. NEAs represent interesting targets, not only for the high level scientific return of such missions, but also for advanced technologies demonstration. Accordingly, the NEA mission described in this paper is conceived as an intermediate step before a human mission to the Red Planet and, in this regard, several technologies required for Mars are implemented, in order to test and validate them in significant environment, but at a closer and easier destination. Another crucial aspect to be considered, when dealing with asteroids, is related to planetary defense: even if the probability of an impact with the Earth is very low, this possibility does actually exist. A human mission as the one described in this paper would represent a chance for the development and test of technologies and techniques to be used for asteroid collision avoidance. The paper starts discussing the main objectives of a NEA mission, highlighting the benefits of the human presence. A reference human mission is then described, in terms of strategy, architecture and concept of operations, with particular attention to NEA collision avoidance issue. In the last part, the idea of exploiting virtual reality in support of the mission definition and execution is discussed.

  14. Benchmark on hydrogen distribution in a containment based on the OECD-NEA THAI HM-2 experiment

    Schwarz, S.; Fischer, K.; Bentaib, A.

    2009-01-01

    Within the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear power plant, hydrogen can be generated in the primary circuit and released into the containment. Considering the possibility of a deflagration, the simulation of the hydrogen distribution in the containment by computer codes is of major importance. In order to create a data base for code validation, several distribution experiments using helium and hydrogen have been performed in the German THAI (Thermal-Hydraulics, Hydrogen, Aerosols, Iodine) facility. They started with the ISP-47 test TH13 and were followed by the HM (Hydrogen-Helium Material Scaling Tests) series. The objectives of the HM Tests are to confirm the transferability of existing helium distribution test data to hydrogen distribution problems, to understand the processes that lead to the formation and dissolution of a light cloud stratification. The test HM-2 was chosen for a code benchmark. During the first phase of test HM-2 a light gas cloud consisting of hydrogen and nitrogen was established in the upper half of the facility. In the second phase steam was injected at a lower position inducing a rising steam - nitrogen plume. The plume did not break through the cloud, because its density was higher than the density of the cloud. Therefore the cloud was gradually dissolved from its bottom. Eleven organisations performed 'blind' calculations to the HM-2 experiment. The lumped parameter (LP) codes ASTEC, COCOSYS and MELCOR and the CFD codes FLUENT, GASFLOW and GOTHIC were used. The main phenomena were natural convection, interaction between the rising plume and the light gas cloud, steam condensation on walls, fog behaviour and the heat up of the walls. The experimental data of the first phase had been published and the atmospheric stratification was simulated reasonably well. The data from the second phase stayed concealed until the simulated results were submitted. The thermal-hydraulic phenomena were predicted well by several LP- and CFD-contributions, whereas the time intervals needed to dissolve the light gas cloud were either under- or over-predicted. However the other LP- and CFD-contributions showed larger deviations to the measured data. Reasons for deviations were identified, and model improvements were demonstrated in open post test calculations. (author)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Republic of Korea

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection) (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Education, Science and Technology, including the Nuclear Energy Bureau; Minister of Knowledge Economy); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission; Atomic Energy Safety Commission); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI; Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety - KINS; Korean Electric Power Company - KEPCO; Korean Hydro and Nuclear Power - KHNP)

  16. ISP-31 OECD/NEA/CSNI International Standard Problem n.31. Cora-13 experiment on severe fuel damage. Comparison report

    Firnhaber, M.; Trambauer, K.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1993-07-01

    The severe fuel damage experiment CORA-13 has been offered as CSNI-International Standard Problem (ISP) No. 31. The out-of-pile experiment CORA-13 was executed in November 1990 at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The major objectives of this experiment were to investigate the behavior of PWR fuel elements during early core degradation and fast cooldown due to refill. Measured quantities are boundary conditions, bundle temperatures, hydrogen generation and the final bundle configuration. The ISP was conducted as a blind exercise. Boundary conditions which could not be measured, but which are necessary for simplified test simulation (axial power profile, shroud insulation temperature, bundle refill flow) were estimated using ATHLET-CD. Results to the ISP were submitted by 9 participants using different versions of SCDAP/RELAP5, and codes such as FRAS-SFD, ICARE2, KESS-III, MELCOR. The thermal behavior up to significant oxidation has been predicted quite well by most of the codes. In general, the capability of the codes in calculating the main degradation phenomena has been clearly illustrated and weaknesses concerning the modelling of some degradation processes have been identified. Among the degradation phenomena involved in the test, the more severe limitations concern the UO 2 -ZrO 2 dissolution by molten Zr, the solubility limits in the resulting U-Zr-O mixture and the cladding failure by the molten mixture

  17. ISP 22 OECD/NEA/CSNI International standard problem n. 22. Evaluation of post-test analyses

    1992-07-01

    The present report deals with the open re-evaluation of the originally double-blind CSNI International Standard Problem 22 based on the test SP-FW-02 performed in the SPES facility. The SPES apparatus is an experimental simulator of the Westinghouse PWR-PUN plant. The test SP-FW-02 (ISP22) simulates a complete loss of feedwater with delayed injection of auxiliary feedwater. The main parts of the report are: outline of the test facility and of the SP-FW-02 experiment; overview of pre-test activities; overview of input models used by post-test participants; evaluation of participant predictions; evaluation of qualitative and quantitative code accuracy of pre-test and post-test calculations

  18. ZZ-PBMR-400, OECD/NEA PBMR Coupled Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics Transient Benchmark - The PBMR-400 Core Design

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Description of benchmark: This international benchmark, concerns Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transients based on the PBMR-400 MW design. The deterministic neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and transient analysis tools and methods available to design and analyse PBMRs lag, in many cases, behind the state of the art compared to other reactor technologies. This has motivated the testing of existing methods for HTGRs but also the development of more accurate and efficient tools to analyse the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic behaviour for the design and safety evaluations of the PBMR. In addition to the development of new methods, this includes defining appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The scope of the benchmark is to establish well-defined problems, based on a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark exercise has the following objectives: - Establish a standard benchmark for coupled codes (neutronics/thermal-hydraulics) for PBMR design; - Code-to-code comparison using a common cross section library ; - Obtain a detailed understanding of the events and the processes; - Benefit from different approaches, understanding limitations and approximations. Major Design and Operating Characteristics of the PBMR (PBMR Characteristic and Value): Installed thermal capacity: 400 MW(t); Installed electric capacity: 165 MW(e); Load following capability: 100-40-100%; Availability: ≥ 95%; Core configuration: Vertical with fixed centre graphite reflector; Fuel: TRISO ceramic coated U-235 in graphite spheres; Primary coolant: Helium; Primary coolant pressure: 9 MPa; Moderator: Graphite; Core outlet temperature: 900 C.; Core inlet temperature: 500 C.; Cycle type: Direct; Number of circuits: 1; Cycle efficiency: ≥ 41%; Emergency planning zone: 400 meters. The PBMR functions under a direct Brayton cycle with primary coolant helium flowing downward through the core and exiting at 900 C. The helium then enters the turbine relinquishing energy to drive the electric generator and compressors. After leaving the turbine, the helium then passes consecutively through the LP primary side of the recuperator, then the pre-cooler, the low pressure compressor, inter-cooler, high pressure compressor and then on to the HP secondary side of the recuperator before re-entering the reactor vessel at 500 C. Power is adjusted by regulating the mass flow rate of gas inside the primary circuit. This is achieved by a combination of compressor bypass and system pressure changes. Increasing the pressure results in an increase in mass flow rate, which results in an increase in the power removed from the core. Power reduction is achieved by removing gas from the circuit. A Helium Inventory Control System is used to provide an increase or decrease in system pressure. The benchmark is divided into Phases and Exercises as follows: Phase I: Steady State Benchmark Calculational Cases; Exercise 1: Neutronics Solution with Fixed Cross Sections ; Exercise 2: Thermal Hydraulic solution with given power / heat sources; Exercise 3: Combined neutronics thermal hydraulics calculation - starting condition for the transients. Phase II: Transient benchmark: Exercise 1: De-pressurised Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) without SCRAM; Exercise 2 : De-pressurised Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) with SCRAM; Exercise 3: Pressurised Loss of Forced Cooling (PLOFC) with SCRAM; Exercise 4 : 100-40-100 Load Follow; Exercise 5: Fast Reactivity Insertion - Control Rod Withdrawal (CRW) and Control Rod Ejection (CRE) scenarios at hot full power conditions; Exercise 6 : Cold Helium Inlet

  19. SOAR on Containment Thermal-hydraulics and Hydrogen Distribution - Prepared by an OECD/NEA Group of Experts

    Karwat, Helmut; Bardelay, Joel; Hashimoto, Takashi; Koroll, Grant W.; Krause, Matt; L'Heriteau, Jean-Pierre; Lundstroem, Petra; Notafrancesco, Allen; Royl, Peter; Schwinges, Bernd; Tezuka, Hiroko; Tills, Jack; Royen, Jacques

    1999-06-01

    During the course of severe accidents in water-cooled nuclear power plants, large amounts of hydrogen could be generated and released into the containment. The formation of hydrogen inevitably accompanies any core degradation process. The problem may be amplified by the less-likely core-concrete interaction during a subsequent basemat erosion. The integrity of the containment could be challenged by certain hydrogen combustion modes if no mitigative measures were available. International consensus is that a detailed knowledge of containment thermal-hydraulics is necessary to analyse the effectiveness of hydrogen mitigation methods, even though, at present, there are no generally accepted requirements for this purpose. During the last decade, considerable international efforts have been undertaken to better understand the associated problems by executing a large number of experiments and subjecting the test results to extensive analytical assessment. The CSNI Principal Working Group 4 at its meeting in September 1995 proposed to CSNI to draft a state-of-the-art-report (SOAR) on 'Containment Thermal-hydraulics and Hydrogen Distribution'. CSNI had endorsed the preparation of such a SOAR at its November 1995 meeting. The mandate for this SOAR can be best illustrated by several guiding questions that had been raised and discussed during earlier meetings of PWG4 and its Task Group on Severe Accident Phenomena in Containment (SAC): - What had been learnt from recent International Standard Problem (ISP) exercises on containment thermal-hydraulics and hydrogen distribution? - What could be concluded about the codes' abilities to predict the containment thermal behaviour from ISPs and from other related tests for plant application? - How should remaining uncertainties be best handled? - What more needs to be done, if anything? Consequently, the main objectives of this SOAR are: 1. to assess the current capabilities to make relevant predictions for the plant assessment of existing and future containments with respect to pressure, temperature and gas concentration-distribution inside the containment under severe accident conditions; and 2. to address strengths and weaknesses of analytical methods realized in codes that are in use to predict the effectiveness of a chosen mitigation technique (e.g., lumped-parameter codes or three-dimensional (3D) field codes) or both taking into account important simulation uncertainties. The report is structured into several parts. Chapter 2 on Relevant Technical Aspects and Key Requirements provides a brief description of relevant hydrogen mitigation techniques. Chapter 3 describes phenomena relevant to containment thermal-hydraulics and hydrogen distribution under severe accident conditions and evaluates the advantage of phenomena's identification and ranking tables (PIRTs) to streamline the assessment of the available experimental and analytical research activities. Chapter 4 assesses more Recent Experimental Activities investigating the mentioned phenomena and evaluating the suitability of experimental results obtained from various test rigs to serve for code validation purposes and eventually derive the need for further experiments in the near future. Relevant experimental works, preferably for phenomena ranked high in Chapter 3, are described and assessed. Specific attention is devoted to the experimental boundary conditions and scaling effects. Code Development and Application Activities are discussed in Chapter 5, where specific attention is devoted to the findings obtained from the comparisons of code results with the aforementioned experiments, and in specific from the ISP activities. In addition, recommendations focusing on the applicability of different types of codes to serve as basis for the selection and design of particular mitigation techniques are derived. Finally, in Chapter 6 Remaining Uncertainties Derived from Experimental and Analytical Experience, evaluated from existing experimental and analytical evidence, are discussed with specific focus on code application for containments of nuclear power plants (NPPs), to support subsequent general recommendations and the conclusions drawn for necessary or desirable future research activities

  20. NEA Activities in Preserving, Evaluating and Applying Data from Fast Reactor Experiments

    Gulliford, N.T.; Cornet, S.M.; Hill, I.; Yamaji, A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the area of nuclear science is to help member countries identify, collate, develop and disseminate the basic scientific and technical knowledge required to ensure safe and reliable operation of current nuclear systems and to develop next generation technologies. Within these general goals, the current nuclear science programme has three key objectives: (i) to help advance the existing scientific knowledge needed to enhance the performance and safety of current nuclear systems, (ii) to contribute to building a solid scientific and technical basis for the development of future generation nuclear systems and (iii) to support the preservation of essential knowledge in the field of nuclear science. As part of the second and third of these objectives, an extensive programme of work to preserve and evaluate data from integral experiments has been established, including reactor physics, shielding and criticality safety experiments on fast reactor systems. Data from experimental facilities are reviewed and, if necessary, archives of information are made safe. This may typically involve the indexing and scanning of key documents and archiving of logbooks, for example. Selected experiments go through a detailed evaluation process and where deemed appropriate, a benchmark description is created in a standardized format for inclusion in one of the NEA Data Bank international databases. This information is used extensively by the international nuclear science community to validate their modelling and simulation tools. The process can be viewed as part of a broader knowledge management function, where information is gathered, evaluated, linked and made accessible to a wide range of users. The presentation gives details of the main databases maintained and developed by the NEA, focusing on those related to fast reactor applications. The status of recent preservation activities for fast reactor archives in the United Kingdom is

  1. Oil demand asymmetry in the OECD

    Shealy, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Oil demand asymmetry exists, is significant, and can be captured with a simple demand equation using a Pmax term. The unstable parameters of the original symmetric equations suggest misspecification. Addition of a Pmax term to represent asymmetry yields stable parameters from 1982 through 1989 and so suggests proper specification. Asymmetry is significant because the short-run (and long-run) price elasticity is less than half as large when oil price falls as when price rises beyond the past peak. The lower elasticity applies both to price decreases and also to price increases for which price remains below the past peak. As long as the real oil price remains well below the 1981 peak, asymmetry implies that OECD oil demand should be less sensitive to oil price variations than in 1981. More specifically, the results shown suggest that today's oil demand elasticity should be less than half as large as the elasticity for a price increase in 1981. Forecasts from the asymmetric equations are significantly higher than the DOE base-case forecast. DOE's lower forecast is due to greater price asymmetry through 1995 and to higher long-run price elasticity beyond 1995. One reason for the higher long-run price elasticity might be greater assumed improvements in energy-efficiency than implied by the historical data

  2. NEA, Nuclear law and information processing

    Reyners, P.

    1977-01-01

    NEA has for many years now been collating information on, and analysing, laws and regulations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and this work has resulted in a series of publications. However, as seen by the multiplication of computer-based legal information centres, both at national and international level, conventional information systems are no longer adequate to deal with the increasing volume of information and with users' needs. In view of the particular aspects of nuclear law and of its own availabilities, NEA has endeavoured to make the best possible use of existing structures by opting for participation in the IAEA International Nuclear Information System rather than by creating a specialised centre. Before becoming operational, the arrangements concluded between NEA and IAEA required that the INIS rules be altered somewhat to take account of the specific problems raised by treatment of legal literature and also to improve the quality of information provided to users. (auth.) [fr

  3. NEA activities in 1980. 9. Activity Report

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1980 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, nuclear safety research and licensing, nuclear law, nuclear development and fuel cycle studies technical co-operation, nuclear science organisation and administration are reviewed

  4. OECD : Euroopa peaks laenuraha odava hoidma / Sirje Rank

    Rank, Sirje, 1966-

    2002-01-01

    USA majanduse kiire toibumine võib varsti tuua laenuintresside tõusu, Euroopa Keskpank peaks vähemalt aasta lõpuni ootama ja laskma kasvul juurduda. Diagramm: OECD tõstis majanduskasvu prognoosi. Maksukoormus

  5. Taxation, business environment and FDI location in OECD countries

    Hájková, Dana; Nicoletti, G.; Vartia, L.; Yoo, K.-Y.

    Č. 502 (2006), s. 1-33 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : taxation * business environment * foreign direct investment Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.oecd.org/eco/working_papers

  6. Kajian Perbandingan Tax Treaty Model: OECD, UN, dan US

    Rachmawati, Dyna

    2003-01-01

    The needs of tax treaty arise as International trade growth rapidly due to advancement of information technology. Taxa imposed on income derived from International trade are double. Tax treaty or tax convention is bilateral agreement for the avoidance of double taxation. This agreement arranges taxation rights. There are 3 (three) tax treaty model, which is used as reference to make bilateral agreement for the avoidance of double taxation. The first one is OECD Model made by The OECD...

  7. The (New) OECD Jobs Study: Introduction and Assessment

    Alfred Stiglbauer

    2006-01-01

    In 1994, the OECD presented the Jobs Study analyzing the causes of high unemployment in Europe. The study identified inappropriate labor market regulations and legislation as a key determinant of high unemployment. The OECD recommended deregulation and liberalization of labor market institutions as a remedy. Meanwhile, new empirical research has explored the influence of labor market institutions on unemployment and has only partly confirmed the recommendations of the Jobs Study. In a reevalu...

  8. Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries

    1987-01-01

    This report assesses the possible bearing of the Chernobyl accident on the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries. It discusses analyses of the accident performed in several countries as well as improvements to the safety of RBMK reactors announced by the USSR. Several remaining questions are identified. The report compares RBMK safety features with those of commercial reactors in OECD countries and evaluates a number of issues raised by the Chernobyl accident

  9. Labor market deregulation and globalization: empirical evidence from OECD countries

    Potrafke , Niklas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This paper empirically investigates the influence of globalization on various aspects of labor market deregulation. I employ the data set by Bassanini and Duval (2006) on labor market institutions in OECD countries and the KOF index of globalization. The data set covers 20 OECD countries in the 1982?2003 period. The results suggest that globalization did neither influence the unemployment replacement rate, the unemployment benefit length, public expenditures on ALMP, the t...

  10. Japan and the OECD - a lesson for Romania

    Iustina Luţan

    2007-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is a unique forum where the governments of 30 market democracies work together to address the economic, social and governance challenges of globalisation as well as to exploit its opportunities. One of the most important advantages of the OECD over other intergovernmental organizations or academia is the fact that the work, expertise, and know-how is transferred from a wide range of participants, like member countries, senior o...

  11. The NEA's Early Conflict over Educational Freedom

    Cain, Timothy Reese

    2009-01-01

    In the modern era, the National Education Association (NEA) is committed to the rights of teachers and faculty members to teach, undertake research, and lead fully political lives without fear of retribution. This devotion can be seen in policy statements, legislative activities, and the pages of "Thought and Action," its journal devoted to higher…

  12. The NEA Nuclear Innovation 2050 Initiative

    Rayment, Fiona; ); Deffrennes, Marc; )

    2017-01-01

    The NEA launched its Nuclear Innovation 2050 (NI2050) Initiative with the aim of identifying research and development (R and D) strategies and associated priorities to achieve commercial readiness of innovative, sustainable nuclear fission technologies in a fast and cost-effective way. As defined at the beginning of the process, these R and D strategies would be elaborated with NEA stakeholders at large, in particular involving nearly all NEA committees, nuclear research organisations, industry, regulators and technical safety organisations. The NI2050 Initiative has evolved over the last year to become an NEA incubator for the selection and development of a number of large nuclear fission R and D programs (and infrastructures) that can support the role of nuclear energy in a low carbon future, mainly by accelerating innovation and the market deployment of technologies. This article provides a brief overview and the next steps of the initiative, which has reached the stage where more concrete outcomes might now be expected, in particular in terms of programs of action to be proposed for co-operative implementation

  13. Coal Consumption and Economic Growth: Panel Cointegration and Causality Evidence from OECD and Non-OECD Countries

    Taeyoung Jin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between coal consumption and economic growth for 30 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries and 32 non-OECD countries for 1990–2013 using a multivariate dependent panel analysis. For the analysis, we conducted the common factor defactorization process, unit root test, cointegration test, long-run cointegrating vector, and Granger causality test. Our results suggest the following: First, there is no long-run relationship between coal consumption and economic growth in OECD countries; however, in non-OECD countries, the relationship does exist. Second, excessive coal usage may hinder economic growth in the long run. Lastly, the growth hypothesis (coal consumption affects economic growth positively is supported in the short run for non-OECD countries. As coal consumption has a positive effect on economic growth in the short run and a negative effect in the long run, energy conservation policies may have adverse effects only in the short run. Thus, non-OECD countries should gradually switch their energy mix to become less coal-dependent as they consider climate change. Moreover, a transfer of technology and financial resources from developed to developing countries must be encouraged at a global level.

  14. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 8. Activity Report. 1979

    1980-01-01

    This work is concerned with trends in nuclear power, the international impact of the Harrisburg accident radiation protection, radioactive waste management safety research for reactors, nuclear law, nuclear fuel cycle studies, technical cooperation and the NEA data bank

  15. A review of the IEA/NEA Projected Costs of Electricity – 2015 edition

    Khatib, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    The IEA/NEA recently issued their eighth edition of the Study on the “Projected Costs of Generating Electricity” – 2015 edition. The Study is mainly concerned with calculating the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE). The LCOE calculations are based on a levelised average life time cost approach using the discounted cash flow (DCF) method. The analysis was this year, and for the first time, performed using three discount rates (3%, 7%, and 10%). The LCOE can serve as a tool for calculating the cost of different generation technologies. However the Study's usefulness is affected by its narrow base of a limited set of countries that are not necessarily representative. It ignored the negative role of subsidies and did not provide a methodology for selective application of the discount rates and costing of carbon. The global power generation scene is changing. Generation growth in OECD countries has become very limited; simultaneously there is rapid growth of varying renewables (VRE) generation which needs special criteria for assessing its system cost. All this demands a rethinking of the application and usefulness of the LCOE in future generation planning. - Highlights: • LCOE is a useful tool for economics of generation technologies. • The IEA/NEA study did not cover fully the required criteria for assessment. • It ignored interpretation of: the discount rate, carbon costing and subsidies. • The world energy scene is changing, this requires reassessment of LCOE.

  16. NEA perspectives on timescales and criteria in post-closure safety of geological disposal

    Preter, P. de; Smith, P.; Pescatore, C.; Forinash, B.

    2006-01-01

    A key challenge in the development of safety cases for geological repositories is associated with the long periods of time over which radioactive wastes that are disposed of in repositories remain hazardous. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently examined issues related to timescales in the context of two projects under the auspices of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC): the Timescales Initiative and the Long-Term Safety Criteria (LTSC) Initiative. These projects examine, respectively, the treatment of timescales in actual safety cases and in the development of radiological protection criteria for geological disposal. They treat different aspects of timescales but have some overlap and have shown some convergence of the results achieved to date. Based on these projects, this paper examines general considerations in the handling of timescales, including ethical principles, evolution of the hazards of radioactive waste over time, and uncertainty in the evolution of repository systems (including geological features). The implications of these considerations are examined in terms of repository siting; levels of protection in regulations; planning for pre-closure and post-closure actions; and development and presentation of safety cases. A comparison is made with previous NEA work related to timescales, in order to show evolutions in current understanding. (authors)

  17. NEA perspectives on timescales and criteria in post-closure safety of geological disposal

    Preter, P. de [ONDRAF/NIRAS, Brussels (Belgium); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, SAM Ltd. (United Kingdom); Pescatore, C.; Forinash, B. [OECD/NEA, Nuclear Energy Agency, 92 - Issy les Moulineaux (France)

    2006-07-01

    A key challenge in the development of safety cases for geological repositories is associated with the long periods of time over which radioactive wastes that are disposed of in repositories remain hazardous. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently examined issues related to timescales in the context of two projects under the auspices of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC): the Timescales Initiative and the Long-Term Safety Criteria (LTSC) Initiative. These projects examine, respectively, the treatment of timescales in actual safety cases and in the development of radiological protection criteria for geological disposal. They treat different aspects of timescales but have some overlap and have shown some convergence of the results achieved to date. Based on these projects, this paper examines general considerations in the handling of timescales, including ethical principles, evolution of the hazards of radioactive waste over time, and uncertainty in the evolution of repository systems (including geological features). The implications of these considerations are examined in terms of repository siting; levels of protection in regulations; planning for pre-closure and post-closure actions; and development and presentation of safety cases. A comparison is made with previous NEA work related to timescales, in order to show evolutions in current understanding. (authors)

  18. SCAP: the Nea project on stress corrosion cracking and cable ageing

    Yamamoto, A.; Huerta, A.; Gott, K.; Koshy, T.

    2007-01-01

    Two subjects - stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and degradation of cable insulation - were selected as the focus of the SCC and Cable Ageing Project (SCAP) due to their relevance for plant ageing assessments and their implication on inspection practices. Fourteen NEA member countries agreed to contribute to the project. The main SCAP objectives are to: establish a complete database with regard to major ageing phenomena for SCC and degradation of cable insulation through collective efforts by OECD/NEA members; establish a knowledge base in these areas by compiling and evaluating the collected data and information systematically; perform an assessment of the data and identify the basis for commendable practices which would help regulators and operators to enhance ageing management. The aim of the knowledge base is to provide a state-of-the-art description of the degradation mechanisms, the main influencing factors, the most susceptible materials and locations, and common strategies available for mitigation and repair. The SCAP project is currently in the development phase, defining and refining the database performance requirements, data format and coding guidelines. The project is scheduled to last four years. It is anticipated that the database definition and the collection of data from member countries will take approximately two years. The subsequent assessment and the commendable practices report are expected to take one year each

  19. MIASIS CUTÁNEA POR CORDYLOBIA ANTHROPOPHAGA

    Miriam Alkorta Gurrutxaga

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available El incremento progresivo en el número de personas que viajan a países tropicales ha hecho que las enfermedades importadas adquieran una relevancia cada vez mayor. Las miasis (o infestaciones por larvas de moscas cutáneas se encuentran entre este tipo de enfermedades siendo especialmente frecuentes en países tropicales. A propósito de la observación de un caso de miasis cutánea masiva por Cordylobia antropophaga, que ocurrió en una mujer de 34 años de edad al volver de un viaje a Senegal, se ha efectuado una revisión de los casos de miasis cutáneas forunculoides importadas publicados en España, así como de la biología, patología, tratamiento y prevención de la miasis humana por Cordylobia anthropophaga. El caso referido, se caracterizó por la infestación con un número inusualmente elevado de larvas, no sospechándose su etiología hasta la fase final de la enfermedad. La emergencia continuada de larvas (se recogieron 91 generó en la paciente un estado de ansiedad importante. Finalmente, la eliminación de las larvas provocó una rápida mejoría de la paciente. Aunque los casos de miasis cutánea no tienen la gravedad de otras enfermedades importadas, su conocimiento es necesario desde el punto de vista preventivo, diagnóstico y terapeútico. Es importante proceder a la identificación morfológica de las larvas diferenciándolas de otro tipo de miasis con implicaciones terapéuticas diferentes.

  20. FDS5 Simulation for OECD PRISME Fire Test of DOOR PRSD5

    Lee, Kyu Bok; Park, Jong Seuk

    2009-01-01

    OECD/NEA PRISME Fire Project is an international co-operation project to investigate fire propagation by means of experiments and analyses for nuclear power plant applications. This project focuses on the generation of experimental data for fire and smoke propagation from the fire room to adjacent rooms under various conditions and room configurations. In addition, analyses using computer codes are performed to understand the phenomena of interest and to produce a consistent interpretation of the experimental results. The PRISME Project is composed of series of tests named as SOURCE, DOOR, LEAK and Global Tests. The SOURCE is composed of tests to characterize the fire source, and the DOOR is to study fire and smoke propagation through an open door, while the LEAK is to investigate hot gas leakages through other modes of openings such as holes, a slot, a duct, and a partially opened door. The Global test will be conducted as integral tests on the basis of the results of the previous separate effects tests. In this paper, simulations are performed with FDS5 computer code for the DOOR Test No.5 (PRS D 5) and the calculation results are compared with the corresponding experimental data to study the code capability to predict the phenomena of the hot gas propagation between two rooms

  1. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels.

  2. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels

  3. A Simulation Study about OECD-SETH PANDA Tests by using MARS Code

    Bae, Sung Won; Chung, Bub Dong

    2007-04-01

    Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI) conceived and started the development of MARS code with the main objective of producing a state-of-the-art realistic thermal hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-dimensional analysis capability. MARS achieves this objective by integrating the one dimensional RELAP5/MOD3 with the multi-dimensional COBRA-TF codes. The method of integration of the two codes is based on the dynamic link library techniques, and the system pressure equation matrices of both codes are implicitly integrated and solved simultaneously. In addition, the Equation-Of-State (EOS) for the light water was unified by replacing the EOS of COBRA-TF by that of the RELAP5. In addition, the multi-D module component has been developed to meet the expand the multi-dimensional analysis capability of MARS. Participating in OECD-SETH, MARS provides and undergoes the assess procedure of comercial CFD codes, like FLUENT, CFX, etc. During the participation, MARS has been used to provide the system code results, which is made with the intermediate length scale, restricted analysis volume numbers. With these restrictions and shortcomings, MARS predicts well about the steam concentration distribution and mixture temperature in the large multi-comparted bulk spaces. After the SETH project, NEA has planned the SETH II, which deals with the multiple non-condensible gas stratification and mixing phenomena

  4. Preliminary uncertainty analysis of OECD/UAM benchmark for the TMI-1 reactor

    Cardoso, Fabiano S.; Faria, Rochkhudson B.; Silva, Lucas M.C.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the demand from nuclear research centers for safety, regulation and better-estimated predictions provided with confidence bounds has been increasing. On that way, studies have pointed out that present uncertainties in the nuclear data should be significantly reduced, to get the full benefit from the advanced modeling and simulation initiatives. The major outcome of NEA/OECD (UAM) workshop took place Italy on 2006, was the preparation of a benchmark work program with steps (exercises) that would be needed to define the uncertainty and modeling tasks. On that direction, this work was performed within the framework of UAM Exercise 1 (I-1) 'Cell Physics' to validate the study, and to be able estimated the accuracies of the model. The objectives of this study were to make a preliminary analysis of criticality values of TMI-1 PWR and the biases of the results from two different nuclear codes multiplication factor. The range of the bias was obtained using the deterministic codes: NEWT (New ESC-based Weighting Transport code), the two-dimensional transport module that uses AMPX-formatted cross-sections processed by other SCALE; and WIMSD5 (Winfrith Improved Multi-Group Scheme) code. The WIMSD5 system consists of a simplified geometric representation of heterogeneous space zones that are coupled with each other and with the boundaries, while the properties of each spacing element are obtained from Carlson DSN method or Collision Probability method. (author)

  5. Summary record of the experts meeting on the proposed OECD-IRSN STLOC project

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to determine the interest in member countries for the types of LOCA tests envisaged in the STLOC programme proposed by IRSN. The IRSN proposal was circulated among this Group in advance of the meeting. After the presentations and discussions, the Group recommendations were as follows: different views were expressed as to the need to perform the LOCA integral tests; there was an understanding that the results of separate effect tests (ANL, JAERI, Halden) would need to be obtained before deciding on the intended LOCA tests proposed in STLOC; IRSN and the OECD-NEA should explore the possibility to run the first ST test with air ingress (STLOC1), for which partial funding already exists (this test is foreseen for 2008); the need of LOCA tests as envisaged in STLOC should be re-assessed in about three years time (2006); analytical and experimental progress on LOCA tests should be monitored until then, through for instance the SEGFSM. An executive summary of the IRSN Source term LOCA program LOCA part is given in an appendix

  6. Review of OECD study into 'Projected costs of generating electricity-2010 Edition'

    Khatib, Hisham

    2010-01-01

    This joint report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is the seventh in the long established series of studies into electricity generating costs. It presents the main results of the work carried out in 2009 for calculating the costs of generating baseload electricity. The study is quite comprehensive in covering almost all financial aspects facing investors in the electricity generating system. Therefore this study although useful, its usefulness lies in explaining methodologies, mentioning factors that affect investment and cost, educating planners and improving investment evaluation and planning methodologies, its resulting figures and cost comparisons are however controversial. Generation planning and investments are case and country specific, and should be studied correspondingly and as close as possible to the timing of decision making to take account of trends. Most likely such case specific results will differ from figures calculated in the study. Therefore we need to emphasize a key conclusion of the study which is 'that country-specific circumstances determine the LCOE'; it is this that needs to be considered and not the results represented in the study.

  7. New Early Cycladic Figurine At Nea Styra

    Kosma, M.

    The existence of an Early Bronze Age coastal site in the district of Nea Styra has been known since the end of the 19th century when three marble figurines of early Cycladic type had been found in the area. During the 20th century survey investigations conducted by Greek and foreign archaeologists offered new evidence which demonstrated the significance of the site during the Early and Middle Helladic periods. A new figurine of early Cycladic type, which recently came to light at Nea Styra due to the control of building permits by the 11th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, reaffirms the identification of the area as one of the three most important sites on Euboea during the Early Helladic II period. This paper focuses on a newly discovered figurine and its typological character. The new find is compared to the figurines that had been found in the 19th century at Nea Styra. We hope that the scheduled excavations on the private land plot where the new figurine was found will offer new data leading to a better understanding of the character of the Early Helladic settlement in this part of southern Euboea.

  8. OECD/NEZ Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Problem Exercise I Simulation Using the SPACE Code with the Point Kinetics Model

    Kim, Yohan; Kim, Seyun; Ha, Sangjun

    2014-01-01

    The Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants (SPACE) has been developed in recent years by the Korea Nuclear Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP) through collaborative works with other Korean nuclear industries. The SPACE is a best-estimated two-phase three-field thermal-hydraulic analysis code to analyze the safety and performance of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The SPACE code has sufficient features to replace outdated vendor supplied codes and to be used for the safety analysis of operating PWRs and the design of advanced reactors. As a result of the second phase of the development, the 2.14 version of the code was released through the successive various V and V works. The topical reports on the code and related safety analysis methodologies have been prepared for license works. In this study, the OECD/NEA Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark Problem Exercise I was simulated as a V and V work. The results were compared with those of the participants in the benchmark project. The OECD/NEA MSLB Benchmark Problem Exercise I was simulated using the SPACE code. The results were compared with those of the participants in the benchmark project. Through the simulation, it was concluded that the SPACE code can effectively simulate PWR MSLB accidents

  9. Pensions at a glance 2015 OECD and G20 indicators

    2016-01-01

    The 10-year anniversary edition of Pensions at a Glance highlights the pension reforms undertaken by OECD and G20 countries over the last two years. Two special chapters provide deeper analysis of first-tier pension schemes and of the impact of short or interrupted careers, due to late entry into employment, childcare or unemployment, on pension entitlements. Another chapter analyses the sensitivity of long-term pension replacement rates on various parameters. A range of indicators for comparing pension policies and their outcomes between OECD and G20 countries is also provided.

  10. Budget reform in Ukraine and the OECD countries

    Puchko Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the fiscal reforms in Ukraine and the OECD countries. It has been proved that the main areas which should undergo changes are the tax reform, regulatory reform and restructuring policies to encourage entrepreneurship, reform of social protection and social security, reform of social sphere constituents, administrative reform, reform of the army and law enforcement, administrative and territorial reform. According to the analysis results, there has been drawn the conclusion about the need to introduce in Ukraine the successful experience of the OECD countries in implementing budget reforms.

  11. Comparison of approximate electrical energy generating costs in OECD countries

    Stevens, G.H.; Bertel, E.

    1996-01-01

    Costs of power generating in nuclear power plants have been predicted taking into account all factors connected with investment, maintenance, exploitation and decommissioning, basing on last OECD report. The costs have been compared with alternative solutions. In majority of OECD countries the direct costs of electricity generation are very close for nuclear fossil-fuel and gas power plants. All indirect costs such as environmental impact, public health hazard, waste management, accident risk and also public acceptance for nuclear power have been discussed. 13 refs, 5 tabs

  12. Overview of the OECD-Halden reactor project

    Vitanza, Carlo

    2001-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is an international network dedicated to enhanced safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. The Project operates under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and aims at addressing and resolving issues relevant to safety as they emerge in the nuclear community. This paper gives a concise presentation of the Project goals and of its technical infrastructure. The paper contains also a brief overview of results from the programme carried out in the time period 1997-1999 and of the main issues contemplated for the 3-year programme period 2000-2002

  13. Synthesis of the turbulent mixing in a rod bundle with vaned spacer grids based on the OECD-KAERI CFD benchmark exercise

    Lee, Jae Ryong; Kim, Jungwoo; Song, Chul-Hwa, E-mail: chsong@kaeri.re.kr

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • OECD/KAERI international CFD benchmark exercise was operated by KAERI. • The purpose is to validate relevant CFD codes based on the MATiS-H experiments. • Blind calculation results were synthesized in terms of mean velocity and RMS. • Quality of control volume rather than the number of it was emphasized. • Major findings were followed OECD/NEA CSNI report. - Abstract: The second international CFD benchmark exercise on turbulent mixing in a rod bundle has been launched by OECD/NEA, to validate relevant CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes and develop problem-specific Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) based on the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) MATiS-H experiments on the turbulent mixing in a 5 × 5 rod array having two different types of vaned spacer grids: split and swirl types. For this 2nd international benchmark exercise (IBE-2), the MATiS-H testing provided a unique set of experimental data such as axial and lateral velocity components, turbulent intensity, and vorticity information. Blind CFD calculation results were submitted by twenty-five (25) participants to KAERI, who is the host organization of the IBE-2, and then analyzed and synthesized by comparing them with the MATiS-H data. Based on the synthesis of the results from both the experiments and blind CFD calculations for the IBE-2, and also by comparing with the IBE-1 benchmark exercise on the mixing in a T-junction, useful information for simulating this kind of complicated physical problem in a rod bundle was obtained. And some additional Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) are newly proposed. A summary of the synthesis results obtained in the IBE-2 is presented in this paper.

  14. Synthesis of the turbulent mixing in a rod bundle with vaned spacer grids based on the OECD-KAERI CFD benchmark exercise

    Lee, Jae Ryong; Kim, Jungwoo; Song, Chul-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • OECD/KAERI international CFD benchmark exercise was operated by KAERI. • The purpose is to validate relevant CFD codes based on the MATiS-H experiments. • Blind calculation results were synthesized in terms of mean velocity and RMS. • Quality of control volume rather than the number of it was emphasized. • Major findings were followed OECD/NEA CSNI report. - Abstract: The second international CFD benchmark exercise on turbulent mixing in a rod bundle has been launched by OECD/NEA, to validate relevant CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes and develop problem-specific Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) based on the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) MATiS-H experiments on the turbulent mixing in a 5 × 5 rod array having two different types of vaned spacer grids: split and swirl types. For this 2nd international benchmark exercise (IBE-2), the MATiS-H testing provided a unique set of experimental data such as axial and lateral velocity components, turbulent intensity, and vorticity information. Blind CFD calculation results were submitted by twenty-five (25) participants to KAERI, who is the host organization of the IBE-2, and then analyzed and synthesized by comparing them with the MATiS-H data. Based on the synthesis of the results from both the experiments and blind CFD calculations for the IBE-2, and also by comparing with the IBE-1 benchmark exercise on the mixing in a T-junction, useful information for simulating this kind of complicated physical problem in a rod bundle was obtained. And some additional Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) are newly proposed. A summary of the synthesis results obtained in the IBE-2 is presented in this paper

  15. NEA activities in safety and regulation

    Stadie, K.B.

    1983-01-01

    The NEA programme on Safety and Regulations is briefly reviewed. It encompasses four main areas - nuclear safety technology; nuclear licensing; radiation protection; and waste management - with three principal objectives: to promote exchanges of technical information in order to enlarge the data base for national decision making; to improve co-ordination of national R and D activities with emphasis on international standard problem exercises, and to promote international projects; to develop common technical, administrative and legal approaches to improve compatibility of safety and regulatory practices

  16. Peritonite bacteriana espontânea

    Strauss Edna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A peritonite bacteriana espontânea ocorre em 30% dos cirróticos com ascite e, neste grupo, apresenta altas taxas de morbidade e mortalidade. Os fatores predisponentes incluem a diminuição da defesa imunológica encontrada no homem nas fases avançadas da cirrose, o supercrescimento da flora intestinal e a translocação bacteriana da luz dos intestinos aos linfonodos mesentéricos. As manifestações clínicas variam de graves a leves ou ausentes, sendo sempre necessária a análise do líquido ascítico. O diagnóstico de peritonite bacteriana espontânea se faz pela contagem de neutrófilos > 250/mm³ no líquido ascítico associado ou não ao crescimento de bactéria na cultura. As enterobactérias predominam como causa da infecção, sendo a Echerichia coli a bactéria mais freqüentemente isolada. O diagnóstico precoce e o tratamento adequado provocaram a queda das taxas de mortalidade nas duas últimas décadas. O uso endovenoso de cefalosporinas de terceira geração mostra-se eficaz em 70% a 95% dos casos. A recorrência de peritonite bacteriana espontânea é comum e pode ser prevenida com norfloxacina oral, de uso contínuo. O surgimento de resistência bacteriana tem estimulado a procura de novas opções para a profilaxia da peritonite bacteriana espontânea; os probióticos constituem nova abordagem promissora, mas que necessita melhor avaliação. Recomenda-se a profilaxia primária de curta duração aos cirróticos com ascite que apresentem episódio de hemorragia digestiva alta.

  17. Taxation and the household saving rate: evidence from OECD countries

    Vito Tanzi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes anew the relationship between taxation and the household saving rate. On the basis of standard savings and tax revenue data from a sample of OECD countries, it provides compelling empirical evidence of a powerful impact of taxes on household savings. In particular, income taxes are shown to affect negatively the household saving rate much more than consumption taxes.

  18. Does corporate income taxation affect securitization? : Evidence from OECD banks

    Gong, Di; Hu, Shiwei; Ligthart, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate income taxation, by affecting the after-tax cost of funding, has implications for a bank’s incentive to securitize. Using a sample of OECD banks over the period 1999–2006, we find that corporate income taxation led to more securitization at banks that are constrained in funding markets,

  19. 2001-2002 carbon dioxide emissions in OECD

    2004-11-01

    This document provides carbon dioxide emissions data, from energy uses and production, from 2001 to 2002 in the OECD. It concerns the climate corrected CO 2 emissions in France, the non corrected CO 2 emissions (M tons), the emissions intensity / the Gross Domestic Product and the emissions intensity / the population (tons per inhabitant). (A.L.B.)

  20. OECD märkab Eesti edusamme / Signe Leesmann

    Leesmann, Signe

    2002-01-01

    Vaatamata probleemidele on Eesti ettevõtluskliima paranenud, mille taga näeb OECD Eestisse tulnud välisinvesteeringute ning ekspordi kasvu. Diagrammid: Ettevõtete arv. Ettevõtete struktuur töötajate arvu järgi

  1. Does Corporate Income Taxation Affect Securitization? Evidence from OECD Banks

    Gong, D.; Ligthart, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Corporate income taxation, by affecting the after-tax cost of funding, has implications for a bank's incentive to securitize. Using a sample of OECD banks over the period 1999-2006, we fi nd that corporate income taxation led to more securitization at banks that are constrained in funding

  2. EU and OECD benchmarking and peer review compared

    Groenendijk, Nico

    2009-01-01

    Benchmarking and peer review are essential elements of the so-called EU open method of coordination (OMC) which has been contested in the literature for lack of effectiveness. In this paper we compare benchmarking and peer review procedures as used by the EU with those used by the OECD. Different

  3. Financial Inequity in Basic Education in Selected OECD Countries

    Zhang, Yu; Mizunoya, Suguru; You, You; Tsang, Mun

    2011-01-01

    This is a study of financial disparities in primary and secondary education in OECD countries that have a relatively large population and a school finance system with decentralized features. These countries include the United States, Britain, Australia, Spain, Canada, and Japan. There are two major research questions: What are the trends in…

  4. Taxation and Skills. OECD Tax Policy Studies. No. 24

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This Tax Policy Study on Taxation and Skills examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries. This study also assesses the returns to tertiary and adult education and examines how these returns are shared between governments and students. The study builds indicators that examine incentives for individuals and governments…

  5. In situ research and investigations in OECD countries

    1988-01-01

    This report explains why deep geological disposal is the most favoured option for the disposal of high level waste and spent fuel, as well as some alpha bearing wastes. It also gives an overview of the main aim and elements of in-situ research and investigation activities in OECD countries, as well as of initiatives taken at an international level

  6. Unbundling payments for radioisotopes from radiopharmaceuticals and from diagnostic procedures: A tool to support the implementation of full-cost recovery. NEA discussion document

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the NEA's HLG-MR policy approach is to ensure a long-term secure supply. The HLG-MR has determined that to attain that objective, a necessary (but not sufficient) requirement is that irradiation services in the 99 Mo/ 99m Tc supply chain must be provided on a full-cost recovery (FCR) basis (OECD-NEA, 2011). The HLG-MR policy approach also recommended that supply chain participants should implement payment reforms that promote full-cost recovery within their reimbursement systems. Reforms might include separate radioisotope pricing or auditing, separate radioisotope payment, differential radioisotope payment for FCR, or other approaches to promote a complete transition to full-cost recovery

  7. Fundamentals of the NEA Thermochemical Database and its influence over national nuclear programs on the performance assessment of deep geological repositories.

    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Costa, Davide

    2017-03-14

    For the last 30 years, the NEA Thermochemical Database (TDB) Project (www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/) has been developing a chemical thermodynamic database for elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste repositories, providing data that are vital to support the geochemical modeling of such systems. The recommended data are selected on the basis of strict review procedures and are characterized by their consistency. The results of these efforts are freely available, and have become an international point of reference in the field. As a result, a number of important national initiatives with regard to waste management programs have used the NEA TDB as their basis, both in terms of recommended data and guidelines. In this article we describe the fundamentals and achievements of the project together with the characteristics of some databases developed in national nuclear waste disposal programs that have been influenced by the NEA TDB. We also give some insights on how this work could be seen as an approach to be used in broader areas of environmental interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. NEA incident reporting system: Three years' experience

    Otsuka, Y.; Haeussermann, W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) which was set up to collect, assess and disseminate on safety-related incidents in nuclear power plants. The IRS information exchange is significant in two senses. First, it enables regulatory authorities and utilities in participating countries to take appropriate action to prevent the reported mishaps occurring again elsewhere. Secondly, the continuous collection and systematic analysis of such information allows identification of areas of concern where safety research should be strengthened. There are two stages in the IRS information exchange. First, the national IRS Co-ordinator selects information on significant incidents, in accordance with a common reporting threshold, from the abnormal occurrences reported to the regulatory body, to be distributed through the NEA Secretariat. This screening is intended to exclude minor events, so that only significant information is sent to participating countries. Secondly, a group of experts periodically reviews the incidents reported during the preceding twelve months to identify major areas of concern. To assist this process, a computer-based data retrieval system is being developed for IRS incident reports. The paper gives some details of the IRS mechanism and discusses reporting criteria and the information included in a report. Areas of concern derived from reported incidents, an outline of the data retrieval system, and examples of feedback of lessons learned and possibilities for international co-operation are also discussed. (author)

  9. Migration in OECD countries: Labour Market Impact and Integration Issues. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 562

    Jean, Sebastien; Causa, Orsetta; Jimenez, Miguel; Wanner, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Immigration pressures are increasing in most OECD countries. This paper investigates the consequences of immigration for natives' labour market outcomes, as well as issues linked to immigrants' integration in the host country labour market. Changes in the share of immigrants in the labour force may have a distributive impact on natives' wages, and…

  10. Labour Market Performance, Income Inequality and Poverty in OECD Countries. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 500

    Burniaux, Jean-Marc; Padrini, Flavio; Brandt, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    There have been concerns that employment-enhancing reforms along the lines of the 1994 OECD Jobs Strategy could inadvertently lead to increased income inequality and poverty. This paper focuses on the impact of institutions and redistributive policies on inequality and poverty with the view of assessing whether a trade-off between better labour…

  11. Comments on OECD discussion draft on revisions to Chapter I of the Transfer Pricing Guidelines

    Burgers, Irene; van Herwaarden, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    These comments provide recommendations for improved transfer pricing guidance and were submitted in response to an invitation by the OECD to interested parties to submit written comments on a discussion draft regarding the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines

  12. OECD Trilog Plenary Symposium : public policy issues in global freight logistics

    1998-01-01

    This is the fifth plenary symposium on public policy issues in global freight logistics conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). OECD's Trilateral Logistics Project, Trilog Project, is aimed at clarifying the pub...

  13. Spanish collaboration in the OECD Halden Reactor Project research on Gadolinia Fuel

    Horvath, M.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Tverberg, T.; Jenssen, H. K.

    2010-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants benefit from research and development advances and related technical solutions. One research platform is the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP). HRP is a joint undertaking of national organisations in 18 countries sponsoring a jointly financed programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). As a member state, Spain is participating HRP research programs with ENUSA as a partner in the fuel research programs. Improving the NPP operations, fuel cycles were designed to increase fuel burnup. Higher fuel burnup reduces the number of spent fuel assemblies and thus the costs of new fuel as well as the costs of back-end management. Higher burnup is reached either by prolonging the reactor cycles or by increasing the number of reactor cycles for the fuel in the core. Both ways entail additional requirements concerning fuel enrichment and burnable absorbers as additives and adjustments on the cladding material properties, such as mechanical treatment and chemical composition of the alloys. For these demands and needs ENUSA promotes the research on high burnup effects, gadolinium doped fuels and cladding material behaviour under irradiation. Various experiments, called IFA, are developed and performed also by providing materials. ENUSA collaborates with HRP on various experiments investigating the fuel densification and swelling, fission gas release, pressure limits on UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 fuels (IFA-504, -515, -636, -681); the cladding creep, lift-off, corrosion and hydrides on different tubing materials (IFA-567, -610, -638); instrumentation of the experiments, especially on pre-irradiated materials (IFA-533). These experiments are combined with model calculations to improve predictions for higher burnups and to maintain safety margins (IFA-515, -636, -681). Besides these unique in-pile experiments PIEs are performed as well on fuel and structural materials to complete the scope of these studies (IFA

  14. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 7. activity report 1978

    1978-01-01

    This work is concerned with trends in nuclear power; basic radiation protection norms and their application; radiation protection considerations relating to the nuclear fuel cycle; radioactive waste management; safety research for reactors, nuclear ships and fuel cycle; licensing of nuclear installations; nuclear law; nuclear fuel cycle studies; technical cooperation; scientific support for nuclear technology and NEA data bank

  15. The OECD and the Expansion of PISA: New Global Modes of Governance in Education

    Sellar, Sam; Lingard, Bob

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the expansion of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and associated growth in the influence of the OECD's education work. PISA has become one of the OECD's most successful "products" and has both strengthened the role of the Directorate for Education within the organization and enhanced…

  16. Convergence and determinants of health expenditures in OECD countries.

    Nghiem, Son Hong; Connelly, Luke Brian

    2017-08-17

    This study examines the trend and determinants of health expenditures in OECD countries over the 1975-2004 period. Based on recent developments in the economic growth literature we propose and test the hypothesis that health care expenditures in countries of similar economic development level may converge. We hypothesise that the main drivers for growth in health care costs include: aging population, technological progress and health insurance. The results reveal no evidence that health expenditures among OECD countries converge. Nevertheless, there is evidence of convergence among three sub-groups of countries. We found that the main driver of health expenditure is technological progress. Our results also suggest that health care is a (national) necessity, not a luxury good as some other studies in this field have found.

  17. PERAN OECD DALAM MEMINIMALKAN UPAYA TAX AGRESIVENESS PADA PERUSAHAAN MULTINATIONALITY

    Hanindia Hajjar Damayanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: OECD's Role in Minimizing Tax Aggressiveness Efforts at Multinationality Companies. This paper aims to prove the relation between multinationality transaction of tax heaven countries and the tax investigation toward the tax aggressiveness. This research is done by quantitative approach upon the companies registered in BEI for 2010-2014 periods. The findings denote the tax heaven countries have no effort to conduct the tax aggressiveness on which the multinationality negatively has no effect since the occurrence in the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines as the guideline for both the taxing authority and the multinational companies in accomplishing the transfer pricing matter. In contrary, the investigation does not influence the tax aggressiveness.

  18. First mover advantages in mobile telecommunications: Evidence from OECD countries

    Muck, Johannes; Heimeshoff, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We explore the existence of first mover advantages in mobile telecommunications markets. Building on a data set comprising monthly penetration rates, market concentration, number of active operators, and market shares of 90 followers from 33 OECD countries, we estimate a dynamic growth model. Our analysis delivers five key results. Regarding a follower's longrun market share, we observe that (1) the penetration rate at the time of market entry exerts an inverted u-shaped effect, suggesting th...

  19. A status of the art report for OECD RASPLAV program

    Nho, Ki Man; Kim, Sang Baik; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Hee Dong; Suh, Kun Yeol

    1996-06-01

    The objective of current study is to summarize the work of OECD RASPLAV technical reports, which include investigation of natural convection in the corium, chemical interaction between corium and reactor vessel, solidification of corium crust during severe accident such as TMI-2 accident in the United States and Chernobyl accident in the USSR. The experimental data and technique will be used when designing a large scale experimental facility for the second phase of the project. 7 tabs., 11 figs., 14 refs. (Author)

  20. Globalization, female employment, and regional differences in OECD countries

    Fischer, Justina A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Accounting for within-country spatial differences is a much neglected issue in many cross-country comparisons. This paper highlights this importance in this empirical analysis of the impact of a country’s degree of social and economic globalization on female employment in 33 OECD countries, using a pseudo micro panel on 110’000 persons from the World Values Survey, 1981 to 2008. A traditional cross-country analysis suggests that only the social dimension of globalization, the worldwide inform...

  1. Tax Havens and the OECD Campaign Against them

    Narci, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    There are two essential primary purposes for this thesis. The first has been to highlight the phenomena Tax Havens with its economical impact on other countries outlined in chapter two. Firstly the concept of tax havens is presented based on the OECD definition. Secondly the secrecy legislation, regulation and the corporate structures which tax havens offer to foreign investors and firms are given with their significance for other states. Thirdly, the ways tax havens are used b...

  2. Aggregate Multi-Factor Productivity: Measurement Issues in OECD Countries

    Egert, Balazs

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyses for 34 OECD countries the extent to which the calculation of aggregate multi-factor productivity (MFP) is sensitive to alternative parameterisations. The starting point is the definition of MFP used in previous work in the OECD’s Economics Department (e.g. Johansson et al. 2013). They include alternative MFP measures, with human capital included or excluded, with different measures of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) exchange rates, using time-varying capital depreciation rat...

  3. Trade-related Electronic Commerce Issues in the OECD

    Chang-In Yoon

    1998-01-01

    The trade committee of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has begun the study of the trade related to electronic commerce since 1997. The scale of the study on one hand has avoided the fact of copy and duplication of WTO and its organizational principles, on the other hand it has played a supplementary and supportive function. At present, digital-related product, such as computers, software and travel is the key point to the trade which resorts to electronic commerce...

  4. Institutions and service employment: a panel study for OECD countries

    Messina, Julián

    2004-01-01

    We live in a service economy, but the extent of development of service employment differs across developed countries. This paper assesses the role of structural factors and institutions in explaining the common patterns and main di?erences in the recent expansion of service employment in OECD countries. It finds that GDP per capita, the size of the government sector and the extent of urbanization are positively associated with the service employment share. However, the evidence suggests that ...

  5. IRPhE-DRAGON-DPR, OECD High Temperature Reactor Dragon Project, Primary Documents

    2004-01-01

    Description: The DRAGON Reactor Experiment (DRE): The first demonstration High temperature gas reactor (HTGR) was built in the 1960's. Thirteen OECD countries began a project in 1959 to build an experimental reactor known as Dragon at Winfrith in the UK. The reactor - which operated successfully between 1966 and 1975 - had a thermal output of 20 MW and achieved a gas outlet temperature of 750 deg. C. The High Temperature Reactor concept, if it justified its expectations, was seen as having its place as an advanced thermal reactor between the current thermal reactor types such as the PWR, BWR, and AGR and the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. It was expected that the HTR would offer better thermal efficiency, better uranium utilisation, either with low enriched uranium fuel or high enriched uranium thorium fuel, better inherent safety and lower unit power costs. In the event all these potential advantages were demonstrated to be in principle achievable. This view is still shared today. In fact Very High Temperature Reactors is one of the concepts retained for Generation IV. Projects on constructing Modular Pebble Bed Reactors are under way. Here all available Dragon Project Reports (DPR) - approximately 1000 - are collected in electronic form. An index points to the reports (PDF format); each table in the report is accessible in EXCEL format with the aim of facilitating access to the data. These reports describe the design, experiments and modelling carried out over a period of 17 years. 2 - Related or auxiliary information: IRPHE-HTR-ARCH-01, Archive of HTR Primary Documents NEA-1728/01. 3 - Software requirements: Acrobat Reader, Microsoft Word, HTML Browser required

  6. Comparative analysis of exercise 2 results of the OECD WWER-1000 MSLB benchmark

    Kolev, N.; Petrov, N.; Royer, E.; Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of joint effort between OECD/NEA, US DOE and CEA France a coupled three-dimensional (3D) thermal-hydraulic/neutron kinetics benchmark for WWER-1000 was defined. Phase 2 of this benchmark is labeled W1000CT-2 and consists of calculation of a vessel mixing experiment and main steam line break (MSLB) transients. The reference plant is Kozloduy-6 in Bulgaria. Plant data are available for code validation consisting of one experiment of pump start-up (W1000CT-1) and one experiment of steam generator isolation (W1000CT-2). The validated codes can be used to calculate asymmetric MSLB transients involving similar mixing patterns. This paper summarizes a comparison of the available results for W1000CT-2 Exercise 2 devoted to core-vessel calculation with imposed MSLB vessel boundary conditions. Because of the recent re-calculation of the cross-section libraries, core physics results from PARCS and CRONOS codes could be compared only. The comparison is code-to-code (including BIPR7A/TVS-M lib) and code vs. plant measured data in a steady state close to the MSLB initial state. The results provide a test of the cross-section libraries and show a good agreement of plant measured and computed data. The comparison of full vessel calculations was made from the point of view of vessel mixing, considering mainly the coarse-mesh features of the flow. The FZR and INRNE results from multi-1D calculations with different mixing models are similar, while the FZK calculations with a coarse-3D vessel model show deviations from the others. These deviations seem to be due to an error in the use of a boundary condition after flow reversal (Authors)

  7. Income inequality and obesity prevalence among OECD countries.

    Su, Dejun; Esqueda, Omar A; Li, Lifeng; Pagán, José A

    2012-07-01

    Using recent pooled data from the World Health Organization Global Infobase and the World Factbook compiled by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States, this study assesses the relation between income inequality and obesity prevalence among 31 OECD countries through a series of bivariate and multivariate linear regressions. The United States and Mexico well lead OECD countries in both obesity prevalence and income inequality. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the inclusion or exclusion of these two extreme cases can fundamentally change the findings. When the two countries are included, the results reveal a positive correlation between income inequality and obesity prevalence. This correlation is more salient among females than among males. Income inequality alone is associated with 16% and 35% of the variations in male and female obesity rates, respectively, across OECD countries in 2010. Higher levels of income inequality in the 2005-2010 period were associated with a more rapid increase in obesity prevalence from 2002 to 2010. These associations, however, virtually disappear when the US and Mexico have been excluded from the analysis. Findings from this study underscore the importance of assessing the impact of extreme cases on the relation between income inequality and health outcomes. The potential pathways from income inequality to the alarmingly high rates of obesity in the cases of the US and Mexico warrant further research.

  8. OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines - Implementation by Norwegian Tax Administration

    Sollund, Stig

    1998-07-01

    Presentation. The growth of multinational enterprises and integration of world markets across national borders has increased the importance of this issue: How should corporate tax systems at the national level be applied to the profits of companies engaging in the vast number of cross border transactions? The challenges and implications of the issue are tremendous both to the national governments and to the enterprises. The OECD countries have responded to these challenges by declaring that each enterprise within a multinational group of companies shall be treated as a separate entity. In order to apply the separate entity approach to intra group transactions, individual group members must be taxed on the basis that they act at arm's length with each other. The arm's length principle is more easily understood in theory than applied in practice. In some countries, therefore, the authorities have explored other methods than the traditional ones, as described in the 1979 Transfer Pricing Report of the OECD. A confirmed consensus between the governments was reached in the form of the revised 1995 guidelines. The Norwegian Ministry of Finance has given its full support to the efforts of defending the separate entity approach and the arm's length principle in the OECD committees.

  9. Drivers for renewable energy: A comparison among OECD countries

    Gan, Jianbang; Smith, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    The difference in the shares of renewable energy in total primary energy supply among OECD countries is immense. We attempt to identify some key factors that may have driven this difference for renewable energy in general and bioenergy in particular. We found that besides country-specific factors, gross national product (GDP) and renewable energy and bioenergy market deployment policies have significant and positive impacts on the per capita supply of both renewable energy and bioenergy in OECD countries. R and D expenditures, energy prices, CO 2 emissions, and other energy policies are statistically insignificant in terms of their impact on renewable energy and bioenergy supply. However, this does not necessarily mean that they are not potential drivers for renewable energy and bioenergy, but rather suggests that their magnitudes have not been big enough to significantly influence energy supply based on the historical data from 1994 to 2003. These findings lead to useful policy implications for countries attempting to promote renewable energy and bioenergy development. -- Highlights: ► We identify the drivers of renewable energy development in OECD countries. ► Common drivers include GDP per capita and market deployment policies. ► Country-specific drivers reveal different pathways for bioenergy development.

  10. OECD Policy Recommendations on Security for Biological Materials

    Radisch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical innovations derived from research on pathogenic micro-organisms promise astounding health and economic benefits. Some such biological resources employed in the RandD for diagnostic kits, vaccines and therapeutics, however, possess capacity for dual-use; they may be misused to develop biological weapons. Research facilities entrusted with possession of such dual-use materials have a responsibility to comply with biosecurity measures that are designed to prevent loss or theft and thereby reduce the probability of a bioterrorist attack. The OECD has provided a forum for its Member countries to engage in a dialogue of international co-operation with a view to produce policies that achieve a research environment fortified by biosecurity measures and capable of producing health innovations. In 2007, the OECD developed a risk assessment framework and risk management principles for Biological Resource Centres. Ongoing policy work at the OECD will look to design biosecurity guidelines appropriate to a broader range of facilities in possession of dual-use materials, such as university and industrial laboratories.(author)

  11. NEA Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme related to sea disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    Ruegger, B.; Templeton, W.L.; Gurbutt, P.

    1983-05-01

    Sea dumping operations of certain types of packaged low and medium-level radioactive wastes have been carried out since 1967 in the North-East Atlantic under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. On the occasion of the 1980 review of the continued suitability of the North-East Atlantic site used for the disposal of radioactive waste, it was recommended that an effort should be made to increase the scientific data base relating to the oceanographic and biological characteristics of the dumping area. In particular, it was suggested that a site specific model of the transfer of radionuclides in the marine environment be developed, which would permit a better assessment of the potential radiation doses to man from the dumping of radioactive waste. To fulfill these objectives a research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste was set up in 1981 with the participation of thirteen Member countries and the International Laboratory for Marine Radioactivity of the IAEA in Monaco. The research program is focused on five research areas which are directly relevant to the preparation of more site-specific assessments in the future. They are: model development; physical oceanography; geochemistry; biology; and radiological surveillance. Promising results have already been obtained and more are anticipated in the not too distant future. An interim description of the NEA dumping site has been prepared which provides an excellent data base for this area (NEA 1983).It includes data in bathymetry, isopycnal topography, local and larger scale currents, sediment distribution and sedimentary processes, hydrochemistry, deep ocean biology and results of radiochemical analyses of sea water, sediments and biological materials. The modelling work is also well advanced allowing comparison of results obtained from different codes. After integration of the models, sensitivity analyses will provide indications for future research needs

  12. Observations of NEAs at Arecibo Observatory and NASA's IRTF: Combining Radar and Thermal Measurements to Better Understand NEA Physical Properties

    Nolan, Michael C.; Vervack, R. J.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Taylor, P. A.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    As we sample ever-smaller sizes of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), we see an increasing variation in the range of physical properties. Radar experiments show a diverse range of shapes, surface features, and rotation states among NEAs. Infrared observations of these objects are equally varied,

  13. Contribution of the Nea data bank in the field of calculation codes in radiation protection, radio physics and dosimetry; Role de la banque de donnees de l'AEN dans le domaine des codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Kodeli, I; Sartori, E [Organization for Econimic Co-Operation and Development (OECD NEA DB), 91 - Issy les Moulineaux (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Nuclear energy agency is a specialised agency of OECD (organization economic co-operation and development). These missions are to help its members to keep and improve by international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases necessary to a peaceful use of nuclear energy. Nea includes twenty eight countries. Nea works in collaboration with IAEA. The field of activities concerns the acquisition, validation and distribution of nuclear data, calculation codes and experiments. To help users, it organises conferences and training about the calculation codes that it shares out. (N.C.)

  14. The OECD expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate — Towards the development of improved OECD guidelines for the testing of nanomaterials

    Kühnel, Dana; Nickel, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    On behalf of the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) an expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate of nanomaterials (NMs) took place in January 2013 in Berlin. At this meeting experts from science, industry and regulatory bodies discussed the applicability of OECD test guidelines (TGs) for chemicals to nanomaterials. The objective was to discuss the current state of the relevant science and provide recommendations to the OECD WPMN on (1) the need for updating current OECD TGs and the need for developing new ones specific to nanomaterials; and (2) guidance needed for the appropriate and valid testing of environmental fate and ecotoxicity endpoints for NMs. Experts at the workshop agreed that the majority of the OECD TG for chemicals were generally applicable for the testing of NM, with the exception of TG 105 (water solubility) and 106 (adsorption-desorption). Additionally, the workshop also highlighted considerations when conducting OECD chemical TG on nanomaterials (e.g., sample preparation, dispersion, analysis, dosimetry and characterisation). These considerations will lead to the future development of proposals for new TG and guidance documents (GDs) to ensure that OECD TG give meaningful, repeatable, and accurate results when used for nanomaterials. This report provides a short overview of topics discussed during the meeting and the main outcomes. A more detailed report of the workshop will become available through the OECD, however, due to the urgency of having OECD TG relevant for nanomaterials, this brief report is being shared with the scientific community through this communication. - Highlights: • OECD test guidelines (TGs) were developed for the testing of conventional chemicals. • Need for discussion on applicability of current TGs to nanomaterials • An expert meeting addressing this issue was held. • The focus was on TGs covering ecotoxicology and environmental fate. • Recommendations for updating current OECD

  15. Aspectos nutricionales de la dieta mediterránea

    Mariné Font, Abel; Vidal, M. Carmen

    1999-01-01

    Se realiza un anàlisis de los orígenes de la dieta mediterránea, los cuales se remontan a las grandes culturas clásicas de la Edad Antigua. Además, se describe lo que hoy en dia cabe entender como dieta mediterránea y se analiza el valor nutritivo de los alimentos que integran los diversos tipos de dietas mediterrdneas. Finalmente, se realizan algunas consideraciones sobre la bondad de la dieta mediterránea, que, sin ser una panacea, es lo suficientemente equilibrada y agradable para consider...

  16. neas de Ensamble Auto-balanceables

    Palomino Sánchez, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Este documento presenta una monografía de las líneas de ensamble auto-balanceables. Este tipo de líneas se han popularizado con la implementación de la manufactura esbelta en muchas empresas de diferentes ramos. Sin embargo, su estudio es aún incipiente, por lo que el objetivo de este proyecto es hacer una revisión de la literatura existente con el propósito de identificar posibles trabajos en esta área. Las líneas de ensamble auto-balanceables, también descritas en la literatura como Buck...

  17. The NEA sorption data base (SDB)

    Ruegger, B.; Ticknor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The current NEA Sorption Data Base is developed to replace the former International Sorption Information Retrieval System (ISIRS) initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and contains about 11,000 distribution coefficients with corresponding experimental condition parameters describing sorption of key nuclides for a large variety of solid and liquid phases. The SDB is designed to run on a micro-computer using the commercially available database software dBASE III Plus. For each recorded sorption experiment, the SDB provides a bibliographical reference, the most complete characterization of the solid and liquid phases available, a description of the experimental conditions and the distribution coefficient or retardation factor for each element studied. When available, parameters such as temperature, initial radionuclide concentration, pH, Eh, contact time, solid to solution ratio, sample origin, oxidation state and type of solution are included. The SDB provides information for a wide variety of rocks or geological materials, buffer backfill candidates, concretes/cements, elements (Am, Cs, Co, I, Np, Pu, Ra, Sr, Se, Tc, U and, to a lesser extent, Ag, Ba, C, Ce, Eu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pm, Ru, Sb, Sn, Y, Zn, and Zr), or radioisotopes. A compilation of sorption data like SDB provide a readily available source of data for radioactive waste repository performance assessments when site specific data are not available or essential, for example, during a site selection phase. 2 appendices

  18. Korea-France collaboration for the preparation of joint proposal for the OECD project on the steam explosion experiments

    Song, Jin Ho; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. W.; Min, B. T.; Park, I. K.

    2004-07-01

    There are some difficulties in design of the new reactor containment and in establishment of accident management strategy for operating reactors, since there exist a few phenomenological uncertainties in a steam explosion which occurs at the time of the interaction between the corium melt and coolant. So, the OECD/NEA recommended a research which could finalize the unsolved issues in a steam explosion and then an international collaborative research involving US, France, Germany, Japan and Korea, so called the SERENA (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Application) started in 2002. The first phase of this collaborative research is an analytical research and the second phase is planned to be an experimental research which will start in 2005. Korea and France agreed that both countries would cooperate in the second phase of the SERENA program at the specialist meetings and collaborative committee between the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). This preparation research is performed in order to carry out the agreement between Korea and France and propose a collaborative research to the SERENA second phase. The contents of this research is to perform a collaborative research between Korea and France to propose an international collaborative research on a steam explosion research to the OECD. The scope includes the technical exchange for the construction of an international collaborative research and the preparation of a proposal for an international collaborative research for the OECD steam explosion program. Two steam explosion specialist meetings were held to discuss the technical issues in the TROI and KROTOS experiments. A formal accession and amendment agreement for the collaboration was contracted between the KAERI/KINS/CEA/IRSN. And the KAERI's capability to perform an international collaborative research was proved by advertizing the TROI test results to the USNRC/CSARP and JAERI. Also, the English

  19. NEA International Workshop on the Nuclear Innovation Road-map - NI2050. Workshop proceedings

    Ait Abderrahim, Hamid; Fernandez Fernandez, Alberto; Van Walle, Eric; Speranzini, Robert; Zezula, Lubor; Puska, Eija Karita; Tuomisto, Harri; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim; Bazile, Fanny; Cordier, Pierre-Yves; Wahide, Carole; Tromm, Th. Walter; Horvath, Akos; Agostini, Pietro; Ambrosini, Walter; Kamide, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Toru; Sagayama, Yutaka; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Jeong, Ik; LEE, Gye Seok; Roelofs, Ferry; Van Der Lugt, Hermen; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Alekseev, Pavel; Andreeva-Andrievskaya, Lyudmila N.; Liska, Peter; Cizelj, Leon; Castelao Lopez, Carlos; Zimmermann, Martin; Rayment, Fiona; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Martin Ramos, Manuel; Schmitz, Bruno; Monti, Stefano; Bignan, Gilles; Mcgrath, Margaret; Caron-Charles, Marylise; Magwood, William IV; Ha, Jaejoo; Deffrennes, Marc; Paillere, Henri; Noh, Jae Man; Gulliford, Jim; Breest, Axel; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Lebedev, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    The two-day workshop held at the OECD Headquarters in Paris on 7-8 July 2015, brought together some of the leading experts in the field of nuclear fission research, development and demonstration. The purpose was to launch the NEA Nuclear Innovation 2050 Initiative, aiming, after a first survey phase, at producing a road-map of main priority research programs and infrastructures necessary to support the role nuclear energy may play in the low carbon power sector of the future. This might then further lead to some ad-hoc co-operation frameworks that help to effectively implement key priorities coming out of the road-mapping. The workshop was organised into the following five sessions: 1 - Opening session on NI2050: vision and main objectives; 2 - National presentations on nuclear fission research and innovation activities (programs, infrastructures, budgets); 3 - Presentations on some existing international nuclear fission road-maps and co-operation frameworks; 4 - Defining the way forward for NI2050: survey, road-mapping and priorities and co-operation; 5 - Open discussion. This document gathers the available presentations given at this workshop

  20. Proceedings of the NEA/CSNI-UNIPEDE Specialist Meeting on Operating Experience with Steam Generators

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The long history of operating experience with pressurized water reactors has indicated that the steam generators are of primary importance in nuclear power plant design and operation; this is furthermore confirmed by analyzing the data of the Incident Reporting System (IRS). It is for this reason that the OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations organizes, in cooperation with UNIPEDE, a Specialist Meeting on 'Operating Experience with Steam Generators'. This Specialist Meeting, held in Brussels, Belgium, in September 1991, is hosted by the Belgian Government and AIB-Vincotte Nuclear. In addition to being a follow-up to the October 1984 meeting (organized by the CSNI and UNIPEDE in Stockholm, Sweden), this Meeting reviews the current state-of-the-art of steam generator technology thus providing a forum for the exchange of related experience in operation, inspection, maintenance, repair, modifications, replacement, and licensing requirements pertaining to steam generators. Forty-seven papers are presented in eight sessions entitled: Operating Experience (two sessions), Structural Integrity and Licensing Issues, Analysis and Prediction of Degradation Mechanisms, Inservice Inspection Methods, Preventive and Corrective Actions (two sessions) and Replacement of Steam Generators. There are furthermore two panel sessions entitled 'Observed Degradation Mechanisms and Licensing Positions', and 'Inspection, Repair and Replacement Strategies'. These proceedings consist of a compilation of the papers presented at the Meeting, which is attended by more than one hundred and fifty participants from fifteen countries and several international organisations.

  1. Occupational radiation exposure trends in the nuclear industry of NEA/IAEA Member States

    Ilari, O.; Horan, J.R.; Franzen, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    After various introductory statements on current occupational radiation exposure trends in nuclear facilities, the authors briefly discuss the problems involved in the application of the ICRP principle of optimization of radiological protection to the design and, in particular, the operation of nuclear plants, with the aim of comparing present exposure trends. To assemble an adequate data base for supporting the technical studies required to optimize radiological protection, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency have launched a survey aimed at collecting information on the levels and trends of occupational radiation exposure in the nuclear industry. The features of this study, based on the answers of NEA/IAEA Member States to a questionnaire, are described. The first results of the survey, regarding the situation and time trends of the average individual dose equivalents and collective dose equivalents for different plant types and for several countries, are also given. A preliminary analysis of the data collected allows certain considerations to be made relating to the influence of size, age and plant type, as well as of different national practices in plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  2. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    Brown, Peter [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada). Uranium and Radioactive Waste Div.; Pescatore, Claudio [Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France)

    2006-09-15

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available.

  3. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available

  4. Labour Taxation in Poland Compared to the Other OECD Countries

    Kryńska Elżbieta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Celem opracowania jest identyfikacja wysokości i zróżnicowania opodatkowania pracy, wyrażanego poprzez tzw. klin podatkowy, w Polsce na tle krajów OECD. Identyfikacji tej dokonano na podstawie analizy danych statystycznych zgromadzonych w bazie OECD obejmujących lata 2000-2012. W opracowaniu dokonano interpretacji pojęć kluczowych, takich jak opodatkowanie pracy, klin podatkowy i pozapłacowe koszty pracy. W dalszej części syntetycznie omówiono ustalenia teoretyczne i wyniki badań empirycznych dotyczących skutków opodatkowania pracy dla funkcjonowania rynku pracy, a zwłaszcza jego wpływ na zatrudnienie i bezrobocie. Badania własne objęły analizę porównawczą wielkości klina podatkowego w różnych typach gospodarstw domowych w Polsce i pozostałych krajach OECD w latach 2000-2012. Najważniejszą konstatacją wynikającą z analiz jest, iż w Polsce opodatkowanie pracy w zbyt małym stopniu uwzględnia sytuację materialną osób nisko zarabiających oraz mających nautrzymaniu dzieci. Wyniki przeprowadzonych badań stały się podstawą sformułowania wniosków syntetycznych i rekomendacji dla Polski. Zasugerowano w nich przede wszystkim, by rozważono selektywne obniżenie pozapłacowych kosztów pracy osób nisko zarabiających oraz obciążonych obowiązkami rodzinnymi.

  5. 20. Annual report. OECD Halden reactor project. 1979

    1981-01-01

    This is the Twentieth Annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities during 1979, the first year of the 1979-1981 Halden Agreement. Research work at the project is focussed on three areas: 1) In-core behaviour of reactor fuel, particularly reliability and safety aspects, which is studied through irradiation of test fuel elements. 2) Prediction, surveillance and control of fuel and core performance, for which models of fuel and core behaviour are developed. 3) Applications of process computers to power plant control, for which prototype software systems and hardware arrangements are developed

  6. Compensation for nuclear damage in the OECD member countries

    1977-01-01

    The study aims to describe briefly the main features of the system for compensation of nuclear damage in OECD Member Countries, emphasising the practical arrangements for compensating such damage, with illustrations drawn from various national legal provisions applicable to such cases. The study indicates and compares legislative provisions which are specifically nuclear, without going into the substantive and procedural rules of the general law, reference to which frequently occurs in enactments relating to nuclear third party liability. The references to national nuclear legislation illustrate the manner in which effect has been given to international Conventions. (Auth.) [fr

  7. Energy statistics of OECD countries 1993-1994

    1996-01-01

    This work contains a compilation of energy supply and consumption data in original units for coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewable combustible and waste. Historical tables summarize data on production, trade and final consumption of hard coal, brown coal, oil, natural gas and electricity. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data. The data contained in this publication are presented in comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent in Energy Balances of OECD Countries, 1993-1994, the sister volume of this publication. (authors). figs., tabs

  8. General Overview On Poverty: The Sample of OECD Countries

    Hasan YÜKSEL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Poverty, as a significant threat to humans all over the world, has been enhancing because of the fact that there has been a strong inequality of the income rates. In this economic system, the poor becomes poorer and the rich becomes richer and the difference between these two groups has become absolute. On the other hand, the international organizations are not effective enough to solve the problem of poverty. In this context, the main aim of the study is to have a look at the general overview of poverty by means of OECD countries and to come to a certain as well as concrete resolutions on its prevention.

  9. Energy Market Liberalisation and Renewable Energy Policies in OECD Countries

    Vona, Francesco; Nicolli, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the effect of energy liberalizations on policies that support renewable energy in a long panel of OECD countries. We estimate this effect accounting for the endogeneity of liberalisation related to joint decisions within a country's energy strategy. Using regulation in other industries as instruments, we find that energy liberalisation increases the public support to renewable energy. The effect of liberalisation is the second largest after the effect of per-capita income and is fully driven by reductions in entry barriers, while the effect of privatisation is negative. Finally, our results are robust to dynamic specifications and various policy indicators. (authors)

  10. Address to the OECD Council. 30 September 1998

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the OECD Council, on 30 September 1998. The conference gave an overview on the role and work of the IAEA in relation to the following main topics: the role of nuclear power in the twenty-first century, the management of nuclear power in this century, the challenge of verification, safeguards and the security of nuclear material, and the particular importance and contribution of nuclear technology transfer

  11. Inequality of energy intensities across OECD countries: a note

    Alcantara, Vicent; Duro, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of Theil's second measure to analyze international energy intensity differences. This index allows differences to be broken down within and between groups of countries in a consistent manner. An analysis of OECD countries for the period 1971-1999 shows some basic points: first, the fall in energy intensities differences is attributable both to within-group and between-group inequality components; second, between-group inequalities are currently the main contributor to the whole inequality value; finally, a detailed exploration on within-group inequalities reveals the significant explanatory role played by EU-countries

  12. OECD:s multilaterala BEPS-konvention – Ärdubbelbeskattning tillbaka på menyn?OECD:s multilateral BEPS-convention – Is double Taxation back on the menu?

    Bender, Lars-Ole

    2017-01-01

    Uppsatsen behandlar OECD:s multilaterala BEPS-konvention för vilken i skrivande stund OECD om några dagar ska hålla en signeringscermoni. Uppsatsen innefattar en redogörelse för bakomliggande traktatsrätt, en redogörelse för konventionen i sig samt hänvisningar till relevant nationell rätt där denna är aktuell för konveentionens tillämpning.

  13. Proceedings of the NEA International Workshop on the Nuclear Innovation road-map (NI2050)

    Ha, Jaejoo HA; Deffrennes, Marc; ); Tromm, Walter; Ait Abderrahim, Hamid; Fernandez Fernandez, Alberto; Speranzini, Robert; Jeong, Ik; Lee, Gye Seok; Castelao Lopez, Carlos; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Puska, Eija Karita; Cordier, Pierre-Yves; Horvath, Akos; Agostini, Pietro; Kamide, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Toru; Roelofs, Ferry; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zezula, Lubor; Rayment, Fiona; Cizelj, Leon; Zimmermann, Martin A.; Schmitz, Bruno; Martin-Ramos, Manuel; Andreeva-Andrievskaya, Lyudmila N.; Monti, Stefano; ); Paillere, Henri; ); Caron-Charles, Marylise; Gulliford, Jim; ); Breest, Axel; ); McGrath, Margaret; Bignan, Gilles

    2015-07-01

    The two-day workshop held at the OECD Headquarters in Paris on 7-8 July 2015, brought together some of the leading experts in the field of nuclear fission research, development and demonstration. The purpose was to launch the NEA Nuclear Innovation 2050 Initiative, aiming, after a first survey phase, at producing a road-map of main priority research programmes and infrastructures necessary to support the role nuclear energy may play in the low carbon power sector of the future. This might then further lead to some ad-hoc cooperation frameworks that help to effectively implement key priorities coming out of the road-mapping. The workshop was organised into the following five sessions: 1 - Opening session on NI2050: vision and main objectives; 2 - National presentations on nuclear fission research and innovation activities (programmes, infrastructures, budgets); 3 - Presentations on some existing international nuclear fission road-maps and co-operation frameworks; 4 - Defining the way forward for NI2050: survey, road-mapping and priorities and co-operation; 5 - Open discussion. These proceedings bring together the available presentations (slides) given during the workshop: 1. Opening session on NI2050: vision and main objectives: Setting the scene: NEA/IEA Nuclear Energy road-map 2050 (Jaejoo Ha); Proposed scope and organisation of the NI2050 project launching, taking stock of the IEA Energy RD and D survey and going further (Marc Deffrennes); 2. National presentations on nuclear fission research and innovation activities (programmes, infrastructures, budgets): Overview of German Situation with focus on HGF NUSAFE - HELMHOLTZ (W. Tromm); Investing in Nuclear Innovation in Belgium - SCKCEN (Hamid Ait Abderrahim and Alberto Fernandez); Canadian Nuclear Laboratories: Nuclear S and T and Innovation (R. Speranzini); ROK's Nuclear Policies and R and D Programs - KAERI (Ik Jeong and Lee Gye Seok); R and D Spanish Nuclear Platform (C. Castelao); NOE-NE Programs and

  14. NEA activities on medical isotope supply issues

    Westmacott, C.; Vance, R.

    2009-01-01

    Medical radioisotopes play a vital role in modern medical practices. One of their principal uses is for nuclear diagnostic imaging techniques. These techniques are powerful and non-invasive, allowing the identification of common diseases such as heart conditions and cancer at an early stage, tracking disease progression and providing predictive information about likely success of a therapy. Such techniques enable precise and accurate management of the disease and may significantly assist in the medical decision-making process, for example removing the need for surgical intervention to obtain diagnostic information. Every year, 46 million people are estimated to benefit globally from such nuclear medicine testing. However, over the last few years there have been a number of supply shortages of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) and its decay product, Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), the most widely used medical radioisotope. These isotopes decay within a matter of days; therefore they must be produced continually in order to meet demand. Most recently, the unexpected extended shutdown of Canada's NRU research reactor - which produces approximately 35 percent of world Mo-99 supply - has compounded existing concerns regarding the supply reliability of these medical radioisotopes. Currently, five reactors between 42 and 52 years old produce over 95 percent of the world's supply of Mo-99 and face challenges in maintaining a continuous supply to the health community. As outlined above, disruptions in this supply chain have affected the availability of vital medical testing for millions of patients around the world. On 29-30 January 2009, the NEA hosted a workshop on Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes at the request of the Government of Canada. The workshop assembled an international group of experts to identify challenges faced in providing a reliable supply of Mo-99 and Tc-99m and measures that should be taken to ensure such reliability. Workshop participants discussed a wide

  15. The OECD and sustainable development: A call for leadership

    Johnston, D. [OECD, Paris, (France)

    2003-01-01

    Progress in sustainable development made by the world's developed economies since the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 is reviewed, including the range of regulatory instruments to reduce pollution and natural resource use, and the increased application of science and technology. Despite substantial progress, there are many gaps still remaining, and dealing with them is more difficult the longer the action is delayed. Some of the more serious threats remaining are the changing climate under pressure from the continued release of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the disappointing progress in reducing extreme poverty worldwide, as many of the poorest countries are left at the margin of the globalization process, unable to share in the economic benefits of open markets, technology transfer and private investments. An examination of the remaining problems reveals that the policies and practices followed by the OECD countries such as improved policy coherence and integration, increased accountability of political decisions, application of appropriate criteria to monitor progress in policy integration, citizens' involvement in developing long-term capacities in government, elimination of economically inefficient and environmentally damaging subsidies, could also be effective in the developing countries, provided that they are applied with the right level of ambition and consistency. Some OECD actions currently underway and focusing on options to deal with these problems are also described.

  16. Have Public Finances in the OECD Area Been Sustainable?

    Ferraz Ricardo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to test, from an empirical standpoint, the existence of sustainable public finances in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD area as a whole, over the most recent period of the world economy, 1973-2016. The research methods include not only standard stationarity tests, but also tests, which allow for a structural break. The relevant results of this research are a stationary public budget balance expressed as a percentage of GDP and a debt to GDP ratio that is stationary in first differences. According to the literature, this means that a “necessary and sufficient” condition is fulfilled for proving the existence of a strong sustainability. We hope this research can make a valuable contribution to the debate regarding public finances in the world economy. To obtain other relevant conclusions, additional tests will need to be performed in the future in order to assess which members are contributing to the fiscal sustainability of the OECD aggregate.

  17. A systematic review of medical practice variation in OECD countries.

    Corallo, Ashley N; Croxford, Ruth; Goodman, David C; Bryan, Elisabeth L; Srivastava, Divya; Stukel, Therese A

    2014-01-01

    Major variations in medical practice have been documented internationally. Variations raise questions about the quality, equity, and efficiency of resource allocation and use, and have important implications for health care and health policy. To perform a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature on medical practice variations in OECD countries. We searched MEDLINE to find publications on medical practice variations in OECD countries published between 2000 and 2011. We present an overview of the characteristics of published studies as well as the magnitude of variations for select high impact conditions. A total of 836 studies were included. Consistent with the gray literature, there were large variations across regions, hospitals and physician practices for almost every condition and procedure studied. Many studies focused on high-impact conditions, but very few looked at the causes or outcomes of medical practice variations. While there were an overwhelming number of publications on medical practice variations the coverage was broad and not often based on a theoretical construct. Future studies should focus on conditions and procedures that are clinically important, policy relevant, resource intensive, and have high levels of public awareness. Further study of the causes and consequences of variations is important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fathers’ Leave and Fathers’ Involvement: Evidence from Four OECD Countries

    Huerta, Maria C.; Adema, Willem; Baxter, Jennifer; Han, Wen-Jui; Lausten, Mette; Lee, RaeHyuck; Waldfogel, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several OECD countries have taken steps to promote policies encouraging fathers to spend more time caring for young children, thereby promoting a more gender equal division of care work. Evidence, mainly for the United States and United Kingdom, has shown fathers taking some time off work around childbirth are more likely to be involved in childcare related activities than fathers who do not take time off. This paper conducts a first cross-national analysis on the association between fathers’ leave taking and fathers’ involvement when children are young. It uses birth cohort data of children born around 2000 from four OECD countries: Australia, Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Results show that the majority of fathers take time off around childbirth independent of the leave policies in place. In all countries, except Denmark, important socio-economic differences between fathers who take leave and those who do not are observed. In addition, fathers who take leave, especially those taking two weeks or more, are more likely to carry out childcare related activities when children are young. This study adds to the evidence that suggests that parental leave for fathers is positively associated with subsequent paternal involvement. PMID:28479865

  19. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark. Summary Record of the First Workshop (V1000-CT1)

    2003-01-01

    The first workshop for the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark TT Benchmark was hosted by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, France. The V1000CT benchmark defines standard problems for validation of coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron-kinetics/system thermal-hydraulics codes for application to Soviet-designed VVER-1000 reactors using actual plant data without any scaling. The overall objective is to access computer codes used in the safety analysis of VVER power plants, specifically for their use in reactivity transient simulations in a VVER-1000. The V1000CT benchmark consists of two phases: V1000CT-1 - simulation of the switching on of one main coolant pump (MCP) while the other three MCP are in operation, and V1000CT- 2 - calculation of coolant mixing tests and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) scenario. Further background information on this benchmark can be found at the OECD/NEA benchmark web site . The purpose of the first workshop was to review the benchmark activities after the Starter Meeting held last year in Dresden, Germany: to discuss the participants' feedback and modifications introduced in the Benchmark Specifications on Phase 1; to present and to discuss modelling issues and preliminary results from the three exercises of Phase 1; to discuss the modelling issues of Exercise 1 of Phase 2; and to define work plan and schedule in order to complete the two phases

  20. Assessment of multi-dimensional analysis cacpacity of the MARS using the OECD-SETH PANDA tests

    Bae, S. W.; Jung, J. J.; Jung, B. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of OECD/NEA-PANDA tests are to validate and assess computer codes that analyze the non-condensable gas concentrations and mixing phenomena in a reactor containment building. Especially, the main issue is multi-dimensional analysis capability which is involved in the mixing of non-condensable gases, i. e. hydrogen. The main tests consist of a superheated steam flow injection into a large vessel initially filled with air or air/helium mixtures. Then the temperature and concentration of noncondensable gases are measured. A pre-calculation has been performed with the MARS about PANDA Tests even though MARS is not a containment analysis code. Three cases among 25 PANDA Tests are selected and are modeled to simulate the jet plumes and air mixing in a large vessel. The dimensions of large vessel are 4 m diameter and 8 m height. For the conclusion of calculation, the cylindrical vessel which dimensions are 4 m diameter and 8 m height was simplified as rectangular geometry. It is revealed that the MARS code has the capability to distinguish the multi-dimensional distribution of the velocity and the temperature fields

  1. The OECD expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate--towards the development of improved OECD guidelines for the testing of nanomaterials.

    Kühnel, Dana; Nickel, Carmen

    2014-02-15

    On behalf of the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) an expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate of nanomaterials (NMs) took place in January 2013 in Berlin. At this meeting experts from science, industry and regulatory bodies discussed the applicability of OECD test guidelines (TGs) for chemicals to nanomaterials. The objective was to discuss the current state of the relevant science and provide recommendations to the OECD WPMN on (1) the need for updating current OECD TGs and the need for developing new ones specific to nanomaterials; and (2) guidance needed for the appropriate and valid testing of environmental fate and ecotoxicity endpoints for NMs. Experts at the workshop agreed that the majority of the OECD TG for chemicals were generally applicable for the testing of NM, with the exception of TG 105 (water solubility) and 106 (adsorption-desorption). Additionally, the workshop also highlighted considerations when conducting OECD chemical TG on nanomaterials (e.g., sample preparation, dispersion, analysis, dosimetry and characterisation). These considerations will lead to the future development of proposals for new TG and guidance documents (GDs) to ensure that OECD TG give meaningful, repeatable, and accurate results when used for nanomaterials. This report provides a short overview of topics discussed during the meeting and the main outcomes. A more detailed report of the workshop will become available through the OECD, however, due to the urgency of having OECD TG relevant for nanomaterials, this brief report is being shared with the scientific community through this communication. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. First EURONEAR NEA discoveries from La Palma using the INT

    Vaduvescu, O.; Hudin, L.; Tudor, V.; Char, F.; Mocnik, T.; Kwiatkowski, T.; de Leon, J.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Alvarez, C.; Popescu, M.; Cornea, R.; Díaz Alfaro, M.; Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Kamiński, K.; Stecklum, B.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sota, A.; Casanova, V.; Martin Ruiz, S.; Duffard, R.; Zamora, O.; Gomez-Jimenez, M.; Micheli, M.; Koschny, D.; Busch, M.; Knofel, A.; Schwab, E.; Negueruela, I.; Dhillon, V.; Sahman, D.; Marchant, J.; Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Riddick, F. C.; Mendez, J.; Lopez-Martinez, F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hollands, M.; Kong, A. K. H.; Jin, R.; Hidalgo, S.; Murabito, S.; Font, J.; Bereciartua, A.; Abe, L.; Bendjoya, P.; Rivet, J. P.; Vernet, D.; Mihalea, S.; Inceu, V.; Gajdos, S.; Veres, P.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Abreu Rodriguez, D.

    2015-05-01

    Since 2006, the European Near Earth Asteroids Research (EURONEAR) project has been contributing to the research of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) within a European network. One of the main aims is the amelioration of the orbits of NEAs, and starting in 2014 February we focus on the recovery of one-opposition NEAs using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in La Palma in override mode. Part of this NEA recovery project, since 2014 June EURONEAR serendipitously started to discover and secure the first NEAs from La Palma and using the INT, thanks to the teamwork including amateurs and students who promptly reduce the data, report discoveries and secure new objects recovered with the INT and few other telescopes from the EURONEAR network. Five NEAs were discovered with the INT, including 2014 LU14, 2014 NL52 (one very fast rotator), 2014 OL339 (the fourth known Earth quasi-satellite), 2014 SG143 (a quite large NEA), and 2014 VP. Another very fast moving NEA was discovered but was unfortunately lost due to lack of follow-up time. Additionally, another 14 NEA candidates were identified based on two models, all being rapidly followed-up using the INT and another 11 telescopes within the EURONEAR network. They include one object discovered by Pan-STARRS, two Mars crossers, two Hungarias, one Jupiter trojan, and other few inner main belt asteroids (MBAs). Using the INT and Sierra Nevada 1.5 m for photometry, then the Gran Telescopio de Canarias for spectroscopy, we derived the very rapid rotation of 2014 NL52, then its albedo, magnitude, size, and its spectral class. Based on the total sky coverage in dark conditions, we evaluate the actual survey discovery rate using 2-m class telescopes. One NEA is possible to be discovered randomly within minimum 2.8 deg2 and maximum 5.5 deg2. These findings update our past statistics, being based on double sky coverage and taking into account the recent increase in discovery.

  3. OECD/CSNI Workshop on Best Estimate Methods and Uncertainty Evaluations - Workshop Proceedings

    2013-01-01

    Best-Estimate Methods plus Uncertainty Evaluation are gaining increased interest in the licensing process. On the other hand, lessons learnt from the BEMUSE (NEA/CSNI/R(2011)3) and SM2A (NEA/CSNI/R(2011)3) benchmarks, progress of UAM benchmark, and answers to the WGAMA questionnaire on the Use of Best-Estimate Methodologies show that improvements of the present methods are necessary and new applications appear. The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for a wide range of experts to exchange information in the area of best estimate analysis and uncertainty evaluation methods and address issues drawn-up from BEMUSE, UAM and SM2A activities. Both, improvement of existing methods and recent new developments are included. As a result of the workshop development, a set of recommendations, including lines for future activities were proposed. The organisation of the Workshop was divided into three parts: Opening session including key notes from OECD and IAEA representatives, Technical sessions, and a Wrap-up session. All sessions included a debate with participation from the audience constituted by 71 attendees. The workshop consisted of four technical sessions: a) Development achievements of BEPU methods and State of the Art: The objective of this session was to present the different approaches to deal with Best Estimate codes and uncertainties evaluations. A total of six papers were presented. One initial paper summarized the existing methods; the following open papers were focused on specific methods stressing their bases, peculiarities and advantages. As a result of the session a picture of the current State of the Art was obtained. b) International comparative activities: This session reviewed the set of international activities around the subject of BEPU methods benchmarking and development. From each of the activities a description of the objectives, development, main results, conclusions and recommendations (in case it is finalized) was presented. This

  4. Role of Attractiveness Factors of the OECD Countries in Immigrations

    Kristina Duvnjak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An influx of immigrants to developed countries, is an ongoing process that lasts for centuries. Numerous researches have been written encouraged by this topic. Today’s free labor market enables immigrants to become a very influential aspect of every economy. With general stagnation and aging of word population, especially European, a question about level of immigration impact on active labor market appears. This paper is testing the stated, what are the factors that attract immigrants in OECD countries. Considering the main factors that encourage immigrants to migrate in specific country, this paper is testing how total GDP per country, as an indicator of level of economic growth, and social spending, as an indicator of support to those who need it, influence on their decision. The determined variable is asylum seeker as it is much precise in stating the thesis. The cross-section model which is used with 2015 data shows significant results.

  5. Overview of nuclear data measurement facilities in OECD countries

    Bioux, P.; Rowlands, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    In 1992 EDF commissioned a review of activity in the fields of nuclear data for fission power technology applications in OECD countries. The review was carried out in cooperation with the consultants EUROGRAM. This paper presents a summary. The situation is of concern to the French nuclear industry because of the few measurement facilities which are now funded for work in the field and the reductions in the numbers of scientists expert in measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. There are requirements which justify work to improve knowledge of many items of nuclear data. To ensure maintenance of expertise the French Nuclear Industry has arranged for several young scientists to work with leading experts in the different fields. However, the problem of continued availability of facilities remains. (authors)

  6. Electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle in OECD countries

    1988-01-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member Countries. In the questionnaire of January 1988, countries were asked to provide data for 1986 and 1987 and most likely projections up to the year 2005. The replies to the questionnaire (or estimates for unavailable data) are presented in this Booklet. Data for 1987 are provisional for several countries. The data on electricity generation and electric capacity are presented to the year 2005, and the data on fuel cycle services to the year 2000. The Addendum contains an analysis of the present and past projections for installed nuclear capacity to 2000. It shows the total capacity of those plants connected to the grid, under construction and firmly planned to be in operation in 2000 as 282 GWe. The new projection of 300 GWe is above this estimate, indicating that some countries are considering further expansion of their nuclear capacities within this time-frame [fr

  7. Nuclear power in the OECD countries results and current issues

    Jones, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    The first use of nuclear power for the generation of electricity on a commercial scale occurred in the United Kingdom in 1956. Today, 13 OECD countries have 318 nuclear units in operation and 66 more in construction or on order. This outstanding achievement is the result of the successful organization, start up, and operation of an industry to design, build, equip, fuel, and maintain these facilites. Nuclear power, however, is currently troubled by a number of issues that may impair its ability to reach its full potential. The industry has acknowledged problems that can be and are being managed. But the industry also has a number of political difficulties that could be beyond its ability to resolve with its own resources. These are issues common to the introduction of new technologies into a complex world. Nevertheless, nuclear power continues to be the means by which we can provide the electric power needed to raise the living standard of everyone on the globe

  8. The Environmental Kuznets Curve. An empirical analysis for OECD countries

    Georgiev, E.

    2008-09-15

    This paper tests the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis for four local (SOx, NOx, CO, VOC) and two global (CO2, GHG) air pollutants. Using a new panel data set of thirty OECD countries, the paper finds that the postulated inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution does not hold for all gases. A meaningful Environmental Kuznets Curve exists only for CO, VOC and NOx, where for CO2 the curve is monotonically increasing. For GHG there is indication of an inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution, but still most countries are on the increasing path of the curve and hence the future development of the curve is uncertain. For SOx it was found that emissions follow an U-shaped curve. Based on the empirical results, the paper concludes that the Environmental Kuznets Curve does not hold for all gases, it is rather an empirical artefact than a regularity.

  9. The Environmental Kuznets Curve. An empirical analysis for OECD countries

    Georgiev, E.

    2008-09-01

    This paper tests the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis for four local (SOx, NOx, CO, VOC) and two global (CO2, GHG) air pollutants. Using a new panel data set of thirty OECD countries, the paper finds that the postulated inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution does not hold for all gases. A meaningful Environmental Kuznets Curve exists only for CO, VOC and NOx, where for CO2 the curve is monotonically increasing. For GHG there is indication of an inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution, but still most countries are on the increasing path of the curve and hence the future development of the curve is uncertain. For SOx it was found that emissions follow an U-shaped curve. Based on the empirical results, the paper concludes that the Environmental Kuznets Curve does not hold for all gases, it is rather an empirical artefact than a regularity.

  10. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in OECD Countries

    Austin, Stephanie E.; Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D.; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a major challenge facing public health. National governments play a key role in public health adaptation to climate change, but there are competing views on what responsibilities and obligations this will—or should—include in different nations. This study aims to: (1) examine how national-level public health adaptation is occurring in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries; (2) examine the roles national governments are taking in public health adaptation; and (3) critically appraise three key governance dimensions of national-level health adaptation—cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning—and identify practical examples suited to different contexts. We systematically reviewed publicly available public health adaptation to climate change documents and webpages by national governments in ten OECD countries using systematic web searches, assessment of self-reporting, and content analysis. Our findings suggest national governments are primarily addressing infectious disease and heat-related risks posed by climate change, typically emphasizing capacity building or information-based groundwork initiatives. We find national governments are taking a variety of approaches to public health adaptation to climate change that do not follow expected convergence and divergence by governance structure. We discuss practical options for incorporating cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning into a variety of contexts and identify leaders national governments can look to to inform their public health adaptation planning. Following the adoption of the Paris Agreement and subsequent increased momentum for adaptation, research tracking adaptation is needed to define what health adaptation looks like in practice, reveal insights that can be taken up across states and sectors, and ensure policy orientated learning. PMID:27618074

  11. Electricity supply industry. Structure, ownership and regulation in OECD countries

    1994-01-01

    This study surveys developments and implications in the electricity supply industries in OECD countries. Chapter 1 introduces the issues. (Competition or electricity supply for everybody?) Electricity markets are dynamic and the participants are restructuring and repositioning themselves in order to benefit from new opportunities or policy initiatives. These changes are described in chapter 2. Privatisation is being pursued by some governments, not only for reasons of economic efficiency. Arguments for and against privatisation and different ways of introducing it are discussed in chapter 3. Fair trade and competition legislation, as it applies to all corporate entities, creates the institutional framework within which the utility has to operate. Various approaches to regulation and recent developments are described in chapter 4; the implications of regulatory changes are analysed in chapter 5. Having surveyed recent developments and their direct consequences, this study then goes on to look at their broader implications for the achievement of a range of energy policy objectives. Chapter 6 looks at fuel choice and investment decisions. Chapter 7 considers the issue of security of electricity supply, which has many special characteristics for both suppliers and regulators. OECD countries use different approaches for ensuring security of supply. Chapter 8 looks at environmental protection. Chapter 9 looks at energy efficiency. Chapter 10 discusses pricing. The introduction of competition has significant effects: it tends to reduce costs, remove cross subsidies, and bring prices more closely in line with the structure of costs. But there is no clear evidence at this stage as to whether, in the long run, competition produces lower overall prices. Finally chapter 11 analyses risk. The electricity business, like every other business, is faced with a variety of risks that cover every financial and technical facet of electricity production, transport, and supply. (N.C.)

  12. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in OECD Countries.

    Austin, Stephanie E; Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D

    2016-09-07

    Climate change is a major challenge facing public health. National governments play a key role in public health adaptation to climate change, but there are competing views on what responsibilities and obligations this will-or should-include in different nations. This study aims to: (1) examine how national-level public health adaptation is occurring in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries; (2) examine the roles national governments are taking in public health adaptation; and (3) critically appraise three key governance dimensions of national-level health adaptation-cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning-and identify practical examples suited to different contexts. We systematically reviewed publicly available public health adaptation to climate change documents and webpages by national governments in ten OECD countries using systematic web searches, assessment of self-reporting, and content analysis. Our findings suggest national governments are primarily addressing infectious disease and heat-related risks posed by climate change, typically emphasizing capacity building or information-based groundwork initiatives. We find national governments are taking a variety of approaches to public health adaptation to climate change that do not follow expected convergence and divergence by governance structure. We discuss practical options for incorporating cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning into a variety of contexts and identify leaders national governments can look to to inform their public health adaptation planning. Following the adoption of the Paris Agreement and subsequent increased momentum for adaptation, research tracking adaptation is needed to define what health adaptation looks like in practice, reveal insights that can be taken up across states and sectors, and ensure policy orientated learning.

  13. OECD/NRC Benchmark Based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Test (PSBT). Volume I: Experimental Database and Final Problem Specifications

    Rubin, A.; Schoedel, A.; Avramova, M.; Utsuno, H.; Bajorek, S.; Velazquez-Lozada, A.

    2012-01-01

    The need to refine models for best-estimate calculations, based on good-quality experimental data, has been expressed in many recent meetings in the field of nuclear applications. The needs arising in this respect should not be limited to the currently available macroscopic methods but should be extended to next-generation analysis techniques that focus on more microscopic processes. One of the most valuable databases identified for the thermal-hydraulics modelling was developed by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan, which includes sub-channel void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) measurements in a representative Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly. Part of this database has been made available for this international benchmark activity entitled 'NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT) benchmark'. This international project has been officially approved by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and endorsed by the OECD/NEA. The benchmark team has been organised based on the collaboration between Japan and the USA. A large number of international experts have agreed to participate in this programme. The fine-mesh high-quality sub-channel void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling data encourages advancement in understanding and modelling complex flow behaviour in real bundles. Considering that the present theoretical approach is relatively immature, the benchmark specification is designed so that it will systematically assess and compare the participants' analytical models on the prediction of detailed void distributions and DNB. The development of truly mechanistic models for DNB prediction is currently underway. The benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitised computer graphic images are the

  14. OECD Skills Outlook 2013: First Results from the Survey of Adult Skills

    OECD Publishing, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This first "OECD Skills Outlook" presents the initial results of the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), which evaluates the skills of adults in 22 OECD member countries and two partner countries. The PIAAC survey was designed to provide insights into the availability of some key skills and how they are used at work and at home through the…

  15. Adults, Computers and Problem Solving: "What's the Problem?" OECD Skills Studies

    Chung, Ji Eun; Elliott, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The "OECD Skills Studies" series aims to provide a strategic approach to skills policies. It presents OECD internationally comparable indicators and policy analysis covering issues such as: quality of education and curricula; transitions from school to work; vocational education and training (VET); employment and unemployment; innovative…

  16. OECD Work on Technology and Education: Innovative Learning Environments as an Integrating Framework

    Istance, David; Kools, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This article presents in summary a selection of the work conducted by OECD in the field of technology and education, which has been an on-going focus of OECD work since the 1980s. Recently, much of this has been under the heading of "New Millennium Learners", but it has also included the widening of student achievement surveys towards…

  17. Improving Education Achievement and Attainment in Luxembourg. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 508

    Carey, David; Ernst, Ekkehard

    2006-01-01

    Improving education achievement in Luxembourg is a priority for strengthening productivity growth and enhancing residents' employment prospects in the private sector, where employers mainly hire cross-border workers. Student achievement in Luxembourg is below the OECD average according to the 2003 OECD PISA study, with the performance gap between…

  18. School-to-Work Transitions in the OECD: Do Education Systems Make a Difference?

    Karmel, Tom

    2017-01-01

    High unemployment among the young is a concern in many OECD countries. A key issue for policy makers is whether the education system has a role to play in assisting the transition from education to work or whether economic issues dominate. This paper uses OECD country-level data to see whether the structure of countries' education systems,…

  19. Golden Relics & Historical Standards: How the OECD is Expanding Global Education Governance through PISA for Development

    Addey, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Setting this paper against the backdrop of scholarly research on recent changes in the OECD's approach and workings in education, I analyse how the OECD has reinforced its infrastructural and epistemological global governance through the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) for Development (PISA-D). Drawing on qualitative data,…

  20. OECD Health Care Quality Indicator Project. The expert panel on primary care prevention and health promotion

    Marshall, Martin; Klazinga, Niek; Leatherman, Sheila; Hardy, Charlie; Bergmann, Eckhard; Pisco, Luis; Mattke, Soeren; Mainz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This article describes a project undertaken as part of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)'s Healthcare Quality Indicator (HCQI) Project, which aimed to develop a set of quality indicators representing the domains of primary care, prevention and health

  1. Digital Broadband Content: Digital Content Strategies and policies. OECD Digital Economy Papers, No. 119

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    The development of digital content raises new issues as rapid technological developments challenge existing business models and government policies. This OECD study identifies and discusses six groups of business and public policy issues and illustrates these with existing and potential OECD Digital Content Strategies and Policies: (1) Innovation…

  2. Taxation and business environment as drivers of foreign direct investment in OECD countries

    Hájková, Dana; Nicoletti, G.; Vartia, L.; Yoo, K.-Y.

    2006/2, č. 43 (2006), s. 7-38 ISSN 0255-0822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : taxation * foreign direct investment * OECD Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/62/30/40505831.pdf

  3. Comparison of Early Childhood Education (Preschool Education) in Turkey and OECD Countries

    Ozgan, Habib

    2010-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to evaluate how the difference the early childhood education in Turkey and OECD countries. The outstanding point evaluated by the teachers about the difference between the education in Turkey and that in OECD countries and the conditions needing to be improved was the compare of age groups benefiting from the services…

  4. Fiscal Rules and the Composition of Government Expenditures in OECD Countries

    Dahan, Momi; Strawczynski, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s many OECD countries have adopted fiscal rules. After the adoption of these rules, the ratio of social transfers to government consumption substantially declined, and it recovered following the global economic crisis. Using a sample of 22 OECD countries, we found a negative effect of fiscal rules on the ratio of social transfers to…

  5. Babies and bosses: reconciling work and family life : a synthesis of findings for OECD countries

    2007-01-01

    ... of population ageing, and well-designed policies may also help raise fertility rates from the exceptionally low levels that exist in some countries. In recent years, the OECD Babies and Bosses reviews of policies to promote work and family reconciliation covered Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands (OECD, 2002a); Austria, Ireland and ...

  6. OECD - Majandusliku Koostöö ja Arengu Organisatsioon / Kairi Saar, Jane Makke

    Saar, Kairi, 1973-

    2011-01-01

    Ülevaade OECD ajaloost, tegevusest, liikmesuse kriteeriumitest (riikide sarnane mõtteviis) ning majandusprognoose, uuringuid ja statistikat sisaldavatest väljaannetest. Eesti liitumisest organisatsiooniga 2010. a., Eesti ja Balti riikide kohta avaldatud väljaanded. Rahvusraamatukogu kui OECD hoiuraamatukogu Eestis

  7. OECD Ülkelerinde Eğlence Vergisi Uygulamaları(Amusement Tax Applications in the OECD Countries

    Bernur AÇIKGÖZ ERSOY

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 17th century, “the right of the poor” was a transitory tax on the income of entertainment in favor of public assistance in France. “The right of the poor” was abolished later by the regime of Vichy, which created a permanent tax on games and entertainment to the direct benefit of the communes. Later, other European countries followed the example of France by introducing a so-called amusement tax. The paper is organized as follows: The first part presents the historical development and theoretical base of amusement tax and amusement tax applications in the OECD countries. The second part shows the amusement tax application in Turkey, and the last part resumes arguments in favor of the maintenance or an abolishment of the tax on entertainment.

  8. Progress on Using NEA Cathodes in an RF Gun

    Fliller, Raymond P; Blüm, Hans; Edwards, Helen; Hüning, Markus; Schultheiss, Tom; Sinclair, Charles K

    2005-01-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications, and are an attractive electron source for the ILC. Using a NEA GaAs photocathode in such a gun allows for the production of polarized electron beams. However the lifetime of a NEA cathode in this environment is reduced by ion and electron bombardment and residual gas oxidation. We report progress made with studies to produce a RF gun using a NEA GaAs photocathode to produce polarized electron beams. Attempts to reduce the residual gas pressure in the gun are discussed. Initial measurements of ion flux through the cathode port are compared with simulations of ion bombardment. Future directions are also discussed.

  9. Criptococosis cutánea primaria en paciente inmunocompetente.

    Vázquez-Osorio, Igor; García-Rodiño, Sara; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Marta; Labandeira, Javier; Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Sánchez-Aguilar, MDolores; Vázquez-Veiga, Hugo

    2016-05-15

    La criptococosis cutánea es una micosis propia de pacientes inmunodeprimidos, sobre todo aquellos con infección por el virusde la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH). Sin embargo, existen casos infrecuentes de criptococosis cutánea en pacientes inmunocompetentes, que suelen simular otras dermatosis, lo que retrasa su diagnóstico y tratamiento. Presentamos el caso de un varón pluripatológico de 79 años, con úlceras dolorosas en dorso de mano derecha que no respondían a tratamientos tópicos. A través del estudio histopatológico y micológico se alcanzó el diagnóstico de criptococosis cutánea primaria, lográndose la remisión de las lesiones tras 6 meses de tratamiento con fluconazol.

  10. Summary of nuclear power and fuel cycle data in OECD Member countries

    1983-03-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member countries. Member countries were asked to provide, where available, various statistics for the previous calendar year (1982) and modified projections up to the year 2000. Tables 1 to 8 are based on the responses received and update the March 1982 issue. Tables 3 to 8 show the revised electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle supply and demand projections in OECD Member countries to the year 2000. Figure 1 illustrates the contribution of the different fuel sources to the OECD's electricity generation from 1974 to 1982. Figure 2 shows the nuclear share of electricity generation in the OECD countries for 1982 and 1985. Figure 3 gives the fuel cycle supply and demand from the Tables 5, 6 and 8 in the OECD area

  11. Practical Application of Art. 9 OECD Model Convention: the Czech Republic

    Veronika Solilová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All transfer prices determined between the associated enterprises must comply with the arm’s length principle. The arm’s length principle for associated enterprises is mentioned in Art. 9(1 of the OECD Model Convention, which was also adopted by the OECD Member states into their national law. However, not all OECD Member states adopted the next part of Art. 9, namely Art. 9(2, with the same way, some of them, like the Czech Republic, entered a reservation on Art. 9 (2 OECD Model Convention. In this paper the practical application of Art. 9 is analyzed from the point of view of the Czech Ministry of Finance, where the corresponding adjustment and time-limit issue are highlighted. On the basis of the results of analysis, where the history, context and purpose of Art. 9 OECD Model Convention have to be taken into account, are made some recommendations.

  12. neas de girasol de la EEA Pergamino

    GONZÁLEZ, J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron tres grupos de líneas de girasol (Helianthus annuus de la EEA Pergamino del INTA. Grupo 1: líneas derivadas de los compuestos P1, P2, P4, PGRK y KLM liberadas en la década del 90. Grupo 2: líneas GP logradas de cruzas entre las del grupo 1 con otras fuentes, liberadas a partir del 2001. Grupo 3: líneas AO (contenido de oleico > 80% derivadas de materiales del North Dakota y de cruzas con materiales locales. Se analizaron los siguientes caracteres: número de aquenios por capítulo, peso de cien aquenios, porcentaje de pepita y aceite, altura de planta y número de días desde siembra a floración. El objetivo fue evaluar la variabilidad del germoplasma entre grupos y las asociaciones entre caracteres dentro de cada grupo, para identificar el idiotipo y las características diferenciales. El efecto de la selección se manifestó claramente al comparar los grupos. En el Grupo 1, la selección se efectuó principalmente por rendimiento de semilla y en los Grupos 2 y 3, se dirigió a la mejora del contenido porcentual de aceite y contenido porcentual de oleico respectivamente. Las líneas del Grupo 2 y Grupo 3 (AO superaron en contenido de aceite a las del Grupo 1, las cuales fueron de mayor altura y peso de aquenio. Dentro de cada grupo se identificaron de 4 a 6 subgrupos caracterizados por los objetivos del mejoramiento y diferenciándose líneas independientes derivadas por objetivos de selección indirecta. El germoplasma evaluado podría incorporarse a diferentes “backgrounds” genéticos según los objetivos del mejoramiento.

  13. In-vessel core degradation code validation matrix update 1996-1999. Report by an OECD/NEA group of experts

    2001-02-01

    In 1991 the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) issued a State-of-the-Art Report (SOAR) on In-Vessel Core Degradation in Light Water Reactor (LWR) Severe Accidents. Based on the recommendations of this report a Validation Matrix for severe accident modelling codes was produced. Experiments performed up to the end of 1993 were considered for this validation matrix. To include recent experiments and to enlarge the scope, an update was formally inaugurated in January 1999 by the Task Group on Degraded Core Cooling, a sub-group of Principal Working Group 2 (PWG-2) on Coolant System Behaviour, and a selection of writing group members was commissioned. The present report documents the results of this study. The objective of the Validation Matrix is to define a basic set of experiments, for which comparison of the measured and calculated parameters forms a basis for establishing the accuracy of test predictions, covering the full range of in-vessel core degradation phenomena expected in light water reactor severe accident transients. The emphasis is on integral experiments, where interactions amongst key phenomena as well as the phenomena themselves are explored; however separate-effects experiments are also considered especially where these extend the parameter ranges to cover those expected in postulated LWR severe accident transients. As well as covering PWR and BWR designs of Western origin, the scope of the review has been extended to Eastern European (VVER) types. Similarly, the coverage of phenomena has been extended, starting as before from the initial heat-up but now proceeding through the in-core stage to include introduction of melt into the lower plenum and further to core coolability and retention to the lower plenum, with possible external cooling. Items of a purely thermal hydraulic nature involving no core degradation are excluded, having been covered in other validation matrix studies. Concerning fission product behaviour, the effect of core degradation on fission product release is considered, but not its detailed mechanisms; fission product transport is also outside the scope and has been covered in other validation matrix studies. The report initially provides brief overviews of the main LWR severe accident sequences and of the dominant phenomena involved. The experimental database is then summarised, with test conditions, phenomena covered and parameter ranges being presented in concise standard tabular formats to aid comparison amongst the different experimental series. These data are then cross-referenced against a condensed set of the phenomena and test condition headings presented earlier, judging the results against a set of selection criteria and identifying key tests of particular value. Areas where data are still required are identified. Finally, the main conclusions and recommendations are listed. The main body of the report is supplemented by an appendix which summarises the experiments listing the most important references for data and evaluation reports for each test and/or relevant series, indicating the availability of the data for further analysis, while in addition evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the experiments in providing data for code validation. Overall, the report is designed to help code developers in choosing tests to help formulate and validate new models, by summarizing the relevant data in one place in a convenient form, and to aid reviewers and users of codes to judge whether validation of a particular programme is sufficient for given plant applications, by checking that the relevant phenomena and parameter ranges have been covered. (authors)

  14. ISP 33. OECD/NEA/CSNI International Standard Problem n. 33. Pactel natural circulation stepwise coolant inventory reduction experiment. Comparison report. Volume 1 + 2

    Purhonen, H.; Kouhia, J.; Holmstrom, H.

    1994-12-01

    This is the comparison report of the CSNI ISP n.33, which is based on a natural circulation experiment with various coolant inventories conducted in Pactel facility (Finland), a 1/305 volumetrically scaled, full-height simulator of a Russian type VVER-440 pressurized water reactor. It presents all submitted blind calculational results from different countries, using various codes (Athlet, Cathare2, etc.) and compares them with the experimental data. The Pactel facility and the ISP 33 experiment are described, and the summaries of the participants, the computer codes and the nodalizations used for the blind calculations are presented

  15. Dynamic Monte Carlo transient analysis for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) C5G7-TD benchmark

    Shaukat, Nadeem; Ryu, Min; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    With ever-advancing computer technology, the Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport calculation is expanding its application area to nuclear reactor transient analysis. Dynamic MC (DMC) neutron tracking for transient analysis requires efficient algorithms for delayed neutron generation, neutron population control, and initial condition modeling. In this paper, a new MC steady-state simulation method based on time-dependent MC neutron tracking is proposed for steady-state initial condition modeling; during this process, prompt neutron sources and delayed neutron precursors for the DMC transient simulation can easily be sampled. The DMC method, including the proposed time-dependent DMC steady-state simulation method, has been implemented in McCARD and applied for two-dimensional core kinetics problems in the time-dependent neutron transport benchmark C5G7-TD. The McCARD DMC calculation results show good agreement with results of a deterministic transport analysis code, nTRACER.

  16. ISP - 26 OECD/NEA/CSNI International standard problem n. 26. Rosa-4 LSTF Cold-Leg Small-Break Loca experiment. Comparison report

    1992-02-01

    This report is the final comparison report for the CSNI ISP-26 which was performed for a 5 pc cold-leg small-break LOCA experiment conducted in the ROSA-IV Large scale test facility (LSTF), and simulation of the thermal-hydraulic response of a pressurized water reactor during a small break loss-of-coolant accident or an operational transient. The facility has an overall scaling factor of 1/48, with hot and cold legs sized to conserve the volume scaling. Both the initial steady-state conditions and the test procedures are designed to minimize the effects of scaling compromises. 10 seconds into the break, the turbine throttle valve was closed at a pressurizer pressure of 12.97 MPa. The turbine bypass was inactive, since loss-of-offsite power was assumed concurrently with the scram. The reactor coolant pumps stopped at 265 seconds. The core was uncovered between 120 seconds and 155 seconds into the break. The comparison report presents all the nineteen submitted calculations. A summary description of the participants as well as the computer codes and input decks used by them is provided

  17. Source term assessment, containment atmosphere control systems, and accident consequences. Report to CSNI by an OECD/NEA Group of experts

    1987-04-01

    CSNI Report 135 summarizes the results of the work performed by CSNI's Principal Working Group No. 4 on the Source Term and Environmental Consequences (PWG4) during the period extending from 1983 to 1986. This document contains the latest information on some important topics relating to source terms, accident consequence assessment, and containment atmospheric control systems. It consists of five parts: (1) a Foreword and Executive Summary prepared by PWG4's Chairman; (2) a Report on the Technical Status of the Source Term; (3) a Report on the Technical Status of Filtration and Containment Atmosphere Control Systems for Nuclear Reactors in the Event of a Severe Accident; (4) a Report on the Technical Status of Reactor Accident Consequence Assessment; (5) a list of members of PWG4

  18. PHISICS/RELAP5-3D RESULTS FOR EXERCISES II-1 AND II-2 OF THE OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 BENCHMARK

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Methods group currently leads the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) 350 benchmark. The benchmark consists of a set of lattice-depletion, steady-state, and transient problems that can be used by HTGR simulation groups to assess the performance of their code suites. The paper summarizes the results obtained for the first two transient exercises defined for Phase II of the benchmark. The Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS), coupled with the INL system code RELAP5-3D, was used to generate the results for the Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) (exercise II-1a) and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) (exercise II-2) transients. These exercises require the time-dependent simulation of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics phenomena, and utilize the steady-state solution previously obtained for exercise I-3 of Phase I. This paper also includes a comparison of the benchmark results obtained with a traditional system code “ring” model against a more detailed “block” model that include kinetics feedback on an individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher spatial fidelity that can be obtained by the block model is illustrated with comparisons of the maximum fuel temperatures, especially in the case of natural convection conditions that dominate the DCC and PCC events. Differences up to 125 K (or 10%) were observed between the ring and block model predictions of the DCC transient, mostly due to the block model’s capability of tracking individual block decay powers and more detailed helium flow distributions. In general, the block model only required DCC and PCC calculation times twice as long as the ring models, and it therefore seems that the additional development and calculation time required for the block model could be worth the gain that can be obtained in the spatial resolution

  19. Proceedings of a joint OECD/NEA-IAEA symposium on human factors and organisation in NPP maintenance outages: impact on safety

    1995-01-01

    The sessions of this conference dealt with outage strategy and methods (in Sweden, France and United States), the organisation and management of outages (organisation during refuelling shutdowns in France, safety approaches in France, in the USA, in Canada, in the United Kingdom and in Sweden), case studies and lessons learned (in France, Korea, Sweden, UK, USA), regulatory aspects of outages (UK, Germany, Mexico, France), the development of outage techniques

  20. OECD/SERENA Project Report. Summary and Conclusions

    2015-02-01

    The OECD/SERENA Project Integration Report summarises the outcome of a broad range of activities conducted in the framework of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications Project (OECD/SERENA) to address remaining issues on fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) mechanisms and their effect on ex-vessel steam explosion energetics. The scope the OECD/SERENA project was to resolve uncertainties in the remaining issues and to bring the code capabilities to an adequate level for use in reactor safety applications. This scope was accomplished with the completion of three major tasks: (1) an experimental programme consisting of two sets of steam explosion experiments in two different facilities; (2) an analytical programme consisting of pre-test calculations in support of test specifications and post-test calculations in support of data analysis and code assessment, and also a code benchmark exercise; and (3) a reactor calculation exercise repeating the one performed in the framework of the CSNI/WGAMA SERENA activity performed from 2001 to 2006 (also referred to as SERENA Phase I, published as CSNI/R(2007)/11). The objectives of the experimental programme were to provide data: (1) to clarify the explosion behaviour of prototypic corium melts and for validation of steam explosion models for prototypic materials; and (2) for steam explosion behaviour in two different geometries to verify the geometrical extrapolation capabilities of the codes. These objectives were to be accomplished by conducting complementary sets of six experiments each at two different facilities: KROTOS at the Commissariat l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) in Cadarache, France, representing one-dimensional FCI configuration involving nominally 5 kilograms of prototypic corium melt, and TROI at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in Daejeon, Korea, representing multi-dimensional FCI configuration