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Sample records for octanoic acid radical

  1. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite.

  2. Structure and polymer form of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates produced by Pseudomonas oleovorans grown with mixture of sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid and sodium octanoate/5-phenylvaleric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, I-Ching; Yang, Sheng-Pin; Chiu, Wen-Yen; Huang, Shih-Yow

    2007-01-30

    PHAs (poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates) obtained by Pseudomonas oleovorans grown with mixed carbon sources were investigated. Mixed carbon sources were sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid and sodium octanoate/5-phenylvaleric acid. Effect of carbon source in pre-culture on PHAs structure was investigated. Main fermentation was conducted with mixture of sodium octanoate/undecylenic acid, and PHA contained both saturated and unsaturated units. When more undecylenic acid was used in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated unit increased and the T(g) of the products also changed. The PHA grown with mixture of sodium octanoate and undecylenic acid was a random copolymer, which was determined by DSC analysis. Using mixed carbon sources of sodium octanoate and 5-phenylvaleric acid, highest dry cell weight and PHA concentration were obtained when 0.02g or 0.04g of 5-phenylvaleric acid were added in 50mL medium. Cultured with sodium octanoate and 5-phenylvaleric acid, PHA containing HO (3-hydroxyoctanoate) unit and HPV (3-hydroxy-5-phenylvalerate) unit was produced. T(g) of the products fell between those of pure PHO and pure PHPV. By means of DSC analysis and fractionation method, the PHA obtained was regarded as a random copolymer.

  3. [*C]octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying rate of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Rutgeerts, P J; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B; Vantrappen, G

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a breath test to measure solid gastric emptying using a standardized scrambled egg test meal (250 kcal) labeled with [14C]octanoic acid or [13C]octanoic acid. In vitro incubation studies showed that octanoic acid is a reliable marker of the solid phase. The breath test was validated in 36 subjects by simultaneous radioscintigraphic and breath test measurements. Nine healthy volunteers were studied after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin and peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline, respectively. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying, while propantheline significantly reduced gastric emptying rates. We conclude that the [*C]octanoic breath test is a promising and reliable test for measuring the gastric emptying rate of solids.

  4. Conducting polymers of octanoic acid 2-thiophen-3-yl-ethyl ester and their electrochromic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camurlu, Pinar; Cirpan, Ali; Toppare, Levent

    2005-01-01

    Octanoic acid 2-thiophen-3-yl-ethyl ester was synthesized via the reaction of 3-thiophene ethanol with octanoyl chloride. The resulting monomer was electrochemically homopolymerized in the presence of tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate as the supporting electrolyte, in the acetonitrile/borontrifluoride ethyl ether solvent system. The resulting polymer was characterized using various experimental techniques. Spectroelectrochemistry analysis of the homopolymer reflects electronic transitions at 434, ∼800 and ∼1100 nm, revealing π-π* transition, polaron and bipolaron band formation, respectively, leading to esthetically pleasing color changes between transmissive yellow and blue, with reasonable switching times

  5. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid...

  6. Excess molar enthalpies of binary systems containing 2-octanone, hexanoic acid, or octanoic acid at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wei-Chen; Lin, Ho-mu; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → An isothermal titration calorimeter was used for enthalpy data measurement. → The investigated binary systems contain 2-octanone, hexanoic acid, or octanoic acid. → The excess enthalpies are all positive except for mixtures containing DMSO and DMF. → The Peng-Robinson equation with two parameters yielded the best representation. - Abstract: An isothermal titration calorimeter was used to measure the excess molar enthalpies (H E ) of six binary systems at T = 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure. The systems investigated include (1-hexanol + 2-octanone), (1-octanol + 2-octanone), (1-hexanol + octanoic acid), (1-hexanol + hexanoic acid), {N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + hexanoic acid}, and {dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) + hexanoic acid}. The values of excess molar enthalpies are all positive except for the DMSO- and the DMF-containing systems. In the 1-hexanol with hexanoic acid or octanoic acid systems, the maximum values of H E are located around the mole fraction of 0.4 of 1-hexanol, but the H E vary nearly symmetrically with composition for other four systems. In addition to the modified Redlich-Kister and the NRTL models, the Peng-Robinson (PR) and the Patel-Teja (PT) equations of state were used to correlate the excess molar enthalpy data. The modified Redlich-Kister equation correlates the H E data to within about experimental uncertainty. The calculated results from the PR and the PT are comparable. It is indicated that the overall average absolute relative deviations (AARD) of the excess enthalpy calculations are reduced from 18.8% and 18.8% to 6.6% and 7.0%, respectively, as the second adjustable binary interaction parameter, k bij , is added in the PR and the PT equations. Also, the NRTL model correlates the H E data to an overall AARD of 10.8% by using two adjustable model parameters.

  7. The inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae population during alcoholic fermentation of grape must by octanoic, decanoic and dodecanoic acid mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baroň Mojmír

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of alcoholic fermentation by octanoic, decanoic and dodecanoic acid mixture was investigated. Middle chain fatty acids (MCFA mixture contained 10 grams of C8:C10:C12 in a ratio of 2:7:1 was dissolved in 100 ml of 70% ethanol, and in such form, it was subsequently applied into the fermenting must samples. A flow cytometry test showed that the 10 mg/L dose of MCFA mixture had a toxic effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (45.9% of viable cells compared with the control variant (74.35%. In combination with 60 mg/L of SO2, it had a higher efficiency (3.1% of viable cells than using a dose of SO2 alone (13.9%. Direct counting of yeast cells confirmed a higher concentration of dead cells with a higher concentration of MCFA. A dose of 10 mg/L of MCFA mixture caused the highest percentage of dead yeast after 24 hours (about 60% compared to the control variant without MCFA dosage (about 24%. The results of residues showed that there is no significant quantitative difference between the treated and untreated musts because of fixing of MCFA inside the yeast cells. This method can effectively reduce the cost of production technology for wines with residual sugar and, in general, reduce the dosage of SO2.

  8. The Effect of AOT and Octanoic Acid on the Formation of Stable Water-in-diesel Microemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Misran, Misni Bin; Wang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and octanoic acid (OA) were used as surfactants to prepare water-in-diesel microemulsion. The effect of mixed surfactants ratio on the phase behavior of water-in-diesel microemulsion was investigated. The R0-T plot phase diagrams for the diesel/AOT and OA/water system with different surfactant ratios were constructed at 30-80 °C. The results indicate that the largest single phase region could be obtained when OA to AOT molar ratio was 1. The temperature had a significant influence on phase transformation behavior. The single phase separated into two immiscible phases with the increase of temperature when R0 value was above 10. Compared with applying AOT alone, mixing AOT with appropriate amount of OA is benefit to form smaller nanosized W/O droplets. The determination of particle size was performed to verify the phase transformation behavior, and the results were consistent with the phase diagrams.

  9. Influence of octanoic acid on SmCo{sub 5} nanoflakes prepared by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Liyun, E-mail: zheng@udel.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); College of Electromechanical Engineering, Hebei University of Engineering, Handan, Hebei 056038 (China); Cui Baozhi; Akdogan, Nilay G.; Li Wanfeng; Hadjipanayis, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    High-energy ball milling (HEBM) of magnetically hard SmCo{sub 5} was conducted in heptane with octanoic acid as the surfactant. The effects of octanoic acid on the morphology and magnetic properties of the powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results show an interesting unexpected fact that the SmCo{sub 5} powders processed by octanoic acid-assisted HEBM were in form of nanoflakes with aspect-ratio of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} without the presence of nanoparticles. The thickness of nanoflakes decreases with increasing milling time. X-ray diffraction patterns did not show the sign of oxidation and the diffraction peaks of SmCo{sub 5} were getting broader with the increase of milling time. The nanoflakes were magnetically anisotropic and had a higher coercivity than the micro-particles prepared by HEBM without surfactant. The coercivity of SmCo{sub 5} increased initially with the milling time and then it decreased after reaching the maximum value of 15.2 kOe. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy image showed that the SmCo{sub 5} nanoflakes are nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size approximately 12 nm.

  10. Effect of DA-9701 on gastric emptying in a mouse model: assessment by ¹³C-octanoic acid breath test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Hyeyeon; Baeg, Myong Ki; Park, Jae Myung

    2013-07-21

    To evaluate the effects of DA-9701 on the gastric emptying of a solid meal using the ¹³C-octanoic acid breath test in a mouse model. Male C57BL/6 mice aged > 8 wk and with body weights of 20-25 g were used in this study. The solid test meal consisted of 200 mg of egg yolk labeled with 1.5 L/g ¹³C-octanoic acid. The mice were placed in a 130 mL chamber flushed with air at a flow speed of 200 mL/min. Breath samples were collected for 6 h. The half-emptying time and lag phase were calculated using a modified power exponential model. To assess the reproducibility of the ¹³C-octanoic acid breath test, the breath test was performed two times at intervals of one week in ten mice without drug treatment. To assess the gastrokinetic effects of DA-9701, the breath test was performed three times in another twelve mice, with a randomized crossover sequence of three drug treatments: DA-9701 3 mg/kg, erythromycin 6 mg/kg, or saline. Each breath test was performed at an interval of one week. Repeatedly measured half gastric emptying time of ten mice without drug treatment showed 0.856 of the intraclass correlation coefficient for the half gastric emptying time (P = 0.004). The mean cumulative excretion curve for the ¹³C-octanoic acid breath test showed accelerated gastric emptying after DA-9701 treatment compared with the saline control (P = 0.028). The median half gastric emptying time after the DA-9701 treatment was significantly shorter than after the saline treatment [122.4 min (109.0-137.9 min) vs 134.5 min (128.4-167.0 min), respectively; P = 0.028] and similar to that after the erythromycin treatment [123.3 min (112.9-138.2 min)]. The lag phase, which was defined as the period taken to empty 15% of a meal, was significantly shorter after the DA-9701 treatment than after the saline treatment [48.1 min (44.6-57.1 min) vs 52.6 min (49.45-57.4 min), respectively; P = 0.049]. The novel prokinetic agent DA-9701 accelerated gastric emptying, assessed with repeated

  11. Production of 3-Oxo-2-(2'-pentenyl)-cyclopentane-1-octanoic Acid in the Fungus Aspergillus oryzae: A Step Towards Heterologous Production of Pyrethrins in Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Maged E; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A K; Lazarus, Colin M

    2016-03-01

    Pyrethrins are natural insecticides, which accumulate to high concentrations in pyrethrum (Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium) flowers. Synthetic pyrethroids are more stable, more efficacious and cheaper, but contemporary requirements for safe and environmentally friendly pesticides encourage a return to the use of natural pyrethrins, and this would be favoured by development of an efficient route to their production by microbial fermentation. The biosynthesis of pyrethrins involves ester linkage between an acid moiety (chrysanthemoyl or pyrethroyl, synthesised via the mevalonic acid pathway from glucose), and an alcohol (pyrethrolone). Pyrethrolone is generated from 3-oxo-2-(2'-pentenyl)-cyclopentane-1-octanoic acid, which originates from α-linolenic acid via the jasmonic acid biosynthetic cascade. The first four genes in this cascade, encoding lipoxygenase 2, allene-oxide synthase, allene-oxide cyclase 2 and 12-oxophytodienoic acid reductase 3, were amplified from an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, cloned in a purpose-built fungal multigene expression vector and expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. HPLC-MS analysis of the transgenic fungus homogenate gave good evidence for the presence of 3-oxo-2-(2'-pentenyl)-cyclopentane-1-octanoic acid.

  12. 13C-octanoic acid breath test for measurement of solid gastric emptying: reproducibility in normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Bo; Dan, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To examine the intra-individual reproducibility of the octanoic acid breath test in normal subjects and diabetics and to investigate whether cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and delayed gastric emptying influence the intra-individual reproducibility. Methods: Nine normal subjects (six men, three women,mean age 38 years) and 15 diabetics with insulin treatment [nine men, six women; mean age 47 years; six had cardiovascular autonomic diabetic neuropathy (CADN) and/or delayed gastric emptying time] were, after a nocturnal fasting period, given a standard test meal (labelled with 13 C-octanoic acid, 1 046 kJ). Breath samples were taken at ten minute intervals over first one hour and at fifteen minute intervals over the following three hours and examined for 13 CO 2 by isotope ratio infrared spectrometry. Using a regression method gastric emptying half times (t 1/2 ) and lag phase (t lag ) were determined. Results: There was not a significant difference of t 1/2 and t lag between two measurements in normal subjects and diabetics. The coefficients of variation of day-to-day reproducibility were 11.7% for t 1/2 , 19.4% for t lag in normal subjects and 17.8% for t 1/2 , 28.2% for t lag in diabetics, but there was not significant difference between normal subjects and diabetics. There was not significant difference of intra-individual coefficient of variation of t 1/2 and t lag between diabetics with/without CADN and between diabetics with normal gastric emptying time and diabetics with delayed gastric emptying time. Conclusions: The 13 C-octanoic acid breath test has a high intra-individual reproducibility which is not affected by the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and delayed gastric emptying. It can be recommended as a non-invasive test for assessing gastric emptying time after a solid test meal in diabetics

  13. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by sequential feeding of xylose and octanoic acid in engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Meur Sylvaine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is able to synthesize large amounts of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs. To reduce the substrate cost, which represents nearly 50% of the total PHA production cost, xylose, a hemicellulose derivate, was tested as the growth carbon source in an engineered P. putida KT2440 strain. Results The genes encoding xylose isomerase (XylA and xylulokinase (XylB from Escherichia coli W3110 were introduced into P. putida KT2440. The recombinant KT2440 exhibited a XylA activity of 1.47 U and a XylB activity of 0.97 U when grown on a defined medium supplemented with xylose. The cells reached a maximum specific growth rate of 0.24 h-1 and a final cell dry weight (CDW of 2.5 g L-1 with a maximal yield of 0.5 g CDW g-1 xylose. Since no mcl-PHA was accumulated from xylose, mcl-PHA production can be controlled by the addition of fatty acids leading to tailor-made PHA compositions. Sequential feeding strategy was applied using xylose as the growth substrate and octanoic acid as the precursor for mcl-PHA production. In this way, up to 20% w w-1 of mcl-PHA was obtained. A yield of 0.37 g mcl-PHA per g octanoic acid was achieved under the employed conditions. Conclusions Sequential feeding of relatively cheap carbohydrates and expensive fatty acids is a practical way to achieve more cost-effective mcl-PHA production. This study is the first reported attempt to produce mcl-PHA by using xylose as the growth substrate. Further process optimizations to achieve higher cell density and higher productivity of mcl-PHA should be investigated. These scientific exercises will undoubtedly contribute to the economic feasibility of mcl-PHA production from renewable feedstock.

  14. Surface pKa of octanoic, nonanoic, and decanoic fatty acids at the air-water interface: applications to atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, Bethany A; Lach, Evan A; Allen, Heather C

    2017-10-11

    There exists large uncertainty in the literature as to the pK a of medium-chain fatty acids at the air-water interface. Via surface tension titration, the surface-pK a values of octanoic (C 8 ), nonanoic (C 9 ), and decanoic (C 10 ) fatty acids are determined to be 4.9, 5.8, and 6.4, respectively. The surface-pK a determined with surface tension differs from the bulk value obtained during a standard acid-base titration. Near the surface-pK a of the C 8 and C 9 systems, surface tension minima are observed and are attributed to the formation of surface-active acid-soap complexes. The direction of the titration is shown to affect the surface-pK a of the C 9 system, as the value shifts to 5.2 with NaOH titrant due to a higher concentration of Na + ions at pH values close to the surface-pK a . As the reactivity and climate-relevant properties of sea spray aerosols (SSA) are partially dictated by the charge and surface activity of the organics at the aerosol-atmosphere interface, the results presented here on SSA-identified C 8 -C 10 fatty acids can be used to better predict the health and climate impact of particles with significant concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids.

  15. Gastric emptying and related symptoms in patients treated with buspirone, amitriptyline or clebopride: a "real world" study by 13C-octanoic Acid Breath Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Gian P; Sguazzini, Carlo; Cisarò, Fabio; Ribaldone, Davide G; Rosso, Chiara; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Smedile, Antonina; Saracco, Giorgio M; Astegiano, Marco; Pellicano, Rinaldo

    2017-12-01

    Gastric motility is a key-factor in the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia (FD). 13C-octanoic Acid Breath Test (OBT) is a tool used for measuring gastric emptying time in clinical setting. We aimed to investigate the variation in FD symptoms and OBT parameters after treatment with buspirone, amitriptyline or clebopride. Between Jan-2007 and Dec-2014, we enrolled 59 patients with FD unresponsive to first-line therapy with proton pump inhibitors and/or domperidone that underwent OBT before and after 3 months of buspirone (N.=32), amitriptyline (N.=16) or clebopride (N.=11) treatment. Early satiation severity was positively correlated with gastric half emptying time (t1/2) (r=0.3789, P=0.003) and gastric lag phase (r=0.3371, P=0.011), and negatively correlated with gastric emptying coefficient (r=-0.3231, P=0.015). A reduction in t1/2 measurement in association to postprandial fullness, and early satiation severity improvement was observed (P=0.009, P=0.005 and Pclebopride. Patients with FD, non-responders to first-line therapy and reporting meal-related discomfort, may benefit from buspirone or amitriptyline-based therapies.

  16. Experimental vapor pressures (from 1 Pa to 100 kPa) of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs): Methyl hexanoate, methyl octanoate, methyl decanoate, methyl dodecanoate, methyl tetradecanoate and methyl hexadecanoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahraoui, Lakhdar; Khimeche, Kamel; Dahmani, Abdallah; Mokbel, Ilham; Jose, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • Vapor-liquid equilibria, Enthalpy of Vaporization, saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs), methyl hexanoate (or methyl caproate), methyl octanoate (or methyl caprylate), Methyl decanoate (or methyl caprate), methyl dodecanoate (or methyl laurate), methyl tetradecanoate (or methyl myristate), and methyl hexadecanoate (or methyl palmitate) were measured from 1 Pa to 100 kPa and at temperature range between 262 and 453 K using a static apparatus. The experimental data (P-T) were compared with the available literature data.

  17. Sex-related differences in the enhancing effects of perfluoro-octanoic acid on stearoyl-CoA desaturase and its influence on the acyl composition of phospholipid in rat liver. Comparison with clofibric acid and tiadenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Y; Uy-Yu, N; Kozuka, H

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the peroxisome proliferators clofibric acid (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid), tiadenol [2,2'-(decamethylenedithio)diethanol] and perfluoro-octanoic acid (PFOA) on hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturation in male and female rats were compared. Treatment of male rats with the three peroxisome proliferators increased markedly the activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Administration of clofibric acid or tiadenol to female rats increased greatly the hepatic activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase, the extent of the increases being slightly less pronounced than those of male rats. In contrast with the other two peroxisome proliferators, however, PFOA did not change the activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase in female rats. Hormonal manipulations revealed that this sex-related difference in the effect of PFOA on stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity is strongly dependent on testosterone. The increase in stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity by peroxisome proliferators was not accompanied by any notable increases in the microsomal content of cytochrome b5 or the activity of NADH: cytochrome b5 reductase. The administration of the peroxisome proliferators greatly altered the acyl composition of hepatic phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (namely the proportions of C18:1 and C20:3,n-9 fatty acids increased in both phospholipids), and the alterations were partially associated with the increase in stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity. PMID:2574572

  18. Changes in trehalose content of baker's yeast as affected by octanoic acid Alterações no teor de trealose de levedura de panificação provocadas por ácido octanóico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Gutierrez

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Octanoic acid inhibited ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast and the trehalose accumulation, however did not affect the endogenous degradation of trehalose. This inhibition may be explained by the binding of octanoic acid to hexokinase or other proteins of plasma membrane because they are not necessary for endogenous fermentation. The degradation of trehalose may be due to an activation of trehalase.A adição de ácido octanóico inibiu a fermentação alcoólica realizada por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (levedura de panificação e o acúmulo de trealose, contudo não afetou a degradação endógena de trealose. Esta inibição poderia ser explicada pela ligação do ácido octanóico a hexoquinase ou outra proteína da membrana plasmática porque não são necessárias para a fermentação endógena. A degradação da trealose poderia ser devida a uma ativação da trealase.

  19. Sex-related difference in the inductions by perfluoro-octanoic acid of peroxisomal beta-oxidation, microsomal 1-acylglycerophosphocholine acyltransferase and cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA hydrolase in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Y; Uy-Yu, N; Kozuka, H

    1989-01-01

    Inductions by perfluoro-octanoic acid (PFOA) of hepatomegaly, peroxisomal beta-oxidation, microsomal 1-acylglycerophosphocholine acyltransferase and cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA hydrolase were compared in liver between male and female rats. Marked inductions of these four parameters were seen concurrently in liver of male rats, whereas the inductions in liver of female rats were far less pronounced. The sex-related difference in the response of rat liver to PFOA was much more marked than that seen with p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (clofibric acid) or 2,2'-(decamethylenedithio)diethanol (tiadenol). Hormonal manipulations revealed that this sex-related difference in the inductions is strongly dependent on sex hormones, namely that testosterone is necessary for the inductions, whereas oestradiol prevented the inductions by PFOA. PMID:2570571

  20. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zarzana, Christopher A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  1. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Zarzana, Christopher A.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO 3 . It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  2. OH radical induced depolymerization of poly(methacrylic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanski, Piotr; Bothe, Eberhard; von Sonntag, Clemens

    1999-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (generated pulse radiolytically in dilute N 2O-saturated aqueous solutions) react with poly(methacrylic acid) producing two kinds of radicals. The primary radical is converted into a secondary one by H-abstraction ( k=3.5 × 10 2 s -1) as monitored by changes in the UV spectrum. Subsequently, the secondary radicals undergo chain scission ( k=1.8 s -1 at pH 7-9). This process has been followed both by spectrophotometry as well as by conductometry. In competition with the bimolecular decay of the radicals the ensuing end-chain radicals undergo efficient depolymerization resulting in the release of monomer. Since the lifetime of the radicals is much longer at high pH, where the polymer attains a rod-like conformation, depolymerization is most efficient in basic solution.

  3. Modulation of adipocyte lipogenesis by octanoate: involvement of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jianrong

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Octanoate is a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA that is rich in milk and tropical dietary lipids. It also accounts for 70% of the fatty acids in commercial medium chain triglycerides (MCT. Use of MCT for weight control tracks back to early 1950s and is highlighted by recent clinical trials. The molecular mechanisms of the weight reduction effect remain not completely understood. The findings of significant amounts of MCFA in adipose tissue in MCT-fed animals and humans suggest a direct influence of MCFA on fat cell functions. Methods 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with octanoate in a high glucose culture medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 170 nM insulin. The effects on lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the expression and activity of peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma (PPARγ and its associated lipogenic genes were assessed. In selected experiments, long-chain fatty acid oleate, PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and antioxidant N-acetylcysteine were used in parallel. Effects of insulin, L-carnitine, and etomoxir on β-oxidation were also measured. Results β-oxidation of octanoate was primarily independent of CPT-I. Treatment with octanoate was linked to an increase in ROS in adipocytes, a decrease in triglyceride synthesis, and reduction of lipogenic gene expression. Co-treatment with troglitazone, N-acetylcysteine, or over-expression of glutathione peroxidase largely reversed the effects of octanoate. Conclusion These findings suggest that octanoate-mediated inactivation of PPARγ might contribute to the down regulation of lipogenic genes in adipocytes, and ROS appears to be involved as a mediator in this process.

  4. Octanoic Hydrazide-Linked Chitooligosaccharides-2,5-Anhydro-d-Mannofuranose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chitooligosaccharide with one 2,5-anhydro-d-mannofuranose unit at the reducing end (COSamf was prepared by nitrous acid depolymerization of chitosan. The reducing-end functionalization of COSamf by reductive amination with octanoic hydrazide in the presence of NaBH3CN was achieved in high yield. The chemical structure of the targeted octanoic hydrazide-linked COSamf was fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This synthesis opens the way to a new generation of COSamf derivatives with potential amphiphilic properties.

  5. The cholesteryl octanoate breath test: a new procedure for detection of pancreatic insufficiency in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundlos, S; Rhodes, J B; Hofmann, A F

    1987-09-01

    A breath test for the detection of pancreatic insufficiency was developed and tested in rats. The test features the hydrophobic molecule cholesteryl-1-14C-octanoate, which liberates 14C-octanoic acid when hydrolyzed by carboxyl ester lipase (cholesterol esterase). The 14C-octanoate is absorbed passively and rapidly metabolized to 14CO2, which is excreted in expired air. The compound was administered as an emulsion of cholesteryl octanoate, triglyceride, and lecithin to rats with mild pancreatic insufficiency induced by injecting the pancreatic duct with zein. The animals had exocrine pancreatic hypofunction based on the enzyme content of pancreas at autopsy. Amylase was reduced by 97.1 +/- 1.4%, whereas chymotrypsin was reduced by 73 +/- 14%. The p-aminobenzoic acid test was abnormal at 1 wk (21.68 +/- 8.4%), but become normal at 3 months (72.08 +/- 5.8%) after zein injection. Despite this, the animals gained weight and absorbed fat normally. The 14CO2 excretion rate in the 110-min interval after feeding was significantly reduced to 60% of sham-operated animals. Peak 14CO2 collections 20 min after feeding were reduced by 75 +/- 11%. 14CO2 output was completely normalized by administration of pancreatin prior to the test meal. The results suggest that a sensitive, noninvasive method for detecting deficiency of pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase (cholesterol esterase) secretion in the rat has been developed.

  6. Aerosol Fragmentation Driven by Coupling of Acid-Base and Free-Radical Chemistry in the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Aqueous Citric Acid by OH Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Matthew J; Wiegel, Aaron A; Wilson, Kevin R; Houle, Frances A

    2017-08-10

    A key uncertainty in the heterogeneous oxidation of carboxylic acids by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in aqueous-phase aerosol is how the free-radical reaction pathways might be altered by acid-base chemistry. In particular, if acid-base reactions occur concurrently with acyloxy radical formation and unimolecular decomposition of alkoxy radicals, there is a possibility that differences in reaction pathways impact the partitioning of organic carbon between the gas and aqueous phases. To examine these questions, a kinetic model is developed for the OH-initiated oxidation of citric acid aerosol at high relative humidity. The reaction scheme, containing both free-radical and acid-base elementary reaction steps with physically validated rate coefficients, accurately predicts the experimentally observed molecular composition, particle size, and average elemental composition of the aerosol upon oxidation. The difference between the two reaction channels centers on the reactivity of carboxylic acid groups. Free-radical reactions mainly add functional groups to the carbon skeleton of neutral citric acid, because carboxylic acid moieties deactivate the unimolecular fragmentation of alkoxy radicals. In contrast, the conjugate carboxylate groups originating from acid-base equilibria activate both acyloxy radical formation and carbon-carbon bond scission of alkoxy radicals, leading to the formation of low molecular weight, highly oxidized products such as oxalic and mesoxalic acid. Subsequent hydration of carbonyl groups in the oxidized products increases the aerosol hygroscopicity and accelerates the substantial water uptake and volume growth that accompany oxidation. These results frame the oxidative lifecycle of atmospheric aerosol: it is governed by feedbacks between reactions that first increase the particle oxidation state, then eventually promote water uptake and acid-base chemistry. When coupled to free-radical reactions, acid-base channels lead to formation of low molecular

  7. Microwave-assisted Polymerization of D, L-Lactide with Stannous Octanoate as Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) was synthesized by microwave-assisted ring-opening poly- merization of D, L-lactide with stannous octanoate (SnOct2) as catalyst. Its weight-average molar mass (Mw) ranged from 39000 to 67000 and the polydispersity index from 1.3 to 1.7. The polymerization rate was much faster than that of the conventional thermal polymerization. A degradation of newly formed PLA in reaction mixture by microwave irradiation was observed.

  8. Reactions of linoleic acid peroxyl radicals with phenolic antioxidants: a pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben-Russ, Michael; Bors, Wolf; Saran, Manfred

    1987-01-01

    Linoleic acid peroxyl radicals (LOO) can be viewed as model intermediates occurring during lipid peroxidation processes. Formation and reactions of these species were investigated in aqueous alkaline solution using pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic spectroscopy. Irradiation of linoleic acid in N 2 O/O 2 -saturated solutions leads to a mixture of peroxyl radical isomers; reaction of 13-hydroperoxylinoleic acid (13-LOOH) with azide radicals in N 2 O-saturated solution produces 13-LOO radicals specifically. These peroxyl radicals cannot be observed directly, but their reactions with kaempferol and quercetin, acting as radical-scavenging antioxidants, produced strongly absorbing aroxyl radicals (ArO). The same aroxyl radicals were generated by OH and N 3 with rate constants exceeding 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Applying a reaction scheme that includes competing generation and decay reactions of both LOO and ArO radicals, individual rate constants were derived for LOO reactions with the phenols (> 10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s-? 1 ), with aroxyl radicals to form covalent adducts (> 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ), as well as for their bimilecular decay (3.0 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ). These results demonstrate high reactivity of fatty acid peroxyl radicals and flavone antioxidants in aqueous solution. (author)

  9. Reactions of linoleic acid peroxyl radicals with phenolic antioxidants: a pulse radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erben-Russ, M.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-09-01

    Linoleic acid peroxyl radicals (LOO) can be viewed as model intermediates occurring during lipid peroxidation processes. Formation and reactions of these species were investigated in aqueous alkaline solution using pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic spectroscopy. Irradiation of linoleic acid in N/sub 2/O/O/sub 2/-saturated solutions leads to a mixture of peroxyl radical isomers; reaction of 13-hydroperoxylinoleic acid (13-LOOH) with azide radicals in N/sub 2/O-saturated solution produces 13-LOO radicals specifically. These peroxyl radicals cannot be observed directly, but their reactions with kaempferol and quercetin, acting as radical-scavenging antioxidants, produced strongly absorbing aroxyl radicals (ArO). The same aroxyl radicals were generated by OH and N/sub 3/ with rate constants exceeding 10/sup 9/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Applying a reaction scheme that includes competing generation and decay reactions of both LOO and ArO radicals, individual rate constants were derived for LOO reactions with the phenols (> 10/sup 7/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s-./sup 1/), with aroxyl radicals to form covalent adducts (> 10/sup 8/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/), as well as for their bimilecular decay (3.0 x 10/sup 8/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/). These results demonstrate high reactivity of fatty acid peroxyl radicals and flavone antioxidants in aqueous solution.

  10. EPR study of gamma induced radicals in amino and iminodiacetic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Murat; Baskan, M. Halim; Osmanoglu, Y. Emre

    2009-01-01

    In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate free radicals formed in gamma irradiated L-glutamine hydrochloride, iminodiacetic acid hydrochloride and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) iminodiacetic acid powders. The free radicals produced in L-glutamine hydrochloride powders were attributed to the CH 2 CHCOOH radical; and those in iminodiacetic acid hydrochloride and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) iminodiacetic acid powders to the HNCHCH 2 (CO OH) 2 and HOCH 2 CH 2 NCHCH 2 (CO OH) 2 , respectively. The g-values of the radicals and the hyperfine structure constants of the free electron with the environmental protons and 14 N nucleus were determined. The samples were not displayed before they were not irradiated. The free radicals were found stable at room temperature for more than six months. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning possible structure of the radicals are discussed in this paper. (author)

  11. Enantioselective radical reactions. Evaluation of nitrogen protecting groups in the synthesis of β2-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P.; Patil, Kalyani

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of nitrogen protecting groups in radical addition trapping experiments leading to β2-amino acids. Of the three N-protecting groups examined, the phthalimido group was optimal with respect to both yields and enantioselectivity. Additionally, radical additions to more complex acrylates were also investigated, which provided access to functionalized β2-amino acids in modest selectivity. PMID:16799704

  12. Enantioselective radical reactions. Evaluation of nitrogen protecting groups in the synthesis of beta-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Patil, Kalyani

    2006-02-20

    We have investigated the effect of nitrogen protecting groups in radical addition trapping experiments leading to beta(2)-amino acids. Of the three N-protecting groups examined, the phthalimido group was optimal with respect to both yields and enantioselectivity. Additionally, radical additions to more complex acrylates were also investigated, which provided access to functionalized beta(2)-amino acids in modest selectivity.

  13. [Correlation Between Functional Groups and Radical Scavenging Activities of Acidic Polysaccharides from Dendrobium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying; Yuan, Wen-yu; Zheng, Wen-ke; Luo, Ao-xue; Fan, Yi-jun

    2015-11-01

    To compare the radical scavenging activity of five different acidic polysaccharides, and to find the correlation with the functional groups. Alkali extraction method and Stepwise ethanol precipitation method were used to extract and concentrate the five Dendrobium polysaccharides, and to determine the contents of sulfuric acid and uronic acid of each kind of acidic polysaccharides, and the scavenging activity to ABTS+ radical and hydroxyl radical. Functional group structures were examined by FTIR Spectrometer. Five kinds of Dendrobium polysaccharides had different ability of scavenging ABTS+ free radical and hydroxyl free radical. Moreover, the study had shown that five kinds of antioxidant activity of acidic polysaccharides had obvious correlation withuronic acid and sulfuric acid. The antioxidant activity of each sample was positively correlated with the content of uronic acid, and negatively correlated with the content of sulfuric acid. Sulfuric acid can inhibit the antioxidant activity of acidic polysaccharide but uronic acid can enhance the free radical scavenging activity. By analyzing the structure characteristics of five acidic polysaccharides, all samples have similar structures, however, Dendrobium denneanum, Dendrobium devonianum and Dendrobium officinale which had β configuration have higher antioxidant activity than Dendrobium nobile and Dendrobium fimbriatum which had a configuration.

  14. Radical quenching by rosmarinic acid from Lavandula vera MM cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, Elena; Georgiev, Milen; Pashova, Svetlana; Angelova, Maria; Ilieva, Mladenka

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the radical scavenging capacities of extracts and preparations from a Lavandula vera MM plant cell culture with different rosmarinic acid content and to compare them with pure rosmarinic and caffeic acids as well. The methods, which were used are superoxide anion and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radicals scavenging assays. Results showed that extracts and preparations from Lavandula vera MM possess strong radical scavengers, as the best both radical scavengers appeared to be the fractions with enriched rosmarinic acid content, obtained after ethylacetate fractioning (47.7% inhibition of superoxide radicals and 14.2 microM 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid equivalents, respectively). These data reveal the possibilities for application of these preparations as antioxidants.

  15. Distribution of stable free radicals among amino acids of isolated soy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qingxin; Liebold, Christopher M; Boatright, William L; Shah Jahan, M

    2010-09-01

    Application of deuterium sulfide to powdered isolated soy proteins (ISP) was used to quench stable free radicals and produce a single deuterium label on amino acids where free radicals reside. The deuterium labels rendered increases of isotope ratio for the specific ions of radical-bearing amino acids. Isotope ratio measurements were achieved by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses after the amino acids were released by acidic hydrolysis and converted to volatile derivatives with propyl chloroformate. The isotope enrichment data showed the stable free radicals were located on Ala, Gly, Leu, Ile, Asx (Asp+Asn), Glx (Glu+Gln), and Trp but not on Val, Pro, Met, Phe, Lys, and His. Due to the low abundance of Ser, Thr, and Cys derivatives and the impossibility to accurately measure their isotope ratios, the radical bearing status for these amino acids remained undetermined even though their derivatives were positively identified from ISP hydrolysates. The relative isotope enrichment for radical-bearing amino acids Ala, Gly, Leu, Ile, Asx (Asp+Asn), Glx (Glu+Gln), and Trp were 8.67%, 2.96%, 2.90%, 3.94%, 6.03%, 3.91%, and 21.48%, respectively. Isotope ratio increase for Tyr was also observed but further investigation revealed such increase was mainly from nonspecific deuterium-hydrogen exchange not free radical quenching. The results obtained from the present study provide important information for a better understanding of the mechanisms of free radical formation and stabilization in "dry" ISP.

  16. 40 CFR 180.1262 - Sorbitol octanoate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sorbitol octanoate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1262 Sorbitol octanoate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sorbitol octanoate in or on all...

  17. Preliminary evaluation of [1-11C]octanoate as a PET tracer for studying cerebral ischemia. A PET study in rat and canine models of focal cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, Yuji; Kawashima, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2000-01-01

    Octanoate is taken up into the brain and is converted in astrocytes to glutamine through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle after β-oxidation. We speculate that [1- 11 C]octanoate may be used as a tracer for astroglial functions and/or fatty acid metabolism in the brain and may be useful for studying cerebral ischemia. In the present study we investigated brain distribution of [1- 11 C]octanoate and compared it with cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using rat and canine models of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion and a high resolution PET. In rats brain distribution of [ 15 O]H 2 O measured 1-2 h and 5-6 h after insult was compared with that of [1- 11 C]octanoate measured 3-4 h after insult. Radioactivity ratios of lesioned to normal hemispheres determined with [ 15 O]H 2 O were lower than those determined with [1- 11 C]octanoate. These results were confirmed by a study on a canine model of MCA-occlusion. Twenty-four hours after insult, CBF decreased in the MCA-territory of the occluded hemisphere, whereas normal or higher accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate was observed in the ischemic regions. The uptake of [1- 11 C]octanoate-derived radioactivity therefore increased relative to CBF in the ischemic regions, indicating that [1- 11 C]octanoate provides functional information different from CBF. In conclusion, we found that [1- 11 C]octanoate is a potential radiopharmaceutical for studying the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. (author)

  18. A pulse radiolysis study of the OH radical induced autoxidation of methanesulfinic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methanesulfinic acid, CH3SO2H, reacts with OH radicals at pH 7 forming CH3SO2 radicals with a rate constant k = (6.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The CH3SO2 radical absorbs at 325 nm with an extinction coefficient of 900 +/- 100 M(-1) cm(-1) and disappears in a second order self-reaction with k...... takes place. During the course of the chain oxidation a peroxyacid, presumably methaneperoxymonosulfonic acid, is formed and accumulated. This acid absorbs in the UV and eventually decays by reaction with excess methanesulfinic acid k = 5 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The final product of the chain autoxidation...... = (1.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). This radical reacts with oxygen, k = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), forming a peroxy radical which absorbs in the UV below 300 nm. The peroxy radical reacts in turn with methanesulfinic acid reforming the CH3SO2 radical whereby a chain oxidation of sulfinic acid...

  19. Hydroxyl radical modify amino acids and prevent E. coli growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report that hydroxyl radical (/sup ./OH) damage to amino acids (AA) affects their incorporation into E. coli proteins. Modification of AA (Try, Trp, Met, Cys, His, Lys, Asn, Gln) by /sup ./OH was achieved by exposure to 60 Co radiation (1-100 krads at 600 rads/min) in N 2 O saturated water. Following exposure to /sup ./OH, the modified AA were added to suspensions of 8 AA requiring E. coli mutants in M9 medium + glucose. Mutants incubated with the /sup ./OH modified AA underwent less growth than those incubated with unmodified AA; with a declining exponential relationship between /sup ./OH exposure of AA and cell growth. The sensitivity of each AA to modification by /sup ./OH was as follows: Tyr > Trp > Met > Cys > His > Lys > Asn > Gln. Essentially the same pattern was observed for inhibition of mutant growth, which was proportional to the concentration of remaining unmodified (i.e. native) AA. Furthermore, cell growth was restored to normal levels by replenishment of native AA. When AA were irradiated at 50μM and then diluted to concentrations expected to support exponential growth (different for each AA) the radiation doses at which mutant growth was inhibited by 63% were as follows (in krad): Tyr 41, Trp 48, Met 53, Cys 56, His 57, Lys 68, Asn 80, Gln 116. /sup ./OH-modified 3 H-Trp was not a substrate for protein synthesis in Trp requiring mutants but was taken up by the cells. Modified Trp was also not incorporated in cell-free synthesis experiments. No toxicity was observed when wild type E. coli, in M9 medium + glucose, were supplemented with any of the/sup ./OH-modified AA. Thus /sup ./OH-modified AA do not support E. coli growth

  20. Free radicals in dicarboxylic acids: an e.s.r. study of radical conversions in γ-irradiated single crystals of glutaric acid and glutaric-2,2,4,4-d4 acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.; Minegishi, A.; Riesz, P.

    1980-01-01

    The γ-radiation-induced free radicals in single crystals of glutaric acid and glutaric-2,2,4,4-d 4 acid were studied in the temperature range 77-300 K by e.s.r. techniques. At 77 K the decarboxylation radical and the anion are stabilized. At higher temperatures the decarboxylation radical is found to be converted into a hydrogen abstraction radical with an activation energy of 6.3 +- 0.5 kcal/mole for the non-deuterated crystal. This radical is stable at room temperature. The anion seems to be converted to a unidentified intermediate radical which in turn is converted to the σ-acyl radical. An analysis of the g-value anisotropy and of the 13 C hyperfine splitting variation for this radical in the deuterated crystal is consistent with the assigned radical structure. By heat treatment the σ-acyl radical is converted to another form of the hydrogen abstraction radical with an activation energy of 9.6 +- 0.6 kcal/mole in the deuterated crystal. U.V.-light (lambda= 254 nm) transforms one of the room temperature radicals into the other. (author)

  1. EPR spectral investigation of radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuner, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, spectroscopic features of the radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid compounds were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While un-irradiated samples presented no EPR signal, irradiated samples exhibited an EPR spectrum consisting of an intense resonance line at the center and weak lines on both sides. Detailed microwave saturation investigations were carried out to determine the origin of the experimental EPR lines. It is concluded that the two side lines of the triplet satellite originate from forbidden ''spin-flip'' transitions. The spectroscopic and structural features of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using EPR spectrum fittings. The experimental EPR spectra of the two gallic acid compounds were consistent with the calculated EPR spectroscopic features of the proposed radicals. It is concluded that the most probable radicals are the cyclohexadienyl-type, O(OH) 2 C 6 H 2 COOH radicals for both compounds. (orig.)

  2. EPR spectral investigation of radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuner, Hasan

    2017-11-01

    In the present work, spectroscopic features of the radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid compounds were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While un-irradiated samples presented no EPR signal, irradiated samples exhibited an EPR spectrum consisting of an intense resonance line at the center and weak lines on both sides. Detailed microwave saturation investigations were carried out to determine the origin of the experimental EPR lines. It is concluded that the two side lines of the triplet satellite originate from forbidden "spin-flip" transitions. The spectroscopic and structural features of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using EPR spectrum fittings. The experimental EPR spectra of the two gallic acid compounds were consistent with the calculated EPR spectroscopic features of the proposed radicals. It is concluded that the most probable radicals are the cyclohexadienyl-type, [Formula: see text] radicals for both compounds.

  3. Presence of hydrogen peroxide, a source of hydroxyl radicals, in acid electrolyzed water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mokudai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acid electrolyzed water (AEW, which is produced through the electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride (NaCl or potassium chloride solution, is used as a disinfectant in various fields because of its potent antimicrobial activity. The hydroxyl radical, an oxygen radical species, is often suggested as a putative active ingredient for AEW antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study is to detect hydroxyl radicals in AEW. The hydroxyl radicals in AEW prepared under different conditions were determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR technique. A signal from 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO-OH, an adduct of DMPO and the hydroxyl radical, was detected in AEW prepared by double or triple electrolyses of 1% NaCl but not of 0.1% NaCl solution. Then the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a proposed source of hydroxyl radicals was examined using a combination of ESR and a Fenton reaction. The DMPO-OH signal was clearly detected, even in AEW prepared by single electrolysis of 0.1% NaCl solution, when ferrous sulfate was added to induce a Fenton reaction, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the AEW. Since sodium formate, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, did not affect the bactericidal activity of AEW, it is concluded that the radical is unlikely to contribute to the antimicrobial activity of AEW, although a small amount of the radical is produced from hydrogen peroxide. Dimethyl sulfoxide, the other hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the present study, canceled the bactericidal activity of AEW, accompanied by complete depletion of free available chlorine, suggesting that hypochlorous acid is probably a major contributor to the antimicrobial activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is strongly suggested that although hydrogen peroxide is present in AEW as a source of hydroxyl radicals, the antimicrobial activity of AEW does not depend on these radicals.

  4. Degradation of acetic acid with sulfate radical generated by persulfate ions photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2009-09-01

    The photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) was studied for the removal of acetic acid in aqueous solution and compared with the H(2)O(2)/UV system. The SO(4)(-) radicals generated from the UV irradiation of S(2)O(8)(2-) ions yield a greater mineralization of acetic acid than the ()OH radicals. Acetic acid is oxidized by SO(4)(-) radicals without significant formation of intermediate by-products. Increasing system pH results in the formation of ()OH radicals from SO(4)(-) radicals. Maximum acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. The results suggest that above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of the solute with SO(4)(-) and also ()OH radicals. Scavenging effects of two naturally occurring ions were tested; in contrast to HCO(3)(-) ions, the presence of Cl(-) ions enhances the efficiency of the S(2)O(8)(2-)/UV process towards the acetate removal. It is attributed to the formation of the Cl() radical and its great reactivity towards acetate.

  5. Lanthanide Lewis acid-mediated enantioselective conjugate radical additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Manyem, Shankar

    2002-08-22

    [reaction: see text] Lanthanide triflates along with proline-derived ligands have been found to be efficient catalysts for enantioselective conjugate addition of nucleophilic radicals to enoates. N-Acyl oxazolidinones, when used as achiral additives, gave meaningful enhancements in the ees for the product.

  6. Free radicals during hypertriglyceridemia treatment by N-3 fatty acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, M.; Stopka, Pavel; Vecka, M.; Žák, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2006), s. 292 ISSN 1567-5688 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : free radicals Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.875, year: 2006

  7. Enhancement of carboxylic acid degradation with sulfate radical generated by persulfate activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, J; Nebout, P; Karpel Vel Leitner, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the generation of sulfate radical for the removal of two carboxylic acids in aqueous solution: acetic and citric acids. From photochemical and radiolytic processes, kinetics of the degradation of these two carboxylic acids was studied as a function of the pH of the solution. It was shown that the maximum of acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. Above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of with the solute. In the case of citric acid, pH has only a little effect on the kinetic of citric acid degradation. The determination of mineralization yields shows several differences depending on carboxylic acids and pH. The degradation of both carboxylic acids was also studied in the radiolysis process whether with or without persulfate addition. A comparison of the processes of sulfate radical production is presented.

  8. Differential Effects Of Octanoate And Heptanoate On Myocardial Metabolism During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation In An Infant Swine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Oddnumbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant betaoxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Methods: Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-hour ECMO were received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA) or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol/kg body wt/min as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5 per group). The 13-Carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 minutes before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]/[ADP] ratio compared with other http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpen Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition For Peer Review groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC as well as heptanoate. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in fractional protein synthesis rate. Conclusion: Octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate, while preserving protein synthesis.

  9. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  10. Protonated o-semiquinone radical as a mimetic of the humic acids native radicals: A DFT approach to the molecular structure and EPR properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierska, Julia

    2012-06-01

    Organic radicals are known to be an indispensable component of the humic acids (HA) structure. In HA two forms of radicals, stable (native) and short-lived (transient), are identified. Importantly, these radical forms can be easily differentiated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This article provides a DFT-based insight into the electronic and molecular structure of the native radicals. The molecular models including an increase of the radical aromaticity and the hydrogen bonding between the radical and other functional groups of HA are taken under investigation. In consequence the interesting pieces of information on the structure of the native radical centers in HA are revealed and discussed, especially in terms of differences between the electronic structure of the native and transient forms.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e aq - , (CH 3 ) 2 (OH) CCH 2 · , CO 2 ·- , H · , ·OH and N 3 · radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  12. Immobilization of lipase on sepabeads and its application in pentyl octanoate synthesis in a low aqueous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Jugović Zorica D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study was to investigate the process conditions relevant for the pentyl octanoate production with the lipase from Candida rugosa immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EP carrier. This is an epoxide-containing commercial polymethacrylic carrier with suitable characteristics for enzyme immobilization. The immobilized lipase suitable for pentyl octanoate synthesis has been prepared by a direct lipase binding to polymers via their epoxide groups. The enzymatic activity was determined by both hydrolysis of olive oil in an aqueous system and esterification of n-pentanol with octanoic acid in a low aqueous system. The influence of several important reaction parameters such as temperature, initial water content, initial substrate molar ratio, enzyme loading and time of adding of molecular sieves in the system is carefully analyzed by means of an experimental design. Production of the ester was optimized and an ester production response equation was obtained, making it possible to predict ester yields from known values of the five main factors. Almost complete conversion (>99% of the substrate to ester could be realized, using lipase loading as low as 37 mg/g dry support and in a relatively short time (24 h at 45ºC, when high initial substrate molar ratio of 2.2 is used.

  13. Characterization of actions of octanoate on porcine preadipocytes and adipocytes differentiated in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shunichi, E-mail: shunsuzu@affrc.go.jp [Transgenic Pig Research Unit, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2 Ikenodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0901 (Japan); Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Onishi, Akira [Transgenic Pig Research Unit, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2 Ikenodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0901 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Octanoate regulated gene expressions in a way distinct from rosiglitasone. ► Octanoate upregulatedPPRE and LXRE reporter activities. ► Octanoate may act on some PPARγ-target genes competitively with other ligands. - Abstract: Octanoate is used to induce adipogenic differentiation and/or lipid accumulation in preadipocytes of domestic animals. However, information on detailed actions of octanoate and the characteristics of octanoate-induced adipocytes is limited. The aim of this study was to examine these issues by comparing the outcomes of the effects of octanoate with those of rosiglitazone, which is a well-defined activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. The adipocytes that were differentiated with 5 mM of octanoate had dispersed and diversely sized lipid droplets compared to those that were differentiated with 1 μM of rosiglitazone. The gene expression levels of adiponectin, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, perilipin 1, and perilipin 4 were much higher in the adipocytes that were differentiated with rosiglitazone than in those differentiated with octanoate, while the gene expression levels of lipoprotein lipase and perilipin 2 were decreased in rosiglitazone-differentiated adipocytes compared to octanoate-differentiated adipocytes. However, the expressions of aP2 and CD36 genes were comparably induced. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that PPAR and liver-X-receptor activities were upregulated by octanoate more effectively than by rosiglitazone. Overall, these results suggested that the action of octanoate was complicated and may be dependent on the targeted genes and cellular status.

  14. Spin trapping study on the nature of radicals generated by X radiolysis and peroxidation of linolenic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizova, O.A.; Osipov, A.N.; Zubarev, V.E.; Yakhyaev, A.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.A.; Savov, V.M.; Kagan, V.E.

    1983-01-01

    The radicals of linolenic acid and their spin adducts (SA) with PBN formed during X radiolysis of linolenic acid and in lipid peroxidation with ferrous ions were investigated and identified. It was found that in the absence of oxygen in pure linolenic acid at 77 K X irradiation produces alkyl and carboxyl radicals. In the presence of the spin trap alkyl radical spin adducts were formed. Irradiation of linolenic acid in the presence of oxygen at 77 K also resulted in the formation of alkyl radicals. These radicals were transformed into peroxy radicals in the interaction of alkyl radical with oxygen upon heating to 117 K. In the presence of spin trap X irradiation of linolenic acid and heating of the sample up to 300 K gave rise to EPR spectra of SA alkyl and unidentified radicals. Lipid peroxidation of linolenic acid induced by ferrous ions in the presence of spin trap also formed radicals and SA of linolenic acid. The spectral parameters of SA generated with ferrous ions in lipid peroxidation and of those generated during X radiolysis do not differ. The similarity of spectral parameters of SA in these two cases suggests a similarity in the structure of linolenic acid radicals. (author)

  15. Test for antioxidant ability by scavenging long-lived mutagenic radicals in mammalian cells and by blood test with intentional radicals: an application of gallic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Jun; Kawaura, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Prost, Michel; Prost, Emmanuelle; Watanabe, Masami; Quetin-Leclercq, J.Joeelle

    2003-01-01

    Antioxidant ability of gallic acid (GA) are determined both by electron spin resonance measurement of long-lived radicals produced in γ-ray irradiated Syrian golden hamster embryo cells with GA and by hemolysis measurement with GA when blood cells are submitted to radicals. Scavenging properties of GA are determined by the reaction rate constant with long-lived mutagenic radicals in the cells while the blood test allows to analyze the global effects of this compound: radical scavenger+metal ion chelator+regeneration of intra- and extra-cellular antioxidant

  16. Formation and properties of radicals in γ-irradiated molecular compounds of urea with dicarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasparov, M.S.; Trofimov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation chemical yields of paramagnetic centres and their nature have been studied as well as secondary reactions in channel inclusion compounds of urea with sebacic acid and in mixed crystals of urea with succinic acid. In inclusion compounds of urea with sebacic acid the yield exceeds additive at 77 K. In mixed crystals of urea with succinic acid the yield at 77 K is equal to additive. In mixed crystals at all temperatures quazistationary concentrations of radicals are lower than in pure succinic acid. In inclusion compounds quazistationary concentration of radicals are higher than in pure sebacic acid. It has been shown that in solid two-component systems, when the nature of the components is identical, the matrix structure exerts an essential influence on the radiolysis of the system

  17. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  18. Determination of free radical reaction products and metabolites of salicylic acid using capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, S.A.J.; Huf, F.A.; Reijenga, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydroxylated radical products of salicylic acid are often used as a relative measurement in free radical research. Several analytical methods exist to determine the amount of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. In this study we use capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and

  19. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products-A gamma radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Solar, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.a [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Reznicek, Gottfried [Department of Pharmacognosy, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH{sub 3} by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  20. EPR studies of the free radicals generated in gamma irradiated amino acid derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanoğlu, Y. Emre; Sütçü, Kerem

    2017-10-01

    Gamma irradiated powder forms of N-acetyl-DL-aspartic acid, N-carbamoyl-DL-aspartic acid and N-methyl-L-serine were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) at room temperature. In these compounds, the paramagnetic centers formed after irradiation were attributed to the HOOCCH2ĊHCOOH, COOHĊHCHNH and HOCH2ĊHCOOH radicals, respectively. The g values and the hyperfine coupling constants for the radical species are with values of g = 2.0038 ± 0.0005, aα = 2.15 mT, aβ(1) = 3.84 mT and aβ(2) = 2.15 for the first radical, g = 2.0039 ± 0.0005, aα = 1.7 mT, aß(1) = 0.62 mT, aß(2) = 0.54 mT, aγ = 0.53 mT for the second radical and g = 2.0039 ± 0.0005, aβ(1) = 2.40 mT, aβ(2) = 1.83 mT and aα = 1.83 mT for the third radical. The free radicals formed in three compounds were found to be stable for three months at room temperature. It was concluded that, spin density was concentrated predominantly in the 2pπ orbital of the carbon atom.

  1. Reactivity of glycyl-amino acids toward hydroxyl radical in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Iwashita, Naomi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Masaharu

    1978-01-01

    Rate constants for reactions of hydroxyl radicals with several glycyl-amino acids were determined by a competition method using p-nitrosodimethylailine as a reference compound. For glycyl-aliphatic amino acids, the enhancement of reactivity was observed as compared with the corresponding free amino acids. The reactivity was explained qualitatively in terms of partial reactivities assigned to each C-H bond of the dipeptides. For glycyl-aromatic amino acids, the rate constants were found to be almost equal to those of the corresponding free amino acids. The reactivity of a protein toward hydroxyl radical was well understood by summation of the rate constants, corrected by steric factors, of amino acid residues located on surface of the protein. The enhanced reactivity of the aliphatic peptides was interpreted in terms of the difference in interaction energy between NH 2 - and NH 3 + -forms of an aliphatic amino acid, which was calculated for the system including glycine and hydroxyl radical according to CNDO/2 method. (auth.)

  2. Radical Scavenging Capacity of Methanolic Phillyrea latifolia L. Extract: Anthocyanin and Phenolic Acids Composition of Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naciye Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical scavenging capacity of a crude methanolic extract from the fruits of Phillyrea latifolia L., commonly known as green olive tree or mock privet, was investigated with reference to anthocyanin standards, as flavonoids, and phenolic acid standards, as phenylpropanoids. Characterization with high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD indicated the presence of keracyanin, kuromanin, cyanidin, ferulic acid, caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid at amounts of 289.1, 90.4, 191.4, 225.2, 221.2 and 190.1 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW of fruits, respectively. Chlorogenic and p-coumaric acids were found to exist in lower amounts. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and IC50 values of the plant extract were found to be 1.8 mM Trolox equivalents (TE/g FW of fruits and 69.4 µg/mL, respectively, indicating the close radical scavenging activity of the extract to those of keracyanin and p-coumaric acid. The crude methanolic P. latifolia L. fruit extract was seen to be fairly potent in radical scavenging. Total phenolic content (TPC of the plant extract was found to be 1652.9 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/100 g FW of fruits.

  3. Reactions of clofibric acid with oxidative and reductive radicals-Products, mechanisms, efficiency and toxic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csay, Tamás; Rácz, Gergely; Salik, Ádám; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of clofibric acid induced by hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron and O2-•/HO2• reactive species was studied in aqueous solutions. Clofibric acid was decomposed more effectively by hydroxyl radical than by hydrated electron or O2-•/HO2•. Various hydroxylated, dechlorinated and fragmentation products have been identified and quantified. A new LC-MS method was developed based on 18O isotope labeling to follow the formation of hydroxylated derivatives of clofibric acid. Possible degradation pathways have been proposed. The overall degradation was monitored by determination of sum parameters like COD, TOC and AOX. It was found that the organic chlorine degrades very effectively prior to complete mineralization. After the treatment no toxic effect was found according to Vibrio fischeri tests. However, at early stages some of the reaction products were more harmful than clofibric acid.

  4. Kinetics of free radical decay reactions in lactic acid homo and copolymers irradiated to sterilization dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantoglu, O.; Ozbey, T.; Gueven, O.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of free radical decay reactions of poly(L-Lactic acid), poly(DL-Lactic acid) and random copolymer of lactic and glycolic acid have been investigated for decays taking place in air and in vacuum. The change in ESR lines of γ-irradiated polymers have been followed over a long time period. The decay has been found to follow neither simple first-order nor second-order kinetics. Various kinetic approaches including composite first or second-order mechanisms and diffusion-controlled first or second-order equations were determined to be also unsatisfactory. The decay of radicals in bulk irradiated lactic acid homo and copolymers was found to be best described when the second-order non-classical equation with time dependent rate constant approach was used. (Author)

  5. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of perfluorinated carboxylic acids: Reaction with OH radicals and atmospheric lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, MD; Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Wallington, TJ

    2004-01-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals with a homologous series of perfluorinated acids, F(CF2)(n)COOH (n = 1, 2, 3, 4), in 700 Torr of air at 296 +/- 2 K. For n > 1, the length of the F(CF2)(n) group had no discernible impact on the reactivity of...

  7. EPR spectral investigation of radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuner, Hasan [Balikesir University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Balikesir (Turkey)

    2017-11-15

    In the present work, spectroscopic features of the radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid compounds were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While un-irradiated samples presented no EPR signal, irradiated samples exhibited an EPR spectrum consisting of an intense resonance line at the center and weak lines on both sides. Detailed microwave saturation investigations were carried out to determine the origin of the experimental EPR lines. It is concluded that the two side lines of the triplet satellite originate from forbidden ''spin-flip'' transitions. The spectroscopic and structural features of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using EPR spectrum fittings. The experimental EPR spectra of the two gallic acid compounds were consistent with the calculated EPR spectroscopic features of the proposed radicals. It is concluded that the most probable radicals are the cyclohexadienyl-type, O(OH){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2}COOH radicals for both compounds. (orig.)

  8. New derivatives of 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid with free-radical scavenging, D-amino acid oxidase, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecka, Jolanta; Guśpiel, Adam; Postek, Magdalena; Ziemska, Joanna; Kawęcki, Robert; Lęczycka, Katarzyna; Osior, Agnieszka; Pietrzak, Bartłomiej; Pypowski, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowska, Agata

    2014-09-30

    A series of 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesised and tested for their free-radical scavenging activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH·), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS·+), superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and nitric oxide radical (·NO) assays. We also studied d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitory activity. Almost each of newly synthesised compounds exhibited radical scavenging capabilities. Moreover, several compounds showed moderate inhibitory activities against DAAO, AChE and BuChE. Compounds with significant free-radical scavenging activity may be potential candidates for therapeutics used in oxidative-stress-related diseases.

  9. Effect of processing on phenolic acids composition and radical scavenging capacity of barley pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Rosanna; Rabalski, Iwona; Messia, Maria Cristina; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Marconi, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic acids, total phenolics content and DPPH radical scavenging capacity in raw ingredients, fresh and dried spaghetti, and in uncooked and cooked spaghetti were evaluated and compared with semolina spaghetti as a reference. Ferulic acid was the major phenolic acid found in the free and bound phenolic extracts in all the investigated pasta samples. The addition of barley flour into pasta at incorporation levels of 30, 50 and 100% increased phenolic acids and total phenolics content. Pasta processing did not significantly affect the total phenolics content and free radical scavenging capacity, but a significant reduction in total phenolic acids measured by HPLC was found. Drying process differently affected individual phenolic compounds in the free and bound fractions, and thus, the total phenolic acids content. Free vanillic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids did not significantly change, while p-hydroxybenzoic and ferulic acids of the free extracts showed higher values compared to the corresponding fresh pasta. Cooking did not greatly affect total phenolic acids, more leading to conserving free and bound phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of tocopherol treatment on deterioration of edible oil quality (acid value, carbonyl value, free fatty acid and radical activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Yuko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2014-01-01

    In this study, waste edible oil was prepared by both heat and aeration treatment, and the increasing inhibitive effect of tocopherol treatment on the acid value (AV) and carbonyl value (CV) of the oil was investigated. The AV and CV of waste edible oil treated with tocopherol were 0.1-1.0% lower than those of the nontreated oil, indicating that tocopherol exerted a radical-scavenging activity. The concentration of tocopherol decreased with time, while that of the remaining 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals increased. These results suggest that the addition of tocopherol proved to be useful for preventing the deterioration of waste edible oil.

  11. A Comparative Study of the Radical-scavenging Activity of the Phenolcarboxylic Acids Caffeic Acid, p-Coumaric Acid, Chlorogenic Acid and Ferulic Acid, With or Without 2-Mercaptoethanol, a Thiol, Using the Induction Period Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Fujisawa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolcarboxylic acid antioxidants do not act in vivo as radical-scavengers in isolation, but rather together with GSH (glutathione, a coantioxidant, they constitute an intricate antioxidant network. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid with or without 2-mercaptoethanol (ME, as a substitute for GSH, was investigated by the induction period (IP method for polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, a source of alkyl radicals, R. and benzoyl peroxide (BPO, a source of peroxy radicals, PhCOO. using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Upon PhCOO. radical scavenging, the stoichiometric factors (n, number of free radical trapped by one mole of antioxidant for caffeic acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid and chlorogenic acid were 2.4, 1.8, 1.7 and 0.9, whereas upon R. radical scavenging, the corresponding values were 1.3, 1.2, 1.0 and 0.8, respectively. Antioxidants with n values close to 2 suggest the stepwise formation of semiquinone radicals and quinones. By contrast, those with n values close to 1 suggest the formation of dimers after single-electron oxidation, possibly due to recombination of corresponding aryloxy radicals. The ratio of the rate constant of inhibition to that of propagation (kinh/kp declined in the order chlorogenic acid > p-coumaric acid > ferulic acid > caffeic acid. The ratio of the observed IP for the phenolcarboxylic acid/2-mercapto-ethanol (ME mixture (1:1 molar ratio (A to the calculated IP (the simple sum of phenol acid antioxidant and ME (B was investigated. Upon R. scavenging, the caffeic acid or p-coumaric acid/ME mixture was A/B > 1, particularly the former was 1.2, suggesting a synergic effect. By contrast, upon PhCOO. scavenging, the corresponding mixture was A/B < 1, particularly the latter was 0.7, suggesting an antagonistic effect. Upon both radicals scavenging, the A/B for the ferulic acid or chlorogenic acid

  12. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  13. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH) CCH{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}, CO{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}, H{sup {center_dot}}, {center_dot}OH and N{sub 3}{sup {center_dot}} radicals were studied by {gamma}-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/{center_dot}OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  14. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Timmel, Christiane R., E-mail: christiane.timmel@chem.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: stuart.mackenzie@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Centre for Advanced Electron Spin Resonance, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R., E-mail: christiane.timmel@chem.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: stuart.mackenzie@chem.ox.ac.uk [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (k{sub B}T), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green’s function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  15. Quantum Chemical Benchmarking, Validation, and Prediction of Acidity Constants for Substituted Pyridinium Ions and Pyridinyl Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2012-09-11

    Sensibly modeling (photo)electrocatalytic reactions involving proton and electron transfer with computational quantum chemistry requires accurate descriptions of protonated, deprotonated, and radical species in solution. Procedures to do this are generally nontrivial, especially in cases that involve radical anions that are unstable in the gas phase. Recently, pyridinium and the corresponding reduced neutral radical have been postulated as key catalysts in the reduction of CO2 to methanol. To assess practical methodologies to describe the acid/base chemistry of these species, we employed density functional theory (DFT) in tandem with implicit solvation models to calculate acidity constants for 22 substituted pyridinium cations and their corresponding pyridinyl radicals in water solvent. We first benchmarked our calculations against experimental pyridinium deprotonation energies in both gas and aqueous phases. DFT with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals provide chemical accuracy for gas-phase data and allow absolute prediction of experimental pKas with unsigned errors under 1 pKa unit. The accuracy of this economical pKa calculation approach was further verified by benchmarking against highly accurate (but very expensive) CCSD(T)-F12 calculations. We compare the relative importance and sensitivity of these energies to selection of solvation model, solvation energy definitions, implicit solvation cavity definition, basis sets, electron densities, model geometries, and mixed implicit/explicit models. After determining the most accurate model to reproduce experimentally-known pKas from first principles, we apply the same approach to predict pKas for radical pyridinyl species that have been proposed relevant under electrochemical conditions. This work provides considerable insight into the pitfalls using continuum solvation models, particularly when used for radical species.

  16. ESR studies of radiation induced radical products from linoleic acid and linolenic acid and the radioprotective effect by α-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Younan; Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Zhang Jiashan; Li Nianyun

    1993-01-01

    Primary radicals from the γ-radiolysis of air-saturated linoleic acid and linolenic acid at 77 K, and the subsequent secondary radicals appeared during the course of variable temperature elevation were investigated by ESR. The ESR spectrum from samples irradiated and observed at 77 K shows the presence of the radical anion doublet arise from the electron adducts of the carboxy groups and the poorly resolved broad singlet results from some carbon-centered radicals. Annealing to approximately 125 K which allows for molecular oxygen migration results in the formation of peroxyl radicals. At 247 K, the ESR spectrum is a multi-line pattern which is attributable to structure of the α-carbon radical superimposed on the pentadienyl radicals. The ESR spectra from linoleic acid-α-tocopherol and linolenic acid-α-tocopherol binary systems irradiated at 77 K and recorded at 140 K or 215 K revealed the characteristic similarity to that from α-tocopherol alone, no trace of ESR signal from either peroxyl or the composite pattern from superposition of pentadienyl radical and α-carbon radicals can be found out. Therefore α-tocopherol has exerted radioprotection effect on peroxidation of linoleic acid and linolenic acid

  17. Free radicals produced by the oxidation of gallic acid: An electron paramagnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Brett A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid is found in a wide variety of plants; it is extensively used in tanning, ink dyes, as well as in the manufacturing of paper. The gallate moiety is a key component of many functional phytochemicals. In this work electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR was used to detect the free radicals generated by the air-oxidation of gallic acid. Results We found that gallic acid produces two different radicals as a function of pH. In the pH range between 7-10, the spectrum of the gallate free radical is a doublet of triplets (aH = 1.00 G, aH = 0.23 G, aH = 0.28 G. This is consistent with three hydrogens providing hyperfine splitting. However, in a more alkaline environment, pH >10, the hyperfine splitting pattern transforms into a 1:2:1 pattern (aH (2 = 1.07 G. Using D2O as a solvent, we demonstrate that the third hydrogen (i.e. aH = 0.28 G at lower pH is a slowly exchanging hydron, participating in hydrogen bonding with two oxygens in ortho position on the gallate ring. The pKa of this proton has been determined to be 10. Conclusions This simple and novel approach permitted the understanding of the prototropic equilibrium of the semiquinone radicals generated by gallic acid, a ubiquitous compound, allowing new insights into its oxidation and subsequent reactions.

  18. Products of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) formed by free radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schittl, H. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, R.M. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Getoff, N. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.at

    2007-10-15

    The radiolysis of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) has been investigated under various experimental conditions. The highest vitamin degradation (G=3.22) was observed in solutions saturated with N{sub 2}O, where 90% OH radicals are operating. As final products, the following were established: aldehydes, carboxylic acids and ammonia. Their yield strongly depends on the presence/absence of air as well as on N{sub 2}O (used to convert e{sub aq} {sup -} into OH) and was determined as a function of absorbed radiation dose. HPLC-analysis showed that in all media, a main product is formed, having the highest yield in aerated solutions. Based on the chemical analysis, it appears that the OH radicals are most involved in the degradation process. A precise sequence of the reaction steps could not be given presently, because of the implication of many simultaneous reactions.

  19. Products of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) formed by free radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittl, H.; Quint, R.M.; Getoff, N.

    2007-01-01

    The radiolysis of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) has been investigated under various experimental conditions. The highest vitamin degradation (G=3.22) was observed in solutions saturated with N 2 O, where 90% OH radicals are operating. As final products, the following were established: aldehydes, carboxylic acids and ammonia. Their yield strongly depends on the presence/absence of air as well as on N 2 O (used to convert e aq - into OH) and was determined as a function of absorbed radiation dose. HPLC-analysis showed that in all media, a main product is formed, having the highest yield in aerated solutions. Based on the chemical analysis, it appears that the OH radicals are most involved in the degradation process. A precise sequence of the reaction steps could not be given presently, because of the implication of many simultaneous reactions

  20. Effect of hydrocarbon radical length of fatty acid collectors on flotation separation process of thorium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Perlova, O.V.; Sazonova, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that the degree of flotation separation of thorium ions collected by their means increases firstly (potassium laurate), then decreases (potassium tridecanate) and after that increases again (potassium palminate) when increasing the length of the hydrocarbon radical of potassium soaps of saturated fatty acids. The first increase of the collector efficiency is due to the decrease of solubility of thorium-containing sublates, and drop and further increase is due to the change in colloidchemical properties of sublates

  1. Radiolytic study of the action of perhydroxyl radicals with ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat-Shafaie, T.; Ferradini, C.; Julien, R.; Pucheault, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper shows that the difficulties encountered up to now about the interpretation of the radiolysis of aerated ascorbic acid (AH 2 ) solutions, were due to a low oxygen concentration. For oxygen-saturated solutions, the yield is about G(-AH 2 ) = G/sub OH/ + G/sub H/ + G/sub eaq-/ according to the mechanism, and formic acid has no influence on it. For lower concentrations of oxygen, in the presence of air, the action of oxygen on AH radical being slow, the yield decreases because of competitive reactions. Formic acid accentuates the decrease. This hypothesis allows a quantitative interpretation of the experimental results which explains the influence of AH 2 concentration (1) by the presence of an oxidation chain by O 2 , initiated by OH and HO 2 radicals; this chain, however, is not important even at the highest concentrations, and (2) by a dilution effect allowing partial disproportionation of HO 2 radicals; the kinetic calculation leads to the value of the rate constant of oxidation of AH 2 by HO 2 : k 8 = 3300 M -1 sec -1

  2. Roles of oxygen radicals and elastase in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea-pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y -L; Chiou, W -Y; Lu, F J; Chiang, L Y

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidants attenuate noncholinergic airway constriction. To further investigate the relationship between tachykinin-mediated airway constriction and oxygen radicals, we explored citric acid-induced bronchial constriction in 48 young Hartley strain guinea-pigs, divided into six groups: control; citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+phosphoramidon+citric acid; dimethylthiourea (DMTU)+citric acid; and DMTU+phosphoramidon+citric acid. Hexa(sulphobutyl...

  3. Free radical mediated formation of 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) fatty acid diesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Shi, Haiming; Jiang, Yuangrong; Xu, Xuebing; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2013-03-13

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that a free radical was formed and mediated the formation of 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) fatty acid diesters, a group of food contaminants, from diacylglycerols at high temperature under a low-moisture condition for the first time. The presence of free radicals in a vegetable oil kept at 120 °C for 20 min was demonstrated using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy examination with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as the spin trap agent. ESR investigation also showed an association between thermal treatment degree and the concentration of free radicals. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis of sn-1,2-stearoylglycerol (DSG) at 25 and 120 °C suggested the possible involvement of an ester carbonyl group in forming 3-MCPD diesters. On the basis of these results, a novel free radical mediated chemical mechanism was proposed for 3-MCPD diester formation. Furthermore, a quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) MS/MS investigation was performed and detected the DMPO adducts with the cyclic acyloxonium free radical (CAFR) and its product MS ions, proving the presence of CAFR. Furthermore, the free radical mechanism was validated by the formation of 3-MCPD diesters through reacting DSG with a number of organic and inorganic chlorine sources including chlorine gas at 120 and 240 °C. The findings of this study might lead to the improvement of oil and food processing conditions to reduce the level of 3-MCPD diesters in foods and enhance food safety.

  4. Free-radical-mediated conjugate additions. Enantioselective synthesis of butyrolactone natural products: (-)-enterolactone, (-)-arctigenin, (-)-isoarctigenin, (-)-nephrosteranic acid, and (-)-roccellaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Liu, Pingrong; Ji, Jianguo; Hajra, Saumen; Chen, Jian-xie

    2002-03-22

    Lewis acid-mediated conjugate addition of alkyl radicals to a differentially protected fumarate 10 produced the monoalkylated succinates with high chemical efficiency and excellent stereoselectivity. A subsequent alkylation or an aldol reaction furnished the disubstituted succinates with syn configuration. The chiral auxiliary, 4-diphenylmethyl-2-oxazolidinone, controlled the stereoselectivity in both steps. Manipulation of the disubstituted succinates obtained by alkylation furnished the natural products (-)-enterolactone, (-)-arctigenin, and (-)-isoarctigenin. The overall yields for the target natural products were 20-26% over six steps. Selective functionalization of the disubstituted succinates obtained by aldol condensation gave the paraconic acid natural products (-)-nephrosteranic acid (8) and (-)-roccellaric acid (9). The overall yield of the natural products 8 and 9 over four steps was 53% and 42%, respectively.

  5. Reaction of single-standard DNA with hydroxyl radical generated by iron(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prigodich, R.V.; Martin, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the reaction of Fe(II)-EDTA and hydrogen peroxide with the single-stranded nucleic acids d(pT) 70 and a 29-base sequence containing a mixture of bases results in substantial damage which is not directly detected by gel electrophoresis. Cleavage of the DNA sugar backbone is enhanced significantly after the samples are incubated at 90 degree C in the presence of piperidine. The latter reaction is used in traditional Maxam-Gilbert DNA sequencing to detect base damage, and the current results are consistent with reaction of the hydroxyl radical with the bases in single-stranded DNA (although reaction with sugar may also produce adducts that are uncleaved but labile to cleavage by piperidine). We the authors propose that hydroxyl radicals may react preferentially with the nucleic acid bases in ssDNA and that reaction of the sugars in dsDNA is dominant because the bases are sequestered within the double helix. These results have implications both for the study of single-stranded DNA binding protein binding sites and for the interpretation of experiments using the hydroxyl radical to probe DNA structure or to footprint double-stranded DNA binding protein binding sites

  6. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  7. Interactions of coffee and bread crust melanoidins with hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids in aqueous radical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Rubio, Jose Manuel Amigo; Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Gökmen, Vural

    2018-06-01

    The interactions of coffee and bread crust melanoidins with hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids (HCA/HBA) containing different numbers of -OH and -OCH₃ groups localized at different positions on the aromatic ring were investigated. By doing so, mechanism of the interactions was intended to be explained with a structural approach. Experimental studies were carried out in DPPH radical medium. Chemometric methods were used for experimental design and multivariate data analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) values calculated from the plots of time versus inhibition (%) for coffee and bread crust melanoidins and HCA/HBA derivatives were ranged between 6532 ± 97-19,106 ± 85, 3997 ± 102-7565 ± 159 and - 1678 ± 81-22,486 ± 119, respectively. Synergistic interactions were revealed for both coffee and bread crust melanoidins and HCA/HBA derivatives. The significance of the concentrations of coffee and bread crust melanoidins on radical scavenging activity was clearly centered from the scores plots obtained via Principal component analysis (PCA). Phases of radical scavenging reactions were also revealed from the loadings plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enzymatic and free radical formation of cis- and trans- epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliwarga, Theresa; Raccor, Brianne S; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Gharib, Sina A; Xu, Libin; Totah, Rheem A

    2017-11-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation that have important cardioprotective and signaling properties. AA is an ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that is prone to autoxidation. Although hydroperoxides and isoprostanes are major autoxidation products of AA, EETs are also formed from the largely overlooked peroxyl radical addition mechanism. While autoxidation yields both cis- and trans-EETs, cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases have been shown to exclusively catalyze the formation of all regioisomer cis-EETs, on each of the double bonds. In plasma and red blood cell (RBC) membranes, cis- and trans-EETs have been observed, and both have multiple physiological functions. We developed a sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) assay that separates cis- and trans- isomers of EETs and applied it to determine the relative distribution of cis- vs. trans-EETs in reaction mixtures of AA subjected to free radical oxidation in benzene and liposomes in vitro. We also determined the in vivo distribution of EETs in several tissues, including human and mouse heart, and RBC membranes. We then measured EET levels in heart and RBC of young mice compared to old. Formation of EETs in free radical reactions of AA in benzene and in liposomes exhibited time- and AA concentration-dependent increase and trans-EET levels were higher than cis-EETs under both conditions. In contrast, cis-EET levels were overall higher in biological samples. In general, trans-EETs increased with mouse age more than cis-EETs. We propose a mechanism for the non-enzymatic formation of cis- and trans-EETs involving addition of the peroxyl radical to one of AA's double bonds followed by bond rotation and intramolecular homolytic substitution (S H i). Enzymatic formation of cis-EETs by cytochrome P450 most likely occurs via a one-step concerted mechanism that does not allow bond rotation. The ability to accurately measure

  9. Lipoxygenase-mediated pro-radical effect of melatonin via stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, F.; Sestili, P.; Martinelli, C.; Paolillo, M.; Paternoster, L.; Albertini, M.C.; Accorsi, A.; Gualandi, G.; Ghibelli, L.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that melatonin immediately and transiently stimulates intracellular free radical production on a set of leukocytes, possibly as a consequence of calmodulin binding. We show here that melatonin-induced ROS are produced by lipoxygenase (LOX), since they are prevented by a set of LOX inhibitors, and are accompanied by increase of the 5-LOX product 5-HETE. LOX activation is accompanied by strong liberation of AA; inhibition of Ca 2+ -independent, but not Ca 2+ -dependent, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), prevents both melatonin-induced arachidonic acid and ROS production, whereas LOX inhibition only prevents ROS, indicating that PLA2 is upstream with respect to LOX, as occurs in many signaling pathways. Chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of melatonin-calmodulin interaction, inhibits both ROS and arachidonic acid production, thus possibly placing calmodulin at the origin of a melatonin-induced pro-radical pathway. Interestingly, it is known that Ca 2+ -independent PLA2 binds to calmodulin: our results are compatible with PLA2 being liberated by melatonin from a steady-state calmodulin sequestration, thus initiating an arachidonate signal transduction. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway through which melatonin may participate to the inflammatory response.

  10. Histone H1- and other protein- and amino acid-hydroperoxides can give rise to free radicals which oxidize DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luxford, C; Morin, B; Dean, R T

    1999-01-01

    analysis has demonstrated that radicals from histone H1-hydroperoxides, and other protein and amino acid hydroperoxides, can also oxidize both free 2'-deoxyguanosine and intact calf thymus DNA to give the mutagenic oxidized base 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxod......Exposure of amino acids, peptides and proteins to radicals, in the presence of oxygen, gives high yields of hydroperoxides. These materials are readily decomposed by transition metal ions to give further radicals. We hypothesized that hydroperoxide formation on nuclear proteins, and subsequent...... decomposition of these hydroperoxides to radicals, might result in oxidative damage to associated DNA. We demonstrate here that exposure of histone H1 and model compounds to gamma-radiation in the presence of oxygen gives hydroperoxides in a dose-dependent manner. These hydroperoxides decompose to oxygen...

  11. Free radicals in pyrimidines: ESR of. gamma. -irradiated 5-cyclohexenyl-1,5-dimethyl barbituric acid. [/sup 60/Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA); Erich, L.

    1981-06-01

    ESR studies have determined that ionizing radiation damage of hexobarbital (5-cyclohexenyl-1,5-dimethylbarbituric acid) causes the formation of a free radical (A) by hydrogen abstraction from the cyclohexenyl group. Hyperfine coupling tensors were determined for coupling of the unpaired electron to four protons. Visible light of wavelengths near 450 nm reversibly converts this radical to a second free radical (B) which also has the unpaired electron localized in the cyclohexenyl group. The activation energy for a thermally induced reverse conversion (B ..-->.. A) was determined to be 1.4 eV.

  12. An electron spin resonance study of radicals formed from tetrolic acid by radiolysis in a freon matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, e.s.r. spectra have been observed following γ-irradiation of dilute frozen solutions of tetrolic acid, MeC≡CCO 2 H, in CFCl 3 at 77 K. A typical spectrum is shown which we interpret in terms of an isotropic quartet from the parent radical cation. MeC≡CCo 2 H +· , and an anisotropic triplet arising from the propargyl radical, ·CH 2 C≡CCO 2 H, formed by deprotonation of the parent cation. This appears to be the first example of an alkyne radical cation to be observed in a CFCl 3 matrix. (author)

  13. Characterization of fatty acids, bioactive lipids, and radical scavenging activity of Canterbury bells seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanien, M. F.R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the chemical composition and radical scavenging activity of Canterbury bells (Campanula medium seed oil. C. medium seeds contained 9.2% extractable oil. The lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterol and tocopherol composition of C. medium seed oil were determined. The amount of neutral lipids in the oil was the highest, followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. Linoleic and oleic were the main fatty acids. C. medium oil is characterized by high levels of phytosterols and β-sitosterol was the main compound. β-Tocopherol constituted 42.5% of the total tocopherol content followed by γ-tocopherol. The radical scavenging activity (RSA toward 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals and galvinoxyl radicals of C. medium oil were higher than those of extra virgin olive oil. The diverse potential uses of C. medium oil may make this plant industrially important.El objetivo de este estudio fue caracterizar la composición química y la actividad de captación de radicales de aceites de semillas de campanillas de Canterbury (Campanula medium. Las semillas de C. medium contenían 9,2 % de aceite extraíble. Se determinó la composición de las diferentes clases de lípidos, ácidos grasos, fitoesteroles y tocoferoles. La cantidad de lípidos neutros en el aceite fue mayoritario, seguido de glicolípidos y fosfolípidos. Linoleico y oleico fueron los ácidos grasos principales. El aceite de C. medium se caracteriza por altos niveles de fitoesteroles y β-sitosterol fue el compuesto principal. β-tocoferol constituía 42,5 % del contenido total de tocoferol seguido de γ-tocoferol. La actividad de captación de radicales (RSA a 1,1-difenil-2- picrilhidrazil (DPPH y radicales galvinoxil de C. medium fueron superiores a las de aceite de oliva virgen extra. Los diversos usos potenciales de los aceites de C. medium pueden hacer que esta planta pueda ser importante industrialmente.

  14. Sulphur-containing Amino Acids: Protective Role Against Free Radicals and Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colovic, Mirjana B; Vasic, Vesna M; Djuric, Dragan M; Krstic, Danijela Z

    2018-01-30

    Sulphur is an abundant element in biological systems, which plays an important role in processes essential for life as a constituent of proteins, vitamins and other crucial biomolecules. The major source of sulphur for humans is plants being able to use inorganic sulphur in the purpose of sulphur-containing amino acids synthesis. Sulphur-containing amino acids include methionine, cysteine, homocysteine, and taurine. Methionine and cysteine are classified as proteinogenic, canonic amino acids incorporated in protein structure. Sulphur amino acids are involved in the synthesis of intracellular antioxidants such as glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine. Moreover, naturally occurring sulphur-containing ligands are effective and safe detoxifying agents, often used in order to prevent toxic metal ions effects and their accumulation in human body. Literature search for peer-reviewed articles was performed using PubMed and Scopus databases, and utilizing appropriate keywords. This review is focused on sulphur-containing amino acids - methionine, cysteine, taurine, and their derivatives - glutathione and N-acetylcysteine, and their defense effects as antioxidant agents against free radicals. Additionally, the protective effects of sulphur-containing ligands against the toxic effects of heavy and transition metal ions, and their reactivation role towards the enzyme inhibition are described. Sulphur-containing amino acids represent a powerful part of cell antioxidant system. Thus, they are essential in the maintenance of normal cellular functions and health. In addition to their worthy antioxidant action, sulphur-containing amino acids may offer a chelating site for heavy metals. Accordingly, they may be supplemented during chelating therapy, providing beneficial effects in eliminating toxic metals. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Free radical reaction pathway, thermohemistry of peracetic acid homolysis and its application for phenol degradation: spectroscopic sti=udy and quantum chemistry calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Makarova, K.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2010-01-01

    The homolysis of peracetic acid (PAA) as a relevant source of free radicals (e.g., •OH) was studied in detail. Radicals formed as a result of chain radical reactions were detected with electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spin trapping techniques and subsequently identified by

  16. Concerted effects in the reaction of ·OH radicals with aromatics: radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albarran, G.; Schuler, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic and capillary electrophoretic studies have been used to resolve the products produced in the radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution. These studies have shown that, as in the case of phenol, · OH radicals preferentially add to the positions ortho and para to the OH substituent. However, in contrast to its reaction with phenol, addition at the ortho position is favored over addition at the para position. Because · OH radical is a strong electrophile this difference suggests that the electron population at the ortho position in the salicylate anion is enhanced as a result of the hydrogen bonding in salicylic acid

  17. Radical-Scavenging Activity of Thiols, Thiobarbituric Acid Derivatives and Phenolic Antioxidants Determined Using the Induction Period Method for Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Fujisawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The radical-scavenging activities of two thiols, eight (thiobarbituric acid derivatives and six chain-breaking phenolic antioxidants were investigated using the induction period method for polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2’-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The induction period (IP for the thiols 2-mercaptoethanol (ME and 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI was about half that for phenolic antioxidants. Except for the potent inhibitor 5,5-dimethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (3, the IP for thiobarbituric acid derivatives was about one tenth of that for phenolic antioxidants. The IP for 1,3,5-trimethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (1 and 5-allyl-1, 3-dimethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (7 was less than that of the control, possibly due to inhibition by a small amount of atmospheric oxygen in the DSC container. The ratio of the chain inhibition to that of chain propagation (CI/CP for the thiols and thiobarbituric acid compounds except for 1, 3 and 7 was about 10 times greater or greater than that for phenolic compounds. A kinetic chain length (KCL about 10% greater than that of the control was observed for 1, suggesting that 1 had chain transfer reactivity in the polymerization of MMA. The average molecular weight of polymers formed from thiobarbituric acid derivatives is discussed.

  18. Antiglycation, radical scavenging, and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibitory activities of acetohydroxamic acid in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuh-Hwa Liu,1,2,* Yeh-Lin Lu,3,* Der-Zen Liu,4 Wen-Chi Hou5 1Division of Gastroenterology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of General Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs can promote intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and the levels of AGEs are highly correlated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes complications. Acetohydroxamic acid (acetH is a bacterial urease inhibitor drug used to treat kidney stones and infections in the urinary tract, and hydroxyurea (HU is a drug used for antineoplasm and sickle cell diseases. Both acetH and HU are hydroxamic acid derivatives. It was found that acetH and HU at 2.5 or 5 mM showed anti-AGE formation by lowering the AGEs’ fluorescent intensities and Nε-(carboxymethyllysine formation in bovine serum albumin/galactose models, and both showed better and significant differences (P<0.05 compared to the positive control of aminoguanidine. Regarding radical scavenging activities, the half-inhibition concentrations (IC50 of acetH against α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical and hydroxyl radical were 34.86 and 104.42 µM, respectively. The IC50 of acetH against semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase was 10.56 µM, and acetH showed noncompetitive inhibition respective to the substrates (benzylamine. The antiglycation, antioxidant, and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibitory activities of acetH prove that it has the potential for treating cardiovascular disease and diabetes complications and it needs further investigation in animal models. Keywords: acetH, AGEs, Nε

  19. Antioxidant multi-walled carbon nanotubes by free radical grafting of gallic acid: new materials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Hampel, Silke; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Puoci, Francesco; Iemma, Francesca; Curcio, Manuela; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Picci, Nevio; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Ritschel, Manfred; Büchner, Bernd

    2011-02-01

    To prove the possibility of covalently functionalizing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by free radical grafting of gallic acid on their surface with the subsequent synthesis of materials with improved biological properties evaluated by specific in-vitro assays. Antioxidant CNTs were synthesized by radical grafting of gallic acid onto pristine CNTs. The synthesis of carbon nanotubes was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor and, after the removal of the amorphous carbon, the grafting process was performed. The obtained materials were characterized by fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyses. After assessment of the biocompatibility and determination of the disposable phenolic group content, the antioxidant properties were evaluated in terms of total antioxidant activity and scavenger ability against 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Finally the inhibition activity on acetylcholinesterase was evaluated.   The covalent functionalization of CNTs with gallic acid was confirmed and the amount of gallic acid bound per g of CNTs was found to be 2.1±0.2 mg. Good antioxidant and scavenging properties were recorded in the functionalized CNTs, which were found to be able to inhibit the acetylcholinesterase with potential improved activity for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. For the first time, a free radical grafting procedure was proposed as a synthetic approach for the covalent functionalization of CNTs with an antioxidant polyphenol. © 2010 The Authors. JPP © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Ascorbic Acid-Initiated Tandem Radical Cyclization of N-Arylacrylamides to Give 3,3-Disubstituted Oxindoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ascorbic acid-promoted and metal-free tandem room temperature cyclization of N-arylacrylamides with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium generated in situ was developed. This reaction proceeds smoothly through a radical mechanism and provides an environmentally friendly alternative approach to biologically active 3-alkyl-3-benzyloxindoles, avoiding the use of excess oxidants and light irradiation.

  1. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, protects liver against valproic acid induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cakmak Neziha Hacihasanoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA, is a well established anticonvulsant drug that has been increasingly used in the treatment of many forms of generalized epilepsy. Edaravone (EDA; 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one is a potent free radical scavenger. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of EDA on VPA-induced hepatic damage. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Group I was control animals. Group II was control rats given valproic acid (500 mg kg-1 day for seven days. Group III was given only EDA (30 mg kg-1day for seven days. Group IV was given VPA+EDA (in same dose and time. EDA and VPA were given intraperitoneally. On the 8th day of experiment, blood samples and liver tissue were taken. Serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, liver myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase, adenosine deaminase, Na+/K+ATPase, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, DT-diaphorase, arginase and thromboplastic activities, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl levels were increased whereas paraoxonase, biotinidase activities and glutathione levels were decreased in VPA group. Application of EDA with VPA protected against VPA-induced effects. These results demonstrated that administration of EDA is a potentially beneficial agent to reduce hepatic damage in VPA induced hepatotoxicity, probably by decreasing oxidative stress.

  2. Reaction of hypochlorite with amino acids and peptides : EPR evidence for rapid rearrangement and fragmentation of nitrogen-centred radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.L.; Davies, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Various amino acid side chains have been shown to be particularly susceptible to attack and modification by hypochlorite (HOCl). It is known that tyrosine is readily chlorinated by HOCl to give 3-chlorotyrosine and this product has been employed as a marker of HOCl-mediated damage to proteins. Cysteine and methionine react rapidly with HOCl to give oxy acids and cystine (from cysteine) and sulphoxides (from methionine). Lysine and amino acids which lack the above functional groups also react with HOCl via the free amino group which results in the generation of unstable chloramine intermediates; subsequent decomposition of these species gives NH 3 , CO 2 and aldehydes. While the products of reaction of HOCl with amino acids and peptides are reasonably well characterised, the mechanism(s) by which these products arise is less well understood. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with spin trapping and UV/visible spectroscopy has been employed to examine the reaction of HOCl with amino acids and some small peptides. Reaction of HOCl with N-acetyl amino acids or small peptides gives radicals predominantly at α-carbon sites via reaction at N-terminal free amino groups or amide (peptide) bonds. It is proposed that these carbon-centred radicals are produced as a result of the rearrangement of initial nitrogen-centred radicals formed on cleavage of the N-CI bond of the chloramine/chloramide species by a 1,2-shift reaction

  3. Synthesis of Amino Acid Analogues of 5H-Dibenz[b,f]azepine and Evaluation of their Radical Scavenging Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vijay Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the synthesis of tyrosine, phenyl alanine, hydroxy proline and threonine free amino acid analogues of 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine is proposed. 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine was prepared by known method. The key intermediate 3-chloro-1-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-ylpropan-1-one was obtained by N-acylation of 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine with 3-chloro propionyl chloride. Further coupling of respective free amino acid to produce 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropylamino3-(4 hydroxyphenyl propanoic acid, 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropylamino-3-phenyl propanoicacid,1-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropyl-3-hydroxypyrolidine-2-carboxylic acid and 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f] azepine-yl-3-oxopropyl amino-3-hydroxy butanoic acid. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their potential over 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA and ascorbic acid (AA were used as the reference antioxidant compounds and also the comparative study with synthesized compounds was done. Under our experimental conditions tyrosine, hydroxy proline and threonine analogues possess a direct scavenging effect on trapping the stable free radical DPPH. Hydroxy proline analogues showed a significant radical scavenging activity among the synthesized analogues

  4. A multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) study on the antioxidant capacity of a neuroprotective drug, edaravone as compared with uric acid, glutathione, and trolox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Erisa; Sueishi, Yoshimi

    2014-03-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one) is a neuroprotective drug that has been used for brain ischemia injury treatment. Because its activity is speculated to be due to free radical scavenging activity, we carried out a quantitative determination of edaravone's free radical scavenging activity against multiple free radical species. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping-based multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) method was employed, where target free radicals were hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, methyl radical, and singlet oxygen. Edaravone showed relatively high scavenging abilities against hydroxyl radical (scavenging rate constant k=2.98×10(11) M(-1) s(-1)), singlet oxygen (k=2.75×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), and methyl radical (k=3.00×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Overall, edaravone's scavenging activity against multiple free radical species is as robust as other known potent antioxidant such as uric acid, glutathione, and trolox. A radar chart illustration of the MULTIS activity relative to uric acid, glutathione, and trolox indicates that edaravone has a high and balanced antioxidant activity with low specificity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of gamma-ray-induced free radicals on the metal content and amino acid composition of human metallothionein-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goossens, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs), a low-mass class of metalloproteins, are characterized by a high thiolate sulphur and metal content. MTs are involved in metal homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification, and are efficient scavengers of free radicals. This article describes zinc release from human MT-1 and modification of its amino acid composition when subjected to free radicals generated during gamma ray radiolysis. The effect of gamma ray radiolysis of untreated and metal-depleted human MT-1 was tested under multiple aerobic and anaerobic conditions at increasing irradiation doses. Under all conditions, a rapid increase of serine in the early stages of irradiation was observed. Irradiation for longer times led to cysteic acid formation, except under argon atmosphere. Several other amino acid concentrations gradually decreased. Formation of limited amounts of hydroxyproline, hydroxylysine and ornithine as well as some less common derivatives such as cystathionine occurred as side-effects. (author)

  6. Addition and elimination kinetics in OH radical induced oxidation of phenol and cresols in acidic and alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, M.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Emmi, S.S.; Beggiato, G.; D'Angelantonio, M.

    1999-01-01

    The rates of the two consecutive reactions, OH radical addition and H 2 O/OH - elimination, were studied by pulse radiolysis in highly acidic (pH=1.3-1.9) and alkaline (pH∼11) solutions, respectively, for phenol and for the three cresol isomers. The rate coefficient of the addition as measured by the build-up of phenoxyl radical absorbance and by a competitive method is the same (1.4±0.1)x10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1 both in acidic and alkaline solution. The rate coefficient of the H 2 O elimination in acidic solution is (1.6±0.2)x10 6 s -1 , whereas the coefficient of the OH - elimination in alkaline solutions is 6-8 times higher. The kinetics of the phenoxyl radical formation was described by the two-exponential equation of the consecutive reactions: the first exponential is related to the pseudo-first-order addition, while the second to the elimination reaction. No considerable structure dependence was found in the rate coefficients, indicating that the methyl substitutent in these highly acidic or alkaline solutions influences neither the addition nor the elimination rate

  7. Urocanic acid isomers are good hydroxyl radical scavengers: a comparative study with structural analogues and with uric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Eggelte, T. A.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    UV-exposure of the epidermis leads to the isomerisation of trans-UCA into cis-UCA as well as to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. This study shows by means of the deoxyribose degradation test that UCA isomers are more powerful hydroxyl radical scavengers than the other 4-(5-)substituted imidazole

  8. Thiyl radical-induced cis-trans-isomerization of arachidonic acid inhibits prostaglandin metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzsch, S.; Droessler, K.; Sprinz, H.; Brede, O.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Thiyl radicals radiolytically generated from thiophenol in methanolic solution are known to isomerise double bonds of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). γ-irradiating of such a system containing all-cis 5,8,11,14 eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid, AA) with low doses (0.1-0.8 kGy) results in a mixture of 8 to 32% mono-trans-isomers. Here we report about the influence of mono-trans-AA on the primary steps of AA-metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis, catalysed by cyclooxygenase (COX). In the cell-free model system the reaction of COX-1 with AA was analysed by controlling the oxygen level during the enzymatic reaction. As an example, a mixture of a low quantity of mono-trans-isomerized AA (10%) and 90% all-cis-isomer exhibits a marked reduced oxygen consumption by 45%. As further proofs - the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the COX-coupled peroxidase reaction was detected, - and the COX-1 activity in presence of different amounts of trans-AA was characterized using a photometric assay based on the oxidation of TMPD. All these methods indicated semiquantitatively a reduced activity of COX-1, depending on the trans-isomer yield. Therefore, an inhibition of COX-1 activity by only one trans-double-bond in AA could be concluded. Furthermore, in vitro cell-line experiments were performed analysing the influence of mono-trans-isomerized AA on the activity of the cell-own COX-2. Hence, VD 3 -differentiated and LPS-stimulated monocyte-like cells were incubated with mono-trans-AA and ROS-production was detected by the chemiluminescence measurements mentioned above. Compared to the reaction with all-cis-AA we found a considerable lowered formation of ROS. Likewise, we obtained a reduced PGE 2 -expression between 15 and 40% for cells treated with 8 to 29% trans-AA. The model as well as in vivo experiments demonstrate an inhibition effect of mono-trans-AA and give rise for postulating an enzyme blocking mechanism

  9. Thermal Behavior and Free-Radical-Scavenging Activity of Phytic Acid Alone and Incorporated in Cosmetic Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Máximo Daneluti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid is a natural compound widely used as depigmenting agent in cosmetic emulsions. Few studies are available in the literature covering the stability and the antioxidating property of this substance, used alone or into emulsions. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to investigate the thermal behavior and antioxidant properties of phytic acid alone and into cosmetic emulsions. The thermal behavior of this substance was evaluated by thermogravimetry (TG/derivative thermogravimetry (DTG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and the free-radical-scavenging activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH. TG/DTG and DSC curves allowed evaluation of the thermal behavior of phytic acid. These results showed that the substance presented four stages of mass loss. Thermal decomposition of the material initiated at 150 °C. Thermal behavior of the cosmetic emulsions detected that the addition of phytic acid decreased the thermal stability of the system. DPPH free-radical-scavenging activity showed that phytic acid incorporated into emulsion had no antioxidant capacity compared to BHT. In summary, we concluded that the thermoanalytical techniques (TG and DSC were efficient and reliable in the characterization of phytic acid alone and incorporated into cosmetic emulsions.

  10. Ascorbic acid as a free radical scavenger in porcine and bovine aqueous humour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Carl; Nau-Staudt, Kerstin; Flammer, Josef; Nau, Werner

    2004-01-01

    To study the antioxidant activity, UV absorption, concentration and stability of ascorbic acid (AA) in porcine and bovine aqueous humour (AH). Porcine and bovine AH was taken within 5 min after death and frozen at -70 degrees C. The characteristic UV absorption band of AA and the concentration of AA in AH was determined by UV spectrophotometry. The antioxidant activity of AA to serve as a free radical scavenger in AH has been determined by using a novel fluorescent probe for antioxidants, the azoalkane 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO). The fluorescence lifetime and intensity of this probe reflect the concentration of dissolved antioxidants. The time-resolved fluorescence of DBO (laser excitation at 351 nm) in AH and in a neutral phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing only the natural amount of AA as an additive were measured. The characteristic UV absorption band of AA has its maximum at 266 nm in AH. The concentration of AA in porcine and bovine AH was found to be 0.547 +/- 0.044 and 1.09 +/- 0.16 mM, respectively, by spectrophotometry. The fluorescence lifetime of the probe DBO was reduced from 320 +/- 5 ns in pure aerated PBS to 205 +/- 5 ns in porcine AH and 165 +/- 3 ns in bovine AH. A detailed kinetic analysis of the lifetime shortening suggests that AA contributes approximately 75 and 85% to the antioxidant activity of porcine and bovine AH, respectively. Our experiments suggest that AA is the major contributor to the antioxidant activity of porcine and bovine AH. The role of AA to serve as an antioxidant in AH is discussed. In addition, UV spectrophotometry is established as an alternative method to determine the concentration of AA in AH. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Structure and Reactivity of the Glutathione Radical Cation: Radical Rearrangement from the Cysteine Sulfur to the Glutamic Acid alpha-Carbon Atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Gulyuz, K.; Polfer, N.C.; O'Hair, R.A.J.; Ryzhov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A gas-phase radical rearrangement through intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) was studied in the glutathione radical cation, [-ECG](+.), which was generated by a homolytic cleavage of the protonated S-nitrosoglutathione. Ion-molecule reactions suggested that the radical migrates from the

  12. Modification of Cys-418 of pyruvate formate-lyase by methacrylic acid, based on its radical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Vielhaber, G; Wallach, J; Knappe, J

    2000-01-21

    The recently determined crystal structure of pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) suggested a new view of the mechanism of this glycyl radical enzyme, namely that intermediary thiyl radicals of Cys-418 and Cys-419 participate in different ways [Becker, A. et al. (1999) Nat. Struct. Biol. 6, 969-975]. We report here a suicide reaction of PFL that occurs with the substrate-analog methacrylate with retention of the protein radical (K(I)=0.42 mM, k(i)=0.14 min(-1)). Using [1-(14)C]methacrylate (synthesized via acetone cyanhydrin), the reaction end-product was identified by peptide mapping and cocrystallization experiments as S-(2-carboxy-(2S)-propyl) substituted Cys-418. The stereoselectivity of the observed Michael addition reaction is compatible with a radical mechanism that involves Cys-418 thiyl as nucleophile and Cys-419 as H-atom donor, thus supporting the functional assignments of these catalytic amino acid residues derived from the protein structure.

  13. Changes in the amino acid profiles and free radical scavenging activities of Tenebrio molitor larvae following enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujiao; Debnath, Trishna; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Young Wook; Ryu, Jung Pyo; Jang, Sejin; Chung, Sang Uk; Choi, Young-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) larvae provide food at low environmental cost and contribute positively to livelihoods. In this research, we compared the amino acids compositions and antioxidant activities of various extracts of T. molitor to enhance their quality as food. For the comparison, distilled water extracts, enzymatic hydrolysates, and condensed enzymatic hydrolysates of T. molitor larvae were prepared. Their amino acids (AAs) profiles and antioxidant activities, including ferric-reducing antioxidant power, oxygen radical absorption capacity, and DPPH, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging properties assay were analyzed. DW extracts had the lowest AAs contents and antioxidant activity compared with enzymatic extracts. Condensed hydrolysates with a combination of alcalase and flavourzyme (C-A+F) exhibited the highest levels of total free AAs (11.1759 g/100 g). C-A+F produced higher total hydrolyzed AAs (32.5292 g/100 g) compared with the other groups. The C-A+F possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. Notably, the antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates and the total hydrolyzed AAs amount were correlated. Taken together, our findings showed that C-A+F was a promising technique for obtaining extracts of T. molitor larvae with antioxidant activity as potential nutritious functional food.

  14. Formation and transformations of radicals in frozen aqueous solutions of components of nucleic acids and H3PO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkhadzhidinova, D.R.; Chefranova, O.A.; Sharpatyj, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiolysis of frozen aqueous solutions of 6-16 M H 3 PO 4 and 5 M NaH 2 PO 4 was studied, as well as radiolysis of these systems in the presence of nitrous bases and glucose. In aqueous solutions of H 3 PO 4 and NaH 2 PO 4 irradiated at 77 K, two groups of radicals formed as a result of interaction of the oxidative component of radiolysis of water with phosphate ions were identified. Their photolytic properties were studied. Primary products of radiolysis of the nitrous bases in phosphoric- acid solutions are anion- and cation-radicals. The molal absorption coefficients of the particles were determined

  15. Reaction pathway of the degradation of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid by sulfate radical generated by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) in aqueous solutions by ionizing radiation was studied. The phenolic pollutant was easily removed by the electron beam irradiation, as more than 80% of the initial 100 µM introduced was degraded for a dose of 600 Gy. It was shown that the addition of persulfate, producing the sulfate radical as additional reactive species, induced a change in the reaction pathway. LC–MS analyses were performed in order to identify the different by-products formed. In the absence of persulfate, the main by-product formed was 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, while in presence of persulfate, 1,4-benzoquinone was detected and the hydroxylated by-products were not present. A reaction pathway of HBA degradation by hydroxyl and sulfate radicals was proposed from the identification of the chemical structure of the different by-products detected. The influences of pH and dissolved oxygen were also studied. A high decline of HBA degradation was observed at pH 11 compared to pH 4.5, this decrease was minimized in the presence of persulfate. The dissolved oxygen concentration was found to be a limiting parameter of HBA degradation, however an excess of dissolved oxygen in solution did not improve the degradation to a large extent. - Highlights: • p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) is easily removed by e-beam irradiation. • The sulfate radicals formed from persulfate induce loss of the benzoic acid skeleton. • The dissolved oxygen concentration is a limiting parameter of the HBA degradation. • The effect of pH is minimized in presence of persulfate

  16. Histidine, lysine, and arginine radical cations: isomer control via the choice of auxiliary ligand (L) in the dissociation of [CuII(L)amino acid]*2+ complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuyong; Zhao, Junfang; Verkerk, Udo H; Hopkinson, Alan C; Siu, K W Michael

    2007-12-27

    Histidine, lysine, and arginine radical cations have been generated through collision-induced dissociation (CID) of complexes [CuII(auxiliary ligand)namino acid]*2+, using tri-, bi-, as well as monodentate auxiliary ligands. On the basis of the observed CID products, the existence of two isomeric amino-acid populations is postulated. The Type 1 radical cations of histidine and lysine, stable on the mass spectrometer time scale, were found to lose water, followed by the loss of carbon monoxide under more energetic CID conditions. The arginine Type 1 radical cation behaved differently, losing dehydroalanine. The Type 2 radical cations were metastable and easily fragmented by the loss of carbon dioxide, effectively preventing direct observation. Type 1 radical cations are proposed to result from neutral (canonical) amino-acid coordination, whereas Type 2 radical cations are from zwitterionic amino-acid coordination to copper in the complex. The ratio of Type 1/Type 2 ions was found to be dependent on the auxiliary ligand, providing a method of controlling which radical cation would be formed primarily. Density functional calculations at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) have been used to determine the relative energies of five His*+ isomers. Barriers against interconversion between the isomers and against fragmentation have been calculated, giving insight as to why the Type 1 ions are stable, while only fragmentation products of the Type 2 ions are observable under CID conditions.

  17. Amino acid changes in disease-associated variants differ radically from variants observed in the 1000 genomes project dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaart A P de Beer

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project data provides a natural background dataset for amino acid germline mutations in humans. Since the direction of mutation is known, the amino acid exchange matrix generated from the observed nucleotide variants is asymmetric and the mutabilities of the different amino acids are very different. These differences predominantly reflect preferences for nucleotide mutations in the DNA (especially the high mutation rate of the CpG dinucleotide, which makes arginine mutability very much higher than other amino acids rather than selection imposed by protein structure constraints, although there is evidence for the latter as well. The variants occur predominantly on the surface of proteins (82%, with a slight preference for sites which are more exposed and less well conserved than random. Mutations to functional residues occur about half as often as expected by chance. The disease-associated amino acid variant distributions in OMIM are radically different from those expected on the basis of the 1000 Genomes dataset. The disease-associated variants preferentially occur in more conserved sites, compared to 1000 Genomes mutations. Many of the amino acid exchange profiles appear to exhibit an anti-correlation, with common exchanges in one dataset being rare in the other. Disease-associated variants exhibit more extreme differences in amino acid size and hydrophobicity. More modelling of the mutational processes at the nucleotide level is needed, but these observations should contribute to an improved prediction of the effects of specific variants in humans.

  18. [1-11C]octanoate as a PET tracer for studying ischemic stroke. Evaluation in a canine model of thromboembolic stroke with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, Yuji; Kawashima, Hidefumi; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Octanoate is taken up by the brain and converted in astrocytes to glutamine through the TCA cycle after β-oxidation. Consequently, [1- 11 C]octanoate might serve as a useful positron emission tomography (PET) probe for studying cerebral oxidative metabolism and/or astroglial functions. The present study attempted to evaluate the utility of using [1- 11 C]octanoate as a PET tracer for imaging and evaluating the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. We used a canine model of thromboembolic stroke. Five male beagle dogs were implanted with an indwelling catheter in the left internal carotid artery. A single autologous blood clot was injected into the left internal carotid artery through the catheter. The brain distribution of [1- 11 C]octanoate and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were determined 24 h after insult using a high resolution PET scanner. Post mortem brain regions unstained with 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) were defined as infarcts. In the region of an infarct, accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate decreased concurrently with CBF reduction. In contrast, normal accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate was observed in ischemic but vital regions, suggesting that an increased accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate relative to CBF takes place in these regions. In conclusion, [1- 11 C]octanoate accumulated in ischemic but vital regions, indicating that [1- 11 C]octanoate is a potentially useful PET tracer for imaging and evaluating the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. (author)

  19. Clinical efficacy ofω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in perioperative period of radical operation for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Xue Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the regulating effect of application of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in perioperative period of radical surgery for gastric cancer on patients’ nutritional status, inflammatory response and immune function. Methods: A total of 86 cases of patients receiving radical operation for gastric cancer in our hospital were selected for study and randomly divided into two groups, ω-3 PUFAs group received ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids combined with conventional intravenous nutritional support and control group only received conventional intravenous nutritional support. Serum nutrition indicators of two groups were detected before and after surgery, and inflammation indicators in serum as well as immune molecules in tumor tissue of tow groups were detected after surgery. Results: 1d before operation and 3 d after operation, serum RBP, PA, RTF, PEPT1 and ghrelin contents of ω-3 PUFAs group were significantly higher than those of control group; 3 d after operation, serum CC16, α-MSH and HSP70 contents of ω-3 PUFAs group were significantly higher than those of control group, and LBP and sCD14 contents were significantly lower than those of control group; B7-H1, B7-H4, CD157 and CD133 contents in tumor tissue of ω-3 PUFAs group were significantly lower than those of control group, and CD11c content was significantly higher than that of control group. Conclusion: Application of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in perioperative period of radical operation for gastric cancer can improve patients’ nutritional status, reduce postoperative inflammatory response caused by surgical trauma and regulate the expression of immune molecules in tumor tissue.

  20. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-17

    Reo, C. M. Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic...SUBTITLE 7C 5. FUNDING NUMBERS" Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids : A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo G-AFOSR-90-0148 6...octanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoro-n-decanoic acid (PFDA). These Air Force chemicals belong to a class of CU’. compounds known as peroxisome

  1. Reactivity of OH radicals with chlorobenzoic acids-A pulse radiolysis and steady-state radiolysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zona, Robert; Solar, Sonja; Getoff, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    The reactions of OH radicals with 2-, 3-, 4-chlorobenzoic acids (ClBzA) and chlorobenzene (ClBz), k(OH+substrates)=(4.5−6.2)×109 dm3 mol−1 s−1, have been studied by pulse radiolysis in N2O saturated solutions. The absorption maxima of the OH-adducts were in the range of 320−340 nm. Their decay wa...... to degradation. The order for the efficiency of dehalogenation was 4->2->3-ClBzA. Several primary radiolytic products could be detected by HPLC. To evaluate the toxicity of final products a bacterial bioluminescence test was carried out....

  2. Sulfate radical-induced degradation of Acid Orange 7 by a new magnetic composite catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Ma, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Guangren

    2014-08-30

    We synthesized a novel magnetic composite, Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH, as a heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the solution using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes. The physicochemical properties of the composite synthesized via two-step microwave hydrothermal method were characterized by several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The degradation tests were performed at 25°C with Acid Orange 7 (AO7) initial concentration of 25mg/L and AO7/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) molar ratio of 1:10, which showed that the complete degradation by Fe3O4/Cu1.5Ni0.5Cr-LDH could be achieved and the mineralization rate could reach 46%. PMS was activated by Cu (II) and Fe (II/III) of Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH to generate sulfate radicals (SO4(-)). Subsequently, the organic functional groups of AO7 molecules were destroyed by sulfate radicals (SO4(-)), inducing the degradation of AO7. Moreover, the catalytic behavior of the catalysts could be reused five times. Therefore, our work suggested that the Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH composite could be applied widely for the treatment of organic dyes in wastewater. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Reactions of OH-radicals with hydroxylated and methoxylated benzoic acids and cinnamic acids. Radiation-induced chemical changes in mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaisberger, B.

    2001-05-01

    In the first part of this work the radiation induced chemical changes of methoxylated and hydroxylated benzoic acids and cinnamic acids were investigated. Methoxylated compounds were also used as model components for acid derivatives with no free-OH groups. The latter are essentials parts of vegetable foodstuff. A comparison of the radiolytic behaviour of single substituted methoxy- and hydroxybenzoic acids was given at first, data of literature was included. The priority of the investigation was the hydroxylation process induced by OH-radicals. The OH-adduct distribution is generally the same for the hydroxy- as well as for the methoxybenzoic acid isomers. This could be proved by oxidation of these OH-adducts with K 3 Fe(CN) 6 . In the presence of air 68-77 % of the hydroxybenzoic acids are converted into hydroxylation products, whereas with the methoxylated acids this reaction leads only to about 10%. An explanation gives the different decay pathways of the intermediate peroxylradical. The multiple methoxy- and hydroxybenzoic acids show three different reaction possibilities: hydroxylation, replacement of -OCH 3 by -OH and -in case of the cinnamic acids-oxidative decomposition of the rest of the propenic acid under formation of the corresponding benzaldehydes. All these reactions can be expected when irradiating foodstuff, containing these acid compounds. The characteristic formation of these components and their linear dose/concentration relationship make these substrates very promising for the use as markers for irradiation treatment of foodstuff. The second part of this work deals with the gamma-radiation induced chemical changes in mushrooms. The irradiated and non-irradiated samples were freeze-dried and purified from matrix components chromatographically on polyamid columns. In case of the phenolic compounds for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and three unknown components linear dose/concentration relationships could be obtained. Two of these unknown compounds seem

  4. Reactivity of OH radicals with chlorobenzoic acids-A pulse radiolysis and steady-state radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zona, Robert [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Solar, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.a [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Getoff, Nikola [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Sehested, Knud; Holcman, Jerzy [RISO National Laboratory Environmental Science and Technology Department, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2010-05-15

    The reactions of OH radicals with 2-, 3-, 4-chlorobenzoic acids (ClBzA) and chlorobenzene (ClBz), k({sup c}entre dotOH+substrates)=(4.5-6.2)x10{sup 9} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, have been studied by pulse radiolysis in N{sub 2}O saturated solutions. The absorption maxima of the OH-adducts were in the range of 320-340 nm. Their decay was according to a second-order reaction, 2k=(1-9)x10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. In the presence of N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} the formation of peroxyl radicals was detectable for 2-, 4-ClBzA and ClBz, k(OH-adduct+O{sub 2})=(2-4)x10{sup 7} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while this reaction for 3-ClBzA was too slow to be registered. In the presence of N{sub 2}O the degradation rates induced by gamma radiation were very similar for all chlorobenzoic acids, yet the chloride formation was distinctly higher for 3-ClBzA. In the presence of oxygen the initial degradation of 2-and 4-ClBzA equaled the OH-radical concentration, whereas in case of 3-ClBzA only approx60% of {sup c}entre dotOH led to degradation. The order for the efficiency of dehalogenation was 4->2->3-ClBzA. Several primary radiolytic products could be detected by HPLC. To evaluate the toxicity of final products a bacterial bioluminescence test was carried out.

  5. Tropospheric chemistry of natural hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and peroxy radicals: Their connections to sulfuric acid production and climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1993-05-01

    Recent work has shown that natural hydrocarbon emissions can significantly affect the levels of urban and regional tropospheric ozone. We report on the reactivities of these biogenic trace gases, particularly isoprene, focusing on their importance in the production of aldehydes and peroxy radicals, leading to increased levels of hydrogen over regional forests. Hydrogen peroxide can lead to the wet oxidation of sulfur dioxide to acidic sulfate in aerosols, fogs, and clouds. In turn, acidic sulfate can act to as a light scattering aerosol and a source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), potentially leading to global cooling. Aerosol sulfate and other dissolved organic and inorganic compounds can also play important roles as a greenhouse species in the lower troposphere

  6. Visible-Light Photoredox-Catalyzed Giese Reaction: Decarboxylative Addition of Amino Acid Derived α-Amino Radicals to Electron-Deficient Olefins

    KAUST Repository

    Millet, Anthony; Lefebvre, Quentin; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    A tin- and halide-free, visible-light photoredox-catalyzed Giese reaction was developed. Primary and secondary α-amino radicals were generated readily from amino acids in the presence of catalytic amounts of an iridium photocatalyst. The reactivity of the α-amino radicals has been evaluated for the functionalization of a variety of activated olefins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  7. Visible-Light Photoredox-Catalyzed Giese Reaction: Decarboxylative Addition of Amino Acid Derived α-Amino Radicals to Electron-Deficient Olefins

    KAUST Repository

    Millet, Anthony

    2016-06-20

    A tin- and halide-free, visible-light photoredox-catalyzed Giese reaction was developed. Primary and secondary α-amino radicals were generated readily from amino acids in the presence of catalytic amounts of an iridium photocatalyst. The reactivity of the α-amino radicals has been evaluated for the functionalization of a variety of activated olefins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  8. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus L...Carboxylic Acids and 4Polychiorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance G-AFOSR-90-0148 Investigation in Vivo ,IIC 6. AUTHOR(S a Nicholas V. Reo...Maxim um 200 words) This report outlines our research progress regarding toxicological investigations of perifluoro- n-octanoic acid (PFOA) and

  9. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone.

  10. Mechanisms for formation of organic acids in gas-phase reactions of ozone and hydroxyl radical with dialkenes and unsaturated carbonyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chao-Jung

    2001-07-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous throughout the troposphere and may contribute significant fractions of the free acidity in some remote areas. One of the important sources of these carboxylic acids is thought to be photochemical transformation of biogenic hydrocarbons such as isoprene. For the work reported here, atmospheric samples from University of North Carolina dual outdoor environmental chamber under simulated urban atmospheric conditions were analyzed for carboxylic acids. Both OH radicals and O3 initiated photooxidation reaction experiments were performed for isoprene, along with its structural analogs, 1,3-butadiene and 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, and their primary photooxidation products, methacrolein, acrolein, and methyl vinyl ketone. Among the detected carboxylic acids were formic, acetic, and several multifunctional carboxylic acids, including methacrylic, acrylic, glyoxylic, and glycolic acids. Quantification of most carboxylic acid products was also established. Formation yields of carboxylic acids from the reactions of O3 with studied compounds were determined, and time-concentration series of the reactants and carboxylic acid products were measured to facilitate mechanism formulation. While the reaction mechanisms of Criegee biradicals arising from decomposition of primary ozonides are proposed to account for the observed carboxylic acid products in the ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons, reactions of peroxy acyl radicals with HO2 and/or other peroxy radicals are thought to be responsible for the formation of carboxylic acids during the OH-initiated reactions in the presence of NOx. In this study, smog chamber simulations have also been performed for selected compounds using Morpho, a photochemical kinetic simulation software package. Explicit photochemical mechanisms with O 3 and OH radicals that lead to formation of carboxylic acids were elaborated and implemented, and the simulation results were compared with those from other chemical

  11. Free radical grafting of gallic acid (GA) on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCS) and evaluation of antioxidant reinforced gellan gum films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, P.; Fraschini, C.; Salmieri, S.; Becher, D.; Safrany, A.; Lacroix, M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiradical properties were introduced on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by redox pair (RP) initiator and γ-radiation treatments. Different procedures were tested on CNC, first a 2 h reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/ascorbic acid (AA) was performed on CNC solution. γ-Radiation treatment at 20 kGy dose was then applied and immediately after GA was reacted during 24 h with the pretreated CNCs, giving CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA. The formation of new carboxylic acids and carbonyl groups were characterized by FT-IR at 1650 and 1730 cm-1 respectively. Carboxylic acid functionalities were also analyzed by conductometric titration where an increase from 49 to 134 mmol COOH kg-1 was found from native to irradiated CNCs. A similar increase in the carboxylic acid content (132 mmol kg-1) was observed for CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA, showing the highest radical scavenging properties (8 mM Trolox eq/mg CNC). Thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the structural changes onto CNC. Film packaging containing 20% of CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA was then added to a gellan-based film packaging. A significant improvement (p<0.05) of the tensile strength (TS), the tensile modulus (TM) and the elongation at break (EB) and water vapor permeability reduction was observed when CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA was added to the film packaging formulation.

  12. Free radical scavenging properties of mannitol and its role as a constituent of hyaluronic acid fillers: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, P; Villain, F

    2017-08-01

    Mannitol has both hydrating and antioxidant properties that make it an ideal excipient for use with hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers. This review examines the role of reactive oxygen species in the ageing process and their effects on both endogenous HA and HA products developed for aesthetic use. Evidence is presented to show that the free radical scavenging properties of mannitol provide it with a two-fold mechanism of action when combined with HA fillers: reducing the inflammation and swelling associated with the injection procedure itself, and preventing the degradation of the injected HA by free radicals. Mannitol also has a long- and well-established safety profile in both the food and pharmaceutical industry. Having established the rationale for using mannitol in combination with an HA filler, the products using this strategy are then reviewed. The addition of mannitol to HA fillers is a viable and safe option for improving both short- and long-term HA aesthetic effects. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  13. Sulfate radical-induced degradation of Acid Orange 7 by a new magnetic composite catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dan; Ma, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Guangren

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Organic dyes could be absorbed on the surface of the composite or dispersed in the solution. Sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ) generated by the synergistic reaction between peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and the composite, attacked the organic functional groups of the dyes molecules both adsorbed on the composite surface and dispersed in the solution, which resulted in the degradation of AO7 dye. - Highlights: • A new composite was synthesized successfully via microwave hydrothermal method. • The complete degradation in the system of FLCN and PMS can be achieved. • The catalytic behavior of FLCN can be reused at least for five times. • The AO7 degradation mechanism in the system of FLCN and PMS was demonstrated. - Abstract: We synthesized a novel magnetic composite, Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH, as a heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the solution using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes. The physicochemical properties of the composite synthesized via two-step microwave hydrothermal method were characterized by several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The degradation tests were performed at 25 °C with Acid Orange 7 (AO7) initial concentration of 25 mg/L and AO7/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) molar ratio of 1:10, which showed that the complete degradation by Fe 3 O 4 /Cu 1.5 Ni 0.5 Cr-LDH could be achieved and the mineralization rate could reach 46%. PMS was activated by Cu (II) and Fe (II/III) of Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH to generate sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ). Subsequently, the organic functional groups of AO7 molecules were destroyed by sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ), inducing the degradation of AO7. Moreover, the catalytic behavior of the catalysts could be reused five times. Therefore, our work suggested that the Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH composite could be applied widely for the

  14. Accessibility of nucleic acid-complexed biomolecules to hydroxyl radicals correlates with their conformation: a fluorescence polarization spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makrigiorgos, G.M.; Bump, E.; Huang, C.; Kassis, A.I.; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, J.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescence methodology has been developed to examine the relationship between the conformational state of specific biomolecules in simple chromatin models and their accessibility to hydroxyl radicals ( . OH). Polylysine and histone H1 were labelled with SECCA, the succinimidyl ester of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, which generates the fluorescent derivative 7-OH-SECCA following its interaction with radiation-induced . OH in aqueous solution. The fluorescence induced per unit γ-ray dose reflecting the accessibility of . OH to such SECCA-conjugated biomolecules was recorded. The biomolecules were also labelled with the fluorescent derivative 7-OH-SECCA in trace amounts to study their conformation under identical conditions via fluorescence polarization spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Structural study of concentrated micelle-solutions of sodium octanoate by light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1982-05-01

    Structural investigation of sodium octanoate (CH 3 -(CH 2 ) 6 -COONa) by light scattering has been made to study properties of concentrated aqueous micelle-solutions. From static light scattering data, the micellar weight and shape have been determined. The monomer aggregation number and the apparent micellar charge have been confirmed. Quasi-elastic light scattering, has been used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the volume fraction. Extrapolation to the c.m.c. give the hydrodynamic radius of the micelles. At low micelle-concentration, strong exchange reaction between monomers and micelles affects the Brownian motion and resulting is an increase in the diffusion coefficient. The experimental data show a strong hydrodynamic contribution to S(q) (factor structure) and D(q) (effective diffusion coefficient) arising from hard spheres interactions with a large repulsive potential. (author) [fr

  16. Assessing the fatty acid, essential oil composition, their radical scavenging and antibacterial activities of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi leaves and twigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennigrou, Asma; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle; Hanchi, Belgacem; Hosni, Karim

    2018-04-01

    The fatty acid, essential oil compositions and their respective antioxidant and antibacterial activities was determined in Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi leaves and twigs. The lipid content ranged from 1.75 to 4.65% in twigs and leaves, respectively. Thirteen fatty acids were identified with α-linolenic (C18:3), palmitic (C16:0) and linoleic (C18:2) acids being the main components. The essential oils of both organs were characterized by a high amount of monoterpene hydrocarbons (68.91-74.88%) with α-phellandrene (33.06-36.18%), α-pinene (14.85-15.18%) and limonene (6.62-8.79%) being the chief components. The DPPH˙ radical scavenging assay revealed that both oils have a very weak antiradical activity. In contrast, they showed an appreciable antibacterial activity against the gram-positive Enterococcus feacium (ATCC 19434) and Streptococcus agalactiae (ATCC 13813) bacteria. These results suggest that leaves and twigs of S. terebinthifolius could be considered as an important dietary source of health promoting phytochemicals and has a good potential for use in food industry and pharmacy.

  17. Progress in Understanding Algal Bloom-Mediated Fish Kills: The Role of Superoxide Radicals, Phycotoxins and Fatty Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Dorantes-Aranda

    Full Text Available Quantification of the role of reactive oxygen species, phycotoxins and fatty acids in fish toxicity by harmful marine microalgae remains inconclusive. An in vitro fish gill (from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss assay was used to simultaneously assess the effect in superoxide dismutase, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities caused by seven species of ichthyotoxic microalgae (Chattonella marina, Fibrocapsa japonica, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Alexandrium catenella, Karlodinium veneficum, Prymnesium parvum. Quantification of superoxide production by these algae was also performed. The effect of purified phycotoxins and crude extracts was compared, and the effect of fatty acids is discussed. The raphidophyte Chattonella was the most ichthyotoxic (gill cell viability down to 35% and also the major producer of superoxide radicals (14 pmol cell-1 hr-1 especially after cell lysis. The raphidophyte Heterosigma and dinoflagellate Alexandrium were the least toxic and had low superoxide production, except when A. catenella was lysed (5.6 pmol cell-1 hr-1. Catalase showed no changes in activity in all the treatments. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and lactate dehydrogenase exhibited significant activity increases of ≤23% and 51.2% TCC (total cellular content, respectively, after exposure to C. marina, but SOD showed insignificant changes with remaining algal species. A strong relationship between gill cell viability and superoxide production or superoxide dismutase was not observed. Purified brevetoxins PbTx-2 and -3 (from Karenia brevis, LC50 of 22.1 versus 35.2 μg mL-1 and karlotoxin KmTx-2 (from Karlodinium; LC50 = 380 ng mL-1 could almost entirely account for the fish killing activity by those two dinoflagellates. However, the paralytic shellfish toxins (PST GTX1&4, C1&C2, and STX did not account for Alexandrium ichthyotoxicity. Only aqueous extracts of Alexandrium were cytotoxic (≤65% decrease of viability, whereas

  18. Formation of hydroxyl radical (sm-bulletOH) in illuminated surface waters contaminated with acidic mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.M.; Lucas, S.; Allen, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Formation rates and steady-state concentrations of hydroxyl radical ( sm-bullet OH) in illuminated surface water samples collected in west-central Indiana that receive acidic mine drainage runoff are reported. Formation rates for sm-bullet OH in samples were measured by the addition of 1 x 10 -3 M benzene prior to illuminate in order to effectively scavenge all of the sm-bullet OH formed, thereby yielding phenol. The sm-bullet OH formation rates were calculated from the measured phenol formation rates. Steady-state concentrations of sm-bullet OH were measured by the addition of 5 x 10 -7 M nitrobenzene to the samples prior to illumination. Estimated sunlight sm-bullet OH formation rates range from 16 microM h -1 to 265 microM h -1 . Estimated sunlight steady-state sm-bullet OH concentrations range from 6.7 x 10 -15 to 4.0 x 10 -12 M. Both the formation rates and steady-state concentrations for sm-bullet OH are thus two to three orders of magnitude higher than values reported in the literature for other sunlit surface water samples. Due to the very high rates of formation and steady-state concentrations for sm-bullet OH in these samples, the authors conclude that aqueous-phase reactions involving sm-bullet OH represent a significant pathway by which organic pollutants in illuminated surface waters receiving acidic mine drainage runoff may be consumed

  19. A computational study on Lewis acid-catalyzed diastereoselective acyclic radical allylation reactions with unusual selectivity dependence on temperature and epimer precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Miglena K; Santos, A Gil

    2014-12-05

    In stereoselective radical reactions, it is accepted that the configuration of the radical precursor has no impact on the levels of stereoinduction, as a prochiral radical intermediate is planar, with two identical faces, independently of its origin. However, Sibi and Rheault (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 8873-8879) remarkably obtained different selectivities in the trapping of radicals originated from two epimeric bromides, catalyzed by chelating Lewis acids. The selectivity rationalization was made on the basis of different conformational properties of each epimer. However, in this paper we show that the two epimers have similar conformational properties, which implies that the literature proposal is unable to explain the experimental results. We propose an alternative mechanism, in which the final selectivity is dependent on different reaction rates for radical formation from each epimer. By introducing a different perspective of the reaction mechanism, our model also allows the rationalization of different chemical yields obtained from each epimer, a result not rationalized by the previous model. Adaptation to other radical systems, under different reaction conditions, is also possible.

  20. Yields of hydrogen peroxide from the reaction of hydroxyl radical with organic compounds in solution and ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hullar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH is a significant oxidant in atmospheric condensed phases (e.g., cloud and fog drops, aqueous particles, and snow that also photolyzes to form hydroxyl radical (OH. OH can react with organics in aqueous phases to form organic peroxyl radicals and ultimately reform HOOH, but the efficiency of this process in atmospheric aqueous phases, as well as snow and ice, is not well understood. We investigate HOOH formation from OH attack on 10 environmentally relevant organic compounds: formaldehyde, formate, glycine, phenylalanine, benzoic acid, octanol, octanal, octanoic acid, octanedioic acid, and 2-butoxyethanol. Liquid and ice samples with and without nitrate (as an OH source were illuminated using simulated solar light, and HOOH formation rates were measured as a function of pH and temperature. For most compounds, the formation rate of HOOH without nitrate was the same as the background formation rate in blank water (i.e., illumination of the organic species does not produce HOOH directly, while formation rates with nitrate were greater than the water control (i.e., reaction of OH with the organic species forms HOOH. Yields of HOOH, defined as the rate of HOOH production divided by the rate of OH production, ranged from essentially zero (glycine to 0.24 (octanal, with an average of 0.12 ± 0.05 (95 % CI. HOOH production rates and yields were higher at lower pH values. There was no temperature dependence of the HOOH yield for formaldehyde or octanedioic acid between −5 to 20 °C and ice samples had approximately the same HOOH yield as the aqueous solutions. In contrast, HOOH yields in formate solutions were higher at 5 and 10 °C compared to −5 and 20 °C. Yields of HOOH in ice for solutions containing nitrate and either phenylalanine, benzoate, octanal, or octanoic acid were indistinguishable from zero. Our HOOH yields were approximately

  1. Antioxidant and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl Free Radical Scavenging Activities of Boniger Acid and Calix[4]arene Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. ERDEM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diazonium derivative of calix[4]arene has been synthesized using three different synthetic steps. Initially p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene was synthesized with the condensation reaction of p-tert-butylphenol and formaldehyde in basic conditions. Calix[4]arene was obtained after the debutylation reaction of p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene with AlCl3. Calix[4]arene reacted with diazonium salt of Böniger acid to yield the 5,17-[(Bis(azo-bis(5-hydroxy-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonicacid]-25,26,27,28-tetrahydroxy calix[4]arene which has eight free phenolic hydroxyl group. Reaction steps were shown in Fig.1.2,7-naphthalenedisulfonicacid]-25,26,27,28-tetrahydroxy calix[4]arene The antioxidant activity of the Böniger acid and calix[4]aren derivative were determined using β-karotene-linoleic acid system. Moreover, the free radical scavenging activity values were tested with DPPH free radical. The two compounds showed strong antioxidant activity. Total antioxidant activity of Böniger acid and calix[4]aren derivative was determined using β–carotenelinoleic acid model system and was found the antioxidant activity of 84.00% and 85.60 % respectively. The free radical scavenging activities were determined as 83.05% and 84.69 %. Results show that, two compounds has the antioxidant activity. The calix[4]aren derivaties has more higher activity then Boniger acid because of calix[4]aren derivative has much hydroxl groups.

  2. The structure and properties of free radicals: An electron spin resonance study of radiation damage to nucleic acid and protein components and to some sulfur-substituted derivitives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagstuen, E.

    1979-01-01

    When cellular systems are exposed to ionizing radiation the long-term effects may range from minor disturbances to such dramatic changes as mutations and cell death. The processes leading to these macroscopical injuries are primarily confined at the molecular level. In all models aimed at a description of the action of radiation at the molecular level the formation of free radicals (which are species containing unpaired electrons) is a central concept. The technique of ESR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to study free radicals, as it is based on resonance absorption of energy by unpaired electrons in a magnetic field. ESR spectroscopy makes it possible to detect free radicals and, in some cases, to identify them. In order to study free radicals by ESR it is necessary to build up a sufficient number of unpaired spins in the sample (approximately 10 11 or more, depending on the shape of the resonance). This may be different techniques have been used to trap the induced radicals or to attain a sufficient steady state concentration level. A procedure which seems to contain a large amount of information is to irradiate at low temperatures, and, by subsequent heat-treatment of the sample to study the reactions and fate of the induced radicals. In this thesis single crystal studies of aromatic amino acids and pyrimidine derivitives together with some substituted purine derivitives are presented, and the results are discussed in relation to the present knowledge about radical formation in these classes of compounds. Single crystal studies of some sulfur-containing aromatic compounds have been presented with the purpose of shedding light on the electronic structure of sulfur-centred radicals. (JIW)

  3. Free radical transfer in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.

    1998-01-01

    For the present study of free-radical transfer in polymers pulse radiolysis and product studies have been carried out in aqueous solutions using thus far only the water-soluble polymers polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid and polyvinyl alcohol. When OH radicals, generated in the radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions, react with polymers the lifetime of the polymer radical thus created very much depends on the number of radicals per polymer chain. When there are a large number of radicals per chain their bimolecular decay may be faster than the corresponding (diffusion controlled) decay of monomeric radicals, but when the macromolecule contains only few or even just one radical their lifetime is considerably prolonged. Highly charged polymers such as polyacrylic acid at high pH attain a rod-like conformation which again favors a long lifetime of the radicals. Under such conditions, radical transfer reactions can occur. For example, in polyacrylic acid OH radicals generate two kinds of radicals side by side. The radical in β-position to the carboxylate group converts into the thermodynamically more stable α-radicals by an H-transfer reaction as can be followed by spectrophotometry. Besides radical transfer reactions β-fragmentation reactions occur causing chain scission. Such reactions can be followed in a pulse radiolysis experiment by conductometry, because counter ions are released upon chain scission. Such a process is especially effective in the case of polymethacrylic acid, where it results in a chain depolymerization. An intramolecular H-abstraction is also observed in the γ-radiolysis of polyacrylic acid with the corresponding peroxyl radicals. This causes a chain reaction to occur. The resulting hydroperoxides are unstable and decarboxylate given rise to acetylacetone-like products. In polyvinyl alcohol the peroxyl radicals in α-position to the alcohol function undergo HO 2 -elimination. This prevents a scission of the polymer chain in the

  4. Fractionation, amino acid profiles, antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of Citrullus lanatus seed protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyanka; Ghosh, Goutam

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, a modified Osborne fractionation method was followed to isolate albumin (C alb ), globulin (C glo ), prolamin (C pro ) and glutelin (C glu ) successively from seeds of Citrullus lanatus (watermelon). This research work was undertaken to investigate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of isolated protein fractions of C. lanatus seed. Amino acid composition and molecular weight distribution were determined to establish their relationship with antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. Among all the fractions, C pro was found to be most effective against A. baumannii followed by C alb and C glo . The results showed that growth of inhibition of these protein fractions differ significantly from each other (p ≤ 0.05). In view of antioxidant potential, C glo exhibited strongest antioxidant capacity while C glu showed weakest antioxidant potential.

  5. Free radical derivatives formed from cyclooxygenase-catalyzed dihomo-γ-linolenic acid peroxidation can attenuate colon cancer cell growth and enhance 5-fluorouracil's cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Qi, Jin; Yang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Erxi; Qian, Steven Y

    2014-01-01

    Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) and its downstream fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) are both nutritionally important ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-6s). Evidence shows that, via COX-mediated peroxidation, DGLA and its metabolites (1-series prostaglandins) are associated with anti-tumor activity, while AA and its metabolites (2-series prostaglandins) could be tightly implicated in various cancer diseases. However, it still remains a mystery why DGLA and AA possess contrasting bioactivities. Our previous studies showed that DGLA could go through an exclusive C-8 oxygenation pathway during COX-catalyzed lipid peroxidation in addition to a C-15 oxygenation pathway shared by both DGLA and AA, and that the exclusive C-8 oxygenation could lead to the production of distinct DGLA׳s free radical derivatives that may be correlated with DGLA׳s anti-proliferation activity. In the present work, we further investigate the anti-cancer effect of DGLA׳s free radical derivatives and their associated molecular mechanisms. Our study shows that the exclusive DGLA׳s free radical derivatives from C-8 oxygenation lead to cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human colon cancer cell line HCA-7 colony 29, probably by up-regulating the cancer suppressor p53 and the cell cycle inhibitor p27. In addition, these exclusive radical derivatives were also able to enhance the efficacy of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a widely used chemo-drug for colon cancer. For the first time, we show how DGLA׳s radical pathway and metabolites are associated with DGLA׳s anti-cancer activities and able to sensitize colon cancer cells to chemo-drugs such as 5-FU. Our findings could be used to guide future development of a combined chemotherapy and dietary care strategy for colon cancer treatment.

  6. Inhibition of Procarcinogen Activating Enzyme CYP1A2 Activity and Free Radical Formation by Caffeic Acid and its Amide Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narongchai, Paitoon; Niwatananun, Kanokporn; Narongchai, Siripun; Kusirisin, Winthana; Jaikang, Churdsak

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CAF) and its amide analogues, ethyl 1-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl) propen amide (EDPA), phenethyl 1-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl) propen amide (PEDPA), phenmethyl 1- (3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl) propen amide (PMDPA) and octyl 1-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl) propen amide (ODPA) were investigated for the inhibition of procarcinogen activating enzyme. CYP1A2 and scavenging activity on formation of nitric oxide, superoxide anion, DPPH radical and hydroxyl radical. It was found that they inhibited CYP1A2 enzyme by uncompetitive inhibition. Apparent Ki values of CAF, EDPA, PEDPA, PMDPA and ODPA were 0.59, 0.39, 0.45, 0.75 and 0.80 µM, respectively suggesting potent inhibitors of CYP1A2. Moreover, they potentially scavenged nitric oxide radical with IC 50 values of 0.12, 0.22, 0.28, 0.22 and 0.51 mM, respectively. The IC50 values of superoxide anion scavenging were 0.20, 0.22, 0.44, 2.18 and 2.50 mM, respectively. 1, 1- diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging ability, shown as IC50 values, were 0.41, 0.29, 0.30, 0.89 and 0.84 mM, respectively. Moreover, the hydroxyl radical scavenging in vitro model was shown as IC50 values of 23.22, 21.06, 17.10, 17.21 and 15.81 µM, respectively. From our results, caffeic acid and its amide analogues are in vitro inhibitors of human CYP1A2 catalytic activity and free radical formation. They may be useful to be developed as potential chemopreventive agents that block CYP1A2-mediated chemical carcinogenesis.

  7. Stereocontrol during the radical polymerization of methyl methacrylates with combined Lewis acids:Aluminium trichloride(AlCl3) and iron dichloride tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate(MMA) was carried out in the presence of combined Lewis acids of the AlCl3-FeCl2 system.Compared with the polymerization produced in the presence of single Lewis acids,AlCl3 or FeCl2,the MMA polymerization in the presence of AlCl3-FeCl2 composite in CHCl3 or 1-butanol produced a polymer with a higher isotacticity and in toluene produced a polymer with a much higher isotacticity(mm=50%) .The molecular weight and polydispersity of PMMA in the presence of Lewis acids were similar with those in the absence of Lewis acids,although Lewis acids decelerate the polymerization of MMA.The effects of the Lewis acids were greater in a solvent with a lower polarity.A possible stereocontrol mechanism of the polymerization was proposed.The Lewis acid composite of AlCl3-FeCl2 readily formed a complex with growing species.These complexes possessed apparent bulkiness that changes the direction of monomer addition to the growing radical center.

  8. DPPH radical scavenging activity of a mixture of fatty acids and peptide-containing compounds in a protein hydrolysate of Jatropha curcas seed cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phengnuam, Thanyarat; Goroncy, Alexander K; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2013-12-04

    Jatropha curcas, a tropical plant, has great potential commercial relevance as its seeds have high oil content. The seeds can be processed into high-quality biofuel producing seed cake as a byproduct. The seed cake, however, has not gotten much attention toward its potential usefulness. This work was aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of different fractions of a protein hydrolysate from J. curcas seed cake and to elucidate the molecular structures of the antioxidants. Seed cake was first processed into crude protein isolate and the protein was hydrolyzed by Neutrase. The hydrolysate obtained from 1 h of Neutrase hydrolysis showed the strongest antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). After a purification series of protein hydrolysate by liquid chromatography, chemicals acting as DPPH radical inhibitors were found to be a mixture of fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and a small amount of peptides characterized by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

  9. Synthesis of Amide and Ester Derivatives of Cinnamic Acid and Its Analogs: Evaluation of Their Free Radical Scavenging and Monoamine Oxidase and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Koichi; Toda, Kazuhiro; Saito, Takayuki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    A series of cinnamic acid derivatives, amides (1-12) and esters (13-22), were synthesized, and structure-activity relationships for antioxidant activity, and monoamine oxidases (MAO) A and B, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities were analyzed. Among the synthesized compounds, compounds 1-10, 12-18, and rosmarinic acid (23), which contained catechol, o-methoxyphenol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity. Compounds 9-11, 15, 17-22 showed potent and selective MAO-B inhibitory activity. Compound 20 was the most potent inhibitor of MAO-B. Compounds 18 and 21 showed moderate BChE inhibitory activity. In addition, compound 18 showed potent antioxidant activity and MAO-B inhibitory activity. In a comparison of the cinnamic acid amides and esters, the amides exhibited more potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity, while the esters showed stronger inhibitory activities against MAO-B and BChE. These results suggested that cinnamic acid derivatives such as compound 18, p-coumaric acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl ester, and compound 20, p-coumaric acid phenethyl ester, may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel MAO-B inhibitors and candidate lead compounds for the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Effect of free-radical spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone on seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 375-375 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015 Keywords : free radical scavenger * epilepsy * immature rats * homocysteic acid Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  11. Modeling nitrous acid and its impact on ozone and hydroxyl radical during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Czader

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous acid (HONO mixing ratios for the Houston metropolitan area were simulated with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ Model for an episode during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II in August/September 2006 and compared to in-situ MC/IC (mist-chamber/ion chromatograph and long path DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy measurements at three different altitude ranges. Several HONO sources were accounted for in simulations, such as gas phase formation, direct emissions, nitrogen dioxide (NO2 hydrolysis, photo-induced formation from excited NO2 and photo-induced conversion of NO2 into HONO on surfaces covered with organic materials. Compared to the gas-phase HONO formation there was about a tenfold increase in HONO mixing ratios when additional HONO sources were taken into account, which improved the correlation between modeled and measured values. Concentrations of HONO simulated with only gas phase chemistry did not change with altitude, while measured HONO concentrations decrease with height. A trend of decreasing HONO concentration with altitude was well captured with CMAQ predicted concentrations when heterogeneous chemistry and photolytic sources of HONO were taken into account. Heterogeneous HONO production mainly accelerated morning ozone formation, albeit slightly. Also HONO formation from excited NO2 only slightly affected HONO and ozone (O3 concentrations. Photo-induced conversion of NO2 into HONO on surfaces covered with organic materials turned out to be a strong source of daytime HONO. Since HONO immediately photo-dissociates during daytime its ambient mixing ratios were only marginally altered (up to 0.5 ppbv, but significant increase in the hydroxyl radical (OH and ozone concentration was obtained. In contrast to heterogeneous HONO formation that mainly accelerated morning ozone formation, inclusion of photo-induced surface chemistry

  12. In Vitro Antioxidant-Activity Evaluation of Gallic-Acid-Grafted Chitosan Conjugate Synthesized by Free-Radical-Induced Grafting Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Zhou, Mingyong; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-07-27

    The major objective of this work was to develop a green and facile process to prepare gallic acid-chitosan conjugate and comprehensively evaluate the physicochemical properties and biological activities of an as-prepared water-soluble chitosan derivative. A free-radical-induced grafting approach using an ascorbic acid-hydrogen peroxide redox pair was adopted. The obtained conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, and pKa analysis. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6)-sulphonic acid (ABTS), reducing power, and oxygen-radical antioxidant-capacity assays. The results showed that the mass ratio of gallic acid to chitosan played a vital role in determining the grafting degree and ζ potential of the conjugates, with the ratio of 0.5:1 being the optimal ratio that resulted in the highest grafting degree. The antioxidant assays demonstrated that conjugation significantly improved the antioxidant activities, being dramatically higher than that of free chitosan. It was notable that the DPPH- and ABTS-scavenging activities of conjugate at 0.4 mg/mL reached the same level as the free gallic acid at the equivalent concentration. Our study demonstrated a green and facile synthesis approach to preparing a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative that may have promising potentials in the food industry.

  13. Tranexamic Acid versus Placebo to Prevent Blood Transfusion during Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer (TACT): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Rodney H; Lavallée, Luke T; Cnossen, Sonya; Witiuk, Kelsey; Cagiannos, Ilias; Momoli, Franco; Bryson, Gregory; Kanji, Salmaan; Morash, Christopher; Turgeon, Alexis; Zarychanski, Ryan; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Knoll, Greg; Fergusson, Dean A

    2018-05-02

    Radical cystectomy for bladder cancer is associated with a high risk of needing red blood cell transfusion. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss during cardiac and orthopedic surgery, but no study has yet evaluated tranexamic acid use during cystectomy. A randomized, double-blind (surgeon-, anesthesiologist-, patient-, data-monitor-blinded), placebo-controlled trial of tranexamic acid during cystectomy was initiated in June 2013. Prior to incision, the intervention arm participants receive a 10 mg/kg loading dose of intravenously administered tranexamic acid, followed by a 5 mg/kg/h maintenance infusion. In the control arm, the patient receives an identical volume of normal saline that is indistinguishable from the intervention. The primary outcome is any blood transfusion from the start of surgery up to 30 days post operative. There are no strict criteria to mandate the transfusion of blood products. The decision to transfuse is entirely at the discretion of the treating physicians who are blinded to patient allocation. Physicians are allowed to utilize all resources to make transfusion decisions, including serum hemoglobin concentration and vital signs. To date, 147 patients of a planned 354 have been randomized to the study. This protocol reviews pertinent data relating to blood transfusion during radical cystectomy, highlighting the need to identify methods for reducing blood loss and preventing transfusion in patients receiving radical cystectomy. It explains the clinical rationale for using tranexamic acid to reduce blood loss during cystectomy, and outlines the study methods of our ongoing randomized controlled trial. Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) Protocol: MOP-342559; ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT01869413. Registered on 5 June 2013.

  14. Hepatic Toxicity of Perfluorocarboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    1995). 3. N. V. Reo, C. M. Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n-octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate ...Artz, and B. M. Jarnot: "ILiver Phosphorous Metabolic Response to Perfluorocarboxylic Acids and Clofibrate in Rats and Guinea Pigs: A 31 P NMR Study...Peroxisome Induction by Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid and Clofibrate in the Rat: Proliferation Versus Activity." International Society for the Study of

  15. A non-acid-assisted and non-hydroxyl-radical-related catalytic ozonation with ceria supported copper oxide in efficient oxalate degradation in water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Oxalate is usually used as a refractory model compound that cannot be effectively removed by ozone and hydroxyl radical oxidation in water. In this study, we found that ceria supported CuO significantly improved oxalate degradation in reaction with ozone. The optimum CuO loading amount was 12%. The molar ratio of oxalate removed/ozone consumption reached 0.84. The catalytic ozonation was most effective in a neutral pH range (6.7-7.9) and became ineffective when the water solution was acidic or alkaline. Moreover, bicarbonate, a ubiquitous hydroxyl radical scavenger in natural waters, significantly improved the catalytic degradation of oxalate. Therefore, the degradation relies on neither hydroxyl radical oxidation nor acid assistance, two pathways usually proposed for catalytic ozonation. These special characters of the catalyst make it suitable to be potentially used for practical degradation of refractory hydrophilic organic matter and compounds in water and wastewater. With in situ characterization, the new surface Cu(II) formed from ozone oxidation of the trace Cu(I) of the catalyst was found to be an active site in coordination with oxalate forming multi-dentate surface complex. It is proposed that the complex can be further oxidized by molecular ozone and then decomposes through intra-molecular electron transfer. The ceria support enhanced the activity of the surface Cu(I)/Cu(II) in this process. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Physiology of free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals imply that every atom, molecule, ion, group of atoms, or molecules with one or several non-paired electrons in outer orbital. Among these are: nitrogenoxide (NO•, superoxide-anion-radical (O2•-, hydroxyl radical (OH•, peroxyl radical (ROO•, alcoxyl radical (RO• and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•. However, reactive oxygen species also include components without non-paired electrons in outer orbital (so-called reactive non-radical agents, such as: singlet oxygen (1O2, peroxynitrite (ONOO-, hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2, hypochloric acid (eg. HOCl and ozone (O3. High concentrations of free radicals lead to the development of oxidative stress which is a precondition for numerous pathological effects. However, low and moderate concentrations of these matter, which occur quite normally during cell metabolic activity, play multiple significant roles in many reactions. Some of these are: regulation of signal pathways within the cell and between cells, the role of chemoattractors and leukocyte activators, the role in phagocytosis, participation in maintaining, changes in the position and shape of the cell, assisting the cell during adaption and recovery from damage (e.g.caused by physical effort, the role in normal cell growth, programmed cell death (apoptosis and cell ageing, in the synthesis of essential biological compounds and energy production, as well as the contribution to the regulation of the vascular tone, actually, tissue vascularization.

  17. Effect of Azadirachta indica leaves extract on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats:Role of antioxidants, free radicals and myeloperoxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghatule RR

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the healing effects of extract of dried leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Neem tree is known as ‘arishtha ’ in Sanskrit, meaning ‘reliever of sicknesses ’. Methods: 50% ethanolic extract of Azadirachta indica leaves was administered orally, once daily for 14 days in rats after the induction of colitis with acetic acid and 500 mg/kg dose of extract was found to have an optimal effect against acetic acid-induced colonic damage score, weight and adhesions (Macroscopic. Effect of Azadirachta indica extract was then further studied on various physical (mucous/blood in stool, food and water intake and body weight changes, colonic mucosal damage and inflammation (microscopic, antibacterial and biochemical parameters viz. i antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione and ii free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase (acute inflammatory marker activities in acetic acid-induced colitis. Results: Azadirachta indica extract decreased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation (macroscopic and microscopic, mucous/bloody diarrhea, fecal frequency and increased body weight. Azadirachta indica extract showed intestinal antibacterial activity and enhanced the antioxidants but decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase activities. Acute toxicity study indicated no mortality or other ANS or CNS related adverse effects even with 5.0 g/kg dose (10 times of effective dose indicating its safety. Conclusions: Azadirachta indica seemed to be safe and effective in colitis by its predominant effect on promoting antioxidant status and decreasing intestinal bacterial load, free radicals and myeloperoxidase responsible for tissue damage and delayed healing.

  18. Preliminary study on the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution with Aldrich humic acid, algae and Fe(III) under high-pressure mercury lamp irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianli; Xu, Dong; Wu, Feng; Liao, Zhenhuan; Liu, Jiantong; Deng, Nansheng

    2004-03-01

    Under a high-pressure mercury lamp (HPML) and using an exposure time of 4 h, the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) could be induced in an aqueous solution containing humic acid (HA). Hydroxyl radicals were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using benzene as a probe. The results showed that *OH photoproduction increased from 1.80 to 2.74 microM by increasing the HA concentration from 10 to 40 mg L(-1) at an exposure time of 4 h (pH 6.5). Hydroxyl radical photoproduction in aqueous solutions of HA containing algae was greater than that in the aqueous solutions of HA without algae. The photoproduction of *OH in the HA solution with Fe(III) was greater than that of the solution without Fe(III) at pH ranging from 4.0 to 8.0. The photoproduction of *OH in HA solution with algae with or without Fe(III) under a 250 W HPML was greater than that under a 125 W HPML. The photoproduction of *OH in irradiated samples was influenced by the pH. The results showed that HPML exposure for 4 h in the 4-8 pH range led to the highest *OH photoproduction at pH 4.0.

  19. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid induces the generation of free-radicals and associated oxidative stress responses in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Miguel C.; Telo, Joao P.; Duarte, Nuno F.; Sa-Correia, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    The pro-oxidant action of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is demonstrated in this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic experimental model. Evidence is presented for the generation of hydroxyl-radicals, in yeast cells suddenly exposed to 2,4-D, detected by in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using 5,5'-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide as spin-traps. The intensity of the EPR spectra was dependent on the concentration of herbicide tested and was consistently higher in a mutant (Δsod1) devoid of the cytosolic CuZn-superoxide dismutase. A time-course-dependent variation of the level of free-radical adducts was registered upon sudden exposure of an yeast cell population to concentrations of 2,4-D that lead to an initial period of viability loss, before resumption of inhibited growth by the viable adapted population. The variation pattern of the level of hydroxyl-radical adducts correlated with the one determined for the activity of Sod1p, cytosolic catalase Ctt1p, and the dithiol glutaredoxins Grx1p and Grx2p

  20. Mechanism of protection of adenosine from sulphate radical anion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Repair by caffeic acid; repair of adenosine radicals; oxidation by sulphate radical anions. ... known that hydroxycinnamic acids are natural anti- oxidants ... acid. 2. Experimental ..... ously and independently under kinetic conditions at.

  1. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in vito

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-06

    L. Narayanan. and B. M. Jamot. ’Effects of Peulluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus Metabolism in...pathways and examined the impact of perfluorocarboxylic acid exposure. This investigative strategy will delineate the metabolic effices exerted by...Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo Principal Investigator: Nicholas V. Reo

  2. Studies on the syntheses, structural characterization, antimicrobial-, and DPPH radical scavenging activity of the cocrystals caffeine:cinnamic acid and caffeine:eosin dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, G. S.; Seethalakshmi, P. G.; Bhuvanesh, N.; Kumaresan, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two organic cocrystals namely, caffeine:cinnamic acid [(caf)(ca)] (1) and caffeine:eosin dihydrate [(caf)(eos)]·2H2O (2) were synthesized and studied by FT-IR, TGA/DTA, and single crystal XRD. The crystal system of cocrystal 1 is triclinic with space group P-1 and Z = 2 and that of cocrystal 2 is monoclinic with space group P21/C and Z = 4. An imidazole-carboxylic acid synthon is observed in the cocrystal 1. The intermolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯N and π-π interactions play a major role in stabilizing 1 whereas the intermolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, and intramolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Br; along with π-π interactions together play a vital role in stabilizing the structure of 2. The antimicrobial- and DPPH radical scavenging activities of both the cocrystals were studied.

  3. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  4. 2-Aminobenzamide and 2-Aminobenzoic Acid as New MALDI Matrices Inducing Radical Mediated In-Source Decay of Peptides and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smargiasso, Nicolas; Quinton, Loic; de Pauw, Edwin

    2012-03-01

    One of the mechanisms leading to MALDI in-source decay (MALDI ISD) is the transfer of hydrogen radicals to analytes upon laser irradiation. Analytes such as peptides or proteins may undergo ISD and this method can therefore be exploited for top-down sequencing. When performed on peptides, radical-induced ISD results in production of c- and z-ions, as also found in ETD and ECD activation. Here, we describe two new compounds which, when used as MALDI matrices, are able to efficiently induce ISD of peptides and proteins: 2-aminobenzamide and 2-aminobenzoic acid. In-source reduction of the disulfide bridge containing peptide Calcitonin further confirmed the radicalar mechanism of the ISD process. ISD of peptides led, in addition to c- and z-ions, to the generation of a-, x-, and y-ions both in positive and in negative ion modes. Finally, good sequence coverage was obtained for the sequencing of myoglobin (17 kDa protein), confirming the effectiveness of both 2-aminobenzamide and 2-aminobenzoic acid as MALDI ISD matrices.

  5. Free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibition, two potential mechanisms involved in the anti-diabetic activity of oleanolic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, J.M.; Guinda, A.; Macias, L.; Santos-Lozano, J.M.; Lapetra, J.; Rada, M.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the role of oleanolic acid (OA), isolated from the olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf, as a radical scavenger and inhibitor of the hydrolyzing enzymes of dietary carbohydrates. New evidence is provided showing that OA may capture 2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and peroxyl radicals, and also exert a strong and non-competitive inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 10.11 ± 0.30 µM). The kinetic and spectrometric analyses performed indicate that OA interacts with this enzyme inside a hydrophobic pocket, through an endothermic and non spontaneous process of a hydrophobic nature. These are two possible mechanisms by which OA may facilitate a better control of post-prandial hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress, so contributing to preserving insulin signalling. Obesity, insulin resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are considered the first pandemics of the 21st century. In this sense, OA might be used in future preventive and therapeutic strategies, as an ingredient in new drugs and functional foods. [es

  6. Medium-chain fatty acid binding to albumin and transfer to phospholipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-dependent (5-42 degree C) 13 C NMR spectra of albumin complexes with 90% isotopically substituted [1- 13 C]octanoic or [1- 13 C]decanoic acids showed a single peak at >30 degree C but three peaks at lower temperatures. The chemical-shift differences result from different ionic and/or hydrogen-bonding interactions between amino acid side chains and the fatty acid carboxyl carbon. Rapid exchange of fatty acid among binding sites obscures these sites at temperatures >30 degree C. Rate constants for exchange at 33 degree C were 350 sec -1 for octanoate and 20 sec -1 for decanoate. Temperature-dependent data for octanoate showed an activation energy of 2 kcal/mol for exchange. Spectra of albumin complexes with the 12-carbon saturated fatty acid, lauric acid, had several narrow laurate carboxyl peaks at 35 degree C, indicating longer lifetimes in the different binding sites. Fatty acid exchange between albumin and model membranes (phosphatidylcholine bilayers) occurred on a time scale comparable to that for exchange among albumin binding sites, following the order octanoate > decanoate > laurate. The equilibrium distribution of fatty acid between lipid bilayers and protein was measured directly from NMR spectra. Decreasing pH increased the relative affinity of fatty acid for the lipid bilayer. The results predict that the relative affinity of octanoic acid for albumin and membranes will be similar to that of long-chain fatty acids, but the rate of equilibration will be ∼ 10 4 faster for octanoic acid

  7. Anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging actions of two herbs, Uncaria rhynchophylla (MIQ) Jack and Gastrodia elata Bl., in kainic acid-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C L; Tang, N Y; Chiang, S Y; Hsieh, C T; Lin, J G

    1999-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jack (UR) and Gastrodia elata BI. (GE) are traditional Chinese herbs that are usually used in combination to treat convulsive disorders, such as epilepsy, in China. The aim of this study was to compare the anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging activities of UR alone and UR in combination with GE in rats. For the in vitro studies, brain tissues from 6 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated with 120 microg/ml kainic acid (KA), with or without varied concentrations of UR or UR plus GE. For the in vivo studies, male SD rats (6 per group) received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of KA 12 mg/kg to induce epileptic seizures and generation of free radicals, with or without oral administration of UR 1 g/kg alone or UR 1 g/kg plus GE 1 g/kg. Epileptic seizures were verified by behavioral observations, and electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) recordings. These results showed that UR alone decreased KA-induced lipid peroxide levels in vitro, whereas UR plus GE did not produce a greater effect than UR alone. UR significantly reduced counts of wet dog shakes (WDS), paw tremor (PT) and facial myoclonia (FM) in KA-treated rats and significantly delayed the onset time of WDS, from 27 min in the control group to 40 min in the UR group. UR plus GE did not inhibit seizures more effectively than UR alone, but did further prolong the onset time of WDS to 63 min (P < 0.05 vs. UR alone). UR alone reduced the levels of free radicals in vivo, as measured by lipid peroxidation in the brain and luminol-chemiluminescence (CL) counts and lucigenin-CL counts in the peripheral whole blood, but the combination of GE and UR did not reduce free radical levels more markedly than UR alone. In conclusion, our results indicate that UR has anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging activities, and UR combined with GE exhibit greater inhibition on the onset time of WDS than UR alone. These findings suggest that the anticonvulsive effects of UR and

  8. Hydroxyl Radical Formation from HULIS and Fe(II) Interactions: Fulvic Acid-Fe(II) Complexes in Simulated and Human Lung Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D.

    2017-12-01

    Inhalation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has long been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the causative agents and underlying mechanisms for these health effects have yet to be identified. One hypothesis is that PM2.5 deposited in the alveoli produce an excess of highly reactive radicals, leading to oxidative stress. The OH radical may be the most physiologically damaging, capable of oxidizing of lipids, proteins and DNA. Due to the variability and uncertainty in PM2.5 composition, the components that contribute to OH formation are not well understood. Soluble Fe is a component of PM2.5that produces OH under physiological conditions. Humic-like substances are water soluble organics found in biomass burning and tobacco smoke. Humic-like substances are capable of binding to Fe and enhancing OH formation, but this chemistry is not well understood. In this work, we use soil derived fulvic acid as a surrogate for Humic-like substances and investigate its effect on OH formation from Fe(II) under conditions relevant to the lungs. We use a fluorescent OH trapping probe, chemical kinetics and thermodynamic modeling to investigate OH formation from fulvic acid and Fe(II) dissolved in simulated and human lung fluids. In simulated lung fluid, we find that fulvic acid binds to Fe(II) and enhances the rate of key reactions that form OH. When fulvic acid is added to human lung fluids containing Fe(II), an enhancement of OH formation is observed. In human lung fluid, fulvic acid and metal binding proteins compete for Fe binding. These metal binding proteins are typically not found in simulated lung fluids. Results show that fulvic acid strongly binds Fe(II) and catalyzes key reactions that form OH in both simulated and human lung fluids. These results may help explain the role of Humic-like substances and Fe in oxidative stress and adverse health outcomes. Furthermore, we suggest that future studies employ simulated lung fluids containing metal binding proteins

  9. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude

  10. Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by AIBN/FeCl3/isophthalic acid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reverse ATRP of MMA using AIBN/FeCl3/ isophthalic acid as the initiating system was successfully performed. The new initiating system can be used to synthesize PMMA with high molecular weight and narrow polydis- persity index. The polymerization shows 'living'/controlled characteristics. Compared with other initiating system used in reverse ATRP, the easy availability and non-toxicity of isophthalic acid make it very attractive.

  11. Binding of Gallic Acid and Epigallocatechin Gallate to Heat-Unfolded Whey Proteins at Neutral pH Alters Radical Scavenging Activity of in Vitro Protein Digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanyun; Xiong, Youling L

    2017-09-27

    Preheated (80 °C for 9 min) whey protein isolate (HWPI) was reacted with 20, 120, and 240 μmol/g (protein basis) gallic acid (GA) or epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) at neutral pH and 25 °C. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorometry showed a similar trend that GA binding to HWPI was moderate but weaker than EGCG binding. However, the shift of maximal fluorescence emission wavelength in opposite directions in response to GA (blue) and EGCG (red) suggests discrepant binding patterns. Electrophoresis results showed that EGCG induced formation of HWPI complexes while GA only had a marginal effect. Both free and phenolic-bound HWPI exhibited mild antiradical activity. However, when subjected to in vitro digestion, synergistic radical-scavenging activity was produced between the phenolics and peptides with the highest synergism being observed on 120 μmol/g phenolics.

  12. Radical Evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Manrique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an aporia in Kant’s analysis of evil: he defines radical evilas an invisible disposition of the will, but he also demands an inferential connection between visible evil actions and this invisible disposition. This inference,however, undermines the radical invisibility of radical evil according to Kant’s own definition of the latter. Noting how this invisibility of moral worth is a distinctive feature of Kant’s approach to the moral problem, the paper then asks why, in the Groundwork, he nonetheless forecloses a question about evil that seems to be consistent with this approach. It is argued that to account for this aporia and this foreclosure, one has to interrogate the way in which the category of religion orients Kant’s incipient philosophy of history in Die Religion.

  13. Phenolic acid content and radical scavenging activity of extracts from medlar (Mespilus germanica L.) fruit at different stages of ripening

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grúz, Jiří; Ayaz, F. A.; Torun, H.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 1 (2011), s. 271-277 ISSN 0308-8146 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200380801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Phenolic acids * HPLC * Mass spectrometry * Fruit * Ripening Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.655, year: 2011

  14. Changes in optical density, amino acid composition, and fluorescence of papain inactivated by hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.R.; Lin, W.S.; Armstrong, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Chromatography of irradiated papain on an affinity column with the Gly-Gly-Tyr(Bzl)-Arg inhibitor peptide gave rise to three clearly resolved peaks. The first one was relatively small and contained completely inactive nonreparable enzyme, which appeared to have suffered a massive conformational change or loss of several binding sites. The second contained the inactive sulfenic acid derivative, which can be reactivated with cysteine. The third peak was composed of nonrepairable enzyme as well as some repairable enzyme and some fully active papain. Changes in absorbance and amino acid analysis established a significant loss of tyrosine residues, while tryptophan destruction appeared to be insignificant up to 10 krad. Fluorescence measurements indicated changes in the active-site region, which are probably largely due to the inactivating modification of the Cys-25 sulfhydryl group, for which evidence has already been reported

  15. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactivity: reaction conditions and the role of iron, antioxidants and lipid peroxy radicals on the quantitation of plasma lipid peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C.R.; van Rij, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Fe/sup 3 +/, lipid peroxy radicals and the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene on the 2-thiobarbituric (TBA) acid quantitation of plasma lipid peroxides were investigated. Whole plasma and plasma fractions prepared by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) protein precipitation and lipid extraction, demonstrated markedly differing TBA reactivities in the presence or absence of added Fe/sup 3 +/. Examination of the spectral profiles of the TBA reacted whole plasma and TCA precipitated fractions demonstrated the presence of interfering compounds which gave rise to an artifactual increase in lipid peroxide concentrations. In contrast the TBA reacted lipid extracts had low levels of interfering compounds that could be removed by our previously described high pressure liquid chromatographic method. Further characterization of the TBA reactivity of the lipid extract showed that Fe/sup 3 +/ at an optimal concentration of 0.5 mM was necessary for the quantitative decomposition of the lipid peroxides to the TBA reactive product malondialdehyde (MDA). However the presence of Fe/sup 3 +/ resulted in further peroxidation of any unsaturated lipids present.

  16. Solvothermal modification of BiOCl nanosheets with Bi nanoparticles using ascorbic acid as reductant and the superoxide radicals dominated photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhankui; Gao, Keke; Ge, Suxiang; Fa, Wenjun

    2017-11-01

    BiOCl nanosheets were solvothermally modified with Bi nanoparticles (NPs) using ascorbic acid as the reductant. The structures of Bi/BiOCl composites were characterized by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The light absorption properties were measured by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The photocatalytic performances were evaluated by photodegrading methyl orange (MO) and the photocatalytic mechanism was investigated using trapping experiments and a fluorescent probe method. The results show that Bi NPs are uniformly distributed on the surfaces of BiOCl nanosheets and the modification amount of Bi NPs could be well controlled because of the mild property of ascorbic acid as reducing agent. The photocatalytic activities for the composites are improved obviously and the best photocatalytic performance is obtained when the weight ratio of Bi and BiOCl is1:10 and the photochemical reaction rate is 3.5 times that of pure BiOCl nanosheets and 19.7 times of Bi powders. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency is ascribed to the favorable formation of dominant \\cdot O2- radicals caused by the increased photoinduced electrons from both Bi NPs and BiOCl nanosheets.

  17. Stability of immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase for the synthesis of pentyl octanoate in a continuous packed bed bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Skoronski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic synthesis of organic compounds in continuous bioreactors is an efficient way to obtain industrially important chemicals. However, few works have focused on the study of the operational conditions and the bioprocess performance. In this work, the aliphatic ester pentyl octanoate was obtained by direct esterification using a continuous packed bed bioreactor containing the immobilized enzyme Lipozyme® RM IM as catalyst. Enzymatic deactivation was evaluated under different conditions for the operational parameters substrate/enzyme ratio (5.00, 1.67, 0.83 and 0.55 mmol substrate∙min-1∙g-1enzyme and temperature (30, 40, 50 and 60 °C. The optimal condition was observed at 30 ºC, which gave the minimum enzymatic deactivation rate and the maximum conversion to the desired product, yielding approximately 60 mmols of ester for an enzyme loading of 0.5 g into the bioreactor. A first-order deactivation model showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Effects of chlorogenic acid on capacity of free radicals scavenging and proteomic changes in postharvest fruit of nectarine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xi

    Full Text Available To study how chlorogenic acid affects changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the proteins involved in ROS scavenging of nectarine during storage time, the fruits were treated with chlorogenic acid (CHA then stored at 25°C for further studies. The CHA-treatment significantly reduced O2-· production rate, H2O2 content, and membrane permeability of nectarine fruit during storage. The key proteins related the nectarine fruit senescence during storage were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Level and enzymatic activity of peroxidase were reduced, while both the protein levels and the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-s-transferase and monodehydroascorbate reductase were enhanced in nectarine fruit treated with CHA. In addition, levels of several pathogen-related proteins were also enhanced by CHA-treatment. Taking together, the present study showed that CHA could influence changes in defense related proteins and reduced oxidative damage in nectarine fruit during postharvest ripening.

  19. A medium-chain fatty acid as an alternative energy source in mouse preimplantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Takanashi, Kazumi; Hamatani, Toshio; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akutsu, Hidenori; Fukunaga, Tomoko; Ogawa, Seiji; Sugawara, Kana; Shinoda, Kosaku; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuji, Naoaki; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Tomita, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    To further optimize the culturing of preimplantation embryos, we undertook metabolomic analysis of relevant culture media using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). We detected 28 metabolites: 23 embryo-excreted metabolites including 16 amino acids and 5 media-derived metabolites (e.g., octanoate, a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA)). Due to the lack of information on MCFAs in mammalian preimplantation development, this study examined octanoate as a potential alternative energy source for preimplantation embryo cultures. No embryos survived in culture media lacking FAs, pyruvate, and glucose, but supplementation of octanoate rescued the embryonic development. Immunoblotting showed significant expression of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, important enzymes for ß-oxidation of MCFAs, in preimplantation embryo. Furthermore, CE-TOFMS traced [1-(13)C(8)] octanoate added to the culture media into intermediate metabolites of the TCA cycle via ß-oxidation in mitochondria. These results are the first demonstration that octanoate could provide an efficient alternative energy source throughout preimplantation development.

  20. Free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibition, two potential mechanisms involved in the anti-diabetic activity of oleanolic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellano, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the role of oleanolic acid (OA, isolated from the olive (Olea europaea L. leaf, as a radical scavenger and inhibitor of the hydrolyzing enzymes of dietary carbohydrates. New evidence is provided showing that OA may capture 2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid and peroxyl radicals, and also exert a strong and non -competitive inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 10.11 ± 0.30 μM. The kinetic and spectrometric analyses performed indicate that OA interacts with this enzyme inside a hydrophobic pocket, through an endothermic and non spontaneous process of a hydrophobic nature. These are two possible mechanisms by which OA may facilitate a better control of post-prandial hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress, so contributing to preserving insulin signalling. Obesity, insulin resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are considered the first pandemics of the 21st century. In this sense, OA might be used in future preventive and therapeutic strategies, as an ingredient in new drugs and functional foods.Este trabajo estudia el papel del ácido oleanólico (OA, aislado de la hoja de olivo, como secuestrador de radicales libres e inhibidor de enzimas implicados en la hidrolisis de los carbohidratos de la dieta, dos mecanismos por los que el triterpeno podría mitigar la hiperglicemia postprandial y el estrés oxidativo. Se aportan nuevas evidencias que muestran que el OA puede capturar radicales ácido 2,2’-azino-bis-(3-etilbenzotiazolín-6-sulfónico y peroxilo, y que ejerce una potente inhibición no-competitiva de α-glucosidasa (IC50 10.11±0.30 μM. El análisis cinético y espectrométrico llevado a cabo indica que OA interacciona con este enzima en el interior de un bolsillo hidrofóbico, mediante un proceso endotérmico no espontáneo, de naturaleza hidrofóbica. Estos son dos posibles mecanismos por los cuales el OA puede facilitar un mejor control de la hiperglucemia postprandial y el estrés oxidativo

  1. Redox properties of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of electron transfer reactions observed and monitored by pulse radiolysis are reported. This technique allows determination of the first one-electron reduction or oxidation of a compound rather than the overall two-electron transfer usually reported. Pulse radiolysis allows the determination of absolute rate constants for reactions of free radicals and helps elucidate the mechanisms involved. Studies using this technique to study radicals derived from quinones, nitro compounds, pyridines, phenols, and anilines are reported. Radicals of biochemical interest arising from riboflavin, ascorbic acid, vitamin K 3 , vitamin E, MAD + , porphyrins, etc. have also been studied

  2. Some reactions of oxidizing radicals with enzymes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundall, R.B.; Bisby, R.H.; Hoe, S.T.; Sims, H.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    A range of oxidizing radicals including some inorganic radical anions and the superoxide radical, can be generated by radiolysis of aqueous solutions. These radicals are more selective in their reactions with amino acids than the hydroxyl radical. Factors controlling the apparent reactivity of radical anions with proteins, such as free radical equilibria and ion-binding, are described. The superoxide radical inactivates papain by reaction with the cysteine residue. This reaction has been studied in solutions subjected to radiations of varying linear energy transfer. (Auth.)

  3. Development of 2-(Substituted Benzylamino)-4-Methyl-1, 3-Thiazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors and Free Radical Scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Rahmat; Kumar, Suresh; Afzal, Obaid; Shalmali, Nishtha; Sharma, Manju; Bawa, Sandhya

    2016-04-01

    A series of 2-(substituted benzylamino)-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylic acid was designed and synthesized as structural analogue of febuxostat. A methylene amine spacer was incorporated between the phenyl ring and thiazole ring in contrast to febuxostat in which the phenyl ring was directly linked with the thiazole moiety. The purpose of incorporating methylene amine was to provide a heteroatom which is expected to favour hydrogen bonding within the active site residues of the enzyme xanthine oxidase. The structure of all the compounds was established by the combined use of FT-IR, NMR and MS spectral data. All the compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to inhibit the enzyme xanthine oxidase as per the reported procedure along with DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Compounds 5j, 5k and 5l demonstrated satisfactory potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values, 3.6, 8.1 and 9.9 μm, respectively, whereas compounds 5k, 5n and 5p demonstrated moderate antioxidant activities having IC50 15.3, 17.6 and 19.6 μm, respectively, along with xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. Compound 5k showed moderate xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity as compared with febuxostat along with antioxidant activity. All the compounds were also studied for their binding affinity in active site of enzyme (PDB ID-1N5X). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Radical fashion and radical fashion innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of the related concepts of radical fashion and radical fashion innovation. Radical fashions are defined here as those that may never enter the market at all, and exist primarily on runway shows, in exhibitions and in publicity; by contrast, radical fashion innovations may be very

  5. Chemical repair of trypsin-histidinyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.V.; Ruvarac, I.; Jankovic, I.; Josimovic, L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxyl radicals, such as hydroxyl, alkoxyl and peroxyl, react with biomolecules to produce bioradicals. Unless chemically repaired by suitable antioxidants, these bioradicals form stable products. This leads to loss of biological function of parent biomolecules with deleterious biological results, such as mutagenesis and cancer. Consequently, the understanding of the mechanisms of oxyl radical damage to biomolecules and chemical repair of such damage is crucial for the development of strategies for anticarcinogenesis and radioprotection. In this study the chemical repair of the histidinyl radical generated upon the trichloromethylperoxyl radical reaction with trypsin vas investigated by gamma radiolysis. The trypsin histidinyl radical is a resonance-stabilized heterocyclic free radical which was found to be unreactive with oxygen. The efficacy of the chemical repair of the trypsin-histidinyl radical by endogenous antioxidants which are electron donors (e.g. 5-hydroxytryptophan, uric acid) is compared to that of antioxidants which are H-atom donors (e. g. glutathione). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Development of methods for determining organic free radical structures by electron spin resonance and application to the radiation chemistry of nucleic acid model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouse, G.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This project was undertaken with the objective of developing more efficient and reliable methods for the analysis of free radicals in organic single crystals. A technique was developed for the rapid calculation of single crystal ESR line positions and intensities. This method, which avoids the time-consuming matrix operations required by conventional methods, has been incorporated into a computer program for determining ESR parameters by the least-squares fitting of digitized ESR spectra. This program has been used to analyze complex spectra arising from a . CH 2 -CH 2 -O-PO 3 H - radical trapped in O-phosphorylethanolamine. A method was developed for the estimation of variance and covariance of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of experimentally-determined tensors. This error analysis is quite general, and may be applied to any tensors which can be determined by the non-linear least-squares fitting of ESR data. Monte-Carlo simulations have been employed to estimate the limitations of the approximation method. This error analysis has been included in the analysis of two phosphite radicals, - O 2 -P-OX, found in single crystals of O-phosphorylethanolamine. To aid in the formulation and evaluation of free radical models, a generalized method for the calculation of theoretically-expected hyperfine coupling tensors for arbitrary radical models was developed. Tensors are calculated for a furan-type radical which may be found in 5' dCMP. These calculated tensors are compared with tensors determined by an ENDOR experiment. Two ENDOR studies were done, one in 5' dCMP, the other in L-asparagine. The observed radical in 5' dCMP is allylic, characterized by coupling to three α-hydrogens. In L-asparagine, the dominant room-temperature radical has the form CO(NH 2 )CHCH(N + H 3 )CO 2 - . In both these studies, a series of molecular orbital calculations were performed as a means of substantiating the postulated radical structures

  7. Production of hydroxyl radicals from abiotic oxidation of pyrite by oxygen under circumneutral conditions in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-12-01

    Besides acidic environments, pyrite oxidation also occurs in circumneutral environments, such as well-buffered marine and estuarine sediments and salt marshes where low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (e.g., citrate and oxalate) prevail. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals (radOH) from pyrite oxidation by oxygen (O2) in these circumneutral environments is poorly understood. In this study, radOH production was measured during the abiotic oxidation of pyrite by O2 under circumneutral conditions. A pyrite suspension (50 g/L pyrite) that was buffered at pH 6-8 was exposed to air for oxygenation in the dark. Benzoate (20 mM) was added into the suspension to trap radOH. At pH 7, the cumulative radOH reached 7.5 μM within 420 min in the absence of LMWOAs, whereas it increased to 14.8, 12 and 11.2 μM in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminotetraacetate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. When the citrate concentration, which serves as a LMWOAs model, was increased from 0.5 to 5 mM, the cumulative radOH increased from 10.3 to 27.3 μM within 420 min at pH 7. With the decrease in pH from 8 to 6, the cumulative radOH increased from 2.1 to 23.3 μM in the absence of LMWOAs, but it increased from 8.8 to 134.9 μM in the presence of 3 mM citrate. The presence of LMWOAs enhanced the radOH production from pyrite oxidation under circumneutral conditions. In the absence of LMOWAs, radOH is produced mostly from the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) by O2. In the presence of citrate, radOH production is attributed mainly to the oxidation of Fe(II)-citrate- by O2 and secondarily to the oxidation of H2O on surface-sulfur defects. The acceleration of pyrite oxidation by Fe(III)-citrate increases radOH production. Fe(II)-citrate- is generated mainly from the complexation of adsorbed Fe(II) by citrate and the reduction of Fe(III)-citrate, and the generation is suppressed by the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II). Fe(III)-citrate is generated predominantly from Fe

  8. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... How radical change in public policy has occurred in the past is then documented. We find examples of radical change by chance, radical change by consensus, radical change by learning, and radical change by entrepreneurial design...

  9. Enhancing production through optimisation of DPPH and radical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of dry matter for DPPH radical scavenging activity. Methanol had the lowest value (78 mg g-1 dry matter) for polyphenol extracts and 80 mg g-1 for the DPPH radical scavenging activity. The main extract compounds were gallic acid, catechin and epicatechin. Key Words: High density lipids, polyphenol, radical scavenging ...

  10. Antioxidant activities and radical scavenging activities of flavonoids studied by the electrochemical methods and ESR technique based on the novel paramagnetic properties of poly(aniline-co-5-aminosalicylic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yifei; Mu, Shaolin

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ESR spectra of the PAASA/RGO/graphite electrodes: (1) in the buffer solution consisting of 0.20 M phosphate and methanol (80: 20, v/v), (2) in the buffer solutions containing 150 μM of (+)-catechin. -- Abstract: Four kinds of flavonoid, viz. flavanone naringenin, Flavone apigenin, flavonol kaempferol, and flavanol (+)-catechin, are used to investigate their antioxidant and radical scavenging activitis in the water-methanol solution of pH 6.3, using the electrochemical methods and electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Poly(aniline-co-5-aminosalicylic acid) (PAASA) is first used as a radical source that was polymerized on a reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/glassy carbon (GC) disk or on the RGO/graphite fiber electrode. The assessment of the antioxidant activities is performed using both cyclic voltammetry and the open circuit potential measurement. On the basis of results from both electrochemical mathods, the order of the antioxidant actitvities of flavonoids is as follows: (+)-catechin > kaempferol > apigenin > naringenin However, the difference in the antioxidant activities between naringenin and apigenin is very small. On the basis of the ESR signal intensities of PAASA, the order of the radical scavenging activities of flavonoids is in good agreement with that of the above antioxdant activities.Three oxidation peaks on the cyclic voltammograms of (+)-catechin are first detected, which gives us a deep insight into the oxidation mechanism of (+)-catechin

  11. An engineered fatty acid synthase combined with a carboxylic acid reductase enables de novo production of 1-octanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henritzi, Sandra; Fischer, Manuel; Grininger, Martin; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard

    2018-01-01

    The ideal biofuel should not only be a regenerative fuel from renewable feedstocks, but should also be compatible with the existing fuel distribution infrastructure and with normal car engines. As the so-called drop-in biofuel, the fatty alcohol 1-octanol has been described as a valuable substitute for diesel and jet fuels and has already been produced fermentatively from sugars in small amounts with engineered bacteria via reduction of thioesterase-mediated premature release of octanoic acid from fatty acid synthase or via a reversal of the β-oxidation pathway. The previously engineered short-chain acyl-CoA producing yeast Fas1 R1834K /Fas2 fatty acid synthase variant was expressed together with carboxylic acid reductase from Mycobacterium marinum and phosphopantetheinyl transferase Sfp from Bacillus subtilis in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δfas1 Δfas2 Δfaa2 mutant strain. With the involvement of endogenous thioesterases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and aldehyde reductases, the synthesized octanoyl-CoA was converted to 1-octanol up to a titer of 26.0 mg L -1 in a 72-h fermentation. The additional accumulation of 90 mg L -1 octanoic acid in the medium indicated a bottleneck in 1-octanol production. When octanoic acid was supplied externally to the yeast cells, it could be efficiently converted to 1-octanol indicating that re-uptake of octanoic acid across the plasma membrane is not limiting. Additional overexpression of aldehyde reductase Ahr from Escherichia coli nearly completely prevented accumulation of octanoic acid and increased 1-octanol titers up to 49.5 mg L -1 . However, in growth tests concentrations even lower than 50.0 mg L -1 turned out to be inhibitory to yeast growth. In situ extraction in a two-phase fermentation with dodecane as second phase did not improve growth, indicating that 1-octanol acts inhibitive before secretion. Furthermore, 1-octanol production was even reduced, which results from extraction of the intermediate octanoic acid to

  12. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  13. Formation of an adduct by clenbuterol, a beta-adrenoceptor agonist drug, and serum albumin in human saliva at the acidic pH of the stomach: evidence for an aryl radical-based process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraforte, D; Brambilla, G; Camerini, S; Scorza, G; Peri, L; Loizzo, A; Crescenzi, M; Minetti, M

    2008-07-15

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is an antiasthmatic drug used also illegally as a lean muscle mass enhancer in both humans and animals. CLB and amine-related drugs in general are nitrosatable, thus raising concerns regarding possible genotoxic/carcinogenic activity. Oral administration of CLB raises the issue of its possible transformation by salivary nitrite at the acidic pH of gastric juice. In acidic human saliva CLB was rapidly transformed to the CLB arenediazonium ion. This suggests a reaction of CLB with salivary nitrite, as confirmed in aerobic HNO(2) solution by a drastic decrease in nitric oxide, nitrite, and nitrate. In human saliva, both glutathione and ascorbic acid were able to inhibit CLB arenediazonium formation and to react with preformed CLB arenediazonium. The effect of ascorbic acid is particularly pertinent because this vitamin is actively concentrated within the gastric juice. EPR spin trapping experiments showed that preformed CLB arenediazonium ion was reduced to the aryl radical by ascorbic acid, glutathione, and serum albumin, the major protein of saliva. As demonstrated by anti-CLB antibodies and MS, the CLB-albumin interaction leads to the formation of a covalent drug-protein adduct, with a preference for Tyr-rich regions. This study highlights the possible hazards associated with the use/abuse of this drug.

  14. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  15. Characterization and DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity of Gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization and DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity of Gallic Acid-Lecithin Complex. C Liu, C Chen, H Ma, E Yuan, Q Li. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the physicochemical properties and DPPH radical scavenging activity of gallic acid–lecithin complex. Methods: The complex of gallic acid with lecithin was prepared ...

  16. Vinylcyclopropylacyl and polyeneacyl radicals. Intramolecular ketene alkyl radical additions in ring synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Benoit; Herbert, Nicola M A; Harrington-Frost, Nicole M; Pattenden, Gerald

    2005-01-21

    Treatment of a variety of substituted vinylcyclopropyl selenyl esters, e.g. 11, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN in refluxing benzene leads to the corresponding acyl radical intermediates, which undergo rearrangement and intramolecular cyclisations via their ketene alkyl radical equivalents producing cyclohexenones in 50-60% yield. By contrast, treatment of conjugated triene selenyl esters, e.g. 32, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN produces substituted 2-cyclopentenones via intramolecular cyclisations of their ketene alkyl radical intermediates. Under the same radical-initiating conditions the selenyl esters derived from o-vinylbenzoic acid and o-vinylcinnamic acid undergo intramolecular cyclisations producing 1-indanone and 5,6-dihydrobenzocyclohepten-7-one respectively in 60-70% yields. A tandem radical cyclisation from the alpha,beta,gamma,delta-diene selenyl ester 31 provides an expeditious synthesis of the diquinane 35 in 69% yield.

  17. Reactions of carbonate radical with cobalt(II) aminopolycarboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.; Bhattacharyya, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate (CO 3 - radical) and bicarbonate (HCO 3 radical) radicals generated by photolysis of a carbonate or bicarbonate solution at pH 11.2 and 8.5, respectively, with Co(II) complexes of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) have been studied. The rate constants for the reactions were in the order of 10 6 -10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . From the time-resolved spectroscopy of the products formed after reaction of CO 3 - radical or HCO 3 radical, it is observed that CO 3 - radical or HCO 3 radical oxidize the metal center to its higher oxidation state. (author) 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Free radicals in biology. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    This volume continues the treatment of topics in free radical biology and free radical pathology from Volume I. In the first chapter, pyridinyl radicals, radicals which are models for those derived from NAD, are discussed. Pyridinyl radicals can be synthesized and isolated and directly studied in a number of chemical systems. The next chapter treats the role of glutathione in the cell. It is becoming even more apparent that this vital thiol controls a large number of important cellular functions. The GSH/GSSG balance has recently been implicated as a control for cellular development; this balance also may be important in relaying the effects of oxidants from one site to another in the body. The next chapter outlines the reactions of singlet oxygen; some of these involve free radicals and some do not. This reactive intermediate appears to be important both in photochemical smog and in cellular chemistry where singlet oxygen is produced by nonphotochemical processes. The production of free radicals from dry tissues, a controversial area with conflicting claims is reviewed. The next chapter outlines the current status of the studies of photochemical smog. The next two chapters treat specific reactive materials which are present in smog. The first discusses the chemistry of nitrogen oxides and ozone. The second chapter treats the chemistry of the peroxyacyl nitrites. These compounds, although present in only small concentration, are among the most toxic components of smog. The last two chapters treat radiation damage to proteins and radiation protection and radical reactions produced by radiation in nucleic acids

  19. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  20. Influence of the geometric isomers on the radical scavenging properties of 3,5-dica®eoylquinic acid: A DFT study in vacuo and in solution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makola, MM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 3,5-Dica®eoylquinic acid (diCQA) is a part of the chlorogenic acid group of compounds, largely isolated from food sources and possessing potent antioxidant activity. Only the trans–trans isomer exists in nature, however, abiotic stresses, such as UV...

  1. Reactions of melatonin with radicals in deoxygenated aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasica, P.; Ulanski, P.; Rosiak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Reactions of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) with radiolytically generated radicals were studied. Reaction of melatonin with OH radicals is diffusion-controlled (k=1.2 x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 x s -1 ), the main (but not the only one) intermediate being the indolyl-type radical, while the rate constant for the reaction with hydrated electrons is k=4.3 x 10 8 dm 3 x mol -1 x s -1 . Melatonin is capable of scavenging tert-butanol radicals, while its reactivity towards polymer radicals of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) is very low. (author)

  2. Preparation and study of dialkyl nitroxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenavas, P.

    1969-01-01

    These radicals are obtained by oxidation of N-hydroxy-imides with lead tetracetate or p-nitro-perbenzoic acid. These imides are prepared by heating dicarboxylic acids anhydrides with benzyloxy-amine followed by catalytic hydrogenation of N-benzyloxy-imides so obtained. Two series of radicals have mainly been studied, the first concerning five-membered cyclic imides, the second six-membered cyclic imides, these molecules having methyls substituents or no on the carbon ring. N. M. R. spectra of some O-benzyl-imides have been analysed. These different results have made it possible to study the conformation and stereochemistry of these imides. (author) [fr

  3. Sodium Octanoate Modulates the Innate Immune Response of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells through the TLR2/P38/JNK/ERK1/2 Pathway: Implications during Staphylococcus aureus Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2017-01-01

    Bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMECs) contribute to mammary gland defense against invading pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus (intracellular facultative), which is recognized by TLR2. In a previous report, we showed that sodium octanoate [NaO, a medium chain fatty acid (C8)] induces (0.25 mM) or inhibits (1 mM) S. aureus internalization into bMECs and differentially regulates the innate immune response (IIR). However, the molecular mechanisms have not been described, which was the aim of this study. The results showed that α5β1 integrin membrane abundance (MA) was increased in 0.25 mM NaO-treated cells, but TLR2 or CD36 MA was not modified. When these receptors were blocked individually, 0.25 mM NaO-increased S. aureus internalization was notably reduced. Interestingly, in this condition, the IIR of the bMECs was impaired because MAPK (p38, JNK, and ERK1/2) phosphorylation and the activation of transcription factors related to these pathways were decreased. In addition, the 1 mM NaO treatment induced TLR2 MA, but neither the integrin nor CD36 MA was modified. The reduction in S. aureus internalization induced by 1 mM NaO was increased further when TLR2 was blocked. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of the MAPKs increased, and 13 transcriptional factors related to the IIR were slightly activated (CBF, CDP, c-Myb, AP-1, Ets-1/Pea-3, FAST-1, GAS/ISRE, AP-2, NFAT-1, OCT-1, RAR/DR-5, RXR/DR-1, and Stat-3). Moreover, the 1 mM NaO treatment up-regulated gene expression of IL-8 and RANTES and secretion of IL-1β. Notably, when 1 mM NaO-treated bMECs were challenged with S. aureus , the gene expression of IL-8 and IL-10 increased, while IL-1β secretion was reduced. In conclusion, our results showed that α5β1 integrin, TLR2 and CD36 are involved in 0.25 mM NaO-increased S. aureus internalization in bMECs. In addition, 1 mM NaO activates bMECs via the TLR2 signaling pathways (p38, JNK, and ERK1/2), which improves IIR before S. aureus invasion. Additionally

  4. Volumetric, viscometric, spectral studies and viscosity modelling of binary mixtures of esters and alcohols (diethyl succinate, or ethyl octanoate + isobutanol, or isopentanol) at varying temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majstorović, Divna M.; Živković, Emila M.; Matija, Lidija R.; Kijevčanin, Mirjana Lj.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Densitis and viscosities of four ester + alcohol binary mixtures were measured. • Excess and deviation functions were calculated. • Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis was conducted. • Molecular interactions present in the mixture were analyzed. • Viscosity modelling was performed. - Abstract: Density, viscosity and refractive index of four binary mixtures consisting of diethyl succinate or ethyl octanoate + 2-methyl-1-propanol or 3-methyl-1-butanol have been measured at atmospheric pressure and over the temperature range from 288.15 K to 323.15 K. Excess and deviation functions have been calculated from these data and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The values of excess molar volume and deviation functions, with FT-IR study, were further used in the analysis of molecular interactions present in the mixture as well as the temperature influence on them. Molar excess Gibbs free energies of activation of viscous flow were additionally calculated from measured density and viscosity data for better understanding of present molecular interactions. Viscosity modelling was done with two approaches, predictive by group contribution models (UNIFAC-VISCO and ASOG-VISCO), and correlative by one to three-parameter models (Teja-Rice, Grunberg–Nissan, McAlister, Eyring-UNIQUAC and Eyring-NRTL). The obtained results were compared with experimental data and conclusions about applied approaches and models were made.

  5. State of Motor-Evacuation Function of the Stomach According to 13C-Octanoate Breath Test in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Mishchuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined 58 patients with erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease and 10 healthy volunteers. All patients underwent fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24 hour pH monitoring in the lower third of esophagus, 13C-octanoate breath test, identified concentration of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin in blood serum. It is found that 44.83 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have delayed, 36.21 % — rapid and 18.97 % — normal motor-e­vacuation function of the stomach. In patients with delayed gastric motility we observed prevalence of bile reflux with pH over 6 in the lower third of the esophagus, amounting to 42 % (p = 0.044, and increased concentration in the blood of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin up to (7.12 ± 0.21 ng/ml (p < 0.05, in healthy subjects — (5.91 ± 0.34 ng/ml. In patients with accelerated motility number of refluxes under 4 was 45 %, and cholecystokinin-pankreozymin le­vel — (4.4 ± 1.2 ng/ml. These data support the view of other authors that causes of heartburn as a leading symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease can be duodenogastric reflux and visceral hyperalgesia.

  6. A non-acid-assisted and non-hydroxyl-radical-related catalytic ozonation with ceria supported copper oxide in efficient oxalate degradation in water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Weiwei; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    with ozone. The optimum CuO loading amount was 12%. The molar ratio of oxalate removed/ozone consumption reached 0.84. The catalytic ozonation was most effective in a neutral pH range (6.7-7.9) and became ineffective when the water solution was acidic

  7. Oxidation of SO2 by stabilized Criegee intermediate (sCI radicals as a crucial source for atmospheric sulfuric acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increased reaction rates of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs with SO2 to produce sulfuric acid is investigated using data from two different locations, SMEAR II, Hyytiälä, Finland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. Results from MALTE, a zero-dimensional model, show that using previous values for the rate coefficients of sCI + SO2, the model underestimates gas phase H2SO4 by up to a factor of two when compared to measurements. Using the rate coefficients recently calculated by Mauldin et al. (2012 increases sulfuric acid by 30–40%. Increasing the rate coefficient for formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO with SO2 according to the values recommended by Welz et al. (2012 increases the H2SO4 yield by 3–6%. Taken together, these increases lead to the conclusion that, depending on their concentrations, the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with SO2 could contribute as much as 33–46% to atmospheric sulfuric acid gas phase concentrations at ground level. Using the SMEAR II data, results from SOSA, a one-dimensional model, show that the contribution from sCI reactions to sulfuric acid production is most important in the canopy, where the concentrations of organic compounds are the highest, but can have significant effects on sulfuric acid concentrations up to 100 m. The recent findings that the reaction of sCI + SO2 is much faster than previously thought together with these results show that the inclusion of this new oxidation mechanism could be crucial in regional as well as global models.

  8. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  9. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLet K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement

  10. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstijn, Willem Jan

    2014-01-01

    Let K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement group. We give

  11. Muonium and muonic radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Geeson, D.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An energetic positive muon which is injected in a liquid sample of substrate molecules (S) creates an ionization track consisting of substrate cations (S + ) and electrons. Near the end of this track the muon may combine with an electron to form muonium (Mu) which is observable in inert liquids, but which reacts by addition to form a radical. Alternatively, the electron can add to S to form S - , which then combines with the muon to form the radical. Furthermore, instead of ending up in Mu or in a radical the muon may stay in a diamagnetic environment as a solvated muon, or as a muon substituting a proton in a molecule. Of interest in these schemes are the mechanisms and rates of formation of muonated radicals and in particular the rate constants for their reactions to products. Investigations are based on the observation of Mu and the radical by means of the μSR technique in transverse magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  12. Comparison of Phenolics and Phenolic Acid Profiles in Conjunction with Oxygen Radical Absorbing Capacity (ORAC) in Berries of Vaccinium arctostaphylos L. and V. myrtillus L.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Colak, N.; Torun, H.; Grúz, Jiří; Strnad, Miroslav; Šubrtová, Michaela; Inceer, H.; Ayaz, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2016), s. 85-91 ISSN 1230-0322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : blueberry * bilberry * phenolic acids Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.276, year: 2016 http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/pjfns.2016.66.issue-2/pjfns-2015-0053/pjfns-2015-0053.xml

  13. Oxidation of Gas-Phase SO2 on the Surfaces of Acidic Microdroplets: Implications for Sulfate and Sulfate Radical Anion Formation in the Atmospheric Liquid Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Ming; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation of SO2(g) on the interfacial layers of microdroplet surfaces was investigated using a spray-chamber reactor coupled to an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. Four major ions, HSO3(-), SO3(•-), SO4(•-) and HSO4(-), were observed as the SO2(g)/N2(g) gas-mixture was passed through a suspended microdroplet flow, where the residence time in the dynamic reaction zone was limited to a few hundred microseconds. The relatively high signal intensities of SO3(•-), SO4(•-), and HSO4(-) compared to those of HSO3(-) as observed at pH SO2·H2O, which is also affected by the pH dependent uptake coefficient. When H2O2(g) was introduced into the spray chamber simultaneously with SO2(g), HSO3(-) is rapidly oxidized to form bisulfate in the pH range of 3 to 5. Conversion to sulfate was less at pH SO2(g) on the acidic microdroplets was estimated as 1.5 × 10(6) [S(IV)] (M s(-1)) at pH ≤ 3. In the presence of acidic aerosols, this oxidation rate is approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the rate of oxidation with H2O2(g) at a typical atmospheric H2O2(g) concentration of 1 ppb. This finding highlights the relative importance of the acidic surfaces for SO2 oxidation in the atmosphere. Surface chemical reactions on aquated aerosol surfaces, as observed in this study, are overlooked in most atmospheric chemistry models. These reaction pathways may contribute to the rapid production of sulfate aerosols that is often observed in regions impacted by acidic haze aerosol such as Beijing and other megacities around the world.

  14. Effect of free radical spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) on seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 201, č. 1 (2006), s. 105-119 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : DL-homocysteic acid induced seizures * neuronal damage * protection Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.156, year: 2006

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer involving eosin-tryptophan conjugates. Long-lived radical pair states for systems incorporating aromatic amino acid side chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. II; Farahat, C.W.; Oh, C. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1994-07-14

    The electron-transfer photochemistry of the covalent derivatives of the dye eosin, in which the xanthene dye is covalently attached to the amino acid L-tryptophan via the thiohydantoin derivative, the tryptophan dipeptide, and an ethyl ester derivative, has been investigated. The singlet excited state of the dye is significantly quenched on attachment of the aromatic amino acid residue. Dye triplet states are also intercepted through intramolecular interaction of excited dye and amino acid pendants. Flash photolysis experiments verify that this interaction involves electron transfer from the indole side chains of tryptophan. Rate constants for electron transfer are discussed in terms of the distance relationships for the eosin chromophore and aromatic redox sites on peptide derivatives, the pathway for [sigma]-[pi] through-bond interaction between redox sites, and the multiplicity and state of protonation for electron-transfer intermediates. Selected electron-transfer photoreactions were studied under conditions of binding of the peptide derivatives in a high molecular weight, water-soluble, globular polymer, poly(vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone). 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  17. Tin-free enantioselective radical reactions using silanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Yang, Yong-Hua; Lee, Sunggi

    2008-12-04

    Readily available hexyl silane is an excellent choice as a H-atom donor and a chain carrier in Lewis acid mediated enantioselective radical reactions. Conjugate radical additions to alpha,beta-unsaturated imides at room temperature proceed in good yields and excellent enantioselectivities.

  18. Crotylations of alpha-carbonyl radicals with crotylstannane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Miyabe, Hideto

    2002-10-03

    Electrophilic radicals undergo crotylation with crotylstannane with moderate to good efficiency. The reaction provides the syn isomer as the major product. The present methodology is complementary to Claisen protocols for the synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives. Details of the new radical methodology are presented. [reaction: see text

  19. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and radical feminism would easily fall under this definition. There is, however, one major difference: since radical feminism is a relatively recent phenomenon which also benefited from modern modes of text production and preservation, almost all of the sources are still with us. This, in turn, may allow us...... to use radical feminism to make certain aspects of ancient Gnosticism re-emerge from their long submersion, provided that enough similarities can be independently drawn between the two phenomena to merit such a comparison. This paper therefore presents a comparison between concepts and positions...

  20. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters...... youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious radicalization...

  1. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  2. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  3. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G

    2010-01-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  4. Radical's view of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: General concept in radiation biology is that free radicals are highly reactive and they can damage vital cellular molecules leading to injurious effects. However, in this talk, evidence will be presented through the techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance ( EPR ) and pulse radiolysis that free radicals can be highly selective in their reaction with the target molecules. In addition, attempts will be made to present a brief account of emerging scenario of free radical generation, identification and their involvement in radiation damage mechanisms in chemical and biological systems

  5. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  6. Surface Electrostatic Potential and Water Orientation in the presence of Sodium Octanoate Dilute Monolayers Studied by Means of Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Kalil; de Moura, André F

    2015-10-13

    A series of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the present investigation to assess the spontaneous formation of surfactant monolayers of sodium octanoate at the water-vacuum interface. The surfactant surface coverage increased until a saturation threshold was achieved, after which any further surfactant addition led to the formation of micellar aggregates within the solution. The saturated films were not densely packed, as might be expected for short-chained surfactants, and all films regardless of the surface coverage presented surfactant molecules with the same ordering pattern, namely, with the ionic heads toward the aqueous solution and the tails lying nearly parallel to the interface. The major contributions to the electrostatic surface potential came from the charged heads and the counterion distribution, which nearly canceled out each other. The balance between the oppositely charged ions rendered the electrostatic contributions from water meaningful, amounting to ca. 10% of the contributions arising from the ionic species. And even the aliphatic tails, whose atoms bear relatively small partial atomic charges as compared to the polar molecules and molecular fragments, contributed with ca. 20% of the total electrostatic surface potential of the systems under investigation. Although the aliphatic tails were not so orderly arranged as in a compact film, the C-H bonds assumed a preferential orientation, leading to an increased contribution to the electrostatic properties of the interface. The most prominent feature arising from the partitioning of the electrostatic potential into individual contributions was the long-range ordering of the water molecules. This ordering of the water molecules produced a repulsive dipole-dipole interaction between the two interfaces, which increased with the surface coverage. Only for a water layer wider than 10 nm was true bulk behavior observed, and the repulsive dipole-dipole interaction faded away.

  7. Regioselectively nucleus and/or side-chain fluorinated 2-(Phenanthryl)propionic acids by an effective combination of radical and organometallic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Giacomo; Ruzziconi, Renzo

    2005-01-21

    Regioselectively nucleus and/or side-chain fluorinated 2-(phenanthr-1-yl)- and 2-(phenanthr-2-yl)propionic acids 1-5 were prepared using phenanthren-1(2H)-ones 6a-c as key intermediates. Thus, ethyl 2-(fluorophenanthryl)propionates 11 were obtained in good yields by Reformatsky reaction of 6a-c with ethyl 2-bromopropionate followed by dehydratation and DDQ-promoted aromatization of the resulting beta-hydroxyesters. Side-chain alkyl 2-hydroxy-2-(phenanthr-1-yl)propionates 14 were obtained by bromine/lithium permutation of dihydrophenanthryl bromides 12a-c with butyllithium followed by quenching of the lithiated intermediates with methyl pyruvate or ethyl 3,3,3-trifluoropyruvate and subsequent DDQ-promoted aromatization. The alkyl 2-hydroxy-2-(phenanthr-1-yl)propionates 25 were prepared by reacting 8-bromo-1,3-difluorophenanthrene 24 with butyllithium for 10 seconds at -110 degrees C and subsequent addition of the suitable pyruvate to the lithiated intermediates. Alkyl 2-hydroxy-2-(phenanthr-2-yl)propionates 26 and 29 were suitably obtained by site-selective metalation of 1,3-difluorophenanthrene 28 and the bromophenanthrene 24, respectively, with LDA followed by quenching of the metalated intermediates with the suitable alkyl pyruvate. Fluorination of the above alpha-hydroxypropionates with DAST, followed by the alkaline hydrolysis, allowed the expected 2-(phenanthryl)propionic acids 1-5 to be obtained in satisfactory overall yields.

  8. Free radicals trapped in polyethylene matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, S.; Maeda, M.; Hori, Y.; Kashiwabara, H.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of alkyl radicals were found to be trapped in irradiated crystals grown from polyethylene solution. One of them corresponds to the broad sextet pattern of the e.s.r. spectrum and the other corresponds to the sharp sextet pattern. The free radicals attributed to the broad sextet began to disappear at a lower temperature than the temperature at which the free radicals attributed to the sharp sextet disappeared. When butadiene molecules were brought into contact with the specimen, the decay of the free radicals corresponding to the broad sextet was accelerated. When the specimen was subjected to fuming nitric acid treatment, no broad sextet was observed. The mat of the crystals was aligned so that the c-axes of its crystallites were perpendicular to its surface. The broad sextet showed no anisotropy when the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and that of the c-axis of the crystallite was varied. On the other hand, the sharp component of the spectrum showed apparent anisotropy. It can be concluded that the broad component comes from the free radicals trapped in the lamellar surface and the sharp component is attributed to the free radicals trapped in the inner part of the crystallite. (author)

  9. Kinetic study on the enzymatic esterification of octanoic acid and hexanol by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopresto, Catia Giovanna; Calabro, Vincenza; Woodley, John M.

    2014-01-01

    a Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by both substrates and, based on the proposed model, the kinetic constants of the esterification reaction are estimated. These parameters are verified to be intrinsic – neither external nor internal mass transfer resistances are significant...

  10. Moderate and Radical Islam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabasa, Angel

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the statement of Angel Rabasa, PhD, Senior Policy Analyst, The RAND Corporation, to the Committee on Armed Services, Defense Review Terrorism and Radical Islam Gap Panel, United...

  11. Radical transfer between proteins: role of tyrosine, tryptophan and protein peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.A.; Ostdal, H.; Davies, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Reaction of the Fe(III) forms of the heme proteins myoglobin (Mb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with H 2 O 2 gives rise to high-oxidation-state heme-derived species which can be described as a Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation ('Compound 1'). In the case of Mb, the Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation undergoes rapid electron transfer with the surrounding protein to give protein (globin)-derived radicals and an Fe(lV)-oxo species ('Compound 2'). The globin-derived radicals have been shown to be located at two (or more) sites: Tyr-103 or Trp-14, with the latter radical known to react with oxygen to give a Trp-derived peroxyl radical (Mb-Trp-OO*). With HRP, the Fe(lV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation carries out two successive one-electron oxidation reactions at the exposed heme edge to give firstly 'Compound 2' [the Fe(lV)oxo species] and then the resting Fe(III) state of the enzyme. n this study we have investigated whether the Trp-14 peroxyl radical from Mb and the Compound 1 and 2 species from HRP (in the absence and presence of free Tyr) can oxidise amino acids, peptides and proteins. Such reactions constitute intermolecular protein-to-protein radical transfer reactions and hence protein chain-oxidation. We have also examined whether these oxidants react with antioxidants. Reaction of these heme-protein derived oxidants with amino acids, proteins and antioxidants has been carried out at room temperature for defined periods of time before freeze-quenching to 77K to halt reaction. The radical species present in the reaction system at the time of freezing were subsequently examined by EPR spectroscopy at 77K. Three free amino acids, Tyr, Trp and Cys (with Cys the least efficient) have been shown to react rapidly with Mb-Trp-OO*, as evidenced by the loss of the characteristic EPR features of Mb-Trp-OO* on inclusion of increasing concentrations of the amino acids. All other amino acids are much less reactive. Evidence has also been obtained for (inefficient) hydrogen

  12. Violent Radicalization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    When, why, and how do people living in a democracy become radicalized to the point of being willing to use or directly support the use of terrorist violence against fellow citizens? This question has been at the center of academic and public debate over the past years as terrorist attacks...... within this field and to answer the question: From an empirical point of view, what is known and what is not known about radicalization connected to militant Islamism in Europe?...

  13. Quantification of Radicals Generated in a Sonicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassim Badmus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl radical (OH• is a powerful oxidant produced as a consequence of cavitation in water. It can react nonspecifically in breaking down persistent organic pollutants in water into their mineral form. It can also recombine to form hydrogen peroxide which is very useful in water treatment. In this study, terephthalic acid (TA and potassium iodide dosimetry were used to quantify and investigate the behaviour of the generated OH radical in a laboratory scale sonicator. The 2-hydroxyl terephthalic acid (HTA formed during terephthalic acid dosimetry was determined by optical fibre spectrometer. The production rate of HTA served as a means of evaluating and characterizing the OH• generated over given time in a sonicator. The influence of sonicator power intensity, solution pH and irradiation time upon OH• generation were investigated. Approximately 2.2 ´ 10-9 M s-1 of OH radical was generated during the sonication process. The rate of generation of the OH radicals was established to be independent of the concentration of the initial reactant. Thus, the rate of generation of OH• can be predicted by zero order kinetics in a sonicator.

  14. Acyclic diastereoselection in prochiral radical addition to prochiral olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Rheault, Tara R; Chandramouli, Sithamalli V; Jasperse, Craig P

    2002-03-27

    The stereochemical preference (syn or anti) when prochiral radicals add to prochiral acceptors is of fundamental interest. The primary focus of this research was to determine which factors influence the relative stereochemistry between the beta and gamma chiral centers when these are formed concurrently. While moderate diastereoselectivity was found for addition of alkyl (6a-d) and alpha-alkoxy radicals (16a-c) (15:1 anti). Steric influence in alkyl radical additions was difficult to evaluate due to decreased reactivity when using bulky reaction partners; however, more reactive alpha-alkoxy radicals, it was found that increasing steric bulk leads to moderate increases in selectivity. In addition, higher selectivity was observed when employing lanthanide Lewis acids whose environment (reactivity) was modified using achiral additives, suggesting a potentially simple means for selectivity enhancements in radical reactions. Overall these results indicate that significant stereoelectronic effects are necessary to achieve high levels of selectivity in prochiral radical additions to prochiral acceptors.

  15. Kinetic Study of the Aroxyl-Radical-Scavenging Activity of Five Fatty Acid Esters and Six Carotenoids in Toluene Solution: Structure-Activity Relationship for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Maya; Ishikura, Masaharu; Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-17

    A kinetic study of the reaction between an aroxyl radical (ArO • ) and fatty acid esters (LHs 1-5, ethyl stearate 1, ethyl oleate 2, ethyl linoleate 3, ethyl linolenate 4, and ethyl arachidonate 5) has been undertaken. The second-order rate constants (k s ) for the reaction of ArO • with LHs 1-5 in toluene at 25.0 °C have been determined spectrophotometrically. The k s values obtained increased in the order of LH 1 LHs 1-5. The k s value for LH 5 was 2.93 × 10 -3 M -1 s -1 . From the result, it has been clarified that the reaction of ArO • with LHs 1-5 was explained by an allylic hydrogen abstraction reaction. A similar kinetic study was performed for the reaction of ArO • with six carotenoids (Car-Hs 1-6, astaxanthin 1, β-carotene 2, lycopene 3, capsanthin 4, zeaxanthin 5, and lutein 6). The k s values obtained increased in the order of Car-H 1 LHs 1-5. The results of detailed analyses of the k s values for the above reaction indicated that the reaction was also explained by an allylic hydrogen abstraction reaction. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship for the reaction was discussed by taking the result of density functional theory calculation reported by Martinez and Barbosa into account.

  16. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  17. Resveratrol products resulting by free radical attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Yvonne; Quint, R.M. [Section Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Getoff, Nikola [Section Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.at

    2008-06-15

    Trans-resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RES), which is contained in red wine and many plants, is one of the most relevant and extensively investigated stilbenes with a broad spectrum of biological activities. Among other duties, RES has been reported to have anti-carcinogenetic activities, which could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. The degradation of RES was studied under various conditions. The products (aldehydes, carboxylic acids, etc.) generated from RES by the attack of free radicals were registered as a function of the radical concentration (absorbed radiation dose). Based on the obtained data it appears that the OH radicals are initiating the rather complicated process, which involves of the numerous consecutive reactions. A possible starting reaction mechanism is presented.

  18. Effect of nerve growth factor on the synthesis of amino acids in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Kauffman, F.C.; Baab, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive short-chain fatty acids preferentially label glutamine relative to glutamate in brain due to compartmentation of glutamine and glutamate. To determine whether this phenomenon occurs in a single cell culture model, we examined the effect of fatty acid chain length on the synthesis as well as pool size of selected amino acids in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, a cell culture model of the large glutamate compartment in neurons. Intracellular 14C-amino acids were quantitated by HPLC, and the incorporation of [U-14C]-glucose, [1-14C]-butyrate, [1-14C]-octanoate, and [1-14C]-palmitate into five amino acids was measured in native and NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the intracellular concentration of amino acids as did addition of fatty acids but these effects were not additive. Specific activities of amino acids in native cells labelled by 14C-octanoate were 1,300 DPM/nmol, 490 DPM/nmol, 200 DPM/nmol, and 110 DPM/nmol for glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, and serine, respectively. No radioactivity was detected in alanine. Similar specific activities were noted when 14C-butyrate was the precursor; however, there was at least 5-fold less if 14C-palmitate was the precursor. Pretreatment of cells with NGF decreased the specific activity of amino acids by 25-65%. Specific activities of amino acids synthesized from 14C-glucose decreased in the following order: glutamate, 1,640 DPM/nmol; aspartate, 1,210 DPM/nmol; alanine, 580 DPM/nmol; glutamine, 275 DPM/nmol; and serine, 80 DPM/nmol for native cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the specific activities of glutamate and glutamine, but not of the other 3 amino acids. The preferred precursor for glutamate synthesis in native PC12 cells was glucose followed by octanoate, butyrate and palmitate (16:6:3:1)

  19. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  20. Muon substituted free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Gygax, F.N.; Brinkman, G.A.; Louwrier, P.W.F.; McKenna, D.; Ramos, M.; Webster, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Spin polarized energetic positive muons are injected as magnetic probes into unsaturated organic liquids. They are implemented via fast chemical processes ( -10 s) in various molecules. Of particular interest among these are muonium substituted free radicals. The technique allows determination of accurate rate coefficients for fast chemical reactions of radicals. Furthermore, radiochemical processes occuring in picoseconds after injection of the muon are studied. Of fundamental interest are also the structural and dynamical implications of substituting a proton by a muon, or in other terms, a hydrogen atom by a muonium atom. Selected examples for each of these three types of experiments are given. (Auth.)

  1. IRON AND FREE RADICAL OXIDATIONS IN CELL MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Freya Q.; Yue Qian, Steven; Buettner, Garry R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue being rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, is very susceptible to lipid peroxidation. Iron is well known to be an important initiator of free radical oxidations. We propose that the principal route to iron-mediated lipid peroxidations is via iron-oxygen complexes rather than the reaction of iron with hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction. To test this hypothesis, we enriched leukemia cells (K-562 and L1210 cells) with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a model for brain tissue, increasing the amount of DHA from approximately 3 mole % to 32 mole %. These cells were then subjected to ferrous iron and dioxygen to initiate lipid peroxidation in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide. Lipid-derived radicals were detected using EPR spin trapping with α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN). As expected, lipid-derived radical formation increases with increasing cellular lipid unsaturation. Experiments with Desferal demonstrate that iron is required for the formation of lipid radicals from these cells. Addition of iron to DHA-enriched L1210 cells resulted in significant amounts of radical formation; radical formation increased with increasing amount of iron. However, the exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide before the addition of ferrous iron did not increase cellular radical formation, but actually decreased spin adduct formation. These data suggest that iron-oxygen complexes are the primary route to the initiation of biological free radical oxidations. This model proposes a mechanism to explain how catalytic iron in brain tissue can be so destructive. PMID:10872752

  2. Counter radicalization development assistance

    OpenAIRE

    van Hippel, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The paper reviews current research and practice and recommends strategies for development agencies working in the Arab and Muslim world. It builds on the basic assumption that the realization of the Millennium Development Goals will be vital to reduce support for terrorism in the long term. Within this overall framework, emphasis is placed on particular programs that could be specifically applied to counter radicalization.

  3. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen M.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Coti, Karla K.; Bení tez, Diego S.; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William Andrew III; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, Fraser Fraser Raser

    2009-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    incontinence in relation to sexual activity after surgery. This can present at the time of orgasm (ie, climacturia) or arise during arousal. In general, the problem subsides with time and pelvic floor training and tension penile loops can be used as treatments. Orgasmic disturbances after radical prostatectomy...

  5. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Online Radicalization: Bangladesh Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    radicalization through cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom...cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom of speech...67 An Organizational Approach to Implement the Measures........................................ 69 Formation of

  7. Cation radicals of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Deal, Cailin; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2007-10-01

    Carotenes and xanthophylls are well known to act as electron donors in redox processes. This ability is thought to be associated with the inhibition of oxidative reactions in reaction centers and light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, cation radicals of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and lycopene were generated in solution using ferric chloride as an oxidant and then studied by absorption spectroscopy. The investigation provides a view toward understanding the molecular features that determine the spectral properties of cation radicals of carotenoids. The absorption spectral data reveal a shift to longer wavelength with increasing pi-chain length. However, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin exhibit cation radical spectra blue-shifted compared to that of beta-carotene, despite all of these molecules having 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. CIS molecular orbital theory quantum computations interpret this effect as due to the hydroxyl groups in the terminal rings selectively stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbitals of preferentially populated s-trans-isomers. The data are expected to be useful in the analysis of spectral results from PSII pigment-protein complexes seeking to understand the role of carotene and xanthophyll cation radicals in regulating excited state energy flow, in protecting PSII reaction centers against photoinhibition, and in dissipating excess light energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms but not used for photosynthesis.

  8. Oxidation of aromatic amines and diamines by OH radicals. Formation and ionization constants of amine cation radicals in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayon, E.; Rao, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation by hydroxyl radicals of aromatic amines and diamines in water was studied using the fast-reaction technique of pulse radiolysis and kinetic absorption spectrophotometry. The following compounds were examined: N,N,N 1 ,N 1 - tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), p-phenylenediamine (PD), N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamene (DMPD), N,N,N 1 ,N 1 -tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and diphenylamine (DPA). The main initial reaction of the OH radicals is suggested to be an addition to these compounds to give absorption spectra which absorb strongly in the visible and uv regions. These OH radical adducts decay by first-order kinetics and have lifetimes of approximately 5-50 μsec, dependent on the pH, buffer concentration, and the nature of the aromatic amines and diamines. They decay to give species with somewhat similar absorption spectra and extinction coefficients, which are very long lived in the absence of oxygen. The latter species are assigned to the cation radicals TMPD. + , PD. + , DMPD. + , TMB. + , and DPA. + . The OH radical adducts and the cation radicals have acid-base properties. The pK/sub a/ values of the cation radicals TMPDH. 2+ , PDH. 2+ , DMPDH. 2+ , TMBH. 2+ , and DPAH. 2+ were found to be 5.3, 5.9, 6.1, 5.1, and 4.2, respectively. The results indicate that these aromatic amines and diamines can be oxidized by free radicals to yield the corresponding cation radicals. (U.S.)

  9. Muonium-containing vinyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Symons, M.C.R.; Roduner, E.; Heming, M.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of trimethylsilylacetylene and bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene to positive muons gave radicals whose muon-electron hyperfine coupling constants establish that the corresponding vinyl radicals were formed. (author)

  10. EFSA BIOHAZ Panel (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of peroxyacetic acid solutions for reduction of pathogens on poultry carcasses and meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    no concerns for environmental risk of peroxyacids, acetic acid and octanoic acid. On the basis of a conservative preliminary guideline for surface water quality, the emission of HEDP from a poultry plant into the environment could not be considered safe a priori. It was recommended that HACCP plans should...... include monitoring of the concentration of HEDP and of the decontaminating substance in the working solution and post-marketing surveillance for resistance in both pathogenic and commensal bacteria....

  11. Effects of radical scavengers on aqueous solutions exposed to heavy-ion irradiation using the liquid microjet technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shinji; Tsuchida, Hidetsugu; Furuya, Ryousuke; Miyahara, Kento; Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the radical scavenger ascorbic acid on water radiolysis are studied by fast heavy-ion irradiation of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid, using the liquid microjet technique under vacuum. To understand the reaction mechanisms of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solutions, we directly measure secondary ions emitted from solutions with different ascorbic acid concentrations. The yield of hydronium secondary ions is strongly influenced by the reaction between ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radicals. From analysis using a simple model considering chemical equilibria, we determine that the upper concentration limit of ascorbic acid with a radical scavenger effect is approximately 70 μM.

  12. Effects of radical scavengers on aqueous solutions exposed to heavy-ion irradiation using the liquid microjet technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Shinji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Tsuchida, Hidetsugu, E-mail: tsuchida@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Furuya, Ryousuke; Miyahara, Kento [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the radical scavenger ascorbic acid on water radiolysis are studied by fast heavy-ion irradiation of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid, using the liquid microjet technique under vacuum. To understand the reaction mechanisms of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solutions, we directly measure secondary ions emitted from solutions with different ascorbic acid concentrations. The yield of hydronium secondary ions is strongly influenced by the reaction between ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radicals. From analysis using a simple model considering chemical equilibria, we determine that the upper concentration limit of ascorbic acid with a radical scavenger effect is approximately 70 μM.

  13. Effects of radical scavengers on aqueous solutions exposed to heavy-ion irradiation using the liquid microjet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shinji; Tsuchida, Hidetsugu; Furuya, Ryousuke; Miyahara, Kento; Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the radical scavenger ascorbic acid on water radiolysis are studied by fast heavy-ion irradiation of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid, using the liquid microjet technique under vacuum. To understand the reaction mechanisms of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solutions, we directly measure secondary ions emitted from solutions with different ascorbic acid concentrations. The yield of hydronium secondary ions is strongly influenced by the reaction between ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radicals. From analysis using a simple model considering chemical equilibria, we determine that the upper concentration limit of ascorbic acid with a radical scavenger effect is approximately 70 μM.

  14. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  15. Trends in radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James; Tokuda, Yuji; Scardino, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The surgical treatment of prostate cancer ideally removes the entire cancer, avoids excessive blood loss or serious perioperative complications, and results in complete recovery of continence and potency. To achieve this, the surgeon must excise sufficient periprostatic tissue to cure the cancer while preserving the cavernosal nerves required for erectile function and the neuromusculature required for normal urinary and bowel function. Here we will examine recent trends in radical prostatectomy, focusing on surgical technique.

  16. Syntheses of [ω-11C]-labelled fatty acids using alkyl halides and Grignard reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlberg, T.; Malmborg, P.; Langstroem, B.

    1990-01-01

    A method for synthesizing carbon-11 labelled fatty acids, where the carbon-11 has a mid-chain location, has been developed. Fatty acids labelled thus are less susceptible to early loss of the label through metabolic degradation. Carbon-11 labelled methyl iodide was trapped in a solution of alpha, omega-di(bromo magnesium)alkane in THF. Li 2 CuCl 4 was added and allowed to react. Carbon dioxide was introduced into the mixture, followed by heating and then hydrolysis. Hexanoic, octanoic, and decanoic acids were synthesized with this method

  17. Membrane engineering via trans unsaturated fatty acids production improves Escherichia coli robustness and production of biorenewables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zaigao; Yoon, Jong Moon; Nielsen, David R; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Jarboe, Laura R

    2016-05-01

    Constructing microbial biocatalysts that produce biorenewables at economically viable yields and titers is often hampered by product toxicity. For production of short chain fatty acids, membrane damage is considered the primary mechanism of toxicity, particularly in regards to membrane integrity. Previous engineering efforts in Escherichia coli to increase membrane integrity, with the goal of increasing fatty acid tolerance and production, have had mixed results. Herein, a novel approach was used to reconstruct the E. coli membrane by enabling production of a novel membrane component. Specifically, trans unsaturated fatty acids (TUFA) were produced and incorporated into the membrane of E. coli MG1655 by expression of cis-trans isomerase (Cti) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While the engineered strain was found to have no increase in membrane integrity, a significant decrease in membrane fluidity was observed, meaning that membrane polarization and rigidity were increased by TUFA incorporation. As a result, tolerance to exogenously added octanoic acid and production of octanoic acid were both increased relative to the wild-type strain. This membrane engineering strategy to improve octanoic acid tolerance was found to require fine-tuning of TUFA abundance. Besides improving tolerance and production of carboxylic acids, TUFA production also enabled increased tolerance in E. coli to other bio-products, e.g. alcohols, organic acids, aromatic compounds, a variety of adverse industrial conditions, e.g. low pH, high temperature, and also elevated styrene production, another versatile bio-chemical product. TUFA permitted enhanced growth due to alleviation of bio-product toxicity, demonstrating the general effectiveness of this membrane engineering strategy towards improving strain robustness. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure and lyoluminescent reactions of free radicals of irradiated lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushkov, V.V.; Panasyuk, S.L.; Yudin, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    To determine mechanisms of processes, resulting in lyoluminescence the structure of fren radicals in γ-irradiated lactose was investigated by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance. Analysis of dependences of different radical content in irradiated crystals and lyoluminescent characteristics of these samples on the period of their storing enabled to confirm suggested earlier luminescence mechanism with lambdasub(max)=630 nm of irradiated carbon-hydrate in neutral and acid media. The possibility of controlling the content of different types of radicals in samples by lyoluminescent method was shown

  19. Free radicals generated by radiolysis of aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The free radicals produced in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions span the range of redox potentials from -2.9 to +2.65 volts. The identity and nature of these radicals were discussed. Most of the discussion was results obtained with low LET radiation sources ( 60 Co gamma radiation or electron accelerators). Water radiolysis provides the synthesis of many radicals and radical ions in aqueous solution. The primary radicals, e/sub aq/ - H, OH, are well characterized. The radical population can be made to be 90% pure OH (or O - ) if N 2 O solutions are irradiated, the remaining 10% being H atoms. 55% of the radicals can be converted to H atoms in acid solution or in neutral phosphate solutions(e/sub aq/ - reacts with H 2 PO 4- to produce H). The remaining 45% (OH radicals) are difficult to convert to H by reaction with H 2 , due to the slow rate of the reaction. About 100 atmospheres of H 2 are required to do the conversion in less than 10 - 6 sec. 3 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

  20. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P.; Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R.; Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R"."+), carbon-centered radicals (R".), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R"."+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  1. In vitro free radical scavenging activity of platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Aki; Kajita, Masashi; Kim, Juewon; Kanayama, Atsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yusei [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bioscience Building 402, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Takahashi, Kyoko; Mashino, Tadahiko, E-mail: yusei74@k.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shibakoen, Minato, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan)

    2009-11-11

    A polyacrylic acid (PAA)-protected platinum nanoparticle species (PAA-Pt) was prepared by alcohol reduction of hexachloroplatinate. The PAA-Pt nanoparticles were well dispersed and homogeneous in size with an average diameter of 2.0 {+-} 0.4 nm (n = 200). We used electron spin resonance to quantify the residual peroxyl radical AOO. generated from 2,2-azobis (2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) by thermal decomposition in the presence of O{sub 2} and a spectrophotometric method to quantify the residual 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. PAA-Pt scavenged these two radicals in a dose-dependent manner. Platinum was the functional component. PAA-Pt reduced the rate of oxygen consumption required for linoleic acid peroxidation initiated by AOO. generated from AAPH, indicating inhibition of the propagation of linolate peroxidation. A thiobarbituric acid test also revealed dose-dependent inhibition of the linolate peroxidation by PAA-Pt. Fifty micromolar platinum, as PAA-Pt, completely quenched 250 {mu}M DPPH radical for 5 min. Even when twice diluted in half, the PAA-Pt still quenched 100% of the 250 {mu}M DPPH radical. The scavenging activity of PAA-Pt is durable. These observations suggest that PAA-Pt is an efficient scavenger of free radicals.

  2. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P. [California State University at Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840 (United States); Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, 11973 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R{sup .+}), carbon-centered radicals (R{sup .}), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R{sup .+} as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  3. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  4. Evidence for radical-oxidation of plasma proteins in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Davies, M.; Dean, R.; Fu, S.; Taurins, A.; Sullivans, D.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins by radicals has been implicated in many pathological processes. The hydroxyl radical is known to generate protein-bound hydroxylated derivatives of amino acids, for example hydroxyvaline (from Val), hydroxyleucine (from Leu), o-tyrosine (from Phe), and DOPA (from Tyr). In this study, we have investigated the occurrence of these oxidised amino acids in human plasma proteins from both normal subjects and dialysis patients. By employing previously established HPLC methods [Fu et al. Biochemical Journal, 330, 233-239, 1998], we have found that oxidised amino acids exist in normal human plasma proteins (n=32). The level of these oxidised amino acids is not correlated to age. Similar levels of oxidised amino acids are found in the plasma proteins of the dialysis patients (n=6), but a more detailed survey is underway. The relative abundance of the oxidised amino acids is similar to that resulting from oxidation of BSA by hydroxy radicals or Fenton systems [Fu et al. Biochemical Journal, 333, 519-525, 1998]. The results suggest that metal-ion catalysed oxyl-radical chemistry may be a key contributor to the oxidative damage in plasma proteins in vivo in humans

  5. Free Radical Scavenging Properties of Annona squamosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Biba; Akhil B, S; P, Remani; Sujathan, K

    2017-10-26

    Annona squamosa has extensively been used in the traditional and folkloric medicine and found to possess many biological activities. Different solvents, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Annona squamosa seeds (ASPE, ASCH, ASEA, ASME) have been used to prepare plant extracts. The present investigations dealt with the free radical scavenging activity of four extracts using various techniques such as total reducing power estimation, total phenolic count, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging effect, evaluation of ABTS cation decolorisation capacity, FRAP assay, hdroxyl radical scavenging assay, super oxide assay and Nitric oxide radical scavenging assay of the extracts. The results showed that the four extracts of Annona squamosa showed significant reducing power in four extracts. The total phenolic contents in petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol extracts and positive control were 0.64±0.17, 0.54±0.27, 0.49±0.24, 0.57±0.22 and 0.66±0.33. The antioxidant capacity by ABTS assay of ASPE, ASCH, ASEA, ASME and positive control, trolox showed 77.75±0.5,73.25±1.7,78.5± 1.2 , 80 ± 0.8 μg/ml and 94.2 ± 0.9 respectively. The (50 % scavenging activity) SA50 of ASPE and ASCH, ASEA and ASME was found to be 34.4 μg/ml, 43.8 μg/ml 34.7 μg/m and 28.8 μg/ml respectively by DPPH assay. The percentage of hydroxyl radical scavenging increased with the increasing concentration of the extracts. ASPE, ASCH, ASEA and ASME showed superoxide radical scavenging activity, as indicated by their values 66 ± 0.5, 68 ± 1 ,63 ± 1 and 70 ± 0.5 μg/ml respectively compared to gallic acid which was 97 ± 0.5 μg/ml. The values for scavenging of nitric oxide for ASPE, ASCH, ASEA and ASME were 91.0 ± 1.0, 66.75 ± 0.5, 71.75 ± 1.1 and 75.75 ± 1.15 μg/ml while value for standard ascorbic acid was 91.0 ± 1.0 μg/ml. The results revealed strong antioxidants in four extracts may lead to the development of potent

  6. Free radical scavenging activity of Eagle tea and their flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Meng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an online HPLC-DAD-MS coupled with 2,2′-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS assay was employed for evaluating free radical scavenging activity of Eagle tea and their active components. Twenty-three chromatographic peaks were detected, and nineteen components had free radical scavenging activity. Among them, eight compounds were identified as flavonoids (hyperin, isoquercitrin, quercitrin, quercetin, kaempferol, catechins, chlorogenic acid and epicatechin based on MS data and standard chromatographic characters.

  7. Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) capacity in cattle serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Kamogawa, Erisa; Kimura, Anna; Kitahara, Go; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Oowada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) activity in cattle and human sera was evaluated with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Scavenging rates against six active species, namely hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, methyl radical, and singlet oxygen were quantified. The difference in the electron spin resonance signal intensity in the presence and absence of the serum was converted into the scavenging rates. Comparative MULTIS measurements were made in sera from eight beef cattle, three fetal calves and fifteen healthy human volunteers. Further, we determined the MULTIS value of albumin, the most abundant component in serum. MULTIS values in cattle sera indicated higher scavenging activity against most free radical species tested than human sera. In particular, cattle serum scavenging activities against superoxide and methyl radical were higher than human serum by 2.6 and 3.7 fold, respectively. In cattle serum, albumin appears to play a dominant role in MULTIS activity, but in human serum that is not the case. Previous data indicated that the abundance of uric acid in bovine blood is nearly 80% less than humans; however, this difference does not explain the deviation in MULTIS profile.

  8. [Research progress on free radicals in human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q B; Xu, F P; Wei, C X; Peng, J; Dong, X D

    2016-08-10

    Free radicals are the intermediates of metabolism, widely exist in the human bodies. Under normal circumstances, the free radicals play an important role in the metabolic process on human body, cell signal pathway, gene regulation, induction of cell proliferation and apoptosis, so as to maintain the normal growth and development of human body and to inhibit the growth of bacteria, virus and cancer. However, when organic lesion occurs affected by external factors or when equilibrium of the free radicals is tipped in the human body, the free radicals will respond integratedly with lipids, protein or nucleic acid which may jeopardize the health of human bodies. This paper summarizes the research progress of the free radicals conducted in recent years, in relations to the perspective of the types, origins, test methods of the free radicals and their relationship with human's health. In addition, the possible mechanisms of environmental pollutants (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) mediating oxidative stress and free radicals scavenging in the body were also summarized.

  9. Effect of curcumin against oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Sai Krishna; Mahendra, Jaideep; Gurumurthy, Prema; Jayamathi; Iqbal, Shabeer S; Mahendra, Little

    2014-10-01

    Among various reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radicals have the strongest chemical activity, which can damage a wide range of essential biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. The objective of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of curcumin on prevention of oxidative damage of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals generated in in vitro by a Fenton like reaction. We have incubated the serum, plasma and whole blood with H2O2/Cu2+/ Ascorbic acid system for 4 hours at 37 0C and observed the oxidation of biomolecules like albumin, lipids, proteins and DNA. Curcumin at the concentrations of 50,100 and 200 μmoles, prevented the formation of ischemia modified albumin, MDA, protein carbonyls, oxidized DNA and increased the total antioxidant levels and GSH significantly. These observations suggest the hydroxyl radical scavenging potentials of curcumin and protective actions to prevent the oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

  10. Hydroxyl radical reactivity with diethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Lii, R.R.; Saunders, B.B.

    1977-01-01

    Diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA) reacts with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals on every third collision, whereas the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution is considerably slower. The high gas-phase reactivity explains the predicted inhibitory effect of DEHA in atmospheric smog processes. Results from the studies in the aqueous phase are helpful in predicting the mechanism of the reaction of DEHA with hydroxyl radicals

  11. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Brodovitch, Jean-Claude; Ghandi, Khashayar; Percival, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and 14 N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and 14 N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy

  12. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Iain [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada)]. E-mail: percival@sfu.ca

    2006-03-31

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and {sup 14}N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and {sup 14}N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy.

  13. ESR study of the anion radicals of 5-nitropyrimidines: conversion to iminoxy radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.; Clark, C.; Failor, R.

    1976-01-01

    The anion radicals of a number of 5-nitropyrimidines have been investigated by ESR spectroscopy. The anions are formed by electrolysis in dimethylformamide and by electron attachment in aqueous glasses, 12 M LiCl--D 2 O and 8 M NaOD. The electrolysis of 5-nitrouracil and 5-nitro-6-methyluracil results in relatively stable anion radicals. The results for 5-nitrouracil give evidence for two or perhaps three anions which differ only by the degree of ring nitrogen protonation. The results for 5-nitro-6-methyluracil suggest that the nitro group of the anion is twisted so that it is coupled only weakly to the ring π-electron system. The anions of 5-nitrouracil, 5-nitroorotic acid, 5-nitrobarbituric acid, and 5-nitro-6-methyluracil have been produced in the alkaline and neutral aqueous glasses. The anisotropic spectra found have been analyzed with the aid of computer simulations which assume axial symmetry. For example, the analysis of the spectrum of 5-nitrouracil anion in 12 M LiCl yields A/sub parallel//sup N/ = 33; A/sub perpendicular to//sup N/ = 5, a 6 /sup H/ = 5.5 G, g/sub parallel/ = 2.0016, and g/sub perpendicular to/ = 2.0059. A concentration dependence in the splittings is noted and discussed. Ultraviolet photolysis of the anions of 5-nitro-6-methyluracil and 5-nitrobarbituric acid results in the formation of iminoxy radicals. Mechanisms of formation of the iminoxy radicals are discussed and results found in this work are compared to results found in single crystals and aqueous solution

  14. NOx removal characteristics of corona radical shower with ammonia and methylamine radical injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urashima, K.; Ara, M.; Chang, J.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Uchida, Y. [Aichi Inst. of Technology, (Japan). Dept. of Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur oxides (SOx) are the major cause of acid rain. There are different types of NOx and SOx conversion techniques such as wet scrubber, selective catalytic reactor, sorbent injection, and low NOx burner. Non-thermal plasma techniques have also been utilized in commercial plants, but the energy efficiency of the non-thermal plasma reactors have not yet been optimized. The direct plasma treatments of flue gases including, the electron beam, barrier discharge and pulsed corona reactors, may lose input energy to activate unwanted components of flue gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). The corona discharge ammonia radical shower system has demonstrated significant NOx removal with higher energy efficiency for large bench scale and pilot plant tests for combustion exhausts. An experiment has also demonstrated that methane can replace ammonia as an injection gas with less NOx removal efficiency. This paper presented an experimental investigation that compared methylamine radical injection with traditional ammonia and methane radical injections. The paper discussed the bench scale test facilities and corona radical shower plasma reactor. It was concluded that the processes to form ammonium nitrate could be observed from trace white solid particles deposited on the reactor wall as observed by scanning electron microscopy pictures. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 appendices.

  15. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphite radicals HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 -, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 - are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO 2 ) 3 - are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO 3 2 -. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO 5 - . reversible PO 5 2- . + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed

  16. Radical production in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Akabani, G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes our effort to develop a metric for radiation exposure that is more fundamental than adsorbed dose and upon which a metric for exposure to chemicals could be based. This metric is based on the production of radicals by the two agents. Radicals produced by radiation in biological systems commonly assumed to be the same as those produced in water despite the presence of a variety of complex molecules. This may explain why the extensive efforts to describe the relationship between energy deposition (track structure) and molecular damage to DNA, based on the spectrum of radicals produced, have not been successful in explaining simple biological effects such as cell killing. Current models assume that DNA and its basic elements are immersed in water-like media and only model the production and diffusion of water-based radicals and their interaction with DNA structures; these models lack the cross sections associated with each macro-component of DNA and only treat water-based radicals. It has been found that such models are not realistic because DNA is not immersed in pure water. A computer code capable of simulating electron tracks, low-energy electrons, energy deposition in small molecules, and radical production and diffusion in water like media has been developed. This code is still in at a primitive stage and development is continuing. It is being used to study radical production by radiation, and radical diffusion and interactions in simple molecular systems following their production. We are extending the code to radical production by chemicals to complement our PBPK modeling efforts. It therefore has been developed primarily for use with radionuclides that are in biological materials, and not for radiation fields

  17. Pyrones to pyrans: enantioselective radical additions to acyloxy pyrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Zimmerman, Jake

    2006-10-18

    This paper describes a highly site-, diastereo-, and enantioselective intermolecular radical addition/hydrogen atom transfer to hydroxypyrone pyromeconic and kojic acids. The methodology can be extended to the formation of chiral quaternary centers. The products obtained are densely functionalized pyran moieties. The products contain structural features amenable for the introduction of additional substituents.

  18. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Scoparia dulcis Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babincová, M.; Sourivong, P.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the scavenging capabilities of an extract of Scoparia dulcis (a cosmopolitan weed widespread in Laos and Vietnam) for 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and measured hemoglobin-catalyzed linoleic acid peroxidation with an oxygen electrode. Our results demonstrated strong antioxidant activity corresponding to mitigation of the generation of hydroxyl radicals, a possible rationale for the observed therapeutic effects of this weed.

  19. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  20. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Radical Scavengers from Thymus vulgaris Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapkevicius, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Lelyveld, G.P.; Veldhuizen, van A.; Groot, de Æ.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Venskutonis, R.

    2002-01-01

    2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH*) scavenging activity-guided fractionation of a leaf extract of Thymus vulgaris led to the isolation of the radical scavengers rosmarinic acid 1, eriodictyol, taxifolin, luteolin 7-glucuronide, p-cymene 2,3-diol, p-cymene 2,3-diol 6-6'-dimer, carvacrol,

  1. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  2. Radical scavenging compounds from the aerial parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were the most active fractions and contained apigenin, apigenin glucuronide, luteolin, caffeic acid, methyl caffeate, rosmarinic acid and methyl rosmarinate as the radical scavenging compounds with EC50 values of 26.67 ± 0.31, 185.89 ± 1.02, 5.35 ± 0.31, 3.92 ± 0.06, ...

  3. Attenuated gastric distress but no benefit to performance with adaptation to octanoate-rich esterified oils in well-trained male cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorburn, M.S.; Vistisen, Bodil; Thorp, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of modifying a normal dietary fatty acid composition and ingestion of high-fat exercise supplements on gastrointestinal distress, substrate oxidation. and endurance cycling performance. Nine well-trained male cyclists completed a randomized triple-crossover comprising...

  4. Synthesis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of New Hydroxybenzylidene Hydrazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Sersen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzylidene hydrazines exhibit a wide spectrum of biological activities. Here, we report synthesis and free radical scavenging activity of nine new N-(hydroxybenzylidene-N′-[2,6-dinitro-4-(trifluoromethyl]phenylhydrazines. The chemical structures of these compounds were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 19F-NMR, IR spectroscopy, LC-MS, and elemental analysis. The prepared compounds were tested for their activity to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, galvinoxyl radical (GOR, and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radicals. The free radical scavenging activity expressed as SC50 values of these compounds varied in a wide range, from a strong to no radical scavenging effect. The most effective radical scavengers were hydroxybenzylidene hydrazines containing three hydroxyl groups in the benzylidene part of their molecules. The prepared compounds were also tested for their activity to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport in spinach chloroplasts. IC50 values of these compounds varied in wide range, from an intermediate to no inhibitory effect.

  5. Synthesis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of New Hydroxybenzylidene Hydrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, Frantisek; Gregan, Fridrich; Kotora, Peter; Kmetova, Jarmila; Filo, Juraj; Loos, Dusan; Gregan, Juraj

    2017-05-29

    Hydroxybenzylidene hydrazines exhibit a wide spectrum of biological activities. Here, we report synthesis and free radical scavenging activity of nine new N-(hydroxybenzylidene)-N'-[2,6-dinitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)]phenylhydrazines. The chemical structures of these compounds were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 19F-NMR, IR spectroscopy, LC-MS, and elemental analysis. The prepared compounds were tested for their activity to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), galvinoxyl radical (GOR), and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) radicals. The free radical scavenging activity expressed as SC50 values of these compounds varied in a wide range, from a strong to no radical scavenging effect. The most effective radical scavengers were hydroxybenzylidene hydrazines containing three hydroxyl groups in the benzylidene part of their molecules. The prepared compounds were also tested for their activity to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport in spinach chloroplasts. IC50 values of these compounds varied in wide range, from an intermediate to no inhibitory effect.

  6. Ascorbyl radical disproportionation in reverse micellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gębicki, J. L.; Szymańska-Owczarek, M.; Pacholczyk-Sienicka, B.; Jankowski, S.

    2018-04-01

    Ascorbyl radical was generated by the pulse radiolysis method and observed with the fast kinetic spectrophotometry within reverse micelles stabilized by AOT in n-heptane or by Igepal CO-520 in cyclohexane at different water to surfactant molar ratio, w0. Rate constants for the disproportionation of the ascorbyl radicals were smaller than those for intermicellar exchange for both type of reverse micelles and slower than those in homogeneous aqueous solutions. However, they increased with increasing w0 for AOT/n-heptane system, while they decreased for Igepal CO-520 system. The absorption spectra of ascorbic acid AOT/n-heptane reverse micellar system showed that the "pH" sensed by this molecule is lower than that in respective homogeneous aqueous solutions. The obtained results were rationalized taking into account three main factors (i) preferential location of ascorbic acid molecules in the interfacial region of the both types of reverse micelles; (ii) postulate that the pH of the interface is lower than that of the water pool of reverse micelles and (iii) different structure of the interface of the reverse micelles made by AOT in n-heptane and those formed by Igepal CO-520 I cyclohexane. Some possible consequences of these findings are discussed.

  7. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  8. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  9. Measurements of hydroxyl and hydroperoxy radicals during CalNex-LA: Model comparisons and radical budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, S. M.; Hansen, R. F.; Dusanter, S.; Michoud, V.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Veres, P. R.; Graus, M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J.; Young, C.; Washenfelder, R.; Brown, S. S.; Thalman, R.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.; Tsai, C.; Stutz, J.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Mielke, L. H.; Osthoff, H. D.; Stevens, P. S.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2*) radical concentrations were made at the Pasadena ground site during the CalNex-LA 2010 campaign using the laser-induced fluorescence-fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique. The measured concentrations of OH and HO2* exhibited a distinct weekend effect, with higher radical concentrations observed on the weekends corresponding to lower levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The radical measurements were compared to results from a zero-dimensional model using the Regional Atmospheric Chemical Mechanism-2 constrained by NOx and other measured trace gases. The chemical model overpredicted measured OH concentrations during the weekends by a factor of approximately 1.4 ± 0.3 (1σ), but the agreement was better during the weekdays (ratio of 1.0 ± 0.2). Model predicted HO2* concentrations underpredicted by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.2 on the weekends, while measured weekday concentrations were underpredicted by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.5. However, increasing the modeled OH reactivity to match the measured total OH reactivity improved the overall agreement for both OH and HO2* on all days. A radical budget analysis suggests that photolysis of carbonyls and formaldehyde together accounted for approximately 40% of radical initiation with photolysis of nitrous acid accounting for 30% at the measurement height and ozone photolysis contributing less than 20%. An analysis of the ozone production sensitivity reveals that during the week, ozone production was limited by volatile organic compounds throughout the day during the campaign but NOx limited during the afternoon on the weekends.

  10. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... Radical change by entrepreneurial design then becomes the focal point, in order to acquaint the reader with the strategies and tactics of well-known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding...

  11. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  12. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year's life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  13. Radical Islamism and Failed Developmentalism

    OpenAIRE

    Rahnema, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    The rise of radical Islamism in recent years does not limit the applicability of the concept of cultural nationalism. Rather the two are intertwined in ways which this article will attempt to highlight. Islam took specific national forms as modern nation-states arose and the contemporary resurgence of radical Islamism also follows that modern pattern. I examine the emergence of the three most important movements in the Islamic world, namely, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Jama'at-e Islami i...

  14. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: key points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical cystectomy remains the golden standard for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Objective: to duplicate with highest accuracy the open radical cystectomy procedure, which we successfully utilized earlier in our clinic, in the of laparoscopic conditions in order to preserve the advantages of minimally invasive procedures and retain the reliability of the tried and tested open surgery.Materials and methods. In the report were included 35 patients (27 men and 8 women with bladder cancer, who underwent laparoscopic radical cystectomy in Volgograd Regional Center of Urology and Nephrology between April 2013 and March 2016. Only the patients who had been submitted to full intracorporal ileal conduits were included.Results. The mean operative time was 378 minutes, the mean blood loss was 285 millilitres, the mean length of hospital stay was 12.4 days, only 20 % of patients required the narcotic anesthetics. The postoperative complication rate was 11.4 %. However, the majority of the patients were successfully treated with minimally invasive procedures. Generally, our results were similar to other reported studies.Conclusion. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy is a safe and efficient modality of treatment of bladder cancer. However, it needs more procedures and longer observation period to establish laparoscopic radical cystectomy as an alternative to open radical cystectomy.

  15. In vitro free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extract of the whole plant of Evolvulus alsinoides (L.) L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi, Duraisamy; Ravikumar, Ganesan; Kalaiselvi, Manokaran; Vidya, Balasubramaniam; Uma, Chandrasekar

    2015-06-01

    To identify the free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extract of Evolvulus alsinoides. The free radical scavenging activity was evaluated by in vitro methods like reducing power assay, total antioxidant activity, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) reduction, superoxide radical scavenging activity, 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(+)) scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging assay, and nitric oxide radical scavenging assay, which were studied by using ascorbic acid as standard. The extract showed significant activities in all antioxidant assays compared with the reference antioxidant ascorbic acid. The total antioxidant activity as well as the reducing power was also found to increase in a dose-dependent manner. Evolvulus alsinoides may act as a chemopreventive agent, providing antioxidant properties and offering effective protection from free radicals.

  16. Antioxidant and cyclooxygenase activities of fatty acids found in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Geneive E; Momin, Rafikali A; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Dewitt, David L

    2002-04-10

    Several commercially available C-8 to C-24 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (1-29) were assayed for cyclooxygenase-I (COX-I) and cyclooxygenase-II (COX-II) inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Among the saturated fatty acids tested at 60 microg mL(-1), there was an increase in antioxidant activity with increasing chain length from octanoic acid to myristic acid (C-8-C-14) and a decrease thereafter. All unsaturated fatty acids tested at 60 microg mL(-1) showed good antioxidant activity except for undecylenic acid (12), cis-5-dodecenoic acid (13), and nervonic acid (29). The highest inhibitory activities among the saturated fatty acids tested on cyclooxygenase enzymes COX-I and COX-II were observed for decanoic acid to lauric acid (3-5) at 100 microg mL(-1). Similarly, among the unsaturated fatty acids tested, the highest activities were observed for cis-8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid (25) and cis-13,16-docosadienoic acid (27) at 100 microg mL(-1).

  17. Anti-oxidation and scavenging effects of some extracts from Chinese medicines on free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizhong; Lao Qinhua; Cui Fengmei; Shao Yuan; Sun Cunpu

    1999-11-01

    The inhibiting effects of Chinonin, Quercetin and Tannic Acid on the lipid oxidation induced by radiation exposure were investigated by means of a modified TBA spectrophotometry. The scavenging effects on free radicals caused by γ-irradiation exposure of the three active principles were observed by technique of ESR. The results showed that anti-oxidation effects of Chinonin and Quercetin were better than that of Tannic Acid, while the scavenging effects of the three active principles on free radicals were similar

  18. The games radicals play : special issue on free radicals and radical ions

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, J.C.; Williams, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics have aptly been described as “most excellent children of Intellect and Art” [1]. Both these “children” engage with many playthings, and molecules rank as one of their first favorites, especially radicals, which are amongst the most lively and exciting. Checking out radicals dancing to the music of entropy round their potential energy ballrooms is surely both entertaining and enlightening. Radicals’ old favorite convolutions are noteworthy, but the new styles, modes and a...

  19. Can Carbamates Undergo Radical Oxidation in the Soil Environment? A Case Study on Carbaryl and Carbofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwieląg-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Jezierska, Julia

    2017-12-19

    Radical oxidation of carbamate insecticides, namely carbaryl and carbofuran, was investigated with spectroscopic (electron paramagnetic resonance [EPR] and UV-vis) and theoretical (density functional theory [DFT] and ab initio orbital-optimized spin-component scaled MP2 [OO-SCS-MP2]) methods. The two carbamates were subjected to reaction with • OH, persistent DPPH • and galvinoxyl radical, as well as indigenous radicals of humic acids. The influence of fulvic acids on carbamate oxidation was also tested. The results obtained with EPR and UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that carbamates can undergo direct reactions with various radical species, oxidizing themselves into radicals in the process. Hence, they are prone to participate in the prolongation step of the radical chain reactions occurring in the soil environment. Theoretical calculations revealed that from the thermodynamic point of view hydrogen atom transfer is the preferred mechanism in the reactions of the two carbamates with the radicals. The activity of carbofuran was determined experimentally (using pseudo-first-order kinetics) and theoretically to be noticeably higher in comparison with carbaryl and comparable with gallic acid. The findings of this study suggest that the radicals present in soil can play an important role in natural remediation mechanisms of carbamates.

  20. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of irradiated Kampo extracts using ESR spin-trap method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Yui; Kawamura, Shoei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The radical scavenging activity (RSA) of 13 kinds of γ-ray irradiated Kampo extracts were studied by ESR spin-trap method. The RSA against alkoxy radical and hydroxyl radical were measured using new spin trapping reagent CYPMPO. The RSA against these two radicals were evaluated using GSH for alkoxy RSA and L-ascorbic acid for hydroxy RSA as a standard antioxidant reagent. We revealed that a few Kampo extracts showed high RSA against alkoxy radical and also hydroxy radical. This RSA of Kampo extracts was changed by γ-ray irradiation treatment. Using ESR spin-trap method, it is concluded that the effect of radiation treatment on RSA of Kampo extracts were able to detect. (author)

  1. PRODUCT SAFETY AND COLOR CHARACTERISTICS OF GROUND BEEF PROCESSED FROM BEEF TRIMMINGS TREATED WITH PEROXYACETIC ACID ALONE OR FOLLOWED BY NOVEL ORGANIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Pohlman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial interventions using peroxyacetic acetic acid (PAA followed by novel organic acids on beef trimmings prior to grinding with conventional spray (CS or electrostatic spray (ES on ground beef microbial populations and color. Beef trimmings (80/20; 25kg were inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, non- O157:H7 shiga toxin producing (STEC E. coli (EC and Salmonella spp. (SA at 105 CFU/g. Inoculated trimmings (1.5 kg /treatment/replicate, 2 replicates were treated with CS application of 0.02% PAA alone or followed by CS or ES application of 3% octanoic acid (PO, 3% pyruvic acid (PP, 3% malic acid (PM, saturated solution of fumaric acid (PF or deionized water (W. Findings from this study suggest that PA as a single or multiple chemical hurdle approach with malic, pyruvic, octanoic and fumaric acid on beef trimmings may be effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 as well as non-STEC serotypes and Salmonella in ground beef up to day 2 of simulated retail display. Results of this study showed that instrumental color properties of ground beef treated with peroxyacetic acid followed by organic acids had little or no difference (P > 0.05 compared to the untreated un-inoculated control ground beef samples. The results also indicate that ES application of some organic acids may have similar or greater efficiency in controlling ground beef microbial populations compared to the CS application of the same acid providing a more economical and waste manageable decontamination approach.

  2. Formation and reactions of radical cations of substituted benzenes in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcman, J.

    1977-08-01

    Radical cations of anisole, methylated benzenes, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, tert-butylbenzene and N,N-dimethylaniline were studied in aqueous media by pulse radiolytic technique. Absorption spectra and reaction kinetics of the radical cations were recorded. The radical cations are formed from the corresponding OH adducts by the elimination of OH - , either by a simple dissociation or by an acid catalyzed reaction. The rate constants of the formation of the radical cations and their reactions with water, OH - and Fe 2+ , or the reaction of a proton loss, were measured. The rate constants for the reaction with water and OH - , together with the rate constants for the dissociation of the OH adducts, are correlated with the ionization potential of the parent compound. These correlations offer a possibility of predicting the acid-base properties of radical cations of substituted benzenes, or the estimation of their ionization potential. (author)

  3. First examples of intramolecular addition of primary amidyl radicals to olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudreault, P.; Drouin, C.; Lessard, J. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the first examples of radical cyclization involving a primary amidyl radical and a pendant olefin. Amidyl radicals have attracted interest in terms of their structure, reactivity, and ways to generate them. The intramolecular addition of an amidyl radical on a pendant olefin appears to be a powerful synthetic tool for creating nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Although several examples of cyclization involving secondary amidyl radicals are cited in the the literature, there are no examples of a successful cyclization involving a primary amidyl radical. This is because all attempts to prepare the usual radical precursors have failed when applied to olefinic primary amides. This study reveals that N-(phenylthio) derivatives of olefinic primary amides can be easily prepared and that nitrogen heterocycles resulting from their radical cyclization can be obtained in good to very good yields. Four olefinic primary amides were chosen as models for radical cyclization of primary amidyl radicals. They were prepared from the corresponding carboxylic acids via the acid chlorides. Conversion of primary amides into suitable amidyl radical precursors was also examined. The study showed that N-(phenylthio) amides could be easily prepared by following a slightly modified protocol developed by Esker and Newcomb, by reacting the anion of the amide with phenylsulfenyl chloride. In particular, olefinic N-(phenylthio) amides were prepared and used as primary amidyl radical precursors in a reaction with a solution of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) in catalytic quantities and tributyltin hydride in benzene. The resulting yields of cyclic products ranged from 63 to 85 per cent. The intent of the study was to demonstrate that it is no longer necessary to prepare an N-protected precursor and then remove the protecting group after cyclization. Further studies are currently underway. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy, E-mail: skana@cc.oita-u.ac.jp [Szewalski Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences Fiszera 14, 80-952, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO{sub 2}), hydrogen peroxide(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}(v' = 1) <- X {sup 2}{Pi}(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  5. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  6. Conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of alkyl radicals, the conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals and the trapping of allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene have been studied by electron spin resonance (e.s.r.). It has been suggested that in the crystal core alkyl radicals react with trans-vinylene double bonds and are converted into trans-vinylene allyl radicals; at the crystal surface, alkyl radicals react with vinyl end groups and are converted into allyl radicals with vinyl end groups. The decay of radical pairs and the formation of trans-vinylene double bonds are discussed. (author)

  7. 17.9.3 Radical cations of diazo compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.

    This document is part of Subvolume E2 `Phosphorus-Centered Radicals, Radicals Centered on Other Heteroatoms, Organic Radical Ions' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. Comparative study of radical oxidation of DNA and its nucleosides by hydroxyl radicals and ferryl ions generated by the Fenton reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, J.F.; Berger, M.; Anselmino, C.; Polverelli, M.; Cadet, J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals and Fenton type oxidative species with DNA and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides was investigated. This study was based on the characterization of the diamagnetic products resulting from the chemical transformation of the transient radicals. Emphasis was placed on the radical oxidative reactions of the purine nucleosides. It is interesting to note that oxidative purine radicals can be reduced by reagents such as ascorbic acid or N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1, 4-p-phenylenediamine. The observed differences in the nature of the decomposition products resulting from the Fenton reaction are not consistent with the nature of the oxidative species (hydroxyl radicals or ferryl ions) involved, but due to the presence of ferrous sulfate [fr

  9. Photoionization of the OH radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most thoroughly studied free radicals because of its importance in atmospheric chemistry, combustion processes, and the interstellar medium. Detailed experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the ground electronic state (X 2 PI/sub i/) and on the four lowest bound excited electronic states (A 2 Σ + , B 2 Σ + , D 2 Σ - , and C 2 Σ + ). However, because it is difficult to distinguish the spectrum of OH from the spectra of the various radical precursors, the absorption spectrum in the wavelength region below 1200 A has not been well characterized. In the present work, the spectrum of OH has been determined in the wavelength region from 750 to 950 A using the technique of photoionization mass spectrometry. This technique allows complete separation of the spectrum of OH from that of the other components of the discharge and permits the unambiguous determination of the spectrum of OH

  10. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  11. The role of proteins in damage induced by free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicki, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The initial consequence of oxidative stress in living organisms is chemical modification of cell components. Recently increasing attention in this area has been paid to the modification of proteins. A form of protein modification which has been studied in some detail only recently is peroxidation. In the last 8 years, we and our collaborators have shown that a range of isolated proteins acquire hydroperoxide groups when exposed to a range of biologically plausible oxidants. These include HO free radicals generated by radiation or in the Fenton reaction, peroxyl radicals, oxidants released by activated neutrophils, and peroxynitrite. In more complex systems, we also found protein peroxides in the apo B component of LDL treated with 20 μM Cu ++ , and in irradiated blood serum. These observations suggest that the formation of protein peroxides is a possible consequence of oxidative stress in vivo. A remarkable feature of the process of protein peroxidation is its high efficiency. This is most easily measured with proteins oxidized by radiation-generated free radicals. It was found that, for some proteins, peroxide yields reached 40% of the numbers of HO radicals generated. Thus in effect, almost half of these radicals can be converted to the much more long-lived protein peroxide groups. If they, in turn, have the capacity to damage other molecules, the major oxidative pathway in vivo may have the sequence: free radical ? protein peroxide ? another oxidized molecule. This hypothesis was tested by studying the ability of protein peroxides to react with selected molecules and the results are briefly discussed. Clearly, these effects are specific to individual proteins. More generally, amino acid and protein peroxides were found to be a potential source of a range of free radicals when reduced by Fe ++ . If this turns out to be a common phenomenon, protein peroxides may prove to be a major source of oxidative damage

  12. The role of proteins in damage induced by free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebicki, J.M. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    The initial consequence of oxidative stress in living organisms is chemical modification of cell components. Recently increasing attention in this area has been paid to the modification of proteins. A form of protein modification which has been studied in some detail only recently is peroxidation. In the last 8 years, we and our collaborators have shown that a range of isolated proteins acquire hydroperoxide groups when exposed to a range of biologically plausible oxidants. These include HO free radicals generated by radiation or in the Fenton reaction, peroxyl radicals, oxidants released by activated neutrophils, and peroxynitrite. In more complex systems, we also found protein peroxides in the apo B component of LDL treated with 20 {mu}M Cu{sup ++}, and in irradiated blood serum. These observations suggest that the formation of protein peroxides is a possible consequence of oxidative stress in vivo. A remarkable feature of the process of protein peroxidation is its high efficiency. This is most easily measured with proteins oxidized by radiation-generated free radicals. It was found that, for some proteins, peroxide yields reached 40% of the numbers of HO radicals generated. Thus in effect, almost half of these radicals can be converted to the much more long-lived protein peroxide groups. If they, in turn, have the capacity to damage other molecules, the major oxidative pathway in vivo may have the sequence: free radical ? protein peroxide ? another oxidized molecule. This hypothesis was tested by studying the ability of protein peroxides to react with selected molecules and the results are briefly discussed. Clearly, these effects are specific to individual proteins. More generally, amino acid and protein peroxides were found to be a potential source of a range of free radicals when reduced by Fe{sup ++}. If this turns out to be a common phenomenon, protein peroxides may prove to be a major source of oxidative damage.

  13. The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging is reviewed. Only two parameters currently correlate with species longevity in the right sense: the mitochondrial rate of reactive oxygen species (mitROS) production and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation of tissue membranes. Both are low in long-lived animals. In addition, the best-known manipulation that extends longevity, dietary restriction, also decreases the rate of mitROS production and oxidative damage to mtDNA. The same occurs during protein restriction as well as during methionine restriction. These two manipulations also increase maximum longevity in rodents. The decrease in mitROS generation and oxidative stress that takes place in caloric restriction seems to be due to restriction of a single dietary substance: methionine. The information available supports a mitochondrial free radical theory of aging focused on low generation of endogenous damage and low sensitivity of membranes to oxidation in long-lived animals. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radical reactions in vivo - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, M.; Bors, W.

    1990-01-01

    Generation of radicals in vivo depends on metabolic activities. The reactions are usually influenced by (i) the presence and concentration of oxygen, (ii) the availability of transition metals (effects of binding and compartimentalization), (iii) the level of reductants and antioxidants (e.g. nutritional effects). The effects of radicals are thought to be due to (i) membrane damage (affecting passive or active transport through altered fluidity/function interrelationships, intercellular messenging through modifications in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes); (ii) protein damage (e.g. affecting membrane transporters, channel proteins, receptor or regulatory proteins, immunomodulators); (iii) damage to DNA. Defense mechanisms consist of (i) prevention of the 'spreading' of primary damage by low molecular weight antioxidants (e.g. vitamin E, GSH, vitamin C, β-carotene, uric acid); (ii) prevention or limitation of 'secondary' damage by enzymes (e.g. GSH-peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, DT-diaphorase) and/or chelators; (iii) repair processes, e.g. lipid degradation/membrane repair enzymes (phospholipases, peroxidases, some transferases and reductases), protein disposal or repair enzymes (proteases, GSSG-reductase), DNA degradation or repair enzymes (exonucleases III, endonucleases III and IV, glycosylases, polymerases). Recent hypotheses on a messenging function of the superoxide anion O 2 - are discussed and possible implications of cross-reactions between O 2 - and nitric oxide (endothelium-derived relaxing factor EDRF) are shortly mentioned. (orig.)

  15. Donor free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  16. Radical feminists & trans activists truce

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, F.

    2014-01-01

    #GenderWeek: Truce! When radical feminists and trans feminists empathise\\ud Feminist Times\\ud By Finn Mackay \\ud read all #GenderWeek articles.\\ud We wanted to explore the ground between the polarised, entrenched positions in the so-called “TERF-war”. Radical feminists on one pole, trans-inclusionary feminists and trans activists on the other. The disputed territory being women-only space, language and the ever changing legal framework surrounding gender.\\ud Entrenchment leads to stalemate. S...

  17. Regulation of the Docosapentaenoic Acid/Docosahexaenoic Acid Ratio (DPA/DHA Ratio) in Schizochytrium limacinum B4D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Huidong; Chen, Wuxi; Zhao, Minli; Cui, Haiyang; Min, Qingsong; Wang, Haijun; Chen, Shulin; Li, Demao

    2017-05-01

    Docosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratio (DPA/DHA ratio) in Schizochytrium was relatively stable. But ideally the ratio of DPA/DHA will vary according to the desired end use. This study reports several ways of modulating the DPA/DHA ratio. Incubation times changed the DPA/DHA ratio, and changes in this ratio were associated with the variations in the saturated fatty acid (SFAs) content. Propionic acid sharply increased the SFAs content in lipids, dramatically decreased the even-chain SFAs content, and reduced the DPA/DHA ratio. Pentanoic acid (C5:0) and heptanoic acid (C7:0) had similar effects as propionic acid, whereas butyric acid (C4:0), hexanoic acid (C6:0), and octanoic acid (C8:0) did not change the fatty acid profile and the DPA/DHA ratio. Transcription analyses show that β-oxidation might be responsible for this phenomenon. Iodoacetamide upregulated polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase genes, reduced the DHA content, and improved the DPA content, causing the DPA/DHA ratio to increase. These results present new insights into the regulation of the DPA/DHA ratio.

  18. Rapid Hydrogen Shift Reactions in Acyl Peroxy Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2017-01-01

    -shift with X = 6, 7, 8, or 9) in the hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals, this H-shift is a reversible reaction and it scrambles between two peroxides, hydroperoxy acyl peroxy and peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. The forward reaction rate constants of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions are estimated to be above 103 s–1...... with transition state theory corrected with Eckart quantum tunnelling correction. The ratio between the forward and reverse reaction rate constant of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions is around ∼105. Therefore, the equilibrium is pushed toward the production of peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. These very fast 1,X-OOH H......We have used quantum mechanical chemical calculations (CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ) to investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in acyl peroxy and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals. We have focused on the H-shift reactions from a hydroperoxy group (OOH) (1,X-OOH H...

  19. Free radical scavenging and COX-2 inhibition by simple colon metabolites of polyphenols: A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amić, Ana; Marković, Zoran; Marković, Jasmina M Dimitrić; Jeremić, Svetlana; Lučić, Bono; Amić, Dragan

    2016-12-01

    Free radical scavenging and inhibitory potency against cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by two abundant colon metabolites of polyphenols, i.e., 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (3-HPAA) and 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (4-HPPA) were theoretically studied. Different free radical scavenging mechanisms are investigated in water and pentyl ethanoate as a solvent. By considering electronic properties of scavenged free radicals, hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) mechanisms are found to be thermodynamically probable and competitive processes in both media. The Gibbs free energy change for reaction of inactivation of free radicals indicates 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA as potent scavengers. Their reactivity toward free radicals was predicted to decrease as follows: hydroxyl>alkoxyls>phenoxyl≈peroxyls>superoxide. Shown free radical scavenging potency of 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA along with their high μM concentration produced by microbial colon degradation of polyphenols could enable at least in situ inactivation of free radicals. Docking analysis with structural forms of 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA indicates dianionic ligands as potent inhibitors of COX-2, an inducible enzyme involved in colon carcinogenesis. Obtained results suggest that suppressing levels of free radicals and COX-2 could be achieved by 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA indicating that these compounds may contribute to reduced risk of colon cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Zwitterion radicals and anion radicals from electron transfer and solvent condensation with the fingerprint developing agent ninhydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, T D; Reiter, R C; Stevenson, C D

    2001-11-16

    Ninhydrin (the fingerprint developing agent) spontaneously dehydrates in liquid ammonia and in hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA) to form indantrione, which has a sufficiently large solution electron affinity to extract an electron from the solvent (HMPA) to produce the indantrione anion radical. In liquid NH(3), the presence of trace amounts of amide ion causes the spontaneous formation of an anion radical condensation product, wherein the no. 2 carbon (originally a carbonyl carbon) becomes substituted with -NH(2) and -OH groups. In HMPA, the indantrione anion radical spontaneously forms condensation products with the HMPA to produce a variety of zwitterionic radicals, wherein the no. 2 carbon becomes directly attached to a nitrogen of the HMPA. The mechanisms for the formation of the zwitterionic paramagnetic condensation products are analogous to that observed in the reaction of ninhydrin with amino acids to yield Ruhemann's Purple, the contrast product in fingerprint development. The formation of anion and zwitterionic radical condensation products from ninhydrin and nitrogen-containing solvents may represent an example of a host of analogous polyketone-solvent reactions.

  1. Simple and Efficient Generation of Aryl Radicals from Aryl Triflates: Synthesis of Aryl Boronates and Aryl Iodides at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbo; Yang, Xiaobo; Gao, Yang; Li, Chao-Jun

    2017-06-28

    Despite the wide use of aryl radicals in organic synthesis, current methods to prepare them from aryl halides, carboxylic acids, boronic acids, and diazonium salts suffer from limitations. Aryl triflates, easily obtained from phenols, are promising aryl radical progenitors but remain elusive in this regard. Inspired by the single electron transfer process for aryl halides to access aryl radicals, we developed a simple and efficient protocol to convert aryl triflates to aryl radicals. Our success lies in exploiting sodium iodide as the soft electron donor assisted by light. This strategy enables the scalable synthesis of two types of important organic molecules, i.e., aryl boronates and aryl iodides, in good to high yields, with broad functional group compatibility in a transition-metal-free manner at room temperature. This protocol is anticipated to find potential applications in other aryl-radical-involved reactions by using aryl triflates as aryl radical precursors.

  2. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, T.; Karovic, M.; Trska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing procedure with the aim to provide adequate oncological safety to patients with cervical cancer while preserving their fertility. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate, in a series of 3 patients, the feasibility, morbidity, and safety of laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy for early cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: Three non consecutive patients with FIGO stage IA1 and IB1 cervical cancer was evaluated in a period of years 2008 - 2011. The patients underwent a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical parametrectomy class II procedure according to the Piver classification. The section of vaginal cuff, trachelectomy, permanent cerclage and isthmo-vaginal anastomosis ware realised by vaginal approach. Results: The median operative time, the median blood loss and the mean number of resected pelvic nodes was comparable with published data. Major intraoperative complications did not occur and no patient required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up time was 33 (38-59) months. One vaginal recurrence occurred in 7 months after primary surgery. The patient was underwent a radicalisation procedure and adjuvant oncologic therapy and now is free of disease. Conclusions: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy (LAVRT)may be an alternative in fertility-preserving surgery for early cervical cancer. The procedure offers patients potential benefits of minimally invasive surgery with adequate oncological safety, but it should be reserved for oncologic surgeons trained in advanced laparoscopic procedures. (author)

  3. Is Radical Innovation Management Misunderstood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jimmi Normann; Gertsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This paper poses a critical view on radical innovation (RI) management research and practice. The study investigates how expected RI performance influences firms’ under- standing of their RI capability. RI performance is often based on output measures such as market shares or fiscal return...

  4. Exploring the Theories of Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskaliūnaitė Asta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After the London bombings in July 2005, the concern of terrorism scholars and policy makers has turned to “home-grown” terrorism and potential for political violence from within the states. “Radicalization” became a new buzz word. This article follows a number of reviews of the literature on radicalization and offers another angle for looking at this research. First, it discusses the term “radicalization” and suggests the use of the following definition of radicalization as a process by which a person adopts belief systems which justify the use of violence to effect social change and comes to actively support as well as employ violent means for political purposes. Next, it proposes to see the theories of radicalization focusing on the individual and the two dimensions of his/her motivation: whether that motivation is internal or external and whether it is due to personal choice or either internal (due to some psychological traits or external compulsion. Though not all theories fall neatly within these categories, they make it possible to make comparisons of contributions from a variety of different areas thus reflecting on the interdisciplinary nature of the study of terrorism in general and radicalization as a part of it.

  5. Ultrasound-induced radical polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.W.A.; Kemmere, M.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2004-01-01

    Sonochemistry comprises all chemical effects that are induced by ultrasound. Most of these effects are caused by cavitations, ie, the collapse of microscopic bubbles in a liquid. The chemical effects of ultrasound include the formation of radicals and the enhancement of reaction rates at ambient

  6. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  7. Analysis of Ethyl Acetate Extract of Enzymatic Hydrolysate from High Purity Oleuropein and DPPH Radical Scavenging Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiaojiao; Li, Bing; Qin, Frank G. F.; Tu, Junling

    2018-01-01

    High purify oleuropein (81.04% OL) was hydrolyzed by hemicellulase and phenols was existed in the ethyl acetate extract of enzymatic hydrolysate (EAE). The results presented that there were hydroxytyrosol (HT), tyrosol, caffeic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy phenylacetic acid in EAE by HPLC, and HT content was 19.36%. Antioxidant activities (DPPH radical scavenging capacity) were all added as the samples concentration increased, and dose-effect relationships also existed. HT possessed the highest DPPH radical scavenging capacity, followed by Vc, and eugenol, OL, caffeic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid.

  8. Iron-chelating agents never suppress Fenton reaction but participate in quenching spin-trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linxiang; Abe, Yoshihiro; Kanagawa, Kiyotada; Shoji, Tomoko; Mashino, Tadahiko; Mochizuki, Masataka; Tanaka, Miho; Miyata, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical formation by Fenton reaction in the presence of an iron-chelating agent such as EDTA was traced by two different assay methods; an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and high Performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection with terephthalic acid (TPA), a fluorescent probe for hydroxyl radicals. From the ESR spin-trapping measurement, it was observed that EDTA seemed to suppress hydroxyl radical formation with the increase of its concentration. On the other hand, hydroxyl radical formation by Fenton reaction was not affected by EDTA monitored by HPLC assay. Similar inconsistent effects of other iron-chelating agents such as nitrylotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA), oxalate and citrate were also observed. On the addition of EDTA solution to the reaction mixture 10 min after the Fenton reaction started, when hydroxyl radical formation should have almost ceased but the ESR signal of DMPO-OH radicals could be detected, it was observed that the DMPO-OH· signal disappeared rapidly. With the simultaneous addition of Fe(II) solution and EDTA after the Fenton reaction ceased, the DMPO-OH· signal disappeared more rapidly. The results indicated that these chelating agents should enhance the quenching of [DMPO-OH]· radicals by Fe(II), but they did not suppress Fenton reaction by forming chelates with iron ions

  9. Reactions of Hydroxyalkyl Radicals with Cysteinyl Peptides in a NanoESI Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Craig A.; Xia, Yu

    2014-07-01

    In biological systems, carbon-centered small molecule radicals are primarily formed via external radiation or internal radical reactions. These radical species can react with a variety of biomolecules, most notably nucleic acids, the consequence of which has possible links to gene mutation and cancer. Sulfur-containing peptides and proteins are reactive toward a variety of radical species and many of them behave as radical scavengers. In this study, the reactions between alkyl alcohol carbon-centered radicals (e.g., •CH2OH for methanol) and cysteinyl peptides within a nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) plume were explored. The reaction system involved ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of a nanoESI plume using a low pressure mercury lamp consisting of 185 and 254 nm emission bands. The alkyl alcohol was added as solvent into the nanoESI solution and served as the precursor of hydroxyalkyl radicals upon UV irradiation. The hydroxyalkyl radicals subsequently reacted with cysteinyl peptides either containing a disulfide linkage or free thiol, which led to the formation of peptide- S-hydroxyalkyl product. This radical reaction coupled with subsequent MS/MS was shown to have analytical potential by cleaving intrachain disulfide linked peptides prior to CID to enhance sequence information. Tandem mass spectrometry via collision-induced dissociation (CID), stable isotope labeling, and accurate mass measurement were employed to verify the identities of the reaction products.

  10. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auestad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO 2 in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO 2 and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and ω-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by β-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the ω-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the β-ketothiolase step of the β-oxidation pathway. The [ 14 C]acetoacetate formed from the [1- 14 C]labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the [ 14 C]acetoacetate formed from the (ω-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1

  11. Phytochemical Screening and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total phenolic, total flavonoid and proanthocyanidin contents were 65, 0.07 and 2.38 mg/g of powdered plant material for AF fruits, and 12, 51.35, 19.5 mg/g of powdered plant material for AF leaves as gallic acid, rutin and catechin equivalents respectively. Conclusion: AF leaves are five times more potent as a free radical ...

  12. Flavonoids as scavengers of nitric oxide radical.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, S.A.B.E.; Tromp, M.N.J.L.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; van der Vijgh, W.J.F.; Bast, A.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of naturally occurring compounds used, e.g., in the treatment of vascular endothelial damage. They are known to be excellent scavengers of oxygen free radicals. Since the nitric oxide radical (

  13. O conceito de mal radical The concept of radical evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Correia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A noção de mal radical aparece em Kant no contexto da discussão da religião nos limites da simples razão e busca dar conta da complexa relação entre o respeito pela lei moral e o amor-próprio na definição do móbil para a ação. Na busca por identificar o fundamento da propensão para o mal no homem, Kant se vê diante da dificuldade de ter de articular natureza e liberdade, e ainda que a noção de mal radical possa conservar algumas ambigüidades, permite conceber uma noção de responsabilidade compatível com uma inata propensão para o mal. Neste texto busco explicitar alguns passos fundamentais na construção do conceito por Kant.The concept of radical evil appears in Kant's theory when he discusses the religion in the limits of the mere reason and aims explain the complex relationship between respect for the moral law and the self-love, for establish the motive of the action. By aiming identify the basis of human inclination to evil, Kant is faced with the trouble of have to put nature and freedom in connection. Despite of the concept of radical evil retain some ambiguity, it allows conceive a notion of responsibility suitable to an inherent inclination to evil. In this paper is my purpose to explain some basic moments of Kantian formulation of that notion.

  14. Free radicals in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, M R

    1991-12-15

    During the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of cancer-causing agents, mechanisms of cancer formation and the behavior of cancer cells. Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, and lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). It has been estimated that about 75-80% of all human cancers are environmentally induced, 30-40% of them by diet. Only a small minority, possibly no more than 2% of all cases, result purely from inherent genetic changes. Several lines of evidence confirm that the fundamental molecular event or events that cause a cell to become malignant occur at the level of the DNA and a variety of studies indicate that the critical molecular event in chemical carcinogenesis is the interaction of the chemical agent with DNA. The demonstration that DNA isolated from tumor cells can transfect normal cells and render them neoplastic provides direct proof that an alteration of the DNA is responsible for cancer. The transforming genes, or oncogenes, have been identified by restriction endonuclease mapping. One of the characteristics of tumor cells generated by transformation with viruses, chemicals, or radiation is their reduced requirement for serum growth factors. A critical significance of electrophilic metabolites of carcinogenes in chemical carcinogenesis has been demonstrated. A number of "proximate" and "ultimate" metabolites, especially those of aromatic amines, were described. The "ultimate" forms of carcinogens actually interact with cellular constituents to cause neoplastic transformation and are the final metabolic products in most pathways. Recent evidence indicates that free radical derivatives of chemical carcinogens may be produced both metabolically and nonenzymatically during their metabolism. Free radicals carry no

  15. Muonium radicals in benzene-styrene mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, B.W.; Stadlbauer, J.W.; Walker, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Muonium radicals were observed through their μ + SR precession frequencies in high transverse magnetic fields in pure benzene, pure styrene and their mixtures, all as liquids at room temperature. In benzene-styrene mixtures, the radicals obtained in each pure liquid are both present, so no slow (10 -9 -10 -5 s) intermolecular exchange occurs; but strong selectivity was found with the formation of the radical from styrene being about eight-times more probable than the radical from benzene. (Auth.)

  16. Free radicals in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonet, B.

    1993-01-01

    Free radicals appear in the cells as the result of exogenic factors (ionizing radiation, UV) or reactions naturally occurring in the cell. Free radical reactions may cause destruction of macromolecules (DNA, lipids, proteins). Free radical pathology is important in many diseases and aging processes in organisms

  17. Oxygen free radicals in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Biemond (Pieter)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractCurrent knowledge strongly suggests that oxygen free radicals are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Additional information about the mechanism of free radical attack is necessary in order to find out if interaction with the mechanism of free radical damage can be used in the treatment

  18. Radical carbonylations using a continuous microflow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radical-based carbonylation reactions of alkyl halides were conducted in a microflow reactor under pressurized carbon monoxide gas. Good to excellent yields of carbonylated products were obtained via radical formylation, carbonylative cyclization and three-component coupling reactions, using tributyltin hydride or TTMSS as a radical mediator.

  19. Evidence for formation of hydroxyl radicals during reperfusion after global cerebral ischaemia in rats using salicylate trapping and microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, T; Balchen, T

    1994-01-01

    Systemic administration of salicylate (SA) to rats (100 mg kg-1 i.p. ) was used as an in vivo trap of hydroxyl radicals (.OH). In the brain SA reacts with hydroxyl radicals to form the stable adducts 2, 3- and 2,5 dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBAs) which can thus be taken as an index of .OH formation...

  20. A muoniated radical in selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, I.D.; Cox, S.F.J.; Jayasooriya, U.A.; Zimmermann, U.

    2003-01-01

    We report new 0.3 T transverse-field μSR experiments in crystalline Se which show only a small, slowly relaxing muon signal at 300 K, accounting for about 30% of the incoming muon polarization. However, at 90 K signals are observed around 74 and 157 MHz, characteristic of a radical with a hyperfine coupling of 231 MHz. Very fast relaxation which increases with temperature makes these signals impossible to follow beyond 200 K. Above 400 K a quickly relaxing diamagnetic signal becomes visible, its relaxation falling with increasing temperature. In the melt (>490 K) just a single non-relaxing diamagnetic signal is seen. These observations may be explained by electron spin-exchange with a muoniated radical

  1. Radical-Scavenging Compounds from Olive Tree (Olea europaea L.) wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Bonilla, M.; Salido, S.; Beek, van T.A.; Altarejos, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to complete knowledge on the chemical composition and radical-scavenging activity of olive tree wood. Two new monoterpene glycosides, (-)-oleuropeic acid 6'-O-a-d-glucopyranosyl ester (6a) and (-)-perillic acid 1'-O-ß-d-primeverosyl ester (8), together with the known

  2. In vitro anti-radical activities of extracts of Solanum nigrum (L.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... activities observed in this study. The isolation and .... acetate (CH3CO2K), ascorbic acid, rutin, glacial acetic acid (CH3COOH), Folin- ..... and volatile oils that can chelate metals and donate H+ to oxygen radicals, thus making ...

  3. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different c...

  4. Anatomical landmarks of radical prostatecomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Horn, Lars-Christian; Neuhaus, Jochen; Constantinides, Costantinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we review current literature and based on our experience, we present the anatomical landmarks of open and laparoscopic/endoscopic radical prostatectomy. A thorough literature search was performed with the Medline database on the anatomy and the nomenclature of the structures surrounding the prostate gland. The correct handling of puboprostatic ligaments, external urethral sphincter, prostatic fascias and neurovascular bundle is necessary for avoiding malfunction of the urogenital system after radical prostatectomy. When evaluating new prostatectomy techniques, we should always take into account both clinical and final oncological outcomes. The present review adds further knowledge to the existing "postprostatectomy anatomical hazard" debate. It emphasizes upon the role of the puboprostatic ligaments and the course of the external urethral sphincter for urinary continence. When performing an intrafascial nerve sparing prostatectomy most urologists tend to approach as close to the prostatic capsula as possible, even though there is no concurrence regarding the nomenclature of the surrounding fascias and the course of the actual neurovascular bundles. After completion of an intrafascial technique the specimen does not contain any periprostatic tissue and thus the detection of pT3a disease is not feasible. This especially becomes problematic if the tumour reaches the resection margin. Nerve sparing open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy should aim in maintaining sexual function, recuperating early continence after surgery, without hindering the final oncological outcome to the procedure. Despite the different approaches for radical prostatectomy the key for better results is the understanding of the anatomy of the bladder neck and the urethra.

  5. Radical Smiles Rearrangement: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Allart-Simon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades the Smiles rearrangement and its variants have become essential synthetic tools in modern synthetic organic chemistry. In this mini-review we summarized some very recent results of the radical version of these rearrangements. The selected examples illustrate the synthetic power of this approach, especially if it is incorporated into a domino process, for the preparation of polyfunctionalized complex molecules.

  6. Free radical reactions of daunorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houee-Levin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Daunorubicin is an antitumor antibiotic activated in vivo by reduction. Its mechanism of action involves DNA and topoisomerase attack, but side effects are cytotoxicity related to free radical formation. Therefore the mechanism of the one-electron reduction of the drug and the reactions of the daunorubicin transients towards compounds of biological interest have been studied by the methods of radiolysis, in order to provide possible explanations of the drug mechanism of action. Their relative importance in cellular conditions is discussed [fr

  7. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  8. Radical Reactions in the Gas Phase: Recent Development and Application in Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent literature describing the use of gas phase radical reactions for structural characterization of complex biomolecules other than peptides. Specifically, chemical derivatization, in-source chemical reaction, and gas phase ion/ion reactions have been demonstrated as effective ways to generate radical precursor ions that yield structural informative fragments complementary to those from conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID. Radical driven dissociation has been applied to a variety of biomolecules including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. The majority of the molecules discussed in this review see limited fragmentation from conventional CID, and the gas phase radical reactions open up completely new dissociation channels for these molecules and therefore yield high fidelity confirmation of the structures of the target molecules. Due to the extensively studied peptide fragmentation, this review focuses only on nonpeptide biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids.

  9. Transformations of dissolved organic matter induced by UV photolysis, Hydroxyl radicals, chlorine radicals, and sulfate radicals in aqueous-phase UV-Based advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Lathika; Coscarelli, Erica; Khaksari, Maryam; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Minakata, Daisuke

    2018-05-15

    Considering the increasing identification of trace organic contaminants in natural aquatic environments, the removal of trace organic contaminants from water or wastewater discharge is an urgent task. Ultraviolet (UV) and UV-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H 2 O 2 ), UV/free chlorine and UV/persulfate, are attractive and promising approaches for the removal of these contaminants due to the high reactivity of active radical species produced in these UV-AOPs with a wide variety of organic contaminants. However, the removal efficiency of trace contaminants is greatly affected by the presence of background dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, we use ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry to evaluate the transformation of a standard Suwanee River fulvic acid DOM isolate in UV photolysis and UV-AOPs. The use of probe compounds allows for the determination of the steady-state concentrations of active radical species in each UV-AOP. The changes in the H/C and O/C elemental ratios, double bond equivalents, and the low-molecular-weight transformation product concentrations of organic acids reveal that different DOM transformation patterns are induced by each UV-AOP. By comparison with the known reactivities of each radical species with specific organic compounds, we mechanistically and systematically elucidate the molecular-level DOM transformation pathways induced by hydroxyl, chlorine, and sulfate radicals in UV-AOPs. We find that there is a distinct transformation in the aliphatic components of DOM due to HO• in UV/H 2 O 2 and UV/free chlorine. Cl• induced transformation of olefinic species is also observed in the UV/free chlorine system. Transformation of aromatic and olefinic moieties by SO 4 •- are the predominant pathways in the UV/persulfate system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. EPR spin trapping of protein radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2004-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was originally developed to aid the detection of low-molecular-mass radicals formed in chemical systems. It has subsequently found widespread use in biology and medicine for the direct detection of radical species formed during oxidative stress...... tumbling radicals are often broad and relatively poor in distinctive features, a number of techniques have been developed that allow a wealth of information to be obtained about the nature, site, and reactions of such radicals. This article summarizes recent developments in this area and reviews selected...... examples of radical formation on proteins....

  11. Changes in free-radical scavenging ability of kombucha tea during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, R; Subathradevi, P; Marimuthu, S; Sathishkumar, M; Swaminathan, K

    2008-07-01

    Kombucha tea is a fermented tea beverage produced by fermenting sugared black tea with tea fungus (kombucha). Free-radical scavenging abilities of kombucha tea prepared from green tea (GTK), black tea (BTK) and tea waste material (TWK) along with pH, phenolic compounds and reducing power were investigated during fermentation period. Phenolic compounds, scavenging activity on DPPH radical, superoxide radical (xanthine-xanthine oxidase system) and inhibitory activity against hydroxyl radical mediated linoleic acid oxidation (ammonium thiocyanate assay) were increased during fermentation period, whereas pH, reducing power, hydroxyl radical scavenging ability (ascorbic acid-iron EDTA) and anti-lipid peroxidation ability (thiobarbituric assay) were decreased. From the present study, it is obvious that there might be some chances of structural modification of components in tea due to enzymes liberated by bacteria and yeast during kombucha fermentation which results in better scavenging performance on nitrogen and superoxide radicals, and poor scavenging performance on hydroxyl radicals. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the reaction between biological catecholamines and chlorinated methylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimić, Dušan S.; Milenković, Dejan A.; Marković, Jasmina M. Dimitrić; Marković, Zoran S.

    2018-05-01

    The antiradical potency of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, L-DOPA), metabolites of dopamine (homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and catechol towards substituted methylperoxy radicals is investigated. The thermodynamic parameters, together with the kinetic approach, are used to determine the most probable mechanism of action. The natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules are utilised to explain the highest reactivity of trichloromethylperoxy radical. The preferred mechanism is dependent both on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters . The number of chlorine atoms on radical, the presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bond and number of hydroxy groups attached to the aromatic ring significantly influence the mechanism. The results suggest that sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) is the most probable for reaction with methylperoxy and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for reaction with trichloromethylperoxy radicals, with a gradual transition between SPLET and HAT for other two radicals. Due to the significant deprotonation of molecules containing the carboxyl group, the respective anions are also investigated. The HAT and SPLET mechanisms are highly competitive in reaction with MP radical, while the dominant mechanism towards chlorinated radicals is HAT. The reactions in methanol and benzene are also discussed.

  13. Screening of various botanical extracts for antioxidant activity using DPPH free radical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad Khurram; Saqib, Najam-Us; Rashid, Saeed-Ur; Shah, Pervaiz Akhtar; Akhtar, Naveed; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the exploration of herbal use by society, crude extracts of the seeds of some commonly used medicinal plants (Vitis vinifera, Tamarindus indica and Glycin max) were screened for their free radical scavenging properties using ascorbic acid as standard antioxidant. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. The overall antioxidant activity of grape seeds (Vitis vinifera) was the strongest, followed in descending order by soybean (Glycin max) and tamarind (Tamarindus indica). The seeds extract of Vitis vinifera, Glycin max and Tamarindus indica showed 85.61%, 83.45% and 79.26%, DPPH scavenging activity respectively.

  14. Radiolytic oxidation of tamoxifen using the free radicals .OH and (or) HO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguene, C.; Clavere, P.; Jore, D.; Gardes-Albert, M.

    2001-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the most widely used antiestrogen in the treatment of breast cancer. In this work, we have studied its antioxidant properties. We have investigated the ability of tamoxifen to scavenge, in vitro, . OH and (or) HO 2 . free radicals that are produced by water radiolysis. Aqueous solutions of tamoxifen of concentrations ranging between 10 -5 and 2.5 x 10 -5 M have been irradiated (γ 137 Cs) in aerated acidic medium (H 3 PO 4 10 -3 M or HCOOH 10 -1 M). The results show that tamoxifen reacts quantitatively with . OH free radicals but does not react with HO 2 . free radicals under our experimental conditions. (author)

  15. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanism of Furfural Initiated by Hydroxyl Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaocan; Wang, Liming

    2017-05-04

    Furfural is emitted into the atmosphere because of its potential applications as an intermediate to alkane fuels from biomass, industrial usages, and biomass burning. The kinetic and mechanistic information on the furfural chemistry is necessary to assess the fate of furfural in the atmosphere and its impact on the air quality. Here we studied the atmospheric oxidation mechanisms of furfural initiated by the OH radicals using quantum chemistry and kinetic calculations. The reaction of OH and furfural was initiated mainly by OH additions to C 2 and C 5 positions, forming R2 and R5 adducts, which could undergo rapid ring-breakage to form R2B and R5B, respectively. Our calculations showed that these intermediate radicals reacted rather slowly with O 2 under the atmospheric conditions because the additions of O 2 to these radicals are only slightly exothermic and highly reversible. Alternatively, these radicals would react directly with O 3 , NO 2 , HO 2 /RO 2 , etc. Namely, the atmospheric oxidation of furfural would unlikely result in ozone formation. Under typical atmospheric conditions, the main products in OH-initiated furfural oxidation include 2-oxo-3-pentene-1,5-dialdehyde, 5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone, 4-oxo-2- butenoic acid, and 2,5-furandione. These compounds will likely stay in the gas phase and are subject to further photo-oxidation.

  16. Electron transfer oxidation of DNA radicals by paranitroacetophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillans, D W; Adams, G E [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK)

    1975-12-01

    The reaction of a typical electron-affinic sensitizer, paranitroacetophenone (PNAP) with the model compounds thymine, thymidine, thymidylic acid, deoxyribose and single and double-stranded DNA has been investigated by pulse radiolysis. Radicals formed by one-electron reduction of the bases and of DNA reacted rapidly and efficiently with PNAP by electron transfer. A small yield of transfer (< 10 per cent) was also observed arising from oxidation of the radicals formed by the small proportion of OH which reacted at the sugar moieties in DNA. In contrast, electron transfer oxidation by PNAP of radicals formed by the addition of OH to the base moieties, e.g. thymine, was not an efficient process. Further, addition of the sensitizer to the thymine OH-adduct proceeded at a rate that was too low to measure the pulse radiolysis. We conclude that, since the major sites of OH reaction by DNA are the heterocyclic bases (> 80 per cent), oxidation of the resultant radicals is unlikely to be a major step in the mechanism of sensitization by this typical hypoxic-cell sensitizer.

  17. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar (∼1 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for β-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower (∼0.5 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for β-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number of conjugated double bonds, the longer chain systems having

  18. Youth De-Radicalization: A Canadian Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafal (Haval Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Youth radicalization leading to violence has become a growing fear among Canadians, as terrorist attacks are carried out in Western states. Although Canada has suffered relatively fewer acts of violence, this fear has intensified and a de-radicalization strategy is needed in the Canadian context. In a qualitative case study methodology, interviews were conducted with school counsellors, religious leaders, and academics to explore solutions to youth radicalization. Youth de-radicalization approaches from the United Kingdom were analyzed and found that community-based initiatives were missing from programming. Social identity theory is used to explain that youth join radicalized groups to feel a sense of belonging and have to be provided an alternative and moderate group identity to de-radicalize. This study found youth de-radicalization in Canada is best served through a community collaboration approach.

  19. Free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibition, two potential mechanisms involved in the anti-diabetic activity of oleanolic acid; La Captación de radicales libres y la inhibición de α-glucosidasa, dos posibles mecanismos involucrados en la actividad antidiabética del ácido oleanólico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, J.M.; Guinda, A.; Macias, L.; Santos-Lozano, J.M.; Lapetra, J.; Rada, M.

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the role of oleanolic acid (OA), isolated from the olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf, as a radical scavenger and inhibitor of the hydrolyzing enzymes of dietary carbohydrates. New evidence is provided showing that OA may capture 2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and peroxyl radicals, and also exert a strong and non-competitive inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 10.11 ± 0.30 µM). The kinetic and spectrometric analyses performed indicate that OA interacts with this enzyme inside a hydrophobic pocket, through an endothermic and non spontaneous process of a hydrophobic nature. These are two possible mechanisms by which OA may facilitate a better control of post-prandial hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress, so contributing to preserving insulin signalling. Obesity, insulin resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are considered the first pandemics of the 21st century. In this sense, OA might be used in future preventive and therapeutic strategies, as an ingredient in new drugs and functional foods. [Spanish] Este trabajo estudia el papel del ácido oleanólico (OA), aislado de la hoja de olivo, como secuestrador de radicales libres e inhibidor de enzimas implicados en la hidrolisis de los carbohidratos de la dieta, dos mecanismos por los que el triterpeno podría mitigar la hiperglicemia postprandial y el estrés oxidativo. Se aportan nuevas evidencias que muestran que el OA puede capturar radicales ácido 2,2’-azino-bis-(3-etilbenzotiazolín)-6-sulfónico y peroxilo, y que ejerce una potente inhibición nocompetitiva de α-glucosidasa (IC50 10.11±0.30 µM). El análisis cinético y espectrométrico llevado a cabo indica que OA interacciona con este enzima en el interior de un bolsillo hidrofóbico, mediante un proceso endotérmico no espontáneo, de naturaleza hidrofóbica. Estos son dos posibles mecanismos por los cuales el OA puede facilitar un mejor control de la hiperglucemia postprandial y el estrés oxidativo, lo

  20. FAR RIGHT RADICALIZATION AND SOCIALIST RADICALIZATION IN INTERWAR ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONUŢ BUTOI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In his comments on Mircea Vulcănescu. O microistorie a interbelicului românesc (Eikon, 2015, Emanuel Copilaş states that, regarding the cause of the far right radicalization manifested in the interwar Romania, I share the same historical explanation about fascism as Ernst Nolte. In this concise answer, I explain why this is an unsuitable comparison by summarizing the historiographical perspective I use in the cited volume. Nevertheless, Copilaş’s comments are reopening a debate about how to explain the Romanian fascism

  1. Loading of free radicals on the functional graphene combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screening method for the detection of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Chen, Fuwen; Yao, Ruixing; Wang, Zhenju

    2013-11-13

    A novel free radical reaction combined with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (FRR-LC-PDA-ESI/APCI-MS/MS) screening method was developed for the detection and identification of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants. Functionalized graphene was prepared by chemical method for loading free radicals (superoxide radical, peroxyl radical and PAHs free radical). Separation was performed with and without a preliminary exposure of the sample to specific free radicals on the functionalized graphene, which can facilitate reaction kinetics (charge transfers) between free radicals and potential antioxidants. The difference in chromatographic peak areas is used to identify potential antioxidants. The structure of the antioxidants in one sample (Swertia chirayita) is identified using MS/MS and comparison with standards. Thirteen compounds were found to possess potential antioxidant activity, and their free radical-scavenging capacities were investigated. The thirteen compounds were identified as 1,3,5-trihydroxyxanthone-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PD1), norswertianin (PD2), 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone (PD3), 3, 3', 4', 5, 8-penta hydroxyflavone-6-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid-6'-pentopyranose-7-O-glucopyranoside (PD4), 1,5,8-trihydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone (PD5), swertiamarin (PS1), 2-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1,3,7-trihydroxylxanthone (PS2), 1,3,7-trihydroxylxanthone-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PL1), 1,3,8-trihydroxyl xanthone-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PL2), 1,3,7-trihydroxy-8-methoxyxanthone (PL3), 1,2,3-trihydroxy-7,8-dimethoxyxanthone (PL4), 1,8-dihydroxy-2,6-dimethoxy xanthone (PL5) and 1,3,5,8-tetramethoxydecussatin (PL6). The reactivity and SC50 values of those compounds were investigated, respectively. PD4 showed the strongest capability for scavenging PAHs free radical; PL4 showed prominent scavenging capacities in the lipid peroxidation processes; it was found that all components in S. chirayita exhibited weak reactivity in the superoxide

  2. Antioxidant Effects of Herbal Tea Leaves from Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) on Multiple Free Radical and Reducing Power Assays, Especially on Different Superoxide Anion Radical Generation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Shintaro; Ueda, Yuto; Fukuhara, Kumiko; Kamamuta, Yuki; Matsuda, Yasushi; Murata, Tatsuro; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kabata, Kiyotaka; Ono, Masateru; Igoshi, Keiji; Yasuda, Shin

    2015-11-01

    Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius), a native Andean plant, has been cultivated as a crop and locally used as a traditional folk medicine for the people suffering from diabetes and digestive/renal disorders. However, the medicinal properties of this plant and its processed foods have not been completely established. This study investigates the potent antioxidative effects of herbal tea leaves from yacon in different free radical models and a ferric reducing model. A hot-water extract exhibited the highest yield of total polyphenol and scavenging effect on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical among four extracts prepared with hot water, methanol, ethanol, and ethylacetate. In addition, a higher reducing power of the hot-water extract was similarly demonstrated among these extracts. Varying concentrations of the hot-water extract resulted in different scavenging activities in four synthetic free radical models: DPPH radical (EC50 28.1 μg/mL), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) cation radical (EC50 23.7 μg/mL), galvinoxyl radical (EC50 3.06 μg/mL), and chlorpromazine cation radical (EC50 475 μg/mL). The yacon tea-leaf extract further demonstrated superoxide anion (O2(-)) radical scavenging effects in the phenazine methosulfate-NADH-nitroblue tetrazolium (EC50 64.5 μg/mL) and xanthine oxidase assay systems (EC50 20.7 μg/mL). Subsequently, incubating human neutrophilic cells in the presence of the tea-leaf extract could suppress the cellular O2(-) radical generation (IC50 65.7 μg/mL) in a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated cell model. These results support yacon tea leaves may be a good source of natural antioxidants for preventing O2(-) radical-mediated disorders. Yacon has been considered to be a potent alternative food source for patients who require a dietary cure in regional area, while the leaf part has been provided and consumed as an herbal tea in local markets. We demonstrated here potent antioxidative effects of the tea

  3. Radical probing of spliceosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Charnpal S; Kent, Oliver A; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and use of a directed hydroxyl radical probe, tethered to a pre-mRNA substrate, to map the structure of this substrate during the spliceosome assembly process. These studies indicate an early organization and proximation of conserved pre-mRNA sequences during spliceosome assembly. This methodology may be adapted to the synthesis of a wide variety of modified RNAs for use as probes of RNA structure and RNA-protein interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Remembering Dutch-Moluccan radicalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    This article examines memory politics in relation to radical actions of young Dutch-Moluccans, more specifically a train hijacking in 1977 at the village of De Punt in the Netherlands. The article examines how these historical events were remembered in the drama-documentary television film, De Punt...... of the web debate examines how viewers reacted to this interpretation. The web debate functioned as a participatory forum, where collective and national memories and postcolonial history were intensely discussed, and the debate made room for some degree of reconciliation between viewers of Dutch......-Moluccan and of Dutch majority background...

  6. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  7. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  8. Radical constructivism: Between realism and solipsism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Delgado, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    This paper criticizes radical constructivism of the Glasersfeld type, pointing out some contradictions between the declared radical principles and their theoretical and practical development. These contradictions manifest themselves in a frequent oscillation between solipsism and realism, despite constructivist claims to be an anti-realist theory. The paper also points out the contradiction between the relativism of the radical constructivist principles and the constructivist exclusion of other epistemological or educational paradigms. It also disputes the originality and importance of the radical constructivist paradigm, suggesting the idea of an isomorphism between radical constructivist theory and contemplative realism. In addition, some pedagogical and scientific methodological aspects of the radical constructivist model are examined. Although radical constructivism claims to be a rational theory and advocates deductive thinking, it is argued that there is no logical deductive connection between the radical principles of constructivism and the radical constructivist ideas about scientific research and learning. The paper suggests the possibility of an ideological substratum in the construction and hegemonic success of subjective constructivism and, finally, briefly advances an alternative realist model to epistemological and educational radical constructivism.

  9. ESR and spin-trapping study of room-temperature radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidine nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Kuwabara, M.; Yoshii, G.

    1983-01-01

    Free radicals produced in γ-irradiated polycrystalline 5'-dCMP (free acid and 2Na), 3'-CMP (free acid and Li), and 5'-UMP (2Na) were studied by ESR and spin-trapping. The results were compared with those of previous single-crystal studies. Furthermore, attempts to identify free radicals in γ-irradiated 5'-dUMP (2Na), 5'-CMP (free acid and 2Na), and 3'-UMP (Na), which have not been the subject of single-crystal studies to date, were made. After γ-irradiation at room temperature to a dose of 100 kGy, the polycrystalline samples were dissolved in aqueous solutions of t-nitrosobutane in the presence or absence of oxygen. The presence or absence of oxygen was helpful in analyzing the presence of more than one radical species. Thus two types of radicals could be established for all samples. Radical -C 5 H-C 6 H 2 -, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was observed in the presence of oxygen, and radical -C/sub 5'/H 2 , formed by the transformation of the radical due to loss of an H atom at the C/sub 5'/ position of the sugar moiety, was observed in the absence of oxygen. In some cases, radicals located at the C/sub 1'/, C/sub 4'/, and C/sub 5'/ of the sugar moiety were tentatively identified. For the ESR spectrum associated with radical at C/sub 1'/ the possibility of another explanation was also discussed in relation to the spectrum due to radical at C 5 of the base. Radical -C 5 H 2 -C 6 H-, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was not identified

  10. Intramolecular transformation of thiyl radicals to α-aminoalkyl radicals: 'ab initio' calculations on homocystein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhun, S.; Berges, J.; Bleton, V.; Abedinzadeh, Z.

    2000-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of thiols by oxidizing radicals leads to the formation of thiyl radical and carbon-centered radicals. It has been shown experimentally that in the absence of oxygen, the thiyl radicals derived from certain thiols of biological interest such as glutathion, cysteine and homocysteine decay rapidly by intramolecular rearrangement reactions into the carbon-centered radical. In the present work we have investigated theoretically the structure and the stability of thiyl and carbon-centered radicals of homocysteine in order to check the possibility of this rearrangement. (author)

  11. Measurement of antioxidant activity with trifluoperazine dihydrochloride radical cation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Asghar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel, rapid and cost-effective trifluoperazine dihydrochloride (TFPH decolorization assay is described for the screening of antioxidant activity. A chromogenic reaction between TFPH and potassium persulfate at low pH produces an orange-red radical cation with maximum absorption at 502 nm in its first-order derivative spectrum. TFPH was dissolved in distilled water to give a 100 mM solution. The TFPH radical cation solution was made by reacting 0.5 mL of the solution with K2S2O8 (final concentration: 0.1 mM and diluting to 100 mL with 4 M H2SO4 solution. A linear inhibition of color production was observed with linearly increasing amounts of antioxidants, with correlation coefficients (R² ranging from 0.999 to 0.983. The antioxidant capacity of standard solutions of an antioxidant was evaluated by comparing with the inhibition curve using Trolox as the standard. Comparison of antioxidant capacity determined with this newly developed TFPH assay and with the well-known 2,2'-azinobis-[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] (ABTS-persulfate decolorization assay indicated the efficacy and sensitivity of the procedure. The proposed assay is less expensive (costs about US$4 per 100 assays and requires only 20 min for preparation of radical cation solution in comparison with ABTS assay, in which almost 12-16 h are required for preparation of a stable ABTS radical cation solution. The present assay has the advantage over ABTS assay that it can be used to measure the antioxidant activity of the samples, which are naturally found at a pH as low as 1, because the radical cation itself has been stabilized at low pH.

  12. Sensitization of microorganisms and enzymes by radiation-induced selective inorganic radical anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.; Stegeman, H.

    1981-01-01

    Bacterial survival and enzymatic inactivation were examined following exposure to radiolytically-generated radical anions, X - 2 , where X=Cl, Br, I or CNS - . Depending on pH, radical anions react selectively or specifically with cysteine, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine. Consequently, when one or more of these amino acids is crucial for enzymatic activity or bacterial survival and is attacked by a radical anion, a high degree or radiosensitization may be realized. Halide radical anions can form free chlorine, bromine or iodine. However, these bactericidal halogens are destroyed by reaction with the hydrated electron, e - sub(aq), or at pHs>9, as occurs, for example, when a medium saturated with nitrous oxide, N 2 O, and e - sub(aq) scavenger, is replaced by nitrogen or oxygen. Increasing concentration of other e - sub(aq) scavengers, such as phosphate buffer, promotes formation of halogen from halides. The conditions producing formation and elimination of halogens in irradiated media must be appreciated to avoid confusing radiosensitization by X 2 to X - 2 . Radiosensitization by radical anions of several microorganisms: S. faecalis, S. typhimurium, E. coli, and M. radiodurens is described. A crucial amino acid for survival of S. faecalis appears to be tyrosine, while both tyrosine and tryptophan seem essential for recovery of S. typhimurium from effects of ionizing radiation. It is postulated that the radiosensitizing action of radical anions involves inhibition of DNA repair of strand-breaks by depriving the cells of energy. In view of the high OH scavenging power of foods, it is concluded that the radiosensitization of bacteria and enzymes in foods by radical anions, except for special cases, is not practical. Rather, radical anions serve to identify crucial amino acids to radiosensitization mechanisms in model systems, and possibly in radiotherapy. (author)

  13. In vitro free radical scavenging activity of Ixora coccinea L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moni Rani Saha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant activity of the methanol extract of Ixora coccinea L. was determined by DPPH free radical scavenging assay, reducing power and total antioxidant capacity using phosphomolybdenum method. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed that the extract of the flower of I. coccinea possesses flavonoids, steroids and tannin materials. The extract showed significant activities in all antioxidant assays compared to the standard antioxidant in a dose dependent manner and remarkable activities to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS may be attributed to the high amount of hydrophilic phenolics. In DPPH radical scavenging assay the IC50 value of the extract was found to be 100.53 μg/mL while ascorbic acid had the IC50 value 58.92 μg/mL. Moreover, I. coccinea extract showed strong reducing power and total antioxidant capacity.

  14. Preparing polymer brushes on polytetrafluoroethylene films by free radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Chen Yiwang; Deng Qilan; Chen Lie; Zhou Lang

    2006-01-01

    Films of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were exposed to sodium naphthalenide (Na/naphtha) etchant so as to defluorinate the surface for obtaining hydroxyl functionality. Surface-initiators were immobilized on the PTFE films by esterification of 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanopentanoic acid) (ACP) and the hydroxyl groups covalently linked to the surface. Grafting of polymer brushes on the PTFE films was carried out by the surface-initiated free radical polymerization. Homopolymers brushes of methyl methacrylate (MMA) were prepared by free radical polymerization from the azo-functionalized PTFE surface. The chemical composition and topography of the graft-functionalized PTFE surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Water contact angles on PTFE films were reduced by surface grafting of MMA

  15. Research progress on trifluoromethyl-based radical reaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Due to the unique properties imparted by the trifluoromethyl group, such as high electron density and strong lipotropy, which effectively improve acidity, lipophilicity and metabolic stability of the molecule itself, trifluoromethyl-substituted organic compounds are becoming increasingly important as structural motifs in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. In this review, we present several methods developed for the direct introduction of a trifluoromethyl group, beginning with its rich and storied history. Then the present article addresses mechanism and process in carbon-carbon bond forming reaction based on radical process which is divided into three parts according to the way of CF3 radical generation. Finally, challenges and opportunities of researches on trifluoromethylation reactions facing are prospected.

  16. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  17. Radicalization In Pakistan And The Spread Of Radical Islam In Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahir ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is pertinent to mention that radicalism is not intrinsic to Islam and radical interpretations of the religion or for that matter may occur within any way of life and religion Saikal 2003 and yet the question remains as to why Muslims in certain geographical regions have more radical approaches towards their religion and also that what are the causes of such radicalization. Becoming a radical Muslim is not even a matter of a day nor is it a sudden process. There are several reasons behind making a person radical peaceful angry smiling or tolerant. For knowing the reason behind radicalization or radicals persons one has to understand the causes. Tracing these causes is one of the ways to eliminate such behavior. The first step in the elimination of the radical sentiments in a person is to develop peace in his personality Fair Malhotra amp Shapiro 2010. The chapter which has been addressed here is going to shed light on the roots and symptoms of the radicalism. There will be a brief discussion on how the roots of radicalism can be traced and can be eliminated. The assessment and discussion will be conducted on the parameters of the economy media politics and theology from social cultural point of view. According to the analysis of Ahrari 2000 political factor is one of the major and direct factors which have resulted in causing of the radicalism. These factors however intertwine with one another. Radical actions cannot take place only because of the political factors.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime measurement of radical ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Jun-ichiro; Hagiri, Masahide; Nakayama, Toshihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Maki; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    One-photonic excitation of a charge transfer complex of hexamethoxybenzene (HMB) and nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NO + BF 4 - ) in acetonitrile afforded fluorescences emission from excited radical cation of HMB (HMB + *). Lifetime of the excited radical ion species was measured to be 7 ps by the pump-probe transient absorption technique. The lifetime was much shorter than that of free radical ion (63 ps), indicating the presence of an interaction between HMB + * and NO in the excited complex. (author)

  19. Reorientation dynamics of cyclohexadienyl radicals in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolmar, M.; Roduner, E.; Dilger, H.; Himmer, U.; Shelley, M.; Reid, I.D.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of the muonium substituted cyclohexadienyl radical adsorbed on silicalite and NaZSM-5 is investigated by means of avoided level crossing muon spin resonance. The influence of benzene loading on the mobility of the radical is studied. At low loadings the radicals were found to be located on a single adsorption site where they undergo a wobbling type of motion. With increasing loading an additional species adsorbed on a different site is observed

  20. The Rise of Radicals in Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 1950, the consensus was that biological transformations occurred in two-electron steps, thereby avoiding the generation of free radicals. Dramatic advances in spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology have led to the realization that protein-based radicals participate in a vast array of vital biological mechanisms. Redox processes involving high-potential intermediates formed in reactions with O_2 are particularly susceptible to radical formation. Clusters of tyrosine (Tyr) a...

  1. Isolation and characterisation of in vitro and cellular free radical scavenging peptides from corn peptide fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Ding, Long; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-02-16

    Corn gluten meal, a corn processing industry by-product, is a good source for the preparation of bioactive peptides due to its special amino acid composition. In the present study, the in vitro and cellular free radical scavenging activities of corn peptide fractions (CPFs) were investigated. Results indicated that CPF1 (molecular weight less than 1 kDa) and CPF2 (molecular weight between 1 and 3 kDa) exhibited good hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonicacid) diammonium salt (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Meanwhile, the in vitro radical scavenging activity of CPF1 was slightly higher than that of CPF2. Both CPF1 and CPF2 also exhibited significant cytoprotective effects and intracellular reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in Caco-2 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The amino acid composition analysis revealed that the CPF were rich in hydrophobic amino acids, which comprised of more than 45% of total amino acids. An antioxidant peptide sequence of Tyr-Phe-Cys-Leu-Thr (YFCLT) was identified from CPF1 using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS). The YFCLT exhibited excellent ABTS radical scavenging activity with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) value of 37.63 µM, which was much lower than that of Trolox. In conclusion, corn gluten meal might be a good source to prepare antioxidant peptides.

  2. The Games Radicals Play: Special Issue on Free Radicals and Radical Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Walton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry and Physics have aptly been described as “most excellent children of Intellect and Art” [1]. Both these “children” engage with many playthings, and molecules rank as one of their first favorites, especially radicals, which are amongst the most lively and exciting. Checking out radicals dancing to the music of entropy round their potential energy ballrooms is surely both entertaining and enlightening. Radicals’ old favorite convolutions are noteworthy, but the new styles, modes and arrangements appearing on the scene are even more interesting. Some of these are ephemeral and enjoy only a brief appearance, others are retro-types reappearing in new guises, still others are genuinely new and “go viral” in the scientific world. This Special Issue of Molecules contains the observations and reflections of a select group of chemists and physicists fascinated by this spectacle. It contains an eclectic mix reflecting on new modes and advances as well as on permutations and combinations that revive mature themes. [...

  3. With medium-chain triglycerides, higher and faster oxygen radical production by stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruimel, J W; Naber, A H; Curfs, J H; Wenker, M A; Jansen, J B

    2000-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions are suspected of suppressing the immune function. However, study results are contradictory and mainly concern the conventional long-chain triglyceride emulsions. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes were preincubated with parenteral lipid emulsions. The influence of the lipid emulsions on the production of oxygen radicals by these stimulated leukocytes was studied by measuring chemiluminescence. Three different parenteral lipid emulsions were tested: long-chain triglycerides, a physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides, and structured triglycerides. Structured triglycerides consist of triglycerides where the medium- and long-chain fatty acids are attached to the same glycerol molecule. Stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides showed higher levels of oxygen radicals (p triglycerides or structured triglycerides. Additional studies indicated that differences in results of various lipid emulsions were not caused by differences in emulsifier. The overall production of oxygen radicals was significantly lower after preincubation with the three lipid emulsions compared with controls without lipid emulsion. A physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides induced faster production of oxygen radicals, resulting in higher levels of oxygen radicals, compared with long-chain triglycerides or structured triglycerides. This can be detrimental in cases where oxygen radicals play either a pathogenic role or a beneficial one, such as when rapid phagocytosis and killing of bacteria is needed. The observed lower production of oxygen radicals by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the presence of parenteral lipid emulsions may result in immunosuppression by these lipids.

  4. Free radical scavenging window of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: correlation with embryo quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Zhou; Ren, Xinling; Ai, Jihui; Zhu, Lixia; Jin, Lei

    2017-06-01

    The activity of free radicals in follicular fluid was related to ovarian responsiveness, in vitro fertilization (IVF), and embryo transfer success rate. However, studies analyzing the relationship between the free radical scavenging capacity and embryo quality of infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) were lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the free radical scavenging window of women with PCOS and their embryo quality. The free radical scavenging capacity of follicular fluid from women with PCOS was determined by a,a-diphenyl-b-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay, superoxide radical, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. In the DPPH and ROS assays, the follicular fluid from grades I and II embryos was significantly higher than the follicular fluid from grades III and IVembryos. The lower control limit of DPPH radical scavenging capacity and upper control limit of ROS level were 13.2% and 109.0 cps, respectively. The calculated lower control limit and upper control limit were further confirmed in the follicular fluid of embryos of all grades. These cut-off values of free radical scavenging activity of follicular fluid could assist embryologists in choosing the development of embryos in PCOS patients undergoing IVF.

  5. Notes on free radicals in the field of human and environmental protection against ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittel, R.

    It is well known that ionizing radiations, in vitro and in vivo produce, free radicals which may be considered as mediators between physical agents and biological targets. Some aspects of this vast problem are accentuated. Ionizing radiations act either directly on the organic molecules of tissues or indirectly by creating, in the surroundings and in tissular water, inorganic free radicals which act on biochemical molecules to gives new radicals. Analysis of the free radical initiation phenomenon in vivo shows that many initiating agents exist, ionizing radiations representing only one group. The role of oxydants, especially oxydising polluants, and the part played by various enzyme systems (super-oxide dismutase, oxydases etc...) are emphasized. After propagation the chain reactions end in combinations between radicals are stopped by certain organic molecules (radical scavengers). Examples are given (free radical formation from compounds of great biological importance: puric and pyrimidic bases, nucleic acids in particular). These aspects are discussed from the viewpoint of their effects on human and environmental protection against both ionizing radiations and certain chemical pollution [fr

  6. Polarized proton spin density images the tyrosyl radical locations in bovine liver catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zimmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A tyrosyl radical, as part of the amino acid chain of bovine liver catalase, supports dynamic proton spin polarization (DNP. Finding the position of the tyrosyl radical within the macromolecule relies on the accumulation of proton polarization close to it, which is readily observed by polarized neutron scattering. The nuclear scattering amplitude due to the polarization of protons less than 10 Å distant from the tyrosyl radical is ten times larger than the amplitude of magnetic neutron scattering from an unpaired polarized electron of the same radical. The direction of DNP was inverted every 5 s, and the initial evolution of the intensity of polarized neutron scattering after each inversion was used to identify those tyrosines which have assumed a radical state. Three radical sites, all of them close to the molecular centre and the haem, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369, the radical state of which had previously been proven by electron paramagnetic resonance.

  7. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of narrow mental states; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without any reference external to her or him. I show that this fact imposes some severe restrictions to SIS to be incorporated into RC. In particular, I argue that only qualitative studies can comply with the requirement of narrowness. Nevertheless, I propose that quantitative works can be employed as sources of types in order to study token actual students. I use this type-token dichotomy to put forward an outline of a theory of the relation between school contents and mental contents. In this view, token mental contents regarding a given topic can be defined, and probed, only by resorting to typical school contents.

  8. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  9. Photoionisation of the tropyl radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin H. Fischer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the photoionisation of the cycloheptatrienyl (tropyl radical, C7H7, using tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Tropyl is generated by flash pyrolysis from bitropyl. Ions and electrons are detected in coincidence, permitting us to record mass-selected photoelectron spectra. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of tropyl, corresponding to the X+ 1A1’ ← X 2E2” transition, reveals an ionisation energy of 6.23 ± 0.02 eV, in good agreement with Rydberg extrapolations, but slightly lower than the value derived from earlier photoelectron spectra. Several vibrations can be resolved and are reassigned to the C–C stretch mode ν16+ and to a combination of ν16+ with the ring breathing mode ν2+. Above 10.55 eV dissociative photoionisation of tropyl is observed, leading to the formation of C5H5+ and C2H2.

  10. Radical Initiated Hydrosilylation on Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces: An Evaluation of Functional Group Tolerance and Mechanistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Gonzalez, Christina M; Purkait, Tapas K; Iqbal, Muhammad; Meldrum, Al; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2015-09-29

    Hydrosilylation is among the most common methods used for modifying silicon surface chemistry. It provides a wide range of surface functionalities and effective passivation of surface sites. Herein, we report a systematic study of radical initiated hydrosilylation of silicon nanocrystal (SiNC) surfaces using two common radical initiators (i.e., 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) and benzoyl peroxide). Compared to other widely applied hydrosilylation methods (e.g., thermal, photochemical, and catalytic), the radical initiator based approach is particle size independent, requires comparatively low reaction temperatures, and yields monolayer surface passivation after short reaction times. The effects of differing functional groups (i.e., alkene, alkyne, carboxylic acid, and ester) on the radical initiated hydrosilylation are also explored. The results indicate functionalization occurs and results in the formation of monolayer passivated surfaces.

  11. beta-Scission of C-3 (beta-carbon) alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, H A; Mortimer, A; Easton, C J

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O(2) brings about multiple changes in the target molecules. These alterations include oxidation of side chains, fragmentation, cross-linking, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes, and formation...... of methanal (formaldehyde). This product has been quantified with a number of oxidized peptides and proteins, and can account for up to 64% of the initial attacking radicals with some Ala peptides. When quantified together with the hydroperoxide precursors, these species account for up to 80% of the initial...... radicals, confirming that this is a major process. Methanal causes cell toxicity and DNA damage and is an animal carcinogen and a genotoxic agent in human cells. Thus, the formation and subsequent reaction of alkoxyl radicals formed at the C-3 position on aliphatic amino acid side chains on peptides...

  12. Radiation-initiated free-radical fragmentation of biologically active glycerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhrem, A.A.; Kisel', M.A.; Shadyro, O.I.; Yurkova, I.L.

    1993-01-01

    Oxidation reactions of the free-radical type play a decisive role in the initial processes of radiation damage. The most suitable substrates for such reactions are lipids. Lipids are a basic structural element of biomembranes and are involved in the barrier function and biocatalytic activity of such membranes. Free-radical degradation of membrane lipids can lead to serious damage and ultimately to destruction of the living cell. A well-studied type of free-radical conversion of lipids is oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues, so-called peroxide oxidation of lipids. In this paper, using as examples dimyristoylphosphatidyl glycerol (DMPG), monoglycerides, and glycerophosphate, the authors investigated the possibility of free-radical degradation in compounds of a lipid nature containing the α,β-bifunctional group

  13. Antioxidant properties of a radical-scavenging peptide purified from enzymatically prepared fish skin gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Eresha; Rajapakse, Niranjan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2005-02-09

    Hoki (Johnius belengerii) skin gelatin was hydrolyzed with three commercial enzymes to identify radical-scavenging potencies of derived peptides. Peptides derived from tryptic hydrolysate exhibited the highest scavenging activities on superoxide, carbon-centered 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals assessed by ESR spectroscopy. Following consecutive chromatographic separations of tryptic hydroolysate, the peptide sequence His-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-Leu (797 Da) acted as a strong radical scavenger under studied conditions. Further, this peptide could act as an antioxidant against linoleic acid peroxidation and the activity was closer to the highly active synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). In addition, antioxidative enzyme levels in cultured human hepatoma cells were increased in the presence of this peptide and it was presumed to be the peptide involved in maintaining the redox balance in the cell environment. Present data indicate that free-radical-scavenging activities of hoki skin gelatin peptides substantially contribute to their antioxidant properties measured in different oxidative systems.

  14. Radiation inactivation analysis of enzymes. Effect of free radical scavengers on apparent target sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, D.C.; Solomonson, L.P.; Barber, M.J.; McCreery, M.J.; Ness, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    In most cases the apparent target size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis corresponds to the subunit size or to the size of a multimeric complex. In this report, we examined whether the larger than expected target sizes of some enzymes could be due to secondary effects of free radicals. To test this proposal we carried out radiation inactivation analysis on Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, Torula yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Chlorella vulgaris nitrate reductase, and chicken liver sulfite oxidase in the presence and absence of free radical scavengers (benzoic acid and mannitol). In the presence of free radical scavengers, inactivation curves are shifted toward higher radiation doses. Plots of scavenger concentration versus enzyme activity showed that the protective effect of benzoic acid reached a maximum at 25 mM then declined. Mannitol alone had little effect, but appeared to broaden the maximum protective range of benzoic acid relative to concentration. The apparent target size of the polymerase activity of DNA polymerase I in the presence of free radical scavengers was about 40% of that observed in the absence of these agents. This is considerably less than the minimum polypeptide size and may reflect the actual size of the polymerase functional domain. Similar effects, but of lesser magnitude, were observed for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, and sulfite oxidase. These results suggest that secondary damage due to free radicals generated in the local environment as a result of ionizing radiation can influence the apparent target size obtained by this method

  15. Measuring Atmospheric Free Radicals Using Chemical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    CH 3Br, H2S, and SO2 [Logan et al., 1981]. Recently, the OH radical has been determined as the dominant loss mechanism for isoprene and monoterpenes ...W. Heaps, D. Philen, and T. McGee, Bondary Layer Measurements of the OH Radical in the Vicinity of an Isolated Power Plant Plume: SO2 and NO2

  16. Allylthioketone Mediated Free Radical Polymerization of Methacrylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available By combination of high trapping free radical efficiency of the thioketone and resonance of the allylic radical, a new type of mediating agent, 1,3,3-triphenylprop-2-ene-1-thione (TPPT has been successfully synthesized, and then is used to study controlled free radical polymerization of methacrylates. Very stable TPPT radicals at the end of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA are detected in the polymerization of MMA using TPPT and AIBN as the control agent and initiator. The MALDI-TOF MS spectra are used to identify terminal groups of the resultant poly(glycidyl methacrylate (PGMA, and major component of the obtained polymer has the structure, (CH32(CNC-PGMA-C7H9O3. Chain extension reaction tests ascertain formation of the dead polymers during the polymer storage and purification process of the polymers. Owing to very slow fragmentation reaction of the TPPT-terminated polymethacrylate radical and addition reaction of this radical with a primary radical, the growing chain radicals are difficult to be regenerated, leading to an unobvious change of the molecular weight with monomer conversion. The molecular weights of polymers can be controlled by the ratios of monomer/initiator and TPPT/initiator. However, the first order kinetics of the polymerization and the polymers with narrow polydispersity are obtained, and these phenomena are discussed. This study provides useful information on how to design a better controlling agent.

  17. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  18. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasserre, J.B.; Laurent, M.; Mourrain, B.; Rostalski, P.; Trébuchet, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming its complex (resp. real) variety is finite. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and semi-definite

  19. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  20. Quantification of hydroxyl radical produced during phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan M; Aust, Steven D

    2009-12-01

    To quantitate hydroxyl radicals produced during phacoemulsification with various irrigating solutions and conditions used in cataract surgery. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. All experiments were performed using an Infiniti Vision System phacoemulsifier with irrigation and aspiration. Hydroxyl radicals were quantitated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a spectrophotometric assay for malondialdehyde, which is formed by the oxidation of deoxyribose by the hydroxyl radical. Hydroxyl radical production increased during longitudinal-stroking phacoemulsification as power levels were increased in a nonlinear, nonexponential fashion. The detection of hydroxyl radical was reduced in irrigating solutions containing organic molecules (eg, citrate, acetate, glutathione, dextrose) and further reduced in Navstel, an irrigating solution containing a viscosity-modifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. Hydroxyl radicals produced in settings representative of those used in phacoemulsification cataract surgery were quantitated using the deoxyribose method. Hydroxyl radical production was dependent on the level of ultrasound power applied and the irrigating solution used. Oxidative stress on the eye during phacoemulsification may be minimized by using irrigating solutions that contain organic molecules, including the viscosity-modifying agent hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, that can compete for reaction with hydroxyl radicals.

  1. Self-Terminating, Oxidative Radical Cyclizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Wille

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered novel concept of self-terminating, oxidative radical cyclizations, through which alkynes can be converted into carbonyl compounds under very mild reaction conditions using O-centered inorganic and organic radicals as oxidants, is described

  2. An Appreciation of Free Radical Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 9. An Appreciation of Free Radical Chemistry - 6. Experiments Involving Free Radicals. G Nagendrappa. Classroom Volume 10 Issue 9 September 2005 pp 79-84 ...

  3. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  4. Detection of free radicals in gamma-irradiated soybean paste and model system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.-J.; Volkov, Vitaly I.; Byun, M.-W.; Lee, C.-H.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated ESR spectra of fermented soybean paste irradiated at 77 K and compared with those of soybean protein isolate and soybean oil. The influences of irradiation dose, moisture content and heating after irradiation on the free radical concentration and species were examined. Four different carbon type free radicals, FR1-FR4, were identified as the product of amino acid decomposition. In the case of FR1, the doublet line arises from the hydrogen atom on the β-carbon adjacent to the carbonyl free radical. It disappeared at 150 K. FR2 was most abundant and disappeared at 190 K in wet soybean paste (WSP) and at 210 K in dry soybean paste (DSP), respectively. The radical FR4 originated from decarboxylation and deamination of amino acids, which disappeared at 210 K in both WSP and DSP. FR3 was assumed to be formed by the damage of amino acid side chains. The radical · OH was originated from water molecules, and was not observed in dry system. Sulfur radical was stable even at room temperature observed in both wet and dry systems. Aldehyde radical must be originated from the chemical reactions of enzymatic hydrolysates of soybean

  5. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 μM concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with [U- 1 $C]oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of 14 C label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine

  6. Formation of Hydroxylamine from Ammonia and Hydroxyl Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Zins, Emilie-Laure

    2014-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, as well as in icy comets, ammonia may be a crucial species in the first step toward the formation of amino-acids and other prebiotic molecules such as hydroxylamine (NH2OH). It is worth to notice that the NH3/H2 ratio in the ISM is 3 10-5 compared the H2O/H2 one which is only 7 10-5. Using either electron-UV irradiations of water-ammonia ices or successive hydrogenation of solid nitric oxide, laboratory experiments have already shown the feasibility of reactions that may take place on the surface of ice grains in molecular clouds, and may lead to the formation of this precursor. Herein is proposed a new reaction pathway involving ammonia and hydroxyl radicals generated in a microwave discharge. Experimental studies, at 3 and 10 K, in solid phase as well as in neon matrix have shown that this reaction proceed via a hydrogen abstraction, leading to the formation of NH2 radical, that further recombine with hydroxyl radical to form hydroxylamine, under non-energetic conditions.

  7. Free radical reactions of monochloramine and hydroxylamine in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.D.; Cooper, William J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Bartels, David M.

    2002-01-01

    The use of Advanced Oxidation Technologies to destroy organic contaminants in drinking water may be impacted by the presence of disinfection chemicals such as monochloramine (NH 2 Cl). To allow a quantitative evaluation of the effect of NH 2 Cl on the destruction of organics in water rate constants for its reaction with the hydrated electron, the hydroxyl radical and the hydrogen atom were determined in this study. The corresponding values of (2.2±0.2)x10 10 , (2.8±0.2)x10 9 , and (1.2±0.1)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , respectively, were incorporated into a kinetic computer model whose predictions were in good agreement with experimental chloramine removal under large scale, steady-state electron-beam irradiation conditions. Rate constants were also determined for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom with the chloramine hydration product hydroxylamine to supplement established literature data. Hydroxyl radical rate constants for the basic (NH 2 OH) and acidic (NH 3 OH + ) forms were determined as (8.5±0.4)x10 9 and ≤5x10 7 M -1 s -1 , respectively, while for hydrogen atom reaction, corresponding rate constants of (4.5±0.1)x10 7 and (3.6±1.5)x10 5 M -1 s -1 were found

  8. Mechanism of free radical generation in platelets and primary hepatocytes: A novel electron spin resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiun-Lang; Yang, Po-Sheng; Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chou, Duen-Suey

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic liver injury and are thought to be involved in cardiac dysfunction in the cirrhotic heart. Therefore, direct evidence for the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of how D‑galactosamine (GalN), an established experimental hepatotoxic substance, induced free radicals formation in platelets and primary hepatocytes is presented in the present study. ESR results demonstrated that GalN induced hydroxyl radicals (OH•) in a resting human platelet suspension; however, radicals were not produced in a cell free Fenton reaction system. The GalN‑induced OH• formation was significantly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethasin, though it was not affected by the lipoxygenase (LOX) or cytochrome P450 inhibitors, AA861 and 1‑aminobenzotriazole (ABT), in platelets. In addition, the present study demonstrated that baicalein induced semiquinone free radicals in platelets, which were significantly reduced by the COX inhibitor without affecting the formed OH•. In the mouse primary hepatocytes, the formation of arachidonic acid (AA) induced carbon‑centered radicals that were concentration dependently enhanced by GalN. These radicals were inhibited by AA861, though not affected by indomethasin or ABT. In addition, GalN did not induce platelet aggregation prior to or following collagen pretreatment in human platelets. The results of the present study indicated that GalN and baicalein may induce OH• by COX and LOX in human platelets. GalN also potentiated AA induced carbon‑centered radicals in hepatocytes via cytochrome P450. The present study presented the role of free radicals in the pathophysiological association between platelets and hepatocytes.

  9. Hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of cyclic dipeptides: Reactions of free peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieden, O.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of this study investigations were carried out into the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms with cyclic dipeptides as well as the subsequent reactions of peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals in aqueous solution. The radiolysis products formed in the absence and presence of oxygen or transient metal complexes were characterized and determined on a quantitative basis. The linking of information from product analyses to the kinetic data for transient species obtained by time-resolving UV/VIS and conductivity measurements (pulse radiolysis) as well as computer-assisted simulations of individual events during the reaction permitted an evaluation of the mechanisms underlying the various processes and an identification of interim products with short life-times, which did or did not belong to the group of radicals. Through the characterization of key reactions of radicals and peroxyl radicals of this substance class a major advance has been made towards a better understanding of the role of radicals in the peptide compound and the mechanisms involved in indirect radiation effects on long-chain peptides and proteins. (orig.) [de

  10. Metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization and radical polyaddition for precision polymer synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, M; Satoh, K [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kamigaito, M, E-mail: kamigait@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2009-08-01

    The metal-catalyzed radical addition reaction can be evolved into two different polymerization mechanisms, i.e.; chain- and step-growth polymerizations, while both the polymerizations are based on the same metal-catalyzed radical formation reaction. The former is a widely employed metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization or atom transfer radical polymerization of common vinyl monomers, and the latter is a novel metal-catalyzed radical polyaddition of designed monomer with an unconjugated C=C double bond and a reactive C-Cl bond in one molecule. The simultaneous ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization of methyl acrylate and radical polyaddition of 3-butenyl 2-chloropropionate was achieved with Ru(Cp*)Cl(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} to afford the controlled polymers, in which the homopolymer segments with the controlled chain length were connected by the ester linkage.

  11. Oxidative capacity of the Mexico City atmosphere – Part 1: A radical source perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Volkamer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of OH, HO2 and RO2 radical sources is presented for the near field photochemical regime inside the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. During spring of 2003 (MCMA-2003 field campaign an extensive set of measurements was collected to quantify time-resolved ROx (sum of OH, HO2, RO2 radical production rates from day- and nighttime radical sources. The Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.1 was constrained by measurements of (1 concentration time-profiles of photosensitive radical precursors, i.e., nitrous acid (HONO, formaldehyde (HCHO, ozone (O3, glyoxal (CHOCHO, and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs; (2 respective photolysis-frequencies (J-values; (3 concentration time-profiles of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic VOCs (103 compound are treated and oxidants, i.e., OH- and NO3 radicals, O3; and (4 NO, NO2, meteorological and other parameters. The ROx production rate was calculated directly from these observations; the MCM was used to estimate further ROx production from unconstrained sources, and express overall ROx production as OH-equivalents (i.e., taking into account the propagation efficiencies of RO2 and HO2 radicals into OH radicals.

    Daytime radical production is found to be about 10–25 times higher than at night; it does not track the abundance of sunlight. 12-h average daytime contributions of individual sources are: Oxygenated VOC other than HCHO about 33%; HCHO and O3 photolysis each about 20%; O3/alkene reactions and HONO photolysis each about 12%, other sources <3%. Nitryl chloride photolysis could potentially contribute ~15% additional radicals, while NO2* + water makes – if any – a very small contribution (~2%. The peak radical production of ~7.5 107 molec cm−3 s−1 is

  12. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Capogrosso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients’ overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.

  13. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function. PMID:28459142

  14. ORGASMIC FUNCTION AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study orgasmic function (OF in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RPE.Subjects and methods. Seventy-nine patients who had undergone RPE for locally advanced prostate cancer without hormone and radiation therapies were examined. The patients’ mean age was 59.3 years. The mean EF-IIEF domain score was 24.4. OF was estimated by IIEF question 10 and the authors’ questionnaire. The Spearman rank correction coefficient and Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon tests were used.Results. After RPE, there was a reduction in the mean IIEF question 10 score from 3.9 (confidence interval 3.7–4.1 to 3.3 (3–3.5 (p = 0.000. The following changes were found in orgasm intensity: no changes in 43 %, mild worsening in 42 %, severe worsening in 8 %, and enhancement in 4 %; orgasm could not be achieved in 4 % of the patients. Pain usually of low intensity was reported by 8.8 %. The poor factors for preserving OF were its low baseline level, elderly age, or severe post-RPE erectile dysfunction.Conclusion. There were significant OF changes after RPE, which should be kept in mind while treating this category of patients.

  15. Modification by cystamine of radiation-induced free radical damages to biomolecules in tissues of mouse organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svistunenko, D.A.; Gudtsova, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    The method of low-temperature ESR-spectroscopy was used to study a modifying effect of cystamine on the yield of radiation-induced free radicals in different biomolecules of liver and spleen tissues of mice. Intraperitoneal administration of cystamine (150 mg/kg) 15 min before isolation and freezing of the tissues was shown to reduce by 11 per cent the yield of radicals of H-adducts of thymine DNA bases, to decrease by 23 per cent the yield of radicals of triacyglycerol and phospholipid radiolysis, and to increase by 24 per cent the yield of radicals of lipid fatty acid residues in splenic tissues. According to the criterion used, cystamine has no modyfying action on the yield of free-radical damages to liver biomolecules

  16. A quick responding quartz crystal microbalance sensor array based on molecular imprinted polyacrylic acids coating for selective identification of aldehydes in body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sunil K; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2015-03-01

    In present work, a novel quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array has been developed for prompt identification of primary aldehydes in human body odor. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are prepared using the polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer matrix and three organic acids (propenoic acid, hexanoic acid and octanoic acid) as template molecules, and utilized as QCM surface coating layer. The performance of MIP films is characterized by 4-element QCM sensor array (three coated with MIP layers and one with pure PAA for reference) dynamic and static responses to target aldehydes: hexanal, heptanal, and nonanal in single, binary, and tertiary mixtures at distinct concentrations. The target aldehydes were selected subsequent to characterization of body odor samples with solid phase-micro extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometer (SPME-GC-MS). The hexanoic acid and octanoic acid imprinted PAA exhibit fast response, and better sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility than the propenoic acid, and non-imprinted PAA in array. The response time and recovery time for hexanoic acid imprinted PAA are obtained as 5 s and 12 s respectively to typical concentrations of binary and tertiary mixtures of aldehydes using the static response. Dynamic sensor array response matrix has been processed with principal component analysis (PCA) for visual, and support vector machine (SVM) classifier for quantitative identification of target odors. Aldehyde odors were identified successfully in principal component (PC) space. SVM classifier results maximum recognition rate 79% for three classes of binary odors and 83% including single, binary, and tertiary odor classes in 3-fold cross validation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 3-Hydroxylysine, a potential marker for studying radical-induced protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, B; Bubb, W A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    albumin (BSA) and human low-density lipoprotein (LDL)] and diseased human tissues (atherosclerotic plaques and lens cataractous proteins). This work was aimed at investigating oxidized lysine as a sensitive marker for protein oxidation, as such residues are present on protein surfaces, and are therefore...... likely to be particularly susceptible to oxidation by radicals in bulk solution. HO* attack on lysine in the presence of oxygen, followed by NaBH4 reduction, is shown to give rise to (2S)-3-hydroxylysine [(2S)-2,6-diamino-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid], (2S)-4-hydroxylysine [(2S)-2,6-diamino-4-hydroxyhexanoic...... acid], (2S, 5R)-5-hydroxylysine [(2S,5R)-2,6-diamino-5-hydroxyhexanoic acid], and (2S,5S)-5-hydroxylysine [(2S,5S)-2,6-diamino-5-hydroxyhexanoic acid]. 5-Hydroxylysines are natural products formed by lysyl oxidase and are therefore not good markers of radical-mediated oxidation. The other...

  18. Formation of hydroxyl radicals in the human lens is related to the severity of nuclear cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have identified specific hydroxylated amino acid oxidation products which strongly suggest the presence of hydroxyl radical (HO.)-damaged proteins in human cataractous lenses. In the present study, the ability of early stage (type II) and advanced (type IV) nuclear cataractous lens...

  19. Free radical scavenging potency of quercetin catecholic colonic metabolites: Thermodynamics of 2H+/2e- processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amić, Ana; Lučić, Bono; Stepanić, Višnja; Marković, Zoran; Marković, Svetlana; Dimitrić Marković, Jasmina M; Amić, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    Reaction energetics of the double (2H + /2e - ), i.e., the first 1H + /1e - (catechol→ phenoxyl radical) and the second 1H + /1e - (phenoxyl radical→ quinone) free radical scavenging mechanisms of quercetin and its six colonic catecholic metabolites (caffeic acid, hydrocaffeic acid, homoprotocatechuic acid, protocatechuic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol) were computationally studied using density functional theory, with the aim to estimate the antiradical potency of these molecules. We found that second hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and second sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) mechanisms are less energy demanding than the first ones indicating 2H + /2e - processes as inherent to catechol moiety. The Gibbs free energy change for reactions of inactivation of selected free radicals indicate that catecholic colonic metabolites constitute an efficient group of more potent scavengers than quercetin itself, able to deactivate various free radicals, under different biological conditions. They could be responsible for the health benefits associated with regular intake of flavonoid-rich diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of free-radical centers in lignin with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzina, S.I.; Demidov, S.V.; Brezgunov, A.Yu.; Poluehktov, O.G.; Grinberg, O.Ya.; Dubinskij, A.A.; Mikhajlov, A.I.; Lebedev, Ya.S.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of paramagnetic centers in pristine lignin and lignin, treated with molecular chlorine, aqueous solutions of acids and alkalis, and γ- and UV-irradiated, was studied with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy. Most of the observed singlet ESR lines are accounted for by radicals with conjugated bonds. High reactivity of double bonds of polyconjugated systems was in the processes studied

  1. Study of EPR spectra of radicals from ionizing radiation interaction with alanine and 4-hydroxyproline samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, Corina Anca; Georgescu, Rodica; Grigorescu, Eric Leon

    2006-01-01

    A number of stable chemical radicals result following irradiation with ionizing rays of α-β-alanine and 4-hydroxyproline. They could be put into evidence using post-irradiation EPR technique. Analysis and inter-comparison of spectra signals become important for a correct assignment of structure and, subsequently of generating mechanisms in amino acids irradiated samples. (author)

  2. Influence of anoxia on the induction of mutations by phenylalanine radicals during gamma-irradiation of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Gitta K; Slotman, Ben J; Reitsma-Wijker, Carola A; van Andel, Rob J; Poldervaart, Hester A; Lafleur, M Vincent M

    2004-12-21

    When DNA is irradiated in aqueous solution, most of the damage is inflicted by water-derived radicals. This is called the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. However in whole cells not only the primary formed water radicals play a role, because some cellular compounds form secondary radicals which can also damage DNA. It is known that the amino acid phenylalanine is able to react with water radicals, resulting in the production of secondary phenylalanine radicals which can damage and inactivate DNA. In a previous study the influence of the presence of phenylalanine during gamma-irradiation of DNA in aqueous solution under oxic conditions was studied. Under anoxic irradiation conditions different amounts and types of reactive water-derived radicals are formed compared to oxic conditions and also different phenylalanine radicals are formed. Therefore, this study examines the influence of the presence of phenylalanine under anoxic conditions on the gamma-radiation-induced mutation spectrum. The results indicate that phenylalanine radicals are damaging to DNA, but less effective compared to primary water radicals. On the mutational level, in the presence of phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions, the amount of mutations on G:C base pairs was significantly decreased as compared to oxic conditions. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that nucleotide excision repair is involved in repair of both inactivating and mutagenic damage induced by phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions.

  3. Production of sulfate radical from peroxymonosulfate induced by a magnetically separable CuFe2O4 spinel in water: Efficiency, stability, and mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Haibo; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    of the PMS/CuFe2O4 was highest at neutral pH and decreased at acidic and alkaline pHs. Sulfate radical was the primary radical species responsible for the iopromide degradation. On the basis of the stoichiometry of oxalate degradation in the PMS/CuFe 2O4

  4. Change in chemical constituents and free radical-scavenging activity during Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) cultivar fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Eun Hee; Yun, Hae Rim; Jeong, Hang Yeon; Lee, Yu Geon; Kim, Wol-Soo; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2015-01-01

    Changes in chemical constituent contents and DPPH radical-scavenging activity in fruits of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) cultivars during the development were investigated. The fruits of seven cultivars (cv. Niitaka, Chuhwangbae, Wonhwang, Hwangkeumbae, Hwasan, Manpungbae, and Imamuraaki) were collected at 15-day intervals after day 20 of florescence. Vitamins (ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol), arbutin, chlorogenic acid, malaxinic acid, total caffeic acid, total flavonoids, and total phenolics were the highest in immature pear fruit on day 20 after florescence among samples at different growth stages. All of these compounds decreased gradually in the fruit during the development. Immature pear fruit on day 35 or 50 after florescence exhibited higher free radical-scavenging activity than that at other times, although activities were slightly different among cultivars. The chemical constituent contents and free radical-scavenging activity were largely different among immature fruits of the pear cultivars, but small differences were observed when they matured.

  5. User involvement competence for radical innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettl, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    -assisted navigation systems. The case study analysis reveals that firms who closely interact with specific users benefit significantly for their radical innovation work. These users have a high motivation toward new solutions, are open to new technologies, possess diverse competencies, and are embedded into a very......One important market related capability for firms which seek to develop radical innovations is the competence to involve the 'right' users at the 'right' time in the 'right' form. While former studies have identified a rather passive role of users in the radical innovation process, this paper...

  6. User involvement competence for radical innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettl, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    One important market related capability for firms which seek to develop radical innovations is the competence to involve the 'right' users at the 'right' time in the 'right' form. While former studies have identified a rather passive role of users in the radical innovation process, this paper......-assisted navigation systems. The case study analysis reveals that firms who closely interact with specific users benefit significantly for their radical innovation work. These users have a high motivation toward new solutions, are open to new technologies, possess diverse competencies, and are embedded into a very...

  7. Engineering a horseradish peroxidase C stable to radical attacks by mutating multiple radical coupling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Peroxidases have great potential as industrial biocatalysts. In particular, the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by peroxidases has been extensively examined because of the advantage of this method over other conventional chemical methods. However, the industrial application of peroxidases is often limited because of their rapid inactivation by phenoxyl radicals during oxidative polymerization. In this work, we report a novel protein engineering approach to improve the radical stability of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRPC). Phenylalanine residues that are vulnerable to modification by the phenoxyl radicals were identified using mass spectrometry analysis. UV-Vis and CD spectra showed that radical coupling did not change the secondary structure or the active site of HRPC. Four phenylalanine (Phe) residues (F68, F142, F143, and F179) were each mutated to alanine residues to generate single mutants to examine the role of these sites in radical coupling. Despite marginal improvement of radical stability, each single mutant still exhibited rapid radical inactivation. To further reduce inactivation by radical coupling, the four substitution mutations were combined in F68A/F142A/F143A/F179A. This mutant demonstrated dramatic enhancement of radical stability by retaining 41% of its initial activity compared to the wild-type, which was completely inactivated. Structure and sequence alignment revealed that radical-vulnerable Phe residues of HPRC are conserved in homologous peroxidases, which showed the same rapid inactivation tendency as HRPC. Based on our site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we have shown that engineering radical-vulnerable residues to eliminate multiple radical coupling can be a good strategy to improve the stability of peroxidases against radical attack. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Probing cardiac metabolism by hyperpolarized 13C MR using an exclusively endogenous substrate mixture and photo-induced nonpersistent radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Capozzi, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    dissolved, and the radical-free hyperpolarized solution was rapidly transferred into an injection pump located inside a 9.4T scanner. The hyperpolarized solution was injected in healthy rats to measure cardiac metabolism in vivo. Ultraviolet irradiation created nonpersistent radicals in a mixture containing......To probe the cardiac metabolism of carbohydrates and short chain fatty acids simultaneously in vivo following the injection of a hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled substrate mixture prepared using photo-induced nonpersistent radicals. Droplets of mixed [1-13 C]pyruvic and [1-13 C]butyric acids were frozen...... into glassy beads in liquid nitrogen. Ethanol addition was investigated as a means to increase the polarization level. The beads were irradiated with ultraviolet light and the radical concentration was measured by ESR spectroscopy. Following dynamic nuclear polarization in a 7T polarizer, the beads were...

  9. Role of oxygen free radicals in the induction of sister chromatid exchanges by cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.K.; Brown, B.G.; Rice, W.Y. Jr.; Doolittle, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been reported to contain free radicals and free radical generators in both the gas and particulate phases. Studies in our laboratory have shown that both cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and smoke bubbled through phosphate buffered saline solution (smoke-PBS) increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary cells in a dose-dependent manner. Since oxygen free radicals have been shown to cause SCEs and other chromosomal damage, we investigated the role of these radicals in the induction of SCEs by CSC and smoke-PBS. Addition of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase or the oxygen-radical scavenger ascorbic acid failed to reduce the SCE frequency in the presence of either CSC or smoke-PBS. Additional studies indicated that the quantity of hydrogen peroxide produced in CSC or smoke-PBS is too small to account for the observed SCE induction. It appears, therefore, that SCE induction by CSC or smoke-PBS does not involve the participation of oxygen free radicals

  10. Radical pancreaticoduodenectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2008-01-01

    Whipple\\'s procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple\\'s procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple\\'s procedure during a 15-year period (1987-2002) were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%). One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30-75). The major presenting features included jaundice (five), pain (two), gastric outlet obstruction (one), and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one). Investigations included ultrasound (eight), computerised tomography (eight), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology), and endoscopic ultrasound (two). The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two), chronic pancreatitis (two), choledochal cyst (one), inflammatory pseudotumour (one), cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one), duodenal angiodysplasia (one), and granular cell neoplasm (one). There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one), anastomotic leak (one), liver abscess (one), and myocardial infarction (one). All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple\\'s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) may reduce the need for Whipple\\'s operation

  11. Radical Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Benign Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kavanagh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple's procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple's procedure during a 15-year period (1987–2002 were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%. One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30–75. The major presenting features included jaundice (five, pain (two, gastric outlet obstruction (one, and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one. Investigations included ultrasound (eight, computerised tomography (eight, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology, and endoscopic ultrasound (two. The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two, chronic pancreatitis (two, choledochal cyst (one, inflammatory pseudotumour (one, cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one, duodenal angiodysplasia (one, and granular cell neoplasm (one. There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one, anastomotic leak (one, liver abscess (one, and myocardial infarction (one. All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple'’s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound–guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA may reduce the need for Whipple's operation in

  12. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of H, OH, e aq - and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of e aq - with these compounds were of the order of 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) while O - radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N 3 radicals and SO 4 - radicals could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO 4 - radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may be o1 for N 3 ? radical), it is more than 1.33V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species

  13. Scavenging performance and antioxidant activity of γ-alumina nanoparticles towards DPPH free radical: Spectroscopic and DFT-D studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mehdi; Moradi Delfani, Ali; Jabbari, Morteza

    2018-05-03

    The radical scavenging performance and antioxidant activity of γ-alumina nanoparticles towards 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical were investigated by spectroscopic and computational methods. The radical scavenging ability of γ-alumina nanoparticles in the media with different polarity (i.e. i-propanol and n-hexane) was evaluated by measuring the DPPH absorbance in UV-Vis absorption spectra. The structure and morphology of γ-alumina nanoparticles before and after adsorption of DPPH were studied using XRD, FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. The adsorption of DPPH free radical on the clean and hydrated γ-alumina (1 1 0) surface was examined by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) and natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations. Also, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was used to predict the absorption spectra. The adsorption was occurred through the interaction of radical nitrogen N and NO 2 groups of DPPH with the acidic and basic sites of γ-alumina surface. The high potential for the adsorption of DPPH radical on γ-alumina nanoparticles was investigated. Interaction of DPPH with Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites of γ-alumina was more favored than Brønsted basic sites. The following order for the adsorption of DPPH over the different active sites of γ-alumina was predicted: Brønsted base free radicals. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Photodynamically generated bovine serum albumin radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvester, J A; Timmins, G S; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Porphyrin-sensitized photoxidation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) results in oxidation of the protein at (at least) two different, specific sites: the Cys-34 residue giving rise to a thiyl radical (RS.); and one or both of the tryptophan residues (Trp-134 and Trp-214) resulting in the formation...... of tertiary carbon-centred radicals and disruption of the tryptophan ring system. In the case of porphyrins such as hematoporphyrin, which bind at specific sites on BSA, these species appear to arise via long-range transfer of damage within the protein structure, as the binding site is some distance from...... the ultimate site of radical formation. This transfer of damage is shown to depend on a number of factors including the conformation of the protein, the presence of blocking groups and pH. Alteration of the protein conformation results in radical formation at additional (or alternative) sites, as does blocking...

  15. Radical production in the radiolysis of benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVerne, J.A.; Araos, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Benzene is the prototypical aromatic compound and yet the radiation chemistry of the radicals formed in its radiolysis is not well understood. Temporal information on the yield of phenyl radical, the major radical produced in the radiolysis, is important for understanding the radiation chemistry of many other types of aromatic compounds including some polymers. The effects of track structure on the production of phenyl radicals have been examined using iodine-scavenging techniques. The variation of the yields of iodobenzene and the other major molecular products such as biphenyl as a function of iodine concentration gives a good indication of the competition kinetics occurring in particle tracks. Experimental results of the scavenger experiments will be shown and their implications in the radiolysis of condensed hydrocarbons will be discussed

  16. Radical Sustainable Innovation of office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Berker, Thomas; Koch-Ørvad, Nina

    2017-01-01

    by high degrees of newness in the entire life cycle. RSI should offer significant enhancements of known benefits, entirely new benefits, or substantial cost reductions, leading to the transformation of existing markets, the creation of sustainable growth, and global sustainability. Thus, if buildings were....../could be radically new. How to evaluate radicality is a major challenge. It is tentatively proposed, to use standards for sustainable office buildings. Standards are developed to accelerate the sustainable development but has to some extent come to constrain possibilities of radical innovation. As the criteria...... of newness is incorporated in standards, going beyond them, could be viewed as radical. Empirically a selection of international cases of office buildings with very high scores of BREEAM, LEED and DGNB are examined. Six selected cases were analysed more in detail, one of them, Geelens...

  17. Interactions between simple radicals and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Suardiaz, Reynier; Montero, Luis A.; Sander, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of the simple radicals CH 3 , NH 2 , OH, and F with water have been studied by DFT (UB3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p)) and ab initio (RHF-UCCSD(T)/6-311++G(2d,2p)) methods. In this order the number of lone pairs (from zero to three), the electronegativity, and the strength of the X-H bonds increase (X = C, N, and O). The various minima of the radical-water complexes were located using the multiple minima hypersurface (MMH) approach which had previously been proven to be useful for closed-shell molecules. The role of the unpaired electron in hydrogen bonding was investigated using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. A considerable contribution of the unpaired electron to the complex stabilization was only found for the methyl radical and the fluorine atom, whereas in the aminyl and the hydroxyl radical the role of the unpaired electron is negligible

  18. Psychopathology according to behaviorism: a radical restatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alvarez, Marino

    2004-11-01

    This article is a radical restatement of the predominant psychopathology, which is characterized by nosological systems and by its approach towards a neurobiological conception of the so-called mental disorders. The "radical" sense of this restatement is that of radical behaviorism itself. As readers will recall, "radical" applied to behaviorism means total (not ignoring anything that interests psychology), pragmatic (referring to the practical sense of knowledge), and it also derives from the Latin word for "root" (and thus implies change beginning at a system's roots or getting to the root of things, in this case, of psychological disorders). Based on this, I introduce the Aristotelian distinction of material and form, which, besides being behaviorist avant la lettre, is used here as a critical instrument to unmask the hoax of psychopathology as it is presented. The implications of this restatement are discussed, some of them already prepared for clinical practice.

  19. Radical-Local Teaching and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mariane; Chaiklin, Seth

    radical-local teaching and learning approach. The first half of the book introduces the idea of radical-local teaching and learning and develops the theoretical background for this perspective, drawing on the cultural-historical research tradition, particularly from Vygotsky, El'konin, Davydov......, and Aidarova. The second half of the book addresses the central concern of radical-local teaching and learning - how to relate educational practices to children's specific historical and cultural conditions. The experiment was conducted for an academic year in an afterschool programme in the East Harlem......Radical-Local Teaching and Learning presents a theoretical perspective for analyzing and planning educational programmes for schoolchildren. To realize both general societal interests and worthwhile personal development, the content of educational programmes for children must be grounded...

  20. Prison Radicalization: The New Extremist Training Grounds?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coffin, Jr., McKinley D

    2007-01-01

    As a nation with the largest prison population in the world, the United States has all the ingredients for criminals, extremists, and religious radicals to collaborate in producing a new breed of homegrown terrorist...

  1. Neo-liberal Governing of 'Radicals'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekilde, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    The Danish government’s counter-radicalization Action Plan of 2009 had intended and unintended effects. Primarily targeting Danish Muslims, it employs neoliberal governmentality approaches of governance through individual support and response, information and knowledge, empowerment, surveillance...

  2. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  3. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  4. Analysis of radicals of irradiated garlic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2010-01-01

    The detection method of gamma ray irradiated garlic using Electron Spin Resonance(ESR)spectroscopy was studied. The ESR spectrum was consisted of one singlet signal at g=2.00. This signal is due to an organic free radical. Upon irradiation, the intensity of the signal was increased. Also two signals due to cellulose radical were detected nearby the singlet. The intensity of the singlet signal was increased as depend on the increase of the irradiation dose level. (author)

  5. Western radicalization: rethinking the psychology of terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Vern

    2017-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The U.S. strategy to counter violent extremism relies heavily on the expert consensus that terrorists are engaging in political group speak and are by nature psychologically normal. Thus, anyone is susceptible to radicalization. To counter radicalization, finding answers is like finding a needle in a haystack. However, in the psychologically similar phenomenon of arson by firefighter—when a firefighter deliberately sets and then exting...

  6. Demonstration using EPR spin-trapping of an oxygen-dependent, carbon-centered free radical generated by soybean lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.F.; Smith, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified prostaglandin synthase produces a carbon-centered, oxygen-dependent free radical which they have shown forms a spin-trapped adduct with 4-POBN and has characteristic hyperfine spin coupling constants (hfsc). As production of this radical is cyclooxygenase-dependent, additional studies on radical production were done using soybean lipoxygenase. The latter generates a lipid substrate-derived free radical trapped by the EPR spin trap 4-POBN [α-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)N-tert-butyl nitrone]. With linoleate as substrate, the hfsc are a/sub N/ = 15.5 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.7 G. This signal is inhibited by ETYA, various antioxidants and heat inactivation of the enzyme. Additional hfsc are not seen when the enzyme is incubated in an 17 O 2 atmosphere, but the signal is inhibited by anaerobeosis. Substitution of 13 C 18 carbon free fatty acids from Chlorella pyrenoisdosa for linoleate produces 2 new lines for each of the original 6 observed with 12 C substrate; the new spectrum has hfsc of a/sub N/ = 16.0 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.4 G, a/sub β/ 13 C = 4.2 G. This demonstrates that the radical is carbon centered and oxygen-dependent and appears not to be the same radical formed by enzymic hydrogen abstraction from the lipid substrate. This radical and the prostaglandin synthase-dependent radical appear to be nearly identical

  7. Pulse radiolysis of pyridinecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sehested, K.

    1991-01-01

    The reactivity of OH, e(aq)- and H radicals towards aqueous carboxypyridines: picolinic acid (2-pyridinecarboxylic acid), PA; isonicotinic acid (4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), i-NA; 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-PDCA; and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 3,5-PDCA was investigated in the pH-range 1...... radical are: 20% for PA, 75% for i-NA, 60% for 2,6-PDCA and 25% for 3,5-PDCA (a yield of 50% has been found earlier for nicotinic acid, NA)....

  8. Atmospherically Relevant Radicals Derived from the Oxidation of Dimethyl Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardyukov, Artur; Schreiner, Peter R

    2018-02-20

    The large number and amounts of volatile organosulfur compounds emitted to the atmosphere and the enormous variety of their reactions in various oxidation states make experimental measurements of even a small fraction of them a daunting task. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a product of biological processes involving marine phytoplankton, and it is estimated to account for approximately 60% of the total natural sulfur gases released to the atmosphere. Ocean-emitted DMS has been suggested to play a role in atmospheric aerosol formation and thereby cloud formation. The reaction of ·OH with DMS is known to proceed by two independent channels: abstraction and addition. The oxidation of DMS is believed to be initiated by the reaction with ·OH and NO 3 · radicals, which eventually leads to the formation of sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and methanesulfonic acid (CH 3 SO 3 H). The reaction of DMS with NO 3 · appears to proceed exclusively by hydrogen abstraction. The oxidation of DMS consists of a complex sequence of reactions. Depending on the time of the day or altitude, it may take a variety of pathways. In general, however, the oxidation proceeds via chains of radical reactions. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been reported to be a major product of the addition channel. Dimethyl sulfone (DMSO 2 ), SO 2 , CH 3 SO 3 H, and methanesulfinic acid (CH 3 S(O)OH) have been observed as products of further oxidation of DMSO. Understanding the details of DMS oxidation requires in-depth knowledge of the elementary steps of this seemingly simple transformation, which in turn requires a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The methylthiyl (CH 3 S·), methylsulfinyl (CH 3 SO·), methylsulfonyl (CH 3 SO 2 ·), and methylsulfonyloxyl (CH 3 SO 3 ·) radicals have been postulated as intermediates in the oxidation of DMS. Therefore, studying the chemistry of sulfur-containing free radicals in the laboratory also is the basis for understanding the mechanism of DMS oxidation in the

  9. Radical and Not So Radical Transgressions: Invading Backstage Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lada Čale Feldman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Featuring as one of the privileged metaphors in humanities and social sciences, theatre provides primarily an image of a circumscribed space whose spatial syntax and modes of human engagement take place within and with respect to the larger space of the city, the world, and, as in Calderon’s Gran teatro del mundo, the universe. It is precisely as a special organization of spatiality that theatre reached the status of Foucault’s radical hetero-topos, flexible as it proved to be as a model for not only counter-representing all the human dealings in the external space, but also of conceptualizing, as in Freud’s psychoanalysis, man’s inner world, his psychic topography. But theatre is above all a concrete place, a built form with its own spatial history, its changing social and ideological functions, and its ways of bestowing to the bodies that enter into it actual or phantasm identities, thoughts, sensations, feelings and memories.My intervention will deal with one of the ruling borders/dichotomies/barriers of theatrical space, the one dividing “front stage” from “backstage” regions. In his detailed analysis of the latter in an individual and concrete theatre building, Andrew Filmer relies among others on Edward Soja’s “trialectics of being”, and thus also on Lefebvre’s categories of perceptual, conceptual and lived aspects of spatiality which Soja evokes, which will here be of particular interest. In contrast to the repercussions of such an analytical triad for the ethnographic study of concrete theatrical sites, I will ask how it pertains to potential manipulations of the aforementioned division of front-stage and backstage within contemporary performance practice. The temporal aspect of this manipulation should also be emphasized, having in mind the historical provenance of a whole backstage mythology – evidenced in numerous novels, plays and films situated in the backstage world - in the elaborated architectural

  10. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in golden hamster embryo cells exposed to gamma rays at 77 K. I. Radical formation as studied by electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Hayakawa, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, M.; Watanabe, M.

    1990-01-01

    Formation of free radicals in golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells in the frozen living state by gamma irradiation has been studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy at 4.2 and 77 K. The relative yields of H atoms, OH radicals, and organic radicals trapped in the irradiated GHE cells are 12, 72, and 16%, respectively, of total radical yields. When dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is added to GHE cells at 77 K, a large quantity of CH2SOCH3 radicals (DMSO radicals) are formed after gamma irradiation. The yields of OH radicals are not affected by the addition of DMSO. When the GHE cell-DMSO mixtures are irradiated with gamma rays at 77 K and then warmed to 111 K, the OH radicals decay, whereas the DMSO radicals do not increase complementarily. Moreover, the decay rates of the OH radicals at 111 K do not depend upon the concentration of DMSO. Thus OH radicals do not react with DMSO during warming of the irradiated sample. When H atoms are produced by gamma irradiation of acid ice at 60 K, the decay rates of the H atoms at 77 K increase with increasing DMSO concentration, indicating that DMSO reacts with H atoms (CH3SOCH3 + H----.CH2SOCH3 + H2) at 77 K by quantum-mechanical tunneling. When the GHE cell-DMSO mixture is irradiated with gamma rays at 77 or 4.2 K in the dark, DMSO ions are produced in addition to DMSO radicals. Therefore it is concluded that DMSO does not scavenge OH radicals, but does capture H atoms, holes and/or electrons in the gamma-irradiated cells, resulting in the remarkable formation of DMSO radicals. This scavenger effect of DMSO may be related to the radioprotection of DMSO against cell killing

  11. Oxygen uptake during the γ-irradiation of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, M.M.K.; Moore, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation-induced oxidation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in aqueous solutions has been estimated by measurement of the continuous uptake of oxygen using an oxygen electrode. Chain reactions, initiated by HO radicals, are easily identified to be occurring in the case of unsaturated fatty acids. Other mild oxidation agents, namely (SCN)2 -anion radicals, Br 2 - anion radicals and N 3 -anion radicals, are also found to be capable of oxidizing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Evidence is presented the O 2- anion radicals may also initiate peroxidation. The oxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids is dependent on dose rate, fatty acid concentration, temperature and the presence of antioxidant and other protective agents. Kinetic studies of the reaction of (SCN)2 - anion radicals and Br 2 - anion radicals with linoleic and linolenic acids have been carried out using pulse radiolysis. The bimolecular rate constants for both radical species with the lipids are approx 10 7 mol-? 1 dm 3 s -1 , below their critical micelle concentrations, and decrease at higher concentrations due to micelle formation. (author)

  12. Effects of natural water constituents on the photo-decomposition of methylmercury and the role of hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Kyung; Zoh, Kyung-Duk, E-mail: zohkd@snu.ac.kr

    2013-04-01

    Photo-decomposition of methylmercury (MeHg) in surface water is thought to be an important process that reduces the bioavailability of mercury (Hg) to aquatic organisms. In this study, photo-initiated decomposition of MeHg was investigated under UVA irradiation in the presence of natural water constituents including NO{sub 3}{sup −}, Fe{sup 3+}, and HCO{sub 3}{sup −} ions, and dissolved organic matter such as humic and fulvic acid. MeHg degradation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics; the rate constant increased with increasing UVA intensity (0.3 to 3.0 mW cm{sup −2}). In the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup −}, Fe{sup 3+}, and fulvic acid, the decomposition rate of MeHg increased significantly due to photosensitization by reactive species such as hydroxyl radical. The presence of humic acid and HCO{sub 3}{sup −} ions lowered the degradation rate through a radical scavenging effect. Increasing the pH of the solution increased the degradation rate constant by enhancing the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals play an important role in the photo-decomposition of MeHg in water, and natural constituents in water can affect the photo-decomposition of MeHg by changing radical production and inhibition. - Highlights: ► The abiotic photodecomposition of methylmercury (MeHg) in water was examined. ► UVA light is a primary factor inducing MeHg photodecomposition in water. ► Fulvic acid, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, and Fe{sup 3+} ion increased MeHg photo-decomposition rate significantly. ► Humic acid and HCO{sub 3}{sup −} ions inhibited photodecomposition through radical scavenging. ► OH radical is an important compound affecting photodecomposition of MeHg in water.

  13. Development of a new free radical absorption capacity assay method for antioxidants: aroxyl radical absorption capacity (ARAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Nagai, Kanae; Fujii, Yuko; Ouchi, Aya; Mukai, Kazuo

    2013-10-23

    A new free radical absorption capacity assay method is proposed with use of an aroxyl radical (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(4'-methoxyphenyl)phenoxyl radical) and stopped-flow spectroscopy and is named the aroxyl radical absorption capacity (ARAC) assay method. The free radical absorption capacity (ARAC value) of each tocopherol was determined through measurement of the radical-scavenging rate constant in ethanol. The ARAC value could also be evaluated through measurement of the half-life of the aroxyl radical during the scavenging reaction. For the estimation of the free radical absorption capacity, the aroxyl radical was more suitable than the DPPH radical, galvinoxyl, and p-nitrophenyl nitronyl nitroxide. The ARAC value in tocopherols showed the same tendency as the free radical absorption capacities reported previously, and the tendency was independent of an oxygen radical participating in the scavenging reaction and of a medium surrounding the tocopherol and oxygen radical. The ARAC value can be directly connected to the free radical-scavenging rate constant, and the ARAC method has the advantage of treating a stable and isolable radical (aroxyl radical) in a user-friendly organic solvent (ethanol). The ARAC method was also successfully applied to a palm oil extract. Accordingly, the ARAC method would be useful in free radical absorption capacity assay of antioxidative reagents and foods.

  14. Alkylperoxyl radical scavenging activity of red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles R

    2003-07-30

    Although lettuce may provide relatively low levels of antioxidative phytochemicals which may contribute to human health, lettuce leaf extracts in fact contained compounds with high specific peroxyl radical scavenging activities. After determining the extraction conditions that minimized phenolic oxidation and produced the highest oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values, the phenolic compounds from red leaf lettuce were separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The primary phenolic compounds in the leaf tissue extracts were mono- and dicaffeoyltartaric acid (CTA and DCTA), mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acid (CQA and DCQA), quercetin 3-malonylglucoside (QMG), quercetin 3-glucoside (QG), cyanidin 3-malonylglucoside (CMG), and an unknown phenolic ester (UPE). Significant levels of DCQA were only found after wounding. Using the new fluorescein-based ORAC assay procedures, fractions from the HPLC analyses were assayed for peroxyl radical absorbance capacity. Using absorbance to estimate concentration, the decreasing order of contribution to the total ORAC value of an extract from wounded tissue was QMG > DCQA > CMG > DCTA > UPE > QG > CTA. The decreasing order of the specific peroxyl radical scavenging activities was CMG > QG > DCTA > DCQA > QMG > UPE > CQA > CTA. Since the concentrations of plant flavonoid and phenolic acid esters are sensitive to environmental factors, this information may be used to develop pre- and postharvest conditions which increase the dietary benefits of leaf lettuce.

  15. Chemical Constituents with Free-Radical-Scavenging Activities from the Stem of Microcos paniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The free-radical-scavenging activities of various solvent extracts of Microcos paniculata were evaluated through in vitro model systems, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS and Co (II EDTA-induced luminol chemiluminescence by flow injection. In all three of these systems the ethyl acetate (EtOAc extract showed the highest free-radical-scavenging activity compared with the other three (n-BuOH, water and petroleum ether extracts. Free-radical-scavenging assay-guided chromatographic separation of the EtOAc extract, using a normal-phase and reverse-phase silica gel column chromatography yielded five compounds: a new triterpene named methyl 3b-O-p-hydroxy-E-cinnamoyloxy-2a,23-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oate (1, whose spectral data are presented for the first time, together with four known compounds, epicatechin (2, 3-trans-feruloyl maslinic acid (3, maslinic acid (4 and sucrose (5. All of the compounds were isolated from Microcos paniculata for the first time. The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods. Among them, compound 2 displayed significant free-radical-scavenging activity which is similar to that of standard antioxidant ascorbic acid (VC and therefore may be a promising natural antioxidant.

  16. Radiometric studies on the oxidation of (I-14C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Kopajtic, T.M.; Hopkins, G.K.; Cannon, N.P.; Wagner Junior, H.N.

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric assay system has been used to study oxidation patterns of (l - 14 C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant organisms of the genus Mycobacterium (M. tuberculosis - H 37 Rv and Erdman, M. bovis, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M.Kansasii and M. chelonei). The organisms were inoculated in sterile reaction vials containing liquid 7H9 medium, 10% ADC enrichment and 1.0 uli of one of the (l- 14 C) fatty acids (butyric, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic). Vials were incubated at 37 0 C and the 14 CO 2 envolved was measured daily for 3 days with a Bactec R-301 instrument. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Megasphaera hexanoica sp. nov., a medium-chain carboxylic acid-producing bacterium isolated from a cow rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoung Seung; Kim, Seil; Sang, Byoung-In

    2017-07-01

    Strain MHT, a strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, spherical coccus or coccoid-shaped microorganism, was isolated from a cow rumen during a screen for hexanoic acid-producing bacteria. The microorganism grew at 30-40 °C and pH 5.5-7.5 and exhibited production of various short- and medium-chain carboxylic acids (acetic acid, butyric acid, pentanoic acid, isobutyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, heptanoic acid and octanoic acid), as well as H2 and CO2 as biogas. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that MHT represents a member of the genus Megasphaera, with the closest relatives being Megapsphaera indica NMBHI-10T (94.1 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity), Megasphaera elsdenii DSM 20460T (93.8 %) and Megasphaera paucivorans DSM 16981T (93.8 %). The major cellular fatty acids produced by MHT included C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1cis 9, and C18 : 0, and the DNA G+C content of the MHT genome is 51.8 mol%. Together, the distinctive phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics of MHT indicate that this microorganism represents a novel species of the genus Megasphaera, for which the name Megasphaera hexanoica sp. nov. is herein proposed. The type strain of this species is MHT (=KCCM 43214T=JCM 31403T).

  18. Free radicals in wood induced by γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Honglin; Zhang Wenhui

    1994-01-01

    The free radicals in wood induced by γ-radiation were studied by electron spin resonance. The fine structure of the ESR signal from sawdust samples irradiated could be resolved into various radicals. These free radicals have a very long lifetime. The major spectrum for the free radicals will exponentially increased along with the radiation dose according to Y 1-Exp(-α a D). The intensity of radiation radicals is dependent on tree species. The stronger the intensity of mechanic free radicals is, the stronger the intensity of radiation free radicals

  19. ANTIOXIDANT AND PRO-OXIDANT EFFECT OF ASCORBIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Rankovic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals attack proteins, lipids, enzymes and DNA causing pathological changes in organism. There are many mechanisms that organism uses to fight against free radicals. Ascorbic acid is one of the strongest reducers and eliminators of free radicals. It reduces stable oxygenic, azoth and thyol radicals and acts as a primary defense against water radicals in blood. When radicals are dissolved in water suspensions of erythrocytes and low density lipoproteins (LDL, ascorbic acid catches and eliminates free radicals before they arrive to the membrane and LDL molecules. Even though ascorbic acid is not capable of eliminating free radicals out of fluid medium, it acts as synergist to alpha-tocopherol in lipid section, contributes to the lessening of lipid tocoperoxil radicals, and above all, regenerates alpha-tocopherol. Ascorbic acid may act as pro-oxidant under in vitro conditions in the presence of metals; however, this effect is probably not important under in vivo conditions where metal ions, being sequestered, become second reducers.

  20. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  1. Free-radical-induced chain scission and cross-linking of polymers in aqueous solution. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Sonntag, C.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In the radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions OH are generated. In their reactions with polymers, they give rise to polymer-derived radicals. The kinetics of the formation and decay of these radicals are reviewed. The rate of reaction of a polymer with a reactive free radical is noticeably lower than that of an equivalent concentration of monomer due to the non-random distribution of the reaction sites. Once a larger number of radicals are formed on one polymer molecule, e.g. upon pulse radiolysis, close-by radicals recombine more rapidly while the more distant ones survive for much longer times than an equivalent concentration of freely diffusing radicals. Intermolecular cross-linking (between two polymer chains, increase in molecular weight) and intramolecular cross-linking (formation of small loops, no increase in polymer weight) are competing processes, and their relative yields thus depend on the dose rate and polymer concentration. Hydrogen-transfer reactions within the polymer, e.g. transformation of a secondary radical into a tertiary one, are common and facilitated by the high local density of reactive sites. Due to repulsive forces, the lifetime of radicals of charged polymers is substantially increased. This enables even relatively slow b-fragmentation reactions to become of importance. In the case of poly(methacrylic acid), where β-fragmentation is comparatively fast, this even leads to an unzipping, and as a consequence of the efficient release of methacrylic acid the situation of equilibrium polymerization is approached. Heterolytic β-fragmentation is possible when adequate leaving groups are available, e.g. in polynucleotides and DNA. In the presence of O 2 , chain scission occurs via oxyl radicals as intermediates. Some implications for technical applications are discussed

  2. HPLC-ESR techniques for detection of complex trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Lin Nianyun; Xie Leidong; Liu Rengzhong

    1992-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ESR combined examination of radical species is an advanced techniques for separation and identification of complex radical species. At SRCL, Waters 990 HPLC has been used to separate the complex trapped radicals and Varian E-112 ESR spectrometer to record the spectra of single trapped radicals after HPLC separation. The advantages of the combined techniques are described as bellow: HPLC is used to separate the long-lived complex trapped radicals derived from reaction of short-lived radicals with spin trap. ESR spectra from single trapped radicals, obtained following HPLC separation of complex trapped radicals, are recorded one by one and well resolved. The structures of short-lived radicals can be inferred from the ESR spectra of the long-lived trapped radicals

  3. Hydroxyl radical induced degradation of salicylates in aerated aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Homlok, Renáta; Rácz, Gergely; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induced degradation of acetylsalicylic acid, its hydrolysis product salicylic acid and a salicylic acid derivative 5-sulpho-salicylic acid, was investigated in dilute aqueous solutions by UV–vis spectrophotometry, HPLC separation and diode-array or MS/MS detection, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon content and by Vibrio fischeri toxicity measurements. Hydroxyl radicals were shown to degrade these molecules readily, and first degradation products were hydroxylated derivatives in all cases. Due to the by-products, among them hydrogen peroxide, the toxicity first increased and then decreased with the absorbed dose. With prolonged irradiation complete mineralization was achieved. - Highlights: • In OH induced reactions of salicylates first products are hydroxylated derivatives. • With prolonged irradiation dihydroxy derivatives also form. • In aerated solutions the one-electron oxidant OH induces 3–4 oxidations. • Toxicity first increases and then decreases with dose mainly due to H 2 O 2 formation. • The toxicity in tap water is smaller than in pure water

  4. Influence of the medium on the reaction rate of the t-butoxyl radical with iron(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Tert-butoxyl radicals (t-BuO.) were generated by homolytic photodecomposition of di-tert-butylperoxide using ruby laser flashes at 347 nm. The reaction of t-BuO. radicals with Fe 2+ was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The quantum yield Φ(Fe 3+ ) was determined by measuring the absorbance of Fe 3+ ion as [FeCl] 2+ complex at 360 nm 2 μs after the flash. According to the equation derived from the reaction scheme, the rate constant k 3 was obtained from the relative rate constant k r (k r =k 0 /k 3 ) and the value of k 0 ; the latter refers to the overall rate of the competing disappearance of t-BuO. radicals from the system (reaction 2), including the highest contribution of β-cleavage. The rate constant k 0 was determined using diphenylmethanol instead of Fe 2+ . The known rate constant of the reaction of t-BuO. radical with diphenylmethanol giving ketyl radicals (6.9 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) was applied. The quantum yield of ketyl radicals was determined by measuring the maximum of absorbance at 535 nm. At acid concentration of 0.023 mol dm -3 HCl the rate constant k 3 = 3.4 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 was determined. The relative rate constant increased with an increase of the hydrochloric acid concentration which has been ascribed to the lower stability of t-BuO. radical at higher acidity of the medium. The effect of polarity of the medium on the reaction rate was also determined. Decreasing k 3 in media of increasing polarity were explained by increasing of the β-scission rate of t-BuO. radical with increasing polarity of the medium

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Ethylenedithio-MPTTF-PTM Radical Dyad as a Potential Neutral Radical Conductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souto, Manuel; Bendixen, Dan; Jensen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    During the last years there has been a high interest in the development of new purely-organic single-component conductors. Very recently, we have reported a new neutral radical conductor based on the perchlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radical moiety linked to a monopyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (MPTTF...

  6. How to counter radical narratives: Dutch deradicalization policy in the case of Moluccan and Islamic radicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demant, F.; de Graaf, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the role of government in encouraging the decline of radical movements. The question posed is: "Which story can the government tell to encourage the decline of radical groups and the disengagement of their members?" The article makes use of the survey of factors promoting

  7. Radical Transversal Lightlike Submanifolds of Indefinite Para-Sasakian Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla S.S.; Yadav Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study radical transversal lightlike submanifolds and screen slant radical transversal lightlike submanifolds of indefinite para-Sasakian manifolds giving some non-trivial examples of these submanifolds. Integrability conditions of distributions D and RadTM on radical transversal lightlike submanifolds and screen slant radical transversal lightlike submanifolds of indefinite para-Sasakian manifolds, have been obtained. We also study totally contact umbilical radical transvers...

  8. Radical-Local Teaching and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mariane; Chaiklin, Seth

    Radical-Local Teaching and Learning presents a theoretical perspective for analyzing and planning educational programmes for schoolchildren. To realize both general societal interests and worthwhile personal development, the content of educational programmes for children must be grounded in the l......Radical-Local Teaching and Learning presents a theoretical perspective for analyzing and planning educational programmes for schoolchildren. To realize both general societal interests and worthwhile personal development, the content of educational programmes for children must be grounded...... radical-local teaching and learning approach. The first half of the book introduces the idea of radical-local teaching and learning and develops the theoretical background for this perspective, drawing on the cultural-historical research tradition, particularly from Vygotsky, El'konin, Davydov......, and Aidarova. The second half of the book addresses the central concern of radical-local teaching and learning - how to relate educational practices to children's specific historical and cultural conditions. The experiment was conducted for an academic year in an afterschool programme in the East Harlem...

  9. Radical-pair based avian magnetoreception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural experiments suggest that migratory birds possess a magnetic compass sensor able to detect the direction of the geomagnetic. One hypothesis for the basis of this remarkable sensory ability is that the coherent quantum spin dynamics of photoinduced radical pair reactions transduces directional magnetic information from the geomagnetic field into changes of reaction yields, possibly involving the photoreceptor cryptochrome in the birds retina. The suggested radical-pair based avian magnetoreception has attracted attention in the field of quantum biology as an example of a biological sensor which might exploit quantum coherences for its biological function. Investigations on such a spin-based sensor have focussed on uncovering the design features for the design of a biomimetic magnetic field sensor. We study the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

  10. Vibronic Spectroscopy of the Phenylcyanomethyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Deepali N.; Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2011-06-01

    Resonance stabilized radicals (RSRs) are thought to be key intermediates in the formation of larger molecules in planetary atmospheres. Given the nitrogen-rich atmosphere of Titan, and the prevalence of nitriles there, it is likely that nitrile and isonitrile RSRs could be especially important in pathways leading to the formation of more complex nitrogen-containing compounds and the aerosols ("tholins") that are ultimately produced. In this talk, the results of a gas phase, jet-cooled vibronic spectroscopy study of the phenylcyanomethyl radical (C_6H_5.{C}HCN), the nitrogen-containing analog of the 1-phenylpropargyl radical, will be presented. A resonant two color photon ionization spectrum over the range 21,350-22,200 Cm-1 (450.0-468.0 nm) has been recorded, and the D_0-D_1 origin band has been tentatively identified at 21,400 Cm-1. Studies identifying the ionization threshold, and characterizing the vibronic structure will also be presented. An analogous study of the phenylisocyanomethyl radical, C_6H_5.{C}HNC, is currently being pursued for comparison with that of phenylcyanomethyl radical.

  11. Introducing Stable Radicals into Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-27

    Ever since their discovery, stable organic radicals have received considerable attention from chemists because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. Currently, one of the most appealing challenges for the chemical community is to develop sophisticated artificial molecular machines that can do work by consuming external energy, after the manner of motor proteins. In this context, radical-pairing interactions are important in addressing the challenge: they not only provide supramolecular assistance in the synthesis of molecular machines but also open the door to developing multifunctional systems relying on the various properties of the radical species. In this Outlook, by taking the radical cationic state of 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY •+ ) as an example, we highlight our research on the art and science of introducing radical-pairing interactions into functional systems, from prototypical molecular switches to complex molecular machines, followed by a discussion of the (i) limitations of the current systems and (ii) future research directions for designing BIPY •+ -based molecular machines with useful functions.

  12. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Keigo; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Shoei; Sakamoto, Yuhki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    By electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed free radicals in γ-ray irradiated foods; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng. We also analyzed the decay behavior of radiation induced free radicals during storage of irradiated foods. The ESR spectrum of experimental irradiated foods consists of a sextet signal centered at g=2.0 and a singlet signal at the same g-value position and a singlet signal at g=4.0. The singlet signal at g=2.0 is originated from organic free radicals and its peak intensity showed the dependence of γ-ray irradiation dose levels. The signal intensity was decreased during storage. Only after 3 hours of radiation treatment the peak intensity was decreased fast and after that the intensity was decreased slowly. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , of radiation induced free radicals showed the variations before and after irradiation. During long time storage period it was shown that T 1 was increased and T 2 was decreased. By analysis of decay process using the simulation methods based on the theory of reaction speed, it is considered that at least two kinds of radicals were induced in irradiated foods during long time storage. (author)

  13. Fragmentation characteristics of the unstable [CH3 CO][radical sign] radicals generated by neutralization of [CH3CO]+ cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, C. E. C. A.; Holmes, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    The stability and fragmentation characteristics of [CH3 CO][radical sign] radicals, generated by vertical charge exchange between acetyl cations and permanent gases or metal vapours (He, Xe, NO, Cd, Na and K), were examined mass spectrometrically. Two dissociation reactions were observed, the losses of CH[radical sign]3 and H[radical sign]. The H[radical sign] loss reaction, the higher energy dissociation, became of greater importance as the exothermicity of the charge exchange was increased. Based on the analysis of the kinetic energy releases it was concluded that these decompositions arose from the population of two excited states of the [CH3 CO][radical sign] radical.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH . radical and H 3 O + surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH . radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH . radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol –1 and –22 kcal mol –1 , respectively. The COOH . radicals couple with incoming NH=CH 2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH 2 COOH . radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol –1 , exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H 3 O + is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH 2 to give NH 2 =CH 2 + . This latter may react with the COOH . radical to give the NH 2 CH 2 COOH +. glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH 2 CHC(OH) 2 +. species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH 2 CHCOOH . neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H 3 O

  15. Computational Study of Interstellar Glycine Formation Occurring at Radical Surfaces of Water-ice Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-07-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH• radical and H3O+ surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH• radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH• radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol-1 and -22 kcal mol-1, respectively. The COOH• radicals couple with incoming NH=CH2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH2COOH• radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol-1, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H3O+ is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH2 to give NH2=CH2 +. This latter may react with the COOH• radical to give the NH2CH2COOH+• glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH2CHC(OH)2 +• species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH2CHCOOH• neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H3O+ ions to facilitate chemical

  16. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona [Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ugliengo, Piero, E-mail: albert.rimola@uab.cat [Dipartimento di Chimica, NIS Centre of Excellence and INSTM (Materials and Technology National Consortium), UdR Torino, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH{sup .} radical and H{sub 3}O{sup +} surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH{sup .} radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH{sup .} radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol{sup -1} and -22 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. The COOH{sup .} radicals couple with incoming NH=CH{sub 2} molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH{sub 2}COOH{sup .} radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol{sup -1}, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H{sub 3}O{sup +} is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH{sub 2} to give NH{sub 2}=CH{sub 2}{sup +}. This latter may react with the COOH{sup .} radical to give the NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH{sup +.} glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH{sub 2}CHC(OH){sub 2}{sup +.} species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH{sub 2}CHCOOH{sup .} neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh

  17. Time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and aniline radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    We report, in this paper, submicrosecond time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and its radical cation as observed in pulse radiolytic studies of the oxidation of aniline in aqueous solution. By excitation in resonance with the broad and weak electronic transition of anilino radical at 400 nm (ε--1250 M -1 cm -1 ) we have observed, for the first time, the vibrational features of this radical. The Wilson ν 8 /sub a/ ring stretching mode at 1560 cm -1 is most strongly resonance enhanced. The ν 7 /sub a/ CN stretching band at 1505 cm -1 , which is shifted to higher frequency by 231 cm -1 with respect to aniline, is also prominent. The frequency of this latter mode indicates that the CN bond in the radical has considerable double bond character. The Raman spectrum of aniline radical cation, excited in resonance with the --425 nm electronic absorption (ε--4000 M -1 cm -1 ), shows features which are similar to phenoxyl radical. Most of the observed frequencies of this radical in solution are in good agreement with vibrational energies determined by recent laser photoelectron spectroscopic studies in the vapor phase. The bands most strongly enhanced in the resonance Raman spectrum are, however, weak in the photoelectron spectrum. While the vibrational frequencies observed for anilino radical and its isoelectronic cation are quite similar, the resonance enhancement patterns are very different. In particular the ν 14 b 2 mode of anilino radical observed at 1324 cm -1 is highly resonance enhanced because of strong vibronic coupling between the 400 nm 2 A 2 -- 2 B 1 and the higher 2 B 1 -- 2 B 1 electronic transitions

  18. Free radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibition of Hypericum helianthemoides (spach Boiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Moein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are compounds that obstruct the oxidation of macromolecules in the body. In general, there are two categories of antioxidants, natural and synthetic. Recently, interest has been increased considerably for obtaining new natural antioxidants. In this study, the scavenging of free radicals such as DPPH, NO and OH by Hypericum helianthemoides extract was evaluated. Also, the antioxidant properties of this extract were evaluated by FRAP, FTC methods and determination phenolic compounds. The plant was collected from north of Fars Province and plant extraction was obtained using ethanol. In DPPH radical scavenging, different concentrations of the Hypericum extract were added to DPPH radical. In hydroxyl radical scavenging, Fenton reaction mixture, TCA and TBA were mixed with Hypericum extract. In nitric radical scavenging, nitropruside was mixed with Hypericum extract and then sulphanilic acid, naphthylene diamine were added. In determination of phenolic compounds, Folin-ciocalteu and sodium carbonate were added to Hypericum extract. In DPPH radical scavenging, the IC50 of Hypericum extract (309.35±6.5μg/ml was higher than the antioxidant standards, BHT (IC50=81.9±2.6 μg/ml and quercetin (IC50=60.04±6.48 μg/ml. The highest scavenging of hydroxyl radicals was observed in Hypericum extract (70.3±0.8%, 125 μg/ml. In gallic acid it was (73.8±3.3%. In 200 μg/ml of Hypericum extract scavenged NO radical (85.2±2.7%. In FRAP method, the IC50 of this extract was 109.7±10.5 μg/ml. In FTC method, the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by Hypericum extract, BHT and ascorbic acid were 59.2±2.2, 66.9±0.15, 64.06±0.02 respectively. Total phenol of the plant extract was 3±0.4 mg/g.

  19. Free radicals and lipid peroxidation mediated injury in burn trauma: the role of antioxidant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Jureta W.

    2003-01-01

    Burn trauma produces significant fluid shifts that, in turn, reduce cardiac output and tissue perfusion. Treatment approaches to major burn injury include administration of crystalloid solutions to correct hypovolemia and to restore peripheral perfusion. While this aggressive postburn volume replacement increases oxygen delivery to previously ischemic tissue, this restoration of oxygen delivery is thought to initiate a series of deleterious events that exacerbate ischemia-related tissue injury. While persistent hypoperfusion after burn trauma would produce cell death, volume resuscitation may exacerbate the tissue injury that occurred during low flow state. It is clear that after burn trauma, tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels gradually fall, and increased adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is converted to hypoxanthine, providing substrate for xanthine oxidase. These complicated reactions produce hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, clearly recognized deleterious free radicals. In addition to xanthine oxidase related free radical generation in burn trauma, adherent-activated neutrophils produce additional free radicals. Enhanced free radical production is paralleled by impaired antioxidant mechanisms; as indicated by burn-related decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, alpha tocopherol, and ascorbic acid levels. Burn related upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) may produce peripheral vasodilatation, upregulate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and promote transcription and translation of numerous inflammatory cytokines. NO may also interact with the superoxide radical to yield peroxynitrite, a highly reactive mediator of tissue injury. Free radical mediated cell injury has been supported by postburn increases in systemic and tissue levels of lipid peroxidation products such as conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reaction products, or malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Antioxidant therapy in burn therapy

  20. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  1. Customers as Partners in Radical Service Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2009-01-01

      Purpose- The main purpose of this paper is to investigate customer involvement and related challenges in radical service innovations in engineering consulting services Design/methodology/approach - The paper uses a case study approach and so called rich descriptions to investigate customer...... involvement, roles and related challenges and conditions in radical service innovations.Findings- One main finding is that customers can engage in radical service innovations in engineering consultancy services and may play a decisive role. In doing this they most likely take on all the three user involvement...... roles defined in the literature of New Service and New Product Development. Also a number of conditions are found to be necessary in order for this collaboration to succeed. The conclusion is that another understanding and handling of the customer/supplier relation is needed along with a need...

  2. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  3. Formation of stable radicals during perfluoroalkane radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allayarov, S.R.; Demidov, S.V.; Kiryukhin, D.P.; Mikhajlov, A.I.; Barkalov, I.M.

    1984-01-01

    Accumulation and stabilization kinetics of perfluoroalkyls during α-radiolysis ( 60 Co) of perfluoralkanes (PFA) in a wide temperature range for different PFA fractions differing in the average molecular weight, is investigated. It is noted that low temperature (PFA) radiolysis (77 K) is of a linear nature of accumulation of stabilized radicals up to doses of approximately 700 KGy. In the case of PFA radiolysis at 300 K radiation yields of stable radicals are somewhat lower than at 47 K and at doses of 200-300 KGy, their accumulation ceases. It is shown that kinetics of formation and accumulation of stable radicals does not depend on molecular mass and PFA fraction viscosity. Perfluoroalkyl stability is explained by intra molecular conformation spheric insulation of the free valency. Perfluoroalkyl stability in different PFA fractions in a wide time range in different media is investigated

  4. Phytochemical Analysis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Medicinal Plants Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sougata; Derle, Abhishek; Ahire, Mehul; More, Piyush; Jagtap, Soham; Phadatare, Suvarna D.; Patil, Ajay B.; Jabgunde, Amit M.; Sharma, Geeta K.; Shinde, Vaishali S.; Pardesi, Karishma; Dhavale, Dilip D.; Chopade, Balu A.

    2013-01-01

    Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera are traditional medicinal plants that can be considered as sources of natural antioxidants. Herein we report the phytochemical analysis and free radical scavenging activity of their sequential extracts. Phenolic and flavonoid content were determined. Scavenging activity was checked against pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ and OH radical, in addition to DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by biochemical methods followed by principal component analysis. G. glauca leaf extracts were rich in phenolic and flavonoid content. Ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulbs and methanol extract of G. glauca stem exhibited excellent scavenging of pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ radical with a second order rate constant of 2.33×106 and 1.72×106, respectively. Similarly, methanol extract of G. glauca flower and ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulb with second order rate constants of 4.48×106 and 4.46×106 were found to be potent scavengers of pulse radiolysis generated OH radical. G. glauca leaf and stem showed excellent reducing activity and free radical scavenging activity. HPTLC fingerprinting, carried out in mobile phase, chloroform: toluene: ethanol (4: 4: 1, v/v) showed presence of florescent compound at 366 nm as well as UV active compound at 254 nm. GC-TOF-MS analysis revealed the predominance of diphenyl sulfone as major compound in G. glauca. Significant levels of n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid were also present. Diosgenin (C27H42O3) and diosgenin (3á,25R) acetate were present as major phytoconstituents in the extracts of D. bulbifera. G. glauca and D. bulbifera contain significant amounts of phytochemicals with antioxidative properties that can be exploited as a potential source for herbal remedy for oxidative stress induced diseases. These results rationalize further investigation in the potential discovery of new natural bioactive principles from these two important medicinal plants. PMID:24367520

  5. Biological activity of clovers - free radical scavenging ability and antioxidant action of six Trifolium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Nowak, Pawel; Kowalska, Iwona; Stochmal, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Clovers were chosen on the basis of traditional medicine recommendations, agricultural value, or available information on their promising chemical profiles. This study evaluates and compares free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties of six clover species: Trifolium alexandrinum L. (Leguminosae), Trifolium fragiferum L., Trifolium hybridum L., Trifolium incarnatum L., Trifolium resupinatum var. majus Boiss., and Trifolium resupinatum var. resupinatum L. Free radical scavenging activity of the extracts (1.5-50 µg/ml) was estimated by reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic) acid (ABTS(•)) radicals. The Trifolium extract effects on total antioxidant capacity of blood plasma were determined by the reduction of ABTS(•+) and DPPH(•) radicals, as well as with the use of the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay. The UPLC analysis of chemical profiles of the examined extracts showed the presence of three or four groups of phenolic substances, including phenolic acids, clovamides, isoflavones, and other flavonoids. The measurements of free radical scavenging and ferric reducing ability of the examined clover extracts revealed the strongest effect for T. alexandrinum. Furthermore, antioxidant activity assays in human plasma have shown protective effects of all extracts against peroxynitrite-induced reduction of total antioxidant capacity. Trifolium plants may be a rich source of bioactive substances with antioxidant properties. The examined extracts displayed free radical scavenging action and partly protected blood plasma against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative stress; however, the beneficial effects of T. alexandrinum and T. incarnatum seem to be slightly higher.

  6. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E. Ishmael

    2016-01-01

    radicals can be generated close to deoxyribonucleic acid of cells by proper localization of NPs, NP-aided microwave hyperthermia can yield cell killing via both elevated temperature and free radical generation.

  7. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E Ishmael

    2016-04-01

    deoxyribonucleic acid of cells by proper localization of NPs, NP-aided microwave hyperthermia can yield cell killing via both elevated temperature and free radical generation.

  8. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Nava Raj, E-mail: nrpaudel@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43614 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 (United States); Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E. Ishmael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43614 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    radicals can be generated close to deoxyribonucleic acid of cells by proper localization of NPs, NP-aided microwave hyperthermia can yield cell killing via both elevated temperature and free radical generation.

  9. Hearing Status after Radical Mastoidectomy without Tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamaila Nawaz; Udaipurwala, Iqbal Hussain; Mehmood, Talat; Rahat, Zahid Mehmood

    2017-12-01

    To find out the impairment of hearing associated with radical mastoidectomy by measuring the quantitative difference in the functional hearing level before and after radical mastoidectomy operation without tympanoplasty. Cross-sectional comparative study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur and PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from November 2009 to January 2013. Eighty-five patients, diagnosed clinically as chronic suppurative otitis media with extensive cholesteatoma having history of ear discharge and hearing impairment for more than 6 weeks duration and requiring radical mastoidectomy for treatment, were included in this study. Pure tone audiogram was done before and after radical mastoidectomy. Hearing impairment was compared in each patient before and after the operation. Among the 85 patients, 54 (63.5%) were males and 31 (36.5%) were females, with the age ranged between 18 to 63 years, mean age being 42.31 4.8 years. The mean increase in hearing loss after radical mastoidectomy in air conduction was 7.19 dB, bone conduction was 4.16 dB, and air-bone gap was 3.75 dB (0.001). The ear became dry and safe in 82 patients (96.5%) out of a total of 85, and only 3 patients required revision surgery at a second stage. Radical mastoidectomy has a least negligible effect on hearing status and one should not limit this technique due to the concern of aggravated hearing in patients with extensive cholesteatoma at the cost of dry and safe ears, which should be of prime importance.

  10. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O-/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O-/sub 2/ generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O-/sub 2/ responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils.

  11. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O- 2 and H 2 O 2 . This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O- 2 generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O- 2 responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils

  12. Exploring how lead users develop radical innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettl, Christopher; Gemuenden, Hans Georg; Hienerth, C.

    2008-01-01

    in order to transform their radically new solutions into functional prototypes and then to convince established manufacturers of the technological and market potential of their innovations. Using a comparative case study design in the high-tech field of medical equipment technology, we find that individual...... the supply of diversified knowledge, the development and coordination of a network for further development of the innovation, and initial tests of technical or market feasibility. Our findings have implications for manufacturing firms that wish to design radical innovation projects with (individual) lead...

  13. RADICAL. Radiation information centre with analysing logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, H.

    1998-01-01

    in an emergency, the production of data is overwhelming and the need of accurate and up-to-date information is essential. In Finland a new system (RADICAL) has been developed in order to automatically collect and maintain an overall view of the radiation situation and to facilitate the analysis of the consequences of any radiation incident. The project was started in the beginning of 1992 and the system was operational in summer 1994. The main objectives of the development process and how they are being fulfilled with the RADICAL system are discussed. (author)

  14. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  15. Radical Islamism and Migrant Integration in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goli, Marco; Rezaei, Shahamak

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that alienation and failed integration may be causes of “Homegrown Radical Islamism” in Western societies. Western countries often expect that migrants and their descendants residing there as citizens will embrace or support common democratic ideals as a predicate for – or c......It has been suggested that alienation and failed integration may be causes of “Homegrown Radical Islamism” in Western societies. Western countries often expect that migrants and their descendants residing there as citizens will embrace or support common democratic ideals as a predicate...

  16. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cool, T.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  17. Study of OH● Radicals in Human Serum Blood of Healthy Individuals and Those with Pathological Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Linert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is constantly under attack from free radicals that occur as part of normal cell metabolism, and by exposure to environmental factors such as UV light, cigarette smoke, environmental pollutants and gamma radiation. The resulting “Reactive Oxygen Species” (ROS circulate freely in the body with access to all organs and tissues, which can have serious repercussions throughout the body. The body possesses a number of mechanisms both to control the production of ROS and to cope with free radicals in order to limit or repair damage to tissues. Overproduction of ROS or insufficient defense mechanisms leads to a dangerous disbalance in the organism. Thereby several pathomechanisms implicated in over 100 human diseases, e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus, physiological disease, aging, etc., can be induced. Thus, a detailed investigation on the quantity of oxygen radicals, such as hydroxyl radicals (OH● in human serum blood, and its possible correlation with antioxidant therapy effects, is highly topical. The subject of this study was the influence of schizophrenia on the amount of OH● in human serum blood. The radicals were detected by fluorimetry, using terephthalic acid as a chemical trap. For all experiments the serum blood of healthy people was used as a control group.

  18. Hydroxyl radical induced cross-linking of cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, E.; Dizdaroglu, M.

    1990-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical induced formation of a DNA-protein cross-link involving cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone in buffered aqueous solution is reported. The technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for this investigation. A γ-irradiated aqueous mixture of cytosine and tyrosine was first investigated in order to obtain gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric properties of possible cytosine-tyrosine cross-links. One cross-link was observed, and its structure was identified as the product from the formation of a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. With the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring, this cytosine-tyrosine cross-link was identified in acidic hydrolysates of calf thymus nucleohistone γ-irradiated in N 2 O-saturated aqueous solution. The yield of this DNA-protein cross-link in nucleohistone was found to be a linear function of the radiation dose in the range of 100-500 Gy (J·kg -1 ). This yield amounted to 0.05 nmol·J -1 . Mechanisms underlying the formation of the cytosine-tyrosine cross-link in nucleohistone were proposed to involve radical-radical and/or radical addition reactions of hydroxyl adduct radicals of cytosine and tyrosine moieties, forming a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. When oxygen was present in irradiated solutions, no cytosine-tyrosine cross-links were observed

  19. l-Tryptophan Radical Cation Electron Spin Resonance Studies: Connecting Solution-derived Hyperfine Coupling Constants with Protein Spectral Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Henry D.; Sturgeon, Bradley E.; Mottley, Carolyn; Sipe, Herbert J.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Fast-flow electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been used to detect a free radical formed from the reaction of l-tryptophan with Ce4+ in an acidic aqueous environment. Computer simulations of the ESR spectra from l-tryptophan and several isotopically modified forms strongly support the conclusion that the l-tryptophan radical cation has been detected by ESR for the first time. The hyperfine coupling constants (HFCs) determined from the well-resolved isotropic ESR spectra support experimental and computational efforts to understand l-tryptophan's role in protein catalysis of oxidation-reduction processes. l-tryptophan HFCs facilitated the simulation of fast-flow ESR spectra of free radicals from two related compounds, tryptamine and 3-methylindole. Analysis of these three compounds' β-methylene hydrogen HFC data along with equivalent l-tyrosine data has led to a new computational method that can distinguish between these two amino acid free radicals in proteins without dependence on isotope labeling, electron nuclear double resonance or high-field ESR. This approach also produces geometric parameters (dihedral angles for the β-methylene hydrogens) which should facilitate protein site assignment of observed l-tryptophan radicals as has been done for l-tyrosine radicals. PMID:18433127

  20. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.