WorldWideScience

Sample records for oecd countries governments

  1. Fiscal Rules and the Composition of Government Expenditures in OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Momi; Strawczynski, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s many OECD countries have adopted fiscal rules. After the adoption of these rules, the ratio of social transfers to government consumption substantially declined, and it recovered following the global economic crisis. Using a sample of 22 OECD countries, we found a negative effect of fiscal rules on the ratio of social transfers to…

  2. The Effect of Corruption on Government Expenditure Allocation in OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Jajkowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the effect of corruption on the allocation of government expenditures by function. Equations using pooled panel dataset for 21 OECD countries between 1998 and 2011 were tested, and the findings show that government expenditure on defense and general public services increase, while government expenditures on education, health, recreation, culture and religion decline with higher levels of corruption. This paper presents new results and new evidence on the link between corruption and allocation of government expenditures in OECD countries.

  3. Corporate governance and corporate social responsibility: A typology of OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Crifo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relationships between corporate governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. The underlying intuition is that governance factors are major determinants of CSR policies and extra-financial performance. More precisely, we identify three main factors that determine the strength of CSR engagement at the firm level: the structure of equity ownership (identity of shareholders, the composition and structure of board of directors, and the regulatory framework on corporate governance and CSR. We show how evolutions regarding corporate governance over the three previous decades have paved the way and shaped the rise of CSR. In addition, we elaborate a typology of CSR and governance structures that characterize OECD countries depending on whether the CSR reporting regime is stringent versus non-stringent, and on whether the corporate governance model is based on the shareholder, stakeholder or hybrid regime.

  4. Government Spending Shocks, the Current Account and the Real Exchange Rate in OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoung Kim

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of government spending shocks on the current account and the real exchange rate for 20 OECD countries using panel VAR model, in order to provide empirical stylized facts. The countries were grouped based on openness and size, and the influence of openness and size on the effects of government spending shocks. The main findings are as follows. First, in the analysis of all 20 countries, in response to government spending shocks, the worsening of the current account is significant, but real exchange rate appreciation is not significant. Second, real exchange rate appreciation is more significant and worsening of the current account is more temporary in the group of countries with higher openness than in those with low openness. Third, the worsening of the current account is more significant in the group of large countries than in the group of small countries. Although real exchange rate depreciation under fiscal expansion is not consistent with traditional theories, the results are broadly consistent with the existing theories that incorporate openness and the size of the country.

  5. Inequality in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, Celine

    2017-08-01

    This article recalls the state of play of inequality levels and trends in OECD countries, with a special focus on Nordic countries. It sheds light on explaining the drivers of the rise in inequality and its economic consequences. It addresses in particular the issue of redistribution through taxes and transfers. It concludes with an overview of policy packages that should be considered to address the issue of rising inequalities.

  6. How Russia and other BRICS Countries as well as Indonesia Implement the G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Lanshina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the implementation of the G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance by Russia in comparison to other BRICS countries and Indonesia. Originally, this document was adopted by OECD in 1999. The last (third version of the document was developed in 2014–2015, with an active involvement of G20 countries, and was adopted at the G20 Summit in Antalya (Turkey in November 2015. Dramatic changes are absent in the new document, however, it contains several new recommendations, which became necessary after the global economic crisis of 2008–2009. The article is focused on the actions of six countries that were chosen for the analysis, as well as on the real changes in these countries. The author takes into account OECD recommendations on the assessment of implementation of G20/OECD principles. According to these recommendations, researchers should not pay too much attention to the quantitative analysis, since many important issues are unobservable for them. Considering this, the author accentuates qualitative research methods and comparative analysis. The results of the study show that Brazil, Indonesia and Russia were most active in implementation, while South Africa and China lacked any actions, and India achieved only partial implementation. Despite the large number of facts documenting formal implementation of corporate governance principles in Russia during the last years, Russia definitely lacks real improvements. This is true for information disclosure (including data on the management remuneration, gender diversity on corporate boards, the share of independent directors, etc. Moreover, Russian companies are characterized by high concentration of capital, and the role of boards is often reduced to formalities. According to the results of the research, similar limitations are found in the systems of corporate governance of other countries covered by this study. Taking into account the limited accessibility of information on

  7. Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) performance and sovereign bond spreads : an empirical analysis of OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelle-Blancard, Gunther; Crifo, Patricia; Oueghlissi, Rim; Scholtens, Bert

    2017-01-01

    What are the determinants of borrowing cost in international capital markets? Apart from macroeconomic fundamentals, are there any qualitative factors that might capture sovereign bond spreads? In this paper we consider to what extent Environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance can affect

  8. The involvement of medical doctors in hospital governance and implications for quality management: a quick scan in 19 and an in depth study in 7 OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotar, A. M.; Botje, D.; Klazinga, N. S.; Lombarts, K. M.; Groene, O.; Sunol, R.; Plochg, T.

    2016-01-01

    Hospital governance is broadening its orientation from cost and production controls towards 'improving performance on clinical outcomes'. Given this new focus one might assume that doctors are drawn into hospital management across OECD countries. Hospital performance in terms of patient health,

  9. How and why do countries differ in their governance and financing-related administrative expenditure in health care? An analysis of OECD countries by health care system typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, L.L.; Klazinga, N.S.; Muller, M.; Morgan, D.J.; Jeurissen, P.P.T.

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Administration is vital for health care. Its importance may increase as health care systems become more complex, but academic attention has remained minimal. We investigated trends in administrative expenditure across OECD countries, cross-country spending differences, spending

  10. How and why do countries differ in their governance and financing-related administrative expenditure in health care? An analysis of OECD countries by health care system typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, Luc L.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Mueller, Michael; Morgan, David J.; Jeurissen, Patrick P. T.

    2017-01-01

    Administration is vital for health care. Its importance may increase as health care systems become more complex, but academic attention has remained minimal. We investigated trends in administrative expenditure across OECD countries, cross-country spending differences, spending differences between

  11. How and why do countries differ in their governance and financing-related administrative expenditure in health care? An analysis of OECD countries by health care system typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenaars, Luc L; Klazinga, Niek S; Mueller, Michael; Morgan, David J; Jeurissen, Patrick P T

    2018-01-01

    Administration is vital for health care. Its importance may increase as health care systems become more complex, but academic attention has remained minimal. We investigated trends in administrative expenditure across OECD countries, cross-country spending differences, spending differences between health care system typologies, and differences in the scale and scope of administrative functions across typologies. We used OECD data, which include health system governance and financing-related administrative activities by regulators, governance bodies, and insurers (macrolevel), but exclude administrative expenditure by health care providers (mesolevel and microlevel). We find that governance and financing-related administrative spending at the macrolevel has remained stable over the last decade at slightly over 3% of total health spending. Cross-country differences range from 1.3% of health spending in Iceland to 8.3% in the United States. Voluntary private health insurance bears much higher administrative costs than compulsory schemes in all countries. Among compulsory schemes, multiple payers exhibit significantly higher administrative spending than single payers. Among single-payer schemes, those where entitlements are based on residency have significantly lower administrative spending than those with single social health insurance, albeit with a small difference. These differences can partially be explained because multi-payer and voluntary private health insurance schemes require additional administrative functions and enjoy less economies of scale. Studies in hospitals and primary care indicate similar differences in administrative costs across health system typologies at the mesolevel and microlevel of health care delivery, which warrants more research on total administrative costs at all the levels of health systems. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares the reserve requirements of OECD countries. Reserve requirements are the minimum percentages or amounts of liabilities that depository institutions are required to keep in cash or as deposits with their central banks. To facilitate monetary policy implementation, twenty-four of the thirty OECD countries impose reserve requirements to influence their banking systems’ demand for liquidity. These include twelve OECD countries that are also members of the European Economic and...

  13. The involvement of medical doctors in hospital governance and implications for quality management: a quick scan in 19 and an in depth study in 7 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotar, A M; Botje, D; Klazinga, N S; Lombarts, K M; Groene, O; Sunol, R; Plochg, T

    2016-05-24

    Hospital governance is broadening its orientation from cost and production controls towards 'improving performance on clinical outcomes'. Given this new focus one might assume that doctors are drawn into hospital management across OECD countries. Hospital performance in terms of patient health, quality of care and efficiency outcomes is supposed to benefit from their involvement. However, international comparative evidence supporting this idea is limited. Just a few studies indicate that there may be a positive relationship between medical doctors being part of hospital boards, and overall hospital performance. More importantly, the assumed relationship between these so-called doctor managers and hospital performance has remained a 'black-box' thus far. However, there is an increasing literature on the implementation of quality management systems in hospitals and their relation with improved performance. It seems therefore fair to assume that the relation between the involvement of doctors in hospital management and improved hospital performance is partly mediated via quality management systems. The threefold aim of this paper is to 1) perform a quick scan of the current situation with regard to doctor managers in hospital management in 19 OECD countries, 2) explore the phenomenon of doctor managers in depth in 7 OECD countries, and 3) investigate whether doctor involvement in hospital management is associated with more advanced implementation of quality management systems. This study draws both on a quick scan amongst country coordinators in OECD's Health Care Quality Indicator program, and on the DUQuE project which focused on the implementation of quality management systems in European hospitals. This paper reports two main findings. First, medical doctors fulfil a broad scope of managerial roles at departmental and hospital level but only partly accompanied by formal decision making responsibilities. Second, doctor managers having more formal decision making

  14. INNOVATION POLICY FEATURES IN THE OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Anisimov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyze the innovation policy features in the OECD countries and give the basic framework which defines rights and obligations of intellectual property rights (IPRs owners. Governments play an important role in determining demand-side policies, such as smart regulations, standards, consumer education, taxation and public procurement that can affect innovation. Because demand linked to supply, policies that affect both need to be better harnessed to drive long-term innovation and sustainable growth. Policies to stimulate innovation require taking account of changes in the international economy and the transformation of innovation processes. To transform invention into innovation requires a range of activities. Innovation now encompasses much more than research and development (R&D, albeit R&D remains vitally important. Methodology. The data for the paper is taken from the publications and reports of the European Commission, OECD, World Bank etc. In the paper the descriptive analysis, supported by the quantitative analysis is applied. Results. It is identified that rises in R&D intensity and innovation are driven by such factors: reduction of anti-competitive market regulations, which promotes business R&D and strengthens the incentives for innovations; stable economic conditions and low interest rates which encourage the growth of inno vation activity by creating a low-cost environment for investment in innovation; availability of internal and external finance. Practical implication. It is given the basic legal framework which defines rights and obligations of IPR owners: reviewing exemptions to copyright in the light of the internet’s different uses; clarifying exemptions for research use; promoting an active and open commercialization policy for universities; encouraging the commercialization and monetization of IPR: for example draft licensing contracts, valuation standards; standards: encouraging pooling

  15. Broadband and Unbundling Regulations in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Wallsten, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Broadband penetration and available speeds vary widely across OECD countries. Policymakers around the world, and especially in countries like the U.S. that lag in the rankings, are searching for policies to narrow those gaps. Relatively little empirical work tests possible reasons for these differences. In this paper I test the impacts of regulations and demographics on broadband development in a panel dataset across countries. In addition to adding to the meager empirical literature on broad...

  16. Globalization and Social Justice in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Björn Kauder; Niklas Potrafke

    2015-01-01

    Social justice is a topic of importance to social scientists and also political decision makers. We examine the relationship between globalization and social justice as measured by a new indicator for 31 OECD countries. The results show that countries that experienced rapid globalization enjoy social justice. When the KOF index of globalization increases by one standard deviation, the social justice indicator increases by about 0.4 points (on a scale from 1 to 10). The policy implication is t...

  17. Quarterly coal statistics of OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-27

    These quarterly statistics contain data from the fourth quarter 1990 to the fourth quarter 1991. The first set of tables (A1 to A30) show trends in production, trade, stock change and apparent consumption data for OECD countries. Tables B1 to B12 show detailed statistics for some major coal trade flows to and from OECD countries and average value in US dollars. A third set of tables, C1 to C12, show average import values and indices. The trade data have been extracted or derived from national and EEC customs statistics. An introductory section summarizes trends in coal supply and consumption, deliveries to thermal power stations; electricity production and final consumption of coal and tabulates EEC and Japanese steam coal and coking coal imports to major countries.

  18. Institutions and service employment: a panel study for OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, Julián

    2004-01-01

    We live in a service economy, but the extent of development of service employment differs across developed countries. This paper assesses the role of structural factors and institutions in explaining the common patterns and main di?erences in the recent expansion of service employment in OECD countries. It finds that GDP per capita, the size of the government sector and the extent of urbanization are positively associated with the service employment share. However, the evidence suggests that ...

  19. Energy demand in seven OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patry, M.

    1990-01-01

    The intensity of utilization of energy has been declining in all OECD countries since the first oil price shock of 1973. In 1988, the OECD countries were consuming 1.7 billion tonnes of crude oil, that is two hundred million tonnes less than fifteen years ago. From 1974 to 1988, OECD oil consumption decreased at an average annual rate of 1.3% while the GDP of these countries rose by an average of 2.6% per annum. The authors present here a model of sectoral energy demand and interfuel substitution for the G-7 countries: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. The ultimate goal is to determine the relative importance of the contributing factors to the observed reversal in energy consumption per unit of production in these countries. The results they present should be viewed as preliminary. They point in the paper to a number of extensions that should improve the theoretical quality of the modeling effort and the statistical robustness of the results. They are presently expanding the data set to pinpoint more adequately the effects of structural change and conservation

  20. IMMIGRATION GROWTH TENDENCIES IN OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran SARIHASAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immigration became one of the relevant economic topics in recent years. Over the centuries millions of people have migrated, despite the physical, cultural etc. obstacles, to other lands in search of better lives for themselves and their children. In the context of development, globalization and labor market mobility, it is necessary to further analyze the determinants and consequences of migration not only on the host country, but also on the sending country. The increased interest and availability of data keeps this subject in the attention of economists all over the world. In this case an increase in immigration became very significant ıssue for policymakers. The aims of this study are to describe immigration growth tendencies and to answer how much is the average growth rate of foreıgn born population. Thus, in order to measure the native and foreign-born unemployed migrants, twenty-seven OECD countries were used in this research paper.

  1. Energy Balances of OECD Countries 2012 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This volume contains data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste presented as comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Complete data are available for 2009 and 2010 and supply estimates are available for the most recent year (i.e.2011). Historical tables summarise production, trade and final consumption data as well as key energy and economic indicators. The book also includes definitions of products and flows, explanatory notes on the individual country data and conversion factors from original units to energy units. More detailed data in original units are published in the 2012 edition of Energy Statistics of OECD Countries, the sister volume of this publication.

  2. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. The findings suggest that the specificities of internal audit function when studying the differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles lead to different treatment.

  3. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. T...

  4. The OECD and Global Governance in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Sam; Lingard, Bob

    2013-01-01

    This review essay discusses the history, evolution and development of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and traces the growing impact of its education work. The essay is in four main sections. The first discusses Carrol and Kellow's "The OECD: A Study of Organizational Adaptation" (Edward Elgar) and…

  5. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Stephanie E.; Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D.; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a major challenge facing public health. National governments play a key role in public health adaptation to climate change, but there are competing views on what responsibilities and obligations this will—or should—include in different nations. This study aims to: (1) examine how national-level public health adaptation is occurring in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries; (2) examine the roles national governments are taking in public health adaptation; and (3) critically appraise three key governance dimensions of national-level health adaptation—cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning—and identify practical examples suited to different contexts. We systematically reviewed publicly available public health adaptation to climate change documents and webpages by national governments in ten OECD countries using systematic web searches, assessment of self-reporting, and content analysis. Our findings suggest national governments are primarily addressing infectious disease and heat-related risks posed by climate change, typically emphasizing capacity building or information-based groundwork initiatives. We find national governments are taking a variety of approaches to public health adaptation to climate change that do not follow expected convergence and divergence by governance structure. We discuss practical options for incorporating cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning into a variety of contexts and identify leaders national governments can look to to inform their public health adaptation planning. Following the adoption of the Paris Agreement and subsequent increased momentum for adaptation, research tracking adaptation is needed to define what health adaptation looks like in practice, reveal insights that can be taken up across states and sectors, and ensure policy orientated learning. PMID:27618074

  6. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in OECD Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Stephanie E; Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D

    2016-09-07

    Climate change is a major challenge facing public health. National governments play a key role in public health adaptation to climate change, but there are competing views on what responsibilities and obligations this will-or should-include in different nations. This study aims to: (1) examine how national-level public health adaptation is occurring in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries; (2) examine the roles national governments are taking in public health adaptation; and (3) critically appraise three key governance dimensions of national-level health adaptation-cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning-and identify practical examples suited to different contexts. We systematically reviewed publicly available public health adaptation to climate change documents and webpages by national governments in ten OECD countries using systematic web searches, assessment of self-reporting, and content analysis. Our findings suggest national governments are primarily addressing infectious disease and heat-related risks posed by climate change, typically emphasizing capacity building or information-based groundwork initiatives. We find national governments are taking a variety of approaches to public health adaptation to climate change that do not follow expected convergence and divergence by governance structure. We discuss practical options for incorporating cross-sectoral collaboration, vertical coordination and national health adaptation planning into a variety of contexts and identify leaders national governments can look to to inform their public health adaptation planning. Following the adoption of the Paris Agreement and subsequent increased momentum for adaptation, research tracking adaptation is needed to define what health adaptation looks like in practice, reveal insights that can be taken up across states and sectors, and ensure policy orientated learning.

  7. Energy balances of OECD countries 1970/1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The present volume provides standardized energy balance sheets expressed in a common unit of tons of oil equivalent for all OECD Countries. It covers the years 1970 to 1982 year by year and includes many revisions and additions to data previously published. The balances in the present volume are based on data published in OECD Energy Statistics 1971-1981 and OECD Energy Statistics 1981-1982. Tables for each OECD Country include production, import, export, consumption by the different industries, transportation, agriculture, residential sector of the different energies: solid fuels, petroleum, gas, nuclear power and hydroelectricity [fr

  8. Adjusting health expenditure for military spending and interest payment: Israel and the OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Amir; Israeli, Avi

    2013-02-20

    Compared to OECD countries, Israel has a remarkably low percentage of GDP and of government expenditure spent on health, which are not reflected in worse national outcomes. Israel is also characterized by a relatively high share of GDP spent on security expenses and payment of public debt. To determine to what extent differences between Israel and the OECD countries in security expenses and payment of the public debt might account for the gaps in the percentage of GDP and of government expenditures spent on health. We compare the percentages of GDP and of government expenditures spent on health in the OECD countries with the respective percentages when using primary civilian GDP and government expenditures (i.e., when security expenses and interest payment are deducted). We compared Israel with the OECD average and examined the ranking of the OECD countries under the two measures over time. While as a percentage of GDP, the national expenditure on health in Israel was well below the average of the OECD countries, as a percentage of primary civilian GDP it was above the average until 2003 and below the average thereafter. When the OECD countries were ranked according to decreasing percent of GDP and of government expenditure spent on health, adjusting for security and debt payment expenditures changed the Israeli rank from 23rd to 17th and from 27th to 25th, respectively. Adjusting for security expenditures and interest payment, Israel's low spending on health as a percentage of GDP and as a percentage of government's spending increases and is closer to the OECD average. Further analysis should explore the effect of additional population and macroeconomic differences on the remaining gaps.

  9. Adjusting health expenditure for military spending and interest payment: Israel and the OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmueli Amir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to OECD countries, Israel has a remarkably low percentage of GDP and of government expenditure spent on health, which are not reflected in worse national outcomes. Israel is also characterized by a relatively high share of GDP spent on security expenses and payment of public debt. Objectives To determine to what extent differences between Israel and the OECD countries in security expenses and payment of the public debt might account for the gaps in the percentage of GDP and of government expenditures spent on health. Methods We compare the percentages of GDP and of government expenditures spent on health in the OECD countries with the respective percentages when using primary civilian GDP and government expenditures (i.e., when security expenses and interest payment are deducted. We compared Israel with the OECD average and examined the ranking of the OECD countries under the two measures over time. Results While as a percentage of GDP, the national expenditure on health in Israel was well below the average of the OECD countries, as a percentage of primary civilian GDP it was above the average until 2003 and below the average thereafter. When the OECD countries were ranked according to decreasing percent of GDP and of government expenditure spent on health, adjusting for security and debt payment expenditures changed the Israeli rank from 23rd to 17th and from 27th to 25th, respectively. Conclusions Adjusting for security expenditures and interest payment, Israel's low spending on health as a percentage of GDP and as a percentage of government's spending increases and is closer to the OECD average. Further analysis should explore the effect of additional population and macroeconomic differences on the remaining gaps.

  10. Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report assesses the possible bearing of the Chernobyl accident on the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries. It discusses analyses of the accident performed in several countries as well as improvements to the safety of RBMK reactors announced by the USSR. Several remaining questions are identified. The report compares RBMK safety features with those of commercial reactors in OECD countries and evaluates a number of issues raised by the Chernobyl accident

  11. Impact, regulation and health policy implications of physician migration in OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Steven

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the face of rising demand for medical services due to ageing populations, physician migration flows are increasingly affecting the supply of physicians in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD countries. This paper offers an integrated perspective on the impact of physician migration on home and host countries and discusses international regulation and policy approaches governing physician migration. Methods Information about migration flows, international regulation and policies governing physician migration were derived from two questionnaires sent to OECD countries, a secondary analysis of EUROSTAT Labour Force Surveys, a literature review and official policy documents of OECD countries. Results OECD countries increasingly perceive immigration of foreign physicians as a way of sustaining their physician workforce. As a result, countries have entered into international agreements regulating physician migration, although their success has been limited due to the imposition of licensing requirements and the protection of vested interests by domestic physicians. OECD countries have therefore adopted specific policies designed to stimulate the immigration of foreign physicians, whilst minimising its negative impact on the home country. Measures promoting immigration have included international recruitment campaigns, less strict immigration requirements and arrangements that foster shared learning between health care systems. Policies restricting the societal costs of physician emigration from developing countries such as good practice guidelines and taxes on host countries have not yet produced their expected effect or in some cases have not been established at all. Conclusions Although OECD countries generally favour long-term policies of national self-sufficiency to sustain their physician workforce, such policies usually co-exist with short-term or medium-term policies to attract foreign physicians

  12. Labor market deregulation and globalization: empirical evidence from OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Potrafke , Niklas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This paper empirically investigates the influence of globalization on various aspects of labor market deregulation. I employ the data set by Bassanini and Duval (2006) on labor market institutions in OECD countries and the KOF index of globalization. The data set covers 20 OECD countries in the 1982?2003 period. The results suggest that globalization did neither influence the unemployment replacement rate, the unemployment benefit length, public expenditures on ALMP, the t...

  13. Resource recovery and recycling in OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacNeil, J.W.

    It was the importance of the economic issues relevant to resource recovery and re-use that prompted OECD to become involved in this general area, and the author proposes in this talk to describe the principal features of the three main approaches to waste management from an economic perspective. These approaches are reduction of waste generation (i.e. birth control) resource recovery and materials recycling or re-use (reincarnation). Most of OECD's work in this area to date has been on the third of these approaches with particular emphasis on the economics of recycling, so somewhat more attention will be devoted to it. Then some conclusions will be drawn concerning possible policy actions to encourage a rational approach to management of this resource.

  14. Nuclear education and training in OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This report conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organizations in 16 countries. In most countries there are now fewer comprehensive, high-quality nuclear technology programs at universities than before. Facilities and faculties for nuclear education are aging, and the number of nuclear programs is declining. The principal reason for the deterioration of nuclear education is the downward spiral of budgetary cut and low enrolment of student whose perception is affected by the educational circumstances, negative public perception, the downsizing of the industry, and reductions in government-funded nuclear programmes, where little strategic planning is occurring. Unless something is done to arrest it, this downward spiral of declining student interest and academic opportunities will continue. Failure to take appropriate steps now will seriously jeopardize the provision of adequate expertise tomorrow. We must act now on the following recommendations: strategic role of governments; the challenges of revitalizing nuclear education by university; vigorous research and maintaining high-quality training; and benefits of collaboration and sharing best practices. (author)

  15. Electricity supply industry. Structure, ownership and regulation in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This study surveys developments and implications in the electricity supply industries in OECD countries. Chapter 1 introduces the issues. (Competition or electricity supply for everybody?) Electricity markets are dynamic and the participants are restructuring and repositioning themselves in order to benefit from new opportunities or policy initiatives. These changes are described in chapter 2. Privatisation is being pursued by some governments, not only for reasons of economic efficiency. Arguments for and against privatisation and different ways of introducing it are discussed in chapter 3. Fair trade and competition legislation, as it applies to all corporate entities, creates the institutional framework within which the utility has to operate. Various approaches to regulation and recent developments are described in chapter 4; the implications of regulatory changes are analysed in chapter 5. Having surveyed recent developments and their direct consequences, this study then goes on to look at their broader implications for the achievement of a range of energy policy objectives. Chapter 6 looks at fuel choice and investment decisions. Chapter 7 considers the issue of security of electricity supply, which has many special characteristics for both suppliers and regulators. OECD countries use different approaches for ensuring security of supply. Chapter 8 looks at environmental protection. Chapter 9 looks at energy efficiency. Chapter 10 discusses pricing. The introduction of competition has significant effects: it tends to reduce costs, remove cross subsidies, and bring prices more closely in line with the structure of costs. But there is no clear evidence at this stage as to whether, in the long run, competition produces lower overall prices. Finally chapter 11 analyses risk. The electricity business, like every other business, is faced with a variety of risks that cover every financial and technical facet of electricity production, transport, and supply. (N.C.)

  16. Financial Inequity in Basic Education in Selected OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mizunoya, Suguru; You, You; Tsang, Mun

    2011-01-01

    This is a study of financial disparities in primary and secondary education in OECD countries that have a relatively large population and a school finance system with decentralized features. These countries include the United States, Britain, Australia, Spain, Canada, and Japan. There are two major research questions: What are the trends in…

  17. Education and Obesity in Four OECD Countries. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Franco; Devaux, Marion; Church, Jody; Cecchini, Michele; Borgonovi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of obesity has been developing in virtually all OECD countries over the last 30 years. Existing evidence provides strong suggestions that such epidemic has affected certain social groups more than others. In particular, education appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of obesity, especially among women. A range of analyses of…

  18. Globalization, female employment, and regional differences in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Justina A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Accounting for within-country spatial differences is a much neglected issue in many cross-country comparisons. This paper highlights this importance in this empirical analysis of the impact of a country’s degree of social and economic globalization on female employment in 33 OECD countries, using a pseudo micro panel on 110’000 persons from the World Values Survey, 1981 to 2008. A traditional cross-country analysis suggests that only the social dimension of globalization, the worldwide inform...

  19. Budget reform in Ukraine and the OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchko Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the fiscal reforms in Ukraine and the OECD countries. It has been proved that the main areas which should undergo changes are the tax reform, regulatory reform and restructuring policies to encourage entrepreneurship, reform of social protection and social security, reform of social sphere constituents, administrative reform, reform of the army and law enforcement, administrative and territorial reform. According to the analysis results, there has been drawn the conclusion about the need to introduce in Ukraine the successful experience of the OECD countries in implementing budget reforms.

  20. in OECD countries concerning biological drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... the pharmaceutical sector about biological drugs come under the umbrella of innovation system of each country. ... The cost of biotechnology R and D within public research centres and ... Existence of a suitable system to protect intellectual property ... biotechnology that provide the capital for industry and.

  1. Fiscal rules, powerful levers for controlling the health budget? Evidence from 32 OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, H.C.; Wu, E.H.; Jeurissen, P.P.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Publicly funded healthcare forms an intricate part of government spending in most Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because of its reliance on entitlements and dedicated revenue streams. The impact of budgetary rules and procedures on publicly

  2. Energy Balances of OECD Countries 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    This volume contains data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste presented as comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Complete data are available for 2010 and 2011 and supply estimates are available for the most recent year (i.e.2012). Historical tables summarise production, trade and final consumption data as well as key energy and economic indicators. The book also includes definitions of products and flows, explanatory notes on the individual country data and conversion factors from original units to energy units.

  3. Taxation and the household saving rate: evidence from OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Tanzi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes anew the relationship between taxation and the household saving rate. On the basis of standard savings and tax revenue data from a sample of OECD countries, it provides compelling empirical evidence of a powerful impact of taxes on household savings. In particular, income taxes are shown to affect negatively the household saving rate much more than consumption taxes.

  4. In situ research and investigations in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report explains why deep geological disposal is the most favoured option for the disposal of high level waste and spent fuel, as well as some alpha bearing wastes. It also gives an overview of the main aim and elements of in-situ research and investigation activities in OECD countries, as well as of initiatives taken at an international level

  5. Comparison of approximate electrical energy generating costs in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Bertel, E.

    1996-01-01

    Costs of power generating in nuclear power plants have been predicted taking into account all factors connected with investment, maintenance, exploitation and decommissioning, basing on last OECD report. The costs have been compared with alternative solutions. In majority of OECD countries the direct costs of electricity generation are very close for nuclear fossil-fuel and gas power plants. All indirect costs such as environmental impact, public health hazard, waste management, accident risk and also public acceptance for nuclear power have been discussed. 13 refs, 5 tabs

  6. Convergence and determinants of health expenditures in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son Hong; Connelly, Luke Brian

    2017-08-17

    This study examines the trend and determinants of health expenditures in OECD countries over the 1975-2004 period. Based on recent developments in the economic growth literature we propose and test the hypothesis that health care expenditures in countries of similar economic development level may converge. We hypothesise that the main drivers for growth in health care costs include: aging population, technological progress and health insurance. The results reveal no evidence that health expenditures among OECD countries converge. Nevertheless, there is evidence of convergence among three sub-groups of countries. We found that the main driver of health expenditure is technological progress. Our results also suggest that health care is a (national) necessity, not a luxury good as some other studies in this field have found.

  7. Drivers for renewable energy: A comparison among OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Jianbang; Smith, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    The difference in the shares of renewable energy in total primary energy supply among OECD countries is immense. We attempt to identify some key factors that may have driven this difference for renewable energy in general and bioenergy in particular. We found that besides country-specific factors, gross national product (GDP) and renewable energy and bioenergy market deployment policies have significant and positive impacts on the per capita supply of both renewable energy and bioenergy in OECD countries. R and D expenditures, energy prices, CO 2 emissions, and other energy policies are statistically insignificant in terms of their impact on renewable energy and bioenergy supply. However, this does not necessarily mean that they are not potential drivers for renewable energy and bioenergy, but rather suggests that their magnitudes have not been big enough to significantly influence energy supply based on the historical data from 1994 to 2003. These findings lead to useful policy implications for countries attempting to promote renewable energy and bioenergy development. -- Highlights: ► We identify the drivers of renewable energy development in OECD countries. ► Common drivers include GDP per capita and market deployment policies. ► Country-specific drivers reveal different pathways for bioenergy development.

  8. Income inequality and obesity prevalence among OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dejun; Esqueda, Omar A; Li, Lifeng; Pagán, José A

    2012-07-01

    Using recent pooled data from the World Health Organization Global Infobase and the World Factbook compiled by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States, this study assesses the relation between income inequality and obesity prevalence among 31 OECD countries through a series of bivariate and multivariate linear regressions. The United States and Mexico well lead OECD countries in both obesity prevalence and income inequality. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the inclusion or exclusion of these two extreme cases can fundamentally change the findings. When the two countries are included, the results reveal a positive correlation between income inequality and obesity prevalence. This correlation is more salient among females than among males. Income inequality alone is associated with 16% and 35% of the variations in male and female obesity rates, respectively, across OECD countries in 2010. Higher levels of income inequality in the 2005-2010 period were associated with a more rapid increase in obesity prevalence from 2002 to 2010. These associations, however, virtually disappear when the US and Mexico have been excluded from the analysis. Findings from this study underscore the importance of assessing the impact of extreme cases on the relation between income inequality and health outcomes. The potential pathways from income inequality to the alarmingly high rates of obesity in the cases of the US and Mexico warrant further research.

  9. Inequality of energy intensities across OECD countries: a note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Vicent; Duro, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of Theil's second measure to analyze international energy intensity differences. This index allows differences to be broken down within and between groups of countries in a consistent manner. An analysis of OECD countries for the period 1971-1999 shows some basic points: first, the fall in energy intensities differences is attributable both to within-group and between-group inequality components; second, between-group inequalities are currently the main contributor to the whole inequality value; finally, a detailed exploration on within-group inequalities reveals the significant explanatory role played by EU-countries

  10. First mover advantages in mobile telecommunications: Evidence from OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Muck, Johannes; Heimeshoff, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We explore the existence of first mover advantages in mobile telecommunications markets. Building on a data set comprising monthly penetration rates, market concentration, number of active operators, and market shares of 90 followers from 33 OECD countries, we estimate a dynamic growth model. Our analysis delivers five key results. Regarding a follower's longrun market share, we observe that (1) the penetration rate at the time of market entry exerts an inverted u-shaped effect, suggesting th...

  11. Aggregate Multi-Factor Productivity: Measurement Issues in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Egert, Balazs

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyses for 34 OECD countries the extent to which the calculation of aggregate multi-factor productivity (MFP) is sensitive to alternative parameterisations. The starting point is the definition of MFP used in previous work in the OECD’s Economics Department (e.g. Johansson et al. 2013). They include alternative MFP measures, with human capital included or excluded, with different measures of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) exchange rates, using time-varying capital depreciation rat...

  12. Energy statistics of OECD countries 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This work contains a compilation of energy supply and consumption data in original units for coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewable combustible and waste. Historical tables summarize data on production, trade and final consumption of hard coal, brown coal, oil, natural gas and electricity. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data. The data contained in this publication are presented in comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent in Energy Balances of OECD Countries, 1993-1994, the sister volume of this publication. (authors). figs., tabs

  13. Energy Market Liberalisation and Renewable Energy Policies in OECD Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vona, Francesco; Nicolli, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the effect of energy liberalizations on policies that support renewable energy in a long panel of OECD countries. We estimate this effect accounting for the endogeneity of liberalisation related to joint decisions within a country's energy strategy. Using regulation in other industries as instruments, we find that energy liberalisation increases the public support to renewable energy. The effect of liberalisation is the second largest after the effect of per-capita income and is fully driven by reductions in entry barriers, while the effect of privatisation is negative. Finally, our results are robust to dynamic specifications and various policy indicators. (authors)

  14. The link between health governance models and global health innovation: an exploration of OECD nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnarr, Karin; Snowdon, Anne; Cramm, Heidi; Cohen, Jason; Alessi, Charles

    2015-01-01

    While there is established research that explores individual innovations across countries or developments in a specific health area, there is less work that attempts to match national innovations to specific systems of health governance to uncover themes across nations. We used a cross-comparison design that employed content analysis of health governance models and innovation patterns in eight OECD nations (Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States). Country-level model of health governance may impact the focus of health innovation within the eight jurisdictions studied. Innovation across all governance models has targeted consumer engagement in health systems, the integration of health services across the continuum of care, access to care in the community, and financial models that drive competition. Improving our understanding of the linkage between health governance and innovation in health systems may heighten awareness of potential enablers and barriers to innovation success.

  15. Funding schemes in OECD countries for future decommissioning of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Yasui, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the funding schemes for decommissioning implemented in selected OECD countries. The scope of this paper includes only the schemes for future decommissioning costs of private company's nuclear power plants. Countries such as Finland, Spain and Sweden have an official funding scheme, in which the government fixes the amount of money to be put aside, specifies a funding scheme and control the fund. In Belgium and Usa, the government do the same but leaves the management of the fund to the facility owners or external organization. In Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands and UK, there is no official funding scheme

  16. Role of Attractiveness Factors of the OECD Countries in Immigrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Duvnjak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An influx of immigrants to developed countries, is an ongoing process that lasts for centuries. Numerous researches have been written encouraged by this topic. Today’s free labor market enables immigrants to become a very influential aspect of every economy. With general stagnation and aging of word population, especially European, a question about level of immigration impact on active labor market appears. This paper is testing the stated, what are the factors that attract immigrants in OECD countries. Considering the main factors that encourage immigrants to migrate in specific country, this paper is testing how total GDP per country, as an indicator of level of economic growth, and social spending, as an indicator of support to those who need it, influence on their decision. The determined variable is asylum seeker as it is much precise in stating the thesis. The cross-section model which is used with 2015 data shows significant results.

  17. Electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member Countries. In the questionnaire of January 1988, countries were asked to provide data for 1986 and 1987 and most likely projections up to the year 2005. The replies to the questionnaire (or estimates for unavailable data) are presented in this Booklet. Data for 1987 are provisional for several countries. The data on electricity generation and electric capacity are presented to the year 2005, and the data on fuel cycle services to the year 2000. The Addendum contains an analysis of the present and past projections for installed nuclear capacity to 2000. It shows the total capacity of those plants connected to the grid, under construction and firmly planned to be in operation in 2000 as 282 GWe. The new projection of 300 GWe is above this estimate, indicating that some countries are considering further expansion of their nuclear capacities within this time-frame [fr

  18. Coal Consumption and Economic Growth: Panel Cointegration and Causality Evidence from OECD and Non-OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeyoung Jin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between coal consumption and economic growth for 30 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries and 32 non-OECD countries for 1990–2013 using a multivariate dependent panel analysis. For the analysis, we conducted the common factor defactorization process, unit root test, cointegration test, long-run cointegrating vector, and Granger causality test. Our results suggest the following: First, there is no long-run relationship between coal consumption and economic growth in OECD countries; however, in non-OECD countries, the relationship does exist. Second, excessive coal usage may hinder economic growth in the long run. Lastly, the growth hypothesis (coal consumption affects economic growth positively is supported in the short run for non-OECD countries. As coal consumption has a positive effect on economic growth in the short run and a negative effect in the long run, energy conservation policies may have adverse effects only in the short run. Thus, non-OECD countries should gradually switch their energy mix to become less coal-dependent as they consider climate change. Moreover, a transfer of technology and financial resources from developed to developing countries must be encouraged at a global level.

  19. Compensation for nuclear damage in the OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The study aims to describe briefly the main features of the system for compensation of nuclear damage in OECD Member Countries, emphasising the practical arrangements for compensating such damage, with illustrations drawn from various national legal provisions applicable to such cases. The study indicates and compares legislative provisions which are specifically nuclear, without going into the substantive and procedural rules of the general law, reference to which frequently occurs in enactments relating to nuclear third party liability. The references to national nuclear legislation illustrate the manner in which effect has been given to international Conventions. (Auth.) [fr

  20. General Overview On Poverty: The Sample of OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan YÜKSEL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Poverty, as a significant threat to humans all over the world, has been enhancing because of the fact that there has been a strong inequality of the income rates. In this economic system, the poor becomes poorer and the rich becomes richer and the difference between these two groups has become absolute. On the other hand, the international organizations are not effective enough to solve the problem of poverty. In this context, the main aim of the study is to have a look at the general overview of poverty by means of OECD countries and to come to a certain as well as concrete resolutions on its prevention.

  1. Fathers’ Leave and Fathers’ Involvement: Evidence from Four OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Maria C.; Adema, Willem; Baxter, Jennifer; Han, Wen-Jui; Lausten, Mette; Lee, RaeHyuck; Waldfogel, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several OECD countries have taken steps to promote policies encouraging fathers to spend more time caring for young children, thereby promoting a more gender equal division of care work. Evidence, mainly for the United States and United Kingdom, has shown fathers taking some time off work around childbirth are more likely to be involved in childcare related activities than fathers who do not take time off. This paper conducts a first cross-national analysis on the association between fathers’ leave taking and fathers’ involvement when children are young. It uses birth cohort data of children born around 2000 from four OECD countries: Australia, Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Results show that the majority of fathers take time off around childbirth independent of the leave policies in place. In all countries, except Denmark, important socio-economic differences between fathers who take leave and those who do not are observed. In addition, fathers who take leave, especially those taking two weeks or more, are more likely to carry out childcare related activities when children are young. This study adds to the evidence that suggests that parental leave for fathers is positively associated with subsequent paternal involvement. PMID:28479865

  2. Higher Education R&D and Productivity Growth: An Empirical Study on High-Income OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a macro study on higher education R&D and its impact on productivity growth. I measure the social rate of return on higher education R&D in 17 high-income OECD countries using country level data on the percentage of gross expenditure on R&D performed by higher education, business, and government sectors over the period…

  3. A systematic review of medical practice variation in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corallo, Ashley N; Croxford, Ruth; Goodman, David C; Bryan, Elisabeth L; Srivastava, Divya; Stukel, Therese A

    2014-01-01

    Major variations in medical practice have been documented internationally. Variations raise questions about the quality, equity, and efficiency of resource allocation and use, and have important implications for health care and health policy. To perform a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature on medical practice variations in OECD countries. We searched MEDLINE to find publications on medical practice variations in OECD countries published between 2000 and 2011. We present an overview of the characteristics of published studies as well as the magnitude of variations for select high impact conditions. A total of 836 studies were included. Consistent with the gray literature, there were large variations across regions, hospitals and physician practices for almost every condition and procedure studied. Many studies focused on high-impact conditions, but very few looked at the causes or outcomes of medical practice variations. While there were an overwhelming number of publications on medical practice variations the coverage was broad and not often based on a theoretical construct. Future studies should focus on conditions and procedures that are clinically important, policy relevant, resource intensive, and have high levels of public awareness. Further study of the causes and consequences of variations is important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Environmental Kuznets Curve. An empirical analysis for OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiev, E.

    2008-09-15

    This paper tests the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis for four local (SOx, NOx, CO, VOC) and two global (CO2, GHG) air pollutants. Using a new panel data set of thirty OECD countries, the paper finds that the postulated inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution does not hold for all gases. A meaningful Environmental Kuznets Curve exists only for CO, VOC and NOx, where for CO2 the curve is monotonically increasing. For GHG there is indication of an inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution, but still most countries are on the increasing path of the curve and hence the future development of the curve is uncertain. For SOx it was found that emissions follow an U-shaped curve. Based on the empirical results, the paper concludes that the Environmental Kuznets Curve does not hold for all gases, it is rather an empirical artefact than a regularity.

  5. The Environmental Kuznets Curve. An empirical analysis for OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, E.

    2008-09-01

    This paper tests the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis for four local (SOx, NOx, CO, VOC) and two global (CO2, GHG) air pollutants. Using a new panel data set of thirty OECD countries, the paper finds that the postulated inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution does not hold for all gases. A meaningful Environmental Kuznets Curve exists only for CO, VOC and NOx, where for CO2 the curve is monotonically increasing. For GHG there is indication of an inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution, but still most countries are on the increasing path of the curve and hence the future development of the curve is uncertain. For SOx it was found that emissions follow an U-shaped curve. Based on the empirical results, the paper concludes that the Environmental Kuznets Curve does not hold for all gases, it is rather an empirical artefact than a regularity.

  6. Evaluating Decoupling Process in OECD Countries: Case Study of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Nazan; Şengün Ucal, Meltem; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is at the top of the present and future problems facing humanity. Climate change is now largely attributed to human activities and economic activities are the source of human activities that cause climate change by creating pressure on the environment. Providing the sustainability of resources for the future seems possible by reducing the pressure of these economic activities on the environment. Given the increasing population pressure and growth-focused economies, it is possible to say that achieving decoupling is not so easy on a global basis. It is known that there are some problems in developing countries especially in terms of accessing reliable data in transition and implementation process of decoupling. Developed countries' decoupling practices and proper calculation methods can also be a guide for developing countries. In this study, we tried to calculate the comparative decoupling index for OECD countries and Turkey in terms of data suitability, and we showed the differences between them. We tried to indicate the level of decoupling (weak, stable, strong) for each country. We think that the comparison of Turkey can be an example in terms of developing countries. Acknowledgement: This research has been supported by Bogazici University Research Fund Grant Number 12220.

  7. Migration in OECD countries: Labour Market Impact and Integration Issues. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 562

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sebastien; Causa, Orsetta; Jimenez, Miguel; Wanner, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Immigration pressures are increasing in most OECD countries. This paper investigates the consequences of immigration for natives' labour market outcomes, as well as issues linked to immigrants' integration in the host country labour market. Changes in the share of immigrants in the labour force may have a distributive impact on natives' wages, and…

  8. Interactions between Financial and Environmental Networks in OECD Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Ruzzenenti

    Full Text Available We analysed a multiplex of financial and environmental networks between OECD countries from 2002 to 2010. Foreign direct investments and portfolio investment showing the flows in equity securities, short-term, long-term and total debt, these securities represent the financial layers; emissions of NOx, PM10, SO2, CO2 equivalent and the water footprint associated with international trade represent the environmental layers. We present a new measure of cross-layer correlations between flows in different layers based on reciprocity. For the assessment of results, we implement a null model for this measure based on the exponential random graph theory. We find that short-term financial flows are more correlated with environmental flows than long-term investments. Moreover, the correlations between reverse financial and environmental flows (i.e. the flows of different layers going in opposite directions are generally stronger than correlations between synergic flows (flows going in the same direction. This suggests a trade-off between financial and environmental layers, where, more financialised countries display higher correlations between outgoing financial flows and incoming environmental flows than from lower financialised countries. Five countries are identified as hubs in this finance-environment multiplex: The United States, France, Germany, Belgium-Luxembourg and United Kingdom.

  9. Overview of nuclear data measurement facilities in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioux, P.; Rowlands, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    In 1992 EDF commissioned a review of activity in the fields of nuclear data for fission power technology applications in OECD countries. The review was carried out in cooperation with the consultants EUROGRAM. This paper presents a summary. The situation is of concern to the French nuclear industry because of the few measurement facilities which are now funded for work in the field and the reductions in the numbers of scientists expert in measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. There are requirements which justify work to improve knowledge of many items of nuclear data. To ensure maintenance of expertise the French Nuclear Industry has arranged for several young scientists to work with leading experts in the different fields. However, the problem of continued availability of facilities remains. (authors)

  10. Nuclear power in the OECD countries results and current issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    The first use of nuclear power for the generation of electricity on a commercial scale occurred in the United Kingdom in 1956. Today, 13 OECD countries have 318 nuclear units in operation and 66 more in construction or on order. This outstanding achievement is the result of the successful organization, start up, and operation of an industry to design, build, equip, fuel, and maintain these facilites. Nuclear power, however, is currently troubled by a number of issues that may impair its ability to reach its full potential. The industry has acknowledged problems that can be and are being managed. But the industry also has a number of political difficulties that could be beyond its ability to resolve with its own resources. These are issues common to the introduction of new technologies into a complex world. Nevertheless, nuclear power continues to be the means by which we can provide the electric power needed to raise the living standard of everyone on the globe

  11. Pensions at a glance 2009 retirement-income systems in OECD countries

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2009-01-01

    Pension and retirement policies have changed dramatically in recent years, as governments have tried to balance the goals of adequate retirement incomes and the long-term financial sustainability of pension systems in the face of population ageing. Pensions at a Glance 2009 provides a consistent framework for comparing pension policies between countries along with reliable data. This third edition updates information on key features of pension provision in OECD countries and provides projections of retirement income for todays workers. It offers an expanded range of indicators, including measures of assets, investment performance, coverage of private pensions, public pension spending, and the demographic context and outlook. Four special chapters provide an in-depth look at important issues in pension policy today. The first examines the implications of the present financial and economic crisis on pension systems. Which countries and which individuals are most affected? What can governments do to help and whi...

  12. Developments in the use of economic instruments in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opschoor, H.

    1994-01-01

    For the period 1987-1993, developments in the environmental policies of OECD countries with respect to the use of economic instruments are compared and the differences analyzed. The focus is on applications in the field of air pollution policies. The comparison is made on the basis of two surveys. To complete the descriptive part, a brief survey is also presented of currently discussed and recently introduced economic instruments. A description of economic instruments as such and a review of rationales for employing economic and financial incentives precede this analysis. The analysis shows that the use of economic instruments has indeed increased since 1987, but the development has not been spectacular. Possible explanations for this are presented. Also, some types of instrument have advanced more than others and the changes differ from one set of countries to another. Product charges (including air pollution-related ones) have become more widely used, especially in Scandinavian countries. Moreover, growing attention is being paid to the use of economic instruments at the international level. The incentive impacts of economic (and other) instruments appear to have received relatively little empirical attention, even though these are an important policy-relevant feature in instrument choice. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  13. International comparisons of health system performance among OECD countries: opportunities and data privacy protection challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderkirk, Jillian; Ronchi, Elettra; Klazinga, Niek

    2013-09-01

    Health data constitute a significant resource in most OECD countries that could be used to improve health system performance. Well-intended policies to allay concerns about breaches of confidentiality and to reduce potential misuse of personal health information may be limiting data use. A survey of 20 OECD countries explored the extent to which countries have developed and use personal health data and the reasons why data use may be problematic in some. Countries are divided, with one-half engaged regularly in national data linkage studies to monitor health care quality. Country variation is linked to risk management in granting an exemption to patient consent requirements; in sharing identifiable data among government authorities; and in project approvals and granting access to data. The resources required to comply with data protection requirements is a secondary problem. The sharing of person-level data across borders for international comparisons is rarely reported and there were few examples of studies of health system performance. Laws and policies enabling data sharing and data linkage are needed to strengthen national information infrastructure. To develop international studies comparing health care quality and health system performance, actions are needed to address heterogeneity in data protection practices. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Golden Relics & Historical Standards: How the OECD is Expanding Global Education Governance through PISA for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addey, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Setting this paper against the backdrop of scholarly research on recent changes in the OECD's approach and workings in education, I analyse how the OECD has reinforced its infrastructural and epistemological global governance through the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) for Development (PISA-D). Drawing on qualitative data,…

  15. Fiscal rules, powerful levers for controlling the health budget? Evidence from 32 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schakel, Herman Christiaan; Wu, Erilia Hao; Jeurissen, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Publicly funded healthcare forms an intricate part of government spending in most Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because of its reliance on entitlements and dedicated revenue streams. The impact of budgetary rules and procedures on publicly funded health care might thus be different from other spending categories. In this study we focus on the potential of fiscal rules to contain these costs and their design features. We assess the relationship between fiscal rules and the level of public health care expenditure of 32 (OECD) countries between 1985 and 2014. Our dataset consists of health care expenditure data of the OECD and data on fiscal rules of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for that same period. Through a multivariate regression analysis, we estimate the association between fiscal rules and its subcategories and inflation adjusted public health care expenditure. We control for population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), debt and whether countries received an IMF bailout for the specific period. In all our regressions we include country and year fixed effects. The presence of a fiscal rule on average is associated with a 3 % reduction of public health care expenditure. Supranational balanced budget rules are associated with some 8 % lower expenditure. Health service provision-oriented countries with more passive purchasing structures seem less capable of containing costs through fiscal rules. Fiscal rules demonstrate lagged effectiveness; the potential for expenditure reduction increases after one and two years of fiscal rule implementation. Finally, we find evidence that fiscal frameworks that incorporate multi-year expenditure ceilings show additional potential for cost control. Our study shows that there seems a clear relationship between the potential of fiscal rules and budgeting health expenses. Using fiscal rules to contain the level of health care expenditure can thus be a necessary precondition for

  16. Comparison of Early Childhood Education (Preschool Education) in Turkey and OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgan, Habib

    2010-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to evaluate how the difference the early childhood education in Turkey and OECD countries. The outstanding point evaluated by the teachers about the difference between the education in Turkey and that in OECD countries and the conditions needing to be improved was the compare of age groups benefiting from the services…

  17. Energy statistics and balances of non-OECD countries 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Contains a compilation of energy production and consumption statistics for 85 non-OECD countries and regions, including developing countries, Central and Eastern European countries and the former Soviet Union. Data are expressed in original units and in common units for coal, oil, gas, electricity and heat. Historical tables for both individual countries and regions summarize data on coal, gas and electricity production and consumption since 1971. Similar data for OECD are available in the IEA publications Energy Statistics and Energy Balances of OECD Countries

  18. Nuclear legislation. Analytical study. Regulatory and Institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD Member countries. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This Volume I of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. (NEA) [fr

  19. Taxation, business environment and FDI location in OECD countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Dana; Nicoletti, G.; Vartia, L.; Yoo, K.-Y.

    Č. 502 (2006), s. 1-33 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : taxation * business environment * foreign direct investment Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.oecd.org/eco/working_papers

  20. Summary of nuclear power and fuel cycle data in OECD Member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member countries. Member countries were asked to provide, where available, various statistics for the previous calendar year (1982) and modified projections up to the year 2000. Tables 1 to 8 are based on the responses received and update the March 1982 issue. Tables 3 to 8 show the revised electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle supply and demand projections in OECD Member countries to the year 2000. Figure 1 illustrates the contribution of the different fuel sources to the OECD's electricity generation from 1974 to 1982. Figure 2 shows the nuclear share of electricity generation in the OECD countries for 1982 and 1985. Figure 3 gives the fuel cycle supply and demand from the Tables 5, 6 and 8 in the OECD area

  1. Selection or network effects? Migration flows into 27 OECD countries, 1990-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Pytlikova, Mariola; Smith, Nina

    Recent migration patterns show growing migration pressure and changing composition of immigrants in many Western countries. During the latest decade, an increasing proportion of the OECD immigrants have been from poor countries, where the educational level of the population is low. The migration ...... evidence that selection effects have had a major influence on the observed migration patterns until now. This may partly be explained by restrictive migration policies in many OECD countries which may have dampened the potential selection effects....

  2. Selection or Network Effects? Migration Flows into 27 OECD Countries, 1990-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P.J.; Pytlikova, Mariola; Smith, Nina

    Recent migration patterns show growing migration pressure and changing composition of immigrants in many Western countries. During the latest decade, an increasing proportion of the OECD immigrants have been from poor countries, where the educational level of the population is low. The migration ...... evidence that selection effects have had a major influence on the observed migration patterns until now. This may partly be explained by restrictive migration policies in many OECD countries which may have dampened the potential selection effects....

  3. Babies and bosses: reconciling work and family life : a synthesis of findings for OECD countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ... of population ageing, and well-designed policies may also help raise fertility rates from the exceptionally low levels that exist in some countries. In recent years, the OECD Babies and Bosses reviews of policies to promote work and family reconciliation covered Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands (OECD, 2002a); Austria, Ireland and ...

  4. Achieving value for money in health: a comparative analysis of OECD countries and regional countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Yusuf; Khan, Mahmud; Hikmet, Neşet

    2017-10-01

    To measure efficiency gains in health sector over the years 1995 to 2013 in OECD, EU, non-member European countries. An output-oriented DEA model with variable return to scale, and residuals estimated by regression equations were used to estimate efficiencies of health systems. Slacks for health care outputs and inputs were calculated by using DEA multistage method of estimating country efficiency scores. Better health outcomes of countries were related with higher efficiency. Japan, France, or Sweden were found to be peer-efficient countries when compared to other developed countries like Germany and United States. Increasing life expectancy beyond a certain high level becomes very difficult to achieve. Despite declining marginal productivity of inputs on health outcomes, some developed countries and developing countries were found to have lowered their inefficiencies in the use of health inputs. Although there was no systematic relationship between political system of countries and health system efficiency, the objectives of countries on social and health policy and the way of achieving these objectives might be a factor increasing the efficiency of health systems. Economic and political stability might be as important as health expenditure in improving health system goals. A better understanding of the value created by health expenditures, especially in developed countries, will require analysis of specific health interventions that can increase value for money in health. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Legitimation of OECD's Global Educational Governance: Examining PISA and AHELO Test Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara; Shahjahan, Riyad A.

    2014-01-01

    Although international student assessments and the role of international organisations (IOs) in governing education via an evidence-based educational policy discourse are of growing interest to educational researchers, few have explored the complex ways in which an IO, such as the OECD, gains considerable influence in governing education during…

  6. Introduction of regulatory and licensing procedures of some OECD countries in the field of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedekfi, O.; Zagyvai, P.; Czifrus, S.; Ormai, P.; Danko, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the OECD countries more than 50 nuclear power plants will have to be closed in the beginning of the next century since their licenses expire. For this reason it is very important to establish reasonable regulations in the field of decommissioning. In this poster firstly we define the basic principles related to decommissioning. Then we account on our survey of the situation of the regulatory and licensing procedures in some OECD countries. Finally we compare the results. (authors)

  7. RE-EXAMINATION OF WAGNER’S LAW FOR OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KORHAN GOKMENOGLU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between government spending and economic growth. Economictheory generally expects a negative relationship between these variables for rich countries with large public sectors.However, empirical studies often cannot find a robust negative relationship and have provided mixed empiricalevidence. In the case of the relationship between public expenditure and economic growth it appears thatspecification of econometric methods, data selection and time span could affect the findings and lead to contradictoryconclusions. This paper utilizes a panel of cross-sectional and time series data for 16 OECD countries over the 1995-2010 periods to reexamine the relationship between government spending and economic growth by conductingeconometric panel study. We investigate the unit root properties and cointegration, long-run economic relationship,between government expenditure and economic growth to test the validity of Wagner’s Law. Our findings indicate thatgovernment spending exerts a positive and significant influence on economic growth and provide evidence for thevalidity of Wagner’s law.

  8. Effect of Governance Indicators on Under-Five Mortality in OECD Nations: Generalized Method of Moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamgholipour, Sara; Asemane, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Today, it is recognized that factors other than health services are involved in health improvement and decreased inequality so identifying them is the main concern of policy makers and health authorities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of governance indicators on health outcomes. A panel data study was conducted to investigate the effect of governance indicators on child mortality rate in 27 OECD countries from 1996 to 2012 using the Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) model and EVIEWS.8 software. According to the results obtained, under-five mortality rate was significantly related to all of the research variables (p corruption and rule of law indicators decreased child mortality rate by 0.05 and 0.08%, respectively. Furthermore, 1% increase in public health expenditure per capita resulted in a 0.03% decrease in under-five mortality rate. The results of the study suggest that considering control variables, including GDP per capita, public health expenditure per capita, total fertility rate, and improvement of governance indicators (control of corruption and rule of law) would decrease the child mortality rate.

  9. Energy statistics and balances of non-OECD countries 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Contains a compilation of energy supply and consumption statistics for more than 100 non-OECD countries and regions, including developing countries Central and Eastern European countries and the former USSR. Data are expressed in original units and in common units for coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat and combustible renewable and waste. Historical tables for both individual countries and regions summarize data on coal, oil, gas and electricity production, trade and consumption as well as main energy and economic indicators since 1971. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and notes on the individual countries as well as conversion factors from original units to common energy units. Similar data for OECD are available in the IEA Energy Statistics and Energy Balances of OECD Countries. (author)

  10. Labour Taxation in Poland Compared to the Other OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryńska Elżbieta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Celem opracowania jest identyfikacja wysokości i zróżnicowania opodatkowania pracy, wyrażanego poprzez tzw. klin podatkowy, w Polsce na tle krajów OECD. Identyfikacji tej dokonano na podstawie analizy danych statystycznych zgromadzonych w bazie OECD obejmujących lata 2000-2012. W opracowaniu dokonano interpretacji pojęć kluczowych, takich jak opodatkowanie pracy, klin podatkowy i pozapłacowe koszty pracy. W dalszej części syntetycznie omówiono ustalenia teoretyczne i wyniki badań empirycznych dotyczących skutków opodatkowania pracy dla funkcjonowania rynku pracy, a zwłaszcza jego wpływ na zatrudnienie i bezrobocie. Badania własne objęły analizę porównawczą wielkości klina podatkowego w różnych typach gospodarstw domowych w Polsce i pozostałych krajach OECD w latach 2000-2012. Najważniejszą konstatacją wynikającą z analiz jest, iż w Polsce opodatkowanie pracy w zbyt małym stopniu uwzględnia sytuację materialną osób nisko zarabiających oraz mających nautrzymaniu dzieci. Wyniki przeprowadzonych badań stały się podstawą sformułowania wniosków syntetycznych i rekomendacji dla Polski. Zasugerowano w nich przede wszystkim, by rozważono selektywne obniżenie pozapłacowych kosztów pracy osób nisko zarabiających oraz obciążonych obowiązkami rodzinnymi.

  11. The periodic safety review of nuclear power plants. Practices in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the regulatory concepts and practices for the periodic safety review of nuclear power plants in OECD countries with nuclear power programmes. The statutory bases for such reviews, their objectives and the processes adopted are summarised against the background of each country's regulatory practices. Although periodic safety reviews are now, or will soon be, part of the regulatory process in the majority of countries, the national approaches to these reviews still differ considerably. This report includes numerous examples of the different concepts and practices in OECD countries, thereby illustrating the variety of ways adopted to reach the common goal of maintaining and improving nuclear safety

  12. Early Gender Test Score Gaps across OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Kelly; Cho, Insook

    2010-01-01

    The results reported in this paper contribute to the debate about gender skill gaps in at least three ways. First, we document the large differences in early gender gaps across developed countries using a large scale, modern, representative data source. Second, we show that countries with pro-female sorting, countries that place girls in classes…

  13. Nuclear legislation analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD member countries. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This volume II of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. This volume also contains tables of international conventions of relevance to the nuclear field. (NEA) [fr

  14. OECD Ülkelerinde Eğlence Vergisi Uygulamaları(Amusement Tax Applications in the OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernur AÇIKGÖZ ERSOY

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 17th century, “the right of the poor” was a transitory tax on the income of entertainment in favor of public assistance in France. “The right of the poor” was abolished later by the regime of Vichy, which created a permanent tax on games and entertainment to the direct benefit of the communes. Later, other European countries followed the example of France by introducing a so-called amusement tax. The paper is organized as follows: The first part presents the historical development and theoretical base of amusement tax and amusement tax applications in the OECD countries. The second part shows the amusement tax application in Turkey, and the last part resumes arguments in favor of the maintenance or an abolishment of the tax on entertainment.

  15. Potential effects of emission taxes on CO2 emissions in OECD and LDC countries. Working paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messner, S.; Strubegger, M.

    1990-12-01

    A set of existing optimization models representing the energy systems of the OECD and LDC countries (the LDC region covers all less developed countries excluding centrally planned economies) with a time horizon up to 2020 was applied to derive first-order estimates of the techno-economic potential for emission reduction. The driving force for the introduction of reduction measures was a scheme of taxes levied on the emissions of 6 relevant pollutants-including the greenhouse gases CO 2 and methane. The tax levels introduced are based on the taxes discussed by the Swedish government administration; they are the break-even point to test which measures are cost-effective and which emission levels can be reached at these costs. The regional models offer the choice between the following alternatives as response to increases in expenditures caused by emission taxes: (*) Reduction of final energy demand by supplying the requested services by other means (i.e., conservation). (*) Substitution of 'dirty' fuels by fuels entailing less pollution. (*) Introduction of 'clean' technologies for the same purposes (e.g., a combined cycle based on coal gasification is a much cleaner process for electricity generation from coal than conventional coal power plants). (*) For SO 2 and NO x emissions pollution reduction technologies (i.e., scrubbers and catalysts) can be added to existing technologies in order to reduce emissions. Alternative scenarios with emission taxes are compared to a base scenario without taxes related to pollutant emissions. The results indicate that an increase in CO 2 emissions in the OECD and LDC regions of 47% over the next 30 years in the base scenario would be changed into stabilization up to 2010 by measures induced by the tax levels introduced. Thereafter, however, energy consumption growth in the LDC area, in conjunction with the exhaustion of economically viable emission reduction measures, reverse this trend: CO 2 emissions start to increase again after

  16. Characteristics of the large corporation-based, bureaucratic model among oecd countries - an foi model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartha Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deciding on the development path of the economy has been a delicate question in economic policy, not least because of the trade-off effects which immediately worsen certain economic indicators as steps are taken to improve others. The aim of the paper is to present a framework that helps decide on such policy dilemmas. This framework is based on an analysis conducted among OECD countries with the FOI model (focusing on future, outside and inside potentials. Several development models can be deduced by this method, out of which only the large corporation-based, bureaucratic model is discussed in detail. The large corporation-based, bureaucratic model implies a development strategy focused on the creation of domestic safe havens. Based on country studies, it is concluded that well-performing safe havens require the active participation of the state. We find that, in countries adhering to this model, business competitiveness is sustained through intensive public support, and an active role taken by the government in education, research and development, in detecting and exploiting special market niches, and in encouraging sectorial cooperation.

  17. Has the accuracy of energy projections in OECD countries improved since the 1970s?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jan Børsen; Linderoth, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Since the 1970s, almost all OECD countries have published projections or forecasts of future energy consumption. By now, three decades later, the actual values of energy consumption are available for the same number of countries and thus a considerable amount of empirical data is available...

  18. WHAT CAN TANZANIA'S HEALTH CARE SYSTEM LEARN FROM OECD COUNTRIES?

    OpenAIRE

    Kajuna, Dezidery Theobard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Healthcare systems around the world have different shapes that are largely affected by socio-economic and political situations of a particular country. It is essential for the population to have better health services which requires the country to have better health policies, enough funding for health care sector, and a well structured delivery system. Tanzania like any other developing countries continue to face different challenges in healthcare sector greatly influenced by poor ec...

  19. Efficiency in wood and fiber utilization in OECD countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroko Kando; Joseph Buongiorno

    2009-01-01

    Utilization efficiency has been defined as the ratio of the amount of industrial roundwood (or wood pulp) consumed in a country and year to the amount that would have been consumed to produce the same output with a reference technology.  The reference technology was described by the average input-output relationships in countries of the Organization for Economic...

  20. Benchmarking health IT among OECD countries: better data for better policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Ronchi, Elettra; Cohen, Genna R; Winn, Laura A Pannella; Jha, Ashish K

    2014-01-01

    To develop benchmark measures of health information and communication technology (ICT) use to facilitate cross-country comparisons and learning. The effort is led by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Approaches to definition and measurement within four ICT domains were compared across seven OECD countries in order to identify functionalities in each domain. These informed a set of functionality-based benchmark measures, which were refined in collaboration with representatives from more than 20 OECD and non-OECD countries. We report on progress to date and remaining work to enable countries to begin to collect benchmark data. The four benchmarking domains include provider-centric electronic record, patient-centric electronic record, health information exchange, and tele-health. There was broad agreement on functionalities in the provider-centric electronic record domain (eg, entry of core patient data, decision support), and less agreement in the other three domains in which country representatives worked to select benchmark functionalities. Many countries are working to implement ICTs to improve healthcare system performance. Although many countries are looking to others as potential models, the lack of consistent terminology and approach has made cross-national comparisons and learning difficult. As countries develop and implement strategies to increase the use of ICTs to promote health goals, there is a historic opportunity to enable cross-country learning. To facilitate this learning and reduce the chances that individual countries flounder, a common understanding of health ICT adoption and use is needed. The OECD-led benchmarking process is a crucial step towards achieving this.

  1. Electricity deregulation in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Sunaidy, A.; Green, R. [Business School, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    This paper discusses the spread of electricity deregulation in OECD countries since the early 1990s. England, Wales and Norway were the pioneers, but almost all OECD countries have now introduced some degree of liberalisation, and several have free entry to generation while allowing all electricity consumers to choose where they buy their power. The paper discusses some of the issues raised by competition in generation and in retailing (or supply), and the need to have appropriate regulation for the transmission and distribution systems, which will continue to be monopolies. (author)

  2. Public health adaptation to climate change in OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austin, Stephanie E.; Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D.; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a major challenge facing public health. National governments play a key role in public health adaptation to climate change, but there are competing views on what responsibilities and obligations this will—or should—include in different nations. This study aims to: (1) examine

  3. Energy taxes, trends and structure in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Most forms of energy are taxed in industrialised countries, but taxes vary amongst regions and between products. Oil taxes are by far the most important. They accounted in 1999 for 45 per cent of the total value of the oil barrel in the market. Natural gas is taxed much less than oil, but taxes are increasing, whereas coal taxes are absent or remain negligible. Environmental considerations have resulted in higher energy taxes in some countries ? the best examples in recent years are Germany and the UK. However, treasury revenue is still the most important determinant both for the level and for the structure of energy taxes. (author)

  4. Energy statistics of OECD countries 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Contains a compilation of energy supply and consumption data in original units for coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, combustible renewables and waste. Historical tables summarize data on production, trade and final consumption of hard coal, brown coal, oil, natural gas and electricity. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data. (authors). 242 tabs

  5. Applying market-based instruments to environmental policies in China and OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    China's rapid economic growth since the late 1970s has been a remarkable achievement, and is projected to continue. However, this prospect could be compromised by pollution of air, water, and land, the unsustainable exploitation of natural resources, and the environmental impacts on public health. Air pollution associated with the use of coal for energy and industrial purposes is a particularly serious challenge in China, with important domestic and transboundary implications. This book presents papers from an international workshop co-sponsored by the OECD and China's National Environmental Protection Agency on the application of economic instruments to control air pollution in China and OECD countries. It presents the state-of-the-air in this field, based upon contributions from Chinese and OECD country policy makers and experts

  6. OECD/NEA Radiological characterisation in decommissioning - Evaluation of questionnaire. Strategies for Radiological Characterisation used by Decommissioning Projects in OECD Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, Stefan; Haneke, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of 2011, the Radiological Characterization and Decommissioning Task Group (RCD) of the WPDD of the OECD/NEA has prepared a questionnaire on the characterisation of nuclear facilities that has been circulated among nuclear installations in various OECD countries. The aim of this questionnaire was to gather information on the approaches and methods that are used for radiological characterisation (RC) for systems and components, for buildings and for sites (land), on domestic and international guidance and regulations that govern RC, and on the experience with RC that is already available in the particular country. The number of responses to this questionnaire that were received in the second half of 2011 was very satisfactory, so that a broad overview is now available from the following countries: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom. The presentation deals with the results that were obtained from the evaluation of these questionnaires and gives overviews of the objectives of characterisation, the input data for planning of characterisation, the measurement techniques that were used for metallic structures and components, for buildings and for sites, the data management and QA measures, the obstacles that were encountered, the experience with availability of as-built plans, the regulatory framework and guidelines, and the costs for RC. All information on RC is further broken down with respect to the operational phase (where RC is used for preliminary decommissioning planning), the transition phase (where RC supports decommissioning planning) and the actual decommissioning phase (where RC is needed for dismantling, decontamination and treatment of systems, components, buildings etc.). The presentation also offers conclusions on these subjects. (authors)

  7. Energy balances of OECD countries 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Contains a compilation of data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, combustible renewables and waste. The figures are expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Historical tables summarize key energy and economic indicators as well as production, trade and final consumption data. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data as well as conversion factors from original units to tonnes of oil equivalent. (authors). 93 figs., 162 tabs

  8. Energy statistics of OECD countries 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Contains a compilation of energy supply and consumption data in original units for coal, oil gas and electricity. Historical tables summarize data on production, trade and final consumption of hard coal, brown coal, oil, natural gas and electricity. Production is shown for 'other solid fuels' such as wood and waste, as well as for heat. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data. (author)

  9. Energy balances of OECD countries 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Contains a compilation of data on the supply and consumption of solid fuels, oil, gas, electricity and heat. The figures are expressed in million metric tons of oil equivalent. Historical tables summarize key energy and economic indicators as well as production, trade and final consumption data. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data as well as conversion factors from original units to metric tons of oil equivalent. (author)

  10. An empirical analysis of gasoline price convergence for 20 OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentzen, J.

    2003-07-01

    Two decades have passed now since the oil price shocks of the 1970s and since then energy prices have - apart from short periods of price instability - evolved relatively smoothly in the industrialized countries. Energy taxes in many countries differ markedly thereby causing differences in final energy prices, but as similar tax levels are becoming more common, e.g. in the European Union, convergence concerning energy prices might be expected to appear. In the present paper national gasoline price data covering the time period since the 1970s for a sample of OECD countries are used in order to test for this often addressed topic of convergence. The empirical part of the paper applies different time series based tests of convergence, where gasoline prices exhibit convergence for most OECD-Europe countries in the case where US$ is used for measurement of the energy prices indicating a convergence or tax harmonization process is taking place for these countries. (au)

  11. An empirical analysis of gasoline price convergence for 20 OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Two decades have passed now since the oil price shocks of the 1970s and since then energy prices have - apart from short periods of price instability - evolved relatively smoothly in the industrialized countries. Energy taxes in many countries differ markedly thereby causing differences in final energy prices, but as similar tax levels are becoming more common, e.g. in the European Union, convergence concerning energy prices might be expected to appear. In the present paper national gasoline price data covering the time period since the 1970s for a sample of OECD countries are used in order to test for this often addressed topic of convergence. The empirical part of the paper applies different time series based tests of convergence, where gasoline prices exhibit convergence for most OECD-Europe countries in the case where US$ is used for measurement of the energy prices indicating a convergence or tax harmonization process is taking place for these countries. (au)

  12. Energy balances of OECD countries 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This work contains a compilation of data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewable combustible and waste presented in energy balances. The figures are expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Historical tables summarize key energy and economic indicators as well as production, trade and final consumption data. Each issue includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on the individual country data as well as conversion factors from original units to tonnes of oil equivalent. (authors). figs., tabs

  13. Environmentally related taxes in OECD countries: issues and strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Economic instruments, including environmentally related taxes, play an increasing role in the environmental policies of developed countries. This publication addresses the use of environmental taxes and their effectiveness in reducing environmental damage. It finds these taxes are a powerful tool for implementing environmental strategy. It also describes obstacles to increased use of such taxes (e.g. concerns about competitiveness and distributional effects) and suggests ways to overcome such barriers. Particular attention is given to issues and options related to taxes on greenhouse gases. 18 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Explosive bubbles in house prices? Evidence from the OECD countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Hviid, Simon Juul; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    the univariate right-tailed unit root test procedure of Phillips et al. (2012) on the individual countries price-rent ratio. Next, we use Engsted and Nielsen's (2012) co-explosive VAR framework to test for bubbles. We find evidence of explosiveness in many housing markets, thus supporting the bubble hypothesis....... However, we also find interesting differences in the conclusions across the two test procedures. We attribute these differences to how the two test procedures control for cointegration between house prices and rent....

  15. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses Ghana s corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Ghana. It is an update of the 2005 Corporate Governance ROSC. Good corporate governance enhances investor trust, helps to protects mino...

  16. Why pay more? Corporate tax avoidance through transfer pricing in OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelsman, E.J.; Beetsma, R.M.W.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents suggestive evidence of income shifting in response to differences in corporate tax rates for a large selection of OECD countries. We use a new method to disentangle the income shifting effects from the effects of tax rates on real activity. Our baseline estimates suggest that a

  17. Productivity Levels in Distributive Trades : A New ICOP Dataset for OECD Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Marcel P.; Ypma, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    This study provides a new dataset for international comparisons of labour productivity levels in distributive trade (retail and wholesale trade) between OECD countries. The productivity level comparisons are based on a harmonised set of Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) for 1997 using the

  18. Patterns of Parental Involvement in Selected OECD Countries: Cross-National Analyses of PISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartas, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), patterns of parental involvement were examined in selected OECD countries. The findings showed that, irrespective of educational qualifications, parents were frequently involved in their children's learning at the start of primary school and at age 15. Cross-national…

  19. MBA Effectiveness in Non-OECD Countries: Perceptions of Leadership and Managerial Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative comparative methods research was to compare the perceptions relative to 12 Master of Business Administration (MBA) skill sets of respondents situated in non-member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with the findings of a prior study of United States situated respondents.…

  20. International comparisons of health system performance among OECD countries: opportunities and data privacy protection challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oderkirk, Jillian; Ronchi, Elettra; Klazinga, Niek

    2013-01-01

    Health data constitute a significant resource in most OECD countries that could be used to improve health system performance. Well-intended policies to allay concerns about breaches of confidentiality and to reduce potential misuse of personal health information may be limiting data use. A survey of

  1. An economic analysis of a major bio-fuel program undertaken by OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Biofuels such as ethanol and bio-diesel are creating a new demand for agricultural output and for agriculture land in Canada. However, the participation of other large countries with a large demand potential is necessary for bio-fuels to have a significant impact on the price of grains and oilseeds. This paper quantified the potential impact that a major bio-fuel program initiated by OECD countries has on grain and oilseed prices. The program was initiated for the period 1999 to 2006. There is considerable interest by Canadian producers to stimulate grain and oilseed prices by increasing demand of biofuels. This renewable energy source produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions than petroleum products. The analysis presented in this paper only considered ethanol from corn or wheat and bio-diesel from vegetable oils. It also focused only on the use of bio-fuels in the OECD transportation sector. The analysis was undertaken with AGLINK, a multi-commodity multi-country policy-specific dynamic model of the international agricultural markets built by the OECD with member countries. It was shown that the increase in world and domestic prices for grains and vegetable oils will remain strong, particularly toward 2006. It was also shown that a major bio-fuel program for all OECD countries would be beneficial to Canadian agriculture. It was concluded that ultimately, an increase in OECD bio-fuels usage has a direct impact on the demand for grains and oilseeds which are important feed-stocks in biofuel production. The analysis presumes an increase in renewable fuel use, but does not consider factors such as financial incentives and regulatory requirements that could bring about this increase. 7 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  2. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities. Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The NEA has updated, in coordination with the Permanent Delegation of Japan to the OECD, the report on the Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities in Japan. This country report provides comprehensive information on the regulatory and institutional framework governing nuclear activities in Japan. It provides a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. Content: I - General Regulatory Regime: Introduction; Mining regime; Radioactive substances and equipment; Nuclear installations (Reactor Regulation, Emergency response); Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; Radiological protection; Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safeguards and nuclear security; Transport; Nuclear third party liability. II - Institutional Framework: Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office, Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), The Agency for Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE), Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)); Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Reactor Safety Examination Committee, Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Committee, Radiation Council, Other advisory bodies); Public and semi-public agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation (NDF), Nuclear Waste Management Organisation (NUMO))

  3. Redistribution and transmission mechanisms of income inequality - panel analysis of the affluent OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josifidis Kosta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to point out the limitations of conventional approaches, articulated via political processes, in reducing income inequality. Using the panel data methods, on the sample of 21 affluent OECD countries in the period from 1980 to 2011, it is observed that the increase in labour productivity as well as preferences of voters to parties that advocate greater redistribution, contrary to common perception, not necessarily lead to reduction in income inequality. Increasing dominance of big capital in the field of technological progress changes the conventions about contribution of workers to labour productivity. The result is a weakening of workers’ bargaining power in relation to employers as well as increase in gap between labour productivity growth and real wage growth, which both lead to increase in income inequality. In comparison with the other political parties, it seems that the right-wing parties are more efficient in using voters’ support to implement their concept of the welfare state, which contributes to maintaining the high market-generated income inequality. Such situation could be explained that de jure power of the government depends on election results, whereas de facto power depends on the support of so-called globally-oriented super elites. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47010

  4. Selection and network effects - Migration flows into OECD countries 1990-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Pytlikova, Mariola; Smith, Nina

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical evidence on immigration flows into the OECD countries during the period 1990-2000. Our results indicate that network effects are strong, but vary between different groups of welfare states and between countries according to the type of immigration policy being applie...... a major influence on the observed migration patterns until now. This may partly be explained by restrictive migration policies which may have dampened the potential selection effects....

  5. Purchasing power parity in OECD countries: nonlinear unit root tests revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Cuestas; Paulo José Regis

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide additional evidence on the purchasing power parity empirical fulfillment in a pool of OECD countries. We apply the Harvey et al. (2008) linearity test and the Kruse (2010) nonlinear unit root test. The results point to the fact that the purchasing power parity theory holds in a greater number of countries than has been reported in previous studies.

  6. Reciprocity in Labor Market Relationships: Evidence from an Experiment across High-Income OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Waichman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We study differences in behavior across countries in a labor market context. To this end, we conducted a bilateral gift-exchange experiment comparing the behavior of subjects from five high-income OECD countries: Germany, Spain, Israel, Japan and the USA. We observe that in all countries, effort levels are increasing while rejection rates are decreasing in wage offers. However, we also find considerable differences in behavior across countries in both one-shot and repeated relationships, the most striking between Germany and Spain. We also discuss the influence of socio-economic indicators and the implications of our findings.

  7. Energy balances of non-OECD countries, 2001-2002. 2004 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste presented as comprehensive energy balances, expressed in tonnes of oil equivalent for over 100 non-OECD countries. Historical tables summarize production, trade and final consumption data as well as key energy and economic indicators. This book includes definitions of products and flows, explanatory notes on the individual country data and conversion factors from original units to tonnes of oil equivalent. More detailed data in original units are published in Energy Statistics of Non-OECD Countries 2001-2002, the sister volume of this publication. Bi-lingual edition: English - French. In general the CD-Rom and on-line service contain detailed time-series back to 1971

  8. Classifying OECD Countries According to Health Indicators Using Fuzzy Clustering Ana lysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Alptekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to classify OECD countries according to health indicators using fuzzy clustering analysis, to identify the cluster in which Turkey is in and the other countries located in the same cluster with Turkey and to determine whether Turkey shows similar characteristics with other countries located in the same cluster or not. In the study, 34 OECD member countries were discussed. With ten variables that directly and indirectly affect the health, c- means clustering analysis was performed. The NCSS 10 software package was used to analyze the data.In the analysis, it was determined that the most appropriate cluster number is five; three countries involved in the first cluster, nine countries involved in the second cluster, nine countries involved in the third cluster, six countries involved in the fourth cluster and seven countries involved in the fifth cluster. Turkey is located in the fourth cluster. Other countries in the same cluster along with Turkey are Estonia, Hungary, Mexico, Poland and Chile

  9. IMPACTS OF AFRICA'S TOTAL AND COMMODITY-BASED TRADE WITH CHINA AND OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Bayraktar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the changes in the pattern of Africa’s trade with China and OECD countries, and the impacts of these changes on sub-Saharan Africa’s economic growth. In the study, the country-level total exports and imports, as well as the commodity-based exports and imports are considered for 42 sub-Saharan African countries between 1980 and 2014. The results show that as the share of China in sub-Saharan Africa’s trade has significantly increased, a declining trend is observed for OECD countries, traditional trading partners. Despite changing trade links, the investigation of the commodity-based exports and imports indicate that the types of imported and exported commodities have not changed much for Africa. However, a strong link is observed between economic growth in SSA and its changing trade links from the OECD countries towards China at the total level as well as at the commodity level. The study concludes that there is an increase in the international competition for Africa’s commodities, and resulting in improvements in the terms of trade has led to higher income growth in the region.

  10. Summary of nuclear power and fuel cycle data in OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member Countries. In the questionnaire of January 1986, countries were asked to provide historical data for 1984 and 1985 and most likely projections up to the year 2005. The replies to the questionnaire are presented in this Summary. Not all countries have revised or made new projections since the April 1985 issue. Too few countries were able to provide projections beyond 2000 to include data for 2005 in this year's Summary. Data for 1985 are in some cases provisional. Where no data were available the Secretariat made estimates, based on information of IEA, IAEA, the previous Brown Book, OECD/IEA Energy Statistics and other sources. The electricity generation and production data for fuel cycle services refer to those facilities located within the country, and thus exclude imports. The fuel cycle requirements, however, refer to the amounts of fuel cycle services necessary for national nuclear power programmes. The Addendum contains an analysis of the present and past projections for OECD nuclear capacity to 2000

  11. Energy efficiency of selected OECD countries: A slacks based model with undesirable outputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apergis, Nicholas; Aye, Goodness C.; Barros, Carlos Pestana; Gupta, Rangan; Wanke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an efficiency assessment of selected OECD countries using a Slacks Based Model with undesirable or bad outputs (SBM-Undesirable). In this research, SBM-Undesirable is used first in a two-stage approach to assess the relative efficiency of OECD countries using the most frequent indicators adopted by the literature on energy efficiency. Besides, in the second stage, GLMM–MCMC methods are combined with SBM-Undesirable results as part of an attempt to produce a model for energy performance with effective predictive ability. The results reveal different impacts of contextual variables, such as economic blocks and capital–labor ratio, on energy efficiency levels. - Highlights: • We analyze the energy efficiency of selected OECD countries. • SBM-Undesirable and MCMC–GLMM are combined for this purpose. • Find that efficiency levels are high but declining over time. • Analysis with contextual variables shows varying efficiency levels across groups. • Capital-intensive countries are more energy efficient than labor-intensive countries.

  12. Stakeholder Engagement for Inclusive Water Governance: “Practicing What We Preach” with the OECD Water Governance Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza Akhmouch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A cursory glance at the literature on water governance reveals that stakeholder engagement has long been considered an integral part of sound governance processes. However, a closer look at the literature reveals that, beyond this general assertion, there is a lack of evidence-based assessment on how engagement processes contribute to water governance objectives. This article addresses this research gap by presenting key findings and policy guidance from a study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD on “Stakeholder Engagement for Inclusive Water Governance”. This study employed comprehensive methods, including a survey administered to 215 stakeholder groups worldwide and separately, 69 case studies of specific stakeholder engagement initiatives on water management. This article also shares the experiences and lessons that have emerged from engaging stakeholders in the OECD Water Governance Initiative—an international multi-stakeholder policy forum created in 2013 to share policy and practical experiences on water governance at different levels. We hope this research will be used to stimulate and enrich discussions about the necessary conditions for results-oriented stakeholder engagement, and to guide decision makers accordingly.

  13. Uruguay - Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementa...

  14. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Uruguay

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementation including: Improving corporate information, particularly ownership disclosure, related party transac...

  15. Energy demand modelling: pointing out alternative energy sources. The example of industry in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renou, P.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis studies energy demand and alternative energy sources in OECD countries. In the first part, the principle models usually used for energy demand modelling. In the second part, the author studies the flexible functional forms (translog, generalized Leontief, generalized quadratic, Fourier) to obtain an estimation of the production function. In the third part, several examples are given, chosen in seven countries (Usa, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Canada). Energy systems analysis in these countries, can help to choose models and gives informations on alternative energies. 246 refs., 24 figs., 27 tabs

  16. The impact of oil price shocks. Evidence from the industries of six OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, Rebeca

    2008-01-01

    Most of the studies about the macroeconomic consequences of oil price shocks have been focused on US aggregate data. In contrast to these studies, this paper empirically assesses the dynamic effect of oil price shocks on the output of the main manufacturing industries in six OECD countries. The pattern of responses to an oil price shock by industrial output is diverse across the four European Monetary Union (EMU) countries under consideration (France, Germany, Italy, and Spain), but broadly similar in the UK and the US. Moreover, evidence on cross-industry heterogeneity of oil shock effects within the EMU countries is also reported. (author)

  17. Education at a Glance 2010: OECD Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Across OECD countries, governments are seeking policies to make education more effective while searching for additional resources to meet the increasing demand for education. The 2010 edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" enables countries to see themselves in the light of other countries' performance. It provides a rich, comparable…

  18. Competition policies and environmental quality: Empirical analysis of the electricity sector in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asane-Otoo, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, electricity markets across OECD countries have been subjected to profound structural changes with far-reaching implications on the economy and the environment. This paper investigates the effect of restructuring – changes in entry regulations, the degree of vertical integration and ownership structure – on GHG emissions. The findings show that competition policies – particularly reducing the degree of vertical integration and increasing privatization – correlate negatively with emission intensity. However, the environmental effect of reducing market entry barriers is generally insignificant. Integration of competition and stringent environmental policies are required to reduce GHG emissions and improve environmental quality. - Highlights: •Empirical study on competition policies and GHG emissions from the electricity sector. •Product market regulation scores for OECD countries are used to measure the extent of competition. •Evidence of a positive relationship between competition policies and environmental quality. •Integration of competition and stringent environmental policies is recommended.

  19. Does trade matter for carbon emissions in OECD countries? Evidence from a new trade openness measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozgor, Giray

    2017-12-01

    This paper analyzes the impacts of the per capita income, the per capita energy consumption, and the trade openness on the level of per capita carbon emissions in the panel dataset of 35 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries over the period 1960-2013. Along with the nominal trade openness, the paper uses a different trade openness measure, so called as the "trade potential index" (TPI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that uses the TPI in the empirical environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis literature. The paper finds that the EKC hypothesis is valid and there is an "inverted-U" relationship between the income and the carbon emissions. In addition, the paper observes that there is a positive effect of the energy consumption on the carbon emissions. Furthermore, the results indicate that both trade openness measures are negatively associated with the carbon emissions in the OECD countries in the long run.

  20. Consideration of probabilistic safety objectives in OECD/NEA member countries: Short overview and update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteeg, M.F.; Andrews, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Almost every member country of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) uses probabilistic safety criteria (PSC), in one way or another, for the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. The choice of the PSC, their applicability, and whether or not these PSC are used in a formal and/or legal way, is dependent on the political and regulatory situation. The spectrum of utilization includes the use as design requirements and the use as a regulatory and licensing tool be the authorities. The paper summarises the various PSC applied to the assessment of nuclear power plant in the OECD member countries and presents in more detail the use of PSC on the public health level in the Netherlands, United Kingdom and USA. 10 refs, 1 fig., 6 tabs

  1. MACROECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY: NEW GENERATION PANEL DATA ANALYSIS ON OECD COUNTRIES (1996-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÖMER YALÇINKAYA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the factors which are effective on total factor productivity (TFP increments include the productivity of all factors in the production process and making improvements for these factors via policies have importance concerning speed the potential growth rate up in the long term and making this sustainable. The mediumlong term determinants of TFP are examined in this research for the 1994-2015 period as econometric within the scope of new generation panel data analysis on the OECD countries who are classified as OECD-1 and OECD-2 by their income levels. From this aspect, purposed in this research that to reveal the primary determinants which cause the differentiations between OECD-1 and OECD-2 countries in terms of their long-term economic growth performances and/or income levels. Determined as a result of the research that the effect of the variables which are used to determine the medium-long term determinants of the TFP on OECD-1 and OECD-2 groups parallelly increased and decreased as long as enhancing the representation degree of the knowledge, innovation and technological development level of the variables. These results show that the differentiation of countries in OECD-1 and OECD-2 groups in terms of long-term economic growth and/or income levels is majorly rooted in indicators which are used on behalf of knowledge, innovation, and technological development.

  2. Hungary : Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    This report assesses the corporate governance policy framework and enforcement and compliance practices in Hungary. Hungary has already invested considerable resources in upgrading its legislation to meet European Union Directives, and the legislative and regulatory framework dealing with corporate governance issues is robust. The major issues identified by this review include: (1) the gen...

  3. Controlling the demand for electricity: strategies and challenges in the residential sector of the OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebot, B.

    2003-01-01

    By reinforcing policies to improve the energy efficiency of household appliances (particularly by rating the efficiency of each appliance as a minimum of its overall cost from 2005 onwards), the member countries of the IEA are in a position to reduce their annual CO 2 emissions by approximately 322 million tonnes (Mt) by 2010, compared to what they would have obtained using current policies. In 2030, this same policy will make it possible to achieve an annual saving of 1 110 TWh in the consumption of electricity, (572 Mt of CO 2 each year). This measure alone will meet 30% of the objectives of the member countries of the IEA under the Kyoto agreements concerning climatic change. These reductions can be obtained at a negative cost for society as the additional cost generated by improvements in energy efficiency is offset by savings made in operating costs during the life of the appliance. Thus, in the United States, each tonne of CO 2 saved in this way in 2020 will generate $65 for society. In Europe, every tonne of CO 2 saved will generate a gain of euros 169 (the difference being accounted for by the higher cost of electricity and by lower energy efficiency standards currently existing in Europe). It is possible to make major savings in all regions of the OECD, despite the vast diversity of the various situations of the countries. In the member countries of the IEA, the policies in place have already demonstrated their economic effectiveness in reducing demand for energy and greenhouse gas emissions. Up to 2000, they made it possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 46 Mt of CO 2 each year. These policies will contribute to reducing emissions by 126 Mt of CO 2 each year up to 2010. International co-operation offers real advantages in the deployment of policies for controlling the demand for energy by households. Manufacturers, consumers and governments all benefit from greater transparency in the marketplace, improved comparisons of test methods

  4. Nuclear energy-economic growth nexus in OECD countries. A panel data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Burcu; Ari, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in 13 OECD countries from 1980 to 2012 is analyzed. The panel causality results supported the feedback hypothesis in both the short-run and long-run. There is a positive relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth. As such, nuclear energy consumption and economic growth complement and reinforce each other. Nuclear energy conservation policies may negatively affect economic growth rates.

  5. Nuclear energy-economic growth nexus in OECD countries. A panel data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Burcu [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Dept. of Economics; Ari, Ayse [Nigde Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Economics

    2016-01-15

    The relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in 13 OECD countries from 1980 to 2012 is analyzed. The panel causality results supported the feedback hypothesis in both the short-run and long-run. There is a positive relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth. As such, nuclear energy consumption and economic growth complement and reinforce each other. Nuclear energy conservation policies may negatively affect economic growth rates.

  6. Trade Openness, Market Competition, and Inflation: Some Sectoral Evidence from OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mahir Binici; Yin-Wong Cheung; Kon S. Lai

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the role market competition plays in determining inflation based on sector-level data from OECD countries. In theory, trade openness can affect inflation through changes in market competitiveness and productivity. Nonetheless, previous empirical studies often fail to account for productivity effects, and their results may overstate the role of market competition. This study shows that inflation decreases with greater market competitiveness even after controlling for produ...

  7. Real House Price Dynamics in OECD countries - The risk of large movements in prices

    OpenAIRE

    Mamre, Mari Olsen

    2014-01-01

    Using different econometric approaches and based on a panel of 21 OECD countries this thesis investigate whether differences in structural or policy factors significantly affects the price responsiveness of shocks to demand in the short run and in the cases of abrupt movements in real prices. Over such steeper areas of the housing cycle the analysis focus specifically on finding evidence of asymmetric responses of demand and structural factors on price dynamics. The study of asymmetries in th...

  8. Do political or economic factors drive healthcare financing privatisations? Empirical evidence from OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    This paper adds new empirical evidence to the political economy literature of economic reform. One of the main contributions of this paper is the development of a novel methodology to identify privatisations. The methodology is a combination of the Bai & Perron structural break filter, and validation of the breaks identified by this filter using de jure evidence of reforms. 21 de facto healthcare financing privatisations are identified in a sample of 23 OECD countries. It is analysed which fa...

  9. Linking Business Ownership and Perceived Administrative Complexity: An Empirical Analysis of 18 OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    André van Stel; Viktor Stunnenberg

    2004-01-01

    Administrative burdens are known to be a major business constraint for incumbent SMEs in modern economies. Far less is known about the influence of these burdens on the startup of new firms. The current paper examines to what extent perceived administrative complexity related to starting a new business influences the number of business owners across 18 OECD countries. We test this relationship combining data on business ownership from EIM's COMPENDIA data base and data on perceived administra...

  10. Protective measures adopted in OECD member countries in response to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines the measures for exposure prevention taken in West European countries following the Chernobyl power plant accident. In particular, the radioactivity regulation levels for foods (derived intervention levels) adopted in these countries are described in detail, citing from the reports of the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health of OECD/NEA (The Radiological Impact of the Chernobyl Accident in OECD Countries) and an scientific seminar held by EC (International Scientific Seminar on Foodstuffs Intervention Levels Following a Nuclear Accident). It is pointed out that these countries rather largely vary in measures taken and the derived intervention levels adopted although the principles for radiation protection which provide the basis for emergency protection measures must be nearly the same in all of the countries. It is necessary to establish consistent standards in each country in consideration of an accident, like the one at Chernobyl, that may have global effects. The ICRP recommendations and IAEA safety guidelines so far are centered on ''near-field'' measures to be taken in areas near an accident site. Thus, studies should be made to establish measures to be taken in areas far from the site. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Long-Term Damage from the Great Recession in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence M. Ball

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the long-term effects of the global recession of 2008-2009 on output in 23 countries. I measure these effects by comparing current estimates of potential output from the OECD and IMF to the path that potential was following in 2007, according to estimates at the time. The losses in potential output range from almost nothing in Australia and Switzerland to more than 30% in Greece, Hungary, and Ireland; the average loss, weighted by economy size, is 8.4%. Most countries hav...

  12. Deaths from international terrorism compared with road crash deaths in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N; Thomson, G

    2005-12-01

    To estimate the relative number of deaths in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) from international terrorism and road crashes. Data on deaths from international terrorism (US State Department database) were collated (1994-2003) and compared to the road injury deaths (year 2000 and 2001 data) from the OECD International Road Transport Accident Database. In the 29 OECD countries for which comparable data were available, the annual average death rate from road injury was approximately 390 times that from international terrorism. The ratio of annual road to international terrorism deaths (averaged over 10 years) was lowest for the United States at 142 times. In 2001, road crash deaths in the US were equal to those from a September 11 attack every 26 days. There is a large difference in the magnitude of these two causes of deaths from injury. Policy makers need to be aware of this when allocating resources to preventing these two avoidable causes of mortality.

  13. Impacts of informal caregiver availability on long-term care expenditures in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Bhattacharya, Jay; McDonald, Kathryn M; Garber, Alan M

    2004-12-01

    To quantify the effects of informal caregiver availability and public funding on formal long-term care (LTC) expenditures in developed countries. Secondary data were acquired for 15 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries from 1970 to 2000. Secondary data analysis, applying fixed- and random-effects models to time-series cross-sectional data. Outcome variables are inpatient or home heath LTC expenditures. Key explanatory variables are measures of the availability of informal caregivers, generosity in public funding for formal LTC, and the proportion of the elderly population in the total population. Aggregated macro data were obtained from OECD Health Data, United Nations Demographic Yearbooks, and U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base. Most of the 15 OECD countries experienced growth in LTC expenditures over the study period. The availability of a spouse caregiver, measured by male-to-female ratio among the elderly, is associated with a $28,840 (1995 U.S. dollars) annual reduction in formal LTC expenditure per additional elderly male. Availability of an adult child caregiver, measured by female labor force participation and full-time/part-time status shift, is associated with a reduction of $310 to $3,830 in LTC expenditures. These impacts on LTC expenditure vary across countries and across time within a country. The availability of an informal caregiver, particularly a spouse caregiver, is among the most important factors explaining variation in LTC expenditure growth. Long-term care policies should take into account behavioral responses: decreased public funding in LTC may lead working women to leave the labor force to provide more informal care.

  14. More Health Expenditure, Better Economic Performance? Empirical Evidence From OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuhmei

    2015-01-01

    Recent economic downturns have led many countries to reduce health spending dramatically, with the World Health Organization raising concerns over the effects of this, in particular among the poor and vulnerable. With the provision of appropriate health care, the population of a country could have better health, thus strengthening the nation’s human capital, which could contribute to economic growth through improved productivity. How much should countries spend on health care? This study aims to estimate the optimal health care expenditure in a growing economy. Applying the experiences of countries from the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) over the period 1990 to 2009, this research introduces the method of system generalized method of moments (GMM) to derive the design of the estimators of the focal variables. Empirical evidence indicates that when the ratio of health spending to gross domestic product (GDP) is less than the optimal level of 7.55%, increases in health spending effectively lead to better economic performance. Above this, more spending does not equate to better care. The real level of health spending in OECD countries is 5.48% of GDP, with a 1.87% economic growth rate. The question which is posed by this study is a pertinent one, especially in the current context of financially constrained health systems around the world. The analytical results of this work will allow policymakers to better allocate scarce resources to achieve their macroeconomic goals. PMID:26310501

  15. More Health Expenditure, Better Economic Performance? Empirical Evidence From OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhmei Wang PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent economic downturns have led many countries to reduce health spending dramatically, with the World Health Organization raising concerns over the effects of this, in particular among the poor and vulnerable. With the provision of appropriate health care, the population of a country could have better health, thus strengthening the nation’s human capital, which could contribute to economic growth through improved productivity. How much should countries spend on health care? This study aims to estimate the optimal health care expenditure in a growing economy. Applying the experiences of countries from the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD over the period 1990 to 2009, this research introduces the method of system generalized method of moments (GMM to derive the design of the estimators of the focal variables. Empirical evidence indicates that when the ratio of health spending to gross domestic product (GDP is less than the optimal level of 7.55%, increases in health spending effectively lead to better economic performance. Above this, more spending does not equate to better care. The real level of health spending in OECD countries is 5.48% of GDP, with a 1.87% economic growth rate. The question which is posed by this study is a pertinent one, especially in the current context of financially constrained health systems around the world. The analytical results of this work will allow policymakers to better allocate scarce resources to achieve their macroeconomic goals.

  16. Labour Market Performance, Income Inequality and Poverty in OECD Countries. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniaux, Jean-Marc; Padrini, Flavio; Brandt, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    There have been concerns that employment-enhancing reforms along the lines of the 1994 OECD Jobs Strategy could inadvertently lead to increased income inequality and poverty. This paper focuses on the impact of institutions and redistributive policies on inequality and poverty with the view of assessing whether a trade-off between better labour…

  17. Re-spending rebound: A macro-level assessment for OECD countries and emerging economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, Miklós; Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that energy conservation can lead to rebound effects that partly offset the original energy savings. One particular rebound mechanism is re-spending of money savings associated with energy savings on energy intensive goods or services. We calculate the average magnitude of this “re-spending rebound” for different fuels and countries, and for both energy and carbon (CO 2 ) emissions. We find that emerging economies, neglected in past studies, typically have larger rebounds than OECD countries. Since such economies play an increasingly important role in the global economy the re-spending rebound is a growing concern. The re-spending effect is generally larger for gasoline than for natural gas and electricity. Paradoxically, stronger financial incentives to conserve energy tend to increase the rebound. This suggests that with climate regulation and peak oil the re-spending rebound may become more important. We discuss the policy implications of our findings. - highlights: • Energy and carbon rebound due to re-spending of money savings is analyzed. • The average magnitude of this rebound is calculated for several countries. • Emerging economies typically have substantially larger rebounds than OECD countries. • The effect is generally stronger for gasoline than for natural gas and electricity. • Policy conclusions are drawn

  18. A Comparative Study of Suicide Rates among 10–19-Year-Olds in 29 OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Beop-Rae; Jung, Eun Hee; Hong, Hyun Ju

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study had two main objectives: to compare current suicide rates in OECD countries among 10–19-year-olds and to identify patterns of suicide rates based on age, gender and time. Furthermore we investigated the main dimensions that contributed to the variation in child and adolescent suicide rates across countries. Methods We combined the WHO mortality data and the population data released by OECD to calculate the suicide rates in 29 OECD countries. A self-organizing map (SOM), k-means clustering analysis, and multi-dimensional scaling were used to classify countries based on similarities in suicide rate structure and to identify the important dimensions accounting for differences among groups. Results We identified significant differences in suicide rates depending on age, sex, country, and time period. Late adolescence and male gender were universal risk factors for suicide, and we observed a general trend of declining suicide rates in OECD countries. The SOM analysis yielded eight types of countries. Most countries showed gender gaps in suicide rates of similar magnitudes; however, there were outliers in which the gender gap was particularly large or small. Conclusion Significant variation exists with respect to suicide rates and their associated gender gaps in OECD countries. PMID:29486551

  19. Trends and determinants of weight gains among OECD countries: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S; Vu, X-B; Barnett, A

    2018-06-01

    Obesity has become a global issue with abundant evidence to indicate that the prevalence of obesity in many nations has increased over time. The literature also reports a strong association between obesity and economic development, but the trend that obesity growth rates may converge over time has not been examined. We propose a conceptual framework and conduct an ecological analysis on the relationship between economic development and weight gain. We also test the hypothesis that weight gain converges among countries over time and examine determinants of weight gains. This is a longitudinal study of 34 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries in the years 1980-2008 using publicly available data. We apply a dynamic economic growth model to test the hypothesis that the rate of weight gains across countries may converge over time. We also investigate the determinants of weight gains using a longitudinal regression tree analysis. We do not find evidence that the growth rates of body weight across countries converged for all countries. However, there were groups of countries in which the growth rates of body weight converge, with five groups for males and seven groups for females. The predicted growth rates of body weight peak when gross domestic product (GDP) per capita reaches US$47,000 for males and US$37,000 for females in OECD countries. National levels of consumption of sugar, fat and alcohol were the most important contributors to national weight gains. National weight gains follow an inverse U-shape curve with economic development. Excessive calorie intake is the main contributor to weight gains. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle in OECD countries, main data 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation. Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member Countries. In the questionnaire of January 1987, countries were asked to provide historical data for 1985 and 1986 and most likely projections up to the year 2005. The replies to the questionnaire or the results of the discussions between national correspondents and the Secretariat are presented in this Booklet. The Secretariat has, in some cases, referred to IEA's electricity-related data and IAEA's nuclear plant data. Where data were still unavailable the Secretariat made estimates based on information from other sources. Data for 1986 are provisional for several countries. The data on electricity generation and electric capacity are presented to the year 2005, and the data on fuel cycle services to the year 2000. The installed nuclear capacity of the OECD countries for the year 2000 is estimated at 340 GWe, a 25 GWe reduction from the estimate in the 1986 Booklet. This reduction is mainly due to revised lower projections of electricity demand. The Addendum contains an analysis of the present and past projections for installed nuclear capacity to 2000. It shows the total capacity of those plants connected to the grid, under construction and firmly planned to be in operation in 2000 as 294 GWe. The new projection of 340 GWe is well above this estimate, indicating that some countries are still planning to expand their nuclear capacities. In only one country does it appear that planned expansion has been affected specifically by the Chernobyl accident. The electricity generation and production data for fuel cycle services refer to those facilities located within the country, and thus exclude imports. The fuel cycle requirements, however, refer to the amounts of fuel cycle materials and services necessary for national nuclear power programmes

  1. Health aid and governance in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, David

    2011-07-01

    Despite anecdotal evidence that the quality of governance in recipient countries affects the allocation of international health aid, there is no quantitative evidence on the magnitude of this effect, or on which dimensions of governance influence donor decisions. We measure health-aid flows over 1995-2006 for 109 aid recipients, matching aid data with measures of different dimensions of governance and a range of country-specific economic and health characteristics. Everything else being equal, countries with more political rights receive significantly more aid, but so do countries with higher corruption levels. The dependence of aid on political rights, even when we control for other governance indicators, suggests that health aid is sometimes used as an incentive to reward political reforms. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Trend and pattern analysis of operational data through cooperation between OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    This papers deals with trend analyses achieved by NEA/OECD countries to assess operational safety experience. It describes the main features of the incident Reporting System operated by NEA to collect relevant safety events from nuclear power plants. It presents the results of exchange methods within Principal Working Group no 1 in charge of operating experience and human factors; the use of preselected IRS incidents is illustrated by the study of losses of containment functions performed by PWGl; some trends resulting from enlarged international exchanges dealing with operational data are highlighted through two examples: reducing scram frequency and improving technical specifications

  3. A comparison of the poverty impact of transfers, taxes and market income across five OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Sami; Duclos, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the poverty reduction impact of income sources, taxes and transfers across five OECD countries. Since the estimation of that impact can depend on the order in which the various income sources are introduced into the analysis, it is done by using the Shapley value. Estimates of the poverty reduction impact are presented in a normalized and unnormalized fashion, in order to take into account the total as well as the per dollar impacts. The methodology is applied to data from the Luxembourg Income Study database.

  4. Why pay more? Corporate Tax Avoidance through Transfer Pricing in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Eric J. Bartelsman; Roel Beetsma

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents suggestive evidence of income shifting in response to differences in corporate tax rates for a large selection of OECD countries. We use a new method to disentangle the income shifting effects from the effects of tax rates on real activity. Our baseline estimates suggest that a substantial share of the revenues from a unilateral increase in the corporate tax rate is lost because of a decline in reported income.This discussion paper has resulted in a publication in the Jour...

  5. Long-term damage from the Great Recession in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Ball

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the long-term effects of the global recession of 2008–2009 on output in 23 countries. I measure these effects by comparing current estimates of potential output from the OECD and IMF to the path that potential was following in 2007, according to estimates at the time. The losses in potential output range from almost nothing in Australia and Switzerland to more than 30 percent in Greece, Hungary, and Ireland; the average loss, weighted by economy size, is 8.4 percent. Mo...

  6. Trend and pattern analysis of operational data through cooperation between OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    This papers deals with trend analyses achieved by NEA/OECD countries to assess operational safety experience. It describes the main features of the Incident Reporting System operated by NEA to collect relevant safety events from nuclear power plants. It presents the results of exchange methods within Principal Working Group n 0 1 in charge of operating experience and human factors; the use of preselected IRS incidents is illustrated by the study of losses of containment functions performed by PWG1; some trends resulting from enlarged international exchanges dealing with operational data are highlighted through two examples: reducing scram frequency and improving technical specifications

  7. Off-balance sheet exposures and banking crises in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Barrell, R; Davis, P; Liadze, I; Karim, D

    2012-01-01

    Against the background of the acknowledged importance of off-balance-sheet exposures in the sub prime crisis, we seek to investigate whether this was a new phenomenon or common to earlier crises. Using a logit approach to predicting banking crises in 14 OECD countries we find a significant impact of a proxy for the ratio of banks‟ off-balance-sheet activity to total (off and on balance sheet) activity, as well as capital and liquidity ratios, the current account balance and GDP growth. These ...

  8. Renewable energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic growth for a panel of twenty OECD countries over the period 1985-2005 within a multivariate framework. Given the relatively short span of the time series data, a panel cointegration and error correction model is employed to infer the causal relationship. The heterogeneous panel cointegration test reveals a long-run equilibrium relationship between real GDP, renewable energy consumption, real gross fixed capital formation, and the labor force with the respective coefficients positive and statistically significant. The Granger-causality results indicate bidirectional causality between renewable energy consumption and economic growth in both the short- and long-run.

  9. World Tax Index: New Methodology for OECD Countries, 2000-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana Machova; Igor Kotlan

    2013-01-01

    This paper follows our previous article, Kotlán and Machová (2012a), which presented an indicator of the tax burden that can be used as an alternative to the tax quota, or for implicit tax rates in macroeconomic analyses. This alternative is an overall multi-criteria index called the WTI – the World Tax Index. The aim of this paper is to present the new World Tax Index 2013 and its methodology, which allowed us to compute it for all 34 OECD countries for the 2000–2012 period, with special ref...

  10. THE IMPACT OF LOGISTICS INDUSTRY ON ECONOMIC GROWTH: AN APPLICATION IN OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Sezer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The most significant elements that enable us to understand economic growth and development levels of nations are economic indicators of the country of interest. As much as these indicators have positive and high values, they affect the economic, social, psychological and cultural texture of the nation positively. These effects increase the culture, living and welfare levels of the individuals in the society. Logistics is one of the tools that play an important role in the change and improvement of economic indicators. Logistics industry provides significant macro contributions to national economy by creating employment, and creating national income and foreign investment influx. On the micro scale, logistics industry is a key industry in increasing the competitive power of corporations. Furthermore, the logistics industry has an important mission in revitalizing and improvement of the competitiveness of other industries. Today, all industries are dependent on logistics sector. The present study aimed to investigate how the logistics variables of transportation and communication affected economic growth in 34 OECD countries. The effect of both transportation industry variables and communication industry variables that form the logistics industry on the increase in per capita income in OECD countries was identified.

  11. Economic and cultural correlates of road-traffic accident fatality rates in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaygisiz, Esma

    2009-10-01

    The relationships between economic conditions, cultural characteristics, personality dimensions, intelligence scores, and road-traffic accident mortality rates were investigated in 30 member and five accession countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Economic indicators included the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, the unemployment rate, and the Gini index. Cultural variables included five Hofstede's cultural dimensions, seven Schwartz cultural value dimensions, NEO-PI-R scales, and the intelligence quotient (IQ). The results showed positive associations between favorable economic conditions (high income per capita, high employment rate, and low income inequality) and high traffic safety. Countries with higher road-traffic accident fatality rates were characterized by higher power distance and uncertainty avoidance as well as embeddedness and emphasis on social hierarchy. Countries with lower road-traffic accident fatality rates were more individualistic, egalitarian, and emphasized autonomy of individuals. Conscientiousness (from NEO-PI-R) and IQ correlated negatively with road-traffic accident fatalities.

  12. Stochastic convergence of renewable energy consumption in OECD countries: a fractional integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarin, Sakiru Adebola; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko; Al-Mulali, Usama

    2018-04-13

    In this article, we have examined the hypothesis of convergence of renewable energy consumption in 27 OECD countries. However, instead of relying on classical techniques, which are based on the dichotomy between stationarity I(0) and nonstationarity I(1), we consider a more flexible approach based on fractional integration. We employ both parametric and semiparametric techniques. Using parametric methods, evidence of convergence is found in the cases of Mexico, Switzerland and Sweden along with the USA, Portugal, the Czech Republic, South Korea and Spain, and employing semiparametric approaches, we found evidence of convergence in all these eight countries along with Australia, France, Japan, Greece, Italy and Poland. For the remaining 13 countries, even though the orders of integration of the series are smaller than one in all cases except Germany, the confidence intervals are so wide that we cannot reject the hypothesis of unit roots thus not finding support for the hypothesis of convergence.

  13. Country Stress Events; Does Governance Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kochanova; Carlos Caceres

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the linkages between governance quality and country stress events. It focuses on two types of events: fiscal and political stress events, for which two innovative stress indicators are introduced. The results suggest that weaker governance quality is associated with a higher incidence of both fiscal and political stress events. In particular, internal accountability, which measures the responsiveness of governments to improving the quality of the bureaucracy, public servic...

  14. The OECD and the Expansion of PISA: New Global Modes of Governance in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Sam; Lingard, Bob

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the expansion of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and associated growth in the influence of the OECD's education work. PISA has become one of the OECD's most successful "products" and has both strengthened the role of the Directorate for Education within the organization and enhanced…

  15. Human Capital Versus Income Variations: Are They Linked in OECD Countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Bartak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The theory of endogenous growth suggests a number of relations between income inequality and human capital. However, empirical evidence in this field is scarce. Therefore, in this paper we aim to demonstrate the existence of interdependencies between income inequality and human capital across OECD countries.Methodology: We present findings of the endogenous growth theory on the mechanisms linking inequality with human capital. Subsequently, we attempt to verify these links empirically using the regression function estimated by means of the generalized method of moments (GMM. The empirical analysis is based on panel data from 1995–2010.Findings: The results of the study reveal the existence of a negative relationship between income inequality and health indicators (infant mortality and maternal mortality. However, we did not reach an authoritative conclusion about the relationship between income inequality and quantitative indicators of educational achievement.Research limitations: Research is limited to the sample of OECD countries. Interdependencies between income inequality and human capital could be captured more clearly using a broader sample.Originality: This paper presents one of few studies testing the relation between human capital and income inequality. The use of high-quality empirical data on inequality (SWIID data and the generalized method of moments made it possible to contribute new arguments to the discussion of empirical analyses of these economic categories.

  16. Energy Innovations-GHG Emissions Nexus: Fresh Empirical Evidence from OECD Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez-Herránz, Agustín; Balsalobre, Daniel; Cantos, José María; Shahbaz, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the impact of improvements in energy research development (ERD) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions using environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis for 28 OECD countries over the period of 1990–2014. In doing so, we have employed a panel data where public budget in energy research development and demonstration (ERD&D) has transformed into a finite inverted V-lag distribution model developed by De Leeuw (1962). This model considers that energy innovation accumulates in time and presents empirical evidence, how energy innovation contributes in reducing energy intensity and environmental pollution as well. Our results indicate that energy innovation measures require lapses of time to reach their full effect i.e. innovation applied to measures for environmental correction does not reach its whole effect immediately, requiring instead a certain amount of time to pass. Innovation policies have recommended for improving environmental quality. - Highlights: • This study analyses the impact of public budget in energy RD&D for 28 OECD countries on environmental quality. • Energy innovation contributes positively to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. • Advances in energy technology seem to be the key of improved environmental quality.

  17. How did the economic recession (2008-2010) influence traffic fatalities in OECD-countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Fred; Allsop, Richard; Antoniou, Constantinos; Bergel-Hayat, Ruth; Elvik, Rune; Lassarre, Sylvain; Lloyd, Daryl; Wijnen, Wim

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents analyses of how the economic recession that started in 2008 has influenced the number of traffic fatalities in OECD countries. Previous studies of the relationship between economic recessions and changes in the number of traffic fatalities are reviewed. Based on these studies, a causal diagram of the relationship between changes of the business cycle and changes in the number of traffic fatalities is proposed. This causal model is tested empirically by means of multivariate analyses and analyses of accident statistics for Great Britain and Sweden. Economic recession, as indicated both by slower growth of, or decline of gross national product, and by increased unemployment is associated with an accelerated decline in the number of traffic fatalities, i.e. a larger decline than the long-term trend that is normal in OECD countries. The principal mechanisms bringing this about are a disproportionate reduction of driving among high-risk drivers, in particular young drivers and a reduction of fatality rate per kilometre of travel, probably attributable to changes in road user behaviour that are only partly observable. The total number of vehicle kilometres of travel did not change very much as a result of the recession. The paper is based on an ITF-report that presents the analyses in greater detail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pensions at a glance 2011 retirement-income systems in OECD and G20 countries

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2011-01-01

    The theme of this fourth edition of Pensions at a Glance is pensions, retirement and life expectancy. Many countries have increased pension ages in the face of population ageing and longer lives. Some have introduced an automatic link between pensions and life expectancy. Improvements to the incentives to work rather than retire are also a common part of recent pension-reform packages. However, ensuring that there are enough jobs for older workers remains a challenge. An in-depth look at these important policy issues is provided by five special chapters on: pension ages, retirement behaviour, pension incentives to retire, the demand for older workers and linking pensions to life expectancy. This edition updates information on the key features of pension provision in OECD countries and provides projections of retirement income for today’s workers. It offers an expanded range of 34 indicators, covering the design of national retirement-income provision, pension entitlements, incomes of older people, the finan...

  19. The Relationship between Property Rights and Economic Growth: an Analysis of OECD and EU Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydaroğlu Ceyhun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, institutions and institutional structure have become some of the most popular concepts analyzed by economics theory. New growth theories have especially focused on the effects of institutions and institutional structure on a macro level. Property rights are one of the most important elements of this institutional structure. The relationship between property rights and economic growth have drawn the attention of many researchers and policymakers in recent years. The aim of this study, covering the period 2007–2014, is to examine the relationship between property rights and economic growth with the help of PARDL in OECD and EU countries. According to the result of a bounds test, there is cointegration between the variables. The long- and short-term relationships between series were determined and the results taken from the analysis show that there is a positive effect on economic growth in those countries.

  20. Changes in Income at Macro Level Predict Sex Ratio at Birth in OECD Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanninen, Ohto; Karhula, Aleksi

    2016-01-01

    The human sex ratio at birth (SRB) is approximately 107 boys for every 100 girls. SRB was rising until the World War II and has been declining slightly after the 1950s in several industrial countries. Recent studies have shown that SRB varies according to exposure to disasters and socioeconomic conditions. However, it remains unknown whether changes in SRB can be explained by observable macro-level socioeconomic variables across multiple years and countries. Here we show that changes in disposable income at the macro level positively predict SRB in OECD countries. A one standard deviation increase in the change of disposable income is associated with an increase of 1.03 male births per 1000 female births. The relationship is possibly nonlinear and driven by extreme changes. The association varies from country to country being particular strong in Estonia. This is the first evidence to show that economic and social conditions are connected to SRB across countries at the macro level. This calls for further research on the effects of societal conditions on general characteristics at birth.

  1. The relationship between health and GDP in OECD countries in the very long run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Robyn

    2011-03-01

    This paper uses Johansen multivariate cointegration analysis to examine the relationship between health and GDP for 13 OECD countries over the last two centuries, for periods ranging from 1820-2001 to 1921-2001. A similar, long run, cointegrating relationship between life expectancy and both total GDP and GDP per capita was found for all the countries estimated. The relationships have a significant influence on both total GDP and GPD per capita in most of the countries estimated, with 1% increase in life expectancy resulting in an average 6% increase in total GDP in the long run, and 5% increase in GDP per capita. Total GDP and GDP per capita also have a significant influence on life expectancy for most countries. There is no evidence of changes in the relationships for any country over the periods estimated, indicating that shifts in the major causes of illness and death over time do not appear to have influenced the link between health and economic growth. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Polices for increasing energy efficiency: Thirty years of experience in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, Howard; Harrington, Philip; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Tanishima, Satoshi; Unander, Fridtjof

    2006-01-01

    Energy efficiency improvement was an important phenomenon in the global energy balance over the past 30 years. Without energy efficiency improvements, the OECD nations would have used approximately 49% more energy than was actually consumed as of 1998. This paper first reviews energy intensity trends for the major OECD nations since 1973, considering how much of the overall reduction in E/GDP was due to energy efficiency improvement and how much was due to structural change. The bulk of the paper examines the energy efficiency policies and programs adopted in Japan, United States, and Western Europe, commenting on their effectiveness and energy savings impacts where possible. The paper also reviews the energy efficiency policies and programs adopted in California. This experience shows that well-designed policies can result in substantial energy savings, as demonstrated in the United States where nine specific policies and programs reduced primary energy use in 2002 by approximately 11%. Substantial energy savings also occurred in Japan, some European countries, and in the electricity sector in California

  3. Constructing Aggregate Environmental-Economic Indicators. A Comparison of 12 OECD Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bergh, C.J.M. [Tinbergen Institute, Labor, Region and Environment, Amsterdam/Rotterdam (Netherlands); Van Veen-Groot, D.B. [Department of Spatial Economics, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    The application of aggregate indicators in environmental-economic research has received little attention so far. An important reason is the incompleteness of environmental data. This article presents a systematic approach to construct indicators of environment and economy on a macro level. It includes a distinction into the following categories: the volume of economic activities as an indicator of potential environmental pressure; actual environmental pressure; environmental quality; and environmental policy. In each category aggregate indicators are calculated for 12 OECD countries. Subsequently, the correlation between these indicators is examined. Significant correlation is found between the economic activity indicators (or 'potential' environmental pressure), actual environmental pressure and environmental quality, whereas a very weak correlation exists with these indicators and two types of aggregate indicators of environmental policy. Due to some arbitrary choices, which are inevitable, the results are to be judged with caution. Several suggestions are offered to improve the calculation and comparison of aggregate indicators. 20 refs.

  4. Constructing Aggregate Environmental-Economic Indicators. A Comparison of 12 OECD Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, C.J.M.; Van Veen-Groot, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    The application of aggregate indicators in environmental-economic research has received little attention so far. An important reason is the incompleteness of environmental data. This article presents a systematic approach to construct indicators of environment and economy on a macro level. It includes a distinction into the following categories: the volume of economic activities as an indicator of potential environmental pressure; actual environmental pressure; environmental quality; and environmental policy. In each category aggregate indicators are calculated for 12 OECD countries. Subsequently, the correlation between these indicators is examined. Significant correlation is found between the economic activity indicators (or 'potential' environmental pressure), actual environmental pressure and environmental quality, whereas a very weak correlation exists with these indicators and two types of aggregate indicators of environmental policy. Due to some arbitrary choices, which are inevitable, the results are to be judged with caution. Several suggestions are offered to improve the calculation and comparison of aggregate indicators. 20 refs

  5. Coal consumption and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between coal consumption and economic growth for 25 OECD countries within a multivariate panel framework over period 1980-2005. The panel cointegration test indicates there is a long-run equilibrium relationship between real GDP, coal consumption, real gross fixed capital formation, and the labor force. The respective coefficients for real gross fixed capital formation and the labor force are positive and statistically significant whereas the coefficient for coal consumption is negative and statistically significant. The results of the panel vector error correction model reveal bidirectional causality between coal consumption and economic growth in both the short- and long-run; however, the bidirectional causality in the short-run is negative.

  6. Is Deindustrialization Causing High Unemployment in Affluent Countries? Evidence from 16 OECD Countries, 1970-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeyer, Christopher; Pichler, Florian

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the possibility that deindustrialization has been contributing to the persistently high unemployment rates experienced by most affluent countries since the mid-1970s. Combining insights from Lilien's (1982) "sectoral shift" thesis and the literature on deindustrialization, the authors assert that the decades-long contraction of…

  7. The Impact of Taxation on Economic Growth: Case Study of OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macek Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate the impact of individual types of taxes on the economic growth by utilizing regression analysis on the OECD countries for the period of 2000–2011. The impact of taxation is integrated into growth models by its impact on the individual growth variables, which are capital accumulation and investment, human capital and technology. The analysis in this paper is based on extended neoclassical growth model of Mankiw, Romer and Weil (1992, and for the verification of relation between taxation and economic growth the panel regression method is used. The taxation rate itself is not approximated only by traditional tax quota, which is characteristic by many insufficiencies, but also by the alternative World Tax Index which combines hard and soft data. It is evident from the results of both analyses that corporate taxation followed by personal income taxes and social security contribution are the most harmful for economic growth. Concurrently, in case of the value added tax approximated by tax quota, the negative impact on economic growth was not confirmed, from which it can be concluded that tax quota, in this case as the indicator of taxation, fails. When utilizing World Tax Index, a negative relation between these two variables was confirmed, however, it was the least quantifiable. The impact of property taxes was statistically insignificant. Based on the analysis results it is evident that in effort to stimulate economic growth in OECD countries, economic-politic authorities should lower the corporate taxation and personal income taxes, and the loss of income tax revenues should be compensated by the growth of indirect tax revenues.

  8. General dependencies and causality analysis of road traffic fatalities in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Muhammad Rizwan; Ali, Qamar; Khan, Muhammad Tariq Iqbal

    2018-05-07

    The road traffic accidents were responsible for material and human loss which was equal to 2.8 to 5% of gross national product (GNP). However, literature does not explore the elasticity coefficients and nexus of road traffic fatalities with foreign direct investment, health expenditures, trade openness, mobile subscriptions, the number of researchers in R&D department, and environmental particulate matter. This study filled this research gap by exploring the nexus between road traffic fatalities, foreign direct investment, health expenditures, trade openness, mobile subscriptions, the number of researchers, and environmental particulate matter in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries by using panel data from 1995 to 2015. The panel Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bound test was used for the detection of cointegration between the variables after checking the stationarity in selected variables with different panel unit root tests. Panel vector error correction model explored the causality of road traffic fatalities, foreign direct investment, PM2.5 in the environment, and trade openness in the long run. Road traffic fatalities showed short run bi-directional causality with foreign direct investment and health expenditures. The short run bi-directional causality was also observed between trade and foreign direct investment and cellular mobile subscriptions and foreign direct investment. The panel fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) and panel dynamic ordinary least square (DOLS) showed the 0.947% reduction in road fatalities for 1% increase in the health expenditures in OECD countries. The significant reduction in road fatalities was also observed due to 1% increase in trade openness and researchers in R&D, which implies the importance of trade and research for road safety. It is required to invest in the health sector for the safety of precious human lives like the hospitals with latest medical equipment and improvement

  9. Determinants and Consequences of Non-Interest Income Diversification of Commercial Banks in OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Ho Hahm

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies determinants and consequences of theThis paper studies determinants and consequences of the changing income structure of commercial banks in the era of financial conglomeration. Utilizing a dataset of 662 relatively large commercial banks in 29 OECD countries from 1992 to 2006, we find that banks with relatively large asset sizes, low net interest margins, high impaired loan ratios, and high cost-income ratios tend to exhibit higher non-interest income shares. As for macroeconomic factors, banks in countries with slow economic growth, a stable inflation environment, and well- developed stock markets tend to show higher non-interest income shares. Second, we investigate the consequences of non-interest income expansion on bank profitability and risks. While the positive effects on profit and capital adequacy seem to become weaker under the consideration of macroeconomic factors and endogeneity problems, the adverse impact on profit variability remains robust. Overall, these findings suggest that expanding toward non-interest income may not produce desired income diversification effects, and it does not necessarily imply a shift toward superior return-risk frontiers.

  10. The impact of minimum wages on population health: evidence from 24 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Otto

    2017-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between minimum wages and several measures of population health by analyzing data from 24 OECD countries for a time period of 31 years. Specifically, I test for health effects as a result of within-country variations in the generosity of minimum wages, which are measured by the Kaitz index. The paper finds that higher levels of minimum wages are associated with significant reductions of overall mortality rates as well as in the number of deaths due to outcomes that have been shown to be more prevalent among individuals with low socioeconomic status (e.g., diabetes, disease of the circulatory system, stroke). A 10% point increase of the Kaitz index is associated with significant declines in death rates and an increase in life expectancy of 0.44 years. Furthermore, I provide evidence for potential channels through which minimum wages impact population health by showing that more generous minimum wages impact outcomes such as poverty, the share of the population with unmet medical needs, the number of doctor consultations, tobacco consumption, calorie intake, and the likelihood of people being overweight.

  11. Renewable energy consumption and economic growth in nine OECD countries: bounds test approach and causality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung-Pin, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the short-run and long-run causality between renewable energy (RE) consumption and economic growth (EG) in nine OECD countries from the period between 1982 and 2011. To examine the linkage, this paper uses the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration test and vector error-correction models to test the causal relationship between variables. The co-integration and causal relationships are found in five countries-United States of America (USA), Japan, Germany, Italy, and United Kingdom (UK). The overall results indicate that (1) a short-run unidirectional causality runs from EG to RE in Italy and UK; (2) long-run unidirectional causalities run from RE to EG for Germany, Italy, and UK; (3) a long-run unidirectional causality runs from EG to RE in USA, and Japan; (4) both long-run and strong unidirectional causalities run from RE to EG for Germany and UK; and (5) Finally, both long-run and strong unidirectional causalities run from EG to RE in only USA. Further evidence reveals that policies for renewable energy conservation may have no impact on economic growth in France, Denmark, Portugal, and Spain.

  12. OECD and NEA countries' national frameworks for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzeyli, Kaan

    2016-01-01

    To assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, the NEA serves as a forum for sharing and analysing information and experience among its member countries in order to pool and maintain their technical expertise and human infrastructure and to support nuclear activities by providing them with nuclear policy analyses. Comprehensive and effective legal regimes are necessary to help achieve confidence in the peaceful use of nuclear energy. These regimes, whose goals are to protect the public and the natural environment from the risks inherent in such activities, include regulation at a national level, co-operation at bilateral and multilateral levels and international harmonisation of national policies and legislation through adherence to international conventions. Regimes need to be strong enough to set and enforce limits, and flexible enough to keep pace with technological advances and changing public concerns. The NEA collects, analyses and disseminates information on nuclear law in general and on topical nuclear legal issues in particular. Nuclear law is the body of special legal norms created to regulate the conduct of legal or natural persons engaged in activities related to fissionable materials, ionising radiation and exposure to natural sources of radiation. In 1995, the NEA began publishing country profiles entitled Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries - Regulatory and Institutional Frameworks for Nuclear Activities or the 'Grand Orange', a name which was adopted and became widely used because of the colour of the initial cover. Since 2006, these country profiles can be downloaded free online both in English and French from the NEA web site. The NEA endeavours to complement country profiles by publishing online an English, non

  13. Once on the Lips, Forever on the Hips: A Benefit-Cost Analysis of Fiscal Stimulus in OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bev Dahlby

    2009-01-01

    The author evaluates the fiscal stimulus policies of 20 OECD countries within a simple benefit-cost framework. Among his findings: in Canada, to be justifiable on a benefit-cost basis, a fiscal stimulus project that improves consumptive public services must provide at least 73 cents in benefits for every dollar of fiscal stimulus.

  14. Public Debt, Economic Growth and the Real Interest Rate : A Panel VAR Approach to EU and OECD Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterken, Elmer; Ogawa, Kazuo; Tokutsu, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the causal relationship between the public debt to GDP ratio and economic growth for 31 EU and OECD countries from 1995 to 2013. A number of studies have tackled this problem, but very few make the transmission mechanism explicit in their analysis. We estimate a panel VAR model that

  15. Economic growth and the environment: reassessing the environmental Kuznets Curve for air pollution emissions in OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiev, E.S.; Mihaylov, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper tests the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis for four local (SOx, NOx , CO, VOC) and two global (CO2, GHG) air pollutants. Using a panel data set of thirty OECD countries, the paper finds that the postulated inverted U-shaped relationship between income and pollution does not

  16. Taxation and business environment as drivers of foreign direct investment in OECD countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Dana; Nicoletti, G.; Vartia, L.; Yoo, K.-Y.

    2006/2, č. 43 (2006), s. 7-38 ISSN 0255-0822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : taxation * foreign direct investment * OECD Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/62/30/40505831.pdf

  17. Which industry is greener? An empirical study of nine industries in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between the CO 2 emissions of different industries and economic growth in OECD countries from 1970 to 2005. We tested an environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis and found that total CO 2 emissions from nine industries show an N-shaped trend instead of an inverted U or monotonic increasing trend with increasing income. The EKC hypothesis for sector-level CO 2 emissions was supported in the (1) paper, pulp, and printing industry; (2) wood and wood products industry; and (3) construction industry. We also found that emissions from coal and oil increase with economic growth in the steel and construction industries. In addition, the non-metallic minerals, machinery, and transport equipment industries tend to have increased emissions from oil and electricity with economic growth. Finally, the EKC turning point and the relationship between GDP per capita and sectoral CO 2 emissions differ among industries according to the fuel type used. Therefore, environmental policies for CO 2 reduction must consider these differences in industrial characteristics. - Highlights: ► We analyze the relationship between CO 2 emissions and economic growth by industry. ► Wood, paper, and construction industries have an inverted U-shaped relationship. ► The turning points differ among industries according to the fuel type used. ► The policies for CO 2 reduction must consider differences in industrial characteristics

  18. Public policy influence on renewable energy investments—A panel data study across OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzin, Friedemann; Migendt, Michael; Täube, Florian A.; Flotow, Paschen von

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of public policy measures on renewable energy (RE) investments in electricity-generating capacity made by institutional investors. Using a novel combination of datasets and a longitudinal research design, we investigate the influence of different policy measures in a sample of OECD countries to suggest an effective policy mix which could tackle failures in the market for clean energy. The results call for technology-specific policies which take into account actual market conditions and technology maturity. To improve the conditions for institutional investments, advisable policy instruments include economic and fiscal incentives such as feed-in tariffs (FIT), especially for less mature technologies. Additionally, market-based instruments such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trading systems for mature technologies should be included. These policy measures directly impact the risk and return structure of RE projects. Supplementing these with regulatory measures such as codes and standards (e.g. RPS) and long-term strategic planning could further strengthen the context for RE investments. - Highlights: • Panel data study on the effectiveness of policies to induce RE investments. • Novel combination of datasets (BNEF/IEA) in solar, wind and biomass sectors. • FIT proves to be more effective than subsidies for less mature technologies. • RPS and tradable permit systems seem more effective for mature technologies. • A long-term strategic planning framework is useful to attract institutional investors

  19. RE-EXAMINATION OF WAGNER’S LAW FOR OECD COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    KORHAN GOKMENOGLU

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between government spending and economic growth. Economic theory generally expects a negative relationship between these variables for rich countries with large public sectors. However, empirical studies often cannot find a robust negative relationship and have provided mixed empirical evidence. In the case of the relationship between public expenditure and economic growth it appears that specification of econometric methods, data selection and time sp...

  20. Gender gaps in life expectancy: generalized trends and negative associations with development indices in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Arai, Asuna; Kanda, Koji; Lee, Romeo B; Glasser, Jay; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2013-08-01

    Life expectancy (LE) is a major marker of individual survival. It also serves as a guide to highlight both the progress and the gaps in total social and societal health. Comparative LE in concert with measures of gender-specific experience, indices of empowerment and societal happiness and development offer a comparative tool to examine trends and similarities of societal progress as seen through the lens of cross-national experience. To determine the gender gaps in LE (GGLE) trends, we performed a longitudinal analysis, covering a period of 49 years (1960-2008). To examine the association of GGLE with development indices, we used the 2007 GGLE data, the newest happiness data mostly drawn from 2006; the 2006 Human Development Index (HDI) data and the 2006 Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM) data. It revealed that most of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries had a GGLE trend that occurred in an inverted U-curve fashion. We divided them into three subgroups based on the peak years of respective GGLE. The earlier the peak year, the happier the countries, the higher the HDI and the smaller the current GGLE are. Association analysis indicates that Happiness, HDI and GEM are all negatively associated with GGLE. This pattern suggests that GGLE undergoes three phases of growth, peak and stability and decline. Japan will soon be seeing its GGLE gradually shrinking in the foreseeable future. The continuing increases in Happiness, HDI and GEM are associated with a decrease in GGLE, which should be carefully taken into consideration.

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Trade governed by nuclear energy legislation; Trade governed by radiation protection legislation; Trade governed by export/import control legislation); 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Ministerial Level (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; Ministry of Trade and Industry; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Other Ministries); B. Subsidiary Level: (The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA; The Norwegian Nuclear Emergency Organisation); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies - Institute for Energy Technology - IFE

  2. The OECD and Educational Policy Reform: International Surveys, Governance, and Policy Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volante, Louis; Fazio, Xavier; Ritzen, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has increasingly influenced the nature and scope of education policies in primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors around the world. Policy suggestions in these sectors primarily stem from the results of their various international surveys such as the…

  3. Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in OECD countries: Cross-sectionally dependent heterogeneous panel causality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazlioglu, Saban; Lebe, Fuat; Kayhan, Selim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the direction causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in OECD countries. The empirical model that includes capital and labor force as the control variables is estimated for the panel of fourteen OECD countries during the period 1980-2007. Apart from the previous studies in the nuclear energy consumption and economic growth relationship, this study utilizes the novel panel causality approach, which allows both cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity across countries. The findings show that there is no causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in eleven out of fourteen cases, supporting the neutrality hypothesis. As a sensitivity analysis, we also conduct Toda-Yamamoto time series causality method and find out that the results from the panel causality analysis are slightly different than those from the time-series causality analysis. Thereby, we can conclude that the choice of statistical tools in analyzing the nature of causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth may play a key role for policy implications. - Highlights: → Causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth is examined for OECD countries. → Panel causality method, which allows cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity, is utilized. → The neutrality hypothesis is supported.

  4. Electricity consumption-real GDP causality nexus: Evidence from a bootstrapped causality test for 30 OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar; Prasad, Arti

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine any causal effects between electricity consumption and real GDP for 30 OECD countries. We use a bootstrapped causality testing approach and unravel evidence in favour of electricity consumption causing real GDP in Australia, Iceland, Italy, the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Korea, Portugal, and the UK. The implication is that electricity conservation policies will negatively impact real GDP in these countries. However, for the rest of the 22 countries our findings suggest that electricity conversation policies will not affect real GDP

  5. Structural Changes in the Consumption of Beer, Wine and Spirits in OECD Countries from 1961 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bentzen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is usually measured as the simple sum of the per capita consumption of beer, wine and spirits in alcohol equivalents, i.e., assuming the specific beverages to be perfect substitutes. Alternatively, total alcohol consumption can be represented by a vector in the three-dimensional space of beer, wine and spirits, and the concept of angular separation is used to give a structural measurement of the beverage composition. Applying such a methodology, the aim of this paper is to analyse and explain structural changes in alcohol consumption among 21 OECD countries over the period from 1961 to 2014. Overall, the analyses suggest that convergence has taken place in the structural composition of alcohol consumption in the OECD countries. Income, the alcohol consumption level, trade openness and demographic factors are found to be drivers of this development during the last decades.

  6. Economic impact of regulatory reforms in the electricity supply industry: a panel data analysis for OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toru; Tsutsui, Miki

    2004-01-01

    This paper re-examines the impact of the regulatory reforms on price in the electricity supply industry, using panel data for 19 OECD countries for the period 1987-1999, and compares the results with those found in an earlier study by Steiner (Regulation, industry structure and performance in the electricity supply industry, OECD Economics Department Working Paper, ECO/WKP, 2000, p. 11). We found that expanded retail access is likely to lower the industrial price and increase the price differential between industrial customers and household customers, as expected. We also found that the unbundling of generation and the introduction of a wholesale spot market did not necessarily lower the price and may possibly have resulted in a higher price. This finding is not consistent with expectations and differs from Steiner (2000), but it is plausible in the light of recent experiences in many countries. (author)

  7. E-Government for Good Governance in Developing Countries ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    E-Government and E-Governance Benefits ..... Morocco's central government promotes the use of ICT in the public sector in order to enhance ...... The project's mission is to develop low-cost laptops with educational value for African children.

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities - National Radiation Laboratory - NRL; 2. Advisory bodies - Radiation Protection Advisory Council; 3. Public and semi-public agencies - Research institutes

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health and Social Security; Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute)

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Luxembourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General; 2. Mining; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency measures); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. General Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister of Labour; Other Ministers competent); 2. Advisory bodies (Higher Health Council)

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Radiation protection standards; Emergency response); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government; Minister for Agriculture and Food; Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources; Minister for Finance; Minister for Health and Children; Minister for Defence); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; Food Safety Authority of Ireland)

  12. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Nuclear terrorism; II. Institutional Framework - The federal government: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Energy; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Labour and Social Security; Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources; Ministry of Communications and Transport); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: (National Nuclear Safety and Safeguards Commission; National Nuclear Research Institute)

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Atomic Energy Co-ordination Council; Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority - HAEA; Minister for Health; Minister for Local Government and Regional Development and Minister for Justice and Law Enforcement; Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development; Minister for Economy and Transport; Minister of Environment Protection and Water Management; Minister for Defence; Minister for Education; President of the Hungarian Mining and Geological Authority; Governmental Co-ordination Committee); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Board); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Institute for Electric Power Research - VEIKI; Atomic Energy Research Institute - AEKI; Institute of Isotopes; Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of Pannon; Hungarian Power Companies Ltd - MVM Zrt.)

  14. Corporate Governance Quality in Selected Transition Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Djokic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Important questions that concern the notion of good corporate governance focus on what good corporate governance is, who benefits from good corporate governance, and how corporate governance quality can be measured. The aim of our study was to broaden our understanding of the role of standards and codes of good corporate governance in improving governance practices.We found that not only formal regulations, standards, and governance codes, but also corporate governance indices-which make the assessment of companies’ governance practices possible-are important in measuring and improving governance quality. The results of the research based on the SEECGAN Index methodology indicated that mandatory requirements and voluntary recommendations of high governance standards had a positive impact on the corporate governance practice in Slovenia.

  15. Higher Education and Economic Development in the OECD: Policy Lessons for Other Countries and Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Rómulo; Pillay, Pundy

    2016-01-01

    This paper sheds light on the role of tertiary or higher education in economic development across two successful OECD case studies: Finland and South Korea. A number of key aspects are discussed, from the nature of the social contract between higher education and the economy to the endogenous characteristics of domestic higher education to the…

  16. Does the Recent Success of some OECD Countries in Lowering their Unemployment Rates lie in the Clever Design of their Labour Market Reforms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belot, M.V.K.; van Ours, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the unemployment rate differs substantially between OECD countries. In recent years some countries experienced a mild increase, other countries had a stable unemployment rate, while there are also 'successful' countries in which the unemployment rate decreased a lot. A common

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Trade and Industry - KTM; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory bodies (Advisory Committee on Nuclear Energy; Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK; State Nuclear Waste Management Fund)

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Fissionable materials, ores, radioactive materials and equipment (Fissionable materials and ores; Radioactive materials and equipment); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of individuals undergoing medical exposure); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment; Minister for Economic Affairs; Minister for Social Affairs and Employment; Minister for Health, Welfare and Sports; Minister for Finance; Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory body - Health Council of the Netherlands; 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG; Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste - COVRA)

  19. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Licensing; Registration and monitoring of nuclear materials and radioactive sources; High activity sources); 4. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (The President of the National Atomic Energy Agency - Prezes Panstwowej Agencji Atomistyki (President of the PAA); Minister of Health; Minister of the Environment); 2. Advisory bodies (Council for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection); 3. Public and semi-public bodies (Radioactive Waste Management Plant); 4. Research institutes (Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection; National Centre for Nuclear Research; Institute of Nuclear Physics; Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology; Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion)

  20. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects (The Environmental Code, Environmental impact statement, Permit under the Environmental Code)); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability (The Nuclear Liability Act; Chernobyl legislation); II. Institutional Framework: 1. Ministries with responsibilities concerning nuclear activities (Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications; Ministry of Justice; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Inspection, including Nuclear Safety; Emergency Response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiological Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic - UJD; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of Economy; Ministry of Labour and National Labour Inspectorate); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies

  2. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Prime Minister; Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment and Forestry); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority - TAEK; General Directorate for Mineral Research and Exploration - MTA; ETI Mine Works General Management; Turkish Electric Generation and Transmission Corporation - TEAS; Turkish Electricity Distribution Corporation - TEDAS)

  4. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trading in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Safeguards and non-proliferation; Physical protection); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade - MITYC; Ministry of the Interior - MIR; Ministry of Economy and the Exchequer - MEH; Ministry of the Environment and Rural and Marine Affairs - MARM); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Safety Council - CSN; Centre for Energy-related, Environmental and Technological Research - CIEMAT; National Energy Commission - CNE; 3. Public capital companies (Enusa Industrias Avanzadas, s.a. - ENUSA; Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, s.a. - ENRESA)

  5. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office; Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI; Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport - MLIT; Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology - MEXT); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission - AEC; Nuclear Safety Commission - NSC; Radiation Council; Special Committee on Energy Policy; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA)

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear items and spent fuel (Ionising radiation sources; Nuclear items; Spent fuel); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (State Office for Nuclear Safety - SUJB; Ministry of Industry and Trade; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (CEZ, a.s.; National Radiation Protection Institute - NRPI; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority - RAWRA; Diamo; Nuclear Physics Institute - NPI; National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; Nuclear Research Institute Rez, a.s. - NRI)

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Health; Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education; Ministry of Economy and Innovation; Ministry of Environment and Territorial Planning; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Independent Commission for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - CIPRSN; National Radiation Protection Commission - CNPCR; National Commission for Radiological Emergencies - CNER; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and semi-public agencies

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction (Licensing system; Offences, compliance and enforcement; Regulatory documents; Other relevant legislation); 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear substances and radiation devices; 4. Nuclear facilities; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (Exports, Other imports); 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Governor in council; Minister of natural resources; Other Ministerial authorities; Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - CNSC); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (National Research Council - NRC; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. - AECL)

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Safeguards for nuclear material; 7. Radiation protection; 8. Radioactive waste management; 9. Nuclear security; 10. Transport; 11. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration - SNSA; Slovenian Radiation Protection Administration - SRPA); 2. Advisory bodies; 3. Public and semi-public agencies; 4. Technical support organisations - approved experts

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister for the Environment/Minister of Transport and Energy; Minister of Justice; Minister of Defence; National Board of Health; Emergency Management Agency); 2. Advisory bodies (The Danish Ministry of Energy, Supply and Climate and the Danish Energy Agency); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Risoe National Laboratory)

  11. Creditor rights, country governance, and corporate cash holdings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Bruce; Gonenc, Halit

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of creditor rights and country governance on cash holdings using a sample of firms from 47 countries. We hypothesize that cash holdings are smaller when both creditor rights and country governance are high. In these circumstances firms will not need to hold as much

  12. OECD Reviews of School Resources : Austria 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Theisens, Henno

    2016-01-01

    The effective use of school resources is a policy priority across OECD countries. The OECD Reviews of School Resources explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. The series considers four types of resources: financial resources, such as public funding of individual schools; human resources, such as teachers, school leaders and education administrators; physical resources, such as location, buildin...

  13. The relevance of asymmetry issues for residential oil and natural gas demand: evidence from selected OECD countries, 1970-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, R.; Zoechling, J.

    1998-01-01

    In times of low oil prices, oil demand in OECD countries has not rebounded as textbook economic theory would suggest. On the other hand, natural gas demand has increased, despite prices being at almost the same level as in 1985. In this paper, the impact of volatile prices on oil demand is investigated. Different econometric approaches are applied. The major conclusions of these investigations are: (i) with respect to the the choice of fuels, strong patterns of asymmetry exist; (ii) the maximum historical oil price is the dominating parameter on residual oil demand; and (iii) volatile prices have a greater influence on energy demand than high but rather constant prices

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Nuclear fuels; Radioactive substances and equipment generating ionising radiation); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Environmental protection; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Council; Federal Assembly; Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications - DETEC; Federal Office of Energy - SFOE; Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - IFSN; Federal Department of Home Affairs - FDHA; Federal Office of Public Health - FOPH; State Secretariat for Education and Research - SER; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission - KNS; Federal Commission for Radiological Protection and Monitoring of the Radioactivity in the Environment; Federal Emergency Organisation on Radioactivity); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Paul-Scherrer Institute - PSI; Fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and for the waste disposal; National Co-operative for the

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  16. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 4. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 5. Radiological protection; 6. Radioactive waste management; 7. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and physical protection of nuclear material (International aspects; National control and security measures); 8. Transport; 9. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC; Federal Public Service for Home Affairs; Federal Public Service for Economy, SME's, Self-Employed and Energy; Federal Public Service for Employment, Labour and Social Dialogue; Federal Public Service for Defence; Federal Public Service for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Co-operation; Federal Public Planning Service for Science Policy); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Council for Ionizing Radiation of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control; Superior Health Council; Superior Council for Safety, Hygiene and Enhancement of Workplaces; Advisory Committee for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation - CREG)

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation Protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of the environment); 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Interdepartmental Committee for Economic Planning; Nuclear Safety Agency; Prime Minister; Minister for Economic Development; Minister for Labour and Social Security; Minister for Health; Minister for the Environment; Minister for the Interior; Minister for Transport and Navigation; Minister for Foreign Trade (now incorporated in Ministry for Economic Development); Minister for Education; Treasury Minister; Minister for Universities and for Scientific and Technical Research; Minister for Foreign Affairs; State Advocate General); 2. Advisory bodies (Inter-ministerial Council for Consultation and Co-ordination; Coordinating Committee for Radiation Protection of Workers and the Public; Regional and Provincial Commissions for Public Health Protection

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime - General Outline: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Federal Authorities - Bund (The Federal Chancellery; The Federal Minister for Women's Affairs and Consumer Protection; The Federal Minister of the Interior; The Federal Minister for Economic Affairs; The Federal Minister of Finance; The Federal Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs; The Federal Minister of Science and Transport; The Federal Minister of Justice; The Federal Minister for the Environment; The Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs) B. Regional Authorities - Laender; C. District Authorities - Bezirksverwaltungsbehorden; 2. Advisory Bodies (Forum for Nuclear Questions, Radiation Protection Commission - SSK); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (The Seibersdorf Austrian Research Centre; The Graz Nuclear Institute; The Nuclear Institute of the Austrian Universities; The Institute of Risk Research, University of Vienna)

  19. Corporate Governance Practices in Developing Countries: The Case for Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Mwanzia Mulili; Dr. Peter Wong

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of corporate governance from a historical perspective. The paper explores how the agency theory and stewardship theory affect corporate governance practices. The focus of the paper is on public universities in Kenya. An extensive review of literature indicates that the ideals of good corporate governance have been adopted by developing countries since the 1980s. Developing countries differ from developed countries in a wide variety of ways. Therefore, there is ...

  20. E-Government for Good Governance in Developing Countries ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... In this book, Kettani and Moulin develop their findings and methods from the eFez ... practitioners, and decision makers in developing countries. ... Science and Software Engineering, Laval University, Québec City, Canada.

  1. Epidemiological estimators' power of rating inequality in health in high-income OECD countries, 1998-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Alfonso, Helman; Gaitán, Hernando; Agudelo, Carlos

    2008-12-01

    Examining the power (ability) of classical epidemiological estimators to rate inequality in health in univariate and composite ways. Ecological study. Ratio, excess risk, attributable risk (AR) and relative difference were the estimators used for showing disparities; all of them were weighted by population size. Kappa concordance coefficient was used between weighted estimators and weighted Gini coefficients for each health outcome used. Cumulative variance at first factor in principal component analysis was used for determining the estimators' suitability for use in a composite index. 24 high-income OECD (Organisation for Economical Cooperation and Development) countries' data for 1998-2002 were included. Such data was obtained from OECD health data for 2004 (3rd edition). Data concerning child mortality and gross domestic product (GDP) was obtained from World Development Indicators for 2005 on CD-ROM.The main outcomes compared amongst countries were: maternal mortality, child mortality, infant mortality, low birth-weight, life-expectancy, measles' immunisation and DTP immunisation. Ratio and AR ranked maternal mortality as being the condition having the most disparity; risk excess ranked vaccination programmes and relative difference ranked low birth-weight as being the worst conditions. There was concordance in the ranking of inequities amongst ratio, AR and Gini coefficients (p<0.05). Cumulative variance in the first factor was higher for ratio and AR when they were used for constructing a composite index. Ratio and AR were better than risk excess and relative difference for measuring disparities in health and constructing composite inequity in health indexes.

  2. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries, and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years, waste management has received increased attention at the national level and also internationally, to harmonize to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems, covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short-term but also the longer-term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority, particularly regarding high-level waste and alpha-bearing wastes. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high-level radioactive waste. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities. (author)

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Special nuclear material; Source material; By-product material; Agreement state programmes); 4. Nuclear installations (Initial licensing; Operation and inspection, including nuclear safety; Operating licence renewal; Decommissioning; Emergency response); 5. Radiological protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 6. Radioactive waste management (High-level waste; Low-level waste; Disposal at sea; Uranium mill tailings; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - FUSRAP); 7. Non-proliferation and exports (Exports of source material, special nuclear material, production or utilisation facilities and sensitive nuclear technology; Exports of components; Exports of by-product material; Exports and imports of radiation sources; Conduct resulting in the termination of exports or economic assistance; Subsequent arrangements; Technology exports; Information and restricted data); 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC; Department of Energy - DOE; Department of Labor - DOL; Department of Transportation - DOT; Environmental Protection Agency - EPA); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: A. Cabinet-level departments (Department of

  4. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Definitions; Licensing requirements); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing regime; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Surveillance of installations and activities); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (General; Principal elements of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; Additional radiation protection norms); 7. Radioactive waste management (Atomic Energy Act 2002; Radiation Protection Ordinance; International obligations); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Non-proliferation regime; Physical protection regime); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities: Federal authorities (Federal Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, Federal Minister for Education and Research, Federal Minister of Finance, Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs, Federal Minister for Economy and Technology, Federal Minister of Defence, Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS, Federal Office of Economics and Export Control); Authorities of the Laender; 2. Advisory bodies (Reactor Safety Commission - RSK; Radiation Protection Commission - SSK; Disposal Commission - ESK; Nuclear Technology

  5. Monitoring good corporate governance in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnamdi Azikiwe University Journal of International Law and Jurisprudence ... The call for good corporate governance was as a result of the scandal and collapse ... This paper made use of legislation, regulations (Codes of best practices) and ...

  6. Systemic Management of Schools: The OECD's Professionalisation and Dissemination of Output Governance in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgi, Regula

    2016-01-01

    At present, European education policy, research and administration is dominated by a specific concept of reform, namely so-called output governance, whose rise to prominence in national contexts in the 1990s coincided with the advance of international tests of school performance such as PISA. In this article it is argued that there is much more to…

  7. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE REGULATION IN EMERGING COUNTRIES. CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu George BOCEAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the literature on corporate governance emphasizes that firms should be run in the interests of shareholders. This is a suitable objective function when markets are perfect and complete. In many emerging economies this is not the case: markets are imperfect and incomplete. Corporate governance issues are especially important in emerging countries, since these countries do not have the long-established financial institution infrastructure to deal with corporate governance issues. This paper discusses how emerging countries are dealing with corporate governance issues and the extra obstacles they have to overcome due to a lack of regulations. Romanian case study is examined.

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General (The French nuclear power programme and its main players; French nuclear law); 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Nuclear Equipment (Regulatory diversity; Radioactive sources; Medical activities); 4. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Basic nuclear installations - INB; Tax on basic nuclear installations, Additional taxes, Funding nuclear costs; Installations classified for environmental protection purposes (ICPE) using radioactive substances; Nuclear pressure equipment - ESPN; Defence-related nuclear installations and activities - IANID; Emergency plans); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation protection (Protection of the public; Protection of workers; Radiation protection inspectors; Labour inspectors; Protection of individuals in a radiological emergency); 7. Radioactive Waste Management (General regulations; Radioactive waste regulations; Discharge of effluents); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Materials not used for the nuclear deterrent; Materials used for the nuclear deterrent); 9. Transport (Licensing and notification regime: Transport of radioactive materials, Transport of nuclear materials, Transport of radioactive substances between member states of the European Union; Methods of transport: Land transport, Sea transport, Air transport, Transport by post); 10

  9. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    Croatia's corporate governance system is framed by civil law with regulation for traded companies in part based on London securities rules and international standards for accounting and auditing. There are two public exchanges, which both have three tiers. The majority of companies are listed on the third tier, which has the lowest level of disclosure and listing requirements. The small nu...

  10. Public Demand and Climate Change Policy Making in OECD Countries – From Dynamics of the Demand to Policy Responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Oehl

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is one of today’s major political challenges. The Kyoto Protocol assigned national emission reduction goals for the developed countries however national governments in these countries have implemented policies varying widely in range and ambition over time and across countries to meet their goals. Can this variation in policy making be explained by dierences in the typically taken for granted – but empirically often neglected – influence of public demand for climate protection?...

  11. Birthplace Diversity, Income Inequality and Education Gradients in Generalised Trust: The Relevance of Cognitive Skills in 29 Countries. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 164

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovi, Francesca; Pokropek, Artur

    2017-01-01

    The paper examines between-country differences in the mechanisms through which education could promote generalised trust using data from 29 countries participating in the OECD's Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC). Results indicate that education is strongly associated with generalised trust and that a large part of this association is mediated by…

  12. On the age-specific correlation between fertility and female employment: Heterogeneity over space and time in OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Brehm

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though there has been profound research on the curious change in correlation between total fertility rate (TFR and female labor force participation (FLP in the mid-1980s, aspects of the compositional character of age-specific effects and the nature of countries' heterogeneity have been neglected. Objective: The present paper aims to contribute to filling this gap by analyzing annual total fertility rates and their equivalents for four age groups between 20 and 39 years as well as the respective lagged FLP from 17 OECD countries between 1985 and 2010. Methods: Random Intercept and Random Coefficient Models are applied, allowing us to assess both effects and country heterogeneity in slopes and intercepts. Results: The analyses reveal that the development of the correlation between FLP and TFR after 1985 is comprised of very different relations between age-specific fertility and labor participation. The youngest group's situation is determined by a decrease in both fertility and FLP, while countries' effects differ increasingly. The oldest women's fertility decisions seem to be detached from labor market influences, though country variation is high. Women in their late 20s and early 30s, in contrast, appear to be most affected by the incompatibility of childbearing and gainful employment. Though these effects seem to have overcome their low points during the mid-1990s, only women in their early 30s show country-convergence. Conclusions: The results highlight the fact that total and age-specific fertility behavior, FLP-effects and country variances are distinct concepts that add considerably to the broad understanding of the correlation between fertility and FLP.

  13. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years waste management has received increased attention not only at the national level but also internationally in order to harmonise to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard in this field. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short term but also the longer term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition to the discussion of policies and practices, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority particularly as far as high level waste and alpha bearing wastes are concerned. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high level radioactive waste. As a result of these efforts an international R and D programme is being established at the site of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the incorporation of high level waste into metal matrices. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes in detail the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities [fr

  14. Japan and the OECD - a lesson for Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Iustina Luţan

    2007-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is a unique forum where the governments of 30 market democracies work together to address the economic, social and governance challenges of globalisation as well as to exploit its opportunities. One of the most important advantages of the OECD over other intergovernmental organizations or academia is the fact that the work, expertise, and know-how is transferred from a wide range of participants, like member countries, senior o...

  15. In-house or outsourced public services? A social and economic analysis of the impact of spending policy on the private wage share in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensiero, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    This article analyses the relationship between government spending and the distribution of private income between capital and labour. While most previous research assumes that government spending redistributes in favour of the less wealthy, I distinguish between types of expenditures that enhance the bargaining position of labour - that is, unemployment benefits, public sector employment and investment in new capital - and labour-saving and pro-business types of expenditures - that is, outsourcing to private firms. The results are derived from various panel regression techniques on a panel of 19 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in the period 1985-2010 and show that expenditures on public sector employment and, to a lesser extent, on new capital prevented the private wage share from declining further, even after controlling for labour market institutions, globalisation and technological change. Conversely, expenditures on outsourcing substantially contributed to reducing the private wage share. Unemployment benefits had a non-significant and negative effect on the private wage share because their increase was the consequence of higher levels of unemployment rather than policy. Implications for theory and policy are drawn, including the support for a public employment-led spending policy.

  16. In-house or outsourced public services? A social and economic analysis of the impact of spending policy on the private wage share in OECD countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensiero, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses the relationship between government spending and the distribution of private income between capital and labour. While most previous research assumes that government spending redistributes in favour of the less wealthy, I distinguish between types of expenditures that enhance the bargaining position of labour – that is, unemployment benefits, public sector employment and investment in new capital – and labour-saving and pro-business types of expenditures – that is, outsourcing to private firms. The results are derived from various panel regression techniques on a panel of 19 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in the period 1985–2010 and show that expenditures on public sector employment and, to a lesser extent, on new capital prevented the private wage share from declining further, even after controlling for labour market institutions, globalisation and technological change. Conversely, expenditures on outsourcing substantially contributed to reducing the private wage share. Unemployment benefits had a non-significant and negative effect on the private wage share because their increase was the consequence of higher levels of unemployment rather than policy. Implications for theory and policy are drawn, including the support for a public employment-led spending policy. PMID:28919641

  17. Evaluating Eco-Innovation of OECD Countries with Data Envelopment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavi, Reza Kiani; Standing, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Government regulations require businesses to improve their processes and products/services in a green and sustainable manner. For being environmentally friendly, businesses should invest more on eco-innovation practices. Firms eco-innovate to promote eco-efficiency and sustainability. This paper evaluates the eco-innovation performance of…

  18. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  19. Main features of licensing requirements for nuclear installations in several OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper contains a brief description of the main features of the above-mentioned six countries' licensing systems, namely the legal regime applicable, the appropriate licensing bodies, the general frame and scope of the respective national regimes, the involvement of the public and technical safety bodies as well as the inspection procedures. This description is supplemented by some introductory remarks. (orig.) [de

  20. Main features of licensing requirements for nuclear installations in several OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper contains a brief description of the main features of the above-mentioned six countries' licensing systems, namely the legal regime applicable, the appropriate licensing bodies, the general frame and scope of the respective national regimes, the involvement of the public and technical safety bodies as well as the inspection procedures. This description is supplemented by some introductory remarks. (orig.) [de

  1. What drives donor funding in population assistance programs? Evidence from OECD countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Reuser, M.

    2006-01-01

    The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) established goals for the expansion of population assistance. To date, the financial promises made by donor countries in 1994 have not been met. To unravel the gap between ambitions and contributions, we use panel estimation

  2. Uncertainty Avoidance and the Rate of Business Ownership Across 21 OECD Countries, 1976-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R.M. Wennekers (Sander); A.R. Thurik (Roy); A.J. van Stel (André); N. Noorderhaven (Niels)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPersistent differences in the level of business ownership across countries have attracted the attention of scientific as well as political debate. Cultural as well as economic influences are assumed to play a role. This paper deals with the influence of cultural attitudes towards

  3. Parenthood and Happiness: Effects of Work-Family Reconciliation Policies in 22 OECD Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer; Simon, Robin W; Andersson, Matthew A

    2016-11-01

    The recent proliferation of studies examining cross-national variation in the association between parenthood and happiness reveal accumulating evidence of lower levels of happiness among parents than nonparents in most advanced industrialized societies. Conceptualizing parenting as a stressor buffered by institutional support, we hypothesize that parental status differences in happiness are smaller in countries providing more resources and support to families. Our analyses of the European Social Surveys (ESS) and International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) reveal considerable variation in the parenthood gap in happiness across countries, with the U.S. showing the largest disadvantage of parenthood. We also find that more generous family policies, particularly paid time off and childcare subsidies, are associated with smaller disparities in happiness between parents and non-parents. Moreover, the policies that augment parental happiness do not reduce the happiness of nonparents. Our results shed light on macro-level causes of emotional processes, with important implications for public policy.

  4. The Evolution of Renewable Energy Policy in OECD Countries: aggregate indicators and determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, Francesco; Vona, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes different methods to aggregate heterogeneous policies for renewable energy. We compare time-varying indicators built using principal component analysis with average-based indicators. The main goal of the paper is to account for the evolution of both types of policy indicators with a set of common variables. Our empirical results are consistent with predictions of political-economy models of environmental policies as lobbying, income and, to a less extent, inequality have expected effects on policy. The brown lobbying power, proxied by entry barriers in the energy sector, has negative influence on the policy indicators even when taking into account endogeneity in its effect. The results are also robust to dynamic panel specifications and to the exclusion of groups of countries. Interestingly, too, corruption has only an indirect effect on policy mediated by entry barriers, while the negative effect of inequality is much stronger for the richer countries. (authors)

  5. Emergency planning practices and criteria in the OECD countries after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeri, G.; Wiktorsson, C.

    1988-09-01

    This critical review has been prepared at the request of the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), on the basis of information collected from Member countries on their emergency planning practices and criteria, and on changes being considered as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. This information was officially provided to the Secretariat in response to a questionnaire. Other material has also been used, such as official papers describing national practices and reports presented at meetings organised by the NEA. In these cases the sources are given in the list of references. The information in this report reflects the situation in the Member countries at the end of 1987 and it might well be that additional changes were introduced in the emergency planning practices and criteria of several countries after the answers were sent to the Secretariat. It should also be noted that several of the questions were mainly relevant to nuclear power reactor operations. However, the basic philosophy for emergency planning is general, i.e. radiological criteria, emergency organisation, medical assistance, information to the public, etc., and applies in similar ways to different emergencies. Therefore, the information in the report should be valid for different types of radiological emergencies, although emphasis is placed in the report is on nuclear power reactor emergencies. For non-nuclear power Member countries the information refers mainly to plans to cope with other types of radiation emergencies, and to emergencies of a transboundary origin. Finally, the information covers only the off-site part of emergency planning, apart from some reflections in Chapter 1 on on-site emergency planning and the measures taken at nuclear facilities to prevent an accident or mitigate its consequences

  6. Effects of regulation and economic environment on the electricity industry's competitiveness: A study based on OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Chulwoo; Jung, Euy-Young; Lee, Jeong-Dong

    2014-01-01

    We propose a competitiveness index for the electricity industry based on efficiency, stability, and growth factors identified from previous studies subject to data accessibility. These are then weighted appropriately through the application of the analytical hierarchy process. This index is an alternative tool to capture the diverse characteristics of the electricity industry in order to analyze performance after deregulation. Using the competitiveness index, we analyze the effect of regulation change in specific economic environments represented by the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share, for example. According to the results, deregulation generally increases competitiveness, but the effect depends on the economic environment and the type of regulation. Deregulating entry and vertical integration to increase competitiveness is more effective in countries where the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share are low. The manner in which the privatization effect is related to the economic environment is, however, unclear. - Highlights: • This study proposes a competitiveness index for the electricity industry. • It examines the effects of electricity industry deregulation in OECD countries. • It suggests an economic environment in which deregulation can contribute to competitiveness

  7. Energy consumption and economic growth for selected OECD countries: Further evidence from the Granger causality test in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoklu, Seref; Yilanci, Veli

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to reexamine the causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for 20 OECD countries. To that end, we employ a Granger causality test in the frequency domain which allows us to distinguish short (temporary) and long-run (permanent) causality. The empirical results could be summarized as following. First, in terms of causality running from GDP to energy consumption, there is a temporary relationship for Australia, Austria, Canada, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Portugal, the UK, the USA, and a permanent relationship for Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, and the USA. Second, in terms of causality running from energy consumption to GDP, there is a temporary relationship for Austria, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Portugal, and a permanent relationship for Belgium, Finland, Greece, Italy, Japan, and Portugal. The main implication of our finding is that the energy policies should take into consideration not only the causality direction between economic growth and energy consumption but also whether it is temporal or permanent and furthermore authorities must design policy actions accordingly. - Highlights: • This study reexamines the causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth. • We employ frequency causality analysis to determine temporary and permanent causality. • The results provide evidence of both temporary and permanent causality relationships for countries examined. • Energy policies should consider whether the causality is temporal or permanent

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In Greece, there are no nuclear power plants and nuclear energy is not considered as an option in the foreseeable future. There is, however, one nuclear research reactor (in extended shutdown since 2014) and one sub-critical assembly. Radioactive waste originating from medicine, research and industry is classified as low level. Although there is no framework act dealing comprehensively with the different aspects of nuclear energy, there are various laws, decrees and regulations of a more specific nature governing several aspects of nuclear activities. This paper gives information on the general regulatory regime (mining regime, radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment, nuclear installations (licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety, emergency response, trade in nuclear materials and equipment, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear security, transport, nuclear third party liability) and on the institutional framework with the regulatory and supervisory authorities (Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE))

  9. Cross-country differences in government sector activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Pevcin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the analysis presented in the article is to identify various economic, social, political, demographic and cultural factors that could shape the differences in the size of government sector across countries and, with the use of econometric analysis empirically verify the effect of those factors. The analysis focuses only on ”budgetary” government, meaning that the size of government is measured with a certain government spending ratio. The results of the analysis revealed that economic factors are more important in explaining the variation in the size of government consumption spending, whereas political, social and cultural factors are more important in explaining the variation in the size of transfer spending. In addition, the results indicate that the relative size of government spending is inversely related to the extent of the regulation of the economy.

  10. Malaysia : Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC), Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This ROSC assessment of corporate governance in Malaysia benchmarks law and practice against the OECD Principles of Corporate Governance, and focuses on listed companies. Important corporate governance reforms have been implemented in Malaysia since 1998, when a high-level Finance Committee on Corporate Governance, consisting of both government and industry, was formed to identify and address weaknesses highlighted by the Asian financial crisis. Key reforms have included the development of a ...

  11. The Reality of Economic Growth towards Green Environment: A Study of Selected OECD Countries 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Economic growth and green environment has a direct relation with health, habitat and well being of our society which depends largely on the natural environment. But on the other side the society is neglecting and often ignoring the benefits that nature provides for economic prosperity. This paper studies the role of environment in economic growth, the role of environmental policy in achieving improved environmental results, closely examine the evidence of decoupling production from environmental damages and discuss decoupling in the context of global economy. In order to study these aspects, we explored our comparative research with special reference to selected eight OECD nations namely-France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Portugal, Turkey, UK and USA with coverage period of 1990-2010. The selection of the countries is based on their prominence in industrialised world and their close economic bounding with each other over a considerable period. The coverage period in the study is 20 years because some of the emission data are available till 2013 and some only up to 2010. In order to do a comparative research on various dimensions we take in to our study period between1990-2010. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11065 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 78-88

  12. A Hybrid Genetic Programming Method in Optimization and Forecasting: A Case Study of the Broadband Penetration in OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Salpasaranis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of a hybrid genetic programming method (hGP in fitting and forecasting of the broadband penetration data is proposed. The hGP uses some well-known diffusion models, such as those of Gompertz, Logistic, and Bass, in the initial population of the solutions in order to accelerate the algorithm. The produced solutions models of the hGP are used in fitting and forecasting the adoption of broadband penetration. We investigate the fitting performance of the hGP, and we use the hGP to forecast the broadband penetration in OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. The results of the optimized diffusion models are compared to those of the hGP-generated models. The comparison indicates that the hGP manages to generate solutions with high-performance statistical indicators. The hGP cooperates with the existing diffusion models, thus allowing multiple approaches to forecasting. The modified algorithm is implemented in the Python programming language, which is fast in execution time, compact, and user friendly.

  13. THE ROLE OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF WOMEN ON INFANT MORTALITY: A PANEL DATA ANALYSES FOR OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KÜRKCÜ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Social and economic development of a nation is often reflected by the existing infant and child mortality rates. In this context, one of the millennium development goals is to reduce infant and child mortalities globally. In particular, women’s socio-economic positions are important variables in explaining infant/child mortality. The correlation between infant/child mortalities and socio-economic positions of women is very strong. This study uses a panel data analysis to measure the effect of labour force participation rate of women on infant/child mortalities. The present article analyzes how women’s socio-economic situations affect infant/child mortality in OECD countries for the era 2000-2014. Our results are statistically significant and also suitable for theoretical expectations. According to our conclusions mortality rates may decline as a result of the increase in labour force participation rates of women. In this context, there is a negative relationship between the labor force participation rate of women and gender inequality. So, as gender inequality decreases, infant/child mortality rates also decrease.

  14. Non-renewable and renewable energy consumption and CO2 emissions in OECD countries: A comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiei, Sahar; Salim, Ruhul A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore the determinants of CO 2 emissions using the STIRPAT model and data from 1980 to 2011 for OECD countries. The empirical results show that non-renewable energy consumption increases CO 2 emissions, whereas renewable energy consumption decreases CO 2 emissions. Further, the results support the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve between urbanisation and CO 2 emissions, implying that at higher levels of urbanisation, the environmental impact decreases. Therefore, the overall evidence suggests that policy makers should focus on urban planning as well as clean energy development to make substantial contributions to both reducing non-renewable energy use and mitigating climate change. - Highlights: • Examine the relationship between disaggregated energy consumption and CO 2 emission. • The STIRPAT econometric model is used for empirical analysis. • Investigate the popular environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis between urbanisation and CO 2 emissions. • Non-renewable energy consumption increases CO 2 emissions whereas renewable energy consumption decreases CO 2 emissions. • There is evidence of the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve between urbanisation and CO 2 emissions

  15. Corporate governance, corporate finance and stock markets in emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajit

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the inter-relationship between corporate governance, financing of corporate growth and stock market development in emerging countries. It explores both theoretically and empirically the nature of the inter-relationships between these phenomena, as well their implications for economic policy. It concentrates on how corporate growth is financed, an area where the literature has identified important anomalies in relation to corporate behaviour and governance. The paper prov...

  16. EPA's Role with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) brings together the governments of countries committed to democracy and the market economy from around the world to support sustainable economic growth.

  17. Mobile government implementation for government service delivery in developing countries: a South Africa context

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available an opportunity to use of this platform to provide better service delivery to the citizens of the developing countries. This paper identifies major service delivery issues in South Africa. Various m-government systems that have been implemented in other countries...

  18. E-Commerce and Security Governance in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali.; Rajabion, Lila

    Security is very often mentioned as one of the preconditions for the faster growth of e-commerce. Without a secure and reliable internet, customer will continue to be reluctant to provide confidential information online, such as credit card number. Moreover, organizations of all types and sizes around the world rely heavily on technologies of electronic commerce (e-commerce) for conducting their day-to-day business transaction. Providing organizations with a secure e-commerce environment is a major issue and challenging one especially in Middle Eastern countries. Without secure e-commerce, it is almost impossible to take advantage of the opportunities offered by e-commerce technologies. E-commerce can create opportunities for small entrepreneurs in Middle Eastern countries. This requires removing infrastructure blockages in telecommunications and logistics alongside the governance of e-commerce with policies on consumer protection, security of transactions, privacy of records and intellectual property. In this paper, we will explore the legal implications of e-commerce security governance by establishing who is responsible for ensuring compliance with this discipline, demonstrating the value to be derived from information security governance, the methodology of applying information security governance, and liability for non-compliance with this discipline. Our main focus will be on analyzing the importance and implication of e-commerce security governance in developing countries.

  19. How much do we spend on prescription medicines? Out-of-pocket costs for patients in Australia and other OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Anna; Preen, David B; Glover, John; Semmens, James; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2011-08-01

    To determine changes in out-of-pocket expenditure on prescription medicines for Australian patients, and how patient expenditure compares with other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. We examined out-of-pocket expenditure on prescription medicines by patients in Australia between 1970 and 2007, and between Australia and 15 other OECD countries (Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Republic of Korea (South Korea), Luxembourg, Poland, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States) in 2005. Spending on publicly subsidised medicines by Australian patients increased from $16 per person in 1971 to $62 in 2007. Patient expenditure on all prescription medicines had risen to $134 per person in 2007. Out-of-pocket expenditure for Australian patients ranked 4th of 14 OCED countries with universal pharmaceutical subsidies. Australian patients pay 28% of national pharmaceutical expenditure; more than patients in South Korea (27%), Slovak Republic (26%), Sweden (22%), France, Luxembourg, Japan and Switzerland (17%), Germany (15%), Czech Republic (11%) and Spain (6%), but less than patients in Finland (36%), Denmark (33%) and Poland (34%). Compared to other OECD countries, Australian out-of-pocket costs are now in the mid to upper range. Further increases have the potential to significantly affect access to care.

  20. Good Governance and Successful Development: Cross Countries Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabthip Kraipornsak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Good Governance is one of the essential factors of success in business as well as in a country’s development. This study aimed at examining the role of good governance and the success of the development. The comparable per head GDP measured in PPP (purchasing power parity was used as the proxy of the successful economic development of countries in the study. Four out of total six factors (indicators being the good governance and the other two being social environmental factors were employed in the investigation following concept of the role of external business environmental factors so called “PESTLE or Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legislative or Legal, and Eco-environmental analysis”. These four indicators of good governance are political stability, control of corruption, rule of law, and voice and accountability which are available from the World Bank’s governance project data base. In addition, the other two indicators, country’s openness and size of population, are the major social variables included in the study which can also affect the success. The total six indicators are taken to examine with the GDP per head to see whether these factors can help countries achieve higher levels of income per head. The study indicates connection between the levels of success with these four indicators of the good governance and the two external social variables. For Thailand, the political instability was found to be a problem of the progress of development among those six indicators.

  1. Short-term and long-term effects of GDP on traffic deaths in 18 OECD countries, 1960-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadgar, Iman; Norström, Thor

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that increases in gross domestic product (GDP) lead to increases in traffic deaths plausibly due to the increased road traffic induced by an expanding economy. However, there also seems to exist a long-term effect of economic growth that is manifested in improved traffic safety and reduced rates of traffic deaths. Previous studies focus on either the short-term, procyclical effect, or the long-term, protective effect. The aim of the present study is to estimate the short-term and long-term effects jointly in order to assess the net impact of GDP on traffic mortality. We extracted traffic death rates for the period 1960-2011 from the WHO Mortality Database for 18 OECD countries. Data on GDP/capita were obtained from the Maddison Project. We performed error correction modelling to estimate the short-term and long-term effects of GDP on the traffic death rates. The estimates from the error correction modelling for the entire study period suggested that a one-unit increase (US$1000) in GDP/capita yields an instantaneous short-term increase in the traffic death rate by 0.58 (pGDP leads to an immediate increase in traffic deaths. However, after the mid-1970s this short-term effect is more than outweighed by a markedly stronger protective long-term effect, whereas the reverse is true for the period before the mid-1970s. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Changes in the utilization of residential energy in nine countries of the OECD and its possible effects in Mexico; Cambios en el uso de la energia residencial en nueve paises de la OECD y sus posibles efectos en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, Lee; Sheinbaum, Claudia [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper analyzes the changes in the residential energy utilization in nine countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) between 1973 and 1990. An analysis is presented for the end uses and the changes for the periods 1973-1979, 1979-1985 and 1985-1990 are studied. The influence of the energy saving and conservation programs as well as the changes in the price of the energy is also discussed. It is also described how in the last period the rate of decrement in the energy intensity has diminished due to the lower energy prices. Finally the potential effects of this experience in the Third World Countries, specially in Mexico, are studied. [Espanol] En este trabajo se analizan los cambios en el uso de la energia residencial en nueve paises de la Organizacion para la Cooperacion y el Desarrollo Economico (OECD) entre 1973 y 1990. Se presenta un analisis por usos finales y se estudian los cambios en los periodos 1973-1979, 1979-1985 y 1985-1990. Se discute la influencia de los programas de ahorro y conservacion asi como de los cambios en el precio de la energia. Se describe como en el ultimo periodo la tasa de decremento de la intensidad energetica ha disminuido debido al bajo precio de la energia. Finalmente se discuten los posibles efectos de esta experiencia en los paises del Tercer Mundo, en especial en Mexico.

  3. Changes in the utilization of residential energy in nine countries of the OECD and its possible effects in Mexico; Cambios en el uso de la energia residencial en nueve paises de la OECD y sus posibles efectos en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, Lee; Sheinbaum, Claudia [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper analyzes the changes in the residential energy utilization in nine countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) between 1973 and 1990. An analysis is presented for the end uses and the changes for the periods 1973-1979, 1979-1985 and 1985-1990 are studied. The influence of the energy saving and conservation programs as well as the changes in the price of the energy is also discussed. It is also described how in the last period the rate of decrement in the energy intensity has diminished due to the lower energy prices. Finally the potential effects of this experience in the Third World Countries, specially in Mexico, are studied. [Espanol] En este trabajo se analizan los cambios en el uso de la energia residencial en nueve paises de la Organizacion para la Cooperacion y el Desarrollo Economico (OECD) entre 1973 y 1990. Se presenta un analisis por usos finales y se estudian los cambios en los periodos 1973-1979, 1979-1985 y 1985-1990. Se discute la influencia de los programas de ahorro y conservacion asi como de los cambios en el precio de la energia. Se describe como en el ultimo periodo la tasa de decremento de la intensidad energetica ha disminuido debido al bajo precio de la energia. Finalmente se discuten los posibles efectos de esta experiencia en los paises del Tercer Mundo, en especial en Mexico.

  4. Long-term Labour Shortage. The Economic Impact of Population Transition and Post-Industrialism on the OECD Countries: the Nordic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perttu Salmenhaara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey of results about studies on ageing. The data is collected from population projections by the United Nations, OECD, the European Union and the Eurostat.The research question is how population ageing affects the percentage of the working age population in the OECD. Special focus countries are the Nordic countries. The method is to collect together comparable data from these previous studies. The results imply that from 2005 to 2050 the number of the elderly in relation to the working-age population is projected to increase radically. Most advanced national economies are likely to have problems in providing elderly care services and pensions. In addition, post-industrialisation and ethnic discrimination add to the problem by excluding a fair share of the working-age population from the labour market.

  5. Effects of Tax Depreciation Rules on Firms' Investment Decisions in an Inflationary Phase: Comparison of Net Present Values in Selected OECD Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Woon Nam

    2001-01-01

    This study compares incentive effects of various tax depreciation methods which are currently employed in selected OECD countries. Their generosity is determined on the basis of Samuelson’s true economic depreciation. For this purpose, the present value model is applied. The central issue is that the so-called historical cost accounting method, which is adopted in practice when calculating the corporate tax base, causes fictitious profits in inflationary phases that should also be taxed. Th...

  6. DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE. THE CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANA IUHASZ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past years, developing countries have become extremely interesting for researchers, as well as for capital investors. Dominated by growth and industrialization, but lacking macroeconomic indicator stability or sufficiently mature financial markets, these countries make it acutely necessary to identify measures that will stimulate foreign investors to invest and that will ensure the financial stability for SMEs. One such measure is increasing the quality of corporate governance at the level of small and medium-sized enterprises, where it is currently almost absent. This article aims to help raise awareness of the need to implement good corporate management practices at the level of companies in developing countries and especially in Romania. This paper uses a questionnaire in order to evaluate the state of the corporate governance in Timis county and offers some suggestions on what should be done for a higher corporate governance quality in the case of small and medium-sized companies in Romania, with the purpose of establishing a connection between governance quality and business performance of SMEs

  7. Global recession and microfinance risk governance in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moro Visconti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Global recession, started in 2008, is still proving an unresolved perfect storm and the financial crisis has affected also the real economy, creating widespread social unrest. Microfinance institutions (MFIs in developing countries seem however less affected by the worldwide turmoil, due to their segmentation and resilience to external shocks. Recession has a big impact on governance mechanisms, altering the equilibriums among different stakeholders and increasing the risk of investment returns; any governance improvement is highly welcome and recommended. No governance, no money for growth or bare survival. In the confused phase we are living in, at the moment there are not evident winners, but the underbanked poorest, unless properly supported, once again risk being the ultimate losers.

  8. Predicting returns and rent growth in the housing market using the rent-to-price ratio: Evidence from the OECD countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    We investigate the predictive power of the rent-to-price ratio for future real estate returns and rent growth in 18 OECD countries over the period 1970 to 2011. First, we document that in most countries returns are signi…cantly predictable by the rent-price ratio. An increase (decrease...... dependent on whether returns and rents are measured in nominal or real terms. Finally, there is some evidence of sub-sample instability in the predictive patterns, especially wrt. rent growth predictability. The predictability tests are conducted within a restricted VAR framework based on the dynamic Gordon...

  9. Development of women's human capital and its impact on economic growth and total factor productivity: A case study of selected OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Mostafaee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of developed countries and various studies in the context of economic growth of developing countries have shown that economic growth is not only explained by physical capital and labor force but also, and more importantly, by human capital. The later variable should be entered, as a major determinant, in the endogenous growth model. With the concern of important role of human capital in this research, the primary objective of this paper is to explore the effect of gender discrimination of human capital on economic growth and factor productivity in Iran and the selected OECD countries. More specifically, to indicate the economic capability of educated females, we use data of the considered countries over the period 1974-2008, to estimate the relevant models of growth and productivity. The implication is to compare the empirical results obtained for Iran and the selected developed countries.

  10. SEÇİLMİŞ OECD ÜLKELERİNDE KÜLTÜREL KAMU HARCAMALARININ SOSYO-EKONOMİK BELİRLEYENLERİ ÜZERİNE BİR ANALİZ (AN ANALYSIS OF THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF PUBLIC CULTURAL EXPENDITURES IN SELECTED OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doğan BAKIRTAŞ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture, considered as a society identity, is an important element to improve social unity. Besides, cultural activities and services are common need for individuals. Therefore this kind of services provided by government effects the social welfare positively. Public cultural spending is determined by economic, demographic, social and politic factors. This paper examines the effects of these factors on cultural spending for 9 OECD countries by using annual data over 1990-2009 period. We test stationary features of data using Panel LM (Lagrange Multiplier unit root test which determines the structural breaks endogenously. Then by employing panel data techniques it was found that cultural spending is negatively correlated with per capita income growth and positively correlated with population growth, young population, unemployment and the measure of left-wing party dominance in the parliament. Furthermore we conclude that demographic factors are much more effective on cultural spending then other factors relatively.

  11. The OECD FIRE database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angner, A.; Berg, H.P.; Roewekamp, M.; Werner, W.; Gauvain, J.

    2007-01-01

    Realistic modelling of fire scenarios is still difficult due to the scarcity of reliable data needed for deterministic and probabilistic fire safety analysis. Therefore, it has been recognized as highly important to establish a fire event database on an international level. In consequence, several member countries of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have decided in 2000 to establish the International Fire Data Exchange Project (OECD FIRE) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data related to fire events at nuclear power plants. This paper presents the OECD FIRE project objectives, work scope and current status of the OECD FIRE database after 3 years of operation as well as first preliminary statistical insights gained from the collected data. (orig.)

  12. Introducing E-Government in Developing Countries Analysis of Egyptian e-Government Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elaswad, Othoman; Jensen, Christian D.

    2016-01-01

    identification and remote authentication in developing countries, such as the North Africa Countries (NAC), where a relatively large proportion of citizens are illiterate. Therefore, the design of a national IDM system in a NAC must explicitly consider illiteracy to allow this group of citizens to benefit from...... services that guarantee equal access to online services and an inclusive society. The study identifies strengths and weaknesses of the Egyptian e-Government and IDM services, which we believe are common to most NAC, since the NAC are quite similar in terms of social culture, citizen's education level...... and skills, citizen's behaviours, digital infrastructure and legislation, but also common to many other developing countries. Our analysis of the Egyptian e-Government services indicates that the security requirements and principle of equal access are not fully met, which illustrates the difficulty...

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection) (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Education, Science and Technology, including the Nuclear Energy Bureau; Minister of Knowledge Economy); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission; Atomic Energy Safety Commission); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI; Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety - KINS; Korean Electric Power Company - KEPCO; Korean Hydro and Nuclear Power - KHNP)

  14. Untangling the causal relationship between tax burden distribution and economic growth in 23 OECD countries: Fresh evidence from linear and non-linear Granger causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Saafi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate the linear and nonlinear causality between a set of alternative tax burden ratios and economic growth in 23 OECD countries. To that end, the linear causality approach of Toda– Yamamoto (1995 and the nonparametric causality method of Kyrtsou and Labys (2006 are applied to annual data spanning from 1970 to 2014. Results obtained from the nonlinear causality test tend to reject the neutrality hypothesis for the tax structure–growth relationship in 19 of the 23 OECD countries. In the majority of the countries under investigation, the evidence is in line with the growth hypothesis where causality running from economic growth to tax burden ratios was detected in Australia, Denmark, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, and Norway. The opposite causality running from tax structure to economic growth was found in Germany, Netherlands, Portugal, and Sweden. In contrast, the neutrality hypothesis was supported in Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, and the USA, whereas the feedback hypothesis was supported in Turkey and the UK. Additional robustness checks show that when the signs of variations are taken into account, there is an asymmetric causality running from positive tax burden shocks to positive per capita GDP shocks for Belgium, France, and Turkey. Overall, our findings suggest that policy implications of the tax structure-economic growth relationships should be interpreted with caution, taking into account the test-dependent and country-specific results.

  15. Taxation and Skills. OECD Tax Policy Studies. No. 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This Tax Policy Study on Taxation and Skills examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries. This study also assesses the returns to tertiary and adult education and examines how these returns are shared between governments and students. The study builds indicators that examine incentives for individuals and governments…

  16. Evaluating National Environmental Sustainability: Performance Measures and Influential Factors for OECD-Member Countries featuring Canadian Performance and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbick, Kenneth S.

    This research reviews five studies that evaluate national environmental sustainability with composite indices; performs uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of techniques for building a composite index; completes principal components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy, sustainable food, nature conservation, and sustainable cities (Due to its current importance, the greenhouse gases (GHG) indicator is included individually as another policy measure.); analyses factors that seem to influence performance: climate, population growth, population density, economic output, technological development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control expenditures, and environmental pricing; and explores Canadian policy implications of the results. The techniques to build composite indices include performance indicator selection, missing data treatment, normalisation technique, scale-effect adjustments, weights, and aggregation method. Scale-effect adjustments and normalisation method are significant sources of uncertainty inducing 68% of the observed variation in a country's final rank at the 95% level of confidence. Choice of indicators also introduces substantial variation as well. To compensate for this variation, the current study recommends that a composite index should always be analysed with other policy subindices and individual indicators. Moreover, the connection between population and consumption indicates that per capita scale-effect adjustments should be used for certain indicators. Rather than ranking normalisation, studies should use a method that retains information from the raw indicator values. Multiple regression and cluster analyses indicate economic output, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important. It is statistically significant for five out of seven performance measures at the 95

  17. The relative contribution of income inequality and imprisonment to the variation in homicide rates among Developed (OECD), South and Central American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadanovsky, Paulo; Cunha-Cruz, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Homicide rates vary widely across and within different continents. In order to address the problem of violence in the world, it seems important to clarify the sources of this variability. Despite the fact that income inequality and imprisonment seem to be two of the most important determinants of the variation in homicide rates over space and time, the concomitant effect of income inequality and imprisonment on homicide has not been examined. The objective of this cross-sectional ecological study was to investigate the association of income inequality and imprisonment with homicide rates among Developed (OECD), South and Central American countries. A novel index was developed to indicate imprisonment: the Impunity Index (the total number of homicides in the preceding decade divided by the number of persons in prison at a single slice in time). Negative binomial models were used to estimate rate ratios of homicides for young males and for the total population in relation to Gini Index and Impunity Index, controlling for infant mortality (as a proxy for poverty levels), Gross Domestic Product per-capita, education, percentage of young males in the population and urbanization. Both low income inequality and low impunity (high imprisonment of criminals) were related to low homicide rates. In addition, we found that countries with lower income inequality, lower infant mortality (less poverty), higher average income (GDP per-capita) and higher levels of education had low impunity. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis that both low income inequality and imprisonment of criminals, independent of each other and of other social-structural circumstances, may greatly contribute to the reduction in homicide rates in South and Central American countries, and to the maintenance of low levels of homicides in OECD countries. The Impunity Index reveals that countries that show greater commitment to education and to distribution of income also show greater commitment to

  18. The effect of a phase out of nuclear power in OECD countries on demand for fossil fuel and on sulphur precipitation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report has been prepared to evaluate the effect of a phase out of nuclear generating capacity in OECD countries on the demand for, and price of, coal and oil in 1990 and 1995, and to assess the effect of increased use of fossil fuels on pollution from sulfur precipitation in Sweden. Our forecasts are based on the model which is shown diagrammatically. We begin with overall energy demand and in particular with forecasts of electricity demand in the key OECD countries. Demand is related to existing capacity and to current plans to install new capacity. The fuel demand resulting from these present plans has been calculated - this provides the base case. Existing and planned non-nuclear capacity is then related to demand and the nuclear capacity which must be retained in 1990 and the new non nuclear capacity which must be constructed for 1995 has been estimated. Fuel demand under these new conditions has then been computed and the increase resulting from a nuclear phase out has been calculated. The effect of this increase has been related to overall world demand for fuels and the effect on prices has been predicted. The emission, transport and precipitation of sulfur in Sweden and its neighbours has been considered. The increase in precipitation which will occur as a result of this greater use of fossil fuels has been calculated

  19. An investigation on the determinants of carbon emissions for OECD countries: empirical evidence from panel models robust to heterogeneity and cross-sectional dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eyup; Seker, Fahri

    2016-07-01

    This empirical study analyzes the impacts of real income, energy consumption, financial development and trade openness on CO2 emissions for the OECD countries in the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) model by using panel econometric approaches that consider issues of heterogeneity and cross-sectional dependence. Results from the Pesaran CD test, the Pesaran-Yamagata's homogeneity test, the CADF and the CIPS unit root tests, the LM bootstrap cointegration test, the DSUR estimator, and the Emirmahmutoglu-Kose Granger causality test indicate that (i) the panel time-series data are heterogeneous and cross-sectionally dependent; (ii) CO2 emissions, real income, the quadratic income, energy consumption, financial development and openness are integrated of order one; (iii) the analyzed data are cointegrated; (iv) the EKC hypothesis is validated for the OECD countries; (v) increases in openness and financial development mitigate the level of emissions whereas energy consumption contributes to carbon emissions; (vi) a variety of Granger causal relationship is detected among the analyzed variables; and (vii) empirical results and policy recommendations are accurate and efficient since panel econometric models used in this study account for heterogeneity and cross-sectional dependence in their estimation procedures.

  20. Greening government procurement in developing countries: building capacity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yong; Doberstein, Brent

    2008-09-01

    With increasing environmental issues and depleting resources, the effective application of green government procurement (GGP) is urgently needed and potentially can have greater impacts in the developing world rather than in the developed world. Such an approach can help promote the general goal of sustainable development and address environmental issues through purchasing and facilitating the use of environmentally friendly services and products. This paper addresses this issue by employing a case study on China. We first trace the development of the GGP concept, its spread to Asian countries, and a number of approaches used to expand GGP adoption. We then review current practices in China on GGP, and analyze and identify some of the current barriers and problems in promoting green procurement in the Chinese governmental sector. We finally seek to identify possible appropriate capacity-building solutions, in order to facilitate the application of GGP in China.

  1. L'evasione in Italia e nei paesi OCSE: evidenze empiriche, determinanti ed effetti economici (Evasion in Italy and in OECD countries: empirical evidence, determinants and economic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. MARÈ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses evasion in terms of size and its main determinants, and discusses some of the measures to reduce its extension. Instead of attempting a new estimate of evasion, the author uses the many existing estimates and compares them, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. The available data on the underground economy and fiscal evasion in Italy and in major OECD countries is shown. Then, after recalling its effects on public budgets, the other economic effects of evasion are discussed. Some determinants of tax evasion, in particular those that appear most significant for our country, are then analysed. Finally, major issues of economic policy and measures to reduce tax evasion are discussed.JEL: H26

  2. Correlation or causation? Income inequality and infant mortality in fixed effects models in the period 1960-2008 in 34 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendano, Mauricio

    2012-08-01

    Income inequality is strongly associated with infant mortality across countries, but whether this association is causal has not been established. In their commentary in this issue of Social Science & Medicine, Regidor et al. (2012) argue that this association has disappeared in recent years, and question the premise of a causal link. This paper empirically tests the impact of income inequality on infant mortality in a fixed effects model that exploits the evolution of income inequality over a 38-year period, controlling for all time-invariant differences across countries. Data came from the Standardized World Income Inequality Database, containing yearly estimates for the period 1960-2008 in 34 countries member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), linked to infant mortality data from the OECD Health database. Infant mortality was modelled as a function of income inequality in a country and year fixed effects model, incorporating controls for changing economic and labour conditions. In a model without country fixed effects, a one-point increase in the Gini coefficient was associated with a 7% increase in the infant mortality rate (Rate ratio[RR] = 1.07, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.04, 1.09). Controlling for differences across countries in a country fixed effects model, however, income inequality was no longer associated with infant mortality (RR = 1.00, 0.98, 1.01). Similar results were obtained when using lagged values of income inequality for up to 15 years, and in models that controlled for changing labour and economic conditions. Findings suggest that in the short-run, changes in income inequality are not associated with changes in infant mortality. A possible interpretation of the discrepancy between cross-country correlations and fixed effects models is that social policies that reduce infant mortality cluster in countries with low income inequality, but their effects do not operate via income. Findings highlight the

  3. Environmental permits in Arab Gulf countries - local government perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczynski, L.

    2002-01-01

    The legacy of past environmentally careless oil and gas exploration practices is becoming more apparent as time goes by and our understanding of causes and results increase. In many petroleum producing countries and in Arab Gulf countries in particular, this understanding has resulted in greater social demand for environmental protection and responsible exploitation of limited resources. In response to this demand, governments of the Gulf Region are paying increasingly more attention to the responsible management of environmental impacts of new developments. As a result, most of them require developers to obtain environmental permits supported by a variety of environmental baseline studies, Environmental Impact Assessments and comprehensive Environmental Management Plans. These local environmental requirements are similar to those in North America and Europe, although there are some important differences on account of local environmental, historical and socioeconomic conditions. Developers, who choose to ignore them, often find their projects caught in a web of unfamiliar environmental regulations or administrative procedures that may cause costly and unnecessary delays. Based on the author's Canadian and Arab Gulf regulatory experience, this paper describes some common causes that may delay obtaining environmental permits or cause cancellation of a project, and provides ideas to assist companies in securing necessary permits and licenses. (author)

  4. E-Government Maturity Model for Sustainable E-Government Services from the Perspective of Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusp Raj Joshi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric government (e-government projects in developing countries are facing many challenges to deliver sustainable e-government services. From the existing literature, we found that most of the studies considered lack of technology, and limitations in budgets and human resources as the main hurdles in effective implementation of e-government services. Along with these limitations, we found that the e-government maturity models adopted by developing countries are failing to provide an appropriate strategic plan to deploy sustainable e-government services. While assessing the existing e-government maturity model, we made several observations on the lack of detail, the technology-centric nature, the emphasis on implementation, and the lack of an adoption strategy. This work contributes toward the proposition of a new e-government maturity model that would address the limitations of exiting e-government maturity models, and would support governments in developing countries to achieve sustainable e-government services. To achieve this goal, we considered five determinants—a detailed process, streamlined services, agile accessibility, use of state-of-the-art technology, and trust and awareness. The proposed model was validated by employing an empirical investigation through case-study and survey methods. We found that both the implementers (government and adopters (users of the e-government services benefited from the proposed model, resulting in an increased sustainability of e-government services.

  5. Energy consumption and economic growth nexus for 17 highly developed OECD countries: Further evidence based on bootstrap-corrected causality tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Ertugrul; Aslan, Alper

    2012-01-01

    Unlike previous energy consumption-economic growth studies, this study examines the relationship among energy consumption, economic growth, employment and gross fixed capital formation for 17 highly developed OECD countries by employing both the Toda–Yamamoto procedure which based on asymptotic critical values and the bootstrap-corrected causality test, since non-normality of the error term harms the validity of the Toda–Yamamoto procedure. This study finds that there is very small bias due to the assumption of normality. Furthermore using different information criterions, importance of lag length is tested. Findings indicate that selection of lag length is important for Denmark, Ireland, Norway and Spain. It is concluded that while there exists uni-directional causality running from energy consumption to real GDP for Japan, bi-directional causality is found for Italy, New Zealand, Norway and Spain. On the other hand, uni-directional causality from GDP to energy is found for Australia, Canada and Ireland whereas no causal nexus is found for all of other nine countries. Our analyses covering the sample periods imply that Japan, Italy, New Zealand, Norway and Spain should not follow energy conservation policy at the aggregated level, since the reduction of energy damages the economic growth. - Highlights: ► This study examines energy consumption, economic growth linkage for 17 developed OECD countries. ► Lag length selection is important for Denmark, Ireland, Norway and Spain. ► There exists uni-directional causality running from energy consumption to real GDP for Japan. ► Bi-directional causality is found for Italy, New Zealand, Norway and Spain.

  6. Economic effects of using carbon taxes to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in major OECD countries. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A tax on fossil fuels designed to obtain a 20 percent reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide by the year 2020 would lower output among major OECD nations by 1 to 3 1/2 percent. The tax required to achieve a 20% reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide by 2020 ranged from $489.4 (Sweden) per metric ton of carbon to $2,427.9 (Japan) per ton of carbon. The tax required for the U.S. was $720.6 per ton. In the U.S., a tax per $100 per ton of carbon would equate to a tax of $70.68 per short ton of coal, $11.42 per barrel of oil, $1.66 per MCF of natural gas and 0.27 per gallon of gasoline. The study is part of a multi-phase effort to gauge the economic consequences of various measures being discussed by the international community to mitigate the possibility of global climate change by limiting emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use. The study assumed that the carbon tax program would be revenue neutral in that increased revenues from the carbon tax would be offset by reductions in personal income taxes

  7. Threshold effect of the economic growth rate on the renewable energy development from a change in energy price. Evidence from OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ting-Huan; Huang, Chien-Ming; Lee, Ming-Chih

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a panel threshold regression (PTR) model to investigate the influence that energy prices have on renewable energy development under different economic growth rate regimes. The empirical data are obtained from each of the OECD member-countries over the period from 1997 to 2006. We show that there is one threshold in the regression relationship, which is 4.13% of a one-period lag in the annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate. The consumer price index (CPI), in so far as it relates to variations in energy, is significantly positively correlated with the contribution of renewables to energy supply in the regime with higher-economic growth, but there is no relationship in the regime with lower economic growth. Therefore, countries characterized by high-economic growth are able to respond to high energy prices with increases in renewable energy use, while countries characterized by low-economic growth countries tend to be unresponsive to energy price changes when they come to their level of renewable energy. (author)

  8. International comparisons of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector: panel data analysis of OECD countries using parametric and non-parametric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2013-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the cross-country comparisons of the performance of national health care systems. The present work provides a comparison of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector using unbalanced panel data from OECD countries over the period 2000-2009. The estimation of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector is performed using nonparametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) and parametric stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Internal and external validity of findings is assessed by estimating the Spearman rank correlations between the results obtained in different model specifications. The panel-data analyses using two-step DEA and one-stage SFA show that countries, which have higher health care expenditure per capita, tend to have a more technically efficient hospital sector. Whether the expenditure is financed through private or public sources is not related to the technical efficiency of the hospital sector. On the other hand, the hospital sector in countries with higher income inequality and longer average hospital length of stay is less technically efficient. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic and cultural correlates of subjective wellbeing in countries using data from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaygisiz, Esma

    2010-06-01

    The correlations among indicators of objective well-being, cultural dimensions, and subjective well-being were investigated using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data from 35 countries. The subjective well-being measures included life satisfaction as well as six positive and six negative indexes of experience. Positive and negative experience scores were subjected to principal component analysis, and two positive experience components (labeled as "positive experiences" and "time management") and two negative experience components (labeled as "pain, worry, and sadness" and "anger and boredom") were extracted. Objective well-being included economic indicators, education, and health. The cultural variables included Hofstede's and Schwartz's cultural dimensions, national Big Five personality scores, and national IQs. High life satisfaction was positively related to Gross Domestic Product, life expectancy, education, individualism, affective and intellectual autonomy, egalitarianism, and conscientiousness, whereas low life satisfaction was related to unemployment, unequal income distribution, power distance, masculinity uncertainty avoidance, embeddedness, hierarchy, and neuroticism.

  10. Household adoption of energy and water-efficient appliances: An analysis of attitudes, labelling and complementary green behaviours in selected OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu-Hang, To; Grafton, R Quentin; Martínez-Espiñeira, Roberto; Garcia-Valiñas, Maria

    2017-07-15

    Using a household-based data set of more than 12,000 households from 11 OECD countries, we analyse the factors underlying the decision by households to adopt energy-efficient and water-efficient equipment. We evaluate the roles of both attitudes and labelling schemes on the adoption of energy and water-efficient equipment, and also the interaction and complementarity between energy and water conservation behaviours. Our findings show: one, 'green' social norms and favourable attitudes towards the environment are associated with an increased likelihood of households' adoption of energy and water-efficient appliances; two, households' purchase decisions are positively affected by their awareness, understanding, and trust of labelling schemes; and three, there is evidence of complementarity between energy conservation and water conservation behaviours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Employment Policies in an Aging Society: Review of the Experiences of the OECD Countries with Population Aging and Their Policy Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Heon Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review the experiences of OECD countries with population aging and their policy responses, and suggest directions and measures of medium and long-term employment policies to cope with population aging in a comprehensive perspective. Specifically, following the policy objective of sustainable economic growth, we systematically classify policy types to cope with population aging and review possibilities and limitations of each policy type, while also considering Korea-specific situations as well as the experiences of other OECD countries. There are two broad types of employment policies to sustain economic growth in an aging society. One is to increase the quantity of labor force and the other is to enhance the quality of labor force. Policies to increase the quantity of labor force include pro-natalist policies, immigration policies, and policies to fully mobilize the labor resources of women and older people. Policies to enhance the quality of labor force include human resource development and flexicurity policies in the labor market. Our review suggests that direct pro-natalist policies seem to be ineffective. Also immigration policies cannot fundamentally solve the problem caused by population aging. Policies to fully mobilize the labor resources of women and older people seem to be the most effective policy. However, labor productivity should be an engine of economic growth in the long run when labor input reaches the limit of its capacity. In conclusion, in the long run, it is most important to enhance the quality of human capital and improve the functioning of the labor market to cope with the challenges of population aging.

  12. Macro determinants of cause-specific injury mortality in the OECD countries: an exploration of the importance of GDP and unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muazzam, Sana; Nasrullah, Muazzam

    2011-08-01

    Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and unemployment has a strong documented impact on injury mortality. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship of GDP per capita and unemployment with gender- and cause-specific injury mortalities in the member nations of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Country-based data on injury mortality per 100,000 population, including males and females aged 1-74, for the 4 year period 1996-1999, were gathered from the World Health Organization's Statistical Information System. We selected fourteen cause-specific injury mortalities. Data on GDP, unemployment rate and population growth were taken from World Development Indicators. GDP and unemployment rate per 100 separately were regressed on total and cause-specific injury mortality rate per 100,000 for males and females. Overall in the OECD countries, GDP per capita increased 12.5% during 1996-1999 (P = 0.03) where as unemployment rate decreased by 12.3% (P = 0.05). Among males, most cause-specific injury mortality rates decreased with increasing GDP except motor vehicle traffic crashes (MTC) that increased with increasing GDP (coefficient = 0.75; P GDP (coefficient = 0.31; P = 0.04). When we modeled cause-specific injury mortality rates with unemployment, injuries due to firearm missiles (coefficient = 0.53; P GDP is more related to cause-specific injury mortality than unemployment. Injury mortality does not relate similarly to each diagnosis-specific cause among males and females. Further research on causation with more predictors is needed.

  13. The Bidirectional Causality between Country-Level Governance, Economic Growth and Sustainable Development: A Cross-Country Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Boţa-Avram

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of contemporary society, characterized by the information users’ growing and differentiated needs, the way country-level governance and social responsibility contribute to the ensuring of sustainable economic development is a concern for all the actors of the economic sphere. The aim of this paper is to test the causal linkages between the quality of country-level governance, economic growth and a well-known indicator of economic sustainable development, for a large panel of world-wide countries for a period of 10 years (2006–2015. While there are some prior studies that have argued the bidirectional causality between good public governance and economic development, this study intends to provide a new focus on the relationship between country-level governance and economic growth, on one hand, and between country-level governance and adjusted net savings, as a selected indicator of economic sustainable development, on the other hand. Four hypotheses on the causal relationship between good governance, economic growth and sustainable development were tested by using Granger non-causality tests. Our findings resulting from Granger non-causality tests provide reasonable evidence of Granger causality from country-level governance to economic growth, but from economic growth to country-level governance, the causality is not confirmed. In what regards the relationship between country-level governance and adjusted net savings, the bidirectional Granger causality is not confirmed. The main implication of our study is that improving economic growth and sustainable development is a very challenging issue, and the impact of macro-level factors such as country-level governance should not be neglected.

  14. Is gender policy related to the gender gap in external cause and circulatory disease mortality? A mixed effects model of 22 OECD countries 1973–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backhans Mona

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender differences in mortality vary widely between countries and over time, but few studies have examined predictors of these variations, apart from smoking. The aim of this study is to investigate the link between gender policy and the gender gap in cause-specific mortality, adjusted for economic factors and health behaviours. Methods 22 OECD countries were followed 1973–2008 and the outcomes were gender gaps in external cause and circulatory disease mortality. A previously found country cluster solution was used, which includes indicators on taxes, parental leave, pensions, social insurances and social services in kind. Male breadwinner countries were made reference group and compared to earner-carer, compensatory breadwinner, and universal citizen countries. Specific policies were also analysed. Mixed effect models were used, where years were the level 1-units, and countries were the level 2-units. Results Both the earner-carer cluster (ns after adjustment for GDP and policies characteristic of that cluster are associated with smaller gender differences in external causes, particularly due to an association with increased female mortality. Cluster differences in the gender gap in circulatory disease mortality are the result of a larger relative decrease of male mortality in the compensatory breadwinner cluster and the earner-carer cluster. Policies characteristic of those clusters were however generally related to increased mortality. Conclusion Results for external cause mortality are in concordance with the hypothesis that women become more exposed to risks of accident and violence when they are economically more active. For circulatory disease mortality, results differ depending on approach – cluster or indicator. Whether cluster differences not explained by specific policies reflect other welfare policies or unrelated societal trends is an open question. Recommendations for further studies are made.

  15. Effects of the Global Financial Crisis on Health in High-Income Oecd Countries: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Heino, Pia; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence documents how economic crises impact aspects of health across countries and over time. We performed a systematic narrative review of the health effects of the latest economic crisis based on studies of high-income countries. Papers published between January 2009 and July 2015 were selected based on review of titles and abstracts, followed by a full text review conducted by two independent reviewers. Ultimately, 122 studies were selected and their findings summarized. The review finds that the 2008 financial crisis had negative effects on mental health, including suicide, and to a varying extent on some non-communicable and communicable diseases and access to care. Although unhealthy behaviors such as hazardous drinking and tobacco use appeared to decline during the crisis, there have been increases in some groups, typically those already at greatest risk. The health impact was greatest in countries that suffered the largest economic impact of the crisis or prolonged austerity. The Great Recessions in high-income countries have had mixed impacts on health. They tend to be worse when economic impacts are more severe, prolonged austerity measures are implemented, and there are pre-existing problems of substance use among vulnerable groups. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. A State of the Art Review on the Impact of Technology on Skill Demand in OECD Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hwa

    2002-01-01

    Review of research since the 1980s shows a consistent trend toward higher skill demands in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. There is evidence both that higher skills are needed to implement technology and that implementing technology raises skill requirements. Automation is displacing low-skilled jobs and creating…

  17. Equalising spending needs of sub national governments in a developing country : the case of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allers, Maarten A.; Ishemoi, Lewis J.

    Decentralisation of government creates fiscal disparities: some subnational governments can provide their citizens with more public services than others. Many countries try to equalise fiscal disparities by targeting grants at disadvantaged jurisdictions. This is especially difficult for developing

  18. Exploring the success, failure and factors influencing M-government implementation in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available and to provide better services to citizens, businesses, and government agencies through using mobile technology. This research reviews the success, failures and factors influencing m-Government development and implementation in developing countries...

  19. Vulnerabilities of Government Websites in a Developing Country – The Case of Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Bissyandé , Tegawendé F.; Ouoba , Jonathan; Ahmat , Daouda; Ouédraogo , Fréderic; Béré , Cedric; Bikienga , Moustapha; Sere , Abdoulaye; Dandjinou , Mesmin; Sié , Oumarou

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Slowly, but consistently, the digital gap between developing and developed countries is being closed. Everyday, there are initiatives towards relying on ICT to simplify the interaction between citizens and their governments in developing countries. E-government is thus becoming a reality: in Burkina Faso, all government bodies are taking part in this movement with web portals dedicated to serving the public. Unfortunately, in this rush to promote government actions wit...

  20. The socioeconomic determinants of health: economic growth and health in the OECD countries during the last three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Casasnovas, Guillem; Soley-Bori, Marina

    2014-01-08

    In times of economic crisis, most countries face the dual challenge of fighting unemployment while restraining social expenditures and closing budget deficits. The spending cuts and lack of employment affect a large number of decisions that have a direct or indirect impact on health. This impact is likely to be unevenly distributed among different groups within the population, and therefore not only health levels may be at risk, but also their distribution. The main purpose of this paper is to explore links between unemployment, economic growth, inequality, and health. We regress a measure of health, the Health Human Development Index (HHDI), against a set of explanatory variables accounting for the countries' economic performance (GDP growth, unemployment, and income inequality), and some institutional factors related to welfare spending and the nature of the health systems for the past three decades. In addition, we explore the causes for different results obtained using an inequality-adjusted HHDI, vs. the unadjusted HHDI. We describe a panel data model, estimated by random effects, for 32 countries from 1980-2010, in five-year intervals. Our conclusion is that the high economic growth observed in the last decades, together with an increase in the levels of income inequality and/or poverty, explain the observed changes of our index, particularly when this indicator is weighted by health inequality. The remaining institutional variables (the share of social spending, health care expenditure, and the type of health systems) show the expected sign but are not statistically significant. A comment on the methodological pitfalls of the approach completes the analysis.

  1. Current positions in OECD member countries on competence profiles at present and requirements for the future: review of questionnaire responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    The picture is mixed and very dependent on the state of the industry in the particular country. A key determinant is the social, political and economic views of the place of nuclear power generation within the energy policy. Where there is support at a political level or there are clearer financial incentives then the industry can develop and has the impetuous to maintain their capabilities and competence. If the industry position is not as strong the social pressures increase so that it is not viewed as a career. Recruitment and retention and maintaining competence becomes more difficult. Furthermore there are trends to move away from the traditional engineering and science degrees towards subjects which have a 'consumer vogue' and even more proven track records of employment. This in turn puts pressure on the availability of university level education at all levels. Hence if there are not well developed alternatives within a country and programmes of cooperation the very foundation of training and development is under threat. The problems have been recognised and there are a number of initiatives in place both in regulatory bodies, training establishments and the utilities. Recognition of the problem and transfer of good practices will help. Fundamentally there has to be the underpinning infrastructure to support education and training which in itself will allow for cross fertilization with the industry. It is clear that the problem is international and there has to be scope for international cooperation. (authors)

  2. Trends in truck freight energy use and carbon emissions in selected OECD countries from 1973 to 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamakate, Fatumata; Schipper, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Trends in truck freight energy use and carbon emissions: In the age of global supply chains and 'just in time' logistics, fast and efficient goods movement is often seen as an economic imperative. Growth in global goods movement not only translates into growth in commercial trucking activity but also into growth in the share of trucking compared to other modes of in-country freight transportation. These trends have a significant impact on the energy intensity of freight transport. Using a bottom-up approach relying on national data, this study compares the energy intensity of truck freight in Australia, France, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States from 1973 to the present. The analysis builds on previous work by and decomposing energy use for freight. Intensity is expressed in terms of vehicle intensity (megajoules/vehicle-kilometer), modal energy intensity (megajoules/tonne-kilometer), and carbon intensity (grams/tonne-km). The cross-country comparison highlights in part the influence of geography, transportation infrastructure, and truck utilization patterns on energy and carbon intensity from this sector. While improving fuel economy of individual vehicles is very important, large reductions in trucking energy use and emissions will also come from better logistics and driving, higher load factors, and better matching of truck capacity to load.

  3. Thermal cycling in LWR components in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, Claude; Chapuliot, Stephane; Mathet, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Thermal cycling is a widespread and recurring problem in nuclear power plants worldwide. Several incidents with leakage of primary water inside the containment challenged the integrity of NPPs although no release outside of containment occurred. Thermal cycling was not taken into account at the design stage. Regulatory bodies, utilities and researchers have to address it for their operating plants. It is a complex phenomenon that involves and links thermal hydraulic, fracture mechanic, materials and plant operation. Thermal cycling is connected either to operating transients (low cycle fatigue) or to complex phenomenon like stratification, vortex and mixing (low and high cycle fatigue). The former is covered by existing rules and codes. The latter is partially addressed by national rules and constitutes the subject of this report. In 2002, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) requested the working group on the integrity of reactor components and structures (IAGE WG) to prepare a program of work on thermal cycling to provide information to NEA member countries on operational experience, regulatory policies, countermeasures in place, current status of research and development, and to identify areas where research is needed both at national and international levels. The working group proposed a 3 fold program that covered: - Review of operating experience, regulatory framework, countermeasures and current research; - Benchmark to assess calculation capabilities in NEA member countries for crack initiation and propagation under a cyclic thermal loading, and ultimately to develop screening criteria to identify susceptible components; results of the benchmark were published in 2005; - Organisation of an international conference in cooperation with the EPRI and the USNRC on fatigue of reactor components. This conference reviews progress in the areas and provides a forum for discussion and exchange of information between high level experts. The

  4. The Socioeconomic Determinants of Health: Economic Growth and Health in the OECD Countries during the Last Three Decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem López-Casasnovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In times of economic crisis, most countries face the dual challenge of fighting unemployment while restraining social expenditures and closing budget deficits. The spending cuts and lack of employment affect a large number of decisions that have a direct or indirect impact on health. This impact is likely to be unevenly distributed among different groups within the population, and therefore not only health levels may be at risk, but also their distribution. The main purpose of this paper is to explore links between unemployment, economic growth, inequality, and health. We regress a measure of health, the Health Human Development Index (HHDI, against a set of explanatory variables accounting for the countries’ economic performance (GDP growth, unemployment, and income inequality, and some institutional factors related to welfare spending and the nature of the health systems for the past three decades. In addition, we explore the causes for different results obtained using an inequality-adjusted HHDI, vs. the unadjusted HHDI. We describe a panel data model, estimated by random effects, for 32 countries from 1980–2010, in five-year intervals. Our conclusion is that the high economic growth observed in the last decades, together with an increase in the levels of income inequality and/or poverty, explain the observed changes of our index, particularly when this indicator is weighted by health inequality. The remaining institutional variables (the share of social spending, health care expenditure, and the type of health systems show the expected sign but are not statistically significant. A comment on the methodological pitfalls of the approach completes the analysis.

  5. The Socioeconomic Determinants of Health: Economic Growth and Health in the OECD Countries during the Last Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Casasnovas, Guillem; Soley-Bori, Marina

    2014-01-01

    In times of economic crisis, most countries face the dual challenge of fighting unemployment while restraining social expenditures and closing budget deficits. The spending cuts and lack of employment affect a large number of decisions that have a direct or indirect impact on health. This impact is likely to be unevenly distributed among different groups within the population, and therefore not only health levels may be at risk, but also their distribution. The main purpose of this paper is to explore links between unemployment, economic growth, inequality, and health. We regress a measure of health, the Health Human Development Index (HHDI), against a set of explanatory variables accounting for the countries’ economic performance (GDP growth, unemployment, and income inequality), and some institutional factors related to welfare spending and the nature of the health systems for the past three decades. In addition, we explore the causes for different results obtained using an inequality-adjusted HHDI, vs. the unadjusted HHDI. We describe a panel data model, estimated by random effects, for 32 countries from 1980–2010, in five-year intervals. Our conclusion is that the high economic growth observed in the last decades, together with an increase in the levels of income inequality and/or poverty, explain the observed changes of our index, particularly when this indicator is weighted by health inequality. The remaining institutional variables (the share of social spending, health care expenditure, and the type of health systems) show the expected sign but are not statistically significant. A comment on the methodological pitfalls of the approach completes the analysis. PMID:24406664

  6. Five countries pioneering accrual budgeting and accounting in central government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dees, M.; Neelissen, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    In its 2001 Budget Memorandum, the Dutch government announced that accrual budgeting and accounting would replace the current obligation-cash budgeting and accounting system in ministerial budgets and accounts in several years’ time.

  7. A Framework for Cloud Based E-Government from the Perspective of Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusp Raj Joshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant efforts to initiate electronic government projects, developing countries are still struggling to reap the benefits of using e-government services. An effective implementation of e-government infrastructure is necessary to increase the efficiency and transparency of the government services. There are several studies that observed causes like lack of infrastructure support, lack of payment gateway and improper e-government service delivery channel as main barriers to a wider adoption of e-government services. The main contribution of this research is to propose a cloud-based G2G (Government-to-government e-government framework for a viable e-government solution from the perspective of developing countries. We have introduced a list of concepts and a systematic process to guide the implementation of e-government project based on the government’s vision, goals, chosen services through the service delivery channel to the appropriate cloud service and deployment model. We have used Nepal as a context of the case study and applied the framework to a real e-government project of driving licensing department using action research methodology. The results from the study show that the G2G approach of e-government implementation would be the best for providing effective government services to the stakeholders of developing countries. The proposed framework also supports a smooth integration of government services and reduces the time of the overall project.

  8. The effects of country and firm-level governance on cash management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Bruce; Gonenc, Halit

    We examine the effects of both country and firm-level governance on cash holdings and the value of cash for a large international sample during the period 2002-2013. We find that both strong country and strong firm-level governance reduce the amount of cash holdings. We observe that a number of the

  9. Combining Diffusion Models and Macroeconomic Indicators with a Modified Genetic Programming Method: Implementation in Forecasting the Number of Mobile Telecommunications Subscribers in OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Salpasaranis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modified Genetic Programming method for forecasting the mobile telecommunications subscribers’ population. The method constitutes an expansion of the hybrid Genetic Programming (hGP method improved by the introduction of diffusion models for technological forecasting purposes in the initial population, such as the Logistic, Gompertz, and Bass, as well as the Bi-Logistic and LogInLog. In addition, the aforementioned functions and models expand the function set of hGP. The application of the method in combination with macroeconomic indicators such as Gross Domestic Product per Capita (GDPpC and Consumer Prices Index (CPI leads to the creation of forecasting models and scenarios for medium- and long-term level of predictability. The forecasting module of the program has also been improved with the multi-levelled use of the statistical indices as fitness functions and model selection indices. The implementation of the modified-hGP in the datasets of mobile subscribers in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD countries shows very satisfactory forecasting performance.

  10. Does Globalization Promote Good Governance in Africa? An Empirical Study Across 51 countries

    OpenAIRE

    Asongu, Simplice

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of globalisation on governance in 51 African countries for the period 1996-2011. Four bundled governance indicators and four globalisation (political, economic, social and general) variables are used. The empirical evidence is based on Instrumental Variable Quantile Regressions. The motivation for the estimation technique is that blanket governance-globalisation policies are not likely to succeed unless they are contingent on initial levels of governance and...

  11. The Importance of Government Effectiveness for Transitions toward Greater Electrification in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Best

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Electricity is a vital factor underlying modern living standards, but there are many developing countries with low levels of electricity access and use. We seek to systematically identify the crucial elements underlying transitions toward greater electrification in developing countries. We use a cross-sectional regression approach with national-level data up to 2012 for 135 low- and middle-income countries. The paper finds that the effectiveness of governments is the most important governance attribute for encouraging the transition to increased electrification in developing countries, on average. The results add to the growing evidence on the importance of governance for development outcomes. Donors seeking to make more successful contributions to electrification may wish to target countries with more effective governments.

  12. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Anna; Amoroso, Jeremie; Herczynski, Jan; Kheyfets, Igor; Lockheed, Marlaine; Santiago, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This joint OECD-World Bank report for Kazakhstan forms part of the OECD Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the Review is to explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. School resources are…

  13. Multi-actor governance of sustainable biofuels in developing countries: The case of Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schut, Marc; Cunha Soares, Núria; Ven, Gerrie van de; Slingerland, Maja

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the multi-actor governance process that made Mozambique the first African nation-state to develop a national policy framework for sustainable biofuels. The paper draws on findings from action research conducted in Mozambique between December 2008 and July 2012. We analyse interactions between the changing governance context, the course of the multi-actor governance process, and the choices in relation to governance framework characteristics and content for four successive stages of governance framework development. This provides the basis for reflection on the competences required for effective multi-actor sustainability governance, and a discussion about the role of the nation-state in sustainability governance of global economies such as biofuels. The governance framework for sustainable biofuels has contributed to a more transparent and secure investment climate for biofuels in Mozambique. Key factors for success were (1) the presence of different types of competences during the various stages of the governance framework development, (2) closing the gap between ‘licences to sell’ and ‘licences to produce’ across different governance levels, and (3) balancing between the short- and long-term objectives for biofuel production in Mozambique and requirements of global biofuel markets. Developing-country nation-states can provide an essential contribution to these success-factors for global governance of sustainable biofuels. - Highlights: • Mozambique is the first African country that developed a national governance framework for sustainable biofuels. • Independence, representation, expertise and operational capacity are essential competences in multi-actor sustainability governance. • Developing country's nation-states play an essential role in harmonizing short- and long-term objectives across different governance levels. • Synergies between licences to sell and licences to produce biofuels sustainably should

  14. URBAN TRANSPORT AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE IN ASIAN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira MORITA

    2004-01-01

    This paper comprises a GIS-based land use analysis on the relationship between urbanization and transport infrastructure development, b GPS-based travel behavior survey, and c interview survey on residents' satisfaction with transport infrastructures and services. It was shown that the current land use patterns largely differ depending on the existence of agricultural infrastructure development in the pre-urbanized stage. It was also confirmed by a GPS-based travel survey that travel behavior patterns in scattered development areas are significantly different from those in orderly development areas. The former areas lack not only road space but also a structured hierarchy of networks, resulting in inefficient travel behaviors with low speed and detours. The GPS survey gave clearer pictures to grasp the relationship between travel patterns of residents and their demand for the improvement of local transport services. It was indicated that local governments who are responsible for these demands often fail to meet them due to financial and institutional limitations of the current system.

  15. The Impact of Government Expenditure on Economic Growth: A Study of Asian Countries

    OpenAIRE

    K. P. K. S. Lahirushan; W. G. V. Gunasekara

    2015-01-01

    Main purpose of this study is to identify the impact of government expenditure on economic growth in Asian Countries. Consequently, main objective is to analyze whether government expenditure causes economic growth in Asian countries vice versa and then scrutinizing long-run equilibrium relationship exists between them. The study completely based on secondary data. The methodology being quantitative that includes econometrical techniques of cointegration, panel fixed effe...

  16. 19 CFR 356.6 - Receipt of notice of a scope determination by the Government of a FTA country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Government of a FTA country. 356.6 Section 356.6 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION... determination by the Government of a FTA country. (a) Where the Department has made a scope determination, notice of such determination shall be deemed received by the Government of a FTA country when a certified...

  17. The relationship among biodiversity, governance, wealth, and scientific capacity at a country level: Disaggregation and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Noriega, Andrés; Soberón, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    At a global level, the relationship between biodiversity importance and capacity to manage it is often assumed to be negative, without much differentiation among the more than 200 countries and territories of the world. We examine this relationship using a database including terrestrial biodiversity, wealth and governance indicators for most countries. From these, principal components analysis was used to construct aggregated indicators at global and regional scales. Wealth, governance, and scientific capacity represent different skills and abilities in relation to biodiversity importance. Our results show that the relationship between biodiversity and the different factors is not simple: in most regions wealth and capacity varies positively with biodiversity, while governance vary negatively with biodiversity. However, these trends, to a certain extent, are concentrated in certain groups of nations and outlier countries. We discuss our results in the context of collaboration and joint efforts among biodiversity-rich countries and foreign agencies.

  18. Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

    2002-05-20

    Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

  19. OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor project is an agreement between OECD member countries. It was first signed in 1958 and since then regularly renewed every third year. The activities at the Project is centred around the Halden heavy water rector, the HBWR. The reseach programme comprizes studies of fuel performance under various operating conditions, and the application of computers for process control. The HBWR is equipped for exposing fuel rods to temperatures and pressures, and at heat ratings met in modern BWR's and PWR's. A range of in-core instruments are available, permitting detailed measurements of the reactions of the fuel, including mechanical deformations, thermal behaviour, fission gas release, and corrosion. In the area of computer application, the studies of the communication between operator and process, and the surveillance and control of the reactor core, are of particular interst for reactor operation. 1988 represents the 30th year since the Project was started, and this publication is produced to mark this event. It gives and account of the activities and achievements of the Project through the years 1958-1988

  20. OECD's Brief Self-Report Measure of Educational Psychology's Most Useful Affective Constructs: Cross-Cultural, Psychometric Comparisons across 25 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Hau, Kit-Tai; Artelt, Cordula; Baumert, Jurgen; Peschar, Jules L.

    2006-01-01

    Through a rigorous process of selecting educational psychology's most useful affective constructs, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) constructed the Students' Approaches to Learning (SAL) instrument, which requires only 10 min to measure 14 factors that assess self-regulated learning strategies, self-beliefs,…

  1. Government, politics and health policy: A quantitative analysis of 30 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenbach, Johan P; McKee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Public health policies are often dependent on political decision-making, but little is known of the impact of different forms of government on countries' health policies. In this exploratory study we studied the association between a wide range of process and outcome indicators of health policy and four groups of political factors (levels of democracy, e.g. voice and accountability; political representation, e.g. voter turnout; distribution of power, e.g. constraints on the executive; and quality of government, e.g. absence of corruption) in contemporary Europe. Data on 15 aspects of government and 18 indicators of health policy as well as on potential confounders were extracted from harmonized international data sources, covering 30 European countries and the years 1990-2010. In a first step, multivariate regression analysis was used to relate cumulative measures of government to indicators of health policy, and in a second step panel regression with country fixed effects was used to relate changes in selected measures of government to changes in indicators of health policy. In multivariate regression analyses, measures of quality of democracy and quality of government had many positive associations with process and outcome indicators of health policy, while measures of distribution of power and political representation had few and inconsistent associations. Associations for quality of democracy were robust against more extensive control for confounding variables, including tests in panel regressions with country fixed effects, but associations for quality of government were not. In this period in Europe, the predominant political influence on health policy has been the rise of levels of democracy in countries in the Central & Eastern part of the region. In contrast to other areas of public policy, health policy does not appear to be strongly influenced by institutional features of democracy determining the distribution of power, nor by aspects of political

  2. OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines - Implementation by Norwegian Tax Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sollund, Stig

    1998-07-01

    Presentation. The growth of multinational enterprises and integration of world markets across national borders has increased the importance of this issue: How should corporate tax systems at the national level be applied to the profits of companies engaging in the vast number of cross border transactions? The challenges and implications of the issue are tremendous both to the national governments and to the enterprises. The OECD countries have responded to these challenges by declaring that each enterprise within a multinational group of companies shall be treated as a separate entity. In order to apply the separate entity approach to intra group transactions, individual group members must be taxed on the basis that they act at arm's length with each other. The arm's length principle is more easily understood in theory than applied in practice. In some countries, therefore, the authorities have explored other methods than the traditional ones, as described in the 1979 Transfer Pricing Report of the OECD. A confirmed consensus between the governments was reached in the form of the revised 1995 guidelines. The Norwegian Ministry of Finance has given its full support to the efforts of defending the separate entity approach and the arm's length principle in the OECD committees.

  3. Corporate governance determinants: the firm-level evidence from transitional country, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Zheka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to empirically investigate the determinants of choices of corporate governance practices by corporations in a transition market. The study offers firm-level evidence benefiting from unique financial and governance data on Ukraine. In particular, we analyze the factors that affect overall level as well as individual elements of corporate governance. We consider such governance elements as shareholder rights, transparency, board independence, chairman independence and ownership. Overall we found that regulatory, industry and firm level factors are important, which is consistent with previous literature for other countries. Combining our results with the results of Zheka (20063 we conclude that it is possible for the government to implement and enforce better corporate governance practices in the economy that would make Ukrainian enterprises more attractive for foreign investment.

  4. `People on the move and goods on the go` behavioral factors driving carbon-dioxide emissions for travel and freight in OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Concern has been expressed in many government and private studies over the cost of externalitites from transportation, which include safety, air pollution, noise, competition for urban space, balance of payments associated with oil imports, and risks from importing oil. If the individual (s) benefiting at the time faced those costs, the travel (or shipment) behind the externality might not take place, or technology would be applied to reduce the extent of the problem. For large trucks and busses, the costs (per vehicle-km) are considerably higher. Expressed as per unit of travel (passenger kilometers) or per unit of freight, i.e., taking into account the utilization of the vehicle, the specific cost change because of economics of scale. Transportation is a valuable part of our economy, but it is no free lunch. Emissions of CO{sub 2} or carbon from road transport are also on government agendas is industrialized countries. Not surprisingly, CO{sub 2} emissions from travel and freight have increased in most industrialized countries faster than population, albeit less rapidly than GDP. This paper reviews some of the factors driving that increase. Whatever the `real` external costs of each mode, all studies suggest two important findings: First, these costs are sometimes comparable to, or higher than, direct fuel costs per kilometer at the margin; Second, the value attached to the externality for carbon emissions tends to be low compared to those associated with other problems. Hence this suggests that CO{sub 2} by itself may not `felt` as a strong stimulus for change, but that changes to deal with the other problems may affect traffic, and therefore CO{sub 2} emissions, profoundly. (EG) 51 refs.

  5. Human resource governance: what does governance mean for the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Avril D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on practical and effective governance of the health workforce is limited. This paper examines health system strengthening as it occurs in the intersection between the health workforce and governance by presenting a framework to examine health workforce issues related to eight governance principles: strategic vision, accountability, transparency, information, efficiency, equity/fairness, responsiveness and citizen voice and participation. Methods This study builds off of a literature review that informed the development of a framework that describes linkages and assigns indicators between governance and the health workforce. A qualitative analysis of Health System Assessment (HSA data, a rapid indicator-based methodology that determines the key strengths and weaknesses of a health system using a set of internationally recognized indicators, was completed to determine how 20 low- and middle-income countries are operationalizing health governance to improve health workforce performance. Results/discussion The 20 countries assessed showed mixed progress in implementing the eight governance principles. Strengths highlighted include increasing the transparency of financial flows from sources to providers by implementing and institutionalizing the National Health Accounts methodology; increasing responsiveness to population health needs by training new cadres of health workers to address shortages and deliver care to remote and rural populations; having structures in place to register and provide licensure to medical professionals upon entry into the public sector; and implementing pilot programs that apply financial and non-financial incentives as a means to increase efficiency. Common weaknesses emerging in the HSAs include difficulties with developing, implementing and evaluating health workforce policies that outline a strategic vision for the health workforce; implementing continuous licensure and regulation systems to

  6. Human resource governance: what does governance mean for the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Avril D; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John Gh; Quain, Estelle E

    2013-02-15

    Research on practical and effective governance of the health workforce is limited. This paper examines health system strengthening as it occurs in the intersection between the health workforce and governance by presenting a framework to examine health workforce issues related to eight governance principles: strategic vision, accountability, transparency, information, efficiency, equity/fairness, responsiveness and citizen voice and participation. This study builds off of a literature review that informed the development of a framework that describes linkages and assigns indicators between governance and the health workforce. A qualitative analysis of Health System Assessment (HSA) data, a rapid indicator-based methodology that determines the key strengths and weaknesses of a health system using a set of internationally recognized indicators, was completed to determine how 20 low- and middle-income countries are operationalizing health governance to improve health workforce performance. The 20 countries assessed showed mixed progress in implementing the eight governance principles. Strengths highlighted include increasing the transparency of financial flows from sources to providers by implementing and institutionalizing the National Health Accounts methodology; increasing responsiveness to population health needs by training new cadres of health workers to address shortages and deliver care to remote and rural populations; having structures in place to register and provide licensure to medical professionals upon entry into the public sector; and implementing pilot programs that apply financial and non-financial incentives as a means to increase efficiency. Common weaknesses emerging in the HSAs include difficulties with developing, implementing and evaluating health workforce policies that outline a strategic vision for the health workforce; implementing continuous licensure and regulation systems to hold health workers accountable after they enter the workforce

  7. Discursive junctions in flood risk governance - A comparative understanding in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Maria; Wiering, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Flood risks are managed differently across Europe. While a number of research studies aim to understand these differences, they tend to pay little attention to the social constructionist aspects of flood risk governance, i.e. the meaning that societies give to flood risk and governance. This paper aims to address this gap by understanding differences in flood risk management approaches (FRMA) from a discursive-institutional perspective. Based on this perspective, an analytical framework was developed to systematically analyse and compare discourses pertaining to flood risk and its governance in six European member states (England (the United Kingdom), Flanders (Belgium), France, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden). Correspondingly, this paper demonstrates how the hegemonic discursive-institutional patterns of flood risk governance differ between the six European countries. These differences may influence the capability of countries to learn from each other, adopt new FRMAs or cooperate with each other. Moreover, the paper argues that differences in discourses partially account for the differences in FRMAs between countries, combined with other factors. Additionally, broader implications are discussed. For example, the research findings imply that some discourses tend to favour or disfavour other discourses, and that they additionally also tend to favour particular FRMAs; e.g. the flood risk discourse pertaining to high manageability of risks seems to favour a governance discourse of collectivity and central governance. The different insights imply that further research is necessary to understand the complex interaction of discourses and institutional arrangements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIMENSIONS ON FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONESCU ALIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a current topic for academic community and practitioners, in the context of globalization and crisis, especially in case of developing countries. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which dimensions of corporate governance are able to exercise a significant impact on the companies’ financial structure, using a dataset with 77 developing countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe. The data are provided from World Bank Enterprise Survey website and the variables are grouped in two directions: corporate governance and financial structure variables. In this regard, using principal components analysis approach, we grouped firstly the variables related to financial structure and then variables related to the main four dimensions of corporate governance, such as ownership structure and management quality, transparency, environment and corruption. The impact of corporate governance dimensions on companies’ financial structure was analyzed in a generalized linear model framework and the main result of this paper consists in the fact that, for analyzed countries, companies’ financial structure is significantly influenced by several dimensions of the governance like transparency, environment or corruption

  9. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIMENSIONS ON FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONESCU ALIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a current topic for academic community and practitioners, in the context of globalization and crisis, especially in case of developing countries. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which dimensions of corporate governance are able to exercise a significant impact on the companies’ financial structure, using a dataset with 77 developing countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe. The data are provided from World Bank Enterprise Survey website and the variables are grouped in two directions: corporate governance and financial structure variables. In this regard, using principal components analysis approach, we grouped firstly the variables related to financial structure and then variables related to the main four dimensions of corporate governance, such as ownership structure and management quality, transparency, environment and corruption. The impact of corporate governance dimensions on companies’ financial structure was analyzed in a generalized linear model framework and the main result of this paper consists in the fact that, for analyzed countries, companies’ financial structure is significantly influenced by several dimensions of the governance like transparency, environment or corruption.

  10. Size of government and entrepreneurship. Analysis of three groups of countries with different economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Díaz Casero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the impact of the "size of government" in entrepreneurial activity for countries with different levels of economical development. It has been used the variables "size of government" of the economic freedom indices released by the Economic Freedom Network (2000-2009 and by The Heritage Foundation (2000-2011, and the variables of "entrepreneurship" released by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. Furthermore, the same analysis has been carried out grouping the countries by development level, following the classification elaborated by the World Economic Forum. Statistical analyses of correlations have shown that the “size of government” is related to entrepreneurship. The variables "Size of Government: Expenditures, Taxes and Enterprises" and " Government Size” have revealed a positive correlation with the total, opportunity and necessity entrepreneurial activity indices for the economies based on efficiency and innovation, thus less taxes on income and lower government spending, increase the entrepreneurship of the country. In “factor driven economies”, there is no relationship between the size of government and entrepreneurship

  11. Government debt-interest rate nexus in G7 countries over a long horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malešević-Perović Lena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to investigate the influence of government fiscal positions on long-term interest rates in G7 countries during the period 1948-2012. Our results suggest that a one percentage point increase in the stock of government debt in GDP is associated with an increase in government bond yields of 2.27-6.28 basis points, while an increase in government deficit in GDP of one percentage point is associated with an increase in government bond yields of 3.15-14.3 basis points. In addition, our results indicate that under reasonable assumptions and in the presence of widening output gaps, the neoclassical growth model predicts a rather low degree of crowding-out (around 36 percent, while the narrowing of the output gap leads to a complete crowding-out.

  12. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  13. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Guillaume, E-mail: gfontaine@flacso.org.e [Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences (FLACSO), Research Laboratory on Governance, Quito (Ecuador)

    2011-05-15

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  14. INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri L.F. de GROOT

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ineffective institutions and bad governance increase transaction costs and reduce international transport flows. In this paper, we empirically investigate this basic notion, and we show that it can account for several, so far, somewhat puzzling results in the empirical literature estimating gravity equations of bilateral trade. More specifically, we show that differences in the quality and effectiveness of institutions offer an explanation for the tendency of OECD countries to trade disproportionately with each other, and with non-OECD countries, as well as for the positive effect of GDP per capita on bilateral trade.

  15. Climate change policies in the OECD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staahle, C.

    1993-01-01

    The author focuses on the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development (UNCED), held in 1992 in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, and on carbon taxation. At the UNCED the Framework Convention on Climate Change was signed by 154 countries. This convention is intended to guide policy makers, and takes into account the great differences that exist between countries with regard to their ability to cater and pay for greenhouse gas emission reductions. It is pointed out that since 1985 the share of CO 2 emissions from non-OECD countries has exceeded that of OECD countries. An overview is given of stated OECD targets on CO 2 emission reductions. The global impact of reductions in OECD countries alone will be limited: if all targets are met, global emissions will be growing with 19% in the coming ten years, compared to 22% in a 'business-as-usual' scenario. It was noted that only very few OECD countries have developed action plans or implemented carbon taxes that could make their targets attainable. Details were given on carbon taxes now in place. It is concluded that no progress will be made if developing countries are not included in climate change policies. Also much work remains to be done in developed countries to meet emission reduction or stabilization targets. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV: Countries progress in implementing technical guidelines and good governance requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochieng, R.M.; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid; Arts, B.; Brockhaus, M.; Herold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The UNFCCC requires REDD+ countries wishing to receive results-based payments to measure, report and verify (MRV) REDD+ impacts; and outlines technical guidelines and good governance requirements for MRV. This article examines institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV by assessing countries’ progress

  17. Mutual Funds and Information Diffusion: The Role of Country-Level Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lin (Chunmei); M. Massa (Massimo); H. Zhang (Hong)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We hypothesize that poor country-level governance, which makes public information less reliable, induces fund managers to increase their use of semi-public information. Utilizing data from international mutual funds and stocks over the 2000-2009 period, we find that

  18. Adapting Floods Management to Climate Change: Comparing Policy Frames and Governance Practices in the Low Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabbé, A.; Wiering, M.A.; Liefferink, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Belgium and the Netherlands together form the Low Countries. Empirical research in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) and the Netherlands proves that there are substantive differences in the organization of governance processes regarding flood management in response to climate change.

  19. The relevance of global energy governance for Arab countries: The case of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, Kerstin; Zejli, Driss; Taenzler, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Global climate and energy governance have led to the creation of a wide range of international and regional institutions, initiatives and financial mechanisms dedicated to fostering renewable energies. Furthermore, a low-carbon economy has evolved in recent years. The objective of this paper is to assess the potential benefits and merits of these institutions, initiatives and mechanisms from the perspective of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The central questions are if and how these organizations, initiatives and finance mechanisms could support a country from MENA in its efforts to implement large-scale capacities for renewable energy production. For this purpose, Morocco was chosen as a case study. The findings in this paper indicate that the existing institutions and financial mechanisms do not sum up to a coordinated governance approach, although the main needs of a country or region appear to be addressed. The existing institutions and financial mechanisms vary significantly in their ability to support countries, especially those taking the lead in renewable energy implementation. - Research highlights: → A coordinated governance approach is missing for the encouragement of renewable energy application. → Existing institutions and financial mechanisms vary significantly in their ability to support countries. → Front runner countries, such as Morocco, may not find all of their needs adequately addressed.

  20. Factors Influencing Adaptive Marine Governance in a Developing Country Context: a Case Study of Southern Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa S. Evans

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive governance can be conceptualized as distinct phases of: 1 understanding environmental change; 2 using this understanding to inform decision making; and 3 acting on decisions in a manner that sustains resilience of desirable system states. Using this analytical framework, we explore governance in practice in two case studies in Kenya, that reflect the "messiness" of contemporary coastal governance in many developing country contexts. Findings suggest that adaptive marine governance is unlikely to be a smooth process of learning, knowledge sharing, and responding. There are institutional, sociocultural, and political factors, past and present, that influence each phase of both local and state decision making. New local institutions related to fisher associations and Beach Management Units influence learning and knowledge sharing in ways contrary to those expected of institutions that enable collaborative fisheries management. Similarly, state decision making is relatively uninformed by the diverse knowledge systems available in the coastal zone, despite the rhetoric of participation. Historical relations and modes of working continue to play a significant role in mediating the potential for adaptive governance in the future. The case studies are illustrative and point to a number of institutional and political issues that would need to be addressed in processes of governance reform towards more adaptive management in developing country contexts.

  1. 48 CFR 252.209-7001 - Disclosure of ownership or control by the government of a terrorist country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) (a) Definitions. As used in this provision— (1) Government of a terrorist country includes the state... the government of which has repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism. As of the...

  2. Comparison of governance approaches for the control of antimicrobial resistance: Analysis of three European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Birgand

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Policy makers and governments are calling for coordination to address the crisis emerging from the ineffectiveness of current antibiotics and stagnated pipe-line of new ones – antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Wider contextual drivers and mechanisms are contributing to shifts in governance strategies in health care, but are national health system approaches aligned with strategies required to tackle antimicrobial resistance? This article provides an analysis of governance approaches within healthcare systems including: priority setting, performance monitoring and accountability for AMR prevention in three European countries: England, France and Germany. Advantages and unresolved issues from these different experiences are reported, concluding that mechanisms are needed to support partnerships between healthcare professionals and patients with democratized decision-making and accountability via collaboration. But along with this multi-stakeholder approach to governance, a balance between regulation and persuasion is needed.

  3. Are performances in Governance Indicators Complementary to Corruption Abatement?: A Cross-Country Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Private use of public office for private gain could be a tentative connotation of corruption and most distasteful event of corruption is that it is not there, nor that it is pervasive, but it is socially acknowledged in the global economy, especially in the developing nations. In the present paper we attempt to assess the interrelationship between the Corruption perception index (CPI and the principal components of governance indicators as per World Bank Governance Indicators like Control of Corruption (CC, Rule of Law (RL, Regulatory Quality (RQ and Government Effectiveness (GE. Applying Granger Causality Test the study observes a mixed or inconclusive result. Only bilateral causal link between the CPI and CC works for UK, whereas there are unilateral causal links between the CPI and one or more governance indicators working for other countries for France, Japan, China, India, Thailand and South Africa. In no way causalities are observed for USA, Germany and Brazil.

  4. Are performances in Governance Indicators Complementary to Corruption Abatement? : A Cross-Country Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Das

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Private use of public office for private gain could be a tentative connotation of corruption and most distasteful event of corruption is that it is not there, nor that it is pervasive, but it is socially acknowledged in the global economy, especially in the developing nations. In the present paper we attempt to assess the interrelationship between the Corruption perception index (CPI and the principal components of governance indicators as per World Bank Governance Indicators like Control of Corruption (CC, Rule of Law (RL, Regulatory Quality (RQ and Government Effectiveness (GE. Applying Granger Causality Test the study observes a mixed or inconclusive result. Only bilateral causal link between the CPI and CC works for UK, whereas there are unilateral causal links between the CPI and one or more governance indicators working for other countries for France, Japan, China, India, Thailand and South Africa. In no way causalities are observed for USA, Germany and Brazil.

  5. Activities of OECD NEA CSNI PWG3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    Activities of OECD NEA are connected with IAEA-IWG LMNPP, IAEA Nuclear safety, CEC-JRC, CEC-DG XI, CEC-DG XII and utilities UNIPEDE and WANO. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) acts through working groups on Fuel Cycle safety; Operating Experiences and Human Factors; Coolant System Behaviour; Integrity of Components and Structures; Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases and Risk Assessment. Korea, Mexico, Hungary and Czech Republic are now members of OECD NEA, and the non OECD Countries like Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Lithuania can participate in workshops but not in regular committee meetings

  6. Climate change mitigation in developing countries through interregional collaboration by local governments: Japanese citizens' preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hidenori; Kato, Takaaki

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the motivation of domestic and international interregional collaboration on climate change mitigation through carbon crediting by Japanese local governments, using a social survey. The study finds balanced collaboration with domestic partner regions and developing countries is preferred in the case of collaboration, given that the unit cost of collaboration is assumed lower than that of no collaboration. Appreciation of benefits such as technology transfer and local environmental improvement in developing countries increases the preference of collaboration with developing countries. Two factors hinder Japanese local governments' collaboration with developing countries from the perspective of citizens: a sense of environmental responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions within the city and a preference for domestic orientation even if the collaboration with developing countries is less costly and has benefits of technology transfer and local environmental improvement. The preference for a lower total cost of GHG emissions reductions is confirmed except for those with a sense of environmental responsibility. The study also finds that provision of information on mitigation projects and co-benefits would increase the preference for interregional collaboration with developing countries depending on the types of collaborative project, except for those with a sense of environmental responsibility. - Highlights: → We surveyed views of Japanese citizens on interregional/international cooperation of their cities for GHG reduction. → Sense of environmental responsibility is negatively correlated with the needs for cooperation. → Information on co-benefits of collaboration would strengthen preference for cooperation.

  7. Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvanger, A.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  8. PARTICIPATORY GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS OF THE SCANDINAVIAN AND BALTIC COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanescu Aurelia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diminished trust of citizens in the public sector, the increased complexity of policy issues and the reforms in accordance with the new public management principles generate the need of focusing more extensively on participatory governance. Participatory governance can be defined as the genuine engagement of citizens and other organizations in the formulation of policies and strategies, in the decision-making process from the public sector and in the implementation of the decisions. The present paper's objectives are to define the concept of participatory governance, to argue in favor of implementing it in the public sector and to find to what extent public healthcare institutions from Scandinavian and Baltic countries publish information on participatory governance and how they perceive community engagement. The research findings are that the information on participatory governance disclosed on the websites of relevant institutions from within the Scandinavian and Baltic public healthcare systems is scarce. The countries with the greatest concern for community engagement are Denmark and Sweden. It is argued that there should be a shift in focus within the public sector in general and within the healthcare system in particular, so that citizens are genuinely involved in the relevant processes and their satisfaction is indeed at an adequate level.

  9. The analysis of the regional self-governing units forests in selected European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Lišková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on identification, analysis, description and comparison of the regional self-governing units (RSGU forests in selected European countries. The analysis deals not only with forests in the ownership of basic regional self-governing units such as villages but also with forests of higher regional self-governing unit such as regions or federated states. The identification and description of this type of ownership is not overly published in the Czech Republic. The published foreign overall studies and summaries state mainly the division into forests in public and private ownership. This article is created on the basis of the selection of relevant information sources according to corresponding key words. The methods of analysis of available literary sources, conspectus, comparison and interpretation were used to deal with the topic. The quantity of information is higher and more available within basic regional self-governing units than with higher regional self-governing units. On the basis of obtained information it can be stated that the share of forest ownership in the observed countries varies ranging from zero share in the ownership to fifty per cent share in Germany.

  10. Are the corporate governance standard in banks in the CEE countries low hanging fruit?

    OpenAIRE

    Slomka-Golebiowska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The dominance of foreign capital in banking sector in the CEE countries created vulnerabilities that have been a contributing cause of recent financial crisis in the region. The question is whether the corporate governance structure of banks seemed to constrain or rather stimulate the potential unfavourable scenario, in which the controlling investors would be improving their difficult financial situation at the cost of their subsidiaries during the financial crisis of 2008. The aim of t...

  11. The Impact of Governance on the Research Performance of European Universities in Cross-Country Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedláček Jan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concentrates on the impact of selected aspects of governance - the level of autonomy and the involvement of stakeholders in the internal governance of a university - on the research performance of universities measured by indicators of international university rankings in cross-country comparisons. The analyses are geographically situated in Europe. They follow two paths which are from the theoretical point of view based on the concepts of the principal-agent problem and stakeholder theory. Using linear regression, the author identifies statistically significant aspects of governance and compares them with results of previous studies. The findings serve as a basis for a discussion regarding how to create appropriate conditions for universities in order to improve their prospects for international success in research. The limitations of the results relating to the data, methodology and their application in the European context are discussed and general recommendations are formulated.

  12. Effects Of Governance On Corporate Ethics: A Cross-Country Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Boța-Avram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research paper empirically investigates the extent to which the quality of governance measured through six dimensions developed by World Bank has a positive influence on the corporate ethics, or in other words, the ethical behaviour of firms in their interaction with public officials, politicians and other companies. By using a dual approach, from geographical and income group classification, this study analyses data from official reports issued by World Bank and World Economic Forum for a final sample of 140 countries, trying to highlight the positive relationship that might exist between governance clusters and ethical behaviour of firms. For the purpose of the paper, a multiple regression analysis was performed. The research results confirm that there are strong positive correlations between most of the governance indicators and companies’ ethical behaviour, even if there are some differences between various geographical areas, and also between different income categories economies, in terms of the intensity of this influence.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ECONOMIC GROWTH AND GOVERNMENT SPENDING: A CASE STUDY OF OIC COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Sudarsono

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results for testing for causal relationship between economic growth and goverment spending for OIC countries covering the time series data 1970~2006. There are usually two propositions regarding the relation between economic growth and government spending: Wagner’s Law states that as GDP grows, the public sector tends to grow; and the Keynesian framework postulates that public expenditure causes GDP to grow. The primary strength and originality of this paper is that we used aggregate data as well as disaggregate data for Granger causality test. By testing for causality between economic growth and government spending, we find that government spending does cause economic growth in Iran, Nigeria and Tunisia, which are compatible with Keynesian’s theory. However, the economic growth does cause the increase in goverment spending in Algeria, Burkina Faso, Benin, Indonesia, Libya Malaysia, Marocco, and Saudi, which are well-suited with Wagner’s law.

  14. OECD migration, welfare and skill selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder; Pytlikova, Mariola; Smith, Nina

    into 27 OECD countries over the period of 12 years, 1989-2000. Using a fixed effects panel data model, we analyze the determinants of the migration flows during the latest decade. We study whether there are significant selectivity effects in international migration flows, i.e. whether the countries...

  15. Tracking development assistance and government health expenditures for 35 malaria-eliminating countries: 1990-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shretta, Rima; Zelman, Brittany; Birger, Maxwell L; Haakenstad, Annie; Singh, Lavanya; Liu, Yingying; Dieleman, Joseph

    2017-07-14

    Donor financing for malaria has declined since 2010 and this trend is projected to continue for the foreseeable future. These reductions have a significant impact on lower burden countries actively pursuing elimination, which are usually a lesser priority for donors. While domestic spending on malaria has been growing, it varies substantially in speed and magnitude across countries. A clear understanding of spending patterns and trends in donor and domestic financing is needed to uncover critical investment gaps and opportunities. Building on the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation's annual Financing Global Health research, data were collected from organizations that channel development assistance for health to the 35 countries actively pursuing malaria elimination. Where possible, development assistance for health (DAH) was categorized by spend on malaria intervention. A diverse set of data points were used to estimate government health budgets expenditure on malaria, including World Malaria Reports and government reports when available. Projections were done using regression analyses taking recipient country averages and earmarked funding into account. Since 2010, DAH for malaria has been declining for the 35 countries actively pursuing malaria elimination (from $176 million in 2010 to $62 million in 2013). The Global Fund is the largest external financier for malaria, providing 96% of the total external funding for malaria in 2013, with vector control interventions being the highest cost driver in all regions. Government expenditure on malaria, while increasing, has not kept pace with diminishing DAH or rising national GDP rates, leading to a potential gap in service delivery needed to attain elimination. Despite past gains, total financing available for malaria in elimination settings is declining. Health financing trends suggest that substantive policy interventions will be needed to ensure that malaria elimination is adequately financed and that

  16. Governance Dynamics and the Application of the Multilevel Governance Approach in Vocational Education and Training (VET) in the European Neighbourhood Countries: The Case of the ENPI South Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin Arribas, J. Manuel

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses moves towards good multilevel governance approaches in Vocational Education and Training (VET) as an effective way to improve VET policy making in transition and developing countries, focusing on the Southern Neighbourhood of the EU (ENPI South). The centralised approaches in public administration and to VET governance still…

  17. Realising local government visions for developing district heating: Experiences from a learning country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, Ruth E.; Bale, Catherine S.E.; Taylor, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    District heating (DH) has an important role to play in enabling cities to transition to low-carbon heating. Although schemes are commonplace in some countries, in ‘learning countries’ where building-level technologies make up the majority of heating systems there are numerous barriers to introducing DH. Local governments are seen as key actors in helping to create a ‘shared vision’ for DH amongst stakeholders. This study uses interviews with stakeholders from a range of sectors in the UK (an example of a learning country) to examine the visions of local actors for developing DH and the types of national policy that would support local implementation of these visions. The analysis shows that in engaging with DH development local governments seek multiple types of value. Realising this value will most likely happen by taking a long-term, planned approach to development. In contrast, national government policy is geared towards techno-economic criteria and may lead to only a minority of potential sites being developed, without realisation of wider social or environmental benefits aligned to local visions. The work highlights the importance of local strategic planning, enabled by aligned national policy, in realising the full economic, environmental and social benefits of DH. - Highlights: • Local governments are key to the development of district heating (DH). • Local government-led visions of DH seek to deliver complex value. • In the UK development is led by funding and commercial factors and is not strategic. • To enable DH, national policy must align with the vision of local actors. • Social and environmental criteria must be incorporated in decision-making.

  18. Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 211 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 211)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This paper synthesises the existing literature on human capital formation and foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. The aim is to take a bird's eye view of the complex linkages between the activities of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and policies of host developing countries. In doing so, general trends, best practices and…

  19. Governance arrangements for health systems in low-income countries: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian A; Lewin, Simon; Paulsen, Elizabeth; Ciapponi, Agustín; Opiyo, Newton; Pantoja, Tomas; Rada, Gabriel; Wiysonge, Charles S; Bastías, Gabriel; Garcia Marti, Sebastian; Okwundu, Charles I; Peñaloza, Blanca; Oxman, Andrew D

    2017-09-12

    Governance arrangements include changes in rules or processes that determine authority and accountability for health policies, organisations, commercial products and health professionals, as well as the involvement of stakeholders in decision-making. Changes in governance arrangements can affect health and related goals in numerous ways, generally through changes in authority, accountability, openness, participation and coherence. A broad overview of the findings of systematic reviews can help policymakers, their technical support staff and other stakeholders to identify strategies for addressing problems and improving the governance of their health systems. To provide an overview of the available evidence from up-to-date systematic reviews about the effects of governance arrangements for health systems in low-income countries. Secondary objectives include identifying needs and priorities for future evaluations and systematic reviews on governance arrangements and informing refinements of the framework for governance arrangements outlined in the overview. We searched Health Systems Evidence in November 2010 and PDQ Evidence up to 17 December 2016 for systematic reviews. We did not apply any date, language or publication status limitations in the searches. We included well-conducted systematic reviews of studies that assessed the effects of governance arrangements on patient outcomes (health and health behaviours), the quality or utilisation of healthcare services, resource use (health expenditures, healthcare provider costs, out-of-pocket payments, cost-effectiveness), healthcare provider outcomes (such as sick leave), or social outcomes (such as poverty, employment) and that were published after April 2005. We excluded reviews with limitations that were important enough to compromise the reliability of the findings of the review. Two overview authors independently screened reviews, extracted data and assessed the certainty of evidence using GRADE. We prepared

  20. Managing nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry: the contribution of the OECD/NEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Although the safety level of nuclear power plants in OECD countries is very satisfactory and the technologies basic to the resolution of safety issues have advanced considerably, continued nuclear safety research work is necessary to address many of the residual concerns, and it remains an important element in ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the funding levels of national Government safety research programmes have been reduced over recent years. There is concern about the ability of OECD Member countries to sustain an adequate level of nuclear safety research capability. The OECD/NEA has a key role to play in organizing reflection and exchange of information on the most efficient use of available technical resources, and in the international management of nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry. Possible initiatives are mentioned in the paper. (author)

  1. The OECD and sustainable development: A call for leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, D. [OECD, Paris, (France)

    2003-01-01

    Progress in sustainable development made by the world's developed economies since the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 is reviewed, including the range of regulatory instruments to reduce pollution and natural resource use, and the increased application of science and technology. Despite substantial progress, there are many gaps still remaining, and dealing with them is more difficult the longer the action is delayed. Some of the more serious threats remaining are the changing climate under pressure from the continued release of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the disappointing progress in reducing extreme poverty worldwide, as many of the poorest countries are left at the margin of the globalization process, unable to share in the economic benefits of open markets, technology transfer and private investments. An examination of the remaining problems reveals that the policies and practices followed by the OECD countries such as improved policy coherence and integration, increased accountability of political decisions, application of appropriate criteria to monitor progress in policy integration, citizens' involvement in developing long-term capacities in government, elimination of economically inefficient and environmentally damaging subsidies, could also be effective in the developing countries, provided that they are applied with the right level of ambition and consistency. Some OECD actions currently underway and focusing on options to deal with these problems are also described.

  2. Governança corporativa na América Latina: a relevância dos princípios da OCDE na integridade dos conselhos e autonomia dos conselheiros Corporate governance in Latin America: the relevance of OECD principles for the board's integrity and directors' independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Kitagawa

    2009-12-01

    that region (Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Chile. Among the seven principles recommended for Latin America, this work focused only on the fifth principle, which addresses the "Responsibilities of the Board" and, more specifically, the recommendations concerning the "Board's Integrity and Directors' Independence". The main objective is to evaluate companies' attitudes in relation to managers' responsibilities and supervision as a way to ensure control and the results expected by shareholders. To that end, a questionnaire expressing the major OECD governance recommendations for Latin America was designed and confronted with the laws of those four countries and the corporate practices of the companies in the sample, in order to identify additional procedures in relation to those required by legislation. Results showed that Mexico is the country with the highest rates of compliance with OECD recommendations, followed by Brazil, Argentina and Chile. In general, the major weak points are the absence of specific committees composed of at least a majority of independent directors and the prohibition of practices like previous meetings or voting instructions by shareholders to directors.

  3. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Austria 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusche, Deborah; Radinger, Thomas; Busemeyer, Marius R.; Theisens, Henno

    2016-01-01

    This report for Austria forms part of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the review is to explore how school resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school…

  4. Technical cooperation on government base with developing countries in the field of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamabe, Yutaka

    1984-01-01

    Since the summer of the last year, the problems in the relation with developing countries have been actively discussed in the Atomic Energy Commission, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum Inc., and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. As the background of this tendency, it is pointed out that Japanese nuclear industry has grown up to the level comparable with European and American counterparts and capable of advancing into the world market as the exporter of nuclear facilities, on the other hand, that Asian countries expect Japanese technical and economical power also in the field of atomic energy. In this report, the technical cooperation of the IAEA on funds, the dispatch of specialists, the supply of materials and training, the technical cooperation of Japanese International Cooperation Agency on the acceptance of trainees, the dispatch of specialists and others, and the fundamental way of thinking about the technical cooperation on government base are reported. It is very important to grasp the true needs of a partner country when a project is selected. In the cooperation, the effort of self-help by a developing country must be the major premise. (Kako, I.)

  5. 78 FR 25337 - Notice With Respect to List of Countries Denying Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ...: Date of Publication. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Pietan, International Procurement... OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Notice With Respect to List of Countries Denying Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded Airport Construction Projects AGENCY: Office of the...

  6. Government participation in mining projects: Fiscal, financial and regulatory implications for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmore, G.

    1992-01-01

    Governments of developing countries may obtain ownership participation in national mining projects in the hope of receiving greater policy control over, financial rewards from, and information about such projects. These objectives could be achieved by using their sovereign authority to tax, regulate and monitor projects more effectively. The principal problem is likely to be the administrative inability fully to enjoy rights that they lawfully possess. As such projects are nearly always controlled by foreign entities, and involve the exploitation of irreplaceable mineral wealth, they may engender feelings of suspicion and hostility. Government participation may sometimes be necessary to mitigate those feelings and to lead to more stable and successful projects. If these political objectives are fully recognized, then government participation may be structured so as to minimize any detrimental effect it might have on the fiscal and financial structure of the project. It may also prove to be a vehicle for future participation by private local interests, thereby eliminating the alien enclave feature generally characteristic of such projects. (author). 9 refs

  7. Interrelationships among Growth, Confidence and Governance in the Globalized World-An experiment of some selected countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The countries in the world in the globalized era have faced heterogeneity in challenges in managing their growth factors as well as the stake holders of such growth profiles. The political and economic turmoil of the last two decades around the world have opened the eyes of the consumers, business houses and the governments of different countries to read and follow the economic events. The paper has tried to study the causal relation and interrelationships among different growth factors like the confidence levels of the consumers and business houses, inflation, unemployment like economic factors and governance like non-economic factors over a selection of 17 countries across all continents for the period 1996-2010. Because of limited sources of data we have applied the pooled regression technique to justify our study. Confidence levels of both the consumers and business houses cause the growth rates whereas governance causes growth only under pooled data. But for individual country data we observe that in majority of the countries there are absences of causalities between the variables. It has been observed that pooled annual growth rates of GDP of the countries are significantly related to the business and consumer confidence indexes, unemployment rate, debt ratio and overall governance indicators that shows improvement over the individual country analysis where in majority of the cases there is no significant factor for growth and confidence. By segregating the entire data the study find a few countries where a few variables like BCI, stock prices and governance make significant impact upon growth rates. In majority of the countries BCI is explained by CCI, Stock prices and governance while CCI is explained by stock prices, governance and debt ratio.

  8. Analysing inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondeynaz, C.; Carmona Moreno, C.; Céspedes Lorente, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    The "Integrated Water Resources Management" principle was formally laid down at the International Conference on Water and Sustainable development in Dublin 1992. One of the main results of this conference is that improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS), being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation). These sectors influence or are influenced by the access to WSS. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC) has developed a new database (WatSan4Dev database) containing 42 indicators (called variables in this paper) from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data in developing countries. This paper describes the development of the WatSan4Dev dataset, the statistical processes needed to improve the data quality, and finally, the analysis to verify the database coherence is presented. Based on 25 relevant variables, the relationships between variables are described and organised into five factors (HDP - Human Development against Poverty, AP - Human Activity Pressure on water resources, WR - Water Resources, ODA - Official Development Aid, CEC - Country Environmental Concern). Linear regression methods are used to identify key variables having influence on water supply and sanitation. First analysis indicates that the informal urbanisation development is an important factor negatively influencing the percentage of the population having access to WSS. Health, and in particular children's health, benefits from the improvement of WSS. Irrigation is also enhancing Water Supply service thanks to multi-purpose infrastructure. Five country profiles are also created to deeper understand and synthetize the amount of information gathered. This new

  9. Analysing inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dondeynaz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The "Integrated Water Resources Management" principle was formally laid down at the International Conference on Water and Sustainable development in Dublin 1992. One of the main results of this conference is that improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS, being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation. These sectors influence or are influenced by the access to WSS. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission (EC has developed a new database (WatSan4Dev database containing 42 indicators (called variables in this paper from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data in developing countries. This paper describes the development of the WatSan4Dev dataset, the statistical processes needed to improve the data quality, and finally, the analysis to verify the database coherence is presented. Based on 25 relevant variables, the relationships between variables are described and organised into five factors (HDP – Human Development against Poverty, AP – Human Activity Pressure on water resources, WR – Water Resources, ODA – Official Development Aid, CEC – Country Environmental Concern. Linear regression methods are used to identify key variables having influence on water supply and sanitation. First analysis indicates that the informal urbanisation development is an important factor negatively influencing the percentage of the population having access to WSS. Health, and in particular children's health, benefits from the improvement of WSS. Irrigation is also enhancing Water Supply service thanks to multi-purpose infrastructure. Five country profiles are also created to deeper understand and synthetize the amount of information gathered

  10. Impact of global health governance on country health systems: the case of HIV initiatives in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Charles Chikodili; Homedes, Nuria

    2015-06-01

    Three global health initiatives (GHIs) - the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the World Bank Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program - finance most HIV services in Nigeria. Critics assert that GHIs burden fragile health systems in resource-poor countries and that health system limitations in these countries constrain the achievement of the objectives of GHIs. This study analyzed interactions between HIV GHIs and the Nigerian Health System and explored how the impact of the GHIs could be optimized. A country case study was conducted using qualitative methods, including: semi-structured interviews, direct observation, and archival review. Semi-structured interviews were held with key informants selected to reach a broad range of stakeholders including policymakers, program managers, service providers, representatives of donor agencies and their implementing partners; the WHO country office in Nigeria; independent consultants; and civil society organizations involved in HIV work. The fieldwork was conducted between June and August 2013. HIV GHIs have had a mixed impact on the health system. They have enhanced availability of and access to HIV services, improved quality of services, and strengthened health information systems and the role of non-state actors in health care. On the negative end, HIV donor funding has increased dependency on foreign aid, widened disparities in access to HIV services, done little to address the sustainability of the services, crowded out non-HIV health services, and led to the development of a parallel supply management system. They have also not invested significantly in the production of new health workers and have not addressed maldistribution problems, but have rather contributed to internal brain drain by luring health workers from the public sector to non-governmental organizations and have increased workload for existing health workers. There is poor policy direction

  11. Explaining convergence of oecd welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, C.; Starke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of conditional convergence helps to both better describe and explain the phenomenon. By applying error correction models, we examine conditional convergence of various types of social expenditure in 21 OECD countries between 1980 and 2005. Our empirical findings go beyond the existing literature in two respects...

  12. Digital technology for health sector governance in low and middle income countries: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, Isaac; Cookson, Tara Patricia; Pagliari, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Poor governance impedes the provision of equitable and cost-effective health care in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although systemic problems such as corruption and inefficiency have been characterized as intractable, "good governance" interventions that promote transparency, accountability and public participation have yielded encouraging results. Mobile phones and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are beginning to play a role in these interventions, but little is known about their use and effects in the context of LMIC health care. Multi-stage scoping review: Research questions and scope were refined through a landscape scan of relevant implementation activities and by analyzing related concepts in the literature. Relevant studies were identified through iterative Internet searches (Google, Google Scholar), a systematic search of academic databases (PubMed, Web of Science), social media crowdsourcing (targeted LinkedIn and Twitter appeals) and reading reference lists and websites of relevant organizations. Parallel expert interviews helped to verify concepts and emerging findings and identified additional studies for inclusion. Results were charted, analyzed thematically and summarized. We identified 34 articles from a wide range of disciplines and sectors, including 17 published research articles and 17 grey literature reports. Analysis of these articles revealed 15 distinct ways of using ICTs for good governance activities in LMIC health care. These use cases clustered into four conceptual categories: 1) gathering and verifying information on services to improve transparency and auditability 2) aggregating and visualizing data to aid communication and decision making 3) mobilizing citizens in reporting poor practices to improve accountability and quality and 4) automating and auditing processes to prevent fraud. Despite a considerable amount of implementation activity, we identified little formal evaluative research

  13. CSNI post-Fukushima activity on filtered containment venting systems: status in OECD countries and guidance for improvements and future designs - 15008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemain, D.; Guentay, S.; Basu, S.; Sonnenkalb, M.; Lebel, L.; Allelein, H.J.; Liebana, B.; Eckardt, B.; Ammirabile, L.

    2015-01-01

    Stress tests performed after the Fukushima' s accident have led many countries to consider the implementation of Filtered Containment Venting Systems (FCVS) and strategies at their Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). Where not earlier applied, this could be considered as part of severe accident management (SAM) measures to enhance the response capability to severe accident (SA) situations. In addition, some countries are considering upgrading existing FCVS and their operation procedures for safe and reliable use in conditions which were not necessarily fully addressed at their design stage (e.g., robustness to hazards and hydrogen combustion loads, prolonged or repetitive use during a SA and manual operation without power supply). The CSNI report details safety design and qualification requirements for FCVS, FCV strategies for emergency operating procedures and SAM domains, implemented filtration technologies, performed source term evaluations in view of FCVS and provides guidance for the improvement of existing systems and for the design of future systems. Main outcomes of the report are presented in this paper

  14. Digital technology for health sector governance in low and middle income countries: a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, Isaac; Cookson, Tara Patricia; Pagliari, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor governance impedes the provision of equitable and cost–effective health care in many low– and middle–income countries (LMICs). Although systemic problems such as corruption and inefficiency have been characterized as intractable, “good governance” interventions that promote transparency, accountability and public participation have yielded encouraging results. Mobile phones and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are beginning to play a role in these interventions, but little is known about their use and effects in the context of LMIC health care. Methods Multi–stage scoping review: Research questions and scope were refined through a landscape scan of relevant implementation activities and by analyzing related concepts in the literature. Relevant studies were identified through iterative Internet searches (Google, Google Scholar), a systematic search of academic databases (PubMed, Web of Science), social media crowdsourcing (targeted LinkedIn and Twitter appeals) and reading reference lists and websites of relevant organizations. Parallel expert interviews helped to verify concepts and emerging findings and identified additional studies for inclusion. Results were charted, analyzed thematically and summarized. Results We identified 34 articles from a wide range of disciplines and sectors, including 17 published research articles and 17 grey literature reports. Analysis of these articles revealed 15 distinct ways of using ICTs for good governance activities in LMIC health care. These use cases clustered into four conceptual categories: 1) gathering and verifying information on services to improve transparency and auditability 2) aggregating and visualizing data to aid communication and decision making 3) mobilizing citizens in reporting poor practices to improve accountability and quality and 4) automating and auditing processes to prevent fraud. Despite a considerable amount of implementation activity, we identified

  15. Governance arrangements for health systems in low-income countries: an overview of systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian A; Lewin, Simon; Paulsen, Elizabeth; Ciapponi, Agustín; Opiyo, Newton; Pantoja, Tomas; Rada, Gabriel; Wiysonge, Charles S; Bastías, Gabriel; Garcia Marti, Sebastian; Okwundu, Charles I; Peñaloza, Blanca; Oxman, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Background Governance arrangements include changes in rules or processes that determine authority and accountability for health policies, organisations, commercial products and health professionals, as well as the involvement of stakeholders in decision-making. Changes in governance arrangements can affect health and related goals in numerous ways, generally through changes in authority, accountability, openness, participation and coherence. A broad overview of the findings of systematic reviews can help policymakers, their technical support staff and other stakeholders to identify strategies for addressing problems and improving the governance of their health systems. Objectives To provide an overview of the available evidence from up-to-date systematic reviews about the effects of governance arrangements for health systems in low-income countries. Secondary objectives include identifying needs and priorities for future evaluations and systematic reviews on governance arrangements and informing refinements of the framework for governance arrangements outlined in the overview. Methods We searched Health Systems Evidence in November 2010 and PDQ Evidence up to 17 December 2016 for systematic reviews. We did not apply any date, language or publication status limitations in the searches. We included well-conducted systematic reviews of studies that assessed the effects of governance arrangements on patient outcomes (health and health behaviours), the quality or utilisation of healthcare services, resource use (health expenditures, healthcare provider costs, out-of-pocket payments, cost-effectiveness), healthcare provider outcomes (such as sick leave), or social outcomes (such as poverty, employment) and that were published after April 2005. We excluded reviews with limitations that were important enough to compromise the reliability of the findings of the review. Two overview authors independently screened reviews, extracted data and assessed the certainty of evidence

  16. Determinants of efficiency in reducing child mortality in developing countries. The role of inequality and government effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Bienvenido; Sanjuán, Jesús; Casquero, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The main aim of this article was to analyze the relationship of income inequality and government effectiveness with differences in efficiency in the use of health inputs to improve the under-five survival rate (U5SR) in developing countries. Robust Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and regression analysis were conducted using data for 47 developing countries for the periods 2000-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2012. The estimations show that countries with a more equal income distribution and better government effectiveness (i.e. a more competent bureaucracy and good quality public service delivery) may need fewer health inputs to achieve a specific level of the U5SR than other countries with higher inequality and worse government effectiveness.

  17. Linking governance mechanisms to health outcomes: a review of the literature in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Dana Karen; Vian, Taryn; Maurer, Lydia; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature to shed light on links between governance mechanisms and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Our review yielded 30 studies, highlighting four key governance mechanisms by which governance may influence health outcomes in these settings: Health system decentralization that enables responsiveness to local needs and values; health policymaking that aligns and empowers diverse stakeholders; enhanced community engagement; and strengthened social capital. Most, but not all, studies found a positive association between governance and health. Additionally, the nature of the association between governance mechanisms and health differed across studies. In some studies (N = 9), the governance effect was direct and positive, while in others (N = 5), the effect was indirect or modified by contextual factors. In still other studies (N = 4), governance was found to have a moderating effect, indicating that governance mechanisms influenced other system processes or structures that improved health. The remaining studies reported mixed findings about the association between governance and health (N = 6), no association between governance and health (N = 4), or had inconclusive results (N = 2). Further exploration is needed to fully understand the relationship between governance and health and to inform the design and delivery of evidence-based, effective governance interventions around the world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategic and institutional effects on foreign IPO performance : Examining the impact of country of origin, corporate governance, and host country effects

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Curt B.; Bell, R. Greg; Filatotchev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    By integrating signaling research with an institutional perspective we examine how country of origin, corporate governance, and host market effects impact foreign IPO performance. Using a sample of 202 foreign IPOs listed in the U.S. or U.K in 2002-2007 results indicate both the legal environment surrounding these organizations in their countries of origin and board independence impact the success of foreign firms at IPO. However, the institutional environment of the chosen IPO...

  19. Modelling Inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries with Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondeynaz, C.; Lopez-Puga, J.; Carmona-Moreno, C.

    2012-04-01

    Improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS), being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation). This inter-dependency has been recognised with the adoption of the "Integrated Water Resources Management" principles that push for the integration of these various dimensions involved in WSS delivery to ensure an efficient and sustainable management. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector in particular in developing countries where WSS still represent an important leverage for livelihood improvement. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has developed a coherent database (WatSan4Dev database) containing 29 indicators from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data focusing on developing countries (Celine et al, 2011 under publication). The aim of this work is to model the WatSan4Dev dataset using probabilistic models to identify the key variables influencing or being influenced by the water supply and sanitation access levels. Bayesian Network Models are suitable to map the conditional dependencies between variables and also allows ordering variables by level of influence on the dependent variable. Separated models have been built for water supply and for sanitation because of different behaviour. The models are validated if complying with statistical criteria but either with scientific knowledge and literature. A two steps approach has been adopted to build the structure of the model; Bayesian network is first built for each thematic cluster of variables (e.g governance, agricultural pressure, or human development) keeping a detailed level for interpretation later one. A global model is then built based on significant indicators of each cluster being previously modelled. The structure of the

  20. Strong nutrition governance is a key to addressing nutrition transition in low and middle-income countries: review of countries' nutrition policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Ong, Ken I C; Dhakal, Sumi; Mlunde, Linda B; Shibanuma, Akira; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2014-06-27

    Nutrition transition necessitates low and middle-income countries (LAMICs) to scale up their efforts in addressing the burdens of undernutrition and overweight/obesity. Magnitudes of undernutrition and overweight are high in LAMICs, but no study has reviewed the existence of nutrition policies to address it. No evidence is also available on the effect of nutrition policies and governance on the undernutrition and overweight/obesity patterns in such countries. We conducted a policy review to examine the presence and associations of nutrition policies and governance with the children's nutrition statuses in LAMICs. We reviewed nutrition policies, nutrition governance, and the trends of nutrition status from LAMICs. We retrieved data on the policies from the global database on the implementation of nutrition actions (GINA). We also retrieved data on the trends of nutrition status and nutrition governance from the nutrition landscape information system (NLiS), and on LAMICs from the World Bank database. We then analyzed the data both descriptively and by using a mixed effects model with random-intercept by country. Of the 139 LAMICs reviewed, only 39.6% had policies to address both undernutrition and overweight/obesity. A higher proportion of low-income countries (LICs) had policies to address undernutrition compared to that of middle-income countries (MICs) (86.1% vs. 63.1%, p = 0.002), and a low proportion of both had policy to address overweight. Having a nutrition policy that addresses undernutrition was not associated with better nutrition status outcomes. Strong nutrition governance in LAMICS was associated with low magnitudes of stunting (beta = -4.958, p = 0.015); wasting (beta = -5.418, p = 0.003); and underweight (beta = -6.452, p = 0.001). Despite high magnitudes of undernutrition and overweight/obesity in LAMICs, only about one third of them had nutrition policies to address such nutrition transition. Having strong nutrition governance may help to bring

  1. Housing market volatility in the OECD area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    Vector-autoregressive models are used to decompose housing returns in 18 OECD countries into cash flow (rent) news and discount rate (return) news over the period 1970-2011. For the jajority of countries news about future returns is the main driver, and both real interest rates and risk-premia play...... an important role in accounting for housing market volatility. Bivariate cross-country correlations and principal components analyses indicate that part of the return movements have a common factor among the majority of countries. We explain the results in terms of global changes in credit constraints...

  2. Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li-Lin; Mirelman, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    A consensus exists that rising income levels and technological development are among key drivers of total health spending. Determinants of public sector health expenditure, by contrast, are less well understood. This study examines a complex relationship across government health expenditure (GHE), sociopolitical risks, and international aid, while taking into account the impacts of national income, debt and tax financing and aging populations on health spending. We apply a fixed-effects two-stage least squares regression method to a panel dataset comprising 120 countries for the years 1995 through 2010. Our results show that democratic accountability has a diminishing positive correlation with GHE, and that levels of GHE are higher when government is more stable. Corruption is associated with less GHE in developing countries, but with higher GHE in developed countries. We also find that development assistance for health (DAH) is fungible with domestically financed government health expenditure (DGHE). For an average country, a 1% increase in DAH to government is associated with a 0.03-0.04% decrease in DGHE. Furthermore, the degree of fungibility of DAH to government is higher in countries where corruption or ethnic tensions are widespread. However, DAH to non-governmental organizations is not fungible with DGHE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  4. International Models and Domestic Translations? The Case of University Governing Boards in Romania and Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králiková, Renáta

    2015-01-01

    In the early 2000s, several post-communist countries launched reforms of university management and governance marked by the influence of a "modernization agenda" for higher education governance, which was promoted by the World Bank, the OECD and the European Commission. However, this "modernization agenda" was employed…

  5. Eesti loodab peagi OECD liikmekutset / Sirje Rank

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rank, Sirje, 1966-

    2010-01-01

    OECD on Eesti hindamisel jõudnud lõppjärku, liitumiskutset on oodata maikuus. OECD-le pakub huvi Eesti reformikogemus, e-valitsusega seonduv, oodatud on Eesti seisukohad OECD liitumiskõnelustel Venemaaga. OECD tegevusest

  6. A Typology of Benefit Sharing Arrangements for the Governance of Social-Ecological Systems in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimo Abraham. Nkhata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores and interprets relevant literature to construct a typology of benefit sharing arrangements for the governance of social-ecological systems in developing countries. The typology comprises three generic categories of benefit sharing arrangements: collaborative, market-oriented, and egalitarian. We contend that the three categories provide a useful basis for exploring and classifying the different societal arrangements required for governance of social-ecological systems. The typology we present is founded on a related set of explicit assumptions that can be used to explore and better understand the linkages among ecosystem services, benefit sharing, and governance. Issues that are strongly related to sustainability in developing countries form the core basis of our assumptions. Our aim is not to write a definitive exposition, but to spark debate and engage ongoing dialogue on governance and benefit sharing in the field of social-ecological systems.

  7. Practical application of corporate governance principles in a developing country: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Wanjiru Gachie; Desmond Wesley Govender

    2017-01-01

    The importance of examining corporate governance in organisations cannot be overemphasised. Corporate governance failure which has resulted from weak corporate governance systems has highlighted the need for research aimed at contributing to the improvement and reform of corporate governance at business, national and international level. A review of corporate governance mechanisms and their practical application in two retail companies in South Africa was undertaken. The research question tha...

  8. 19 CFR 356.7 - Request to determine when the Government of a FTA country received notice of a scope determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Request to determine when the Government of a FTA... determine when the Government of a FTA country received notice of a scope determination. (a) Pursuant to... writing from the Department the date on which the Government of a FTA country received notice of a scope...

  9. School-to-Work Transitions in the OECD: Do Education Systems Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom

    2017-01-01

    High unemployment among the young is a concern in many OECD countries. A key issue for policy makers is whether the education system has a role to play in assisting the transition from education to work or whether economic issues dominate. This paper uses OECD country-level data to see whether the structure of countries' education systems,…

  10. Groundwater socio-ecology and governance: a review of institutions and policies in selected countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Aditi; Shah, Tushaar

    2005-03-01

    Groundwater is crucial for the livelihoods and food security of millions of people, and yet, knowledge formation in the field of groundwater has remained asymmetrical. While, scientific knowledge in the discipline (hydrology and hydrogeology) has advanced remarkably, relatively little is known about the socio-economic impacts and institutions that govern groundwater use. This paper therefore has two objectives. The first is to provide a balanced view of the plus and the down side of groundwater use, especially in agriculture. In doing so, examples are drawn from countries such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, China, Spain and Mexico—all of which make very intensive use of groundwater. Second, institutions and policies that influence groundwater use are analyzed in order to understand how groundwater is governed in these countries and whether successful models of governance could be replicated elsewhere. Finally, the authors argue that there is a need for a paradigm shift in the way groundwater is presently perceived and managed—from management to governance mode. In this attempt, a number of instruments such as direct regulation, indirect policy levers, livelihood adaptation and people's participation will have to be deployed simultaneously in a quest for better governance. L'eau souterraine est cruciale pour la survie et la sécurité alimentaire de plusieurs millions de personnes mais cependant la foramtion en matière d'eaux souterraines reste asymmétrique. Alors que la connaissance scientifique dans la discipline (hydrologie et hydrogéologie) a avancée de manière remarquable, on connaît peu de choses sur les impacts socio-économiques et les institutions qui gouvernent l'utilisation des eaux souterraines. Cet article a par conséquent deux objectifs. Le premier est d'assurer un point de vue balancé entre le côté positif et le côté négatif de l'utilisation de l'eau souterraine, spécialement en agriculture. De cette manière, des exemples d

  11. Associations of government health expenditures, the supply of health care professionals, and country literacy with prenatal care use in ten West African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Yhenneko J; Laditka, Sarah B; Laditka, James N; Brunner Huber, Larissa R; Racine, Elizabeth F

    2017-03-01

    Social and health care context may influence prenatal care use. We studied associations of government health expenditures, supply of health care professionals, and country literacy rates with prenatal care use in ten West African countries, controlling for individual factors. We used data from Demographic and Health Surveys (n = 58,512) and random effect logistic regression models to estimate the likelihood of having any prenatal care and adequate prenatal care. Each percentage increase in the literacy rate was associated with 4% higher odds of having adequate prenatal care (p = .029). Higher literacy rates among women may help to promote adequate prenatal care.

  12. The role of investor protection in corporate governance and accounting harmonization: Cross-country analysis in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Wardhani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to analyze the effect of law system for investor protection on implementation of corporate governance at company level and degree of convergence of local accounting standards to IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standards. The result shows that investor protection has positive effect on implementation of corporate governance and degree of convergence of local standard to IFRS. The evidence is consistent with the argument that firm can establish law environment well for their own, but the quality of corporate investor protection via implementation of corporate governance mechanisms will depend on efficiency of judicial system of the country where the firm operates; and the quality of accounting standard in one country is a signal of country’s commitment to investor protection in order to provide good protection for its investor; a country will tend to adopt higher quality of accounting standard to ensure financial reporting transparency. This indicates that investor protection can be the key to the quality of other governance mechanisms, both at institutional level such as accounting standards, and also at firm level such as corporate governance implementation.

  13. An Investigation of the Influence of the Worldwide Governance and Competitiveness on Accounting Fraud Cases: A Cross-Country Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeea Sadaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how worldwide governance, global competiveness, and other institutional determinants have influenced the number of accounting fraud cases in several countries. The researchers have focused more closely on the importance of ‘good governance’ as one of the indicators of development objectives in itself. The institutional perspective is employed to explain the complexity of frauds in different societies which can be compatible for the purposes of international judgments in order to increase the effectiveness of previous forensic accounting theories. In this paper, a linear regression model is tested where governance, competitiveness, and other institutional variables are associated with a measure of accounting fraud cases. From our results, we can merely claim that an increased level of controlled corruption and political stability might reduce the number of fraud cases in various countries, while more effective and independent governance services with a higher freedom of expression seemed to increase them. The existence of accounting crimes also appeared to be a suitable proxy of better competitiveness. Anglo-Saxon countries have more stated fraud cases than other countries, attributed, perhaps, to the finest commercial courts with the most professional and least corrupt judges in the world, with centuries of precedent cases and experience in dealing with fraud. Moreover, we believe that a better understanding of fraud detection is a potentially important element in forensic accounting analytics in the success of governance policies to enhance development and reduce the risk of bankruptcies related to the reported fraud cases of enterprises.

  14. OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is both the oldest and the only one still in operation of the three major joint undertakings established at the inception of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. This publication has been printed in connection with its twenty-fifth anniversary as an international project. After presentation of the history and organization of the project, a thorough description of the past and present activities in the field of fuel performance and process control and surveillance is given. The projects's fuel testing programme is now focuessed on an investigation to define safety margins under normal operations as well as under various kinds of accident situations. Fuel research is also concerned with the characterisation of long term effects with regard to efficiency, operational safety and mapping of reliability and durability in the case of accidents with loss of coolant. In the field of process control and surveillance, research work is directly linked to the use of computers and colour graphics as tools in the control room. A fullscale simulator-based model and experimental control room has been constructed. The first experiments to be carried out in this laboratory will investigate the advantage of analysing alarms before they are presented to the operator. (RF)

  15. Confidence in Government and Attitudes toward Bribery: A Country-Cluster Analysis of Demographic and Religiosity Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Benk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we try to classify the countries by the levels of confidence in government and attitudes toward accepting bribery by using the data of the sixth wave (2010–2014 of the World Values Survey (WVS. We are also interested in which demographic, attitudinal, and religiosity variables affect each class of countries. For these purposes cluster analysis, linear regression analysis, and ordered logistic regression analysis were used. The study found that countries could be grouped into two clusters which had varying levels of opposition to bribe taking and confidence in government. Another finding was that certain demographic, attitudinal, and religiosity variables that were significant in one cluster might not be significant in another cluster.

  16. OECD/NEA thermochemical database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Kee Hoh; Song, Dae Yong; Shin, Hyun Kyoo; Park, Seong Won; Ro, Seung Gy

    1998-03-01

    This state of the art report is to introduce the contents of the Chemical Data-Service, OECD/NEA, and the results of survey by OECD/NEA for the thermodynamic and kinetic database currently in use. It is also to summarize the results of Thermochemical Database Projects of OECD/NEA. This report will be a guide book for the researchers easily to get the validate thermodynamic and kinetic data of all substances from the available OECD/NEA database. (author). 75 refs.

  17. Determinants of government HIV/AIDS financing: a 10-year trend analysis from 125 low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Carlos; Loncar, Dejan; Amico, Peter; De Lay, Paul

    2013-07-19

    Trends and predictors of domestic spending from public sources provide national authorities and international donors with a better understanding of the HIV financing architecture, the fulfillment of governments' commitments and potential for long-term sustainability. We analyzed government financing of HIV using evidence from country reports on domestic spending. Panel data from 2000 to 2010 included information from 647 country-years amongst 125 countries. A random-effects model was used to analyze ten year trends and identify independent predictors of public HIV spending. Low- and middle-income countries spent US$ 2.1 billion from government sources in 2000, growing to US$ 6.6 billion in 2010, a three-fold increase. Per capita spending in 2010 ranged from 5 cents in low-level HIV epidemics in the Middle East to US$ 32 in upper-middle income countries with generalized HIV epidemics in Southern Africa. The average domestic public spending per capita was US$ 2.55. The analysis found that GDP per capita and HIV prevalence are positively associated with increasing levels of HIV-spending from public sources; a 10 percent increase in HIV prevalence is associated with a 2.5 percent increase in domestic funding for HIV. Additionally, a 10 percent increase in GDP per capita is associated with an 11.49 percent increase in public spending for HIV and these associations were highly significant. Domestic resources in low- and middle-income countries showed a threefold increase between 2000 and 2010 and currently support 50 percent of the global response with 41 percent coming from sub-Saharan Africa. Domestic spending in LMICs was associated with increased economic growth and an increased burden of HIV. Sustained increases in funding for HIV from public sources were observed in all regions and emphasize the increasing importance of government financing.

  18. Status report on developments and cooperation on risk-informed inservice-inspection and non-destructive testing (NDT) qualification in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanberg, Lars

    2005-01-01

    presented at the Workshop have been published in the proceedings referenced NEA/CSNI/R(2004)9. The two reports along with the NRWG-report EUR 21320 are the main source of information for this Status Report on Developments and Cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service-Inspection and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification in OECD-NEA member countries. The report is organized in the following way: introduction to early ISI strategies and Augmented ISI and NDT Qualification; Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI): Development of RI-ISI strategies, RI-ISI Regulatory guidance, Important aspects of RI-ISI, Overview of RI-ISI methods, Comparison of methods, Overview of RI-ISI applications and pilot studies, RI-ISI experience so far, Further evaluations and developments of RI-ISI methodologies; Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification: Development of NDT qualification strategies, NDT-qualification requirements and applications, NDT-qualification experience. Conclusions and recommendations are then given

  19. Practical application of corporate governance principles in a developing country: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjiru Gachie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of examining corporate governance in organisations cannot be overemphasised. Corporate governance failure which has resulted from weak corporate governance systems has highlighted the need for research aimed at contributing to the improvement and reform of corporate governance at business, national and international level. A review of corporate governance mechanisms and their practical application in two retail companies in South Africa was undertaken. The research question that informed the study was: What is the nature of corporate governance mechanisms in the South African retail sector? The research design entailed analysis of secondary data, namely Annual Reports and other pertinent documents, and document analysis was used to show what is accessible to the ordinary share/stake-holder and what is not. Data analysis was conducted both qualitatively and quantitatively. With regard to corporate governance mechanisms, the results and discussion show that the two companies have not yet complied with the King II and III codes. Recommended strategies to strengthen corporate governance mechanisms in the South African retail sector should include a commitment to risk disclosure and revamping of the corporate governance structure of the ‘whole’ system.

  20. Business-Government Relationship in European Post-Transition Countries: Do Innovators Get the Worse End of a Stick?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerija BOTRIĆ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-transition countries struggle in their attempt to catch-up the more advanced market economies with more or less success. Simultaneously, the business performance of the countries whose innovation indicators lag behind the desired levels seems relatively poor. Often emphasized problems in post-transition countries regard the relations of fi rms with government institutions. We analyze perceptions of innovative and non-innovative fi rms in dealing with government offi cials, aiming to explore if these two groups of fi rms share similar experiences with tax administration, business licensing and courts offi cials. The analysis is focused on 17 European post-transition countries that are either EU members or accession countries. The results reveal that corrected for selection mechanism, innovative fi rms do not perceive courts as an obstacle to their business activities more than non-innovative fi rms, although they seem to participate more in court-related procedures. Furthermore, innovative fi rms in these countries are more likely to perceive licensing and tax administration as obstacles to their business. Thus, specifi c policy measures aimed at creating positive business environment should be designed in order to enhance innovation activities and support long-term growth prospects.

  1. The formal-informal patient payment mix in European countries. Governance, economics, culture or all of these?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambor, Marzena; Pavlova, Milena; Golinowska, Stanisława; Sowada, Christoph; Groot, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Cost-sharing for health care is high on the policy agenda in many European countries that struggle with deficits in their public budget. However, such policy often meets with public opposition, which might delay or even prevent its implementation. Increased reliance on patient payments may also have adverse equity effects, especially in countries where informal patient payments are widespread. The factors which might influence the presence of both, formal and informal payments can be found in economic, governance and cultural differences between countries. The aim of this paper is to review the formal-informal payment mix in Europe and to outline factors associated with this mix. We use quantitative analyses of macro-data for 35 European countries and a qualitative description of selected country experiences. The results suggest that the presence of obligatory cost-sharing for health care services is associated with governance factors, while informal patient payments are a multi-cause phenomenon. A consensus-based policy, supported by evidence and stakeholders' engagement, might contribute to a more sustainable patient payment policy. In some European countries, the implementation of cost-sharing requires policy actions to reduce other patient payment obligations, including measures to eliminate informal payments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancement in M-Government and mobile computing in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available to the government and the community at large. In this paper, we provide an introduction to the application and new enhancement of mobile technologies and mobile computing in technical government systems. Mobile devices allow allows every citizens to access...

  3. PEPFAR Investments In Governance And Health Systems Were One-Fifth Of Countries' Budgeted Funds, 2004-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucheraud, Corrina; Sparkes, Susan; Nakamura, Yoriko; Gage, Anna; Atun, Rifat; Bossert, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Launched in 2003, the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is the largest disease-focused assistance program in the world. We analyzed PEPFAR budgets for governance and systems for the period 2004-14 to ascertain whether PEPFAR's stated emphasis on strengthening health systems has been manifested financially. The main outcome variable in our analysis, the first of its kind using these data, was the share of PEPFAR's total annual budget for a country that was designated for governance and systems. The share of planned PEPFAR funding for governance and systems increased from 14.9 percent, on average, in 2004 to 27.5 percent in 2013, but it declined in 2014 to 20.8 percent. This study shows that the size of a country's PEPFAR budget was negatively associated with the share allocated for governance and systems (compared with other budget program areas); it also shows that there was no significant relationship between budgets for governance and systems and HIV prevalence. It is crucial for the global health policy community to better understand how such investments are allocated and used for health systems strengthening. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. The effect of the downturn in oil prices on the relative efficiency of government expenditure in the GCC countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, M.M.; Perera, N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper tests a control model to discover the effect of the decline in oil prices on the relative efficiency of government expenditure in the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council. The econometric analysis shows that as a consequence of the decline in oil prices, the GCC countries need a relatively higher proportional rate of growth in their government expenditure to maintain a given percentage of income growth in the long run. This may, however, prove difficult, which necessitates greater reliance on other means of control. (author)

  5. How Taxes Can Contribute to The Implementation of The Public Governance Strategy? – An Analysis for Eastern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper begins with a short literature review regarding the public governance concept in the EU approach and its methods for establishing a common way to manage different situations for all member states; we discovered that the problems they confront with have to do with good governance and qualitative public administration. In the second part, we developed an econometric model for three Eastern European countries and we found a strong correlation between the total revenues from taxes and social contributions and total gross debt in 2002-2014 period. We ended the paper by emphasizing the conclusions obtained.

  6. Are performances in Governance Indicators Complementary to Corruption Abatement?: A Cross-Country Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Chandra Das; Kamal Ray

    2015-01-01

    Private use of public office for private gain could be a tentative connotation of corruption and most distasteful event of corruption is that it is not there, nor that it is pervasive, but it is socially acknowledged in the global economy, especially in the developing nations. In the present paper we attempt to assess the interrelationship between the Corruption perception index (CPI) and the principal components of governance indicators as per World Bank Governance Indicators like Control of...

  7. OECD Skills Outlook 2013: First Results from the Survey of Adult Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This first "OECD Skills Outlook" presents the initial results of the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), which evaluates the skills of adults in 22 OECD member countries and two partner countries. The PIAAC survey was designed to provide insights into the availability of some key skills and how they are used at work and at home through the…

  8. Estonia to join OECD / Ella Karapetyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2010-01-01

    2010. aasta kevadel tehakse otsus Eesti liitumise kohta OECD-ga. Välisminister Urmas Paet ja OECD peasekretär Angel Gurria allkirjastasid Pariisis privileegide ja immuniteetide lepingu. OECD liikmed

  9. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the nineteenth annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities at the Project during 1978, the last year of the 1976-1978 Halden Agreement. Work continued in two main fields: test fuel irradiation and fuel research, and computer-based process supervision and control. Project research on water reactor fuel focusses on various aspects of fuel behavior under normal, and off-normal transient conditions. In 1978, participating organisations continued to submit test fuel for irradiation in the Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, in instrumented test assemblies designed and manufactured by the Project. Work included analysis of the impact of fuel design and reactor operating conditions on fuel cladding behavior. Fuel performance modelling included characterization of thermal and mechanical behavior at high burn-up, of fuel failure modes, and improvement of data qualification procedures to reduce and quantify error bands on in-reactor measurements. Instrument development yielded new or improved designs for measuring rod temperature, internal pressure, axial neutron flux shape determination, and for detecting cladding defects. Work on computer-based methods of reactor supervision and control included continued development of a system for predictive core surveillance, and of special mathematical methods for core power distribution control

  10. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1975 are summarized. The period under review is the last year of the three year joint programme which commenced on 1st January, 1973. The main items reported upon are: process supervision and control, test fuel irradiation and fuel research, reactor operations, and administration and finance. The process supervision and control work has been concentrated in two fields: methods development for core surveillance and control, and systems development for operator-process communication. As for fuel test, investigations of the densification phenomenon have continued through irradiations to a maximum of about 16000MWd/tUO 2 . Axial and radial deformations of fuel rods are studied, with the effect of power transients upon the dimensional stability of fuel rods, and fuel-cladding heat transfer and fuel temperature. Thermal models for steady state and transient heat transfer in fuel rods have been developed and the work on thermomechanical models of claddings shows considerable promise

  11. The role of government spending on economic growth in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Oladele

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The issue of whether government expenditure helps or hinders economic growth is still debatable. This study examines the contribution of government spending towards economic growth in South Africa using annual data from 1980 – 2014. The cointegration approach and Vector Error Correction Model were used to analyse the data. The cointegration test results indicate that there is long run relationship between government expenditure and economic growth in South Africa. The VECM outcome indicates a positive and significant link between economic growth and expenditure on the long run. There is a positive and significant relationship between exchange rate and economic growth and a significant and negative relationship between economic growth and private consumption. Based on these findings, the correlation between government expenditure and economic growth showed that there is positive relationship on the long run in South Africa, while there is a negative and significant relationship between government spending and economic growth on the short run. More spending should therefore be directed towards important sectors such as infrastructural development and industrial development in order to accelerate economic growth. There is also a need for fiscal policy to be used as an instrument to regulate the amount of money in the economy.

  12. Establishment of audit committees in government ministries of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndeshipewa Johanna Akwenye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The underlying study to this paper attempts to establish to what extent audit committees in government ministries in Namibia have been established as a requirement for enhanced quality of service delivery and accountability to taxpayers A qualitative approach was followed, where questionnaires or an interviews were conducted with accounting officers in government ministries. Content and thematic analyses were used to formulate narratives based on the understanding of similarities and differences in respondents’ experiences, views and perceptions. The study shows that from the 17 ministries that responded, only 2 ministries have established audit committees. Confirmatory, there is currently no legislature that makes it mandatory for government ministries in Namibia to establish audit committees within their respective constituencies. There are no formal audit committee terms and references or an audit committee charters are in place. Government ministries in Namibia seem to not have adopted best national and international governance practices with respect to the establishment of audit committees within their ministries. There is a need for a clear guidance as to how audit committees must be established; the composition of the committee members, the terms of office of committee members and remuneration, to mention a few

  13. An analysis of government immunization program expenditures in lower and lower middle income countries 2006-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Alice Abou; de Quadros, Ciro; Politi, Claudio; McQuestion, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Financing is becoming increasingly important as the cost of immunizing the world's children continues to rise. By 2015, that cost will likely exceed US$60 per infant as new vaccines are introduced into national immunization programs. In 2006, 51 lower and lower middle income countries reported spending a mean US$12 per surviving infant on routine immunization. By 2012, the figure had risen to $20, a 67% increase. This study tests the hypothesis that lower and lower middle income countries will spend more on their routine immunization programs as their economies grow. A panel data regression approach is used. Expenditures reported by governments annually (2006-12) through the World Health Organization/UNICEF Joint Reporting Form are regressed on lagged annual per capita gross national income (GNI), controlling for prevailing mortality levels, immunization program performance, corruption control efforts, geographical region and correct reporting. Results show the expenditures increased with GNI. Expressed as an elasticity, the countries spent approximately $6.32 on immunization for every $100 in GNI increase from 2006 to 2012. Projecting forward and assuming continued annual GNI growth rates of 10.65%, countries could be spending $60 per infant by 2020 if national investment functions increase 4-fold. Given the political will, this result implies countries could fully finance their routine immunization programs without cutting funding for other programs. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  14. Nepal - Country Environmental Analysis : Strengthening Institutions and Management Systems for Enhanced Environmental Governance

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the Country Environmental Analysis (CEA) in Nepal is to identify opportunities for enhancing the overall performance of select environmental management systems through improvements in the effectiveness of institutions, policies, and processes. CEA has been built upon the following three primary study components: (a) an examination of the environmental issues associate...

  15. Appraisal of corporate governance in a lower middle income country: The case of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Oppong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accountability is instrumental for ensuring that a trusting relationship exists between shareholders and management of corporations in order that there will be enhanced investor confidence. Towards this end, corporate governance measures are instituted to make the executives or management of business organizations accountable for their stewardships of the organizational resources or shareholders’ investments. It is against that backdrop that the Securities and Exchange Commission in Ghana has also developed a code on best practices on corporate governance. However, the extent to which the provisions in the code are consistent with the theoretical and empirical literature is unknown. This paper, therefore, sought to explore whether or not gaps exist between the corporate governance policy and practices in Ghana and extant literature. This paper achieves this by examining characteristics of the board as they exist in Ghana in relations to the literature. The characteristics examined in this paper include responsibilities, optimal size, independence, board composition, and audit and compensation committees of boards. Recommendations are made based on the literature to address gaps that exist.

  16. Pensions at a glance 2015 OECD and G20 indicators

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 10-year anniversary edition of Pensions at a Glance highlights the pension reforms undertaken by OECD and G20 countries over the last two years. Two special chapters provide deeper analysis of first-tier pension schemes and of the impact of short or interrupted careers, due to late entry into employment, childcare or unemployment, on pension entitlements. Another chapter analyses the sensitivity of long-term pension replacement rates on various parameters. A range of indicators for comparing pension policies and their outcomes between OECD and G20 countries is also provided.

  17. E-government factors to reduce administrative and finance corruption in Arab countries: Case study Iraqi oil sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, M. A.; Eman, Y.; Hussein, A. H.; Hasson, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Arab countries face the corruption issues in its several public organizations. The corruption in these countries is considered as the main challenge. The oil sector is one of the public sectors that have huge level of corruption. However, the Iraqi economy had become dependable on oil sector daring the last three decades, and on the contrary, of what other oil countries did. The capital is considered as one of the essential factor for economic development. The revenues of oil exports will stay the essential source for economic development in Iraq in the future in order to reduce being dependable on oil. Since the beginning of the 3rd thousands, the world witnessed great rise in the demand on oil, but the Iraqi exports of crude oil come to be less than its similarities in the seventeenths of last century. So our oil sector is still in need of deep study. This study focuses on technological technique that can make huge decrease for corruption in oil sector in Iraq. However, e-government is considered as the best techniques that can decrease the corruption. Thus, this study bases on challenges that effect on build successful e-government project in Iraqi oil industry.

  18. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-01-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates

  19. How do government regulations influence the ability to practice Chinese herbal medicine in western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Tom; Su, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sunny Jui-Shan

    2017-01-20

    The regulation policies of substances used in Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM), have a direct influence on the ability of health providers to practice in the clinic. We set out to assess the truth behind the assumption that practice of CHM in the west is constrained by the regulations imposed by authorities in western countries. For the first part of our study we surveyed and compiled lists of banned and restricted Chinese Materia Medica (CMM) from six countries: USA, UK, Germany, Israel, Canada and Australia. Afterwards, we estimated the relevant importance of the 300 CMM most-commonly-prescribed to the practice of CHM according to prescriptions from 2,000,000 randomly selected patients, from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We then compared both lists and determined the clinical importance of the banned and restricted CMM. Except for regulations from Canada, most of the information of banned CMM proved to be difficult to organize. The USA was found to have the least amount of banned herbs, with 9 substances. Canada had the highest amount, with 98. In Germany, Australia, the UK, and Israel 10, 29, 36, 68 banned CMM were found, respectively. Apart from aristolochic acid containing substances, ma huang (, Ephedra sinica) was the only CMM banned in all countries. Most of the banned CMM were not found to be among the most-commonly-prescribed according to the NHIRD. Authorities should make this information more accessible. No clear relation exists between CHM regulations and any 'Western' common denominator, and the amount of banned CMM varied greatly among the surveyed countries. However, even among countries with a larger amount of banned CMM, the majority of these were in the bottom two-thirds in respect to the frequency of their use. Thus, regulations in some western countries surely influence the practice of CHM, however, the variability of CMM have been influenced by regulations only to a limited extent. Copyright © 2016 The

  20. The Relationship Between Federal Government Revenue and Spending: Empirical Evidence from Asean-5 Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Zulkefly Abdul; Asri, Norain Mod; Abdullah, Azrina Al-Hadi; Antoni, Antoni; Mohd.Yusoff, Zetty Zahureen

    2009-01-01

    The main objectives of this paper is to examine the long run relationship between total expenditure, revenue (tax and nontax) and economic growth in ASEAN-5 countries namely by Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore and Philippines. According to the prior studies, there are several hypotheses to explain the relationship between revenue and spend-ing such as (1) spend-revenue hypotheses, (2) revenue-spend hypotheses and (3)bi-directional causality hypotheses. To test the validity of these hy...

  1. The Relationship Between Federal Government Revenue and Spending: Empirical Evidence From Asean-5 Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd.Yusoff, Zetty Zahureen; Antoni, Antoni; Abdullah, Azrina Al-Hadi; Asri, Norain Mod; Karim, Zulkefly Abdul

    2006-01-01

    The main objectives of this paper is to examine the long run relationship between total expenditure, revenue (tax and nontax) and economic growth in ASEAN-5 countries namely by Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore and Philippines. According to the prior studies, there are several hypotheses to explain the relationship between revenue and spend-ing such as (1) spend-revenue hypotheses, (2) revenue-spend hypotheses and (3)bi-directional causality hypotheses. To test the validity of these hy...

  2. Foreign aid, governance quality, and economic growth in developing countries : foreign aid and growth

    OpenAIRE

    Biboh, Nkoumboh Henrietta

    2007-01-01

    Most poor developing countries, especially those with limited natural resources, low savings and investment levels, natural disaster stricken, need help from the affluent nations in order to meet some of their development objectives. Still, some that are rich in natural resources equally depend on some form of aid. Though most growth theories stress on investment as an important step to steady economic growth, they are mostly silent on the importance of aid as a component of in vestment and...

  3. Government financial support for civil aircraft research, technology and development in four European countries and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, B.; Golaszewski, R.; Patten, C.; Rudman, B.; Scott, R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the levels of government financial support for civil aircraft airframe and engine (CAAE) research and technology (R&T) in the United States and Europe (United Kingdom, West Germany, France and The Netherlands) and means of comparing these levels are provided. Data are presented for the years 1974-1977. European R&T expenditure data were obtained through visits to each of the four European countries, to the Washington office of the European Communities, and by a search of applicable literature. CAAE R&T expenditure data for the United States were obtained from NASA and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  4. Digital Broadband Content: Digital Content Strategies and policies. OECD Digital Economy Papers, No. 119

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    The development of digital content raises new issues as rapid technological developments challenge existing business models and government policies. This OECD study identifies and discusses six groups of business and public policy issues and illustrates these with existing and potential OECD Digital Content Strategies and Policies: (1) Innovation…

  5. Do U.S. Firms Have the Best Corporate Governance? A Cross-Country Examination of the Relation between Corporate Governance and Shareholder Wealth

    OpenAIRE

    Reena Aggarwal; Isil Erel; Rene M. Stulz; Rohan Williamson

    2007-01-01

    We compare the governance of foreign firms to the governance of similar U.S. firms. Using an index of firm governance attributes, we find that, on average, foreign firms have worse governance than matching U.S. firms. Roughly 8% of foreign firms have better governance than comparable U.S. firms. The majority of these firms are either in the U.K. or in Canada. When we define a firm's governance gap as the difference between the quality of its governance and the governance of a comparable U.S. ...

  6. The Relationship between Corporate Governance and Value of the Firm in Developing Countries: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Rouf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to examine the relationship between four corporate governance mechanisms (board size, board independent director, chief executive officer duality and board audit committee and value of the firm (performance measures (return on assets, ROA and return on equity, ROE. The paper is based on a sample of 93 listed non-financial companies in Dhaka Stock Exchanges (DSE 2006. Using OLS as a method of estimation, the results provide evidence of a positive significant relationship between ROA and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The results further reveal a positive significant relationship between ROE and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The study, however, could not provide a significant relationship between the value of the firm measures (ROA and ROE and board size and board audit committee.

  7. Taxation of International Performing Artistes: the problems with Article 17 OECD and how to correct them

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, Dick

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the taxation of international performing artistes. Their performance income is often generated in many countries other than their country of residence, and this performance income is subject to special tax treatment. Most countries have followed the OECD recommendation to tax the performance income of non-resident artistes. Article 17 of the OECD Model Tax Convention sets aside the normal allocation rules of Article 7 (Business Profits) and Article 15 (Income ...

  8. Encouraging private sector investment in climatefriendly technologies in developing countries. An assessment of policy options for the Dutch government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, S.N.M.; Van Wees, M.T.

    2006-10-01

    This study aims to explore new or reformed policies to be adopted by the Dutch government to encourage private sector investments in climate-friendly technologies in developing countries. A literature review of barriers to climate-friendly investments and of directions for solutions has been complemented with a number of in-depth interviews with stakeholders representing the major actors involved in investment projects (project sponsors, financing institutions, institutional investors and government). The barrier analysis has resulted in the following list of key obstacles to climate-friendly investments: (1) Lack of a sound, transparent and stable enabling environment for investing in developing countries; (2) Shortage of experienced and creditworthy sponsors; (3) High specific project risks; (4) Overestimation investment risks related to (sustainable) investments in developing countries in general (risk perspective); (5) Additional costs of climate-friendly technologies; (6) Shortage of risk capital; (7) Insufficient guarantee mechanisms; (8) Lack of know-how on public-private partnership structures and on financial design; and (9) Lack of insight how corporate social responsibility can be operationalised. Four main gaps have been identified on the basis of an assessment of current Dutch policies and instruments: (1) Shortage of instruments to directly promote investments; (2) Underdeveloped guarantee instruments; (3) Too restrictive cap on project size in financial schemes; (4) Lack of support in operationalising the concept of corporate social responsibility. Four areas for new or intensified policies have been identified based on the barrier and gap analysis: (1) Direct promotion of (potentially large scale) investments, including: (a) Supporting (the establishment of) sponsor companies developing sustainable energy projects in developing countries; (b) Making risk capital available; (c) Creating investment credit facilities; (d) Making development capital in

  9. Evidence on equity, governance and financing after health care reform in Mexico: lessons for Latin American countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Arredondo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article includes evidence on equity, governance and health financing outcomes of the Mexican health system. An evaluative research with a cross-sectional design was oriented towards the qualitative and quantitative analysis of financing, governance and equity indicators. Taking into account feasibility, as well as political and technical criteria, seven Mexican states were selected as study populations and an evaluative research was conducted during 2002-2010. The data collection techniques were based on in-depth interviews with key personnel (providers, users and community leaders, consensus technique and document analysis. The qualitative analysis was done with ATLAS TI and POLICY MAKER softwares. The Mexican health system reform has modified dependence at the central level; there is a new equity equation for resources allocation, community leaders and users of services reported the need to improve an effective accountability system at both municipal and state levels. Strategies for equity, governance and financing do not have adequate mechanisms to promote participation from all social actors. Improving this situation is a very important goal in the Mexican health democratization process, in the context of health care reform. Inequality on resources allocation in some regions and catastrophic expenditure for users is unequal in all states, producing more negative effects on states with high social marginalization. Special emphasis is placed on the analysis of the main strengths and weaknesses, as relevant evidences for other Latin American countries which are designing, implementing and evaluating reform strategies in order to achieve equity, good governance and a greater financial protection in health.

  10. A study on an establishment for collaboration system with the OECD/NEA by means of the analysis of its main activities related to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Park, J. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Oh, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1st February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20th April 1972, when Japan became its first non-European full member. NEA membership today consists of 28 OECD member countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Republic of Korea, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Commission of the European Communities also takes part in the work of the Agency. The mission of the NEA is: o to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, as well as o to provide authoritative assessments and to forge common understandings on key issues, as input to government decisions on nuclear energy policy and to broader OECD policy analyses in areas such as energy and sustainable development. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency performs the work putting emphasis on safety enhancement and regulatory safety. Having Analyzed activities areas of Nuclear Development Committee (NDC), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and drew out cooperation methods relating to nuclear safety regulation with them, it will be helpful economically and technically in meeting with improvement of nuclear safety efficiently

  11. Disciplining governance in Africa : a comparison of the World Bank’s Country Policy and Institutional Assessment and the African Union’s African Peer Review Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kassa (Saba)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis study examines the promotion of governance in the African Continent. It compares the Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) of the World Bank to the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) of the African Union. These governance assessments represent differing

  12. Esforço tecnológico da indústria de transformação brasileira: uma comparação com países selecionados Technical efforts of the Brazilian transformation industry: a comparison with a group of OECD countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Ferrero Zucoloto

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa o esforço tecnológico da indústria de transformação brasileira, em comparação a um grupo de países da OECD. As principais conclusões são: (a o esforço tecnológico industrial nacional é limitado em comparação ao realizado pelos países selecionados; (b essa performance é válida para a maior parte dos setores nacionais; (c essa diferença é mais significativa entre setores intensivos em tecnologia: produtos químicos, eletrônicos e informática; (d a diferença entre a estrutura produtiva brasileira e das nações da OCDE também é responsável pelo baixo esforço tecnológico realizado pela indústria de transformação, porém com menor intensidade; (e foi identificada uma correlação positiva entre esforço tecnológico relativo e desempenho comercial, e uma correlação negativa entre esforço tecnológico relativo e contROLe estrangeiro na receita operacional líquida.This paper analyses technological efforts of Brazilian industry in comparison with a group of OECD countries. The main conclusions are: (a technological effort of Brazilian industry are lower than the effort implemented in OECD countries; (b this is true for most industrial sectors; (c this difference is higher in technology-intensive sectors: chemicals, electronics and computers; (d the difference between Brazilian and OECD productive structure is also responsible for the relatively low technological effort of Brazilian industry; (e there is a positive correlation between relative technological effort and commercial performance and a negative correlation between relative technological effort and foreign contROL in operational revenue.

  13. Strengthening mental health system governance in six low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South Asia: challenges, needs and potential strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Inge; Marais, Debbie; Abdulmalik, Jibril; Ahuja, Shalini; Alem, Atalay; Chisholm, Dan; Egbe, Catherine; Gureje, Oye; Hanlon, Charlotte; Lund, Crick; Shidhaye, Rahul; Jordans, Mark; Kigozi, Fred; Mugisha, James; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Thornicroft, Graham

    2017-06-01

    Poor governance has been identified as a barrier to effective integration of mental health care in low- and middle-income countries. Governance includes providing the necessary policy and legislative framework to promote and protect the mental health of a population, as well as health system design and quality assurance to ensure optimal policy implementation. The aim of this study was to identify key governance challenges, needs and potential strategies that could facilitate adequate integration of mental health into primary health care settings in low- and middle-income countries. Key informant qualitative interviews were held with 141 participants across six countries participating in the Emerging mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries (Emerald) research program: Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. Data were transcribed (and where necessary, translated into English) and analysed thematically using framework analysis, first at the country level, then synthesized at a cross-country level. While all the countries fared well with respect to strategic vision in the form of the development of national mental health policies, key governance strategies identified to address challenges included: strengthening capacity of managers at sub-national levels to develop and implement integrated plans; strengthening key aspects of the essential health system building blocks to promote responsiveness, efficiency and effectiveness; developing workable mechanisms for inter-sectoral collaboration, as well as community and service user engagement; and developing innovative approaches to improving mental health literacy and stigma reduction. Inadequate financing emerged as the biggest challenge for good governance. In addition to the need for overall good governance of a health care system, this study identifies a number of specific strategies to improve governance for integrated mental health care in low- and middle-income countries. © The

  14. Implementing the United Kingdom Government's 10-Year Teenage Pregnancy Strategy for England (1999-2010): Applicable Lessons for Other Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Alison; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Ingham, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an issue of inequality affecting the health, well-being, and life chances of young women, young men, and their children. Consequently, high levels of teenage pregnancy are of concern to an increasing number of developing and developed countries. The UK Labour Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy for England was one of the very few examples of a nationally led, locally implemented evidence-based strategy, resourced over a long duration, with an associated reduction of 51% in the under-18 conception rate. This article seeks to identify the lessons applicable to other countries. The article focuses on the prevention program. Drawing on the detailed documentation of the 10-year strategy, it analyzes the factors that helped and hindered implementation against the World Health Organization (WHO) ExpandNet Framework. The Framework strives to improve the planning and management of the process of scaling-up of successful pilot programs with a focus on sexual and reproductive health, making it particularly suited for an analysis of England's teenage pregnancy strategy. The development and implementation of the strategy matches the Framework's key attributes for successful planning and scaling up of sexual and reproductive health programs. It also matched the attributes identified by the Centre for Global Development for scaled up approaches to complex public health issues. Although the strategy was implemented in a high-income country, analysis against the WHO-ExpandNet Framework identifies many lessons which are transferable to low- and medium-income countries seeking to address high teenage pregnancy rates. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Public Integrity, Economic Freedom and Governance Performance. A Comparative Study for the EU Member States and Acceding Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani MATEI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The studies concerning the impact of corruption on the effectiveness of governance are numerous, valorising profound approaches, based on criteria and standards related to good governance, organizational behaviour. The concepts and mechanisms specific for econometrics and statistics provide the quantitative support for qualitative analyses, substantiating public policies, in view to assure effectiveness in performance measurement. For EU Member States and acceding countries, the level of development and social organization determines specific ethical behaviours. In this context, the current paper aims a comparative economic and social evaluation of the correlations between corruption, performance and economic freedom in the states mentioned, following the various significant stages of the EU enlargement. The working hypotheses turn into consideration the following issues:# Corruption holds national specific character and the statistic, econometric or sociologic analyses reveal that it is stable during time.# The climate of economic freedom and the intensity of corruption influence powerfully the economic performance.# The EU membership, “seniority” in EU, regional context determine different attitudes and perceptions on the corruption phenomena.# For the newer EU states or the acceding countries, the strategies of integrity have mimetic character and the National Integrity Systems have structured powerful connections aimed at determining an action focused on public integrity.In the analyses achieved, the EU is approached globally, at least from statistic point of view, and the conclusions aim situations specific to the groups of states that have been or will be the beneficiaries of the EU enlargement. The quantitative analyses use both own results of the researches carried out by the authors and public results of World Bank or Heritage Foundation, as well as results of authorities responsible for national statistics. The paper uses the

  16. 75 FR 1235 - Revisions to the Requirements for: Transboundary Shipments of Hazardous Wastes Between OECD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ..., Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway... Requirements for: Transboundary Shipments of Hazardous Wastes Between OECD Member Countries, Export Shipments of Spent Lead- Acid Batteries, Submitting Exception Reports for Export Shipments of Hazardous Wastes...

  17. PACTEL OECD project planning (PACO). PACTEL OECD project planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    OECD launched the SETH project to investigate issues relevant for accident prevention and management and to ensure the existence of integral thermal hydraulic test facilities. The facilities included in the SETH project are PKL from Germany and PANDA from Switzerland. At the early stages of the SETH project an idea was raised to exploit the PACTEL facility in a similar OECD project. Without any external funding the analytical work in the required extent would not be possible within Lappeenranta University of Technology, the party responsible of operating PACTEL. This fact directed the PACO project proposal to be conducted for the SAFIR programme. The aim of the PACO project is to prepare a project proposal to OECD of a PACTEL related project. To attain this objective some preliminary analyses have to be performed to ensure the relevancy of the proposed topic. The low power situation, i.e. midloop state was chosen to be the topic in the PACO studies and project planning basis. The plan is to use PACTEL to examine vertical steam generator behaviour during the midloop operation and the following loss of residual heat removal system transient. Such a possibility is acknowledged with special alterations to PACTEL. The APROS code version 5.04.07 was selected as a tool for the preanalyses. The virtual simulation of the chosen experimental situation would give a preconception on the phenomena to be expected and the progression of the transient. Originally the PACO project was planned to continue only for a few months, ending up with the project proposal to OECD during the summer time 2004. During the pre-calculation process it became obvious that the time expected was not enough to establish good pre-calculation results. The reasons for this relates to time used to learn and adapt the use of the chosen code, improvements and corrections in modelling as well as the code ability to manage the special conditions defined for the project topic. Another aspect on completing a

  18. An OECD comparison of wind power and photovoltaics - approach to a consistent survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.J.; Ziemons, S.

    1996-01-01

    Adequate solutions are expected from renewable energy sources that may stop ozone depletion and contribute to resource conservation. Almost any OECD country is making efforts to promote photovoltaics and wind power. To give a survey of the measures taken and results obtained promotion programs are compared and the success achieved in the individual OECD countries is outlined. National energy institutions were interviewed and their 1993/94 programs were evaluated. Some of the data and statements are incomplete. (orig.) [de

  19. OECD/NEA Study on the Economics of Long Term Operation of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhov, Alexey; Cameron, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad Hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (author)

  20. The investigation of the national views for the strategic plan 2005-2009 of OECD/NEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Lee, K. S.; Yang, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    OECD/NEA has been developing the Strategic Plan of 2005-2009 which will be used as the guidelines of NEA activities for this period. Korean government is of the view that national interests in the cooperation with OECD/NEA become important and are needed to be reflected to this Strategic Plan. We has prepared and suggested Korean proposal for the Strategic Plan of OECD/NEA

  1. Coverage of the WTO's Agreement on Government Procurement: Challenges of Integrating China and other Countries with a Large State Sector into the Global Trading System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Ping

    2007-01-01

    The WTO's plurilateral Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) is a significant WTO instrument to develop disciplines regulating government procurement. A recent major review of the GPA has led to a revised text, likely to enter into force in 2007. In the meanwhile, China, a country with a large state sector, has promised to initiate GPA accession negotiations by the end of 2007.The article provides a critical assessment of the extent to which the recent review of the coverage of the GPA ha...

  2. Factor Configurations with Governance as Conditions for Low HIV/AIDS Prevalence in HIV/AIDS Recipient Countries: Fuzzy-set Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Yang, Bong-Min; Kang, Minah

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate whether good governance of a recipient country is a necessary condition and what combinations of factors including governance factor are sufficient for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in HIV/AIDS aid recipient countries during the period of 2002-2010. For this, Fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) was used. Nine potential attributes for a causal configuration for low HIV/AIDS prevalence were identified through a review of previous studies. For each factor, full membership, full non-membership, and crossover point were specified using both author's knowledge and statistical information of the variables. Calibration and conversion to a fuzzy-set score were conducted using Fs/QCA 2.0 and probabilistic tests for necessary and sufficiency were performed by STATA 11. The result suggested that governance is the necessary condition for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in a recipient country. From sufficiency test, two pathways were resulted. The low level of governance can lead to low level of HIV/AIDS prevalence when it is combined with other favorable factors, especially, low economic inequality, high economic development and high health expenditure. However, strengthening governance is a more practical measure to keep low prevalence of HIV/AIDS because it is hard to achieve both economic development and economic quality. This study highlights that a comprehensive policy measure is the key for achieving low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in recipient country.

  3. Options for Low Income Countries Effective and Efficient Use of Tax Incentives for Investment : A Report to the G-20 Development Working Group by the IMF, OECD, UN and World Bank

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; OECD; United Nations; World Bank

    2015-01-01

    Experience shows that there is often ample room for more effective and efficient use of investment tax incentives in low-income countries. Tax incentives generally rank low in investment climate surveys in low-income countries, and there are many examples in which they are reported to be redundant, that is, investment will have been undertaken even without them. And their fiscal cost can b...

  4. The Influence of Shariah (Islamic Principles) Corporate Governance on Cross-Border Merger and Acquisitions Involving Islamic Companies in the Gulf Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bindabel, Wardah Abdulrahman

    2017-01-01

    The central aim of the research is to examine whether cross-border Merger and Acquisitions (M&A) involving Islamic financial companies in three Gulf countries and non-Islamic financial companies from the Western countries is influenced by Shariah Corporate Governance (CG). Cross-border M&A is a corporate level strategy to achieve organisational growth and expansion through accessing new markets and additional strategic resources (knowledge, technology and complementary skills). Islamic financ...

  5. Potential effects of emission taxes on CO2 emissions in the OECD and LDCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messner, S.; Strubegger, M.

    1991-01-01

    A set of existing optimization models, which represent the energy systems of the OECD and LDCs (less developed countries excluding centrally planned economies) with a time horizon to 2020, has been applied to derive first-order estimates of the techno-economic potential for emission reduction. The driving force for the introduction of reduction measures is a scheme of taxes levied on the emission of six pollutants, including the greenhouse gases CO 2 and methane. The tax levels introduced are based on taxes discussed by the Swedish government: they are the break-even point to test which measures are cost-effective and which emission levels can be reached at these costs. The regional models include the following alternatives: (i) reduction of final energy demand by supplying the requested services by other means (i.e., conservation); (ii) substitution of new fuels for polluting fuels; (iii) introduction of clean technologies for the same purposes; (iv) additions of pollution-reduction technologies. Alternative scenarios with emission taxes are compared with a base scenario without taxes related to pollutant emissions. The results indicate that an increase in CO 2 emissions in the OECD and LDC regions of 47% over the next 30 yr in the base scenario would be changed to stable levels to 2010 by tax-induced measures. Thereafter, energy-consumption growth in the LDCs reverses this trend. (author)

  6. Waste governance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available of governance in Africa. The next section focuses on regulation, and the status of the regulatory frameworks in different African countries. Shortcomings in the regulatory framework are highlighted through examples in various countries. Specific policy...

  7. Taxation of International Performing Artistes: the problems with Article 17 OECD and how to correct them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Molenaar (Dick)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the taxation of international performing artistes. Their performance income is often generated in many countries other than their country of residence, and this performance income is subject to special tax treatment. Most countries have followed the OECD

  8. PERAN OECD DALAM MEMINIMALKAN UPAYA TAX AGRESIVENESS PADA PERUSAHAAN MULTINATIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanindia Hajjar Damayanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: OECD's Role in Minimizing Tax Aggressiveness Efforts at Multinationality Companies. This paper aims to prove the relation between multinationality transaction of tax heaven countries and the tax investigation toward the tax aggressiveness. This research is done by quantitative approach upon the companies registered in BEI for 2010-2014 periods. The findings denote the tax heaven countries have no effort to conduct the tax aggressiveness on which the multinationality negatively has no effect since the occurrence in the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines as the guideline for both the taxing authority and the multinational companies in accomplishing the transfer pricing matter. In contrary, the investigation does not influence the tax aggressiveness.

  9. Review of international developments and cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service-Inspection (RI-ISI) and Non-destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification in OECD-NEA member countries- Responses to the questionnaire - CSNI/integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In December 2000, the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) agreed to prepare a state-of-the art report addressing the present situation and regulatory aspects in NEA member countries on: - Risk based / risk informed in-service inspections (ISI) developments, - Qualification of NDT system to be used for the inspections. The CSNI gave mandate to the CSNI working group on the Integrity of Components and Structures (IAGE) to prepare the report. In order to get a good basis for compiling the report with an overview on the present situation in OECD countries and regulatory aspects on the further developments of RI-ISI and NDT qualification approaches a questionnaire was prepared. This questionnaire was organised in two parts. The first part addressed used risk based / risk informed ISI approaches and regulatory aspects on the further developments. The second part addressed used NDT qualification approaches and other measures for getting reliable inspection results as well as regulatory aspects on the further developments of qualification approaches. Some parts of the questionnaire addressed topics, which have been dealt with in other European or national programs. Available relevant information from these programs has been also collected. The questionnaire was circulated in 2003 among NEA member countries organisations. Appendix 1 contains the questionnaire. Appendix 2 contains the compilation of responses to the questionnaire. A workshop was organized to complement the questionnaire (NEA/CSNI/R(2004)9 Proceedings of the CSNI Workshop on 'International developments and cooperation on Risk-Informed In-Service- Inspection (RI-ISI) and Non-destructive Testing (NDT) Qualification' held in Stockholm, Sweden on 13-14 April 2004 and hosted by SKI). In addition to regulators, licensees, manufacturers and researchers, this workshop gathered international organisations (i.e. EC, IAEA) and the main

  10. Tax Havens and the OECD Campaign Against them

    OpenAIRE

    Narci, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    There are two essential primary purposes for this thesis. The first has been to highlight the phenomena Tax Havens with its economical impact on other countries outlined in chapter two. Firstly the concept of tax havens is presented based on the OECD definition. Secondly the secrecy legislation, regulation and the corporate structures which tax havens offer to foreign investors and firms are given with their significance for other states. Thirdly, the ways tax havens are used b...

  11. Bilgi Ekonomisi Değişkenlerine Yönelik İlk İzlenimler: Türkiye-OECD Ülkeleri Karşılaştırmaları (1995-1999 First Impressions on Information Economic Variables :A Comparative Study between Turkey and OECD Countries (1995-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeloğlu, Hakkı Okan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilgi ekonomisinin özellikle 1990’lı yılların sonlarına doğru artan önemi, farklı araştırmasorularının gündeme gelmesine neden olmuştur. Bu çalışma, hem bilgi ekonomisigöstergelerini oluşturan değişkenlerin neler olabileceğini ele almakta ve hem de Türkiye’yidiğer ülkelerle karşılaştıran bir konumlandırma yapmayı amaçlamaktadır. Böylece, bilgiekonomisi bağlamında, Türkiye’nin zaman içerisinde bilgi ve iletişim teknolojileri faaliyetleribakımından hangi ülkelerle benzerlik gösterdiği ortaya konulmaya çalışılmıştır. Bu amacayönelik olarak çalışmada, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD’nin bilgi ekonomisinin varlığını ölçmede kullandığı kriterler göz önündebulundurularak görgül bir çalışma yürütülmüştür. Çalışmada, çok değişkenli istatistikselyöntemlerden biri olan kümeleme analizinin kullanılması ile elde edilen bulgulara göre,Türkiye’nin, yıllar itibariyle gösterdiği gelişme yönünden daha çok Kuzey Avrupa ülkeleriile benzeştiği tespit edilmiştir.The gradual growth in the importance of Information Economics, especially in late 1990s;has led to different research inquiries along with broadened study fields. In addition, therehave been continuous disputes on subjects like; how “an information economy” shouldbe defined theoretically, and with which variables can its intensity and characteristicsbe measured. Thereby, this study covers both the possible variables that build up theinformation technology, and also it aims to set forth a positioning, by means of comparingTurkey with other countries. Furthermore, in the context of information technology, it hasbeen intended to designate Turkey’s resemblance to other countries in due course, in terms of its information and communication-based technological activities. This studyconceives OECD’s (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development criteriafor an

  12. Transition to e-government in Developing countries: The Case of Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) e-Service Smart City Initiatives in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofi Wireko, Joseph; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2016-01-01

    Most developing countries, especially in Africa are fighting corruption as a major barrier to development, and e-government is seen as a new way of addressing it. Besides generally being recognized as cost-efficient, e-government is thought to reduce corruption through increased transparency......, better accountability and, the disappearance of the “middle-man” in the acquisition of public services by the citizenry. This paper discusses the extent to which this has been achieved in Ghana by analyzing the implementation of e-government service of the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA......) of Ghana using the “stages of growth” mode from a sociotechnical perspective. The outcome of the analysis suggests that the e-government service implementation by DVLA is still at its basic and rudimentary stage (Catalogue stage) and continuous presence of the “middle-man,” high level of corruption, lack...

  13. An OECD perspective of the role of risk assessment in policy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydon, Jim [Environmental Health and Safety Division, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris (France)

    1992-07-01

    OECD is an intergovernmental organization bringing together 24 industrialised countries from North America, Western Europe, and the Pacific. Its basic aims include the following: - to achieve high sustainable development, economic growth and employment; - to achieve high economic and social welfare and a high standard of living throughout the OECD area and in non-Member countries: The specialised Agencies and Directorates of OECD cover the full breadth of economic and social activities of concern to the Conference. Under their programmes, there are a variety of activities which involve various elements of qualitative and quantitative risk assessment. Risk assessment methodology, policies options regarding the use of risk assessment, the role of risk assessment in policy and decision-making are all routine in OECD work. This work ranges from, for example, work on the economics of investment policies, through work on food safety, to the analysis of nuclear safety technology.

  14. Nuclear power programmes and medium term projections in the OECD area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miida, J.; Haeussermann, W.; Mankin, S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes nuclear power growth forecasts up to 1985 on an individual country basis for the OECD area, based on present nuclear programmes. For the period between 1985 and the year 2000, no individual countries' estimates are given. The projections for this period are subdivided into three main areas: OECD Europe, North America and OECD Pacific Region. These projections are derived from the presently prevailing estimates concerning total energy growth, the increasing share of electricity requirements in total energy requirements and the growth of the nuclear share in electrical installed capacity. The basic assumptions are discussed and the combination of various possibilities results in upper and lower growth limits, which should include the most likely development. An attempt is also made to describe probable scenarios of nuclear reactor strategies, taking into account developments under way in the OECD area. Finally, the factors liable to influence nuclear power growth in a positive or negative way are briefly analysed

  15. An OECD perspective of the role of risk assessment in policy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydon, Jim

    1992-01-01

    OECD is an intergovernmental organization bringing together 24 industrialised countries from North America, Western Europe, and the Pacific. Its basic aims include the following: - to achieve high sustainable development, economic growth and employment; - to achieve high economic and social welfare and a high standard of living throughout the OECD area and in non-Member countries: The specialised Agencies and Directorates of OECD cover the full breadth of economic and social activities of concern to the Conference. Under their programmes, there are a variety of activities which involve various elements of qualitative and quantitative risk assessment. Risk assessment methodology, policies options regarding the use of risk assessment, the role of risk assessment in policy and decision-making are all routine in OECD work. This work ranges from, for example, work on the economics of investment policies, through work on food safety, to the analysis of nuclear safety technology

  16. The Chemistry of iodine in reactor safety: summary and conclusions: OECD Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    About seventy experts from fourteen OECD member countries attended this Fourth OECD Workshop on the chemistry of iodine in reactor safety, as well as experts from Latvia and the Commission of the European Communities. Thirty four papers were presented, in five sessions: national and international programmes (integral and intermediate-scale experiments), experimental homogeneous phase chemistry, surface processes, thermodynamic and kinetic studies, safety applications. A final session is devoted to a general discussion on remaining research studies relevant to reactor safety

  17. Corporate governance of the state-owned enterprises in an emerging country: Risk management and related issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noluthando Shirley Matsiliza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the extent to which state owned enterprises (SOE have complied with corporate governance codes, as recommended by King III in South Africa. Corporate governance in the post-apartheid era has changed irrevocably. The development path which is the agenda to transform state owned enterprises has been a trial and error (trend in South Africa. This paper argues that the South African State Owned Enterprises (SOEs have applied the King III principles of corporate governance, while grappling with structural changes that impact in their practice regarding their organisational performance on risk and corporate governance. Along with regulatory measures on corporate governance, the SOEs are looking at strategies to translate the concept of corporate governance into practical solutions that involve stakeholders and government support. Using a qualitative approach, this theoretical paper employed document analysis for data collection and analysis. This paper calls for more risk intelligent management of agencies so that future opportunities and threats are recognized and addressed promptly and effectively. The value of this paper is based on its contribution to the existing knowledge area on corporate governance and leadership

  18. 76 FR 24082 - Notice With Respect to List of Countries Denying Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ..., suppliers, or bidders in foreign government-funded airport construction projects. DATES: Effective Date... to U.S. products, suppliers, or bidders in connection with airport construction projects of $500,000... Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded Airport Construction Projects AGENCY: Office of the...

  19. 77 FR 23791 - Notice With Respect to List of Countries Denying Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ..., suppliers, or bidders in foreign government-funded airport construction projects. DATES: Effective Date... to U.S. products, suppliers, or bidders in connection with airport construction projects of $500,000... Fair Market Opportunities for Government-Funded Airport Construction Projects AGENCY: Office of the...

  20. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Activities Related to Fast Reactor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim

    2013-01-01

    • Despite impact of Fukushima, there remains a high level of interest in continued development of advanced nuclear systems and fuel cycles: – better use of natural resources; – minimisation of waste and reduction of constraints on deep geological repositories. • Ambitious R&D programmes on-going at national level in many countries, also through international projects: – expected to lead to development of advanced reactors and fuel cycle facilities. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in field of fast reactor development and related advanced fuel cycles: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  1. OECD Reviews of Regional Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maguire, Karen; Marsan, Giulia Ajmone; Nauwelaers, Claire

    This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth.......This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth....

  2. Strengthening and redesigning flood risk governance in Europe: an overview of seven key issues and how they are being dealt with in six European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegger Dries

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available European countries, especially urban areas, face increasing flood risks due to urbanization, increase of exposure and damage potential, and the effects of climate change. In literature and in practice, it is argued that a diversification of Flood Risk Management Strategies (FRMSs makes countries more flood resilient. The latter requires innovations in existing Flood Risk Governance Arrangements, development of new arrangements and the coordination of these arrangements, but it also requires these arrangements to be tailored to their physical and institutional context. Within the EU FP7 project STAR-FLOOD (2012-2016, a comparative analysis and evaluation of flood risk governance in Belgium, England, France, The Netherlands, Poland and Sweden has been conducted. The project identified at least seven key issues that are relevant for all researched countries (and probably also beyond. These key issues deal with the topics of (i diversifying Flood Risk Management Strategies (ii establishing connectivity between actors, levels and sectors through what we coin “bridging mechanisms” (iii achieving coproduction between public and private actors; (iv improving fragmented and often non-enforceable rule systems; (v optimising available resources for FRM; (vi operationalising the notion of “diversification of FRM strategies” in a country-specific way; (vii follow general design principles for improving FRM that are sufficiently tailored to local circumstances. Drawing on all project deliverables, this paper will briefly review each key issue, discuss salient similarities and differences between the countries and point at ways forward.

  3. OECD/NEA activities on the safety of new reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reig, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency, a member of the OECD family, has as mission, in line with the overall aim of the OECD, to assist Agency's member countries in maintaining and further developing through international cooperation, the scientific, technological and legal bases for a safe, environmentally friendly and economic use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Our members include very advanced nuclear countries and represent a big part of the world's nuclear capacity. In addition, we have a well established and formal relationship with the Russian Federation and the IAEA. Two years ago, the NEA celebrated its 50th anniversary of providing assistance to its member countries in supporting the safe use of nuclear power. Nuclear power will remain a key part of the energy mix for many decades to come and, as such, the NEA looks forward to continuing its value-adding work in the field of nuclear power. Korea joined the NEA in 24 May, 1993. While the NEA is satisfied that we have in place an effective process of work, we are always looking for ways to improve. This is the reason why we have since 1999 a series of strategic plans in order to better focus on the objectives that member countries assign to the Agency for meeting the economical, environmental and societal challenges of the coming years. The important changes that have occurred in the energy and nuclear landscapes, as well as in the OECD framework, are the basis for these revisions insofar as they influence the NEA's role and activities. We are now completing the process for the new Strategic Plan which will apply from 2011 to 2017. Nuclear safety and regulation is and will continue to be the first priority of the Agency. The NEA will assist member countries to continue sharing information, best practices and lessons learned to enhance nuclear safety worldwide

  4. Future and potential spending on health 2015-40: development assistance for health, and government, prepaid private, and out-of-pocket health spending in 184 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-20

    The amount of resources, particularly prepaid resources, available for health can affect access to health care and health outcomes. Although health spending tends to increase with economic development, tremendous variation exists among health financing systems. Estimates of future spending can be beneficial for policy makers and planners, and can identify financing gaps. In this study, we estimate future gross domestic product (GDP), all-sector government spending, and health spending disaggregated by source, and we compare expected future spending to potential future spending. We extracted GDP, government spending in 184 countries from 1980-2015, and health spend data from 1995-2014. We used a series of ensemble models to estimate future GDP, all-sector government spending, development assistance for health, and government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private health spending through 2040. We used frontier analyses to identify patterns exhibited by the countries that dedicate the most funding to health, and used these frontiers to estimate potential health spending for each low-income or middle-income country. All estimates are inflation and purchasing power adjusted. We estimated that global spending on health will increase from US$9·21 trillion in 2014 to $24·24 trillion (uncertainty interval [UI] 20·47-29·72) in 2040. We expect per capita health spending to increase fastest in upper-middle-income countries, at 5·3% (UI 4·1-6·8) per year. This growth is driven by continued growth in GDP, government spending, and government health spending. Lower-middle income countries are expected to grow at 4·2% (3·8-4·9). High-income countries are expected to grow at 2·1% (UI 1·8-2·4) and low-income countries are expected to grow at 1·8% (1·0-2·8). Despite this growth, health spending per capita in low-income countries is expected to remain low, at $154 (UI 133-181) per capita in 2030 and $195 (157-258) per capita in 2040. Increases in national health spending

  5. Corporate Governance in Post-Socialist Countries - Theoretical Dilemmas, Peculiarities, Research Opportunities / Külliki Tafel, Erik Terk, Alari Purju

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tafel, Külliki

    2006-01-01

    Äriühingute valitsemine postsotsialistlikes riikides - teoreetilised dilemmad, eripärad, uurimisvõimalused. Skeemid: Internal and external relations of corporate governanace; The changing context of corporate governance

  6. OECD/NEA component operational experience, degradation and ageing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.; Nevander, O.; Riznic, J.; Lydell, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several OECD Member Countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 - OECD/NEA SCC and Cable Ageing project - (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the 3. Term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. In May 2011, 13 countries signed the CODAP first Term agreement. The first Term (2011-2014) work plan includes the development of a web-based relational event database on passive, metallic components in commercial nuclear power plants, a web-based knowledge base on material degradation, codes and standards relating to structural integrity and national practices for managing material degradation. The work plan also addresses the preparation of Topical Reports to foster technical cooperation and to deepen the understanding of national differences in ageing management. These Topical Reports are in the public domain and available for download on the NEA web site. Published in 2014, a first Topical Report addressed flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel and low alloy steel piping. A second Topical Report addresses operating experience with electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and instrument air (IA) system piping

  7. Is governance, gross domestic product, inequality, population size or country surface area associated with coverage and equity of health interventions? Ecological analyses of cross-sectional surveys from 80 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmeister, Fernando C; da Silva, Inácio Crochemore M; Barros, Aluisio J D; Victora, Cesar G

    2017-01-01

    To assess associations between national characteristics, including governance indicators, with a proxy for universal health coverage in reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH). Ecological analysis based on data from national standardised cross-sectional surveys. Low-income and middle-income countries with a Demographic and Health Survey or a Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey since 2005. 1 246 710 mothers and 2 129 212 children from 80 national surveys. Gross domestic product (GDP), country surface area, population, Gini index and six governance indicators (control of corruption, political stability and absence of violence, government effectiveness, regulatory quality, rule of law, and voice and accountability). Levels and inequality in the composite coverage index (CCI), a weighted average of eight RMNCH interventions. Relative and absolute inequalities were measured through the concentration index (CIX) and slope index of inequality (SII) for CCI, respectively. The average values of CCI (70.5% (SD=13.3)), CIX (5.3 (SD=5.1)) and mean slope index (19.8 (SD=14.7)) were calculated. In the unadjusted analysis, all governance variables and GDP were positively associated with the CCI and negatively with inequalities. Country surface showed inverse associations with both inequality indices. After adjustment, among the governance indicators, only political stability and absence of violence was directly related to CCI (β=6.3; 95% CI 3.6 to 9.1; p<0.001) and inversely associated with relative (CIX; β=-1.4; 95% CI -2.4 to -0.4; p=0.007) and absolute (SII; β=-5.3; 95% CI -8.9 to -1.7; p=0.005) inequalities. The strongest associations with governance indicators were found in the poorest wealth quintile. Similar patterns were observed for GDP. Country surface area was inversely related to inequalities on CCI. Levels and equity in RMNCH interventions are positively associated with political stability and absence of violence, and with GDP, and inversely

  8. OECD sarjab II samba peatamist / Erik Müürsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Müürsepp, Erik

    2009-01-01

    OECD peab II pensionisamba maksete peatamist taunitavaks. OECD dokumendist, milles vaadeldakse praegu kriisiolukorda sattunud riikide käitumist pensionisüsteemi kujundamisel. Sotsiaalminister Hanno Pevkuri arvamus OECD soovituste kohta

  9. Beyond Wage Bill Ceilings : The Impact of Government Fiscal and Human Resource Management Policies on the Health Workforce in Developing Countries, Background Country Study for Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    One of the main explanations put forth on why access to health workers is so low in developing countries is that there are insufficient resources within the public sector to pay the wage bill - the salary and allowance payments - of an expanded health workforce. In turn, the lack of wage bill resources for the health sector is thought to be a direct result of restrictive macroeconomic poli...

  10. Factors affecting the future of nuclear power in OECD Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of nuclear power in OECD Europe and addresses the prospects for its future over, say, the next quarter century. Most of the data and findings are drawn from studies published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The NEA is a small agency with a rather modest budget whose 27 members are industrialized countries from North America, Asia and Europe. The Agency works to pool the expertise of our member countries to produce technical, economic and legal work of considerable depth and quality addressing issues of common interest to those countries. Our work covers such fields as nuclear science, nuclear power economics, nuclear safety, radiation protection, waste management and nuclear liability. The studies carried out in the framework of the Agency require fewer resources than would be needed by our member countries if they were to pursue them individually, which is especially important at a time of cut-backs in national programmes in such critical areas as nuclear safety research. (author)

  11. Human machine interaction research experience and perspectives as seen from the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oewre, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review is given on important safety issues in the field of human machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear organisations such as USNRC, IAEA and the OECD NEA. Further on, a presentation is offered of research activities at the OECD Halden Reactor Project in the field of human machine interaction aiming to clarify some of the issues outlined by the above mentioned organisations. The OECD Halden Reactor Project is a joint undertaking of national nuclear organisations in 19 countries sponsoring a jointly financed research programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency. One of the research areas is the man-machine systems research addressing the operator tasks in a control room environment. The overall objective is to provide a basis for improving today's control rooms through introduction of computer-based solutions for effective and safe execution of surveillance and control functions in normal as well as off-normal plant situations. (author)

  12. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  13. Finances and governance of urban local bodies: an approach of urban development perspective from a developing country (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman PAUL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With rapid urbanisation and the pressure on urban areas for service delivery, the role of urban local governments is undoubtedly becoming important and, here, their financial capacity can hold the key. At the same time, there are several issues in urban governance that need to be addressed yet. Delegation of decision making powers to urban local bodies (ULBs, which are traditionally considered as a part of the system of State government and acting on behalf of it, is one of them. The constitutional mechanisms like inter-governmental fiscal transfers were an attempt to reduce the gap of ULBs, but they were not effective in implementation at ground. It has become imperative now to understand the financial position of ULBs in order to move forward with the new means of fund flow. This paper presents a cross sectional analysis of the finance of 27 ULBs in North 24 Parganas District of West Bengal, India in terms of their financial base and its adequacy vis-à-vis norms, and their revenue and expenditure performance. Using certain ratios, the relative performance of municipalities on dependency measures was also assessed. The implications of finances of ULBs, in terms of raising resources, improving inter-governmental transfers and charting new mechanisms are also discussed. Lastly, an approach has been made to develop an index, i.e. Urban Governance Index (UGI to a better understanding of the per-capita expenditure scenario of ULBs.

  14. The Evolution of Community Self-Organization in Interaction With Government Institutions: Cross-Case Insights From Three Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Edelenbos (Jurian); I.F. van Meerkerk (Ingmar); Schenk, T. (Todd)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThis article deals with the evolution of community self-organization in public administration. Within the literature of interactive governance, increasing attention is being paid to how communities take initiative in dealing with societal issues. However, we know little about the factors

  15. OECD Policy Recommendations on Security for Biological Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radisch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical innovations derived from research on pathogenic micro-organisms promise astounding health and economic benefits. Some such biological resources employed in the RandD for diagnostic kits, vaccines and therapeutics, however, possess capacity for dual-use; they may be misused to develop biological weapons. Research facilities entrusted with possession of such dual-use materials have a responsibility to comply with biosecurity measures that are designed to prevent loss or theft and thereby reduce the probability of a bioterrorist attack. The OECD has provided a forum for its Member countries to engage in a dialogue of international co-operation with a view to produce policies that achieve a research environment fortified by biosecurity measures and capable of producing health innovations. In 2007, the OECD developed a risk assessment framework and risk management principles for Biological Resource Centres. Ongoing policy work at the OECD will look to design biosecurity guidelines appropriate to a broader range of facilities in possession of dual-use materials, such as university and industrial laboratories.(author)

  16. Eesti allkirjastas liitumislepingu OECD-ga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Peaminister Andrus Ansip ja OECD peasekretär Angel Gurria allkirjastasid 3. juunil 2010. a. Stenbocki majas Eesti liitumislepingu. Samal päeval kohtus president Toomas Hendrik Ilves Angel Gurriaga Kadriorus

  17. OECD environmental performance reviews: United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    This book presents OECD assessments and recommendations regarding the United States' efforts to manage its environment including air, water, nature, and biodiversity; to do this in a sustainable manner; and to do this in co-operation with its global neighbours. In particular, it assesses progress made since 1996, when OECD's previous review on the US was done. 47 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. Governance restructuring in the cut flower trade in France and its impacts on the producers in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroza Filho, Manoel Xavier

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to examine how retailers play a powerful role in shaping the governance in cut flower trade in France. Global Value Chain analysis has been used to explain why a distribution system originally based on spot markets has been replaced by tightly integrated supply chains. It allowed an exploration of the consequences of these changes on the structure of the value chain and the inclusion and exclusion of different agents in the chain. Fieldwork were carried out betwe...

  19. Varieties of flood risk governance in Europe : How do countries respond to driving forces and what explains institutional change?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Mark; Kaufmann, M.; Mees, H.; Schellenberger, T.; Ganzevoort, W.; Hegger, D.L.T.; Larrue, C.; Matczak, P.

    Abstract Floods are challenging the resilience of societies all over the world. In many countries there are discussions on diversifying the strategies for flood risk management, which implies some sort of policy change. To understand the possibilities of such change, a thorough understanding of the

  20. Varieties of flood risk governance in Europe: How do countries respond to driving forces and what explains institutional change?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, M.A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mees, H.; Schellenberger, T.; Ganzevoort, W.; Hegger, D.L.T.; Larrue, C.; Matczak, P.

    2017-01-01

    Floods are challenging the resilience of societies all over the world. In many countries there are discussions on diversifying the strategies for flood risk management, which implies some sort of policy change. To understand the possibilities of such change, a thorough understanding of the forces of