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Sample records for ocp-related photoprotective mechanism

  1. Identification of a required for recovery of full antenna capacity in OCP-related photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boulay, C.; Wilson, A.; D'Haene, S.; Kirilovsky, D.

    2010-01-01

    High light can be lethal for photosynthetic organisms. Similar to plants, most cyanobacteria protect themselves from high irradiance by increasing thermal dissipation of excess absorbed energy. The photoactive soluble orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is essential for the triggering of this

  2. Photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Reena; Srinivas, C R

    2007-01-01

    The deleterious effect of ultraviolet radiation on humans has increased the need for photoprotection. Sunscreens are widely used as photo protective agents. They are divided into chemical sunscreens which absorb high-energy ultraviolet rays and physical blockers which reflect or scatter light. Effectiveness of sunscreens depends upon sun protection factor and its substantivity. Clothing is also important for sun protection and its effectiveness is measured by Ultraviolet Protection Factor. There are many other agents with photo protective properties, which range from antioxidants to plant extracts to DNA repair enzymes. Usage of wide brimmed hats and sunglasses, avoidance of solar exposure at times of peak intensity, use of cover-up garments and sunscreen lotions are effective for photo protection of the skin.

  3. Photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Reena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleritious effect of ultraviolet radiation on humans has increased the need for photoprotection. Sunscreens are widely used as photo protective agents. They are divided into chemical sunscreens which absorb high-energy ultraviolet rays and physical blockers which reflect or scatter light. Effectiveness of sunscreens depends upon sun protection factor and its substantivity. Clothing is also important for sun protection and its effectiveness is measured by Ultraviolet Protection Factor. There are many other agents with photo protective properties, which range from antioxidants to plant extracts to DNA repair enzymes. Usage of wide brimmed hats and sunglasses, avoidance of solar exposure at times of peak intensity, use of cover-up garments and sunscreen lotions are effective for photo protection of the skin.

  4. Photoprotection in Plants Optical Screening-based Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Solovchenko, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    Optical screening of excessive and potentially harmful solar radiation is an important photoprotective mechanism, though it has received much less attention in comparison with other systems preventing photooxidative damage to photoautotrophic organisms. This photoprotection in the form of screening appears to be especially important for juvenile and senescing plants as well as under environmental stresses—i.e. in situations where the efficiency of enzymatic ROS elimination, DNA repair and other ‘classical’ photoprotective systems could be impaired. This book represents an attempt to develop an integral view of optical screening-based photoprotection in microalgae and higher plants. Towards this end, the key groups of pigments involved in the screening of ultraviolet and visible components of solar radiation in microalgae and higher plants, and the patterns of their accumulation and distribution within plant cells and tissues, are described. Special attention is paid to the manifestations of screening pi...

  5. Natural agents: cellular and molecular mechanisms of photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, Farrukh

    2011-04-15

    The skin is the largest organ of the body that produces a flexible and self-repairing barrier and protects the body from most common potentially harmful physical, environmental, and biological insults. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the major environmental insults to the skin and causes multi-tiered cellular and molecular events eventually leading to skin cancer. The past decade has seen a surge in the incidence of skin cancer due to changes in life style patterns that have led to a significant increase in the amount of UV radiation that people receive. Reducing excessive exposure to UV radiation is desirable; nevertheless this approach is not easy to implement. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel strategies to reduce the adverse biological effects of UV radiation on the skin. A wide variety of natural agents have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. Numerous preclinical and clinical studies have elucidated that natural agents act by several cellular and molecular mechanisms to delay or prevent skin cancer. In this review article, we have summarized and discussed some of the selected natural agents for skin photoprotection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Photoprotection by dietary carotenoids: concept, mechanisms, evidence and future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Wilhelm; Sies, Helmut

    2012-02-01

    Carotenoids are micronutrients present mainly in fruits and vegetables, and they are ingested from these sources with the diet. They exhibit specific antioxidant activity but also influence signaling and gene expression at the cellular level. β-Carotene and lycopene, the colorants of carrots and tomatoes, respectively, are among the most prominent members of this group of lipids, and they are usually the dominating carotenoids in human blood and tissues. Both compounds modulate skin properties when ingested as supplements or as dietary products. There is evidence that they protect the skin against sunburn (solar erythema) by increasing the basal defense against UV light-mediated damage. Their photoprotective efficacy, however, is not comparable to the use of a sunscreen. In vitro data show that also other carotenoids are efficient photoprotectors. Among them are lutein and structurally unusual phenolic polyenes like 3,3'-dihydroxyisorenieratene. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Hydrogen bond dynamics governs the effective photoprotection mechanism of plant phenolic sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang; Gao, Jun

    2017-02-15

    Sinapic acid derivatives are important sunscreen species in natural plants, which could provide protection from solar UV radiation. Using a combination of ultrafast excited state dynamics, together with classical molecular dynamics studies, we demonstrate that there is direct coupling of hydrogen bond motion with excited state photoprotection dynamics as part of the basic mechanism in solution. Beyond the intra-molecular degree of freedom, the inter-molecular motions on all timescales are potentially important for the photochemical or photophysical events, ranging from the ultrafast hydrogen bond motion to solvent rearrangements. This provides not only an enhanced understanding of the anomalous experimental spectroscopic results, but also the key idea in the development of sunscreen agents with improved photo-chemical properties. We suggest that the hydrogen bond dynamics coupled excited state photoprotection mechanism may also be possible in a broad range of bio-related molecules in the condensed phase.

  8. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L; Baxter, Bonnie K

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidines, or indirectly from oxidative damage, which may ultimately result in mutation and cell death. As such, these microorganisms have evolved a number of strategies to navigate the threat of DNA damage, which we differentiate into two categories: DNA repair and photoprotection. Photoprotection encompasses damage avoidance strategies that serve as a "first line of defense," and in halophilic archaea include pigmentation by carotenoids, mechanisms of oxidative damage avoidance, polyploidy, and genomic signatures that make DNA less susceptible to photodamage. Photolesions that do arise are addressed by a number of DNA repair mechanisms that halophilic archaea efficiently utilize, which include photoreactivation, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and homologous recombination. This review seeks to place DNA damage, repair, and photoprotection in the context of halophilic archaea and the solar radiation of their hypersaline environments. We also provide new insight into the breadth of strategies and how they may work together to produce remarkable UV-resistance for these microorganisms.

  9. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Jones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidines, or indirectly from oxidative damage, which may ultimately result in mutation and cell death. As such, these microorganisms have evolved a number of strategies to navigate the threat of DNA damage, which we differentiate into two categories: DNA repair and photoprotection. Photoprotection encompasses damage avoidance strategies that serve as a “first line of defense,” and in halophilic archaea include pigmentation by carotenoids, mechanisms of oxidative damage avoidance, polyploidy, and genomic signatures that make DNA less susceptible to photodamage. Photolesions that do arise are addressed by a number of DNA repair mechanisms that halophilic archaea efficiently utilize, which include photoreactivation, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and homologous recombination. This review seeks to place DNA damage, repair, and photoprotection in the context of halophilic archaea and the solar radiation of their hypersaline environments. We also provide new insight into the breadth of strategies and how they may work together to produce remarkable UV-resistance for these microorganisms.

  10. Single-molecule exploration of photoprotective mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiang-Yu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Gwizdala, Michal; Krüger, Tjaart; Xu, Pengqi; Croce, Roberta; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    Plants harvest sunlight by converting light energy to electron flow through the primary events in photosynthesis. One important question is how the light harvesting machinery adapts to fluctuating sunlight intensity. As a result of various regulatory processes, efficient light harvesting and photoprotection are balanced. Some of the biological steps in the photoprotective processes have been extensively studied and physiological regulatory factors have been identified. For example, the effect of lumen pH in changing carotenoid composition has been explored. However, the importance of photophysical dynamics in the initial light-harvesting steps and its relation to photoprotection remain poorly understood. Conformational and excited-state dynamics of multi-chromophore pigment-protein complexes are often difficult to study and limited information can be extracted from ensemble-averaged measurements. To address the problem, we use the Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trap to investigate the fluorescence from individual copies of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the primary antenna protein in higher plants, in a solution-phase environment. Perturbative surface immobilization or encapsulation schemes are avoided, and therefore the intrinsic dynamics and heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual proteins are revealed. We perform simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity (brightness), excited-state lifetime, and emission spectrum of single trapped proteins. By analyzing the correlated changes between these observables, we identify forms of LHCII with different fluorescence intensities and excited-state lifetimes. The distinct forms may be associated with different energy dissipation mechanisms in the energy transfer chain. Changes of relative populations in response to pH and carotenoid composition are observed, which may extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of photoprotection.

  11. Skin photoprotection by natural polyphenols: Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and DNA repair mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joi A.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies have implicated solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in various skin diseases including premature aging of the skin and melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Chronic UV radiation exposure-induced skin diseases or skin disorders are caused by the excessive induction of inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc.. The use of chemopreventive agents, such as plant polyphenols, to inhibit these events in UV-exposed skin is gaining attention. Chemoprevention refers to the use of agents that can inhibit, reverse, or retard the process of these harmful events in the UV-exposed skin. A wide variety of polyphenols or phytochemicals, most of which are dietary supplements, have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. This review article summarizes the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols, such as green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin and genistein, on UV-induced skin inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, etc., with a focus on mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effects of these polyphenols. The laboratory studies conducted in animal models, suggest that these polyphenols have the ability to protect the skin from the adverse effects of UV radiation, including the risk of skin cancers. It is suggested that polyphenols may favorably supplement sunscreens protection, and may be useful for skin diseases associated with solar UV radiation-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:19898857

  12. Skin photoprotection by natural polyphenols: anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joi A; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies have implicated solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in various skin diseases including, premature aging of the skin and melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Chronic UV radiation exposure-induced skin diseases or skin disorders are caused by the excessive induction of inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc. The use of chemopreventive agents, such as plant polyphenols, to inhibit these events in UV-exposed skin is gaining attention. Chemoprevention refers to the use of agents that can inhibit, reverse or retard the process of these harmful events in the UV-exposed skin. A wide variety of polyphenols or phytochemicals, most of which are dietary supplements, have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. This review article summarizes the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols, such as green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin and genistein, on UV-induced skin inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc., with a focus on mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effects of these polyphenols. The laboratory studies conducted in animal models suggest that these polyphenols have the ability to protect the skin from the adverse effects of UV radiation, including the risk of skin cancers. It is suggested that polyphenols may favorably supplement sunscreens protection, and may be useful for skin diseases associated with solar UV radiation-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  13. Spectral radiation dependent photoprotective mechanism in the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Brunet

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton, such as diatoms, experience great variations of photon flux density (PFD and light spectrum along the marine water column. Diatoms have developed some rapidly-regulated photoprotective mechanisms, such as the xanthophyll cycle activation (XC and the non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (NPQ, to protect themselves from photooxidative damages caused by excess PFD. In this study, we investigate the role of blue fluence rate in combination with red radiation in shaping photoacclimative and protective responses in the coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. This diatom was acclimated to four spectral light conditions (blue, red, blue-red, blue-red-green, each of them provided with low and high PFD. Our results reveal that the increase in the XC pool size and the amplitude of NPQ is determined by the blue fluence rate experienced by cells, while cells require sensing red radiation to allow the development of these processes. Variations in the light spectrum and in the blue versus red radiation modulate either the photoprotective capacity, such as the activation of the diadinoxanthin-diatoxanthin xanthophyll cycle, the diadinoxanthin de-epoxidation rate and the capacity of non-photochemical quenching, or the pigment composition of this diatom. We propose that spectral composition of light has a key role on the ability of diatoms to finely balance light harvesting and photoprotective capacity.

  14. Biophysical modeling of in vitro and in vivo processes underlying regulated photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A; Nikonova, Elena E; Kuzminov, Fedor I; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Elanskaya, Irina V; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Fadeev, Victor V; Friedrich, Thomas; Maksimov, Eugene G

    2017-09-01

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a mechanism responsible for high light tolerance in photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria, NPQ is realized by the interplay between light-harvesting complexes, phycobilisomes (PBs), a light sensor and effector of NPQ, the photoactive orange carotenoid protein (OCP), and the fluorescence recovery protein (FRP). Here, we introduced a biophysical model, which takes into account the whole spectrum of interactions between PBs, OCP, and FRP and describes the experimental PBs fluorescence kinetics, unraveling interaction rate constants between the components involved and their relative concentrations in the cell. We took benefit from the possibility to reconstruct the photoprotection mechanism and its parts in vitro, where most of the parameters could be varied, to develop the model and then applied it to describe the NPQ kinetics in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutant lacking photosystems. Our analyses revealed  that while an excess of the OCP over PBs is required to obtain substantial PBs fluorescence quenching in vitro, in vivo the OCP/PBs ratio is less than unity, due to higher local concentration of PBs, which was estimated as ~10 -5 M, compared to in vitro experiments. The analysis of PBs fluorescence recovery on the basis of the generalized model of enzymatic catalysis resulted in determination of the FRP concentration in vivo close to 10% of the OCP concentration. Finally, the possible role of the FRP oligomeric state alteration in the kinetics of PBs fluorescence was shown. This paper provides the most comprehensive model of the OCP-induced PBs fluorescence quenching to date and the results are important for better understanding of the regulatory molecular mechanisms underlying NPQ in cyanobacteria.

  15. Mechanisms of photoprotection and nonphotochemical quenching in pea light-harvesting complex at 2.5 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfuss, Jörg; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Lamborghini, Matteo; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The plant light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) collects and transmits solar energy for photosynthesis in chloroplast membranes and has essential roles in regulation of photosynthesis and in photoprotection. The 2.5 Å structure of pea LHC-II determined by X-ray crystallography of stacked two-dimensional crystals shows how membranes interact to form chloroplast grana, and reveals the mutual arrangement of 42 chlorophylls a and b, 12 carotenoids and six lipids in the LHC-II trimer. Spectral assignment of individual chlorophylls indicates the flow of energy in the complex and the mechanism of photoprotection in two close chlorophyll a–lutein pairs. We propose a simple mechanism for the xanthophyll-related, slow component of nonphotochemical quenching in LHC-II, by which excess energy is transferred to a zeaxanthin replacing violaxanthin in its binding site, and dissipated as heat. Our structure shows the complex in a quenched state, which may be relevant for the rapid, pH-induced component of nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:15719016

  16. Mechanisms of photoprotection and nonphotochemical quenching in pea light-harvesting complex at 2.5 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfuss, Jörg; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Lamborghini, Matteo; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2005-03-09

    The plant light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) collects and transmits solar energy for photosynthesis in chloroplast membranes and has essential roles in regulation of photosynthesis and in photoprotection. The 2.5 A structure of pea LHC-II determined by X-ray crystallography of stacked two-dimensional crystals shows how membranes interact to form chloroplast grana, and reveals the mutual arrangement of 42 chlorophylls a and b, 12 carotenoids and six lipids in the LHC-II trimer. Spectral assignment of individual chlorophylls indicates the flow of energy in the complex and the mechanism of photoprotection in two close chlorophyll a-lutein pairs. We propose a simple mechanism for the xanthophyll-related, slow component of nonphotochemical quenching in LHC-II, by which excess energy is transferred to a zeaxanthin replacing violaxanthin in its binding site, and dissipated as heat. Our structure shows the complex in a quenched state, which may be relevant for the rapid, pH-induced component of nonphotochemical quenching.

  17. Mechanisms of Photoaging and Cutaneous Photocarcinogenesis, and Photoprotective Strategies with Phytochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Bosch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoaging and photocarcinogenesis are primarily due to solar ultraviolet (UV radiation, which alters DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology, and the extracellular matrix (ECM. The DNA alterations include UV radiation induced thymine-thymine dimers and loss of tumor suppressor gene p53. UV radiation reduces cellular antioxidant status by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the resultant oxidative stress alters signal transduction pathways such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB/p65, the janus kinase (JAK, signal transduction and activation of transcription (STAT and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. UV radiation induces pro-inflammatory genes and causes immunosuppression by depleting the number and activity of the epidermal Langerhans cells. Further, UV radiation remodels the ECM by increasing matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP and reducing structural collagen and elastin. The photoprotective strategies to prevent/treat photoaging and photocarcinogenesis include oral or topical agents that act as sunscreens or counteract the effects of UV radiation on DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology and the ECM. Many of these agents are phytochemical derivatives and include polyphenols and non-polyphenols. The flavonoids are polyphenols and include catechins, isoflavones, proanthocyanidins, and anthocyanins, whereas the non-flavonoids comprise mono phenolic acids and stilbenes. The natural sources of polyphenols include tea, cocoa, grape/wine, soy, pomegranate, and Polypodium leucotomos. The non-phenolic phytochemicals include carotenoids, caffeine and sulphoraphance (SFN. In addition, there are other phytochemical derivatives or whole extracts such as baicalin, flavangenol, raspberry extract, and Photomorphe umbellata with photoprotective activity against UVB radiation, and thereby carcinogenesis.

  18. Photosynthetic limitation and mechanisms of photoprotection under drought and recovery of Calotropis procera, an evergreen C3 from arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Rebeca; Frosi, Gabriella; Ramos, Diego G; Pereira, Silvia; Benko-Iseppon, Ana M; Santos, Mauro G

    2017-09-01

    Calotropis procera is a C 3 plant native from arid environmental zones. It is an evergreen, shrubby, non-woody plant with intense photosynthetic metabolism during the dry season. We measured photosynthetic parameters and leaf biochemical traits, such as gas exchange, photochemical parameters, A/C i analysis, organic solutes, and antioxidant enzymes under controlled conditions in potted plants during drought stress, and following recovery conditions to obtain a better insight in the drought stress responses of C. procera. Indeed, different processes contribute to the drought stress resilience of C. procera and to the fast recovery after rehydration. The parameters analyzed showed that C. procera has a high efficiency for energy dissipation. The photosynthetic machinery is protected by a robust antioxidant system and photoprotective mechanisms such as alternative pathways for electrons (photorespiration and day respiration). Under severe drought stress, increased stomatal limitation and decreased biochemical limitation permitted C. procera to maintain maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (V c,max ) and photosynthetic rate (A max ). On the other hand, limitation of stomatal or mesophyll CO 2 diffusion did not impair fast recovery, maintaining V c,max , chloroplast CO 2 concentration (C c ) and mesophyll conductance (g m ) unchanged while electron flow used for RuBP carboxylation (J c ) and A max increased. The ability to tolerate drought stress and the fast recovery of this evergreen C 3 species was also due to leaf anti-oxidative stress enzyme activity, and photosynthetic pigments. Thus, these different drought tolerance mechanisms allowed high performance of photosynthetic metabolism by drought stressed plants during the re-watering period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. New option in photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnec, Ines Sjerobabski; Kotrulja, Lena; Situm, Mirna; Poduje, Sanja

    2010-04-01

    All the people are exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation. Exposure to sun with living in an oxygen-rich atmosphere causes unwanted photodemage. Sunburned skin is a leading risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma cancers. UV exposure causes immunosuppression via multiple mechanisms in the skin. In this review the main topic is to mention new or alternative ways of photoprotection. Sunscreens are commonly used as protection against sun damage. They reduce the penetration of damaging solar UV wavelengths in skin by reflecting or absorbing them. Sunscreens are very valuable, but they have limitations. They have to be used properly to gain the full effect (application a little while before UV exposure, at frequent time points and in adequate amounts). Also, they have the problem of photoinactivation, which is the degeneration of the UV-filter due to exposure to UV rays resulting in the loss of absorbing capacity. Products with immune protection factor contain DNA-repair enzymes and antioxidants that may reduce mutations and enable the immune system to combat photodamage. The use of antioxidants and polyphenols may exert an anti-aging effect by preventing and even reversing sun damage. Adequate photoprotection is essential to control photocarcinogenesis and photoaging.

  20. Mechanisms of photoprotection and nonphotochemical quenching in pea light-harvesting complex at 2.5 Å resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Standfuss, Jörg; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Lamborghini, Matteo; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The plant light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) collects and transmits solar energy for photosynthesis in chloroplast membranes and has essential roles in regulation of photosynthesis and in photoprotection. The 2.5 Å structure of pea LHC-II determined by X-ray crystallography of

  1. Mechanisms of photoprotection and nonphotochemical quenching in pea light-harvesting complex at 2.5 Å resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Standfuss, Jörg; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Lamborghini, Matteo; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The plant light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) collects and transmits solar energy for photosynthesis in chloroplast membranes and has essential roles in regulation of photosynthesis and in photoprotection. The 2.5 Å structure of pea LHC-II determined by X-ray crystallography of stacked two-dimensional crystals shows how membranes interact to form chloroplast grana, and reveals the mutual arrangement of 42 chlorophylls a and b, 12 carotenoids and six lipids in the LHC-II trimer...

  2. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  3. Photoprotection strategies of the alga Nannochloropsis gaditana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chukhutsina, Volha U.; Fristedt, Rikard; Morosinotto, Tomas; Croce, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Nannochloropsis spp. are algae with high potential for biotechnological applications due to their capacity to accumulate lipids. However, little is known about their photosynthetic apparatus and acclimation/photoprotective strategies. In this work, we studied the mechanisms of non-photochemical

  4. Natural products as photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewan, Nisakorn; Jimtaisong, Ampa

    2015-03-01

    The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Update on photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Reena; Shanmuga, Sekar C; Srinivas, Cr

    2012-09-01

    Photoprotection by sunscreens, clothing and glasses are important to protect the skin against the detrimental effects of sun exposure. In order to achieve complete protection, topical strategies must shield against the range of solar wavelengths ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, infrared radiation that can damage the skin. To provide the necessary broad spectrum coverage, combinations of chemical and physical UV filters along with molecules that are capable of interfering with and/or preventing the deleterious effects of sunlight are discussed in this review.

  6. Update on Photoprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Reena; Shanmuga, Sekar C; Srinivas, CR

    2012-01-01

    Photoprotection by sunscreens, clothing and glasses are important to protect the skin against the detrimental effects of sun exposure. In order to achieve complete protection, topical strategies must shield against the range of solar wavelengths ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, infrared radiation that can damage the skin. To provide the necessary broad spectrum coverage, combinations of chemical and physical UV filters along with molecules that are capable of interfering with and/or preventing t...

  7. Photoprotection in teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Fouad; Ammoury, Alfred; Nakhle, Fouad; Dhaybi, Rola; Marguery, Marie-Claude

    2006-02-01

    It is very common to apply a 'template photoprotection' without taking into consideration the background of a specific population. In Lebanon, so far, no preliminary survey has been conducted before launching an educational photoprotection campaign, revealing the need of the people according to their background. In April 2004, a specific questionnaire was administered to 940 adolescents, aged from 14 to 18 years. The questionnaire comprised 18 multiple-choice questions that established the approximate phototype of teenagers, awareness of ultraviolet (UV) hazard, presence of sufficient information regarding the risk of sun exposure (school, doctor, media) and the use of measures of photoprotection (clothes, sunscreens). The incidence of sunburn in teenagers was high (85.42%) despite their awareness of the risks of unprotected sun exposure. The information regarding sun damage seems to be insufficiently delivered at school and by doctors. The main source of information was television. It was obvious that our adolescents underestimated the value of clothing to protect themselves. The use of clothing comes at the second place after sunscreens. However, the application of sunscreen seems to be inadequate. While solar protection has become part of routine beach behavior for adolescents, there is room for improvement with better application of sunscreen and more use of clothing, especially wearing hats, and seeking shade. However, it is difficult to appreciate the impact of publicity campaigns on the risks of sun exposure in reducing the incidence of melanoma.

  8. Update on photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoprotection by sunscreens, clothing and glasses are important to protect the skin against the detrimental effects of sun exposure. In order to achieve complete protection, topical strategies must shield against the range of solar wavelengths ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, infrared radiation that can damage the skin. To provide the necessary broad spectrum coverage, combinations of chemical and physical UV filters along with molecules that are capable of interfering with and/or preventing the deleterious effects of sunlight are discussed in this review.

  9. Natural and artificial photoprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    A solar simulator is described with collimated filtered radiation incorporating an optical integrator to more evenly diffuse the xenon 2.5 KW light source. Populations can be catogorized into skin types I-VI and the minimal erythema dose (MED) in each skin type measured in Joules/cm2 was compared to give a relative suntan photoprotection factor or SPF compared with type I (1.0) so that type II had an SPF of 1.67, type III SPF of 2.5, type IV V had an SPF of nearly 4, whereas the darker Negroid skin (type VI) had an SPF of 9.68, or nearly 10 times that of type I. In addition, various studies were performed to determine the natural protection factor after natural sunlight (3 1/2 mo of summer sun). In 21 subjects the mean SPF was 2.33 when compared to the MED on unexposed skin on the buttocks. Five subjects who had received a mean total dose of 3.49 J/cm2 of UVB within a 4-week period had a mean SPF of 8.01 and 5 subjects who had received a mean total dose of 20 J/cm2 of UVA with PUVA therapy within 2 weeks had a mean SPF of 2.7. These studies were compared with the photoprotection ability of topical chemical protective agents with a range of 4-15

  10. Photoprotective activity of Buddleja scordioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Acevedo, J G; Castañeda, C M C; Benitez, F J C; Durán, D A; Barroso, V R; Martínez, C G; Muñoz, L J L; Martínez, C A; Romo de Vivar, A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the photoprotective properties of the methanolic extract of Buddleja scordioides, as well as verbascoside and linarin which were isolated from this extract, and linarin acetate prepared in the laboratory. The photoprotective effect of substances against UV-B induced cellular death was evaluated by challenge experiments using Escherichia coli. Verbascoside and linarin acetate showed the highest protection. The sun protection factor (SPF) of the methanolic extract, linarin, linarin acetate, and verbascoside was evaluated by guinea pig bioassays. Verbascoside showed the largest SPF measurement.

  11. Photoprotection through ultrafast charge recombination in photochemical reaction centres under oxidizing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Fei; Swainsbury, David J. K.; Jones, Michael R.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2017-01-01

    Engineering natural photosynthesis to address predicted shortfalls in food and energy supply requires a detailed understanding of its molecular basis and the intrinsic photoprotective mechanisms that operate under fluctuating environmental conditions. Long-lived triplet or singlet excited electronic

  12. Photoprotection and vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springbett, Peter; Buglass, Surhi; Young, Antony R

    2010-11-03

    The adverse effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on the skin are well documented, especially in fair-skinned people. These can be ameliorated by photoprotection strategies advocated by many public health bodies and typically include sun avoidance, sunscreen use and clothing. The UVB waveband which is the main cause of all adverse effects investigated in the laboratory to date is also the waveband for vitamin D photosynthesis which is the only established benefit of solar exposure. This is especially important because solar UVB is the main source of vitamin D for most people. There is increasing evidence that vitamin D plays a much greater role in human health than was previously thought. This has given rise to concerns that photoprotection, especially sunscreen use, could adversely affect vitamin D status and human health. Furthermore, it is stated that people with heavily pigmented skins often have poor vitamin D status because of photoprotection by melanin. In this paper we review the effect of photoprotection strategies and pigmentation on vitamin D status. Clothing can clearly be very effective at inhibiting vitamin D synthesis. Sunscreens are effective in theory and some limited human studies support this. However, most studies show little or no effect and the most likely reason for this is that sunscreens have not been applied in the manner that was used to determine their labelled index of protection against sunburn. This could change in the future if public health campaigns and the sunscreen industry are successful in encouraging the public to apply sunscreens more liberally and/or use much higher levels of labelled protection. The role of melanin on vitamin D status is not clear and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. New insights into pesticide photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivella, Aurélien; Richard, Claire

    2014-04-01

    Photolysis may be a significant route of pesticide dissipation on crops, leading to an increase of pesticide use. Spraying strong absorbing compounds (photoprotector) along with pesticide is an attractive strategy to prevent the photodegradation phenomenon. The aim of this study is to get a better understanding of the parameters governing the photoprotection efficiency. Experiments were conducted using formulated sulcotrione as a pesticide and a grape wine extract as a photoprotector. These compounds were irradiated using simulated solar light as dried deposits on carnauba wax films or on disks of tobacco leaves and analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet (UV), spectroscopy, and microscopy. It is shown that photolysis is faster on leaves than on carnauba wax and that the photoprotection effect of grape wine extract is more efficient on leaves than on wax. Images recorded by microscopy bring evidence that deposits are very different on the two supports both in the absence and in the presence of the photoprotector. The grape wine extract plays a double role; it is antioxidant and UV screen. Photoprotection by the grape wine extract is a complex mixing of UV screen and antioxidant effects. The UV screen effect can be rationalized by considering the rate of light absorption by sulcotrione. Our results demonstrate that the rates of sulcotrione phototransformation are mainly governed by the repartition of the deposit on the solid support.

  14. Photoprotection due to pigmentation and epidermal thickness after repeated exposure to ultraviolet light and psoralen plus ultraviolet A therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bech-Thomsen, N.; Wulf, H.C. [Rigshospitalet, The National Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Dermatology, Lab. of Photobiology, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1995-10-01

    Tanning and thickening of the epidermis are cardinal defensive responses of human skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation that lead to increased photoprotection. Earlier studies have shown that skin pigmentation can be used to predict minimal erythema dose and minimal phototoxic dose. In this study it was calculated how much of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of repeated exposure to suberythemogenic doses of either UVA or UVB radiation sources or psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) therapy that was attributable to melanogenesis. The backs of 12 volunteers were exposed to 6 different UVA and UVB radiation sources 9 times during 4 weeks. Skin pigmentation was assessed by skin reflectance measuring. Photoprotection was determined from the minimal erythema dose. Melanogenesis accounted for 63-95% of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of exposure to UVA radiation. Exposure to two UVB sources induced a significant increase in photoprotection but not in pigmentation. Melanogenesis accounted only for 6-11% of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of UVB exposure. The pigmentary and photoprotective responses to PUVA therapy were followed in 14 patients. After 2 weeks of exposure, the increase in photoprotection was significantly higher than predicted form the increase in skin pigmentation. After 4 weeks, melanogenesis accounted for only 36% of the increase in photoprotection. This study shows that melanogenesis accounts for the increased photoprotection after 2 weeks of exposure to UVA radiation, but after 4 weeks other protective mechanisms occur during suberythemal UVB exposure and during PUVA therapy the importance of skin pigmentation in the overall photoprotection gradually decreases during a 4-week irradiation period. (au) 17 refs.

  15. Photoprotection due to pigmentation and epidermal thickness after repeated exposure to ultraviolet light and psoralen plus ultraviolet A therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech-Thomsen, N.; Wulf, H.C.

    1995-01-01

    Tanning and thickening of the epidermis are cardinal defensive responses of human skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation that lead to increased photoprotection. Earlier studies have shown that skin pigmentation can be used to predict minimal erythema dose and minimal phototoxic dose. In this study it was calculated how much of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of repeated exposure to suberythemogenic doses of either UVA or UVB radiation sources or psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) therapy that was attributable to melanogenesis. The backs of 12 volunteers were exposed to 6 different UVA and UVB radiation sources 9 times during 4 weeks. Skin pigmentation was assessed by skin reflectance measuring. Photoprotection was determined from the minimal erythema dose. Melanogenesis accounted for 63-95% of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of exposure to UVA radiation. Exposure to two UVB sources induced a significant increase in photoprotection but not in pigmentation. Melanogenesis accounted only for 6-11% of the increase in photoprotection after 4 weeks of UVB exposure. The pigmentary and photoprotective responses to PUVA therapy were followed in 14 patients. After 2 weeks of exposure, the increase in photoprotection was significantly higher than predicted form the increase in skin pigmentation. After 4 weeks, melanogenesis accounted for only 36% of the increase in photoprotection. This study shows that melanogenesis accounts for the increased photoprotection after 2 weeks of exposure to UVA radiation, but after 4 weeks other protective mechanisms occur during suberythemal UVB exposure and during PUVA therapy the importance of skin pigmentation in the overall photoprotection gradually decreases during a 4-week irradiation period. (au) 17 refs

  16. Dissecting the Photoprotective Mechanism Encoded by the flv4-2 Operon: a Distinct Contribution of Sll0218 in Photosystem II Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersanini, Luca; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Battchikova, Natalia; Heinz, Steffen; Lespinasse, Maija; Ruohisto, Essi; Mustila, Henna; Nickelsen, Jörg; Vass, Imre; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2017-03-01

    In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the flv4-2 operon encodes the flavodiiron proteins Flv2 and Flv4 together with a small protein, Sll0218, providing photoprotection for Photosystem II (PSII). Here, the distinct roles of Flv2/Flv4 and Sll0218 were addressed, using a number of flv4-2 operon mutants. In the ∆sll0218 mutant, the presence of Flv2/Flv4 rescued PSII functionality as compared with ∆sll0218-flv2, where neither Sll0218 nor the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer are expressed. Nevertheless, both the ∆sll0218 and ∆sll0218-flv2 mutants demonstrated deficiency in accumulation of PSII proteins suggesting a role for Sll0218 in PSII stabilization, which was further supported by photoinhibition experiments. Moreover, the accumulation of PSII assembly intermediates occurred in Sll0218-lacking mutants. The YFP-tagged Sll0218 protein localized in a few spots per cell at the external side of the thylakoid membrane, and biochemical membrane fractionation revealed clear enrichment of Sll0218 in the PratA-defined membranes, where the early biogenesis steps of PSII occur. Further, the characteristic antenna uncoupling feature of the ∆flv4-2 operon mutants is shown to be related to PSII destabilization in the absence of Sll0218. It is concluded that the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer supports PSII functionality, while the Sll0218 protein assists PSII assembly and stabilization, including optimization of light harvesting. © 2016 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Enviroment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Polyphenols: skin photoprotection and inhibition of photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, F; Katiyar, S K

    2011-12-01

    Polyphenols are a large family of naturally occurring plant products and are widely distributed in plant foods, such as, fruits, vegetables, nuts, flowers, bark and seeds, etc. These polyphenols contribute to the beneficial health effects of dietary products. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that exposure of the skin to environmental factors/pollutants, such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation induce harmful effects and leads to various skin diseases including the risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer, comprising of squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, is a significant public health concern world-wide. Exposure of the skin to solar UV radiation results in inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, dysregulation of cellular signaling pathways and immunosuppression thereby resulting in skin cancer. The regular intake of natural plant products, especially polyphenols, which are widely present in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes and beverages have gained considerable attention as protective agents against the adverse effects of UV radiation. In this article, we first discussed the impact of polyphenols on human health based on their structure-activity relationship and bioavailability. We then discussed in detail the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols on UV-induced skin inflammation, proliferation, immunosuppression, DNA damage and dysregulation of important cellular signaling pathways and their implications in skin cancer management. The selected polyphenols include: green tea polyphenols, pomegranate fruit extract, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin, genistein and delphinidin. The new information on the mechanisms of action of these polyphenols supports their potential use in skin photoprotection and prevention of photocarcinogenesis in humans.

  18. The benefit of daily photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, Sophie; Fourtanier, Anny M A

    2008-05-01

    It is now recognized that both ultraviolet (UV)-A and UVB wavelengths participate in the generation of photodamaged human skin during sun exposure. During usual daily activities, an appropriate protection against solar UV exposure should prevent clinical, cellular, and molecular changes potentially leading to photoaging. This study was designed to evaluate in human beings the protection afforded by a day cream containing a photostable combination of UVB and UVA filters and thus protect against the UV-induced skin alterations. In solar-simulated radiation exposed and unprotected skin sites we observed melanization. The epidermis revealed a significant increase in stratum corneum and stratum granulosum thickness. In the dermis, an enhanced expression of tenascin and a reduced expression of type I procollagen were evidenced just below the dermoepidermal junction. Although no change in elastic fibers in exposed buttock skin was seen, a slightly increased deposit of lysozyme and alpha-1 antitrypsin on elastin fibers was observed using immunofluorescence techniques. A day cream with photoprotection properties was shown to prevent all of the above-described alterations. This study was performed on a limited number of patients (n = 12) with specific characteristics (20-35 years old and skin type II and III). Two dermal alterations were evaluated by visual assessment and not by computer-assisted image analysis quantification. Our in vivo results demonstrate the benefits of daily photoprotection using a day cream containing appropriate broad-spectrum sunscreens, which prevent solar UV-induced skin damages.

  19. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Probing nucleobase photoprotection with soft x-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipov T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleobases absorb strongly in the ultraviolet region, leading to molecular excitation into reactive states. The molecules avoid the photoreactions by funnelling the electronic energy into less reactive states on an ultrafast timescale via non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics. Current theory on the nucleobase thymine discusses two conflicting pathways for the photoprotective dynamics. We present our first results of our free electron laser based UV-pump soft x-ray-probe study of the photoprotection mechanism of thymine. We use the high spatial sensitivity of the Auger electrons emitted after the soft x-ray pulse induced core ionization. Our transient spetra show two timescales on the order of 200 fs and 5 ps, in agreement with previous (all UV ultrafast experiments. The timescales appear at different Auger kinetic energies which will help us to decipher the molecular dynamics.

  1. Probiotics for photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéniche, Audrey; Philippe, David; Bastien, Philippe; Blum, Stephanie; Buyukpamukcu, Elif; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle

    2009-09-01

    Specific strains of probiotic, have been identified as beneficial to influence the composition and/or metabolic activity of the endogenous microbiota and some of these strains have been also shown to inhibit the growth of a wide range of enteropathogens. The first aim of using probiotics has been to improve the composition of the intestinal microbiota from a potentially harmful composition towards a composition that would be beneficial to the host.Beyond their capacity to influence positively the composition of the intestinal microbiota, several lines of evidence suggest that some probiotic bacteria can modulate the immune system both at the local and systemic levels thereby improving immune defense mechanisms and/or downregulate immune disorders such as allergies or intestinal inflammation.Skin reflects the general health status and aging. Different human trials widely suggest that probiotic supplementation might be useful in the management of atopic dermatitis. Based on these properties it appears that, beyond the gut, probiotics might exert their benefits at the skin level.In a randomized double blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, we investigated whether the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) could modulate the cutaneous immune homeostasis altered by solar-simulated UV exposure in humans. After, UV exposure to twice 1.5 MED, we demonstrated that La1 intake facilitated an earlier recovery of Epidermal cells allostimulatory function. Thus, this clinical data strengthen the assumption that certain probiotics can contribute to modulate skin immune system leading to the preservation of the skin homeostasis. Altogether the data affords the possibility of designing new strategies based on a nutritional approach for the prevention of UV-induced damaging effects.

  2. COMBINED EFFECTS OF CO2 AND O3 ON ANTIOXIDATIVE AND PHOTOPROTECTIVE DEFENSE SYSTEMS IN NEEDLES OF PONDEROSA PINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine interactive effects of important environmental stresses on biochemical defense mechanisms of tree seedlings, we studied responses to elevated O3 and elevated atmospheric CO2 on antioxidative and photoprotective systems in needles of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Do...

  3. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids for Skin Photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Karl P; Long, Paul F; Young, Antony R

    2017-05-29

    Excessive human exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) continues to be a major public health concern, with skin cancer rates increasing year on year. The major protective measure is the use of synthetic UVR filters formulated into sunscreens, but there is growing concern that these chemicals cause damage to delicate marine ecosystems. One alternative is the use of biocompatible mycosporine-like amino acids (MAA), which occur naturally and are found predominantly in a wide range of marine species. Their role within nature is mainly thought to be photoprotective. This is a consequence of their optical properties but there is increasing evidence that they are also antioxidants at a chemical level, as well by activation of endogenous cell antioxidant defence mechanisms. However, their potential for human photoprotection is largely understudied. This review explores the role of MAA in nature and considers the literature available on the use of MAA within human models for photoprotection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Photoprotective effects of methoxycinnamidopropyl polysilsesquioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Jung, Taek Kyu; Lim, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Heung; Kim, Young Baek; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Yoon, Kyung-Sup; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2011-01-01

    A new sunscreen ingredient, methoxycinnamidopropyl polysilsesquioxane (MCP-PSQ), which contains an UV-absorbing p-methoxycinnamoyl group, has been developed synthetically and evaluated using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Previous studies revealed that MCP-PSQ has a raising or boosting effect on the sun protection factor (SPF) of other sunscreen agents. In this study, we demonstrated that MCP-PSQ, an organic/inorganic hybrid compound, has photoprotective effects for human fibroblasts, and for hairless mouse and human skin. MCP-PSQ increases cell viability and suppresses the expression of p53 protein in fibroblasts after UV exposure. In addition, the numbers of sunburn cells and mast cells are reduced by topical application of MCP-PSQ on hairless mouse skin after UV irradiation. A 10% MCP-PSQ cream has higher and similar effects on SPF values for human skin compared to 5% titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and 5% ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), respectively. The SPF value obtained using the MCP-PSQ cream did not drop after UV irradiation of the cream itself. However, higher dose of UV irradiation is required to guarantee the stability or photostability of the formulation. Further, there were no side effects such as erythema, edema, itch or tingling, suggesting that MCP-PSQ is a good sunscreen agent. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. Daily xanthophyll cycle photoprotection in developing leaves prior to photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.N. Angelov; Shi-Jean S. Sung; C.C. Black

    1995-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that the xanthophyll cycle provides a major photoprotection system for photosynthesis in green leaves.Indeed this type of photoprotection seem to be ubiquitous for photosynthetic organisms. Photoprotection is provided via a rapid, near 10-13 sec, ability of zeaxanthin (Z) to dissipate excess light energy from photosynthesis because the...

  6. Photoinhibition and photosynthetic pigment reorganisation dynamics in light/darkness cycles as photoprotective mechanisms of Porphyra umbilicalis against damaging effects of UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aguilera

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Porphyra umbilicalis L. Kutzing collected from the upper intertidal zone at Helgoland, North Sea, was exposed to different spectral ranges of UV radiation under both 12/12 h light/dark cycles and continuous irradiation. In light/dark cycles, oscillations of the optimal quantum yield (Fv /Fm were observed during the experiments, reaching maximal values at the end of the light phase followed by lower values during the dark phase. Decreased Fv /Fm was observed in thalli illuminated with photosynthetic active radiation (PAR plus UV-A and PAR+UV-A+UV-B, compared with the PAR control, indicating a certain degree of UV-induced photoinhibition. In addition, a decrease in the percentage of change of the linear initial slope and maximum electron transport rate (ETR estimated from ETR vs. irradiance curves was induced by UV radiation during the light phase. Recovery during the 12 h dark phase was almost completed in UV-A treated plants. PAR+UV-A seemed not to affect the photosynthesis, measured as O2 production. However, a decrease in O2 production was observed in the PAR+UV-A+UV-B treatment, but it recovered to initial values after 48 h of culture. No changes in total content of photosynthetic pigments were observed. However, thallus absorptance and the in vivo absorption cross-section in the PAR range (400-700 nm normalised to Chl a (a* parameter fluctuated during light/dark cycles and were positively correlated with changes in the optimum quantum yield, thus indicating that daily pigment reorganisation in the light-harvesting complex may play a key role in the photosynthetic performance of the algae. Both UV-A and UV-B treatments under continuous irradiation induced a significant reduction in the optimal quantum yield, ETR efficiency and photosynthetic oxygen production during the first 36 h to values around 30% of the initial ones. Thus, different protective mechanisms against UV stress can be observed in P. umbilicalis: dynamic photoinhibition when

  7. Photoprotection and the photophysics of acylated anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Palmira Ferreira; Paulo, Luísa; Barbafina, Adrianna; Eisei, Fausto; Quina, Frank H; Maçanita, António L

    2012-03-19

    The proposed role of anthocyanins in protecting plants against excess solar radiation is consistent with the occurrence of ultrafast (5-25 ps) excited-state proton transfer as the major de-excitation pathway of these molecules. However, because natural anthocyanins absorb mainly in the visible region of the spectra, with only a narrow absorption band in the UV-B region, this highly efficient deactivation mechanism would essentially only protect the plant from visible light. On the other hand, ground-state charge-transfer complexes of anthocyanins with naturally occurring electron-donor co-pigments, such as hydroxylated flavones, flavonoids, and hydroxycinnamic or benzoic acids, do exhibit high UV-B absorptivities that complement that of the anthocyanins. In this work, we report a comparative study of the photophysics of the naturally occurring anthocyanin cyanin, intermolecular cyanin-coumaric acid complexes, and an acylated anthocyanin, that is, cyanin with a pendant coumaric ester co-pigment. Both inter- and intramolecular anthocyanin-co-pigment complexes are shown to have ultrafast energy dissipation pathways comparable to those of model flavylium cation-co-pigment complexes. However, from the standpoint of photoprotection, the results indicate that the covalent attachment of co-pigment molecules to the anthocyanin represents a much more efficient strategy by providing the plant with significant UV-B absorption capacity and at the same time coupling this absorption to efficient energy dissipation pathways (ultrafast internal conversion of the complexed form and fast energy transfer from the excited co-pigment to the anthocyanin followed by adiabatic proton transfer) that avoid net photochemical damage. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Study of puromycin and acridic orange strain effect on photoprotection of yeasts Candida guillermondii from the lethal action of short-wave ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Ya.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.; Rubvin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis inhibitor of puromycin albumen has been used to establish that photoprotection formation in yeasts of a hypothetic compound which protects DNA from lethal damages, is not connected with macromolecular synthesis. The combined effect of photoprotective light and acridic orange strain on cells has been studied. It is shown that the mechanism in the base of the protector action is analogous to the mechanism of DNA protection with acridic orange

  9. DNA Dosimetry Assessment for Sunscreen Genotoxic Photoprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Lago, Juliana Carvalhães; Yagura, Teiti; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-01-01

    Background: Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systemat...

  10. Topical isoflavones provide effective photoprotection to skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Tournas, Joshua A; Burch, James A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Zielinski, Jan

    2008-04-01

    Isoflavones, one main group of phytoestrogens, have antioxidative and photoprotective effects in cellular and mouse studies. The aim of this study is to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the isoflavone-mediated photoprotection with the pig skin model, a more human-resembling model. The pig skin was treated with five well-known isoflavone compounds (genistein, equol, daidzein, biochanin A, and formononetin) and one antioxidant combination solution of 15% vitamin C and 1% vitamin E and 0.5% ferulic acid (CEF) daily for 4 days. Skin was irradiated with solar-simulated UV irradiation, 1 to 5 minimal erythema dose (MED) at 1-MED intervals. Evaluation was carried out 24 h later by colorimeter-measured erythema and sunburn cell numbers. Topical application of 0.5% solutions of three individual phytoestrogens - genistein, daidzein, biochanin A - are better than similar solutions of equol or formononetin in protecting pig skin from solar-simulated ultraviolet (SSUV)-induced photodamage, as measured by sunburn cell formation and/or erythema. However, the protection was less than that provided by a topical combination antioxidant standard containing 15% L-ascorbic acid, 1%alpha-tocopherol, and 0.5% ferulic acid. Isoflavones provide effective photoprotection and are good candidate ingredients for protection against ultraviolet (UV) photodamage.

  11. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; Wildhagen, Henning; Hess, Moritz; Kayler, Zachary; Kammerer, Bernd; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo

    2017-01-10

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation, including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO 2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change.

  12. Cyanobacterial Sunscreen Scytonemin: Role in Photoprotection and Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are the most promising group of photosynthetic microorganisms capable of producing an array of natural products of industrial importance. Scytonemin is a small hydrophobic alkaloid pigment molecules present in the extracellular sheath of several cyanobacteria as a protective mechanism against short wavelength solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It has great efficacy to minimize the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of DNA lesions. The biosynthesis of scytonemin is regulated by different physico-chemical stressors. Scytonemin display multiple roles, functioning as a potent UV sunscreen and antioxidant molecules, and can be exploited in cosmetic and other industries for the development of new cosmeceuticals. Herein, we review the occurrence, biosynthesis, and potential application of scytonemin in photoprotection, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical research.

  13. Evidence against a photoprotective component of photoreactivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacQuillan, A.M.; Green, G.; Perry, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Photoreactivation-deficient (phr - ) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were shown to lack in vitro DNA-photolyase activity. A phr - mutant was then compared with a phr + strain for near-UV induced photoprotection from far-UV irradiation. Neither strain exhibited a photoprotective effect. (author)

  14. Melanogenesis: a photoprotective response to DNA damage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agar, Nita; Young, Antony R.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to ultra violet radiation (UVR) is associated with significant long-term deleterious effects such as skin cancer. A well-recognised short-term consequence of UVR is increased skin pigmentation. Pigmentation, whether constitutive or facultative, has widely been viewed as photoprotective, largely because darkly pigmented skin is at a lower risk of photocarcinogenesis than fair skin. Research is increasingly suggesting that the relationship between pigmentation and photoprotection may be far more complex than previously assumed. For example, photoprotection against erythema and DNA damage has been shown to be independent of level of induced pigmentation in human white skin types. Growing evidence now suggests that UVR induced DNA photodamage, and its repair is one of the signals that stimulates melanogenesis and studies suggest that repeated exposure in skin type IV results in faster DNA repair in comparison to skin type II. These findings suggest that tanning may be a measure of inducible DNA repair capacity, and it is this rather than pigment per se which results in the lower incidence skin cancer observed in darker skinned individuals. This evokes the notion that epidermal pigmentation may in fact be the mammalian equivalent of a bacterial SOS response. Skin colour is one of most conspicuous ways in which humans vary yet the function of melanin remains controversial. Greater understanding of the role of pigmentation in skin is vital if one is to be able to give accurate advice to the general public about both the population at risk of skin carcinogenesis and also public perceptions of a tan as being healthy

  15. Melanogenesis: a photoprotective response to DNA damage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agar, Nita [St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Guy' s, Kings and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom); Young, Antony R. [St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Guy' s, Kings and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: antony.r.young@kcl.ac.uk

    2005-04-01

    Exposure to ultra violet radiation (UVR) is associated with significant long-term deleterious effects such as skin cancer. A well-recognised short-term consequence of UVR is increased skin pigmentation. Pigmentation, whether constitutive or facultative, has widely been viewed as photoprotective, largely because darkly pigmented skin is at a lower risk of photocarcinogenesis than fair skin. Research is increasingly suggesting that the relationship between pigmentation and photoprotection may be far more complex than previously assumed. For example, photoprotection against erythema and DNA damage has been shown to be independent of level of induced pigmentation in human white skin types. Growing evidence now suggests that UVR induced DNA photodamage, and its repair is one of the signals that stimulates melanogenesis and studies suggest that repeated exposure in skin type IV results in faster DNA repair in comparison to skin type II. These findings suggest that tanning may be a measure of inducible DNA repair capacity, and it is this rather than pigment per se which results in the lower incidence skin cancer observed in darker skinned individuals. This evokes the notion that epidermal pigmentation may in fact be the mammalian equivalent of a bacterial SOS response. Skin colour is one of most conspicuous ways in which humans vary yet the function of melanin remains controversial. Greater understanding of the role of pigmentation in skin is vital if one is to be able to give accurate advice to the general public about both the population at risk of skin carcinogenesis and also public perceptions of a tan as being healthy.

  16. Photoprotective effects of apple peel nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Devasier Bennet,1 Se Chan Kang,2 Jongback Gang,3 Sanghyo Kim1,4 1Department of Bionanotechnology, 2Department of Life Science, 3Department of Nano Chemistry, Gachon University, Bokjeong-Dong, Sujeong-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, Republic of Korea; 4Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Inchon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Plants contain enriched bioactive molecules that can protect against skin diseases. Bioactive molecules become unstable and ineffective due to unfavorable conditions. In the present study, to improve the therapeutic efficacy of phytodrugs and enhance photoprotective capability, we used poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide as a carrier of apple peel ethanolic extract (APETE on permeation-enhanced nanoparticles (nano-APETE. The in vitro toxicity of nano-APETE-treated dermal fibroblast cells were studied in a bioimpedance system, and the results coincided with the viability assay. In addition, the continuous real-time evaluations of photodamage and photoprotective effect of nano-APETE on cells were studied. Among three different preparations of nano-APETE, the lowest concentration provided small, spherical, monodispersed, uniform particles which show high encapsulation, enhanced uptake, effective scavenging, and sustained intracellular delivery. Also, the nano-APETE is more flexible, allowing it to permeate through skin lipid membrane and release the drug in a sustained manner, thus confirming its ability as a sustained transdermal delivery. In summary, 50 µM nano-APETE shows strong synergistic photoprotective effects, thus demonstrating its higher activity on target sites for the treatment of skin damage, and would be of broad interest in the field of skin therapeutics. Keywords: apple peel ethanolic extract, antioxidant, cellular uptake, electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, phyto-drugs, light-induced damage

  17. [Considerations on photoprotection and skin disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, T Ferreira; de Oliveira, F Bazanella; Boza, J Catucci

    2012-11-01

    Excessive exposure to solar or artificial sources of UV radiation is deleterious to the skin and can cause or worsen several diseases. Detrimental effects of UV radiation exert an important role in the development of skin cancers, cause alterations on the immune response, and act as a trigger or aggravating factor for pigmentary disorders. A group of measures, including education, change of habits, use of physical barriers and sunscreens constitutes a significant part of the treatment of many skin disorders and are valuable preventive tools. This article summarizes the relevant studies addressing these issues, emphasizing the many aspects of photoprotection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Considerations on photoprotection and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, T Ferreira; Oliveira, F Bazanella de; Boza, J Catucci

    2012-12-01

    Excessive exposure to solar or artificial sources of UV radiation is deleterious to the skin and can cause or worsen several diseases. Detrimental effects of UV radiation exert an important role in the development of skin cancers, cause alterations on the immune response, and act as a trigger or aggravating factor for pigmentary disorders. A group of measures, including education, change of habits, use of physical barriers and sunscreens constitutes a significant part of the treatment of many skin disorders and are valuable preventive tools. This article summarizes the relevant studies addressing these issues, emphasizing the many aspects of photoprotection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential Roles of Carotenes and Xanthophylls in Photosystem I Photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bressan, Mauro; Carbonera, Donatella; Agostini, Alessandro; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2016-07-05

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, xanthophylls, are structural elements of the photosynthetic apparatus and contribute to increasing both the light-harvesting and photoprotective capacity of the photosystems. β-Carotene is present in both the core complexes and light-harvesting system (LHCI) of Photosystem (PS) I, while xanthophylls lutein and violaxanthin bind exclusively to its antenna moiety; another xanthophyll, zeaxanthin, which protects chloroplasts against photooxidative damage, binds to the LHCI complexes under conditions of excess light. We functionally dissected various components of the xanthophyll- and carotene-dependent photoprotection mechanism of PSI by analyzing two Arabidopsis mutants: szl1 plants, with a carotene content lower than that of the wild type, and npq1, with suppressed zeaxanthin formation. When exposed to excess light, the szl1 genotype displayed PSI photoinhibition stronger than that of wild-type plants, while removing zeaxanthin had no such effect. The PSI-LHCI complex purified from szl1 was more photosensitive than the corresponding wild-type and npq1 complexes, as is evident from its faster photobleaching and increased rate of singlet oxygen release, suggesting that β-carotene is crucial in controlling chlorophyll triplet formation. Accordingly, fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance analysis showed an increase in the amplitude of signals assigned to chlorophyll triplets in β-carotene-depleted complexes. When PSI was fractioned into its functional moieties, it was revealed that the boost in the rate of singlet oxygen release caused by β-carotene depletion was greater in LHCI than in the core complex. We conclude that PSI-LHCI complex-bound β-carotene elicits a protective response, consisting of a reduction in the yield of harmful triplet excited states, while accumulation of zeaxanthin plays a minor role in restoring phototolerance.

  20. DNA dosimetry assessment for sunscreen genotoxic photoprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Passaglia Schuch

    Full Text Available Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systematic use of a DNA dosimeter.The Sun Protection Factor for DNA (DNA-SPF is calculated by using specific DNA repair enzymes, and it is defined as the capacity for inhibiting the generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and oxidised DNA bases compared with unprotected control samples. Five different commercial brands of sunscreen were initially evaluated, and further studies extended the analysis to include 17 other products representing various formulations and Sun Protection Factors (SPF. Overall, all of the commercial brands of SPF 30 sunscreens provided sufficient protection against simulated sunlight genotoxicity. In addition, this DNA biosensor was useful for rapidly screening the biological protection properties of the various sunscreen formulations.The application of the DNA dosimeter is demonstrated as an alternative, complementary, and reliable method for the quantification of sunscreen photoprotection at the level of DNA damage.

  1. DNA dosimetry assessment for sunscreen genotoxic photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Lago, Juliana Carvalhães; Yagura, Teiti; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systematic use of a DNA dosimeter. The Sun Protection Factor for DNA (DNA-SPF) is calculated by using specific DNA repair enzymes, and it is defined as the capacity for inhibiting the generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and oxidised DNA bases compared with unprotected control samples. Five different commercial brands of sunscreen were initially evaluated, and further studies extended the analysis to include 17 other products representing various formulations and Sun Protection Factors (SPF). Overall, all of the commercial brands of SPF 30 sunscreens provided sufficient protection against simulated sunlight genotoxicity. In addition, this DNA biosensor was useful for rapidly screening the biological protection properties of the various sunscreen formulations. The application of the DNA dosimeter is demonstrated as an alternative, complementary, and reliable method for the quantification of sunscreen photoprotection at the level of DNA damage.

  2. DNA Dosimetry Assessment for Sunscreen Genotoxic Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Lago, Juliana Carvalhães; Yagura, Teiti; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systematic use of a DNA dosimeter. Methodology/Principal Findings The Sun Protection Factor for DNA (DNA-SPF) is calculated by using specific DNA repair enzymes, and it is defined as the capacity for inhibiting the generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and oxidised DNA bases compared with unprotected control samples. Five different commercial brands of sunscreen were initially evaluated, and further studies extended the analysis to include 17 other products representing various formulations and Sun Protection Factors (SPF). Overall, all of the commercial brands of SPF 30 sunscreens provided sufficient protection against simulated sunlight genotoxicity. In addition, this DNA biosensor was useful for rapidly screening the biological protection properties of the various sunscreen formulations. Conclusions/Significance The application of the DNA dosimeter is demonstrated as an alternative, complementary, and reliable method for the quantification of sunscreen photoprotection at the level of DNA damage. PMID:22768281

  3. 4-thiouridine and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Gilles; Favre, Alain

    1977-01-01

    A high level of protection is observed in the Escherichia coli K 12 strain AB 1157 rec A 1 nuv + whose transfer RNA contains 4-thiouridine. In contrast, the photoprotection level is low and observed at higher doses in a strain which differs from the former by a single mutation nuv - , (lack of 4-thiouridine). This nucleoside is therefore an important chromophore leading to photoprotection. This conclusion is corroborated by the similarity of the action spectra for 8-13 link formation in tRNA and for photoprotection [fr

  4. Different roles of alpha- and beta-branch xanthophylls in photosystem assembly and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Fiore, Alessia; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Giuliano, Giovanni; Bassi, Roberto

    2007-11-30

    Xanthophylls (oxygenated carotenoids) are essential components of the plant photosynthetic apparatus, where they act in photosystem assembly, light harvesting, and photoprotection. Nevertheless, the specific function of individual xanthophyll species awaits complete elucidation. In this work, we analyze the photosynthetic phenotypes of two newly isolated Arabidopsis mutants in carotenoid biosynthesis containing exclusively alpha-branch (chy1chy2lut5) or beta-branch (chy1chy2lut2) xanthophylls. Both mutants show complete lack of qE, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching, and high levels of photoinhibition and lipid peroxidation under photooxidative stress. Both mutants are much more photosensitive than npq1lut2, which contains high levels of viola- and neoxanthin and a higher stoichiometry of light-harvesting proteins with respect to photosystem II core complexes, suggesting that the content in light-harvesting complexes plays an important role in photoprotection. In addition, chy1chy2lut5, which has lutein as the only xanthophyll, shows unprecedented photosensitivity even in low light conditions, reduced electron transport rate, enhanced photobleaching of isolated LHCII complexes, and a selective loss of CP26 with respect to chy1chy2lut2, highlighting a specific role of beta-branch xanthophylls in photoprotection and in qE mechanism. The stronger photosystem II photoinhibition of both mutants correlates with the higher rate of singlet oxygen production from thylakoids and isolated light-harvesting complexes, whereas carotenoid composition of photosystem II core complex was not influential. In depth analysis of the mutant phenotypes suggests that alpha-branch (lutein) and beta-branch (zeaxanthin, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin) xanthophylls have distinct and complementary roles in antenna protein assembly and in the mechanisms of photoprotection.

  5. Photoprotective Effect of Tea and its Extracts against Ultraviolet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure induces photodamage of skin. It is a matter of ... to the skin as well as the photoprotective effects of tea and its extracts have been highlighted. ..... storage of skin cream supplemented with green tea catechins or EGCG ...

  6. Effects of photoprotection and reversible inactivation of the yeast Candida guilliermondii, induced by 313 nm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajkin, G.Ya.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of studies on the effect of near uv light on the yeast Candida guilliermondii are presented. It was shown that certain doses of 313 nm light inactivated the yeast. The detailed affect is shown in the loss of the ability of the cells to form microcolonies and outwardly does not differ from inactivation caused by 254 nm uv. It was concluded that the cell destruction caused by the 313 nm light was not due to damage to DNA. Experiments in which yeast cells were inactivated by 313 nm light before plating on agar and held for some time in a non-nutrient medium permitted observation of recovery of their viability. A difference was shown in the level of repair of yeasts irradiated by 313 nm light (up to 100% recovery) and 254 nm light (60% recovery). The nature of the dependence of the photoprotection on the 313 nm light dose was determined. A decrease in photoprotection was noted, starting with 7x10 -7 einstein/cm 2 , with its complete disappearance upon further dose increase. It is suggested that, in this recovery of the yeast, some other, thus far unknown, mechanism participates. Data were obtained on the survival of yeast irradiated with lethal uv doses. Of special importance, in the authors' opinion, is the fact that, for the photoprotection effect to appear, some time is needed between actions of the 313 and 254 nm lights, which suggests a photoinduced formation in the yeast cells of compounds that protect them from lethal injury

  7. Lon gene and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waksman, G.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A. (Institut de Recherche en Biologie Moleculaire, Group de Photobiologie Moleculaire, Paris (France))

    1984-03-01

    Photoprotection, i.e. the increased resistance of the cells preilluminated with near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) to the lethal action of 254nm radiations requires either an integrated prophage or a recA mutation in Escherichia coli K12 strains. Significant photoprotection occurs in an Escherichia coli K12 recA/sup +/ cell containing the lon allele responsible for filamentous growth after 254nm irradiation. The Fil phenotype can be suppressed by the sfiA or sfiB suppressor genes. Since the E. coli K12 recA/sup +/ lon sfiB strain exhibits no more photoprotection, it is concluded that in lon strains photoprotection is due to the abolition of the 254nm induced filamentation by the near ultraviolet treatment. In addition, near ultraviolet illumination of the cells leads to a severe restriction of the bulk protein synthesis. This effect is observed only in nuv/sup +/ cells that contain 4-thiouridine the chromophore responsible for photoprotection. It is proposed that in lon (lysogenic strains) photoprotection is due to prevention of the SOS response. During the growth lag, the low residual level of protein synthesis does not allow the induction of the SOS response and accordingly prevents filamentation (the lytic cycle).

  8. The lon gene and photoprotection in Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, G.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A.

    1984-01-01

    Photoprotection, i.e. the increased resistance of the cells preilluminated with near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) to the lethal action of 254nm radiations requires either an integrated prophage or a recA mutation in Escherichia coli K12 strains. Significant photoprotection occurs in an Escherichia coli K12 recA + cell containing the lon allele responsible for filamentous growth after 254nm irradiation. The Fil phenotype can be suppressed by the sfiA or sfiB suppressor genes. Since the E. coli K12 recA + lon sfiB strain exhibits no more photoprotection, it is concluded that in lon strains photoprotection is due to the abolition of the 254nm induced filamentation by the near ultraviolet treatment. In addition, near ultraviolet illumination of the cells leads to a severe restriction of the bulk protein synthesis. This effect is observed only in nuv + cells that contain 4-thiouridine the chromophore responsible for photoprotection. It is proposed that in lon (lysogenic strains) photoprotection is due to prevention of the SOS response. During the growth lag, the low residual level of protein synthesis does not allow the induction of the SOS response and accordingly prevents filamentation (the lytic cycle). (author)

  9. Involvement of near-UV-induced synthesis of serotonin in photoprotection and in potentiation of far UV lethality in the yeast Candida guilliermondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.; Rubin, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanisms of near-UV (334 nm) induced photoprotection as well as potentiation of far-UV (254 nm) lethality are considered in Candida guilliermondii. Using exogenous precursors of serotonin, it appears that the above two mechanisms involve photoactivated synthesis of serotonin. It has been postulated that the serotonin effect could take place by binding to DNA. (author)

  10. Dissecting long-term adjustments of photoprotective and photo-oxidative stress acclimation occurring in dynamic light environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizue Matsubara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in light intensity directly affect the performance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Light energy absorbed in excess of cells’ needs leads to production of reactive oxygen species and photo-oxidative damage. Excess light in both constant and dynamic environments induces photoprotective acclimation in plants. Distinct sets of signals and regulatory mechanisms are involved in acclimatory adjustment of photoprotection and photosynthesis under constant and dynamic (fluctuating light conditions. We are still far away from drawing a comprehensive picture of acclimatory signal transduction pathways, particularly in dynamic environments. In this perspective article, we propose the use of Arabidopsis plants that produce H2O2 in chloroplasts (GO plants under atmospheric CO2 levels as a tool to study the mechanisms of long-term acclimation to photo-oxidative stress. In our opinion there are new avenues to future investigations on acclimatory adjustments and signal transduction occurring in plants under dynamic light environments.

  11. Photosynthesis and photoprotective systems of plants in response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... al., 2008), photoprotective systems (Xiao et al., 2003a;. Chen et al., 2005a; Ali et al., .... et al., 1988) and soybean (Ying and Liu, 2005) and unaffected in beech ...... Goulding KW, Vitousek PM, Zhang FS (2010). Significant.

  12. Natural compounds for solar photoprotection: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Mairim R; Guimarães, Adriana G; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Araújo, Adriano A S; Nunes, Paula S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation has deleterious effects on human skin, including tanning, sunburn, cancer and connective tissue degradation (photoaging). Botanical antioxidants have been shown to be associated with reduced incidence of photocarcinogenesis and photoaging through their photoprotective profile. Here, the authors summarized therapeutic patent applications concerning the employment of medicinal plants on the technological development of a formulation with photoprotective or photoaging application. So, the patent search was conducted in the databases WIPO, Espacenet, USPTO and Derwent, using the keywords - photoaging, photoprotection and the IPC A61K 8/97 (cosmetics or similar cleaning supplies obtained from vegetable origin, for example, plant extracts) and A61K 36/00 (medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, for example, traditional herbal medicines). We found 180 patents, out of which 25 were evaluated using inclusion criteria as application of natural products with photoprotective or photoaging application. We found that some patents related to the cosmetic compositions for improving skin wrinkle and either preventing or reducing the signs of photoaging and sunburn. The cosmetic compositions are manufactured in the form of a lotion, gel, soluble liquid, cream, essence, oil-in-water-type or water-in-oil-type formulation, containing the vegetal extracts as an active ingredient.

  13. Photoprotection as a Trait for Rice Yield Improvement: Status and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Erik H; Ali, Asgar; Herman, Tiara

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation is essential for photosynthesis and global crop productivity but it is also variable in space and time, frequently being limiting or in excess of plant requirements depending on season, environment and microclimate. Photoprotective mechanisms at the chloroplast level help to avoid oxidative stress and photoinhibition, which is a light-induced reduction in photosynthetic quantum efficiency often caused by damage to photosystem II. There is convincing evidence that photoinhibition has a large impact on biomass production in crops and this may be especially high in rice, which is typically exposed to high tropical light levels. Thus far there has been little attention to photoinhibition as a target for improvement of crop yield. However, we now have sufficient evidence to examine avenues for alleviation of this particular stress and the physiological and genetic basis for improvement in rice and other crops. Here we examine this evidence and identify new areas for attention. In particular we discuss how photoprotective mechanisms must be optimised at both the molecular and the canopy level in order to coordinate with efficient photosynthetic regulation and realise an increased biomass and yield in rice.

  14. Antioxidant activity and potential photoprotective from amazon native flora extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Francislene J; Caneschi, César A; Vieira, José L F; Barbosa, Wagner; Raposo, Nádia R B

    2016-08-01

    Plant species are sources of active compounds that can fight and/or prevent damage caused by reactive oxygen species, which enables the development of natural products that can help to prevent premature aging caused by exposure to solar radiation. This study assessed the antioxidant and photoprotective activities of six dried extracts of plants from the Brazilian Amazon biome. Plant extracts were prepared in 70% (v/v) ethanol by dynamic maceration for 72h in the dark, and then filtered, concentrated and lyophilized. The extracts were subjected to a phytochemical screening. The antioxidant activity was measured using a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and the photoprotection assay was performed using the diffuse transmittance technique. The data obtained from the antioxidant activity assay was evaluated by Student's t-test for independent samples, with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences v.14.0 for Windows software. The flavonoids represent a special metabolites class present in all analyzed extracts. The antioxidant activity (μgmL(-1)) decreased in the following order: Aniba canelilla (1.80±0.16), Brosimum acutifolium (2.84±0.38), Dalbergia monetaria (5.46±0.17) or Caesalpinia pyramidalis (6.45±1.18), Arrabidaea chica (15.35±0.86), and Aspidosperma nitidum (99.14±2.3). Only D. monetaria showed a considerable sun protection factor allowing for labeling (6.0±0.3). The D. monetaria extract was considered the most promising sample because it had optimal antioxidant and photoprotective activities against solar radiation, considering the limit established by regulatory agencies. These extracts with antioxidant potential can be used in photoprotective formulations, providing synergistic photoprotective effect or elevating the adeed value of the product. Additionally, these formulations are attractive to a population who searchs for products made with natural ingredients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening by coral green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromoproteins supports a role in photoprotection of zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. G.; D'Angelo, C.; Salih, A.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2013-06-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments are responsible for the vivid colouration of many reef-building corals and have been proposed to act as photoprotectants. Their role remains controversial because the functional mechanism has not been elucidated. We provide direct evidence to support a photoprotective role of the non-fluorescent chromoproteins (CPs) that form a biochemically and photophysically distinct group of GFP-like proteins. Based on observations of Acropora nobilis from the Great Barrier Reef, we explored the photoprotective role of CPs by analysing five coral species under controlled conditions. In vitro and in hospite analyses of chlorophyll excitation demonstrate that screening by CPs leads to a reduction in chlorophyll excitation corresponding to the spectral properties of the specific CPs present in the coral tissues. Between 562 and 586 nm, the CPs maximal absorption range, there was an up to 50 % reduction of chlorophyll excitation. The screening was consistent for established and regenerating tissue and amongst symbiont clades A, C and D. Moreover, among two differently pigmented morphs of Acropora valida grown under identical light conditions and hosting subclade type C3 symbionts, high CP expression correlated with reduced photodamage under acute light stress.

  16. Imidazole and beta-carotene photoprotection against photodynamic therapy evaluated by synchrotron infrared microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, Gabriela N.; Parisi, Julieta; García Einschlag, Fernando S.; Mártire, Daniel O.

    2018-04-01

    In order to better understand the role of β-carotene and imidazole on the Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) mechanism, synchrotron infrared microscopy was used to detect the associated intracellular biochemical modifications following the visible light irradiation of HeLa cells incubated with these compounds as typical hydrophobic and hydrophilic singlet oxygen quenchers, respectively. For this purpose, PDT was performed employing the hydrophilic sensitizer 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridinio) porphyrin tetra (p-toluenesulfonate), TMPyP, and the hydrophobic sensitizer 5-(4-Methoxycarboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin. The single cell IR spectra of PDT-treated, PDT plus quencher-treated and control HeLa cells were recorded at the SOLEIL Synchrotron Infrared SMIS beamline targeting specifically the cell nucleus. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to assess the IR spectral changes. PCA revealed that there is a frequency shift of the protein Amide I vibrational band for the assays with the TMPyP sensitizer, indicating changes in the protein secondary structures of the PDT-treated cancer cells compared to the controls. In addition, the scores in those cells treated with both quenchers appear to be similar to the controls indicating a photoprotective effect. Comparative experiments carried out with SKMEL-28 and HaCat cells showed non- significant photoprotective effects of β-carotene and imidazole.

  17. Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramjee Pallela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS, generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM. These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Diurnal Solar Energy Conversion and Photoprotection in Rice Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Katherine; Sirault, Xavier; Quick, W Paul; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Genetic improvement of photosynthetic performance of cereal crops and increasing the efficiency with which solar radiation is converted into biomass has recently become a major focus for crop physiologists and breeders. The pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence technique (PAM) allows quantitative leaf level monitoring of the utilization of energy for photochemical light conversion and photoprotection in natural environments, potentially over the entire crop lifecycle. Here, the diurnal relationship between electron transport rate (ETR) and irradiance was measured in five cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) in canopy conditions with PAM fluorescence under natural solar radiation. This relationship differed substantially from that observed for conventional short term light response curves measured under controlled actinic light with the same leaves. This difference was characterized by a reduced curvature factor when curve fitting was used to model this diurnal response. The engagement of photoprotective processes in chloroplast electron transport in leaves under canopy solar radiation was shown to be a major contributor to this difference. Genotypic variation in the irradiance at which energy flux into photoprotective dissipation became greater than ETR was observed. Cultivars capable of higher ETR at midrange light intensities were shown to produce greater leaf area over time, estimated by noninvasive imaging. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Hydrolyzed collagen interferes with in vitro photoprotective effectiveness of sunscreens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela D'Almeida Peres

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The chronological skin aging is a progressive and natural process with genetic and physiological changes. However, ultraviolet (UV radiation may accelerate the oxidative stress, generating carcinogenesis and photoaging. Natural compounds and their applications are considered a trend in the cosmetic market. The protein-based film-forming compounds play an important role, once it collaborates for the better distribution of sunscreens on the skin. Here we investigated the in vitro photoprotective effectiveness of sunscreens containing the hydrolyzed collagen associated with UVA, UVB and/or inorganic filters. Sunscreens were developed with octocrylene (7.5%, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (avobenzone (3.0% and/or titanium dioxide (5.0%, associated or not with the hydrolyzed collagen (3.0%. In vitro photoprotective effectiveness was determined in a Labsphere(r UV2000S by the establishment of the sun protection factor (SPF and critical wavelength (nm values. Physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics were also assayed. The hydrolyzed collagen subjectively improved the formulation sensory characteristics. However, this bioactive compound led to a decrease of the SPF values of the photoprotective formulations containing octocrylene alone and octocrylene + butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane + TiO2. This inadequate interaction may be considered during the development of new sunscreens intended to contain protein-based components.

  20. Evidence for a photoprotective function for secondary carotenoids of snow algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidigare, R.R.; Ondrusek, M.E.; Kennicutt, M.C. II; Iturriaga, R.; Harvey, H.R.; Hoham, R.W.; Macko, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Snow algae occupy a unique habitat in high altitude and polar environments. These algae are often subject to extremes in nutrient availability, acidity, solar irradiance, desiccation, and ambient temperature. This report documents the accumulation of secondary carotenoids by snow algae in response to the availability of nitrogenous nutrients. Unusually large accumulations of astaxanthin esters in extra-chloroplastic lipid globules produce the characteristic red pigmentation typical of some snow algae (e.g., Chlamydomonas nivalis (Bauer) Wille). Consequently, these compounds greatly reduce the amount of light available for absorption by the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes, thus potentially limiting photoinhibition and photodamage caused by intense solar radiation. The esterification of astaxanthin with fatty acids represents a possible mechanism by which this chromophore can be concentrated within cytoplasmic globules to maximize its photoprotective efficiency. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Photoprotective substance occurs primarily in outer layers of fish skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabacher, D L; Little, E E

    1998-01-01

    Methanol extracts of dorsal skin layers, eyes, gills, and livers from ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation-sensitive and UVB-tolerant species of freshwater fish were examined for a substance that appears to be photoprotective. Significantly larger amounts of this substance were found in extracts of outer dorsal skin layers from both UVB-sensitive and UVB-tolerant fish when compared with extracts of inner dorsal skin layers. This substance occurred in minor amounts or was not detected in eye, gill, and liver extracts. The apparent primary function of this substance in fish is to protect the cells in outer dorsal skin layers from harmful levels of UVB radiation.

  2. Photosystem II-cyclic electron flow powers exceptional photoprotection and record growth in the microalga Chlorella ohadii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Kaplan, Aaron; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-11-01

    The desert microalga Chlorella ohadii was reported to grow at extreme light intensities with minimal photoinhibition, tolerate frequent de/re-hydrations, yet minimally employs antenna-based non-photochemical quenching for photoprotection. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms by measuring Photosystem II charge separation yield (chlorophyll variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm) and flash-induced O 2 yield to measure the contributions from both linear (PSII-LEF) and cyclic (PSII-CEF) electron flow within PSII. Cells grow increasingly faster at higher light intensities (μE/m 2 /s) from low (20) to high (200) to extreme (2000) by escalating photoprotection via shifting from PSII-LEF to PSII-CEF. This shifts PSII charge separation from plastoquinone reduction (PSII-LEF) to plastoquinol oxidation (PSII-CEF), here postulated to enable proton gradient and ATP generation that powers photoprotection. Low light-grown cells have unusually small antennae (332 Chl/PSII), use mainly PSII-LEF (95%) and convert 40% of PSII charge separations into O 2 (a high O 2 quantum yield of 0.06mol/mol PSII/flash). High light-grown cells have smaller antenna and lower PSII-LEF (63%). Extreme light-grown cells have only 42 Chl/PSII (no LHCII antenna), minimal PSII-LEF (10%), and grow faster than any known phototroph (doubling time 1.3h). Adding a synthetic quinone in excess to supplement the PQ pool fully uncouples PSII-CEF from its natural regulation and produces maximum PSII-LEF. Upon dark adaptation PSII-LEF rapidly reverts to PSII-CEF, a transient protection mechanism to conserve water and minimize the cost of antenna biosynthesis. The capacity of the electron acceptor pool (plastoquinone pool), and the characteristic times for exchange of (PQH 2 ) B with PQ pool and reoxidation of (PQH 2 ) pool were determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloz, Miroslav [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pillai, Smitha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Kodis, Gerdenis [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gust, Devens [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Thomas A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); van Grondelle, Rienk [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kennis, John T. M. [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  4. Identification of quenchers of photoexcited States as novel agents for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T; Jacobson, Myron K; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2005-02-01

    Photooxidative stress is a key mechanism in UVA-induced skin photodamage. Photoexcited states of endogenous UVA chromophores such as porphyrins, melanin precursors, and cross-link-fluorophores of skin collagen exert skin photodamage by direct reaction with substrate molecules (type I photosensitization) or molecular oxygen (type II), leading to formation of reactive oxygen species. Based on our previous research on the role of photoexcited states of endogenous skin chromophores as sensitizers of photooxidative stress, we describe here the identification of a novel class of chemopreventive agents for topical skin photoprotection: quenchers of photoexcited states (QPES). QPES compounds antagonize the harmful excited state chemistry of endogenous sensitizers by physical quenching, facilitating the harmless return of the sensitizer excited state to the electronic ground state by energy dissipation. To identify QPES compounds suitable for development, we designed a primary screening assay based on QPES suppression of photosensitized plasmid cleavage using conditions that exclude antioxidants. This screen is followed with a screen to test for nonsacrificial quenching of dye-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) formation by electron paramagnetic resonance detection of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl, a stable free radical indicative of (1)O(2) formation. These initial screens identified a pyrrolidine pharmacophore with pronounced QPES activity, and l-proline and other noncytotoxic proline derivatives containing this pharmacophore were then screened for efficacy in cellular models of sensitized photodamage. These compounds showed QPES protection against dye-sensitized and psoralen-UVA-induced apoptosis and suppression of proliferation in cultured human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Furthermore, QPES photoprotection of reconstructed full thickness human skin exposed to solar simulated light has been demonstrated.

  5. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogson, B J; Rissler, H M

    2000-10-29

    There are multiple complementary and redundant mechanisms to provide protection against photo-oxidative damage, including non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). NPQ dissipates excess excitation energy as heat by using xanthophylls in combination with changes to the light-harvesting complex (LHC) antenna. The xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids that in addition to contributing to NPQ can quench singlet or triplet chlorophyll and are necessary for the assembly and stability of the antenna. We have genetically manipulated the expression of the epsilon-cyclase and beta-carotene hydroxylase carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The epsilon-cyclase overexpression confirmed that lut2 (lutein deficient) is a mutation in the epsilon-cyclase gene and demonstrated that lutein content can be altered at the level of mRNA abundance with levels ranging from 0 to 180% of wild-type. Also, it is clear that lutein affects the induction and extent of NPQ. The deleterious effects of lutein deficiency on NPQ in Arabidopsis and Chlamydomonas are additive, no matter what the genetic background, whether npq1 (zeaxanthin deficient), aba1 or antisense beta-hydroxylase (xanthophyll cycle pool decreased). Additionally, increasing lutein content causes a marginal, but significant, increase in the rate of induction of NPQ despite a reduction in the xanthophyll cycle pool size.

  6. Updates for responsible sun exposure behavior and photoprotection in the south.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H; Diaz, James H

    2013-01-01

    In Louisiana, the "Sportsman's Paradise," and throughout the Southern United States (US), outdoor pursuits are among the most popular physical activities, despite well-documented associations between excessive solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and skin cancer. Although there have been recent advances in broad-spectru m sunscreens, photoprotective clothing, and photoprotective sunglasses, few peer-reviewed publications have focused specifically on recommendations for responsible sun behavior and photoprotection for residents of the South. In response, the objectives of this review will be (1) to describe the adverse health effects of excessive UV radiation exposures; (2) to review recent cohort studies of public perceptions regarding sun behavior and photoprotection; (3) to identify special populations at increased risks of UV-associated skin cancers; and (4) to recommend responsible sun behavior and photoprotection strategies. Internet search engines were queried with the key words as search terms to examine the latest references on photoprotection and the epidemiology of UV-associated skin cancers and other adverse effects of UV-radiation exposures. Observational studies have demonstrated that the public knows little about proper sunscreen selection and UV protection, and cohort studies have identified populations at increased risks of UV-associated skin cancers. Southerners should avoid intense sunlight, wear photoprotective clothing, wear sunglasses, and select the right sunscreen for their skin type. Physicians should counsel their patients about responsible sun behavior and photoprotection and encourage them to take advantage of recent advances in the development of more effective broad-spectrum sunscreens and photoprotective clothing and sunglasses for themselves and their children.

  7. W Photoprotection in Tropical Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface which results from stratospheric ozone depletions could have serious implications for terrestrial plants and for aquatic organisms within the euphotic zone. A documented 9% decline in ozone at mid-latitudes is considered to produce a 12% increase in harmful UV radiation. The biologically damaging effects of higher UV levels, particularly W-B (280-320 rim), could manifest earlier in the tropics because of the relative thinness of the earth's equatorial ozone layer. Tropical marine organisms are also living close to their upper tolerance levels of water temperature, However, despite the large potential effects on plants and animals, little is known about UV effects on tropical ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial and marine ecosystems and to produce reliable data for prediction. Plants have developed several mechanisms to protect themselves from harmful UV radiation, one of which is the production of secondary leaf pigments that absorb W-B radiation (screening pigments). A higher concentration of screening pigments (e.g. flavonoids) in leaves may be interpreted as a natural response to increased W radiation. If higher concentrations of flavonoids filter out the excessive W radiation, no damage will occur, as suggested by Caldwell et al. (1989) and Tevini (1993). Failure to screen all W-B may result in deleterious effects on photosynthesis, plant genetic material, and plant and leaf morphology and growth. Eventually this will have an impact on ecosystem processes, structure, species composition, and productivity. This paper describes an ongoing project that is assessing the responses of mangroves, seagrasses and corals to W radiation by studying pigment concentrations, biophysical parameters, and variations in spectral reflectance in the field and in W-reduction experiments. Preliminary results on the distribution

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy of LHCSR1 protein dynamics identifies two distinct states responsible for multi-timescale photosynthetic photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Pinnola, Alberta; Chen, Wei Jia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.

    2017-08-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, light harvesting is regulated to safely dissipate excess energy and prevent the formation of harmful photoproducts. Regulation is known to be necessary for fitness, but the molecular mechanisms are not understood. One challenge has been that ensemble experiments average over active and dissipative behaviours, preventing identification of distinct states. Here, we use single-molecule spectroscopy to uncover the photoprotective states and dynamics of the light-harvesting complex stress-related 1 (LHCSR1) protein, which is responsible for dissipation in green algae and moss. We discover the existence of two dissipative states. We find that one of these states is activated by pH and the other by carotenoid composition, and that distinct protein dynamics regulate these states. Together, these two states enable the organism to respond to two types of intermittency in solar intensity—step changes (clouds and shadows) and ramp changes (sunrise), respectively. Our findings reveal key control mechanisms underlying photoprotective dissipation, with implications for increasing biomass yields and developing robust solar energy devices.

  9. Structural Determinats Underlying Photoprotection in the Photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein of Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Adjele; Kinney, James N.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Punginelli, Claire; D' Haene, Sandrine; Perreau, Francois; Klein, Michael G.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2010-04-01

    The photoprotective processes of photosynthetic organisms involve the dissipation of excess absorbed light energy as heat. Photoprotection in cyanobacteria is mechanistically distinct from that in plants; it involves the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP), a water-soluble protein containing a single carotenoid. The OCP is a new member of the family of blue light photoactive proteins; blue-green light triggers the OCP-mediated photoprotective response. Here we report structural and functional characterization of the wildtype and two mutant forms of the OCP, from the model organism Synechocystis PCC6803. The structural analysis provides highresolution detail of the carotenoidprotein interactions that underlie the optical properties of the OCP, unique among carotenoid-proteins in binding a single pigment per polypeptide chain. Collectively, these data implicate several key amino acids in the function of the OCP and reveal that the photoconversion and photoprotective responses of the OCP to blue-green light can be decoupled.

  10. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira-J?nior, Raimundo Gon?alves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Ferraz, Christiane Adrielly Alves; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Ara?jo, Camila de Souza; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Reis, Silvio Alan Gon?alves Bomfim; Gon?alves, Talita Mota; Rolim, Larissa Ara?jo; Rolim-Neto, Pedro Jos?; C?sar, Francine Celise Siqueira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA). Initially, the phenol...

  11. Seasonal, Sex- and Plant Size-Related Effects on Photoinhibition and Photoprotection in the Dioecious Mediterranean Dwarf Palm, Chamaerops humilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Melanie; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    In Mediterranean-type ecosystems plants are exposed to several adverse environmental conditions throughout the year, ranging from drought stress during the warm and dry summers to chilling stress due to the typical drop in temperatures during winters. Here we evaluated the ecophysiological response, in terms of photoinhibition and photoprotection, of the dioecious Mediterranean palm, Chamaerops humilis to seasonal variations in environmental conditions. Furthermore, we considered as well the influence of plant size, maturity, and sexual dimorphism. Results showed evidence of winter photoinhibition, with a marked decrease of the F v /F m ratio below 0.7 between January and March, which was coincident with the lowest temperatures. During this period, the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle and zeaxanthin levels increased, which might serve as a photoprotection mechanism, owing the full recovery from winter photoinhibition during spring. Furthermore, mature plants showed lower chlorophyll levels and higher β-carotene levels per unit of chlorophyll than juvenile plants, and females displayed lower leaf water contents and higher photoinhibition than males during summer, probably due to increased reproductive effort of females. However, neither low temperatures during winter nor reproductive events in females during the summer led to irreversible damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. We conclude that (i) the Mediterranean dwarf palm, C. humilis, suffers from photoinhibition during winter, but this is transient and does not lead to irreversible damage, and (ii) females from this plant species are more sensitive than males to photoinhibition during reproductive events.

  12. Seasonal, sex- and plant size-related effects on photoinhibition and photoprotection in the dioecious Mediterranean dwarf palm, Chamaerops humilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Morales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean-type ecosystems plants are exposed to several adverse environmental conditions throughout the year, ranging from drought stress during the warm and dry summers to chilling stress due to the typical drop in temperatures during winters. Here we evaluated the ecophysiological response, in terms of photoinhibition and photoprotection, of the dioecious Mediterranean palm, Chamaerops humilis to seasonal variations in environmental conditions. Furthermore, we considered as well the influence of plant size, maturity and sexual dimorphism. Results showed evidence of winter photoinhibition, with a marked decrease of the Fv/Fm ratio below 0.7 between January and March, which was coincident with the lowest temperatures. During this period, the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle and zeaxanthin levels increased, which might serve as a photoprotection mechanism, owing the full recovery from winter photoinhibition during spring. Furthermore, mature plants showed lower chlorophyll levels and higher β-carotene levels per unit of chlorophyll than juvenile plants, and females displayed lower leaf water contents and higher photoinhibition than males during summer, probably due to increased reproductive effort of females. However, neither low temperatures during winter nor reproductive events in females during the summer led to irreversible damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. We conclude that (i the Mediterranean dwarf palm, C. humilis, suffers from photoinhibition during winter, but this is transient and does not lead to irreversible damage, and (ii females from this plant species are more sensitive than males to photoinhibition during reproductive events.

  13. Molecular photoprotection of human keratinocytes in vitro by the naturally occurring mycosporine-like amino acid palythine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K P; Gacesa, R; Long, P F; Young, A R

    2017-11-13

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces molecular and genetic changes in the skin, which result in skin cancer, photoageing and photosensitivity disorders. The use of sunscreens is advocated to prevent such photodamage; however, most formulations contain organic and inorganic UVR filters that are nonbiodegradable and can damage fragile marine ecosystems. Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are natural UVR-absorbing compounds that have evolved in marine species for protection against chronic UVR exposure in shallow-water habitats. To determine if palythine, a photostable model MAA, could offer protection against a range of UVR-induced damage biomarkers that are important in skin cancer and photoageing. HaCaT human keratinocytes were used to assess the photoprotective potential of palythine using a number of end points including cell viability, DNA damage (nonspecific, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and oxidatively generated damage), gene expression changes (linked to inflammation, photoageing and oxidative stress) and oxidative stress. The antioxidant mechanism was investigated using chemical quenching and Nrf2 pathway activation assays. Palythine offered statistically significant protection (P photoprotective molecule in vitro that has potential to be developed as a natural and biocompatible alternative to currently approved UVR filters. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Endogenous UVA-photosensitizers: mediators of skin photodamage and novel targets for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T; Jacobson, Myron K; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2006-02-01

    Endogenous chromophores in human skin serve as photosensitizers involved in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Absorption of solar photons, particularly in the UVA region, induces the formation of photoexcited states of skin photosensitizers with subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), organic free radicals and other toxic photoproducts that mediate skin photooxidative stress. The complexity of endogenous skin photosensitizers with regard to molecular structure, pathways of formation, mechanisms of action, and the diversity of relevant skin targets has hampered progress in this area of photobiology and most likely contributed to an underestimation of the importance of endogenous sensitizers in skin photodamage. Recently, UVA-fluorophores in extracellular matrix proteins formed posttranslationally as a consequence of enzymatic maturation or spontaneous chemical damage during chronological and actinic aging have been identified as an abundant source of light-driven ROS formation in skin upstream of photooxidative cellular stress. Importantly, sensitized skin cell photodamage by this bystander mechanism occurs after photoexcitation of sensitizers contained in skin structural proteins without direct cellular photon absorption thereby enhancing the potency and range of phototoxic UVA action in deeper layers of skin. The causative role of photoexcited states in skin photodamage suggests that direct molecular antagonism of photosensitization reactions using physical quenchers of photoexcited states offers a novel chemopreventive opportunity for skin photoprotection.

  15. Photoprotective effect of a psoralen-UVA-induced tan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschnait, F.; Brenner, W.; Wolff, K.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether a tan produced by 8-MOP and UVA protects from subsequent solar light irradiation, volunteers were irradiated with unfiltered Xenon arc light before and 10 days after a 1 week's course of four 8-MOP-UVA treatments. Evaluation of the minimal erythema doses and of histological changes before and after 8-MOP-UVA treatment revealed that the 8-MOP-UVA induced tan protected against the erythemogenic and cell damaging effects of Xenon arc light. Unscheduled repair DNA synthesis, used as a measure for UVB-induced DNA damage and repair, was also investigated in skin irradiated with the Xenon arc before and after 8-MOP-UVA induced tanning. Both the number of grains per sparse labeled cell and the number of sparse labeled cells per 1000 cells, were found to be significantly lower in tanned skin; taking decreased unscheduled repair DNA synthesis as a measure for decreased DNA-damage, these findings also demonstrate a photoprotective effect of the 8-MOP-UVA induced tan. (orig.) [de

  16. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF MALIGNANT SKIN TUMORS – PHOTOPROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Benedičič - Pilih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the world as well as in our country. Decades of research have increased the understanding of the ethiopathogenetic influences and risk factors for development of malignant skin tumors and stimulated efforts to promote their prevention. There are successes of prevention programs in some places in the world expressing with the reduction of mortality because of the cutaneous malignant melanoma. A primary prevention of a skin cancer attempts to change population knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about sunlight, leading to reduce of sunlight exposure.Conclusions. In this article we are discussing guidelines for photoprevention. The best approach to it is a reduction in the overall exposure to sunlight. The natural protection with the use of shade, clothing and hats is promoted as the best protection. Sunscreens are assumed as an important component of adjuvant photoprotection based on their convenience of use and also on their widespread promotion. While it has been argued that all tanning is a manifestation of skin injury, avoiding of artificial tanning devices is proposed also.

  17. Reduced calcification decreases photoprotective capability in the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Gao, Kunshan

    2012-07-01

    Intracellular calcification of coccolithophores generates CO₂ and consumes additional energy for acquisition of calcium and bicarbonate ions; therefore, it may correlate with photoprotective processes by influencing the energetics. To address this hypothesis, a calcifying Emiliania huxleyi strain (CS-369) was grown semi-continuously at reduced (0.1 mM, LCa) and ambient Ca²⁺ concentrations (10 mM, HCa) for 150 d (>200 generations). The HCa-grown cells had higher photosynthetic and calcification rates and higher contents of Chl a and carotenoids compared with the naked (bearing no coccoliths) LCa-grown cells. When exposed to stressfull levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), LCa-grown cells displayed lower photochemical yield and less efficient non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). When the LCa- or HCa-grown cells were inversely shifted to their counterpart medium, LCa to HCa transfer increased photosynthetic carbon fixation (P), calcification rate (C), the C/P ratio, NPQ and pigment contents, whereas those shifted from HCa to LCa exhibited the opposite effects. Increased NPQ, carotenoids and quantum yield were clearly linked with increased or sustained calcification in E. huxleyi. The calcification must have played a role in dissipating excessive energy or as an additional drainage of electrons absorbed by the photosynthetic antennae. This phenomenon was further supported by testing two non-calcifying strains, which showed insignificant changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation and NPQ when transferred to LCa conditions.

  18. Adoption of photoprotection measures on lip and perioral regions among beach workers in North Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Costa, Danielle Clarisse Barbosa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2014-11-01

    Workers from various occupational groups stand out as being more susceptible to photodamage. Behaviors that can reduce the risk of onset of these disorders include the limitation or reduction of sun exposure, use of photoprotective clothing, and correct use of sunscreen. The present study aimed to verify the use of photoprotection measures by beach workers on the lips and perioral regions, as well as investigate possible associations with sociodemographic, occupational, and health variables. For this purpose, calibrated researchers applied validated questionnaires. The participants were 362 beach workers with a minimum age of 18 years. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests and robust Poisson regression. In regard to photoprotection measures, most of the population studied reported using some form of protection (80.1%). Among these, the most common were the use of a cap/hat (66.2%) and sunscreen (41.6%). Applying lipstick (3.6%) and using some other measure (4.2%) were the least reported. When compiling a multivariate analysis model, type of work (P = 0.001) was the only variable that explained the adoption of photoprotection measures, regardless of daily and accumulated exposure and the presence of habits. In general, most workers reported using some form of photoprotection in the oral and perioral regions, and those exposed to direct solar radiation effectively confirmed this. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Comparison of methods for assessing photoprotection against ultraviolet A in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidbey, K.; Gange, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Photoprotection against ultraviolet A (UVA) by three sunscreens was evaluated in humans, with erythema and pigmentation used as end points in normal skin and in skin sensitized with 8-methoxypsoralen and anthracene. The test sunscreens were Parsol 1789 (2%), Eusolex 8020 (2%), and oxybenzone (3%). UVA was obtained from two filtered xenon-arc sources. UVA protection factors were found to be significantly higher in sensitized skin compared with normal skin. Both Parsol and Eusolex provided better and comparable photoprotection (approximately 3.0) than oxybenzone (approximately 2.0) in sensitized skin, regardless of whether 8-methoxypsoralen or anthracene was used. In normal unsensitized skin, Parsol 1789 and Eusolex 8020 were also comparable and provided slightly better photoprotection (approximately 1.8) than oxybenzone (approximately 1.4) when pigmentation was used as an end point. The three sunscreens, however, were similar in providing photoprotection against UVA-induced erythema. Protection factors obtained in artificially sensitized skin are probably not relevant to normal skin. It is concluded that pigmentation, either immediate or delayed, is a reproducible and useful end point for the routine assessment of photoprotection of normal skin against UVA

  20. Photoprotective effect of botanicals and vitamins: A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuong, William; Kuo, Sandy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to solar radiation is a major contributor to skin cancer development and premature skin aging. Botanical extracts and vitamins may represent novel photoprotective agents. We sought to systemically review clinical evidence for the use of botanically derived agents and vitamins as photoprotective agents. We systematically searched Embase and PubMed databases. Two independent reviewers reviewed abstracts for inclusion. Additional relevant studies were identified by a manual review of reference lists. Data from eligible studies were extracted independently and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. A total of 51 studies met inclusion criteria. Limited available evidence indicates that several botanical agents and vitamins in topical or oral forms may have promising photoprotective effects. However, generalizability of results is limited by small sample sizes. Botanical extracts and vitamins may add to the armamentarium of sun-protective agents. Additional high-quality trials are needed to strengthen support for their use.

  1. Repair of 313-nm induced lesions and photoprotection in yeast Candida guilliermondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    The present communication is concerned with the effects of near-UV radiation (300-380 nm) on yeast Candida guilliermondii. It was found that certain doses of 313 nm irradiation caused inactivation of the yeast which was exhibited in a way different from the lethal action of far-UV radiation. It was also found that the cells inactivated by 313 nm are capable of recovering vitality, if incubated for some time in a non-nutrient medium. The yeast inactivated by far-UV radiation also proved to be capable of recovering, though to a lesser degree. Both 334 nm radiation and non-lethal doses at 313 nm induced the photoprotective effect against far-UV damage. The effect was exhibited if there was a certain time interval (2-4 h) between the exposures to photoprotective light and subsequent far-UV radiation. Within this time interval the extent of photoprotection was dependent on temperature. (author)

  2. Photoprotection by sunscreen depends on time spent on application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerfordt, Ida M; Torsnes, Linnea R; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2018-03-01

    To be effective, sunscreens must be applied in a sufficient quantity and reapplication is recommended. No previous study has investigated whether time spent on sunscreen application is important for the achieved photoprotection. To determine whether time spent on sunscreen application is related to the amount of sunscreen used during a first and second application. Thirty-one volunteers wearing swimwear applied sunscreen twice in a laboratory environment. Time spent and the amount of sunscreen used during each application was measured. Subjects' body surface area accessible for sunscreen application (BSA) was estimated from their height, weight and swimwear worn. The average applied quantity of sunscreen after each application was calculated. Subjects spent on average 4 minutes and 15 seconds on the first application and approximately 85% of that time on the second application. There was a linear relationship between time spent on application and amount of sunscreen used during both the first and the second application (P applications. After the first application, subjects had applied a mean quantity of sunscreen of 0.71 mg/cm 2 on the BSA, and after the second application, a mean total quantity of 1.27 mg/cm 2 had been applied. We found that participants applied a constant amount of sunscreen per minute during both a first and a second application. Measurement of time spent on application of sunscreen on different body sites may be useful in investigating the distribution of sunscreen in real-life settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Enhanced photoprotection by protein-bound vs free xanthophyll pools: a comparative analysis of chlorophyll b and xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Havaux, Michel; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    When light absorbed by plants exceeds the capacity of photosynthesis, the xanthophyll violaxanthin is reversibly de-epoxidized to zeaxanthin in the so-called xanthophyll cycle. Zeaxanthin plays a key role in the protection of photosynthetic organisms against excess light, by promoting rapidly reversible (qE) and long-term (qI) quenching of excited chlorophylls, and preventing lipid oxidation. The photoprotective role of zeaxanthin, either free or bound to light-harvesting complexes (Lhcs), has been investigated by using mutants lacking Chl b (ch1) and/or specific xanthophyll species (npq, lut2). The ch1 mutation causes (1) the absence of Lhcb proteins; (2) strong reduction of the feedback de-excitation (qE); and (3) accumulation of xanthophylls as free pigments into thylakoids. Ch1 mutants showed extreme sensitivity to photo-oxidative stress in high light, due to higher singlet oxygen (¹O₂) release. The double mutant ch1npq1 was more sensitive to photo-oxidation than ch1, showing that zeaxanthin does protect lipids even when free in the membrane. Nevertheless, lack of zeaxanthin had a much stronger impact on the level of lipid peroxidation in Lhcs-containing plants (WT vs npq1) with respect to Lhc-less plants (ch1 vs ch1npq1), implying that its protective effect is enhanced by interaction with antenna proteins. It is proposed that the antioxidant capacity of zeaxanthin is empowered in the presence of PSII-LHCs-Zea complexes, while its effect on enhancement of qE only provides a minor contribution. Comparison of the sensitivity of WT vs npq1 plants to exogenous ¹O₂ suggests that besides the scavenging of ¹O₂, at least one additional mechanism is involved in chloroplast photoprotection.

  4. Skin photoprotective and antiageing effects of a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Vincenzo; Michelotti, Angela; Cestone, Enza; Caturla, Nuria; Castillo, Julián; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Micol, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Background Plant polyphenols have been found to be effective in preventing ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin alterations. A dietary approach based of these compounds could be a safe and effective method to provide a continuous adjunctive photoprotection measure. In a previous study, a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) extracts has exhibited potential photoprotective effects both in skin cell model and in a human pilot trial. Objective We investigated the efficacy of a combination of rosemary (R. officinalis) and grapefruit (C. paradisi) in decreasing the individual susceptibility to UVR exposure (redness and lipoperoxides) and in improving skin wrinkledness and elasticity. Design A randomised, parallel group study was carried out on 90 subjects. Furthermore, a pilot, randomised, crossover study was carried out on five subjects. Female subjects having skin phototype from I to III and showing mild to moderate chrono- or photoageing clinical signs were enrolled in both studies. Skin redness (a* value of CIELab colour space) after UVB exposure to 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED) was assessed in the pilot study, while MED, lipoperoxides (malondialdehyde) skin content, wrinkle depth (image analysis), and skin elasticity (suction and elongation method) were measured in the main study. Results Treated subjects showed a decrease of the UVB- and UVA-induced skin alterations (decreased skin redness and lipoperoxides) and an improvement of skin wrinkledness and elasticity. No differences were found between the 100 and 250 mg extracts doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 100 mg extracts dose. Some of the positive effects were noted as short as 2 weeks of product consumption. Conclusions The long-term oral intake of Nutroxsun™ can be considered to be a complementary nutrition strategy to avoid the negative effects of sun exposure. The putative mechanism for these effects is most likely to take place through the

  5. Skin photoprotective and antiageing effects of a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Nobile

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant polyphenols have been found to be effective in preventing ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin alterations. A dietary approach based of these compounds could be a safe and effective method to provide a continuous adjunctive photoprotection measure. In a previous study, a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi extracts has exhibited potential photoprotective effects both in skin cell model and in a human pilot trial. Objective: We investigated the efficacy of a combination of rosemary (R. officinalis and grapefruit (C. paradisi in decreasing the individual susceptibility to UVR exposure (redness and lipoperoxides and in improving skin wrinkledness and elasticity. Design: A randomised, parallel group study was carried out on 90 subjects. Furthermore, a pilot, randomised, crossover study was carried out on five subjects. Female subjects having skin phototype from I to III and showing mild to moderate chrono- or photoageing clinical signs were enrolled in both studies. Skin redness (a* value of CIELab colour space after UVB exposure to 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED was assessed in the pilot study, while MED, lipoperoxides (malondialdehyde skin content, wrinkle depth (image analysis, and skin elasticity (suction and elongation method were measured in the main study. Results: Treated subjects showed a decrease of the UVB- and UVA-induced skin alterations (decreased skin redness and lipoperoxides and an improvement of skin wrinkledness and elasticity. No differences were found between the 100 and 250 mg extracts doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 100 mg extracts dose. Some of the positive effects were noted as short as 2 weeks of product consumption. Conclusions: The long-term oral intake of Nutroxsun™ can be considered to be a complementary nutrition strategy to avoid the negative effects of sun exposure. The putative mechanism for these effects is most likely to take place

  6. Climatic origins predict variation in photoprotective leaf pigments in response to drought and low temperatures in live oaks (Quercus series Virentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Valiente, Jose A; Koehler, Kari; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2015-05-01

    Climate is a major selective force in nature. Exploring patterns of inter- and intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits may explain how species have evolved and may continue evolving under future climate change. Photoprotective pigments play an important role in short-term responses to climate stress in plants but knowledge of their long-term role in adaptive processes is lacking. In this study, our goal was to determine how photoprotective mechanisms, morphological traits and their plasticity have evolved in live oaks (Quercus series Virentes) in response to different climatic conditions. For this purpose, seedlings originating from 11 populations from four live oak species (Quercus virginiana, Q. geminata, Q. fusiformis and Q. oleoides) were grown under contrasting common environmental conditions of temperature (tropical vs temperate) and water availability (droughted vs well-watered). Xanthophyll cycle pigments, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and leaf anatomical traits were measured. Seedlings originating from more mesic source populations of Q. oleoides and Q. fusiformis increased the xanthophyll de-epoxidation state under water-limiting conditions and showed higher phenotypic plasticity for this trait, suggesting adaptation to local climate. Likewise, seedlings originating from warmer climates had higher anthocyanin concentration in leaves under cold winter conditions but not higher de-epoxidation state. Overall, our findings suggest that (i) climate has been a key factor in shaping species and population differences in stress tolerance for live oaks, (ii) anthocyanins are used under cold stress in species with limited freezing tolerance and (iii) xanthophyll cycle pigments are used when photoprotection under drought conditions is needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Molecular Origin of Photoprotection in Cyanobacteria Probed by Watermarked Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Kloz, Miroslav; Polívka, Tomáš; Shukla, Mahendra K.; Sobotka, Roman; Kennis, John T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Photoprotection is fundamental in photosynthesis to avoid oxidative photodamage upon excess light exposure. Excited chlorophylls (Chl) are quenched by carotenoids, but the precise molecular origin remains controversial. The cyanobacterial HliC protein belongs to the Hlip family ancestral to plant

  8. Animal model for evaluation of topical photoprotection against ultraviolet A (320-380 nm) radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, S.; DeLeo, V.A.; Harber, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies reporting UVA (ultraviolet A radiation 320-380 nm) as an integral part of the cumulative sun-induced damage in human skin have prompted an interest in developing effective UVA photoprotective agents. The development of such compounds has been impeded by the absence of a clinically relevant animal model for evaluating their efficacy. This report describes the development and use of such a laboratory animal system. Selected concentrations of oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone) in vehicle (0.1% to 6%) or vehicle alone were applied to the depilated dorsal skin of 30 Hartley strain female albino guinea pigs. The skin was irradiated with solar simulated UVA from a xenon light source. Acute radiation-induced damage was assayed by erythema grading and inhibition of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into epidermal DNA. Data from erythema grading studies indicated that a significant degree of photoprotection was achieved with 6%, 3%, and 1% solutions of benzophenone compared with the control vehicle; the 6% solution was significantly more photoprotective than the 3% and 1% solutions. A 6% solution afforded significant photoprotection when assayed by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation

  9. Vitamin D levels, dietary intake, and photoprotective behaviors among patients with skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Laura K; Wetherington, Sarah; Hill, Nikki; Kumari, Meena; Gammon, Bryan; Dunbar, Scott; Tangpricha, Vin; Chen, Suephy C

    2010-09-01

    Photoprotection against ultraviolet light is an important part of our armamentarium against actinically derived skin cancers. However, there has been concern that adherence to photoprotection may lead to low vitamin D status, leading to negative effects on patients' health. In this work we discuss previous findings in this area, which do not give a clear picture as to the relationship between vitamin D levels and photoprotection measures, as well as research performed by the authors, who did not detect a relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and adherence to photoprotection measures in subjects with skin cancer, as assessed by the use of sunscreen, clothing, hats, sunglasses, and umbrellas/shade through the Sun Protection Habits Index. Subjects who took vitamin D oral supplementation had greater serum 25(OH)D levels than those who did not, whereas dietary intake through foods did not predict 25(OH)D levels in the authors' study. However, there was a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in the authors' study population, highlighting the importance of assessing vitamin D status and recommending oral vitamin D supplementation when indicated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II : Role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do

  11. [Role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in photoprotection in Rumex K-1 leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-Long; Zhang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Taking Rumex K-1 leaves as test materials, this paper studied the role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in photoprotection under different light intensities. Under low light intensity (200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)), and after treated with salicylhydroxamic acid to inhibit the AOX pathway, the leaf actual photochemical efficiency of PS II, linear electron transport rate of photosynthesis, and photosynthetic O2 evolution rate all decreased significantly while the non-Q(B) reducing reaction center had a significant increase, indicating that under low light, the photoinhibition was aggravated while the scavenging enzymes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased, which avoided the over-accumulation of ROS and partially alleviated the photoinhibition of Rumex K-1 leaves. Under high light intensity (800 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)), the inhibition of AOX pathway caused more severe photoinhibition, and the increased activities of ROS scavenging enzymes were insufficient to prevent the over-accumulation of ROS. This study demonstrated that AOX pathway played an important role in the photoprotection in Rumex K-1 leaves under both high and low light intensities, and the role of AOX pathway in photoprotection under high light could be irreplaceable by the other photoprotection pathways in chloroplast.

  12. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II - Role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta; Osto, Luca Dall’

    2008-01-01

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do

  13. [Riboflavin photoprotection with cross-linking effect in photorefractive ablation of the cornea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilovskiy, I M; Sultanova, A I; Burtsev, A A

    2016-01-01

    Photorefractive ablation is inevitably accompanied by oxidative stress of the cornea and weakening of its biomechanical and photoprotective properties. To validate the expediency of riboflavin use in photorefractive ablation for photoprotection of the cornea and cross-linking. The effects of riboflavin use in photorefractive ablation was first studied in a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments performed on 56 eyes of 28 rabbits, and then on 232 eyes of 142 patients with different degrees of myopia. Biomechanical testing of corneal samples was performed with Zwick/RoellВZ 2.5/TN1S tensile-testing machine. Transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (TransPRK) and femtosecond laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (Femto-LASIK) were performed on Wavelight-Allegretto200, MEL-80, and WaveLight-EX500 excimer laser systems and also VisuMax and WaveLight-FS200 femtosecond lasers. For preliminary examinations, an appropriate set of diagnostic tools was used. In vivo experiments have proved that, in the absence of conservative therapy, riboflavin is able to produce both photoprotective and cross-linking effects to the cornea. Corneal syndrome was thus reduced and re-epithelialization after TransPRK accelerated. Biomechanical testing of corneal samples revealed an increase in tolerated load from 12.9±1.4 N to 18.3±1.2 N (p=0.0002) and tensile strength from 8.6±1.7 MPa to 12.4±1.7 MPa (p=0.007). Clinical studies conducted in a group of patients with mild to moderate myopia have also confirmed the photoprotective effect of riboflavin at months 1-12 after TransPRK. There were no significant differences in uncorrected visual acuity (ranged from 0.80±0.16 to 0.85±0.15) and corrected visual acuity at baseline (0.83±0.14). Evaluation of the optical and refractive effect achieved after Femto-LASIK with riboflavin photoprotection in the fellow eye has shown that this technique is not inferior to the traditional one as to its refractive accuracy, but provides better

  14. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira-Júnior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA. Initially, the phenolic and flavonoid total content of Nv-HA were determined. The photoprotective activity of Nv-HA was subsequently assessed using a spectrophotometric method. Nv-HA was incorporated in O/W emulsions in the presence or absence of synthetic filters and their photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric SPF determination. Finally, the stability study of the formulations was performed through the freezing/defrosting method. Nv-HA showed significant phenolic and flavonoids content (61.66±5.14 mg GAE/g and 90.27±5.03 mg CE/g, resp.. Nv-HA showed SPF values of 5.43±0.07 and 11.73±0.04 for the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v, respectively. It was verified that Nv-HA potentiated the photoprotective effect of formulations containing only synthetic filters. Furthermore, the formulations have remained stable at the end of the preliminary stability study. According to the results, it was concluded that Nv-HA can be used as a chemical filter in cosmetic formulations.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Júnior, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Ferraz, Christiane Adrielly Alves; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Araújo, Camila de Souza; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Reis, Silvio Alan Gonçalves Bomfim; Gonçalves, Talita Mota; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; Rolim-Neto, Pedro José; César, Francine Celise Siqueira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA). Initially, the phenolic and flavonoid total content of Nv-HA were determined. The photoprotective activity of Nv-HA was subsequently assessed using a spectrophotometric method. Nv-HA was incorporated in O/W emulsions in the presence or absence of synthetic filters and their photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric SPF determination. Finally, the stability study of the formulations was performed through the freezing/defrosting method. Nv-HA showed significant phenolic and flavonoids content (61.66 ± 5.14 mg GAE/g and 90.27 ± 5.03 mg CE/g, resp.). Nv-HA showed SPF values of 5.43 ± 0.07 and 11.73 ± 0.04 for the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v), respectively. It was verified that Nv-HA potentiated the photoprotective effect of formulations containing only synthetic filters. Furthermore, the formulations have remained stable at the end of the preliminary stability study. According to the results, it was concluded that Nv-HA can be used as a chemical filter in cosmetic formulations.

  16. Bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds in copepods: environmental triggers and sources of intra-specific variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarese, H. E.; García, P.; Diéguez, M. D.; Ferraro, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature are two globally important abiotic factors affecting freshwater ecosystems. Planktonic organisms have developed a battery of counteracting mechanisms to minimize the risk of being damaged by UVR, which respond to three basic principles: avoid, protect, repair. Copepods are among the most successful zooplankton groups. They are highly adaptable animals, capable of displaying flexible behaviors, physiologies, and life strategies. In particular, they are well equipped to cope with harmful UVR. Their arsenal includes vertical migration, accumulation of photoprotective compounds, and photorepair. The preference for a particular strategy is affected by a plethora of environmental (extrinsic) parameters, such as the existence of a depth refuge, the risk of visual predation, and temperature. Temperature modifies the environment (e.g. the lake thermal structure), and animal metabolism (e.g., swimming speed, bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds). In addition, the relative weight of UVR-coping strategies is also influenced by the organism (intrinsic) characteristics (e.g., inter- and intra-specific variability). The UV absorbing compounds, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), are widely distributed among freshwater copepods. Animals are unable to synthesize MAAs, and therefore depend on external sources for accumulating these compounds. Although copepods may acquire MAAs from their food, for the few centropagic species investigated so far, the main source of MAAs are microbial (most likely prokaryotic) organisms living in close association with the copepods. Boeckella gracilipes is a common centropagic copepod in Patagonian lakes. We suspected that its occurrence in different types of lakes, hydrologically unconnected, but within close geographical proximity, could have resulted in different microbial-copepod associations (i.e., different MAAs sources) that could translate into intra-specific differences in the accumulation

  17. Antiaging, photoprotective, and brightening activity in biorevitalization: a new solution for aging skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparavigna A

    2015-02-01

    . Conclusion: The study confirmed the well-known efficacy of biorevitalization in skin rejuvenation. The positive difference between deep and superficial skin hydration registered at the end of the trial suggested improved skin moisture retention of the stratum corneum. Furthermore, the obtained results suggest that the injected product could intervene at different moments of the skin pigmentation process by activating an intrinsic photoprotective mechanism and improving skin pigmentation quality. It may be that these processes employ common mechanisms in which antioxidants could play a pivotal role. This last hypothesis deserves further investigation. Keywords: hyaluronic acid, antioxidants, photoaging, senile lentigo

  18. Photoprotective role of the xanthophyll cycle studied by means of modeling of xanthophyll-LHCII interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I., E-mail: wieslaw.gruszecki@umcs.pl [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Zubik, Monika [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Luchowski, Rafal [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Janik, Ewa [Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Biology, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Grudzinski, Wojciech [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Gospodarek, Malgorzata [Institute of Physics, Technical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Goc, Jacek [Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Poznan (Poland); Fiedor, Leszek [Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy [Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technologies, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    2010-07-19

    The problem of photoprotection associated with the xanthophyll cycle is addressed by examination of effects of exogenous violaxanthin and zeaxanthin on isolated antenna complex LHCII. Analysis of electronic absorption spectra suggests multiple sites of binding of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin to the protein environment. Xanthophyll binding results in enhancement of excitonic bands at ca. 530 and 740 nm, as concluded on the basis of Resonance Light Scattering spectra. The energy states attributed to these excitonic bands are concluded to quench singlet excitations. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy shows that both xanthophylls, but in particular zeaxanthin, promote formation of supramolecular structures characterized by extremely low fluorescence yield. Photoprotective meaning of the xanthophyll cycle is concluded to be primarily based upon role of zeaxanthin in promoting formation of supramolecular structures of LHCII characterized by high rate of energy dissipation.

  19. Photoprotective role of the xanthophyll cycle studied by means of modeling of xanthophyll-LHCII interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.; Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Janik, Ewa; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gospodarek, Malgorzata; Goc, Jacek; Fiedor, Leszek; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2010-07-01

    The problem of photoprotection associated with the xanthophyll cycle is addressed by examination of effects of exogenous violaxanthin and zeaxanthin on isolated antenna complex LHCII. Analysis of electronic absorption spectra suggests multiple sites of binding of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin to the protein environment. Xanthophyll binding results in enhancement of excitonic bands at ca. 530 and 740 nm, as concluded on the basis of Resonance Light Scattering spectra. The energy states attributed to these excitonic bands are concluded to quench singlet excitations. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy shows that both xanthophylls, but in particular zeaxanthin, promote formation of supramolecular structures characterized by extremely low fluorescence yield. Photoprotective meaning of the xanthophyll cycle is concluded to be primarily based upon role of zeaxanthin in promoting formation of supramolecular structures of LHCII characterized by high rate of energy dissipation.

  20. Photoprotective role of the xanthophyll cycle studied by means of modeling of xanthophyll-LHCII interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.; Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Janik, Ewa; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gospodarek, Malgorzata; Goc, Jacek; Fiedor, Leszek; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2010-01-01

    The problem of photoprotection associated with the xanthophyll cycle is addressed by examination of effects of exogenous violaxanthin and zeaxanthin on isolated antenna complex LHCII. Analysis of electronic absorption spectra suggests multiple sites of binding of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin to the protein environment. Xanthophyll binding results in enhancement of excitonic bands at ca. 530 and 740 nm, as concluded on the basis of Resonance Light Scattering spectra. The energy states attributed to these excitonic bands are concluded to quench singlet excitations. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy shows that both xanthophylls, but in particular zeaxanthin, promote formation of supramolecular structures characterized by extremely low fluorescence yield. Photoprotective meaning of the xanthophyll cycle is concluded to be primarily based upon role of zeaxanthin in promoting formation of supramolecular structures of LHCII characterized by high rate of energy dissipation.

  1. Development and stability studies of sunscreen cream formulations containing three photo-protective filters

    OpenAIRE

    Smaoui, Slim; Ben Hlima, Hajer; Ben Chobba, Ines; Kadri, Adel

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to formulate and subsequently evaluate sunscreen cream (W/O/W emulsion) containing three photo-protective filters: benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and titanium dioxide at different percentages. Formulations were stored at 8, 25 and 40 °C for four weeks to investigate their stability. Color, centrifugation, liquefaction, phase separation, pH and Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of sunscreen cream formulations were determined. The microbiological stability of the ...

  2. Photo-protective effect of calcipotriol upon skin photoreaction to UVA and UVB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.I.; Park, B.S.; Chung, J.H.; Lee, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 has a photo-protective effect against UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured rat keratinocytes by induction of metallothionein (MT). Calcipotriol is a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 with equi-potent cell regulating properties, but with a lower risk of calcium-related side effects. The aim of the present study was to see whether calcipotriol has a photo-protective property both in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of calcipotriol on UV-induced damage of cultured human keratinocytes through a cell viability assay, and measurement of DNA synthesis by cultured keratinocytes, on UV-induced damage of mouse skin and on minimal erythema dose (MED). We found that calcipotriol was protective against UVB-induced reduction in DNA synthetic activity of cultured keratinocytes in relatively low doses (20 and 40 mJ/cm 2 ) of UVB. With photo-testing following application of calcipotriol, five subjects among 10 healthy volunteers and three among six psoriasis patients showed an increase in MED compared with the vehicle-treated site. These findings imply that calcipotriol may be photo-protective and that more extensive studies with various doses of UV irradiation and modes of calcipotriol delivery are required. (au)

  3. Light Signaling-Dependent Regulation of Photoinhibition and Photoprotection in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Luyue; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Xiang, Xun; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Foyer, Christine H; Zhou, Yanhong

    2018-02-01

    Photoreceptor-mediated light signaling plays a critical role in plant growth, development, and stress responses but its contribution to the spatial regulation of photoinhibition and photoprotection within the canopy remains unclear. Here, we show that low-red/far-red ( L - R / FR ) ratio light conditions significantly alleviate PSII and PSI photoinhibition in the shade leaves of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) plants. This protection is accompanied by a phytochrome A-dependent induction of LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). HY5 binds to the promoter of ABA INSENSITIVE 5 ( ABI5 ), triggering RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG1 ( RBOH1 )-dependent H 2 O 2 production in the apoplast. Decreased levels of HY5 , ABI5 , and RBOH1 transcripts increased cold-induced photoinhibition and abolished L - R / FR -induced alleviation of photoinhibition. L - R / FR illumination induced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence and increased the activities of Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle enzymes and cyclic electron flux (CEF) around PSI. In contrast, decreased HY5 , ABI5 , and RBOH1 transcript levels abolished the positive effect of L - R / FR on photoprotection. Loss of PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 -dependent CEF led to increased photoinhibition and attenuated L - R / FR -dependent NPQ. These data demonstrate that HY5 is an important hub in the cross talk between light and cold response pathways, integrating ABA and reactive oxygen species signaling, leading to the attenuation of photoinhibition by enhanced induction of photoprotection in shade leaves. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. A Specific Melon Concentrate Exhibits Photoprotective Effects from Antioxidant Activity in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Egoumenides

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin is the largest body organ and the first barrier to exogenous threats. This organ is constantly exposed to external factors such as ultraviolet radiation, which induces many adverse effects including sunburn, depigmentation, photo aging, photo immune suppression, and even skin cancer. Antioxidants seem to be good candidates in order to reduce ultraviolet-mediated damages and to prevent the health consequences of ultraviolet exposure. The present investigation aims to further characterize the potential skin photoprotective effects of a food supplementation and a topical administration of a melon concentrate alone or in combination. A clinical study assessing the Minimal Erythema Dose (MED was first set up to evaluate photoprotection. Afterward, an independent in vitro study was performed on human skin explants from a donor to evaluate the effect of the melon concentrate at different levels including on the sunburn cells formation and on the endogenous antioxidant enzymes and its influence on melanin. Clinical study results demonstrate that melon concentrate application and/or supplementation increased MED. It also increased the endogenous antioxidant enzymes and reduced sunburn cells and melanin level on irradiated skin explants. Therefore, it is suggested that melon concentrate administration (oral and/or topical could be a useful strategy for photoprotection due to its antioxidant properties.

  5. Assessment of the photoprotection properties of sunscreens by chromatographic measurement of DNA damage in skin explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouret, Stéphane; Bogdanowicz, Patrick; Haure, Marie-José; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie; Cadet, Jean; Favier, Alain; Douki, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the photoprotection provided by sunscreens is performed either through the induction of erythema and expressed as the sun protection factor (SPF), or by the UVA-mediated persistent pigment darkening (PPD). None of these two endpoints has a link with skin cancer, the most deleterious consequence of excess exposure to solar UV radiation. We thus set up a complementary approach to evaluate the protection provided by sunscreens to the genome of human skin. This is based on the quantification of the thymine cyclobutane dimer (TT-CPD), the main DNA lesion induced by both UVB and UVA radiations. Irradiations were performed ex vivo on human skin explants and the level of TT-CPD in DNA was determined by HPLC associated with tandem mass spectrometry. The technique was first optimized and validated with three standard sunscreens. The study was then extended to the evaluation of a commercial high SPF sunscreen exhibiting efficient UVA photoprotection. The DNA protecting factor was found to reflect the ratio between UVB and UVA photoprotection, although the absolute values of the genomic protection were, as a general trend, lower than either SPF or PPD. These data show the usefulness of the proposed approach for the evaluation of the genoprotection afforded by sunscreens. © 2010 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2010 The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. Photoprotection in an ecological context: the remarkable complexity of thermal energy dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W

    2006-01-01

    This review places photoprotection into the context of ecology and species diversity. The focus is on photoprotection via the safe removal - as thermal energy - of excess solar energy absorbed by the light collecting system, which counteracts the formation of reactive oxygen species. An update on the surprisingly complex, multiple variations of thermal energy dissipation is presented, placing these different forms into ecological and genetic contexts. Zeaxanthin-facilitated, flexible thermal dissipation associated with the PsbS protein and controlled by the trans-thylakoid pH gradient apparently occurs ubiquitously in plants, and can become sustained (and thus less flexible) at low temperatures. Long-lived, slow-growing plants with low intrinsic capacities for photosynthesis have greater capacities for this flexible dissipation than short-lived, fast-growing species. Furthermore, potent, but inflexible (zeaxanthin-facilitated) thermal dissipation, prominent in evergreen species under prolonged environmental stress, is characterized with respect to the involvement of photosystem II core rearrangement and/or degradation as well as the absence of control by trans-thylakoid pH and, possibly, PsbS. A role of PsbS-related proteins in photoprotection is discussed.

  7. Diurnal Solar Energy Conversion and Photoprotection in Rice Canopies1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, W. Paul; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Genetic improvement of photosynthetic performance of cereal crops and increasing the efficiency with which solar radiation is converted into biomass has recently become a major focus for crop physiologists and breeders. The pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence technique (PAM) allows quantitative leaf level monitoring of the utilization of energy for photochemical light conversion and photoprotection in natural environments, potentially over the entire crop lifecycle. Here, the diurnal relationship between electron transport rate (ETR) and irradiance was measured in five cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) in canopy conditions with PAM fluorescence under natural solar radiation. This relationship differed substantially from that observed for conventional short term light response curves measured under controlled actinic light with the same leaves. This difference was characterized by a reduced curvature factor when curve fitting was used to model this diurnal response. The engagement of photoprotective processes in chloroplast electron transport in leaves under canopy solar radiation was shown to be a major contributor to this difference. Genotypic variation in the irradiance at which energy flux into photoprotective dissipation became greater than ETR was observed. Cultivars capable of higher ETR at midrange light intensities were shown to produce greater leaf area over time, estimated by noninvasive imaging. PMID:27895208

  8. Photo-protective effect of calcipotriol upon skin photoreaction to UVA and UVB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, J.I.; Park, B.S.; Chung, J.H. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Dept. of Dermatology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.H. [Inha Univ. College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    It has been shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} has a photo-protective effect against UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured rat keratinocytes by induction of metallothionein (MT). Calcipotriol is a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} with equi-potent cell regulating properties, but with a lower risk of calcium-related side effects. The aim of the present study was to see whether calcipotriol has a photo-protective property both in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of calcipotriol on UV-induced damage of cultured human keratinocytes through a cell viability assay, and measurement of DNA synthesis by cultured keratinocytes, on UV-induced damage of mouse skin and on minimal erythema dose (MED). We found that calcipotriol was protective against UVB-induced reduction in DNA synthetic activity of cultured keratinocytes in relatively low doses (20 and 40 mJ/cm{sup 2}) of UVB. With photo-testing following application of calcipotriol, five subjects among 10 healthy volunteers and three among six psoriasis patients showed an increase in MED compared with the vehicle-treated site. These findings imply that calcipotriol may be photo-protective and that more extensive studies with various doses of UV irradiation and modes of calcipotriol delivery are required. (au). 21 refs.

  9. Photoprotective Effect of the Plant Collaea argentina against Adverse Effects Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Mamone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality for tumours and other accessible lesions based on the combination of light and a photosensitizer (PS accumulated in the target tissue. The main disadvantage of PDT is PS retention after treatment during long time periods that conduces to cutaneous damage. It is believed that singlet oxygen is responsible for that skin photosensitization. The aim of this work was to evaluate the photoprotective activity of the methanolic extract of the Argentinian plant Collaea argentina against PDT under several treatments and employing different PSs. C. argentina exhibited photoprotective activity against aminolevulinic acid- (ALA- PDT in the LM2 murine adenocarcinoma cell line. The photoprotection was dependant on the extract concentration and the incubation time, being detectable from 40 μg/mL onwards and at least after 3 h exposure of the cells. C. argentina extract protects these mammalian tumor cells against PDT effects, and it interferes with the oxygen singlet production from PSs during PDT treatment. We propose that it will be a promising agent to protect cells against PDT-induced skin sensitivity.

  10. Photo-protection in the centric diatom Coscinodiscus granii is not controlled by chloroplast high-light avoidance movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Wilhelm Goessling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are important phototrophs in the worlds’ oceans contributing approximately 40% of the global primary photosynthetic production. This is partially explained by their capacity to exploit environments with variable light conditions, but there is limited knowledge on how diatoms cope with changes in the spectral composition and intensity of light. In this study, the influence of light quality and high irradiance on photosynthesis in the centric diatom Coscinodiscus granii was investigated with microscopic imaging and variable chlorophyll fluorescence techniques. Determination of the wavelength-dependent functional absorption cross-section of photosystem (PS II revealed that absorption of blue light (BL and red light (RL was 2.3-fold and 0.8-fold that of white light (WL, respectively. Hence, BL was more efficiently converted into photo-chemical energy. Excessive energy from BL was dissipated via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ mechanisms, while RL apparently induced only negligible NPQ even at high irradiance. A dose dependent increase of cells exhibiting an altered chloroplast distribution was observed after exposure to high levels of BL and WL, but not RL. However, no effective quantum yield of PSII was measured in the majority of cells with an altered chloroplast distribution, and positive Sytox green® death staining confirmed that most of these cells were dead. We conclude that although Coscinodiscus granii can sustain high irradiance it does not perform chloroplast high-light avoidance movements for photo-protection.

  11. Fernblock, a Nutriceutical with Photoprotective Properties and Potential Preventive Agent for Skin Photoaging and Photoinduced Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles Juarranz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many phytochemicals are endowed with photoprotective properties, i.e., the capability to prevent the harmful effects of excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV light. These effects include photoaging and skin cancer, and immunosuppression. Photoprotection is endowed through two major modes of action: UV absorption or reflection/scattering; and tissue repair post-exposure. We and others have uncovered the photoprotective properties of an extract of the fern Polypodium leucotomos (commercial name Fernblock. Fernblock is an all-natural antioxidant extract, administered both topically (on the skin or orally. It inhibits generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS production induced by UV including superoxide anion. It also prevents damage to the DNA, inhibits UV-induced AP1 and NF-κB, and protects endogenous skin natural antioxidant systems, i.e., CAT, GSH, and GSSR. Its photoprotective effects at a cellular level include a marked decrease of UV-mediated cellular apoptosis and necrosis and a profound inhibition of extracellular matrix remodeling. These molecular and cellular effects translate into long-term inhibition of photoaging and carcinogenesis that, together with its lack of toxicity, postulate its use as a novel-generation photoprotective nutriceutical of phytochemical origin.

  12. The velocity of light intensity increase modulates the photoprotective response in coastal diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Giovagnetti

    Full Text Available In aquatic ecosystems, the superimposition of mixing events to the light diel cycle exposes phytoplankton to changes in the velocity of light intensity increase, from diurnal variations to faster mixing-related ones. This is particularly true in coastal waters, where diatoms are dominant. This study aims to investigate if coastal diatoms differently activate the photoprotective responses, xanthophyll cycle (XC and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ, to cope with predictable light diel cycle and unpredictable mixing-related light variations. We compared the effect of two fast light intensity increases (simulating mixing events with that of a slower increase (corresponding to the light diel cycle on the modulation of XC and NPQ in the planktonic coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. During each light treatment, the photon flux density (PFD progressively increased from darkness to five peaks, ranging from 100 to 650 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Our results show that the diel cycle-related PFD increase strongly activates XC through the enhancement of the carotenoid biosynthesis and induces a moderate and gradual NPQ formation over the light gradient. In contrast, during mixing-related PFD increases, XC is less activated, while higher NPQ rapidly develops at moderate PFD. We observe that together with the light intensity and its increase velocity, the saturation light for photosynthesis (Ek is a key parameter in modulating photoprotection. We propose that the capacity to adequately regulate and actuate alternative photoprotective 'safety valves' in response to changing velocity of light intensity increase further enhances the photophysiological flexibility of diatoms. This might be an evolutionary outcome of diatom adaptation to turbulent marine ecosystems characterized by unpredictable mixing-related light changes over the light diel cycle.

  13. Effects of seasonality and a daily photo-protection upon some facial signs of Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Qiu, H

    2017-06-01

    These were two-fold: (i) to record through standardized pictures, the possible changes in 31 facial signs induced, in a 6-month period, by the periodical shift from winter to summer in a group of 43 Chinese women and (ii) to appraise the preventive effects of a strong photo-protective product, daily applied to the faces of an additional group (N = 40) of women of same age-range and presenting same severities of facial signs in winter. Facial signs (structural and pigmentation-related) were scored in blind by a panel of 12 experts from photographs taken under standard conditions. Scorings were performed under specific scales as established by a previously published referential Skin Aging Atlas, Volume 2, Asian Type. A significant seasonal impact was found for more than 60% of facial signs, that is presenting a higher severity in summer in the unprotected group. Some changes are of a low or subtle extent, whereas some others show significant amplitudes. The latter comprise eight signs, among the 31, that became, far above scoring threshold, indeed affected during this 6-month period. The observed changes in six of these eight signs, in majority related to pigmentation, appeared efficiently alleviated in the photo-protected group. The shift from winter to summer exposure is confirmed in altering some facial pigmented signs among Chinese women. Such changes appear much alleviated by a daily strong photo-protective regimen. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Ferulic acid stabilizes a solution of vitamins C and E and doubles its photoprotection of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lin, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Ravindra D; Tournas, Joshua A; Burch, James A; Selim, M Angelica; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Grichnik, James M; Zielinski, Jan; Pinnell, Sheldon R

    2005-10-01

    Ferulic acid is a potent ubiquitous plant antioxidant. Its incorporation into a topical solution of 15%l-ascorbic acid and 1%alpha-tocopherol improved chemical stability of the vitamins (C+E) and doubled photoprotection to solar-simulated irradiation of skin from 4-fold to approximately 8-fold as measured by both erythema and sunburn cell formation. Inhibition of apoptosis was associated with reduced induction of caspase-3 and caspase-7. This antioxidant formulation efficiently reduced thymine dimer formation. This combination of pure natural low molecular weight antioxidants provides meaningful synergistic protection against oxidative stress in skin and should be useful for protection against photoaging and skin cancer.

  15. Photosynthetic activity, photoprotection and photoinhibition in intertidal microphytobenthos as studied in situ using variable chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serôdio, João; Vieira, Sónia; Cruz, Sónia

    2008-06-01

    The photosynthetic activity of microphytobenthos biofilms was studied in situ on an intertidal mudflat of the Ria de Aveiro, Portugal. Time series of physical variables characterizing the microenvironment at the sediment photic zone (incident solar irradiance, temperature, salinity), photophysiological parameters and productive biomass of undisturbed microalgal assemblages were measured during daytime low-tide periods along one spring-neap tidal cycle, with the objective of (1) characterizing the short-term variability in photosynthetic activity in situ, (2) relating it with the changing environmental conditions and (3) with the operation of physiologically (xanthophyll cycle) and behaviorally (vertical migration) based photoprotective processes, and (4) assessing the occurrence of photoinhibition. Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry was applied to measure photosynthetic activity (the effective and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, Δ F/ Fm' and Fv/ Fm; the photosynthesis index EFY; rapid light-response curves (RLC)), the photoprotective operation of the xanthophyll cycle and photoinhibition (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ; quantum efficiency of open RCs, Fv'/ Fm'), and vertical migration (productive biomass, Fo). The photosynthetic activity was found to be strongly affected by the cumulative light dose received during the morning low-tide periods. The fluorescence indices Δ F/ Fm', EFY, Fv'/ Fm' and RLC parameters were more depressed under high irradiances when clear sky was present during the morning low tide than when foggy conditions reduced the light dose received during a comparable period. Productive biomass exhibited maximum values in the first hours of the morning, followed by a steep decrease when irradiance reached moderate levels, due to the downward migration of the microalgae. This photophobic migratory response appeared to display a photoprotective role, allowing Δ F/ Fm' to remain near optimum values until irradiance reached

  16. Protein-protein interactions within photosystem II under photoprotection: the synergy between CP29 minor antenna, subunit S (PsbS) and zeaxanthin at all-atom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Vangelis

    2018-05-07

    The assembly and disassembly of protein complexes within cells are crucial life-sustaining processes. In photosystem II (PSII) of higher plants, there is a delicate yet obscure balance between light harvesting and photo-protection under fluctuating light conditions, that involves protein-protein complexes. Recent breakthroughs in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are combined with new approaches herein to provide structural and energetic insight into such a complex between the CP29 minor antenna and the PSII subunit S (PsbS). The microscopic model involves extensive sampling of bound and dissociated states at atomic resolution in the presence of photo-protective zeaxanthin (Zea), and reveals well defined protein-protein cross-sections. The complex is placed within PSII, and macroscopic connections are emerging (PsbS-CP29-CP24-CP47) along the energy transfer pathways from the antenna to the PSII core. These connections explain macroscopic observations in the literature, while the previously obscured atomic scale details are now revealed. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the Non-Photochemical Quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, the down-regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, that enables the protection of PSII against excess excitation load. Zea is found at the PsbS-CP29 cross-section and a pH-dependent equilibrium between PsbS dimer/monomers and the PsbS-CP29 dissociation/association is identified as the target for engineering tolerant plants with increased crop and biomass yields. Finally, the new MD based approaches can be used to probe protein-protein interactions in general, and the PSII structure provided can initiate large scale molecular simulations of the photosynthetic apparatus, under NPQ conditions.

  17. Development of O/W emulsions containing Euterpe oleracea extract and evaluation of photoprotective efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Cecilio Daher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Euterpe oleraceaMart. is a palm tree popularly known as açai, which is primarily found in northern Brazil. The açai's fruits contain anthocyanins, a class of polyphenols to which antioxidant properties have been attributed. The aim of this work was to develop O/W sunscreens emulsions containing açai glycolic extract (AGE and to evaluate both their physical stability and photoprotective efficacy. Emulsions containing AGE and sunscreens were formulated using different types and concentrations of polymeric surfactant (acrylates/C 10-30 alkyl acrylate crosspolymer and sodium polyacrylate. The influence of two rheology modifiers (polyacrylamide (and C13-14/isoparaffin (and Laureth-7 and Carbomer on the stability was also investigated. Physical stability was evaluated by preliminary and accelerated studies. Emulsions with 1.0% sodium polyacrylate were stable and exhibited non-newtonian pseudoplastic behavior and thixotropy. Photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by in vivo Sun Protection Factor (SPF and determination of Protection Factor of UVA (PF-UVA. When AGE was added to the sunscreen emulsion, no significant increase in the in vivo SPF value was observed. The emulsion containing AGE showed PF-UVA = 14.97, 1.69 of the SPF/PF-UVA ratio and a critical wavelength value of 378 nm, and may therefore be considered a sunscreen with UVA and UVB protection.

  18. Dried extracts of Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae) present antioxidant and photoprotective activities in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Guimarães, Amanda Leite; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Silva Morais, Amanda Caroline; da Cruz Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and photoprotective activities of dried extracts from the leaves of Encholirium spectabile were investigated. It was also evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents by the Folin–Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene–linoleic acid bleaching and compared with ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as reference compounds. The photoprotective effect was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The most significant total phenolic and flavonoid contents was of 188.50 ± 27.50 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and 129.70 ± 4.59 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively, for chloroform fraction (Es-CHCl3). The Es-CHCl3 also presented the best antioxidant activity (IC50 25.35 ± 4.35 μg/ml) for DPPH scavenging. The ethanol extract (Es-EtOH), Es-CHCl3 and the fraction ethyl acetate (Es-AcOEt) showed characteristic absorption bands in regions UVB and UVA in a concentration-dependent manner. Es-CHCl3 presented the highest sun protection factor SPF (8.89 ± 2.11). It shows the possibility to use this extract as sunscreen in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:24396251

  19. Bipyrimidine Signatures as a Photoprotective Genome Strategy in G + C-rich Halophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L; Baxter, Bonnie K

    2016-09-02

    Halophilic archaea experience high levels of ultraviolet (UV) light in their environments and demonstrate resistance to UV irradiation. DNA repair systems and carotenoids provide UV protection but do not account for the high resistance observed. Herein, we consider genomic signatures as an additional photoprotective strategy. The predominant forms of UV-induced DNA damage are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, most notoriously thymine dimers (T^Ts), which form at adjacent Ts. We tested whether the high G + C content seen in halophilic archaea serves a photoprotective function through limiting T nucleotides, and thus T^T lesions. However, this speculation overlooks the other bipyrimidine sequences, all of which capable of forming photolesions to varying degrees. Therefore, we designed a program to determine the frequencies of the four bipyrimidine pairs (5' to 3': TT, TC, CT, and CC) within genomes of halophilic archaea and four other randomized sample groups for comparison. The outputs for each sampled genome were weighted by the intrinsic photoreactivities of each dinucleotide pair. Statistical methods were employed to investigate intergroup differences. Our findings indicate that the UV-resistance seen in halophilic archaea can be attributed in part to a genomic strategy: high G + C content and the resulting bipyrimidine signature reduces the genomic photoreactivity.

  20. Photoprotection and triplet energy transfer in higher plants: the role of electronic and nuclear fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Prandi, Ingrid G; Caprasecca, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-28

    Photosynthetic organisms employ several photoprotection strategies to avoid damage due to the excess energy in high light conditions. Among these, quenching of triplet chlorophylls by neighboring carotenoids (Cars) is fundamental in preventing the formation of singlet oxygen. Cars are able to accept the triplets from chlorophylls by triplet energy transfer (TET). We have here studied TET rates in CP29, a minor light-harvesting complex (LHC) of the Photosystem II in plants. A fully atomistic strategy combining classical molecular dynamics of the LHC in its natural environment with a hybrid time-dependent density functional theory/polarizable MM description of the TET is used. We find that the structural fluctuations of the pigment-protein complex can largely enhance the transfer rates with respect to those predicted using the crystal structure, reducing the triplet quenching times in the subnanosecond scale. These findings add a new perspective for the interpretation of the photoprotection function and its relation with structural motions of the LHC.

  1. Evolution of an atypical de-epoxidase for photoprotection in the green lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhirong; Peers, Graham; Dent, Rachel M; Bai, Yong; Yang, Scarlett Y; Apel, Wiebke; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2016-09-12

    Plants, algae and cyanobacteria need to regulate photosynthetic light harvesting in response to the constantly changing light environment. Rapid adjustments are required to maintain fitness because of a trade-off between efficient solar energy conversion and photoprotection. The xanthophyll cycle, in which the carotenoid pigment violaxanthin is reversibly converted into zeaxanthin, is ubiquitous among green algae and plants and is necessary for the regulation of light harvesting, protection from oxidative stress and adaptation to different light conditions(1,2). Violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE) is the key enzyme responsible for zeaxanthin synthesis from violaxanthin under excess light. Here we show that the Chlorophycean VDE (CVDE) gene from the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes an atypical VDE. This protein is not homologous to the VDE found in plants and is instead related to a lycopene cyclase from photosynthetic bacteria(3). Unlike the plant-type VDE that is located in the thylakoid lumen, the Chlamydomonas CVDE protein is located on the stromal side of the thylakoid membrane. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that CVDE evolved from an ancient de-epoxidase that was present in the common ancestor of green algae and plants, providing evidence of unexpected diversity in photoprotection in the green lineage.

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of efficacy and safety of photoprotective formulations containing antioxidant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P.P. Reis Mansur

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic exposure to solar radiation could contribute to premature skin aging and skin cancer. Skin presents its own antioxidant defense, however when defenses are out of balance, reactive oxygen species could damage biological structures. In the present work, an oil-in-water photoprotective emulsion was developed and Bauhinia microstachya var. massambabensis Vaz, Fabaceae, extracts at 1% (obtained by extraction with different solvents were added to this emulsion. In vitro and in vivo efficacy and safety of the formulations were evaluated. Spectrophotometric methods and in vivo Colipa test were performed to evaluated efficacy of the formulations, through sun protection factor (SPF determination and UVA protection factor assessment. To the in vitro safety assessment HET-CAM, CAM-TBS and Red Blood Cell tests were performed. Results showed that both extracts contributed to a higher in vivo photoprotection (SPF 18 when compared to the formulation without extract (SPF 13, this result could be attributed to the antioxidant activity of the plant extracts that act by capturing reactive oxygen species. Concerning safety, all formulations were considered non-irritant according to in vitro tests. Formulations containing extracts could be considered efficient and safe for cosmetic use since they presented higher sun protection factor and passed the toxicity tests.

  3. Green tea polyphenols provide photoprotection, increase microcirculation, and modulate skin properties of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Ulrike; Moore, Carolyn E; De Spirt, Silke; Tronnier, Hagen; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2011-06-01

    Dietary constituents including polyphenols and carotenoids contribute to endogenous photoprotection and modulate skin characteristics related to structure and function of the tissue. Animal and in-vitro studies indicate that green tea polyphenols affect skin properties. In a 12-wk, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 60 female volunteers were randomized to an intervention or control group. Participants consumed either a beverage with green tea polyphenols providing 1402 mg total catechins/d or a control beverage. Skin photoprotection, structure, and function were measured at baseline (wk 0), wk 6, and wk 12. Following exposure of the skin areas to 1.25 minimal erythemal dose of radiation from a solar simulator, UV-induced erythema decreased significantly in the intervention group by 16 and 25% after 6 and 12 wk, respectively. Skin structural characteristics that were positively affected included elasticity, roughness, scaling, density, and water homeostasis. Intake of the green tea polyphenol beverage for 12 wk increased blood flow and oxygen delivery to the skin. Likewise, in a separate, randomized, double-blind, single-dose (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g) study of green tea polyphenols, blood flow was maximized at 30 min after ingestion. In summary, green tea polyphenols delivered in a beverage were shown to protect skin against harmful UV radiation and helped to improve overall skin quality of women.

  4. Photoeducation and photoprotection among liver transplant candidates: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Karina Dal Sasso; Rossin, Fabiana Murad; Ziviani, Luciana da Costa; Ribeiro, Kátia Prado; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão; Ohler, Linda; de Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer after liver transplant ranges from 3% to 16%, considerably higher than that observed in the general population. Skin cancer causes 25% of deaths in patients who have survived more than 3 years after liver transplant. The objective of this study was to identify differences regarding the level of sun exposure, knowledge of potential risk factors, and photoprotection measures among liver transplant candidates and recipients. We carried out a prospective cross-sectional study with 100 patients enrolled at a liver transplant program in a Brazilian center. The patients were interviewed and received oral information regarding skin care and sun exposure. Results reveal that measures of photoprotection and photoeducation are more prevalent among recipients than among candidates. High degrees of solar exposure were observed more frequently among candidates, although recipients showed better knowledge about the risks of sun exposure. Educational actions concerning skin cancer prevention should be part of the guidelines given by the multidisciplinary team to the liver transplant patients, in particular, by the nursing team.

  5. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect the skin cells against the harmful effects of UVA. In this work, we designed a mitochondria-targeted hexadentate (tricatechol-based) iron chelator linked to mitochondria-homing SS-like peptides. The photoprotective potential of this compound against UVA-induced oxidative damage and cell death was evaluated in cultured primary skin fibroblasts. Our results show that this compound provides unprecedented protection against UVA-induced mitochondrial damage, adenosine triphosphate depletion, and the ensuing necrotic cell death in skin fibroblasts, and this effect is fully related to its potent iron-chelating property in the organelle. This mitochondria-targeted iron chelator has therefore promising potential for skin photoprotection against the deleterious effects of the UVA component of sunlight. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of stirring speed, glycerin and sodium chloride concentrations on photoprotective nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Granemann e Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New technologies that improve the physical as the sensory properties of sunscreens can help to increase its continued use and impact on health. The use of nanoemulsions in the development of photoprotective vehicles is an advantage, since nanostructured components may have superior properties regarding their performance when compared to conventional products. The advantages of using nanobiotechnology in manufacture of cosmetic and dermatological formulations arise from the protection of compounds from chemical or enzymatic degradation, from the control of their release, and also to the prolonged retention time of cosmetic ingredients in the stratum corneum. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of stirring speed and of glycerin and sodium chloride concentrations in the development and effectiveness of a nanoemulsion containing ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and benzophenone-3. The results of statistical analyses regarding the impact of the variables in the process of nanoemulsion development showed that these parameters affect the phase inversion temperature (PIT. However, this did not affect the particle size and the photoprotective efficacy in vitro.

  7. Assessing the photoprotective effects of red ochre on human skin by in vitro laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaan F. Rifkin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological indicators of cognitive complexity become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age, with the habitual exploitation of red ochre widely viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour. Given that some of the uses of ochre remain ambiguous, we present the preliminary results of an ongoing study in which we explore the efficacy of red ochre as a photoprotective device or sunscreen. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the detrimental effects of ultraviolet radiation was confirmed through the in vitro calculation of the sun protection factor values of samples derived from the Kunene Region in Namibia and the Bokkeveld Group deposits, Western Cape Province, South Africa. Visible spectroscopy was employed to determine colourimetric parameters of samples and assess the correlation between ochre colour and sun protection factor. The possible role of ochre as a sunscreen agent for hominin populations, including modern humans, during the Middle Stone Age in Africa is explored. We conclude that the habitual use of red ochre as a photoprotective agent likely played a role in the ability of prehistoric humans to adapt to novel environmental circumstances.

  8. Distribution and evolutionary trends of photoprotective isoprenoids (xanthophylls and tocopherols) within the plant kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Raquel; Olano, José M; Castresana, José; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Hernández, Antonio; Becerril, José M; García-Plazaola, José I

    2009-04-01

    The earliest land photosynthesis would have increased the risk of photo-oxidations and the demand of anti-oxidative protection. In this work, we aimed to determine the evolutionary trends in photoprotection across a wide representation of the plant kingdom and to verify whether the non-ubiquitous lutein-epoxide (Lx) cycle is a polyphyletic or an ancient character. Carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-toc) were analysed by HPLC in 266 species. Phylogenetic analyses of the presence of photoprotective compounds and zeaxanthin-epoxidase (ZE) sequences were performed. Violaxanthin-cycle pigments (VAZ) and alpha-toc were taxonomically ubiquitous. Ancient groups showed higher contents of VAZ than vascular plants, while alpha-toc showed the opposite pattern. Lutein-epoxide was present in 45% of the species. It showed a remarkable variation across groups but with a clear increasing trend from algae to basal angiosperms. Lutein-epoxide was also related to woody trait and leaf longevity. No correlation between the presence of Lx and recurrent mutations in ZE sequences, including the duplications, was found. Thus, there is an evolutionary trend to increase the content of alpha-toc and to decrease the total amount of VAZ pigments. Absence of Lx in algae discards an ancestral origin. Present results are also inconsistent with a polyphyletic origin of Lx in angiosperms.

  9. Role of UV light in photodamage, skin aging, and skin cancer: importance of photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Evelyn R

    2009-01-01

    Solar, and particularly UV, radiation causes molecular and cellular damage with resultant histopathologic and clinical degenerative changes, leading in turn to photosensitivity, photo-aging, and skin cancer. While our bodies have some natural UV defenses, additional protection from the sun is essential, including sun avoidance, physical protection, and sunscreen use. Sun avoidance includes limiting exposure during peak UV times (10am-4pm), avoiding UV-reflective surfaces such as sand, snow and water, and eliminating photosensitizing drugs. Physical protection includes wearing photoprotective clothing such as a broad-brimmed hat and long sleeves and use of UV-blocking films on windows. Sunscreen containing avobenzone, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide or encamsule should be used daily and frequently reapplied. To guard against the UVB spectrum, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are particularly recommended. Sunscreen is generally under-applied at only 25% of the recommended dose, seriously compromising photoprotection. Dosage guidelines recommend using more than half a teaspoon each on head and neck area and each arm, and more than a teaspoon each on anterior torso, posterior torso, and each leg (approximately 2 mg/cm(2)).

  10. Mimicking the Role of the Antenna in Photosynthetic Photoprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Bhushan, Kul; Zaks, Julia; Madden, Christopher; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Fleming, Graham R.; Gust, Devens

    2011-03-09

    One mechanism used by plants to protect against damage from excess sunlight is called nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Triggered by low pH in the thylakoid lumen, NPQ leads to conversion of excess excitation energy in the antenna system to heat before it can initiate production of harmful chemical species by photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we report a synthetic hexad molecule that functionally mimics the role of the antenna in NPQ. When the hexad is dissolved in an organic solvent, five zinc porphyrin antenna moieties absorb light, exchange excitation energy, and ultimately decay by normal photophysical processes. Their excited-state lifetimes are long enough to permit harvesting of the excitation energy for photoinduced charge separation or other work. However, when acid is added, a pH-sensitive dye moiety is converted to a form that rapidly quenches the first excited singlet states of all five porphyrins, converting the excitation energy to heat and rendering the porphyrins kinetically incompetent to readily perform useful photochemistry.

  11. Photoprotection in a purple phototrophic bacterium mediated by oxygen-dependent alteration of carotenoid excited-state properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, V.; Chábera, P.; Olsen, J.D.; Martin, E.C.; Qian, P.; Hunter, C.N.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 22 (2012), s. 8570-8575 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : charge-transfer state * photoprotection * purple bacteria * photosynthesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  12. New cytokinin derivatives possess UVA and UVB photoprotective effect on human skin cells and prevent oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hönig, Martin; Plíhalová, Lucie; Spíchal, L.; Grúz, Jiří; Kadlecová, Alena; Voller, Jiří; Rajnochová Svobodová, A.; Vostálová, J.; Ulrichová, J.; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 150, APR 25 (2018), s. 946-957 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Aromatic cytokinins * Caenorhabditis elegans * Kinetin derivatives * Oxidative stress * UVA/UVB photoprotectivity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  13. Targeting NRF2 for Improved Skin Barrier Function and Photoprotection: Focus on the Achiote-Derived Apocarotenoid Bixin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Krajisnik, Andrea; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2017-12-18

    The transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2) orchestrates major cellular defense mechanisms including phase-II detoxification, inflammatory signaling, DNA repair, and antioxidant response. Recent studies strongly suggest a protective role of NRF2-mediated gene expression in the suppression of cutaneous photodamage induced by solar UV (ultraviolet) radiation. The apocarotenoid bixin, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved natural food colorant (referred to as 'annatto') originates from the seeds of the achiote tree native to tropical America, consumed by humans since ancient times. Use of achiote preparations for skin protection against environmental insult and for enhanced wound healing has long been documented. We have recently reported that (i) bixin is a potent canonical activator of the NRF2-dependent cytoprotective response in human skin keratinocytes; that (ii) systemic administration of bixin activates NRF2 with protective effects against solar UV-induced skin damage; and that (iii) bixin-induced suppression of photodamage is observable in Nrf2 +/+ but not in Nrf2 -/- SKH-1 mice confirming the NRF2-dependence of bixin-induced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, bixin displays molecular activities as sacrificial antioxidant, excited state quencher, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) α/γ agonist, and TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4/NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) antagonist, all of which might be relevant to the enhancement of skin barrier function and environmental stress protection. Potential skin photoprotection and photochemoprevention benefits provided by topical application or dietary consumption of this ethno-pharmacologically validated phytochemical originating from the Americas deserves further preclinical and clinical examination.

  14. Radiation sources providing increased UVA/UVB ratios induce photoprotection dependent on the UVA dose in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Vivienne E; Domanski, Diane; Slater, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In studies involving mice in which doses of UVA (320-400 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm) radiation were administered alone or combined sequentially, we observed a protective effect of UVA against UVB-induced erythema/edema and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The UVA immunoprotection was mediated by the induction of the stress enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the skin, protection of the cutaneous Th1 cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-12 and inhibition of the UVB-induced expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-10. In this study, we seek evidence for an immunological waveband interaction when UVA and UVB are administered concurrently to hairless mice as occurs during sunlight exposure in humans. A series of spectra providing varying ratios of UVA/UVB were developed, with the UVA ratio increased to approximately 3.5 times the UVA component in solar simulated UV (SSUV). We report that progressively increasing the UVA component of the radiation while maintaining a constant UVB dose resulted in a reduction of both the erythema/edema reaction and the degree of systemic immunosuppression, as measured as contact hypersensitivity. The UVA-enhanced immunoprotection was abrogated in mice treated with a specific HO enzyme inhibitor. UVA-enhanced radiation also upregulated the expression of cutaneous IFN-gamma and IL-12 and inhibited expression of both IL-6 and IL-10, compared with the activity of SSUV. The results were consistent with the previously characterized mechanisms of photoprotection by the UVA waveband alone and suggest that the UVA component of solar UV may have beneficial properties for humans.

  15. Targeting NRF2 for Improved Skin Barrier Function and Photoprotection: Focus on the Achiote-Derived Apocarotenoid Bixin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Rojo de la Vega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 orchestrates major cellular defense mechanisms including phase-II detoxification, inflammatory signaling, DNA repair, and antioxidant response. Recent studies strongly suggest a protective role of NRF2-mediated gene expression in the suppression of cutaneous photodamage induced by solar UV (ultraviolet radiation. The apocarotenoid bixin, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved natural food colorant (referred to as ‘annatto’ originates from the seeds of the achiote tree native to tropical America, consumed by humans since ancient times. Use of achiote preparations for skin protection against environmental insult and for enhanced wound healing has long been documented. We have recently reported that (i bixin is a potent canonical activator of the NRF2-dependent cytoprotective response in human skin keratinocytes; that (ii systemic administration of bixin activates NRF2 with protective effects against solar UV-induced skin damage; and that (iii bixin-induced suppression of photodamage is observable in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− SKH-1 mice confirming the NRF2-dependence of bixin-induced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, bixin displays molecular activities as sacrificial antioxidant, excited state quencher, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ agonist, and TLR (Toll-like receptor 4/NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells antagonist, all of which might be relevant to the enhancement of skin barrier function and environmental stress protection. Potential skin photoprotection and photochemoprevention benefits provided by topical application or dietary consumption of this ethno-pharmacologically validated phytochemical originating from the Americas deserves further preclinical and clinical examination.

  16. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L. Jones; Bonnie K. Baxter

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidine...

  17. Single-molecule exploration of photoprotective mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Hsiang Yu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Gwizdala, Michal; Krüger, Tjaart; Xu, Pengqi; Croce, Roberta; Van Grondelle, Rienk; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Plants harvest sunlight by converting light energy to electron flow through the primary events in photosynthesis. One important question is how the light harvesting machinery adapts to fluctuating sunlight intensity. As a result of various regulatory processes, efficient light harvesting and

  18. Benthic dinoflagellate blooms in tropical intertidal rock pools: Elucidation of photoprotection mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Rodrigues, R.V.; Paul, P.; Sathish, K.; Rafi, M.; Anil, A.C.

    (HT), mid tide (MT), and low tide (LT) zones on the rocky shores of Anjuna, Goa (India) facing the Arabian Sea. MT-RPs and LT-RPs were dominated by diatoms and HT-RPs by dinoflagellates due to the blooms of autotrophic benthic dinoflagellates belonging...

  19. Photostabilization of doxorubicin hydrochloride with radioprotective and photoprotective agents: Potential mechanism for enhancing chemotherapy during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, M.J.; Asker, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    p-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA), urocanic acid, and sodium urate were found to significantly enhance the photostability of doxorubicin hydrochloride [adriamycin, (ADR)]. d1-Methionine, thiourea, and glycine also increased the photostability of this drug, but to a lesser degree. Sodium thiosulfate on the other hand, was found to be detrimental to the photostability of ADR. The photostabilizing effect of PABA was found to increase with increase of its concentration and was influenced by the pH and the buffer species of the vehicle. The findings would have an impact on the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of adriamycin when administered during radiation therapy

  20. Mechanism of photoprotection in the cyanobacterial ancestor of plant antenna proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staleva, H.; Komenda, Josef; Shukla, Mahendra K.; Šlouf, V.; Kaňa, Radek; Polívka, Tomáš; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2015), s. 287-291 ISSN 1552-4450 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-13967S; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : photosystem II * fluorescence * chlorophyll Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (BC-A) Impact factor: 12.709, year: 2015

  1. Oculocutaneous albinism in sub-Saharan Africa: adverse sun-associated health effects and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y; Norval, Mary; Hertle, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetically inherited autosomal recessive condition. Individuals with OCA lack melanin and therefore are susceptible to the harmful effects of solar ultraviolet radiation, including extreme sun sensitivity, photophobia and skin cancer. OCA is a grave public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa with a prevalence as high as 1 in 1000 in some tribes. This article considers the characteristics and prevalence of OCA in sub-Saharan African countries. Sun-induced adverse health effects in the skin and eyes of OCA individuals are reviewed. Sun exposure behavior and the use of photoprotection for the skin and eyes are discussed to highlight the major challenges experienced by these at-risk individuals and how these might be best resolved. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Photoprotection of Buddleja cordata extract against UVB-induced skin damage in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Acevedo, José Guillermo; Espinosa González, Adriana Montserrat; De Maria y Campos, Diana Matamoros; Benitez Flores, José del Carmen; Hernández Delgado, Tzasna; Flores Maya, Saul; Campos Contreras, Jorge; Muñoz López, José Luis; García Bores, Ana María

    2014-08-03

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using botanical agents to prevent skin damage resulting from solar UV-irradiation. Buddleja cordata is a plant that is known as "tepozan". Some people in Mexico use the leaves of this plant to treat tumours, abscesses, sores and burns. The purpose of this study is to investigate the photoprotective properties of Buddleja cordata methanolic extract (BCME) against UVB-induced skin damage in SKH-1 hairless mice at the macroscopic and histological levels. BCME was characterised to determine its spectroscopic, chromatographic and antioxidant (DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals) properties. To conduct the photoprotection studies, BCME was applied topically to the skin of SKH-1 mice before acute exposure to UVB for 10 minutes. The murine skin samples were used for macroscopic and histological studies to assess tissue damage. Penetration of active components of BCME into stratum corneum on the dorsal area of mice was investigated in vivo by the tape stripping method. Moreover, genotoxicity of BCME was evaluated in a Vicia faba cell root micronucleus model. BCME displayed absorbance over the entire UVB spectrum, and its principal components included verbascoside and linarin. BCME exhibited antioxidant activity and significantly scavenged hydroxyl radicals. BCME reduced erythema, sunburn cell production, vessel congestion and epidermal thickening of UVB irradiated mouse skin. BCME penetrate the skin of mice. BCME did not exhibit genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test. The topical administration of BCME protected against acute UVB-induced damage in mouse SKH-1 skin, and our results suggest that BCME may potentially prevent photodamage.

  3. Assessment of extracts of Helichrysum arenarium, Crataegus monogyna, Sambucus nigra in photoprotective UVA and UVB; photostability in cosmetic emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzycka, Anna; Lewińska, Agnieszka; Gancarz, Roman; Wilk, Kazimiera A

    2013-11-05

    The aim of our study was to investigate the photoprotective activity and photostability efficacy of sunscreen formulations containing Helichrysum arenarium, Sambucus nigra, Crataegus monogyna extracts and their combination. UV transmission of the emulsion films was performed by using diffuse transmittance measurements coupling to an integrating sphere. In vitro photoprotection and photostability efficacy were evaluated according to the following parameters: sun protection factor (SPF), UVA protection factor (PF-UVA), UVA/UVB ratio and critical wavelength (λc) before and after UV irradiation. The results obtained show that the formulations containing polyphenols fulfill the official requirements for sunscreen products due to their broad spectrum of UV protection combined with their high photostability and remarkable antioxidant properties. Therefore H. arenarium, S. nigra, C. monogyna extracts represent useful additives for cosmetic formulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation can both induce photoprotective capacity allowing barley to overcome high radiation stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Štroch, Michal; Nezval, J.; Špunda, Vladimír; Tříska, Jan; Jansen, M. A.; Robson, M. T.; Urban, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 93, aug 2015 (2015), s. 74-83 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12030; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246; GA MŠk 7E12047 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Barley genotype * Photoinhibition * Photoprotection * Polyphenols * Xanthophylls Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.928, year: 2015

  5. Photoprotective potential of metabolites isolated from algae-associated fungi Annulohypoxylon stygium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Olívia Maria Campanini; Tavares, Renata Spagolla Napoleão; Caluz, Daniela Ricardo Engracia; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo; Debonsi, Hosana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Natural products, or secondary metabolites, obtained from fungal species associated with marine algae have been widely used in sunscreens due to their antioxidant activity and protective potential against solar radiation. The endophytic fungus isolated from Bostrychia radicans algae collected in the Rio Escuro mangrove, São Paulo State, Brazil, Annulohypoxylon stygium (Xylariaceae family) was studied to evaluate the photoprotective potential of its metabolites. The Annulohypoxylon genus can produce secondary metabolites with interesting cytotoxic, antibacterial and antioxidant properties and was never isolated before from a marine alga or had its metabolites studied for UV protection. The fungal culture (code As) extracted with dichloromethane: methanol (2:1) yielded 9 fractions (Asa to Asi) which were submitted to different chromatographic methodologies to obtain pure compounds, and to spectroscopic methodologies to elucidate their structures. Also, a screening was conducted to evaluate the qualitative production of the metabolites, besides the absorption in the UVA/UVB range, their photostability and phototoxicity potential using the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test (OECD TG 432). This study led to the isolation of a novel compound, 3-benzylidene-2-methylhexahydropyrrolo [1,2-α] pyrazine-1,4-dione (1), from fractions Ase3 and Asf3; Ase1 was identified as 1-(1,3-Benzodioxol-5-yl)-1,2-propanediol (2), two metabolites were isolated as diastereomers (1S,2R)-1-phenyl-1,2-propanediol (3) from Asd2 and (1R,2R)-1-phenyl-1,2-propanediol (4) from Asd3, and Ase1 and 1,3-benzodioxole-5-methanol (5) from Asc1. The results obtained showed a great potential source of new molecules to be used as UVB filters in sunscreens, since substances 1-2 presented UVB absorption, had no phototoxic potential and were considered photostable. In conclusion, these compounds can be considered as a potential new class of molecules for photoprotection, since their photosafety and non-cytotoxicity were

  6. Photoprotection against the UVB-induced oxidative stress and epidermal damage in mice using leaves of three different varieties of Lepidium meyenii (maca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia; Rivera, Valery; Chirinos, Ana Lucía; Evelson, Pablo; Gonzales, Gustavo Francisco

    2011-08-01

    Skin exposure to ultraviolet (UV) B radiation leads to epidermal damage and generation of reactive oxygen species. The photoprotective effect of extracts of three varieties of leaves (red, yellow, and black) from maca (Lepidium meyenii), a plant from the Peruvian highlands, was assessed in mouse skin exposed to UVB radiation. The hydroalcoholic extracts of three varieties of maca leaves were applied topically to the dorsal skin of young-adult male mice prior to exposition to UVB radiation. The three varieties had UVA/UVB absorptive properties and presented antioxidant activity, being highest with red maca, followed by black and yellow maca. The three varieties of maca leaves prevented the development of sunburn cells, epidermal hyperplasia, leukocytic infiltration, and other alterations produced by UVB radiation. Mice treated with black maca showed the highest superoxide dismutase levels, and mice treated with black and yellow maca showed higher catalase levels in skin, whereas red maca protected the skin and liver against significant increases in the lipid peroxidation activity observed in the unprotected animals. The presence of significant antioxidant activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation suggest that the observed protection could be partly attributable to this mechanism. © 2011 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Photoprotection by foliar anthocyanins mitigates effects of boron toxicity in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Marco; Guidi, Lucia; Pardossi, Alberto; Tattini, Massimiliano; Gould, Kevin S

    2014-11-01

    Boron (B) toxicity is an important agricultural problem in arid environments. Excess edaphic B compromises photosynthetic efficiency, limits growth and reduces crop yield. However, some purple-leafed cultivars of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) exhibit greater tolerance to high B concentrations than do green-leafed cultivars. We hypothesised that foliar anthocyanins protect basil leaf mesophyll from photo-oxidative stress when chloroplast function is compromised by B toxicity. Purple-leafed 'Red Rubin' and green-leafed 'Tigullio' cultivars, grown with high or negligible edaphic B, were given a photoinhibitory light treatment. Possible effects of photoabatement by anthocyanins were simulated by superimposing a purple polycarbonate filter on the green leaves. An ameliorative effect of light filtering on photosynthetic quantum yield and on photo-oxidative load was observed in B-stressed plants. In addition, when green protoplasts from both cultivars were treated with B and illuminated through a screen of anthocyanic protoplasts or a polycarbonate film which approximated cyanidin-3-O-glucoside optical properties, the degree of photoinhibition, hydrogen peroxide production, and malondialdehyde content were reduced. The data provide evidence that anthocyanins exert a photoprotective role in purple-leafed basil mesophyll cells, thereby contributing to improved tolerance to high B concentrations.

  8. Exposure to Non-Extreme Solar UV Daylight: Spectral Characterization, Effects on Skin and Photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Marionnet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV rays (UVA, 320–400 nm and UVB, 280–320 nm. The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1 the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2 description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3 analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure.

  9. Exposure to non-extreme solar UV daylight: spectral characterization, effects on skin and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-12-23

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320-400 nm and UVB, 280-320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure.

  10. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  11. Photobiology, photodermatology and sunscreens: a comprehensive overview. Part 2: topical and systemic photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celleno, L; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Sala, R; Arisi, M C; Bussoletti, C

    2013-02-01

    Sun exposure of the skin triggers several inflammatory pathways via a multitude of photochemical and photobiological effects. Furthermore, local and systemic immune suppression develops. The main clinical effects of UV exposure can be classified schematically into immediate, including sunburn, tanning, vitamin D production and exacerbation of inherited and acquired photosensitive skin disorders and long-term, including solar ageing and skin cancer. The protection against solar radiation is afforded by a healthy behavior of reasonable sun avoidance and the use of topical sunscreens as well as topical and oral antioxidants. However, users of sunscreen products should be able to choose correctly the most convenient product according to their needs. In Europe, the sun protection factor (SPF) and the UVA-protection factor (UVA-PF) are labeled to indicate the degree of protection against UVB and UVA, respectively. However, dermatologists must be aware that the present knowledge of UV effects on human skin needs to be clarified and several regulatory issues of photo-protection remain to be clarified and standardized. Finally, much work is needed to improve water resistance, spreadability, transparency and homogeneity of the sunscreen agents.

  12. Resveratrol imparts photoprotection of normal cells and enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation spans a whole range of electromagnetic spectrum including UV radiation, which are potentially harmful to normal cells as well as ionizing radiations which are therapeutically beneficial towards the killing of cancer cells. UV radiation is an established cause of a majority of skin cancers as well as precancerous conditions such as actinic keratosis. However, despite efforts to educate people about the use of sunscreens and protective clothing as preventive strategies, the incidence of skin cancer and other skin-related disorders are on the rise. This has generated an enormous interest towards finding alternative approaches for management of UV-mediated damages. Chemoprevention via nontoxic agents, especially botanical antioxidants, is one such approach that is being considered as a plausible strategy for prevention of photodamages including photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we have discussed the photoprotective effects of resveratrol, an antioxidant found in grapes and red wine, against UVB exposure-mediated damages in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we have also discussed studies showing that resveratrol can act as a sensitizer to enhance the therapeutic effects of ionizing radiation against cancer cells. Based on available literature, we suggest that resveratrol may be useful for (1) prevention of UVB-mediated damages including skin cancer and (2) enhancing the response of radiation therapies against hyperproliferative, precancerous and neoplastic conditions.

  13. Skin photoprotection improvement: synergistic interaction between lipid nanoparticles and organic UV filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, S; Keck, C M; Anselmi, C; Müller, R H

    2011-07-29

    A photoprotective formulation was developed with an increased sunprotection factor (SPF), compared to a conventional nanoemulsion, but having the same concentration of three molecular sunscreens, namely ethylhexyl triazone, bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine, and ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate. The sunscreen mixture was incorporated into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). The ability of nine different solid lipids to yield stable aqueous NLC suspensions was assessed. After the production by hot high pressure homogenization, the NLC were analyzed in terms of particle size, physical state, particle shape, ultraviolet absorbance and stability. The particle size for all NLC was around 200 nm after production. The NLC suspension with carnauba wax had superior UV absorbance, NLC from bees wax showed similar efficiency as the reference emulsion. The NLC formulations were incorporated into hydrogel formulations and the in vitro SPF was measured. This study demonstrated that approximately 45% higher SPF values could be obtained when the organic UV filters were incorporated into carnauba wax NLC, in comparison to the reference nanoemulsion and bees wax NLC. The data showed that the synergistic effect of NLC and incorporated sunscreens depends not only on the solid state of the lipid but also on its type. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Photoprotective effect and acute oral systemic toxicity evaluation of the novel heterocyclic compound LQFM048.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhal, Daniela C; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Vieira, Marcelo S; Luzin, Rangel M; Quintino, Michelle P; Nunes, Liliane M; Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos Chaves; de Camargo, Henrique Santiago; Pinto, Angelo C; Dos Santos Júnior, Helvécio M; Chiari, Bruna G; Isaac, Vera; Valadares, Marize C; Martins, Tatiana Duque; Lião, Luciano M; de S Gil, Eric; Menegatti, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    The new heterocyclic derivative LQFM048 (3) (2,4,6-tris ((E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate)-1,3,5-triazine) was originally designed through the molecular hybridization strategy from Uvinul® T 150 (1) and (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (2) sunscreens, using green chemistry approach. This compound was obtained in global yields (80%) and showed an interesting redox potential. In addition, it is thermally stable up to temperatures around 250°C. It was observed that LQFM048 (3) showed a low degradation after 150min of sunlight exposure at 39°C, whereas the extreme radiation conditions induced a considerable photodegradation of the LQFM048 (3), especially when irradiated by VIS and VIS+UVA. During the determination of sun protection factor, LQFM048 (3) showed interesting results, specially as in association with other photoprotective compounds and commercial sunscreen. Additionally, the compound (3) did not promote cytotoxicity for 3T3 fibroblasts. Moreover, it was not able to trigger acute oral systemic toxicity in mice, being classified as a compound with low acute toxicity hazard (2.000mg/kg>LD50compound synthesized using green chemistry approach is promising showing potential to development of a new sunscreen product with advantage of presenting redox potential, indicating antioxidant properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Photoprotective Potential and Percutaneous Penetration by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of the Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Milena K; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Baesso, Mauro L; Nogueira, Ana C; Bento, Antonio C; Bortoluzzi, Bruno B; Serra, Lara Z; Cortez, Diogenes A G

    2015-01-01

    Schinus terebinthifolius is a plant rich in phenolic compounds, which have antioxidant properties and can provide new opportunities for treatment and prevention of diseases mediated by ultraviolet radiation like photoaging and skin cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photoprotective potential and ex vivo percutaneous penetration of the crude extract of Schinus terebinthifolius leaves. The extract was tested for antioxidant activity using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method and β-carotene bleaching test. The sun protection factor was also evaluated. The ex vivo skin permeation of the emulsion and gel formulations were assayed. Fractionation of the extract resulted in gallic acid, ethyl gallate and a mixture of flavonoids, suggesting derivatives of quercetin and myricetin. The phenolic content of the extract was 384.64 ± 2.60 mg GAE g(-1) extract. The antioxidant activity was superior to butylated hydroxytoluene, in DPPH method, and ascorbic acid and rutin, in β-carotene bleaching assay. The extract showed UV absorption with photoprotector potential in the UVB region. The photoacoustic spectroscopy measurements confirmed absorption in the UV region and topical application of the formulations caused no histological changes in the rats' skin. These results suggest that the crude extract of Schinus terebinthifolius leaves may be a promising natural sunscreen product. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. Moringa oleifera Leaf Extracts as Multifunctional Ingredients for "Natural and Organic" Sunscreens and Photoprotective Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Buso, Piergiacomo; Radice, Matteo; Dissette, Valeria; Lampronti, Ilaria; Gambari, Roberto; Manfredini, Stefano; Vertuani, Silvia

    2018-03-15

    Moringa oleifera has gained increasing popularity as a food supplement but not in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic area. The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of extracts from the leaves of Moringa oleifera as a herbal sun care phytocomplex. Three different extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves, from Senegal, have been prepared and chemically characterized in the phenolic fraction by HPLC-DAD and Folin-Ciocalteu test. To explore photoprotective properties, an extensive evaluation of UV filtering, antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, ORAC, PCL), and anti-hyperproliferative (human melanoma Colo38 cells) capacities have been conducted. Furthermore, a formulation study regarding cosmetic prototypes has been carried out in order to determine the Sun Protection Factor (SPF), which was assessed in vitro. The extracts were demonstrated to confer significant values of protection, with an SPF 2, that corresponds to a 50% protection against UV-B rays, at concentrations as low as 2% to 4%. Finally, the evaluation on potential irritation of the finished formulations was conducted by Patch Test and no significant irritant potential was observed. These evidence enlarged the already significant number of activities and potential uses of this plant, which is well-known for its importance in the medicinal and nutritional fields.

  17. Development and stability studies of sunscreen cream formulations containing three photo-protective filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slim Smaoui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to formulate and subsequently evaluate sunscreen cream (W/O/W emulsion containing three photo-protective filters: benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and titanium dioxide at different percentages. Formulations were stored at 8, 25 and 40 °C for four weeks to investigate their stability. Color, centrifugation, liquefaction, phase separation, pH and Sun Protection Factor (SPF of sunscreen cream formulations were determined. The microbiological stability of the creams was also evaluated and the organoleptic quality was carried out for 28 days. Interestingly, the combination of 7% Benzophenone-3, 7% Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and 6% Titanium dioxide preserved physicochemical properties of the product and was efficient against the development of different spoilage microorganisms as well as aerobic plate counts, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and yeast and mold counts. Furthermore, a good stability was observed for all formulations throughout the experimental period. The newly formulated sunscreen cream was proved to exhibit a number of promising properties and attributes that might open new opportunities for the development of more efficient, safe, and cost-effective skin-care, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products.

  18. Phytochemical evaluation and in vitro antioxidant and photo-protective capacity of Calendula officinalis L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.C.K.N. DEUSCHLE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The plant Calendula officinalis L. is widely applied due to its medicinal properties, which are mainly dermatological and ornamental. The goal of this study is to assess the phytochemical components in a hydroethanolic extract (HECO from the leaves of Calendula officinalis L. using UV-VIS spectrophotometry and thin layer chromatography (TLC, as well as to identify and quantify the components related to its antioxidant capacity employing high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC. The antioxidant capacity evaluation was performed using the DPPH method for superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. The photo-protective capacity was evaluated by UVspectrophotometry in order to determine the in vitro Sun Protection Factor(SPF. The results show the plant’s strong antioxidant activity (DPPH and hydroxyl methods, which we believe to be related to the presence of flavonoids (24.67 mg/g, polyphenols (33.90 mg/g, condensed tannins (27.30 mg/g, and the amount of rutin (37.25 mg/g, and quercetin (6.09 mg/g found during the study. The HECO presented a good antioxidant capacity, most likely due to the polyphenols, flavonoids, and tannins in its contents. However, the obtained SPF of 1.89 ± 0.05 does not allow the plant to be classified as a stand-alone sunscreen, and more studies are needed in order to test its ability to enhance sunscreens in existing cosmetic formulations.

  19. Use of Agave tequilana-lignin and zinc oxide nanoparticles for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Escalante, Alfredo; Murillo-Vázquez, Raquel Nalleli; Delgado, Ezequiel; González, Francisco Javier; Toríz, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The use of sunscreens is essential for preventing skin damage and the potential appearance of skin cancer in humans. Inorganic active components such as zinc oxide (ZnO) have been used commonly in sunscreens due to their ability to block UVA radiation. This ultraviolet (UV) protection might be enhanced to cover the UVB and UVC bands when combined with other components such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work we evaluate the photoprotection properties of organic nanoparticles made from lignin in combination with ZnO nanoparticles as active ingredients for sunscreens. Lignin nanoparticles were synthesized from Agave tequilana lignin. Two different pulping methods were used for dissolving lignin from agave bagasse. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the precipitation method. All nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were mixed with a neutral vehicle in different concentrations and in-vitro sun protection factor (SPF) values were calculated. Different sizes of spherical lignin nanoparticles were obtained from the spent liquors of two different pulping methods. ZnO nanoparticles resulted with a flake shape. The mixture of all components gave SPF values in a range between 4 and 13. Lignin nanoparticles showed absorption in the UVB and UVC regions which can enhance the SPF value of sunscreens composed only of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Lignin nanoparticles have the added advantage of being of organic nature and its brown color can be used to match the skin tone of the person using it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photoprotection and photoreception of intraocular lenses under xenon and white LED illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, J M; Navea, A; García-Domene, M C; Artigas, C; Lanzagorta, A

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the photoprotection and phototransmission that various intraocular lenses (IOLs) provide under the illumination of a xenon (Xe) lamp and white LEDs (light emitting diode). The spectral transmission curves of six representative IOLs were measured using a Perkin-Elmer Lambda 35 UV/VIS spectrometer. Various filtering simulations were performed using a Xe lamp and white LEDs. The spectral emissions of these lamps were measured with an ILT-950 spectroradiometer. The IOLs analyzed primarily show transmission of nearly 100% in the visible spectrum. In the ultraviolet (UV) region, the filters incorporated in the various IOLs did not filter equally, and some of them let an appreciable amount of UV through. The Xe lamp presented a strong emission of ultraviolet A (UVA), and its emission under 300nm was not negligible. The white LED did not present an appreciable emission under 380nm. The cut-off wavelength of most filters is between 380 and 400nm (Physiol Hydriol60C(®), IOLTECH E4T(®), Alcon SA60AT(®), Alcon IQ SN60WF(®)), so that their UV protection is very effective. Nonetheless, the IOL OPHTEC Oculaid(®) contains a filter that, when a Xe lamp is used, lets through up to 20% for 350nm and up to 15% for 300nm, which at this point is ultraviolet B (UVB). The OPHTEC(®) Artisan IOL has a transmission peak below 300nm, which must be taken into account under Xe illumination. White LEDs do not emit energy below 380nm, so no special protection is required in the UV region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoprotectant improves photostability and bioactivity of abscisic acid under UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Hu, Tanglu; Tan, Weiming; Yu, Chunxin; Li, Zhaohu; Zhang, Lizhen; Duan, Liusheng

    2016-05-01

    Photosensitivity causes serious drawback for abscisic acid (ABA) application, but preferable methods to stabilize the compound were not found yet. To select an efficient photoprotectant for the improvement of photostability and bioactivity of ABA when exposed to UV light, we tested the effects of a photostabilizer bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (HS-770) and two UV absorbers 2-hydroxy-4-n-octoxy-benzophenone (UV-531) and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid (BP-4) with or without HS-770 on the photodegradation of ABA. Water soluble UV absorber BP-4 and oil soluble UV absorber UV-531 showed significant photo-stabilizing capability on ABA, possibly due to competitive energy absorption of UVB by the UV absorbers. The two absorbers showed no significant difference. Photostabilizer HS-770 accelerated the photodegradation of ABA and did not improve the photo-stabilizing capability of BP-4, likely due to no absorption in UVB region and salt formation with ABA and BP-4. Approximately 26% more ABA was kept when 280mg/l ABA aqueous solution was irradiated by UV light for 2h in the presence of 200mg/l BP-4. What's more, its left bioactivity on wheat seed (JIMAI 22) germination was greatly kept by BP-4, comparing to that of ABA alone. The 300 times diluent of 280mg/l ABA plus 200mg/l BP-4 after 2h irradiation showed more than 13% inhibition on shoot and root growth of wheat seed than that of ABA diluent alone. We concluded that water soluble UV absorber BP-4 was an efficient agent to keep ABA activity under UV radiation. The results could be used to produce photostable products of ABA compound or other water soluble agrichemicals which are sensitive to UV radiation. The frequencies and amounts of the agrichemicals application could be thereafter reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo relevance for photoprotection by the vitamin D rapid response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, K M; Deo, S S; Norman, A W; Bishop, J E; Halliday, G M; Reeve, V E; Mason, R S

    2007-03-01

    Vitamin D is produced by exposure of 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin to UV irradiation (UVR) and further converted in the skin to the biologically active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) and other compounds. UVR also results in DNA damage producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). We previously reported that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) at picomolar concentrations, protects human skin cells from UVR-induced apoptosis, and decreases CPD in surviving cells. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) has been shown to generate biological responses via two pathways-the classical steroid receptor/genomic pathway or a rapid, non-genomic pathway mediated by a putative membrane receptor. Whether the rapid response pathway is physiologically relevant is unclear. A cis-locked, rapid-acting agonist 1,25(OH)(2)lumisterol(3) (JN), entirely mimicked the actions of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) to reduce fibroblast and keratinocyte loss and CPD damage after UVR. The effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) were abolished by a rapid-acting antagonist, but not by a genomic antagonist. Skh:hr1 mice exposed to three times the minimal erythemal dose of solar-simulated UVR and treated topically with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) or JN immediately after UVR showed reduction in UVR-induced UVR-induced sunburn cells (pphotoprotective effects via the rapid pathway and raise the possibility that other D compounds produced in skin may contribute to the photoprotective effects.

  3. Ultraviolet-B phototoxicity and hypothetical photomelanomagenesis: intraocular and crystalline lens photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainster, Martin A; Turner, Patricia L

    2010-04-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation can cause phototoxic macular injuries in young people who have been sunbathing but not sungazing and in welders. Welders have a reportedly increased risk of uveal melanoma. We analyze phakic and pseudophakic risks for solar and welding arc UV-B exposure. Optical radiation measurement, analysis, and perspective. Spectral transmittances were measured for UV-transmitting, UV-blocking, and blue-blocking intraocular lenses (IOLs). The photoprotective performances of crystalline and intraocular lenses were analyzed using relevant epidemiologic and laboratory data and action spectra for acute retinal phototoxicity and melanoma photocarcinogenesis. Crystalline lens UV-B retinal protection is deficient in children and young adults, increasing their potential susceptibility to acute retinal phototoxicity and hypothetical photomelanomagenesis. UV-B radiation has sufficient energy/photon to induce primary melanomagenic DNA lesions, unlike blue light or UV-A radiation. UV-blocking and blue-blocking IOLs have negligible UV-B transmittance. UV-transmitting IOL transmittance of UV-B radiation is equivalent to that of a 15-year-old crystalline lens. If optical radiation exposure is responsible for welders' increased risk of uveal melanoma, then UV-B radiation is the most probable causative agent and spectacle wear is a potential confounding factor in epidemiologic studies of ocular melanoma. Welders under 30 years of age are at greater risk for welding maculopathy than older welders. Children, adults under 30 years of age, and pseudophakic individuals with UV-transmitting IOLs should wear sunglasses in bright environments because of the UV-B window in their crystalline lenses or IOLs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoprotection vs. Photoinhibition of Photosystem II in Transplastomic Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Dominantly Accumulating Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Yamano, Nami; Hashimoto, Hideki; Misawa, Norihiko; Ifuku, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Transplastomic (chloroplast genome-modified; CGM) lettuce that dominantly accumulates astaxanthin grows similarly to a non-transgenic control with almost no accumulation of naturally occurring photosynthetic carotenoids. In this study, we evaluated the activity and assembly of PSII in CGM lettuce. The maximum quantum yield of PSII in CGM lettuce was <0.6; however, the quantum yield of PSII was comparable with that in control leaves under higher light intensity. CGM lettuce showed a lower ability to induce non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than the control under various light intensities. The fraction of slowly recovering NPQ in CGM lettuce, which is considered to be photoinhibitory quenching (qI), was less than half that of the control. In fact, 1 O 2 generation was lower in CGM than in control leaves under high light intensity. CGM lettuce contained less PSII, accumulated mostly as a monomer in thylakoid membranes. The PSII monomers purified from the CGM thylakoids bound echinenone and canthaxanthin in addition to β-carotene, suggesting that a shortage of β-carotene and/or the binding of carbonyl carotenoids would interfere with the photophysical function as well as normal assembly of PSII. In contrast, high accumulation of astaxanthin and other carbonyl carotenoids was found within the thylakoid membranes. This finding would be associated with the suppression of photo-oxidative stress in the thylakoid membranes. Our observation suggests the importance of a specific balance between photoprotection and photoinhibition that can support normal photosynthesis in CGM lettuce producing astaxanthin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II: role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta

    2008-03-07

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do not directly contribute to the chlorophyll triplet quenching. The largest part of the triplets is quenched by the lutein bound in site L1, which is located in close proximity to the chlorophylls responsible for the low energy state of the complex. The lutein in the L2 site is also active in triplet quenching, and it shows a longer triplet lifetime than the lutein in the L1 site. This lifetime difference depends on the occupancy of the N1 binding site, where neoxanthin acts as an oxygen barrier, limiting the access of O(2) to the inner domain of the Lhc complex, thereby strongly contributing to the photostability. The carotenoid triplet decay of monomeric Lhcb1, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is mono-exponential, with shorter lifetimes than observed for trimeric LHCII, suggesting that their inner domains are more accessible for O(2). As for trimeric LHCII, only the xanthophylls in sites L1 and L2 are active in triplet quenching. Although the chlorophyll to carotenoid triplet transfer is efficient (95%) in all complexes, it is not perfect, leaving 5% of the chlorophyll triplets unquenched. This effect appears to be intrinsically related to the molecular organization of the Lhcb proteins.

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation in Africa: a systematic review and critical evaluation of the health risks and use of photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Robyn M; Norval, Mary; Wright, Caradee Y

    2016-01-01

    Most information on the harmful health effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been obtained in populations in which the majority has fair skin. Here a systematic review of evidence on diseases related to solar UVR in Africa was undertaken, and the appropriateness of effective photoprotection for these people considered. There are few population-based studies on UV-induced skin cancers (melanoma, squamous and basal cell carcinomas) in Africa, although limited reports indicated that they occur, even in people with deeply pigmented skin. The incidence of melanoma is particularly high in the white population living in the Western Cape of South Africa and has increased significantly in recent years. Cataract is extremely common in people of all skin colours and is a frequent cause of blindness, particularly in the elderly. For both skin cancer and cataract, the proportion of the disease risk that is attributable to exposure to solar UVR in African populations, and therefore the health burden caused by UV irradiation is unclear. There was little published information on the use of sun protection in Africa. The potential disease burden attributable to solar UVR exposure of Africans is high, although accurate data to quantify this are sparse. Information is required on the incidence, prevalence and mortality for the range of UV-related diseases in different populations living throughout Africa. Photoprotection is clearly required, at least for those subpopulations at particularly high risk, but may be limited by cost and cultural acceptability.

  7. In vitro antioxidant and in vivo photoprotective effect of pistachio (Pistacia vera L., variety Bronte) seed and skin extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, Maria; Arcoraci, Teresita; Rizza, Luisa; Cristani, Mariateresa; Bonina, Francesco Paolo; Saija, Antonina; Trombetta, Domenico; Tomaino, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) nuts are a rich source of phenolic compounds, known for their high antioxidant activity, and contained not only in the seeds but also in the skin. A pistachio cultivar of high quality is typical of Bronte, Sicily, Italy. The purpose of our study was to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant properties of two polyphenol-rich extracts from skins (TP) and decorticated seeds (SP) of Bronte pistachios, and to verify the potential use of these extracts for topical photoprotective products. Chemical analysis showed that the TP and SP extracts contain high levels of phenolic compounds, but the TP extract is about ten times richer in phenols than the SP extract, being anthocyanins the most abundant compounds found in the TP extract. Both these extracts, and especially the TP extract, possess good radical scavenger/antioxidant properties, as shown in a series of in vitro assays carried out using homogenous and non-homogenous chemical environment. Furthermore both the TP extract and, although at a lower degree, the SP extract reduce, when topically applied, UV-B-induced skin erythema in human volunteers. These findings suggest that extracts from Bronte TP and SP could be successfully employed as photoprotective ingredients in topical cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Multitarget Approach toward the Development of 8-Substituted Purines for Photoprotection and Prevention of UV-Related Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuidje, Ernestine N; Dissette, Valeria; Bino, Alessia; Benetti, Simonetta; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra; Manfredini, Stefano; Vertuani, Silvia; Baldisserotto, Anna

    2017-05-22

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is the most abundant and significant modifiable risk factor for skin cancer and many other skin diseases such as early photo-aging. Across the solar radiation spectrum, UV light is the main cause behind skin problems. In the search for novel photoprotective compounds, a new series of 8-substituted purines were synthesized from commercially available 6-hydroxy-4,5-diaminopyrimidine hemisulfate or 4,5-diaminopyrimidine. All title compounds were investigated for their UV filtering, antioxidant, antifungal, and antiproliferative activities. For the photoprotection assays we used a diffuse transmittance technique to determine the sun protection factor (SPF) in vitro, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) tests for evaluating the antioxidant activity of the more potent compounds. Among them, 8-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-7H-purin-6-ol (compound 26) proved to be a good radical scavenger and is also endowed with broad-spectrum UVA filtering capabilities, suitable for further development as a protective molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about sun exposure and photoprotection in outpatients attending dermatology clinics at four hospitals in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Gavelan, Elizabeth; Sáenz-Anduaga, Eliana; Ramos, Willy; Sánchez-Saldaña, Leonardo; Sialer, María del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    To establish the knowledge, about sun exposure and photoprotection in outpatients treated at the dermatology clinics in four hospitals in Lima, Peru. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving a sample of 364 patients selected using a systematic random sampling process in the four participating hospitals. The selected patients were interviewed to determine their knowledge, behavior and practices in relation to sun exposure and photoprotection. The chi-square test was used to identify any significant differences between knowledge and practices. The mean age of the patients in this sample was 45.1 ± 21.4 years. Of the 364 patients, 55.9% were women and 54.8% had skin phototype IV. The principal risks related to sun exposure were skin cancer (80.5%) and sunburn (77.8%). Knowledge regarding sun protection was more evident in individuals with university/college education (pphotoprotection, 38.4% used these products daily, while 61.6% used them only occasionally. The use of photo-protectors differed significantly in accordance with the individual's education level (psolar protection. The level of awareness of the outpatients treated at the dermatology clinics in these four hospitals in Lima, Peru about the risks of sun exposure is acceptable; however, a large proportion fail to incorporate regular solar protection as a practice in their daily life.

  10. Fotoproteção e exercício físico Photoprotection and physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Sheylla Malta Purim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As medidas de fotoproteção são divulgadas como procedimentos essenciais na prevenção de doenças cutâneas e manutenção da saúde e beleza. Os exercícios físicos regulares também são indicados para alcançar o estilo de vida saudável; no entanto, a prática esportiva expõe a maior radiação solar. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar as medidas fotoprotetoras na prevenção dos danos causados pelo Sol na pele dos desportistas. Abordam-se o histórico da fotoproteção, o espectro eletromagnético, os efeitos das radiações e os riscos de exposição durante as atividades físicas. Implementar estratégias, como a escolha do horário, local, roupas e acessórios, complementados pelo uso de filtros solares, minimizam os riscos decorrentes das radiações ultravioletas A e B (UVA e UVB durante a prática esportiva ao ar livre. Dentre os produtos disponíveis no mercado, devem-se preferir aqueles que ofereçam segurança, ampla proteção, boa cosmética, estabilidade química em diferentes condições de calor e umidade, fotoestabilidade e baixo custo. O atleta deve ser orientado pelos profissionais da área da saúde sobre os riscos inerentes às suas atividades cotidianas e esportivas. O autoexame de pele é parte essencial na prevenção dos problemas dermatológicos, pois auxilia na detecção precoce. O futuro da fotoproteção no esporte está no investimento em medidas educativas desde a infância, reduzindo assim os danos solares cumulativos. A exposição solar deve ocorrer de modo cauteloso e com o mínimo de sequelas, mediante comportamento de fotoproteção, para proporcionar melhor qualidade de vida.Photoprotection measures are reported as crucial procedures in the prevention of skin disorders and health and beauty maintenance. Although regular physical exercises are also recommended to attain a healthy lifestyle, sports activities expose one to increased sun radiation. The aim of this article is to review photoprotection

  11. An investigation of the predictors of photoprotection and UVR dose to the face in patients with XP: a protocol using observational mixed methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walburn, Jessica; Sarkany, Robert; Norton, Sam; Foster, Lesley; Morgan, Myfanwy; Sainsbury, Kirby; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Anderson, Rebecca; Garrood, Isabel; Heydenreich, Jakob; Sniehotta, Falko F; Vieira, Rute; Wulf, Hans Christian; Weinman, John

    2017-08-21

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic condition caused by defective nucleotide excision repair and characterised by skin cancer, ocular and neurological involvement. Stringent ultraviolet protection is the only way to prevent skin cancer. Despite the risks, some patients' photoprotection is poor, with a potentially devastating impact on their prognosis. The aim of this research is to identify disease-specific and psychosocial predictors of photoprotection behaviour and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dose to the face. Mixed methods research based on 45 UK patients will involve qualitative interviews to identify individuals' experience of XP and the influences on their photoprotection behaviours and a cross-sectional quantitative survey to assess biopsychosocial correlates of these behaviours at baseline. This will be followed by objective measurement of UVR exposure for 21 days by wrist-worn dosimeter and daily recording of photoprotection behaviours and psychological variables for up to 50 days in the summer months. This novel methodology will enable UVR dose reaching the face to be calculated and analysed as a clinically relevant endpoint. A range of qualitative and quantitative analytical approaches will be used, reflecting the mixed methods (eg, cross-sectional qualitative interviews, n-of-1 studies). Framework analysis will be used to analyse the qualitative interviews; mixed-effects longitudinal models will be used to examine the association of clinical and psychosocial factors with the average daily UVR dose; dynamic logistic regression models will be used to investigate participant-specific psychosocial factors associated with photoprotection behaviours. This research has been approved by Camden and King's Cross Research Ethics Committee 15/LO/1395. The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international scientific conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of

  12. Photobiological implications of melanin photoprotection after UVB-induced tanning of human skin but not UVA-induced tanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Sergio G; Yin, Lanlan; Smuda, Christoph; Mahns, Andre; Kolbe, Ludger; Hearing, Vincent J

    2015-03-01

    Repetitive suberythemal UVA and/or UVB exposures were used to generate comparable UV-induced tans in human skin over the course of 2 weeks. To evaluate the potential photoprotective values of those UVA- and/or UVB- induced tans and to avoid the confounding issue of residual UV-induced DNA damage, we waited 1 week before challenging those areas with a 1.5 MED of UVA+UVB after which we measure DNA damage. The results show that the type of UV used to induce skin pigmentation affects the redistribution of melanin in the skin and/or de novo melanin synthesis. The UVA-induced tans failed to even provide a minimal SPF of 1.5, which suggests that producing a tan with UVA-rich sunlamps prior to a holiday or vacation is completely counterproductive. Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Photoprotective effect of vitamins A and E on polyamine and oxygenated free radical metabolism in hairless mouse epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettab, N; Amory, M C; Briand, G; Bousquet, B; Combre, A; Forlot, P; Barey, M

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the photoprotective effect on skin of vitamins A and E, due to inhibition of polyamine synthesis and production of free radicals. These variables were measured in the lumbar epidermis of the female hairless mouse subjected to UVA + B irradiation. Polyamines were assayed in epidermal homogenate by HPLC, and production of oxygenated free radicals was determined by spectrofluorometric assay of malonyl dialdehyde. It was determined that butyl-hydroxy-toluene and vitamin E inhibited production of free radicals (56% and 60%, respectively) and caused a significant reduction in polyamine biosynthesis (P less than 0.01), whereas the inhibitory effect of malonyl dialdehyde induced by vitamin A (30%) had no associated effect on polyamine metabolism.

  14. In vivo photoprotective effects of cosmetic formulations containing UV filters, vitamins, Ginkgo biloba and red algae extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, D G; Wagemaker, T A L; Alves, V M; Benevenuto, C G; Gaspar, L R; Maia Campos, P M B G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the photoprotective effects of cosmetic formulations containing UV filters, red algae, Porphyra umbilicalis, extracts and combinations of the extract with vitamins and Ginkgo biloba through the use of in vivo preclinical studies. For this study, 4 groups of 4 hairless mice each were treated with topical formulations applied on the dorsum for 5 days as follows: group 1 - control (no treatment); group 2 - application of the formulation F (sunscreen formulation containing only UV filters); group 3 - application of the formulation FA (sunscreen formulation with red algae extract); and group 4 - application of the formulation FVGA (sunscreen formulation with red algae extract, G. biloba and vitamins A, C and E). The effects of these formulations were evaluated by determining the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema index. Apoptosis was detected by immunohistochemical staining with anti-p53 and anti-caspase-3 antibodies. The results showed that the formulations protected the skin from erythema when exposed to UV radiation. The group that received the formulation FVGA presented a greater TEWL than did the other groups, suggesting that this formulation was involved in cell renewal. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that UV radiation caused an increase in the expression of p53 and active caspase-3, confirming that the damage caused by UV radiation exposure led to apoptosis. The application of all formulations studied resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the expression of p53 and caspase-3, with a more pronounced effect observed following treatment with FA. In conclusion, extracts from the red algae P. umbilicalis could be considered effective ingredients to be used in sunscreen formulations. The combination of vitamins A, E, C and G. biloba along with red algae extracts can improve significantly the performance of the sunscreens, preventing UV-induced DNA damage and inflammation. Thus, they should be considered

  15. Interfacial charge recombination via the triplet state? Mimicry of photoprotection in the photosynthetic process with a dye-sensitized TiO 2 solar cell reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yu-Xiang; Li, Long; Liu, Yin; Wang, Li; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Sheng, Jian-Qun

    2002-04-01

    Evidence for the photoinduced charge recombination to the excited-triplet state has been observed in chemical solar cell reaction consisting of dye-sensitized TiO 2 colloidal ethanol solution, which mimicks the photoprotection function in the photosynthetic units. The dye is all -trans-retinoic acid, a structural analog of β-carotenoid. Two channels of charge recombination, i.e., through triplet and ground states were observed by nano-second flash photolysis. The possibility of applying the function of photoprotection to the synthetic solar cell is discussed, which provides a potential entry of molecular engineering of the dye to improve the long term stability of the synthetic solar cell.

  16. Theoretical insights into the photo-protective mechanisms of natural biological sunscreens: building blocks of eumelanin and pheomelanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Barbara; Karsili, Tolga N V

    2016-02-07

    Eumelanin (EM) and pheomelanin (PM) are ubiquitous in mammalian skin and hair--protecting against harmful radiation from the sun. Their primary roles are to absorb solar radiation and efficiently dissipate the excess excited state energy in the form of heat without detriment to the polymeric structure. EU and PM exist as polymeric chains consisting of exotic arrangements of functionalised heteroaromatic molecules. Here we have used state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations and on-the-fly surface hopping molecular dynamics simulations to study the intrinsic deactivation paths of various building blocks of EU and PM. Ultrafast excited state decay, via electron-driven proton transfer (in EU and PM) and proton-transfer coupled ring-opening (in PM) reactions, have been identified to proceed along hitherto unknown charge-separated states in EU and PM oligomers. These results shed light on the possible relaxation pathways that dominate the photochemistry of natural skin melanins. Extrapolation of such findings could provide a gateway into engineering more effective molecular constituents in commercial sunscreens--with reduced phototoxicity.

  17. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  18. Piperine attenuates UV-R induced cell damage in human keratinocytes via NF-kB, Bax/Bcl-2 pathway: An application for photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari N; Srivastava, Ajeet K; Srivastava, Saumya; Jamal, Naseem; Srivastava, Kriti; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2017-07-01

    Chronic ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) exposure causes skin disorders like erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Recent research trends of researchers have focused more attention on the identification and use of photo stable natural agents with photoprotective properties. Piperine (PIP), as a plant alkaloid, is an important constituent present in black pepper (Piper nigrum), used widely in ayurvedic and other traditional medicines and has broad pharmacological properties. The study was planned to photoprotective efficacy of PIP in human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line. We have assessed the UV-R induced activation of transcription factor NF-κB in coordination with cell death modulators (Bax/Bcl-2 and p21). The LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that PIP was photostable under UV-A/UV-B exposure. PIP (10μg/ml) attenuates the UV-R (A and B) induced phototoxicity of keratinocyte cell line through the restoration of cell viability, inhibition of ROS, and malondialdehyde generation. Further, PIP inhibited UV-R mediated DNA damage, prevented micronuclei formation, and reduced sub-G1 phase in cell cycle, which supported against photogenotoxicity. This study revealed that PIP pretreatment strongly suppressed UV-R induced photodamages. Molecular docking studies suggest that PIP binds at the active site of NF-κB, and thus, preventing its translocation to nucleus. In addition, transcriptional and translational analysis advocate the increased expression of NF-κB and concomitant decrease in IkB-α expression under UV-R exposed cells, favouring the apoptosis via Bax/Bcl-2 and p21 pathways. However, PIP induced expression of IkB-α suppress the NF-κB activity which resulted in suppression of apoptotic marker genes and proteins that involved in photoprotection. Therefore, we suggest the applicability of photostable PIP as photoprotective agent for human use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Skin penetration and photoprotection of topical formulations containing benzophenone-3 solid lipid microparticles prepared by the solvent-free spray-congealing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rodrigo Molina; Siqueira, Silvia; Fonseca, Maria José Vieira; Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Solid-lipid microparticles loaded with high amounts of the sunscreen UV filter benzophenone-3 were prepared by spray congealing with the objective of decreasing its skin penetration and evaluate whether the sunscreen's photoprotection were impaired by the microencapsulation process. The microparticles were produced using the natural lipids carnauba wax or bees wax and three different concentrations of benzophenone-3 (30, 50 and 70%) using spray congealing technique. The microparticles presented properties suitable for topical application, such as spherical morphology, high encapsulation efficiency (95.53-102.2%), average particle sizes between 28.5 and 60.0 µm with polydispersivities from 1.2 to 2.5. In studies of in vitro skin penetration and preliminary stability, formulations of gel cream containing carnauba wax solid lipid microparticles and 70% benzophenone-3 when compared to the formulation added of bees wax solid-lipid microparticles containing 70% benzophenone-3, was stable considering the several parameters evaluated and were able to decrease the penetration of the UV filter into pig skin. Moreover, the formulations containing solid lipid microparticles with 70% benzophenone-3 increased the photoprotective capacity of benzophenone-3 under UV irradiation. The results show that spray-congealed microparticles are interesting solid forms to decrease the penetration solar filters in the skin without compromising their photoprotection.

  20. Emerging trade-offs - impact of photoprotectants (PsbS, xanthophylls, and vitamin E) on oxylipins as regulators of development and defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Cohu, Christopher M; Amiard, Véronique; Zadelhoff, Guusvan; Veldink, Gerrit A; Muller, Onno; Adams, William W

    2013-02-01

    This review summarizes evidence for a mechanistic link between plant photoprotection and the synthesis of oxylipin hormones as regulators of development and defense. Knockout mutants of Arabidopsis, deficient in various key components of the chloroplast photoprotection system, consistently produced greater concentrations of the hormone jasmonic acid or its precursor 12- oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), both members of the oxylipin messenger family. Characterized plants include several mutants deficient in PsbS (an intrinsic chlorophyll-binding protein of photosystem II) or pigments (zeaxanthin and/or lutein) required for photoprotective thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy in the chloroplast and a mutant deficient in reactive oxygen detoxification via the antioxidant vitamin E (tocopherol). Evidence is also presented that certain plant defenses against herbivores or pathogens are elevated for these mutants. This evidence furthermore indicates that wild-type Arabidopsis plants possess less than maximal defenses against herbivores or pathogens, and suggest that plant lines with superior defenses against abiotic stress may have lower biotic defenses. The implications of this apparent trade-off between abiotic and biotic plant defenses for plant ecology as well as for plant breeding/engineering are explored, and the need for research further addressing this important issue is highlighted.

  1. Seasonally-induced alterations of some facial signs in Caucasian women and their changes induced by a daily application of a photo-protective product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Gautier, B; Benize, A-M; Charbonneau, A; Cassier, M

    2017-12-01

    These were two-fold: (i) to assess the possible changes in some facial signs induced in a 6-month period by the periodical shift from winter to summer in Caucasian women and (ii) to appraise the preventive effects of a strong photo-protective product. The facial signs of two cohorts of French women (N= 40 and 42), of comparable ages were graded between winter to summer. One group was left unprotected whereas the other daily applied a strong photo-protective product for 6 months. Facial signs (structural and pigmentation-related) were graded in blind by a panel of 12 experts from photographs taken under standard conditions. A global and focused analysis of the skin colour or dark spots, when present, was carried out through spectro-radiometry under diffuse and standardized visible light, using the L*, a*, b* referential system. The unprotected group showed significant changes in summer as compared to winter on 10 facial signs (two-third of the studied signs) that presented an increased severity, of variable respective amplitude. Five signs among the 10 were particularly and significantly affected by the seasonal transition, of an amplitude above the precision of the grading scale. Three of these five signs concerned structural elements (wrinkles), the two others being related to vascular disorders (redness). These season-induced alterations appear efficiently reduced in the photo-protected group. The colour of the facial skin then appears more homogeneous, less red, less dull, all criteria being quantified by the L*, a*, b* referential system. The comparison with a previous work carried out on Chinese women, through a similar protocol, shows that the photo-protective product brings, in Caucasian women, a more important effect upon structural and vascular features than upon pigmentation disorders, inversely to the results previously observed in Chinese women. The alterations in some facial signs occurring in a 6-month period between winter and summer are confirmed in

  2. Moringa oleifera Leaf Extracts as Multifunctional Ingredients for “Natural and Organic” Sunscreens and Photoprotective Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baldisserotto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera has gained increasing popularity as a food supplement but not in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic area. The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of extracts from the leaves of Moringa oleifera as a herbal sun care phytocomplex. Three different extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves, from Senegal, have been prepared and chemically characterized in the phenolic fraction by HPLC-DAD and Folin–Ciocalteu test. To explore photoprotective properties, an extensive evaluation of UV filtering, antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, ORAC, PCL, and anti-hyperproliferative (human melanoma Colo38 cells capacities have been conducted. Furthermore, a formulation study regarding cosmetic prototypes has been carried out in order to determine the Sun Protection Factor (SPF, which was assessed in vitro. The extracts were demonstrated to confer significant values of protection, with an SPF 2, that corresponds to a 50% protection against UV-B rays, at concentrations as low as 2% to 4%. Finally, the evaluation on potential irritation of the finished formulations was conducted by Patch Test and no significant irritant potential was observed. These evidence enlarged the already significant number of activities and potential uses of this plant, which is well-known for its importance in the medicinal and nutritional fields.

  3. Prevalence of photoprotection and its associated factors in risk group for skin cancer in Teresina, Piauí.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Ayres de Morais E Silva; Mesquita, Gerardo Vasconcelos; Campelo, Viriato; Martins, Maria do Carmo de Carvalho E; Almeida, Camila Aparecida Pinheiro Landim; Rabelo, Regina Silva; Rocha, Amanda Eugênia Almeida; Santos, Jadson Lener Oliveira Dos

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer has increased worldwide, particularly melanoma rates, which had a mean development of 2.6 % a year in the last 10 years. The agreement on the relation between long-term or chronic exposure to the sun and the emergence of these neoplasias has made several workers who perform activities exposed to solar radiation to form a risk group for the development of skin cancer, community health agents included. To analyze the prevalence of sunscreen-use-related factors to skin cancer in a labor risk group. Cross-sectional study with community health agents selected through simple random sampling. After collecting data using semi-structured interviews, a descriptive analysis was performed for the qualitative variables, bivariate analysis was employed for checking the association between sunscreen use and sociodemographic, occupational and knowledge about skin variables, and multivariate analysis was conducted to check independent variables associated to sunscreen use. A 5% significance level was used. Of 261 health gents selected, 243 were able to participate in the study. The prevalence rate of sunscreen use was 34.2% (95% CI: 28.2-40.2). Factors associated with sunscreen use were female sex, advanced age, use of sunscreen in situations when the skin got burnt, knowledge of the negative effects of the sun on the skin and skin cancer history. The prevalence found reveals that there is a need for implementing educational strategies in health services regarding photoprotection.

  4. SUN EXPOSURE AND PHOTOPROTECTION HABITS EVALUATION OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AT ENIO PIPINO PUBLIC SCHOOL IN SINOP-MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. S. Bernardes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the sun exposure and photoprotection habits of high school students at Enio Pipino Public School in Sinop-MT. 140 surveys were answered by high school students from the urban area of Sinop-MT. From all the interviewed students, 42,14% were male, and 57,85% female, 63 students declared themselves brown, 53 white, and 42 black. Most of the students declared that they are exposed to sun for at least two hours weekly, and 60% of them between 10am and 3pm. Only 26,42% of the students wear sunscreen during the day, and from those, 8,57% re-apply the product, 52,85% of the students declared no knowledge about SPF. Most of the students do not use physical methods of protection although they assume to be aware about the damages caused by solar radiation expodure, and 13 of them declared to have skin cancer incidence in their families. Analyzing the results, it was possible to identify the studied population vulnerability about the risks of sun radiation exposure and it was also seen that there are very less attitudes for the self health care. It is remarkable yet the need of sun exposure habits changes, according to the time, frequency, and timing of exposure

  5. Prevalence of photoprotection and its associated factors in risk group for skin cancer in Teresina, Piauí*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Ayres de Morais e Silva; Mesquita, Gerardo Vasconcelos; Campelo, Viriato; Martins, Maria do Carmo de Carvalho e; Almeida, Camila Aparecida Pinheiro Landim; Rabelo, Regina Silva; Rocha, Amanda Eugênia Almeida; dos Santos, Jadson Lener Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of skin cancer has increased worldwide, particularly melanoma rates, which had a mean development of 2.6 % a year in the last 10 years. The agreement on the relation between long-term or chronic exposure to the sun and the emergence of these neoplasias has made several workers who perform activities exposed to solar radiation to form a risk group for the development of skin cancer, community health agents included. OBJECTIVES To analyze the prevalence of sunscreen-use-related factors to skin cancer in a labor risk group. METHODOLOGY Cross-sectional study with community health agents selected through simple random sampling. After collecting data using semi-structured interviews, a descriptive analysis was performed for the qualitative variables, bivariate analysis was employed for checking the association between sunscreen use and sociodemographic, occupational and knowledge about skin variables, and multivariate analysis was conducted to check independent variables associated to sunscreen use. A 5% significance level was used. Results Of 261 health gents selected, 243 were able to participate in the study. The prevalence rate of sunscreen use was 34.2% (95% CI: 28.2-40.2). Factors associated with sunscreen use were female sex, advanced age, use of sunscreen in situations when the skin got burnt, knowledge of the negative effects of the sun on the skin and skin cancer history. Conclusions The prevalence found reveals that there is a need for implementing educational strategies in health services regarding photoprotection. PMID:28538880

  6. Effect of UV-B Radiation and Desiccation Stress on Photoprotective Compounds Accumulation in Marine Leptolyngbya sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Devika; Mohandass, C; Dhale, Mohan

    2018-01-01

    Increased awareness regarding the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation has led to the search for new sources of natural UV-B protecting compounds. Mycosporine-like amino acids are one of such promising compounds found in several organisms. Cyanobacteria are ideal organisms for isolation of these compounds due to their compatibility and adaptability to thrive under harsh environmental conditions. In the following investigation, we report the production of shinorine in Leptolyngbya sp. isolated from the intertidal region. Based on the spectral characteristics and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, the UV-absorbing compound was identified as shinorine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of shinorine in Leptolyngbya sp. We also investigated the effect of artificial UV-B radiation and periodic desiccation on chlorophyll-a, total carotenoids, and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) production. The UV-B radiation had a negative effect on growth and chlorophyll concentration, whereas it showed an inductive effect on the production of total carotenoids and MAAs. Desiccation along with UV-B radiation led to an increase in the concentration of photoprotective compounds. These results indicate that carotenoids and MAAs thus facilitate cyanobacteria to avoid and protect themselves from the deleterious effects of UV-B and desiccation.

  7. The Functional Significance of Black-Pigmented Leaves: Photosynthesis, Photoprotection and Productivity in Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatier, Jean-Hugues B.; Clearwater, Michael J.; Gould, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Black pigmented leaves are common among horticultural cultivars, yet are extremely rare across natural plant populations. We hypothesised that black pigmentation would disadvantage a plant by reducing photosynthesis and therefore shoot productivity, but that this trait might also confer protective benefits by shielding chloroplasts against photo-oxidative stress. CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll a fluorescence, shoot biomass, and pigment concentrations were compared for near isogenic green- and black-leafed Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’. The black leaves had lower maximum CO2 assimilation rates, higher light saturation points and higher quantum efficiencies of photosystem II (PSII) than green leaves. Under saturating light, PSII photochemistry was inactivated less and recovered more completely in the black leaves. In full sunlight, green plants branched more abundantly and accumulated shoot biomass quicker than the black plants; in the shade, productivities of the two morphs were comparable. The data indicate a light-screening, photoprotective role of foliar anthocyanins. However, limitations to photosynthetic carbon assimilation are relatively small, insufficient to explain the natural scarcity of black-leafed plants. PMID:23826347

  8. Epilobium angustifolium extract demonstrates multiple effects on dermal fibroblasts in vitro and skin photo-protection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszová, Ema; Cheel, José; Pávek, Stanislav; Moravcová, Martina; Hermannová, Martina; Matějková, Ilona; Spilková, Jiřina; Velebný, Vladimír; Kubala, Lukáš

    2013-09-01

    Stress-induced fibroblast senescence is thought to contribute to skin aging. Ultraviolet light (UV) radiation is the most potent environmental risk factor in these processes. An Epilobium angustifolium (EA) extract was evaluated for its capacity to reverse the senescent response of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro and to exhibit skin photo-protection in vivo. The HPLC-UV-MS analysis of the EA preparation identified three major polyphenol groups: tannins (oenothein B), phenolic acids (gallic and chlorogenic acids) and flavonoids. EA extract increased the cell viability of senescent NHDF induced by serum deprivation. It diminished connective tissue growth factor and fibronectin gene expressions in senescent NHDF. Down-regulation of the UV-induced release of both matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 and the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 and -2, and also down-regulation of the gene expression of hyaluronidase 2 were observed in repeatedly UV-irradiated NHDF after EA extract treatment. Interestingly, EA extract diminished the down-regulation of sirtuin 1 dampened by UV-irradiation. The application of EA extract using a sub-irritating dose protected skin against UV-induced erythema formation in vivo. In summary, EA extract diminished stress-induced effects on NHDF, particularly on connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. These results collectively suggest that EA extract may possess anti-aging properties and that the EA polyphenols might account for these benefits.

  9. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  10. GROWTH AND PHOTOPROTECTION IN THREE DINOFLAGELLATES (INCLUDING TWO STRAINS OF ALEXANDRIUM TAMARENSE) AND ONE DIATOM EXPOSED TO FOUR WEEKS OF NATURAL AND ENHANCED ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurion, Isabelle; Roy, Suzanne

    2009-02-01

    Long-term growth response to natural solar radiation with enhanced ultraviolet-B (UVB) exposure was examined in two species of dinoflagellates [Alexandrium tamarense (M. Lebour) Balech, At, and Heterocapsa triquetra (Ehrenb.) F. Stein, Ht], including two strains of A. tamarense, one from Spain and another from UK, and one diatom species (Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle et Heimdal). We examined whether variable photoprotection (mycosporine-like amino acids [MAAs] and xanthophyll-cycle pigments) affected photosynthetic performance, phytoplankton light absorption, and growth. Growth rate was significantly reduced under enhanced UVB for the UK strain of At and for Ht (both grew very little) as well as for the diatom (that maintained high growth rates), but there was no effect for the Spanish strain of At. MAA concentration was high in the dinoflagellates, but undetectable in the diatom, which instead used the xanthophyll cycle for photoprotection. The highest cell concentrations of MAAs and photoprotective pigments were observed in the UK strain of At, along with lowest growth rates and Fv /Fm , indicating high stress levels. In contrast, the Spanish strain showed progressive acclimation to the experimental conditions, with no significant difference in growth between treatments. Increase in total MAAs followed linearly the cumulative UVB of the preceding day, and both total and primary MAAs were maintained at higher constitutive levels in this strain. Acclimation to enhanced UVB in the diatom resulted in an increase in PSII activity and reduction in nonphotochemical quenching, indicating an increased resistance to photoinhibition after a few weeks. All four species showed increased phytoplankton light absorption under enhanced UVB. Large intrastrain differences suggest a need to consider more closely intraspecific variability in UV studies. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  11. Long-term ingestion of high flavanol cocoa provides photoprotection against UV-induced erythema and improves skin condition in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Ulrike; Neukam, Karin; Tronnier, Hagen; Sies, Helmut; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2006-06-01

    Dietary antioxidants contribute to endogenous photoprotection and are important for the maintenance of skin health. In the present study, 2 groups of women consumed either a high flavanol (326 mg/d) or low flavanol (27 mg/d) cocoa powder dissolved in 100 mL water for 12 wk. Epicatechin (61 mg/d) and catechin (20 mg/d) were the major flavanol monomers in the high flavanol drink, whereas the low flavanol drink contained 6.6 mg epicatechin and 1.6 mg catechin as the daily dose. Photoprotection and indicators of skin condition were assayed before and during the intervention. Following exposure of selected skin areas to 1.25 x minimal erythemal dose (MED) of radiation from a solar simulator, UV-induced erythema was significantly decreased in the high flavanol group, by 15 and 25%, after 6 and 12 wk of treatment, respectively, whereas no change occurred in the low flavanol group. The ingestion of high flavanol cocoa led to increases in blood flow of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, and to increases in skin density and skin hydration. Skin thickness was elevated from 1.11 +/- 0.11 mm at wk 0 to 1.24 +/- 0.13 mm at wk 12; transepidermal water loss was diminished from 8.7 +/- 3.7 to 6.3 +/- 2.2 g/(h x m2) within the same time frame. Neither of these variables was affected in the low flavanol cocoa group. Evaluation of the skin surface showed a significant decrease of skin roughness and scaling in the high flavanol cocoa group compared with those at wk 12. Dietary flavanols from cocoa contribute to endogenous photoprotection, improve dermal blood circulation, and affect cosmetically relevant skin surface and hydration variables.

  12. The Arabidopsis szl1 Mutant Reveals a Critical Role of β-Carotene in Photosystem I Photoprotection1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Li, Zhirong; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Dall’Osto, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, the xanthophylls, are structural determinants in both photosystems (PS) I and II. They bind and stabilize photosynthetic complexes, increase the light-harvesting capacity of chlorophyll-binding proteins, and have a major role in chloroplast photoprotection. Localization of carotenoid species within each PS is highly conserved: Core complexes bind carotenes, whereas peripheral light-harvesting systems bind xanthophylls. The specific functional role of each xanthophyll species has been recently described by genetic dissection, however the in vivo role of carotenes has not been similarly defined. Here, we have analyzed the function of carotenes in photosynthesis and photoprotection, distinct from that of xanthophylls, by characterizing the suppressor of zeaxanthin-less (szl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) which, due to the decreased activity of the lycopene-β-cyclase, shows a lower carotene content than wild-type plants. When grown at room temperature, mutant plants showed a lower content in PSI light-harvesting complex I complex than the wild type, and a reduced capacity for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching. When exposed to high light at chilling temperature, szl1 plants showed stronger photoxidation than wild-type plants. Both PSI and PSII from szl1 were similarly depleted in carotenes and yet PSI activity was more sensitive to light stress than PSII as shown by the stronger photoinhibition of PSI and increased rate of singlet oxygen release from isolated PSI light-harvesting complex I complexes of szl1 compared with the wild type. We conclude that carotene depletion in the core complexes impairs photoprotection of both PS under high light at chilling temperature, with PSI being far more affected than PSII. PMID:23029671

  13. Photoprotective effects of two natural products on ultraviolet B-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in SKH-1 mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Adriana; Daicoviciu, Doina; Clichici, Simona; Mocan, Teodora; Muresan, Adriana; Postescu, Ion Dan

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) is the major cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. We studied the photoprotective activity of Calluna vulgaris and red grape seed (Vitis vinifera L, Burgund Mare variety [BM]) extracts in vivo in an SKH-1 hairless mice skin model. Fifty 8-week-old female SKH-1 hairless mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10 each): controls, UVB-irradiated, C. vulgaris plus UVB-irradiated, BM plus UVB-irradiated, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) plus UVB-irradiated. A dose of 4 mg/mouse per cm² of skin area for both extracts was topically applied to the mice 30 minutes before a single-dose (240 mJ/cm²) UVB exposure. EGCG dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 6.6; 0.067 M) was administered at 2 mg/mouse per cm². Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, and caspase 3 activity were determined in skin homogenates 24 hours after irradiation. A single dose of UVB increased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase activity in the exposed skin. C. vulgaris and BM pretreatment significantly decreased GSH formation and glutathione peroxidase activity (P treatments with C. vulgaris and particularly BM extracts (P < .002) significantly reduced caspase 3 activity, indicating that the cells were protected against apoptosis. These results suggest that C. vulgaris and BM extracts might be chemopreventive candidates for reducing UV-induced risk for skin cancer.

  14. PHOTOINHIBITION OF PSII IN EMILIANIA HUXLEYI (HAPTOPHYTA) UNDER HIGH LIGHT STRESS: THE ROLES OF PHOTOACCLIMATION, PHOTOPROTECTION, AND PHOTOREPAIR(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Maria; Airs, Ruth L; Leonardos, Nikos; Geider, Richard J

    2008-06-01

    The response of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) W. H. Hay et H. Mohler to acute exposure to high photon flux densities (PFD) was examined in terms of PSII photoinhibition, photoprotection, and photorepair. The time and light dependencies of these processes were characterized as a function of the photoacclimation state of the alga. Low-light (LL) acclimated cells displayed a higher degree of photoinhibition, measured as decline in Fv /Fm , than high-light (HL) acclimated cells. However, HL cultures were more susceptible to photodamage but also more capable of compensating for it by performing a faster repair cycle. The relation between gross photoinhibition (observed in the presence of an inhibitor of repair) and PFD to which the algae were exposed deviated from linearity at high PFD, which calls into question the universality of current concepts of photoinhibition in mechanistic models. The light dependence of the de-epoxidation state (DPS) of the xanthophyll cycle (XC) pigments on the timescale of hours was the same in cells acclimated to LL and HL. However, HL cells were more efficient in realizing nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) on short timescales, most likely due to a larger XC pool. LL cells displayed an increase in the PSII effective cross-section (σPSII ) as a result of photoinhibition, which was observed also in HL cells when net photoinhibition was induced by blocking the D1 repair cycle. The link between σPSII and photoinhibition suggests that the population of PSII reaction centers (RCIIs) of E. huxleyi shares a common antenna, according to a "lake" organization of the light-harvesting complex. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  15. Synthesis and spectroscopic examination of various substituted 1,3-dibenzoylmethane, active agents for UVA/UVB photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubaud, Jean-Claude; Bombarda, Isabelle; Decome, Laetitia; Wallet, Jean-Claude; Gaydou, Emile M

    2008-08-21

    We describe the synthesis of eighteen variously substituted 1,3- dibenzoylmethane (1,3-DBM) and their change in absorption spectra depending of the nature of donor or acceptor substituents on one or the two aromatic moieties. These compounds were prepared in two steps starting from the corresponding acetophenones, phenol and benzoyl chlorides. The phenyl benzoate was obtained by condensation of benzoyl chloride with phenol in a classical way. Stirring of the phenyl benzoate and acetophenone in DMSO with powdered sodium hydroxide for a few minutes gave the dibenzoylmethane in yields depending on substituents on the phenyl rings. Changes in absorption of UVA/UVB sunlight of these molecules were observed according to the nature and the position of substituents on the phenyl rings. Molecules 2b (1-phenyl-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione), 2d (1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-phenyl-l,3-propanedione), 2e (1-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-phenyl-l,3-propanedione) and 2f (1-(2,3,4-trimethoxyphenyl)-3-phenyl-l,3-propanedione) were the most interesting for cosmetic applications because even after irradiation, they preserve their absorptive in UVA range and also in UVB range The other compounds are too photounstable and so can lose their protective effects. These results showed the lack of phototoxicity of these compounds and the possibility to use them as solar filters. Therefore, variously di- or tri methoxy 1,3-DBM are interesting molecules in term of photoprotection and open new prospects for UVA photostable filters.

  16. Unraveling the Photoprotective Response of Lichenized and Free-Living Green Algae (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta to Photochilling Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Míguez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lichens and free-living terrestrial algae are widespread across many habitats and develop successfully in ecosystems where a cold winter limits survival. With the goal of comparing photoprotective responses in free-living and lichenized algae, the physiological responses to chilling and photochilling conditions were studied in three lichens and their isolated algal photobionts together as well as in a fourth free-living algal species. We specifically addressed the following questions: (i Are there general patterns of acclimation in green algae under chilling and photochilling stresses? (ii Do free-living algae exhibit a similar pattern of responses as their lichenized counterparts? (iii Are these responses influenced by the selection pressure of environmental conditions or by the phylogenetic position of each species? To answer these questions, photosynthetic fluorescence measurements as well as pigment and low molecular weight carbohydrate pool analyses were performed under controlled laboratory conditions. In general, photochemical efficiency in all free-living algae decreased with increasing duration of the stress, while the majority of lichens maintained an unchanged photochemical activity. Nevertheless, these patterns cannot be generalized because the alga Trebouxia arboricola and the lichen Ramalina pollinaria (associated with Trebouxia photobionts both showed a similar decrease in photochemical efficiency. In contrast, in the couple Elliptochloris bilobata-Baeomyces rufus, only the algal partner exhibited a broad physiological performance under stress. This study also highlights the importance of the xanthophyll cycle in response to the studied lichens and algae to photochilling stress, while the accumulation of sugars was not related to cold acclimation, except in the alga E. bilobata. The differences in response patterns detected among species can be mainly explained by their geographic origin, although the phylogenetic position should

  17. Photoprotective Properties of Isothiocyanate and Nitrile Glucosinolate Derivatives From Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Against UVB Irradiation in Human Skin Equivalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan L. Carpenter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation of the skin leads to numerous dermatological concerns including skin cancer and accelerated aging. Natural product glucosinolate derivatives, like sulforaphane, have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive and photoprotective properties. In this study, we examined meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba glucosinolate derivatives, 3-methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate (MBITC and 3-methoxyphenyl acetonitrile (MPACN, for their activity in protecting against the consequences of UV exposure. To that end, we have exposed human primary epidermal keratinocytes (HPEKs and 3D human skin reconstructed in vitro (EpiDermTM FT-400 to UVB insult and investigated whether MBITC and MPACN treatment ameliorated the harmful effects of UVB damage. Activity was determined by the compounds’ efficacy in counteracting UVB-induced DNA damage, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP expression, and proliferation. We found that in monolayer cultures of HPEK, MBITC and MPACN did not protect against a UVB-induced loss in proliferation and MBITC itself inhibited cell proliferation. However, in human reconstructed skin-equivalents, MBITC and MPACN decrease epidermal cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs and significantly reduce total phosphorylated γH2A.X levels. Both MBITC and MPACN inhibit UVB-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression indicating their role to prevent photoaging. Both compounds, and MPACN in particular, showed activity against UVB-induced proliferation as indicated by fewer epidermal PCNA+ cells and prevented UVB-induced hyperplasia as determined by a reduction in reconstructed skin epidermal thickness (ET. These data demonstrate that MBITC and MPACN exhibit promising anti-photocarcinogenic and anti-photoaging properties in the skin microenvironment and could be used for therapeutic interventions.

  18. The trade-off between the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of fucoxanthin-chlorophyll proteins dominates light acclimation in Emiliania huxleyi (clone CCMP 1516).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, Boyd A; Davey, Phillip; Finch, Stewart J; Hopkins, Jason; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Metodiev, Metodi V; Oxborough, Kevin; Raines, Christine A; Lawson, Tracy; Geider, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the costs and benefits of photoacclimation requires knowledge of how photophysiology is affected by changes in the molecular structure of the chloroplast. We tested the hypothesis that changes in the light dependencies of photosynthesis, nonphotochemical quenching and PSII photoinactivation arises from changes in the abundances of chloroplast proteins in Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 grown at 30 (Low Light; LL) and 1000 (High Light; HL) μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) photon flux densities. Carbon-specific light-saturated gross photosynthesis rates were not significantly different between cells acclimated to LL and HL. Acclimation to LL benefited cells by increasing biomass-specific light absorption and gross photosynthesis rates under low light, whereas acclimation to HL benefited cells by reducing the rate of photoinactivation of PSII under high light. Differences in the relative abundances of proteins assigned to light-harvesting (Lhcf), photoprotection (LI818-like), and the photosystem II (PSII) core complex accompanied differences in photophysiology: specifically, Lhcf:PSII was greater under LL, whereas LI818:PSII was greater in HL. Thus, photoacclimation in E. huxleyi involved a trade-off amongst the characteristics of light absorption and photoprotection, which could be attributed to changes in the abundance and composition of proteins in the light-harvesting antenna of PSII. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. An in vitro strategy to evaluate the phototoxicity of solar UV at the molecular and cellular level: application to photoprotection assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrot, L; Belaidi, J P; Chaubo, C; Meunier, J R; Perez, P; Agapakis-Causse, C

    1998-09-01

    Skin cancers are among the most common human cancers and have an increasing incidence. The ultraviolet radiation components of sunlight play a major role in skin tumor induction and development. Cellular DNA has been identified as a target for most of the biological effects of UV, and the induction of photodamage is considered as the initiating step of photocarcinogenesis. Thus, effective photoprotection of DNA against harmful overex-posure to solar UV is a critical issue. The efficiency of a sunscreen is usually tested with respect to its ability to prevent skin erythema, but conceivably, more data are required at the molecular and cellular level in order to ascertain protection against photocarcinogenic risk. In the present study, we define a strategy based on the use of various in vitro models and solar-simulated light to evaluate photodamage and photoprotection: -Supercoiled circular plasmid DNA for detection of structural alterations. -The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. -The single-cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay to determine DNA damage and DNA repair in human keratinocytes. -p53 expression as a hallmark for genotoxic stress. -Induction of pigmentation in human melanocytes. In conditions where light source, spectrum and control of radiation delivery were precisely defined, we have demonstrated that the wide spectrum UVA sunscreen Mexoryl SX protects from the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of solar UV.

  20. Effective photoprotection of human skin against infrared A radiation by topically applied antioxidants: results from a vehicle controlled, double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Infrared A radiation (IRA) from solar sunlight contributes to photoaging of human skin, e.g. by upregulating MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts, indicating the need for photoprotection of human skin against IRA. Up to now, however, there has been no controlled study to show that effective protection of human skin against IRA radiation is possible. Here, we have conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blinded prospective study in 30 healthy volunteers to assess the capacity of an SPF 30 sunscreen versus the same sunscreen supplemented with an antioxidant cocktail containing grape seed extract, vitamin E, ubiquinone and vitamin C to protect human skin against IRA radiation-induced MMP-1 upregulation. As expected, exposure to IRA radiation significantly upregulated MMP-1 expression, as compared to unirradiated skin, and this response was significantly reduced, if the SPF30 sunscreen plus the antioxidant cocktail had been applied prior to IRA radiation. In contrast, treatment of human skin with the SPF30 sunscreen alone did not provide significant protection. These results indicate that topically applied antioxidants effectively protect human skin against IRA radiation and that regular sunscreens need to be supplemented with specific antioxidants in order to achieve IRA photoprotection. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Photoprotection by carotenoids of Plantago media photosynthetic apparatus in natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Tamara; Dymova, Olga; Zakhozhiy, Ilya; Dalke, Igor; Tabalenkova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    The study of daily changes in photosynthetic rate, of energy used in photochemical and non-photochemical processes, and of carotenoid composition aimed at evaluating the role of xanthophyll cycle (XC) in protection of hoary plantain plants (Plantago media) in nature. The leaves of sun plants differed from shade plants in terms of CO(2) exchange rate and photosynthetic pigments content. The total pool XC pigments and the conversion state increased from morning to midday in sun plants. An increase in zeaxanthin content occurred concomitantly with the violaxanthin decrease. About 80% violaxanthin was involved in conversion. The maximum of zeaxanthin in XC pigments pool was 60%. The conversion state of XC was twice as lower in shade plants than that in sun plants. The photosynthesis of sun leaves was depressed strongly at midday, but changes of maximum quantum yield of PS2 (F(v)/F(m)) were not apparent at that time. The coefficient qN (non-photochemical quenching) in the sun leaves changed strongly, from 0.3 to 0.9 as irradiance increased. The direct relation between heat dissipation and the conversion state of XC in plantain leaves was revealed. Thus, plantain leaves were found to be resistant to excess solar radiation due to activation of qN mechanisms associated with the XC de-epoxidation.

  2. Photoprotection by dietary phenolics against melanogenesis induced by UVA through Nrf2-dependent antioxidant responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasongsuk, Anyamanee; Onkoksoong, Tasanee; Pluemsamran, Thanyawan; Limsaengurai, Saowalak; Panich, Uraiwan

    2015-01-01

    Dietary phenolics may play a protective role in UV-mediated skin pigmentation through their antioxidant and UV-absorbing actions. In this study, we investigated whether genetic silencing of Nrf2, regulating the transcription of antioxidant genes, affected melanogenesis in primary human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn) and B16F10 melanoma cells subjected to UVA (8 J/cm2) exposure. Then, we explored the antimelanogenic actions of phenolics; caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA) providing partial UVA protection; quercetin (QU) and rutin (RU) providing strong UVA protection and; avobenzone (AV), an efficient UVA filter, in association with modulation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defenses in response to UVA insults in B16F10 cells. Upon oxidative insults, Nrf2 silencing promoted melanogenesis in both HEMn and B16F10 cells irradiated with UVA. Stimulation of melanogenesis by UVA correlated with increased ROS and oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG), GSH depletion as well as a transient downregulation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation and of Nrf2-ARE signaling in B16F10 cells. All test compounds exerted antimelanogenic effects with respect to their abilities to reverse UVA-mediated oxidative damage as well as downregulation of Nrf2 activity and its target antioxidants (GCLC, GST and NQO1) in B16F10 cells. In conclusion, defective Nrf2 may promote melanogenesis under UVA irradiation through oxidative stress mechanisms. Compounds with antioxidant and/or UVA absorption properties could protect against UVA-induced melanogenesis through indirect regulatory effect on Nrf2-ARE pathway. PMID:26765101

  3. The fine tuning of carotenoid–chlorophyll interactions in light-harvesting complexes: an important requisite to guarantee efficient photoprotection via triplet–triplet energy transfer in the complex balance of the energy transfer processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Valentin, Marilena; Carbonera, Donatella

    2017-01-01

    Triplet–triplet energy transfer (TTET) from the chlorophyll to the carotenoid triplet state is the process exploited by photosynthetic systems to protect themselves from singlet oxygen formation under light-stress conditions. A deep comprehension of the molecular strategies adopted to guarantee TTET efficiency, while at the same time maintaining minimal energy loss and efficient light-harvesting capability, is still lacking. The paramagnetic nature of the triplet state makes electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) the method of choice when investigating TTET. In this review, we focus on our extended comparative study of two photosynthetic antenna complexes, the Peridinin–chlorophyll a -protein of dinoflagellates and the light-harvesting complex II of higher plants, in order to point out important aspects of the molecular design adopted in the photoprotection strategy. We have demonstrated that a proper analysis of the EPR data allows one to identify the pigments involved in TTET and, consequently, gain an insight into the structure of the photoprotective sites. The structural information has been complemented by a detailed description of the electronic structure provided by hyperfine spectroscopy. All these elements represent the fundamental building blocks toward a deeper understanding of the requirements for efficient photoprotection, which is fundamental to guarantee the prolonged energy conversion action of photosynthesis. (topical review)

  4. Proteção à radiação ultravioleta: recursos disponíveis na atualidade em fotoproteção Ultraviolet radiation protection: current available resources in photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Santana Balogh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A radiação ultravioleta pode provocar danos ao DNA, imunossupressão, alterações químicas e histológicas na epiderme, envelhecimento precoce, cataratas e carcinogênese, dentre outras deteriorações. A fotoproteção previne estes e outros efeitos danosos da radiação ultravioleta. Protetores solares, vestimentas, acessórios adequados e exposição segura ao sol são ferramentas essenciais da fotoproteção. Neste artigo, são apresentadas e discutidas as principais formas de fotoproteção, incluindo os protetores solares com filtros inorgânicos e orgânicos, a avaliação da eficácia dos mesmos e atualizações envolvendo o temaUltraviolet radiation can damage the DNA, cause immunosuppression, chemical and histological alterations in the epidermis, early photoaging, cataracts and carcinogenesis, among others. Photoprotection prevents these and other harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. Sunscreens, protective clothing, proper accessories and safe sun exposure are essential photoprotection tools. The main forms of photoprotection are presented and discussed in this article, including sunscreens containing organic and inorganic filters, the assessment of their efficacy and current developments on the topic

  5. Photoprotection by Punica granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Ramos, David; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Vinardell, Maria Pilar

    2015-12-01

    There has been an increase in the use of botanicals as skin photoprotective agents. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is well known for its high concentration of polyphenolic compounds and for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the photoprotection provided by P. granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in the keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. For this purpose, HaCaT cells were pretreated for 1h with nanoemulsions in a serum-free medium and then irradiated with UVB (90-200 mJ/cm(2)) rays. Fluorescence microscopy analysis provided information about the cellular internalization of the nanodroplets. We also determined the in vitro SPF of the nanoemulsions and evaluated their phototoxicity using the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake Phototoxicity Test. The nanoemulsions were able to protect the cells' DNA against UVB-induced damage in a concentration dependent manner. Nanodroplets were internalized by the cells but a higher proportion was detected along the cell membrane. The SPF obtained (~25) depended on the concentration of the ethyl acetate fraction and pomegranate seed oil in the nanoemulsion. The photoprotective formulations were classified as non-phototoxic. In conclusion, nanoemulsions entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction show potential for use as a sunscreen product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trade-Offs Associated with Photoprotective Green Fluorescent Protein Expression as Potential Drivers of Balancing Selection for Color Polymorphism in Reef Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathryn Quick

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodamage of symbiotic algae exposed to thermal stress is involved in mass coral bleaching, a major cause of reef decline. Photoprotection is therefore a vital part of coral stress physiology. Corals produce a variety of green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins, some of which screen the symbiotic algae from excess sun light. Different tissue concentrations of these GFP-like proteins distinguish color morphs that are characteristic for many coral species. The question arises whether these pigmentation differences may diversify the niches that can be occupied by corals along the steep light gradient that structures coral reef communities. We assessed the implications of GFP-like protein expression in two color morphs of the symbiotic coral Hydnophora grandis, both associated with the same Symbiodinium sp. (subclade C40. The color morphs of this species (high fluorescent, HF; and low fluorescent, LF, characterized by markedly different contents of a cyan fluorescent protein, were exposed to different quantities of blue light (470 nm that matched the major absorption band of the host pigment (473 nm. High intensities of blue light caused less photodamage to the symbiotic algae of the HF morph and resulted in higher growth rates of these corals compared to representatives of the LF morph. In contrast, under low intensities of blue light, the HF morph showed lower growth rates than the LF morph, indicating that trade-offs are associated with high levels of fluorescent protein expression under this condition. Both morphs showed highest growth rates at medium light intensities with no obvious influence of the tissue pigmentation. Reef coral color polymorphism caused by photoprotective GFP-like proteins may therefore be a product of balancing selection in which high pigment contents may be beneficial at the upper and detrimental at the lower end of the depth distribution range of symbiotic corals. Conversely, color morphs with GFP-like proteins

  7. The sun protection factor (SPF) inadequately defines broad spectrum photoprotection: demonstration using skin reconstructed in vitro exposed to UVA, UVBor UV-solar simulated radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernerd, Françoise; Vioux, Corinne; Lejeune, François; Asselineau, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Wavelength specific biological damage has been previously identified in human skin reconstructed in vitro. Sunburn cell and pyrimidine dimers were found after UVB exposure, and alterations of dermal fibroblasts after UVA exposure. These damages permitted us to discriminate UVB and UVA single absorbers. The present study shows that these biological effects can be obtained simultaneously by a combined UVB + UVA exposure using ultraviolet solar simulated light (UV-SSR), which represents a relevant UV source. In addition, the protection afforded by two broad spectrum sunscreen complex formulations was assessed after topical application. These two formulations displayed the same sun protection factor but different UVA protection factors determined by the persistent pigment darkening (PPD) method. Dose response experiments of UVA or UV-SSR showed that the preparation with the highest PF-UVA provided a better protection with regard to dermal damage compared to the other formulation. Using an original UVB source to obtain the UVB portion of SSR spectrum, the preparations provided the same protection. This study strikingly illustrates the fact that the photoprotection afforded by two sunscreen formulations having similar SPF values is not equal with regard to dermal damage related to photoaging.

  8. Topical Vitamin C and the Skin: Mechanisms of Action and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Niaimi, Firas; Chiang, Nicole Yi Zhen

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This review article details the main mechanisms of action and clinical applications of topical vitamin C on the skin, including its antioxidative, photoprotective, antiaging, and antipigmentary effects. DESIGN: A PubMed search for the relevant articles on vitamin C and the skin was conducted using the following key words: “vitamin C,” “ascorbic acid,” “ascorbyl-6-palmitate,”and “magnesium ascorbyl phosphate.” RESULTS: As one of the most powerful antioxidants in the skin, vitamin C ...

  9. Seasonal changes in photosynthesis and photoprotection in a Quercus ilex subsp. ballota woodland located in its upper altitudinal extreme in the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera, L; Morales, F; Abadía, A; Gil-Pelegrín, E

    2005-05-01

    Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp., a Mediterranean evergreen species growing in a continental Mediterranean climate, did not experience water stress and showed greater sensitivity to winter stress than to summer stress over a 12-month period. Net CO2 assimilation rates and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency decreased markedly during the cold months and recovered completely in spring. Lutein, neoxanthin and beta-carotene to chlorophyll (Chl) molar ratios all showed the same trend throughout the year, increasing from September to March. This increase was a result of increases in carotenoid concentrations, because Chl concentration per unit leaf area remained stable, and was higher at the end than at the beginning of the first growing season. Lutein-epoxide was a minor component of the total lutein pool. Thermal energy dissipation and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were associated with the de-epoxidated forms of the xanthophyll cycle pigments in the warm months. Photosynthetic rates decreased slightly at midday in summer. These changes were accompanied by decreases in maximum potential PSII efficiency (which recovered during the night), actual and intrinsic PSII efficiencies, photochemical quenching and increases in NPQ. Overall, our data indicate down-regulation of photosynthesis during the summer. The diurnal de-epoxidation of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin occurred throughout the year, except in January. Antioxidant enzymatic activity increased in the winter months, especially during the coldest months, highlighting its key role in photoprotection against photo-oxidation. Structural and functional modifications protected PSII from permanent damage and allowed 1-year-old leaves to photosynthesize at high rates when temperatures increased in spring.

  10. Sex-related differences in photoinhibition, photo-oxidative stress and photoprotection in stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) exposed to drought and nutrient deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simancas, Bárbara; Juvany, Marta; Cotado, Alba; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-03-01

    Dimorphic plant species can show distinct nutrient needs due to sex-related differences in nutrient allocation to reproductive structures, which can potentially affect their sensitivity to photoinhibition and photo-oxidative stress. Here, we investigated sex-related differences in the extent of photo-oxidative stress in male and female individuals of U. dioica exposed to a combination of severe drought and nutrient starvation. Male and female individuals of U. dioica subject to severe drought stress were exposed to various levels of nutrient availability. First, a set of plants grown under field conditions and exposed to summer drought was used to test the effects of nutrient supply (given as NPK fertilizer). Secondly, the effects of various phosphate concentrations in the nutrient solution were tested in drought-stressed potted plants. The Fv/Fm ratio (maximum efficiency of PSII photochemistry), photoprotection capacity (levels of carotenoids, including the xanthophyll cycle, and vitamins C and E), and the extent of lipid peroxidation (hydroperoxide levels) were measured. Results showed that an application of the NPK fertilizer to the soil had a positive effect on drought-stressed plants, reducing the extent of lipid peroxidation in both males and females. P deficiency led to residual photoinhibition, as indicated by significant reductions in the Fv/Fm ratio, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in females, but not in males. We conclude that (i) increased nutrient availability in the soil can alleviate photo-oxidative stress in drought-stressed U. dioica plants, and (ii) U. dioica plants show sexual secondary dimorphism in terms of photoinhibition and photo-oxidative stress, but this is only apparent when stress infringed on plants is very severe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Activation of photoprotective winter photoinhibition in plants from different environments: a literature compilation and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez, Fátima; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Becerril, José María; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Overwintering plants face a pronounced imbalance between light capture and use of that excitation for photosynthesis. In response, plants upregulate thermal dissipation, with concomitant reductions in photochemical efficiency, in a process characterized by a slow recovery upon warming. These sustained depressions of photochemical efficiency are termed winter photoinhibition (WPI) here. WPI has been extensively studied in conifers and in few overwintering crops, but other plant species have received less attention. Furthermore, the literature shows some controversies about the association of WPI with xanthophylls and the environmental conditions that control xanthophylls conversion. To overview current knowledge and identify knowledge gaps on WPI mechanisms, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of literature published over the period 1991-2011. All publications containing measurements of Fv/Fm for a cold period and a corresponding warm control were included in our final database of 190 studies on 162 species. WPI was estimated as the relative decrease in Fv/Fm. High WPI was always accompanied by a high (A + Z)/(V + A + Z). Activation of lasting WPI was directly related to air temperature, with a threshold of around 0°C. Tropical plants presented earlier (at a temperature of >0°C) and higher WPI than non-tropical plants. We conclude that (1) activation of a xanthophyll-dependent mechanism of WPI is a requisite for maintaining photosynthetic structures at sub-zero temperatures, while (2) absence (or low levels) of WPI is not necessarily related to low (A + Z)/(V + A + Z); and (3) the air temperature that triggers lasting WPI, and the maximum level of WPI, do not depend on plant growth habit or bioclimatic origin of species. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Photoprotection related to xanthophyll cycle pigments in epiphytic orchids acclimated at different light microenvironments in two tropical dry forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa-Manzano, Edilia; Andrade, José Luis; García-Mendoza, Ernesto; Zotz, Gerhard; Reyes-García, Casandra

    2015-12-01

    Epiphytic orchids from dry forests of Yucatán show considerable photoprotective plasticity during the dry season, which depends on leaf morphology and host tree deciduousness. Nocturnal retention of antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin was detected for the first time in epiphytic orchids. In tropical dry forests, epiphytes experience dramatic changes in light intensity: photosynthetic photon flux density may be up to an order of magnitude higher in the dry season compared to the wet season. To address the seasonal changes of xanthophyll cycle (XC) pigments and photosynthesis that occur throughout the year, leaves of five epiphytic orchid species were studied during the early dry, dry and wet seasons in a deciduous and a semi-deciduous tropical forests at two vertical strata on the host trees (3.5 and 1.5 m height). Differences in XC pigment concentrations and photosynthesis (maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II; F v/F m) were larger among seasons than between vertical strata in both forests. Antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin retention reflected the stressful conditions of the epiphytic microhabitat, and it is described here in epiphytes for the first time. During the dry season, both XC pigment concentrations and photosystem II heat dissipation of absorbed energy increased in orchids in the deciduous forest, while F v/F m and nocturnal acidification (ΔH(+)) decreased, clearly as a response to excessive light and drought. Concentrations of XC pigments were higher than those in orchids with similar leaf shape in semi-deciduous forest. There, only Encyclia nematocaulon and Lophiaris oerstedii showed somewhat reduced F v/F m. No changes in ΔH(+) and F v/F m were detected in Cohniella ascendens throughout the year. This species, which commonly grows in forests with less open canopies, showed leaf tilting that diminished light interception. Light conditions in the uppermost parts of the canopy probably limit the distribution of epiphytic orchids and the retention of

  14. Gene expression in the scleractinian Acropora microphthalma exposed to high solar irradiance reveals elements of photoprotection and coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Antonio; Dunlap, Walter C; Cullum, John; Shick, J Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F

    2010-11-12

    The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH) from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues. A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a 'shared metabolic adaptation' between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca(2+)-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis. Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching.

  15. Grey hair: clinical investigation into changes in hair fibres with loss of pigmentation in a photoprotected population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, P D; Polefka, T; Grove, G; Daly, S; Jumbelic, L; Harper, D; Nori, M; Evans, T; Ramaprasad, R; Bianchini, R

    2011-04-01

    Loss of pigmentation in hair fibres is one of the most obvious phenotypic changes with ageing and has been a topic of increasing interest in the study of follicle biology. The onset of greying brings cosmetic complaints that grey fibres are wild or difficult to manage. Of course, these perceptions may be the consequence of visual obviousness rather than underlying physical or chemical differences. Although several studies have compared pigmented and unpigmented fibres, few have tried to control genetic and ethnic difference as well as extrinsic factors such as photoexposure and chemical treatment. We have recruited subjects with salt-and-pepper hair from a population of Old Order Mennonites who, for cultural reasons, are not only prohibited from chemically treating their hair but also limit their exposure to sunlight. Hair samples were examined for elemental composition, surface energy, Young's modulus, break stress, bending modulus, shear modulus and water sorption/desorption isotherm. The parameters were evaluated statistically for global differences, individual differences and typical individual differences. Consistent with previous published literature, few global differences were found between pigmented and unpigmented hair across the population. We do find that many individual subjects had differences between pigmented and unpigmented fibres. These differences tend to be more pronounced in bulk than in surface properties. The small differences in mechanical properties and moisture uptake and loss lend support to the perception by consumers that grey hair is wilder, drier and less manageable. © 2011 TRI/Princeton. Journal compilation. © 2010 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Gene expression in the scleractinian Acropora microphthalma exposed to high solar irradiance reveals elements of photoprotection and coral bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Starcevic

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues.A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs, which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a 'shared metabolic adaptation' between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca(2+-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis.Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching.

  17. Photoprotection Conferred by Changes in Photosynthetic Protein Levels and Organization during Dehydration of a Homoiochlorophyllous Resurrection Plant1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charuvi, Dana; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Naveh, Leah; Zia, Ahmad; Adam, Zach; Farrant, Jill M.; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Reich, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    During desiccation, homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants retain most of their photosynthetic apparatus, allowing them to resume photosynthetic activity quickly upon water availability. These plants rely on various mechanisms to prevent the formation of reactive oxygen species and/or protect their tissues from the damage they inflict. In this work, we addressed the issue of how homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants deal with the problem of excessive excitation/electron pressures during dehydration using Craterostigma pumilum as a model plant. To investigate the alterations in the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic protein complexes, we examined cryoimmobilized, freeze-fractured leaf tissues using (cryo)scanning electron microscopy. These examinations revealed rearrangements of photosystem II (PSII) complexes, including a lowered density during moderate dehydration, consistent with a lower level of PSII proteins, as shown by biochemical analyses. The latter also showed a considerable decrease in the level of cytochrome f early during dehydration, suggesting that initial regulation of the inhibition of electron transport is achieved via the cytochrome b6f complex. Upon further dehydration, PSII complexes are observed to arrange into rows and semicrystalline arrays, which correlates with the significant accumulation of sucrose and the appearance of inverted hexagonal lipid phases within the membranes. As opposed to PSII and cytochrome f, the light-harvesting antenna complexes of PSII remain stable throughout the course of dehydration. Altogether, these results, along with photosynthetic activity measurements, suggest that the protection of retained photosynthetic components is achieved, at least in part, via the structural rearrangements of PSII and (likely) light-harvesting antenna complexes into a photochemically quenched state. PMID:25713340

  18. Topical Vitamin C and the Skin: Mechanisms of Action and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Niaimi, Firas; Chiang, Nicole Yi Zhen

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: This review article details the main mechanisms of action and clinical applications of topical vitamin C on the skin, including its antioxidative, photoprotective, antiaging, and antipigmentary effects. DESIGN: A PubMed search for the relevant articles on vitamin C and the skin was conducted using the following key words: "vitamin C," "ascorbic acid," "ascorbyl-6-palmitate,"and "magnesium ascorbyl phosphate." RESULTS: As one of the most powerful antioxidants in the skin, vitamin C has been shown to protect against photoaging, ultraviolet-induced immunosuppression, and photocarcinogenesis. It also has an antiaging effect by increasing collagen synthesis, stabilizing collagen fibers, and decreasing collagen degradation. It decreases melanin formation, thereby reducing pigmentation. Vitamin C is the primary replenisher of vitamin E and works synergistically with vitamin E in the protection against oxidative damage. CONCLUSION: Topical vitamin C has a wide range of clinical applications, from antiaging and antipigmentary to photoprotective. Currently, clinical studies on the efficacy of topical formulations of vitamin C remain limited, and the challenge lies in finding the most stable and permeable formulation in achieving the optimal results.

  19. Correlação entre fotoproteção e concentrações de 25 hidroxi-vitamina D e paratormônio Correlation between photoprotection and 25 hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS- A preocupação com o risco de câncer da pele levou à difusão da fotoproteção em larga escala, e atualmente se discute se haveria, associado a essa recomendação, risco para o desenvolvimento de hipovitaminose D. OBJETIVOS - Avaliar em pacientes orientados para proteção solar, o estado atual de seu estoque de vitamina D. MÉTODOS - Avaliaram-se as concentrações de 25 hidroxivitamina D (25OHD e do hormônio da paratireóide (PTH em grupos de indivíduos com e sem orientação para fotoproteção, moradores da cidade de São Paulo. RESULTADOS - Encontrou-se diferença significativa entre os níveis de 25OHD, maiores no grupo fotoexposto, 35,4ng/mL [21,86- 72,20], em relação ao fotoprotegido, 29,2ng/mL [23,10-45,80]. Também houve diferença com relação ao PTH, maior no grupo fotoexposto, 29,8pg/mL [18,98-73,94], do que no fotoprotegido, 19,24pg/mL [8,06-66,18]. CONCLUSÕES - Apesar dessas diferenças, não havia indivíduos deficientes de vitamina D nessa amostra, e os níveis de PTH mantiveram- se dentro dos valores de normalidade. A radiação ultravioleta solar do cotidiano foi suficiente para promover uma síntese adequada de 25OHD.BACKGROUND - The great concern about skin cancer risk led to the dissemination of photoprotection in high scale. Nowadays the association of this recommendation and the risk of develop hypovitaminosis D is discussed. OBJECTIVE - To evaluate vitamin D storage in patients submitted to sun protection. METHODS - The levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD and parathyroid hormone (PTH were evaluated in groups of individuals living in the city of São Paulo who received or not orientation about photoprotection. RESULTS - Significant differences in 25OHD levels were found between the groups, being higher in the photoexposed group (35.40 ng/mL [21.86-72.20] as compared to the photoprotected group (29.20 ng/mL [23.10-45.80]. There was also difference in PTH levels, being higher in the photoexposed

  20. Fotoproteção, melasma e qualidade de vida em gestantes Photoprotection, melasma and quality of life in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Sheylla Malta Purim

    2012-05-01

    ®, version 8.0, and the significance level of p<0.05. RESULTS: In the sample (109 mothers predominated white women (60.6% phototype III, young (average age 24.4 years SD=6.1 and housewives (59.6%. The majority (80% stayed exposed to sunlight for 1-2 hours per day between 10 am and 3 pm, and from those (72% did not apply any photoprotection due to lack of sunscreen habit. Other physical means of sun protection were used by 15% of these patients. Information during prenatal care about the risks of sun exposure was reported by 34% of the mothers interviewed. There was a trend toward a significant association between prenatal guidance and daily use of sunscreen (p=0.088. About 20% of mothers had melasma. The average score MELASQol-PB (25 showed a negative impact on quality of life of these patients. CONCLUSION: In these women, sun exposure occurred at inappropriate times, without proper guidance and without the use of an effective sunscreen. The mothers with melasma complained about the appearance of their skin, frustration and embarrassment.

  1. DNA photoprotection conveyed by sunscreen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Charlene; Hayden, Patrick J; Armento, Alexander; Oldach, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Skin photoaging is the consequence of solar UV exposure, and DNA damage is an important part of this process. The objective of the current work was to demonstrate that in vitro skin models can be utilized to confirm that DNA damage protection is provided by sunscreens. Skin equivalents were exposed to full-spectrum UV light administered with a standard research solar simulator with and without pre-application of sunscreen. Cyclopyrimidine dimer (CPD) and sunburn cell (SBC) formation as well as CPD quantitation were evaluated to determine DNA damage protection provided by the sunscreen. Marked decreases in both CPDs and SBCs were observed when sunscreen was applied prior to UV exposure. Sunscreen application prior to full-spectrum solar UV exposure protects DNA from photodamage measured by CPD and SBC formation. This can be expected to lessen the risk of photoaging and malignant transformation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Let the sun shine in: mechanisms and potential for therapeutics in skin photodamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T

    2007-05-01

    Photoaging and photocarcinogenesis are the two Janus faces of skin photodamage. Reactivity-based design of prototype agents that antagonize, modulate and reverse the chemistry of skin photodamage holds promise in delivering unprecedented therapeutic benefit. In contrast to structure-based approaches that use selective ligands to target macromolecules, reactivity-based drug discovery uses chemical reagents as therapeutics to target reactive chemical species as key mediators of skin photo-oxidative stress. The following classes of reactivity-based agents for skin photoprotection can be distinguished based on their mechanism of action: direct antagonists of photo-oxidative stress (sunscreens, quenchers of photo-excited states, antioxidants, redox modulators and glycation inhibitors) and skin photo-adaptation inducers (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 [Nrf2] activators, heat-shock response inducers and metallothionein inducers).

  3. Ultraviolet Radiations: Skin Defense-Damage Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Chandel, Shikha; Kumar, Parveen; Verma, Vivek; Digvijay, Kumar; Tripathi, Deepika; Choudhury, Khushboo; Mitten, Sandeep Kumar; Shah, Dilip

    2017-01-01

    UV-radiations are the invisible part of light spectra having a wavelength between visible rays and X-rays. Based on wavelength, UV rays are subdivided into UV-A (320-400 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-C (200-280 nm). Ultraviolet rays can have both harmful and beneficial effects. UV-C has the property of ionization thus acting as a strong mutagen, which can cause immune-mediated disease and cancer in adverse cases. Numbers of genetic factors have been identified in human involved in inducing skin cancer from UV-radiations. Certain heredity diseases have been found susceptible to UV-induced skin cancer. UV radiations activate the cutaneous immune system, which led to an inflammatory response by different mechanisms. The first line of defense mechanism against UV radiation is melanin (an epidermal pigment), and UV absorbing pigment of skin, which dissipate UV radiation as heat. Cell surface death receptor (e.g. Fas) of keratinocytes responds to UV-induced injury and elicits apoptosis to avoid malignant transformation. In addition to the formation of photo-dimers in the genome, UV also can induce mutation by generating ROS and nucleotides are highly susceptible to these free radical injuries. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) has been known to be implicated in different UV-induced damages such as pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and skin cancer. UV-B induces the formation of pre-vitamin D3 in the epidermal layer of skin. UV-induced tans act as a photoprotection by providing a sun protection factor (SPF) of 3-4 and epidermal hyperplasia. There is a need to prevent the harmful effects and harness the useful effects of UV radiations.

  4. Novas Considerações sobre a Fotoproteção no Brasil: Revisão de Literatura/New Considerations on the Photoprotection in Brazil: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Motta Melo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A incidência do câncer de pele vem aumentando a cada ano. Sabe-se que entre outros fatores, a radiação solar é a principal responsável pelo desenvolvimento dessa patologia. A prevenção, feita através da fotoproteção, teria grande impacto nesse cenário. No entanto, as orientações sobre como se proteger dos malefícios do sol devem ser coerentes com a incidência solar da região, os hábitos da população e o fototipo da pele. Os conceitos sobre fotoproteção foram definidos por entidades européias e norte americanas e não devem ser reproduzidos para o Brasil de forma aleatória, pois a incidência solar no Brasil é muito maior, a população tem fototipos diferentes e o hábito de se expor ao sol é muito mais frequente. Portanto, faz-se necessário elaborar conceitos próprios para o Brasil e conscientizar a população sobre os perigos da radiação solar para que a incidência do câncer de pele reduza definitivamente. Essa revisão visa mostrar a relação da radiação solar no Brasil com a pele dos brasileiros e evidenciar a importância da fotoproteção para essa população. Para isso foi feito um levantamento de artigos originais, revisões de literatura, consensos brasileiros e internacionais e livros de dermatologia. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing every year. It is known that among other factors, solar radiation is the main responsible for the development of this pathology. Prevention, made by photoprotection, would have great impact in this scenario. However, the guidelines on how to protect themselves from the sun's harmful effects should be consistent with the sunlight of the region, the habits of the population and the phototype skin. The concepts of photoprotection were defined by European and North American entities and should not be played for Brazil at random, as the solar incidence in Brazil is much higher, people have different skin types and the habit of sun exposure is much more frequent

  5. Mechanics without mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Joshua

    2018-05-01

    At the time of Heinrich Hertz's premature death in 1894, he was regarded as one of the leading scientists of his generation. However, the posthumous publication of his treatise in the foundations of physics, Principles of Mechanics, presents a curious historical situation. Although Hertz's book was widely praised and admired, it was also met with a general sense of dissatisfaction. Almost all of Hertz's contemporaries criticized Principles for the lack of any plausible way to construct a mechanism from the "hidden masses" that are particularly characteristic of Hertz's framework. This issue seemed especially glaring given the expectation that Hertz's work might lead to a model of the underlying workings of the ether. In this paper I seek an explanation for why Hertz seemed so unperturbed by the difficulties of constructing such a mechanism. In arriving at this explanation, I explore how the development of Hertz's image-theory of representation framed the project of Principles. The image-theory brings with it an austere view of the "essential content" of mechanics, only requiring a kind of structural isomorphism between symbolic representations and target phenomena. I argue that bringing this into view makes clear why Hertz felt no need to work out the kinds of mechanisms that many of his readers looked for. Furthermore, I argue that a crucial role of Hertz's hypothesis of hidden masses has been widely overlooked. Far from acting as a proposal for the underlying structure of the ether, I show that Hertz's hypothesis ruled out knowledge of such underlying structure.

  6. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  7. Controlling Light Harvesting with Light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwizdala, M.S.; Berera, R.; Kirilovsky, D.; van Grondelle, R.; Kruger, T.P.J.

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to intense sunlight, all organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis implement various photoprotective strategies to prevent potentially lethal photodamage. The rapidly responding photoprotective mechanisms, occurring in the light-harvesting pigment-protein antennae, take effect within

  8. Puzzling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, M. Oskar

    2009-01-01

    The basis of a good mechanical puzzle is often a puzzling mechanism. This article will introduce some new puzzling mechanisms, like two knots that engage like gears, a chain whose links can be interchanged, and flat gears that do not come apart. It illustrates how puzzling mechanisms can be transformed into real mechanical puzzles, e.g., by…

  9. Light-induced energetic decoupling as a mechanism for phycobilisome-related energy dissipation in red algae: a single molecule study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Ning Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photosynthetic organisms have developed multiple protective mechanisms to prevent photodamage in vivo under high-light conditions. Cyanobacteria and red algae use phycobilisomes (PBsomes as their major light-harvesting antennae complexes. The orange carotenoid protein in some cyanobacteria has been demonstrated to play roles in the photoprotective mechanism. The PBsome-itself-related energy dissipation mechanism is still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, single-molecule spectroscopy is applied for the first time on the PBsomes of red alga Porphyridium cruentum, to detect the fluorescence emissions of phycoerythrins (PE and PBsome core complex simultaneously, and the real-time detection could greatly characterize the fluorescence dynamics of individual PBsomes in response to intense light. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data revealed that strong green-light can induce the fluorescence decrease of PBsome, as well as the fluorescence increase of PE at the first stage of photobleaching. It strongly indicated an energetic decoupling occurring between PE and its neighbor. The fluorescence of PE was subsequently observed to be decreased, showing that PE was photobleached when energy transfer in the PBsomes was disrupted. In contrast, the energetic decoupling was not observed in either the PBsomes fixed with glutaraldehyde, or the mutant PBsomes lacking B-PE and remaining b-PE. It was concluded that the energetic decoupling of the PBsomes occurs at the specific association between B-PE and b-PE within the PBsome rod. Assuming that the same process occurs also at the much lower physiological light intensities, such a decoupling process is proposed to be a strategy corresponding to PBsomes to prevent photodamage of the photosynthetic reaction centers. Finally, a novel photoprotective role of gamma-subunit-containing PE in red algae was discussed.

  10. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  11. Continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, A J M

    2004-01-01

    The mechanics of fluids and the mechanics of solids represent the two major areas of physics and applied mathematics that meet in continuum mechanics, a field that forms the foundation of civil and mechanical engineering. This unified approach to the teaching of fluid and solid mechanics focuses on the general mechanical principles that apply to all materials. Students who have familiarized themselves with the basic principles can go on to specialize in any of the different branches of continuum mechanics. This text opens with introductory chapters on matrix algebra, vectors and Cartesian ten

  12. Two mechanisms for dissipation of excess light in monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osto, Luca [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Cazzaniga, Stefano [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Bressan, Mauro [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Paleček, David [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Židek, Karel [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Niyogi, Krishna K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology; Zigmantas, Donatas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Bassi, Roberto [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze (Italy). Istituto per la Protezione delle Piante (IPP)

    2017-04-10

    Oxygenic photoautotrophs require mechanisms for rapidly matching the level of chlorophyll excited states from light harvesting with the rate of electron transport from water to carbon dioxide. These photoprotective reactions prevent formation of reactive excited states and photoinhibition. The fastest response to excess illumination is the so-called non-photochemical quenching which, in higher plants, requires the luminal pH sensor PsbS and other yet unidentified components of the photosystem II antenna. Both trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and monomeric LHC proteins have been indicated as site(s) of the heat-dissipative reactions. Different mechanisms have been proposed: Energy transfer to a lutein quencher in trimers, formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation in monomers. Here, we report on the construction of a mutant lacking all monomeric LHC proteins but retaining LHCII trimers. Its non-photochemical quenching induction rate was substantially slower with respect to the wild type. A carotenoid radical cation signal was detected in the wild type, although it was lost in the mutant. Here, we conclude that non-photochemical quenching is catalysed by two independent mechanisms, with the fastest activated response catalysed within monomeric LHC proteins depending on both zeaxanthin and lutein and on the formation of a radical cation. Trimeric LHCII was responsible for the slowly activated quenching component whereas inclusion in supercomplexes was not required. Finally, this latter activity does not depend on lutein nor on charge transfer events, whereas zeaxanthin was essential.

  13. Photoprotective and biotechnological potentials of cyanobacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyanobacteria are the main component of microbial populations fixing atmospheric nitrogen in aquatic as well as terrestrial ecosystems, especially in wetland rice-fields, where they significantly contribute to fertility as natural biofertilizers. Cyanobacteria require solar radiation as their primary source of energy to carry out ...

  14. Photoprotective Effects of Hydroalcohol Tagetes Erectus Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Trop J Pharm Res, December 2011;10 (6): 747. Tropical Journal of .... This plant is used in traditional system of medicine as analgesic ... Anne French hair- removing cream. The mice ..... Geriatr Med 2001; 17: 643-659. 21. Kligman LH.

  15. Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventilation is a life support treatment. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that helps people breathe when ... to breathe enough on their own. The mechanical ventilator is also called a ventilator , respirator, or breathing ...

  16. Mechanical design

    CERN Document Server

    Risitano, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    METHODOLOGICAL STATEMENT OF ENGINEERING DESIGNApproaches to product design and developmentMechanical design and environmental requirementsPROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALSMaterials for mechanical designCharacterization of metalsStress conditionsFatigue of materialsOptimum material selection in mechanical designDESIGN OF MECHANICAL COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMSFailure theoriesHertz theoryLubrificationShafts and bearingsSplines and keysSpringsFlexible machine elementsSpur gearsPress and shrink fitsPressure tubesCouplingsClutchesBrakes

  17. NLC Mechanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    text only Mechanical Systems.gif (14697 bytes) NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC Permanent Magnets Organization Overview The Mechanical Systems Group Organization is shown on the NLC Project Group Organization Chart (Next Linear Collider Technical Web Page). The Mechanical Systems Group operates on a matrixed

  18. Mechanical Kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Jerry N.

    Mechanical kinesiology is defined as a study of the mechanical factors affecting human movement, i.e., applying the physical laws of mechanics to the study of human motor behavior. This textbook on the subject is divided into thirty lessons. Each lesson is organized into three parts: a part on the text proper; a part entitled "study…

  19. Mechanisms Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo

    2006-01-01

    Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design such mechan......Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design...... using criteria such as size, performance parameters, operation environment, etc. Content: Understanding Mechanisms Design (2 weeks) Definitions, mechanisms representations, kinematic diagrams, the four bar linkage, mobility, applications of mechanisms, types of mechanisms, special mechanisms, the design......: equations for various mechanisms. At the end of this module you will be able to analyze existing mechanisms and to describe their movement. Designing mechanisms (7 weeks) Type synthesis and dimensional synthesis, function generation, path generation, three precision points in multi-loop mechanisms...

  20. Discrete mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Caltagirone, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental principles of mechanics to re-establish the equations of Discrete Mechanics. It introduces physics and thermodynamics associated to the physical modeling.  The development and the complementarity of sciences lead to review today the old concepts that were the basis for the development of continuum mechanics. The differential geometry is used to review the conservation laws of mechanics. For instance, this formalism requires a different location of vector and scalar quantities in space. The equations of Discrete Mechanics form a system of equations where the H

  1. Discrete mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of time throughout all phases of mechanics: classical mechanics, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and relativistic quantum theory. As an example of the relativistic quantum field theory, the case of a massless scalar field interacting with an arbitrary external current is discussed. The comparison between the new discrete theory and the usual continuum formalism is presented. An example is given of a two-dimensional random lattice and its duel. The author notes that there is no evidence that the discrete mechanics is more appropriate than the usual continuum mechanics

  2. Mechanical drawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ho Seon; Lee, Geun Hui

    2004-04-15

    This book deals with how to read and draw the mechanical drawing, which includes the basic of drawing like purpose, kinds, and criterion, projection, special projection drawing, omission of the figure, section, and types of section, dimensioning method, writing way of allowable limit size, tolerance of regular size, parts list and assembling drawing, fitting, mechanical elements like screw, key, pin, rivet, spring, bearing, pipe, valve, welding, geometric tolerance and mechanical materials.

  3. Classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to classical mechanics at a level intermediate between the typical undergraduate and advanced graduate level. This text describes the background and tools for use in the fields of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, particle physics, and relativity. Students who have had basic undergraduate classical mechanics or who have a good understanding of the mathematical methods of physics will benefit from this book.

  4. Mechanical science

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, W C

    2013-01-01

    This book gives comprehensive coverage of mechanical science for HNC/HND students taking mechanical engineering courses, including all topics likely to be covered in both years of such courses, as well as for first year undergraduate courses in mechanical engineering. It features 500 problems with answers and 200 worked examples. The third edition includes a new section on power transmission and an appendix on mathematics to help students with the basic notation of calculus and solution of differential equations.

  5. Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This book offers a broad overview of the potential of continuum mechanics to describe a wide range of macroscopic phenomena in real-world problems. Building on the fundamentals presented in the authors' previous book, Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica(R), this new work explores interesting models of continuum mechanics, with an emphasis on exploring the flexibility of their applications in a wide variety of fields.Specific topics, which have been chosen to show the power of continuum mechanics to characterize the experimental behavior of real phenomena, include: * various aspects of nonlin

  6. Automotive Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Ralph C.; And Others

    This curriculum guide, which was validated by vocational teachers and mechanics in the field, describes the competencies needed by entry-level automotive mechanics. This guide lists 15 competencies; for each competency, various tasks with their performance objective, student learning experiences, suggested instructional techniques, instructional…

  7. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  8. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  9. College mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Şengül, Caner

    2016-01-01

    College Mechanics QueBank has been designed to be different, enthusiastic, interesting and helpful to you. Therefore, it is not just a test bank about mechanics but also it is like a compass in order to find your way in mechanics Each chapter in this book is put in an order to follow a hierarchy of the mechanics topics; from vectors to simple harmonic motion. Throughout the book there are many multiple choice and long answer questions for you to solve. They have been created for YGS, LYS, SAT, IB or other standardized exams in the world because mechanics has no boundaries and so Physics has no country. Learn the main principle of each chapter and explore the daily life applications. Then you can start to solve the questions by planning a problem solving method carefully. Finally, enjoy solving the questions and discover the meachanics of the universe once more.

  10. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  11. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  12. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, A.I.M.

    1981-01-01

    This book, based on a thirty lecture course given to students at the beginning of their second year, covers the quantum mechanics required by physics undergraduates. Early chapters deal with wave mechanics, including a discussion of the energy states of the hydrogen atom. These are followed by a more formal development of the theory, leading to a discussion of some advanced applications and an introduction to the conceptual problems associated with quantum measurement theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. (U.K.)

  13. Indexing mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.G.; Parker, G.E.; Berry, R.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the indexing mechanism described can be used in a nuclear reactor fuel element inspection rig. It comprises a tubular body adapted to house a canister containing a number of fuel elements located longtitudinally, and has two chucks spaced apart for displacing the fuel elements longitudinally in a stepwise manner, together with a plunger mechanism for displacing them successively into the chucks. A measuring unit is located between the chucks for measuring the diameter of the fuel elements at intervals about their circumferences, and a secondary indexing mechanism is provided for rotating the measuring unit in a stepwise manner. (U.K.)

  14. Robot Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Lenarcic, Jadran; Stanišić, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the area of robot mechanisms, primarily considering industrial manipulators and humanoid arms. The book is intended for both teaching and self-study. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of kinematic analysis and the design of robot mechanisms. The coverage of topics is untypical. The focus is on robot kinematics. The book creates a balance between theoretical and practical aspects in the development and application of robot mechanisms, and includes the latest achievements and trends in robot science and technology.

  15. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  16. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, Nivaldo A

    2018-01-01

    Analytical mechanics is the foundation of many areas of theoretical physics including quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and has wide-ranging applications in engineering and celestial mechanics. This introduction to the basic principles and methods of analytical mechanics covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, rigid bodies, small oscillations, canonical transformations and Hamilton–Jacobi theory. This fully up-to-date textbook includes detailed mathematical appendices and addresses a number of advanced topics, some of them of a geometric or topological character. These include Bertrand's theorem, proof that action is least, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, constrained Hamiltonian systems, non-integrability criteria, KAM theory, classical field theory, Lyapunov functions, geometric phases and Poisson manifolds. Providing worked examples, end-of-chapter problems, and discussion of ongoing research in the field, it is suitable for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students studying analyt...

  17. Engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Dietmar; Schröder, Jörg; Wall, Wolfgang A; Rajapakse, Nimal

    Statics is the first volume of a three-volume textbook on Engineering Mechanics. The authors, using a time-honoured straightforward and flexible approach, present the basic concepts and principles of mechanics in the clearest and simplest form possible to advanced undergraduate engineering students of various disciplines and different educational backgrounds. An important objective of this book is to develop problem solving skills in a systematic manner. Another aim of this volume is to provide engineering students as well as practising engineers with a solid foundation to help them bridge the gap between undergraduate studies on the one hand and advanced courses on mechanics and/or practical engineering problems on the other. The book contains numerous examples, along with their complete solutions. Emphasis is placed upon student participation in problem solving. The contents of the book correspond to the topics normally covered in courses on basic engineering mechanics at universities and colleges. Now in i...

  18. Supersymmetric mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelle, Kellogg S

    2007-01-01

    With the development of the electronic archives in high-energy physics, there has been increasing questioning of the role of traditional publishing styles, particularly in the production of conference books. One aspect of traditional publishing that still receives wide appreciation, however, is in the production of well-focussed pedagogical material. The present two-volume edition, 'Supersymmetric Mechanics-Vol 1', edited by S Bellucci and 'Supersymmetric Mechanics-Vol 2', edited by S Bellucci, S Ferrara and A Marrani, is a good example of the kind of well-digested presentation that should still find its way into university libraries. This two-volume set presents the material of a set of pedagogical lectures presented at the INFN National Laboratory in Frascati over a two-year period on the subject of supersymmetric mechanics. The articles include the results of discussions with the attending students after the lectures. Overall, this makes for a useful compilation of material on a subject that underlies much of the current effort in supersymmetric approaches to cosmology and the unification programme. The first volume comprises articles on 'A journey through garden algebras' by S Bellucci, S J Gates Jr and E Orazi on linear supermultiplet realizations in supersymmetric mechanics,'Supersymmetric mechanics in superspace' by S Bellucci and S Krivonos, 'Noncommutative mechanics, Landau levels, twistors and Yang-Mills amplitudes' by V P Nair, 'Elements of (super) Hamiltonian formalism' by A Nersessian and 'Matrix mechanics' by C Sochichiu. The second volume consists entirely of a masterful presentation on 'The attractor mechanism and space time singularities' by S Ferrara. This presents a comprehensive and detailed overview of the structure of supersymmetric black hole solutions in supergravity, critical point structure in the scalar field moduli space and the thermodynamic consequences. This second volume alone makes the set a worthwhile addition to the research

  19. Soil Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Verruijt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This book is the text for the introductory course of Soil Mechanics in the Department of Civil Engineering of the Delft University of Technology, as I have given from 1980 until my retirement in 2002. It contains an introduction into the major principles and methods of soil mechanics, such as the analysis of stresses, deformations, and stability. The most important methods of determining soil parameters, in the laboratory and in situ, are also described. Some basic principles of applied mecha...

  20. De novo sequencing and analysis of the Ulva linza transcriptome to discover putative mechanisms associated with its successful colonization of coastal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaowen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The green algal genus Ulva Linnaeus (Ulvaceae, Ulvales, Chlorophyta is well known for its wide distribution in marine, freshwater, and brackish environments throughout the world. The Ulva species are also highly tolerant of variations in salinity, temperature, and irradiance and are the main cause of green tides, which can have deleterious ecological effects. However, limited genomic information is currently available in this non-model and ecologically important species. Ulva linza is a species that inhabits bedrock in the mid to low intertidal zone, and it is a major contributor to biofouling. Here, we presented the global characterization of the U. linza transcriptome using the Roche GS FLX Titanium platform, with the aim of uncovering the genomic mechanisms underlying rapid and successful colonization of the coastal ecosystems. Results De novo assembly of 382,884 reads generated 13,426 contigs with an average length of 1,000 bases. Contiguous sequences were further assembled into 10,784 isotigs with an average length of 1,515 bases. A total of 304,101 reads were nominally identified by BLAST; 4,368 isotigs were functionally annotated with 13,550 GO terms, and 2,404 isotigs having enzyme commission (EC numbers were assigned to 262 KEGG pathways. When compared with four other full sequenced green algae, 3,457 unique isotigs were found in U. linza and 18 conserved in land plants. In addition, a specific photoprotective mechanism based on both LhcSR and PsbS proteins and a C4-like carbon-concentrating mechanism were found, which may help U. linza survive stress conditions. At least 19 transporters for essential inorganic nutrients (i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur were responsible for its ability to take up inorganic nutrients, and at least 25 eukaryotic cytochrome P450s, which is a higher number than that found in other algae, may be related to their strong allelopathy. Multi-origination of the stress related proteins

  1. Leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Sufficient data are lacking to provide a basis for adequately assessing the long term leaching behavior of solidified low level radioactive waste forms in their disposal environment. Although the release of radioactivity from a waste form to an aqueous environment is recognized to be due to one or more mechanisms such as diffusion, dissolution, corrosion or ion exchange, the leaching mechanisms and the factors which control the leaching behavior of waste forms are not fully understood. This study will determine the prevailing mechanisms for a variety of selected LLW solidification agents which are being considered for use by defense and commercial generators and which will cover the broadest possible number of mechanisms. The investigation will proceed by the postulation of mathematical models representative of the prevailing mechanism(s) and the use of statistically designed experiments to test the actual leaching behavior of laborattory samples against the postulated representations. Maximum use of existing leach data in the literature will be made by incorporating literature results into a computerized data base along with the experimental results generated in this task

  2. Mechanism of Aloe Vera extract protection against UVA: shelter of lysosomal membrane avoids photodamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Viotto, Ana Cláudia; Checchia, Robert; Gomide, Andreza; Severino, Divinomar; Itri, Rosangela; Baptista, Maurício S; Martins, Waleska Kerllen

    2016-03-01

    The premature aging (photoaging) of skin characterized by wrinkles, a leathery texture and mottled pigmentation is a well-documented consequence of exposure to sunlight. UVA is an important risk factor for human cancer also associated with induction of inflammation, immunosuppression, photoaging and melanogenesis. Although herbal compounds are commonly used as photoprotectants against the harmful effects of UVA, the mechanisms involved in the photodamage are not precisely known. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis mil) on the protection against UVA-modulated cell killing of HaCaT keratinocytes. Aloe Vera exhibited the remarkable ability of reducing both in vitro and in vivo photodamage, even though it does not have anti-radical properties. Interestingly, the protection conferred by Aloe Vera was associated with the maintenance of membrane integrity in both mimetic membranes and intracellular organelles. The increased lysosomal stability led to a decrease in lipofuscinogenesis and cell death. This study explains why Aloe Vera extracts offer protection against photodamage at a cellular level in both the UV and visible spectra, leading to its beneficial use as a supplement in protective dermatological formulations.

  3. Epiphytes modulate Posidonia oceanica photosynthetic production, energetic balance, antioxidant mechanisms and oxidative damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monya Mendes Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytes impose physical barriers to light penetration into seagrass leaves causing shading, which may decrease the production of oxygen reactive species (ROS, but also constitute a physical aggression that may trigger the production of ROS, leading to oxidative damage. Here we investigate the effects of epiphytes on Posidonia oceanica under both interactive perspectives, light attenuation and oxidative stress. Specifically the role of epiphytes in net photosynthesis, chlorophyll a and b, photoprotection (Violaxanthin+Anteraxanthin+Zeaxanthin cycle, soluble sugar and starch contents, enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase (APX and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR and global (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC antioxidant responses, phenolics and oxidative damage (malondialdehyde are tested. Leaves with epiphytes showed higher chlorophyll b and lower content in VAZ cycle carotenoids. Epiphyte shading was the probable reason for the lower VAZ de-epoxidation-ratio of leaves with epiphytes. In spite of being shaded, leaves with epiphytes showed higher antioxidant levels, indicating that epiphytes trigger the production of ROS. Both ORAC and TEAC and also APX and DHAR activities were higher in leaves with epiphytes, indicating that this response was related with its presence. Malondialdehyde concentrations also suggest oxidative damage caused by epiphytes. We conclude that the epiphyte load causes oxidative stress in P. oceanica and the mechanisms to scavenge ROS were not completely effective to avoid cell damage.

  4. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics was developed during the first few decades of the twentieth century via a series of inspired guesses made by various physicists, including Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Schroedinger, Heisenberg, Pauli, and Dirac. All these scientists were trying to construct a self-consistent theory of microscopic dynamics that was compatible with experimental observations. The purpose of this book is to present quantum mechanics in a clear, concise, and systematic fashion, starting from the fundamental postulates, and developing the theory in as logical manner as possible. Topics covered in the book include the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, time-dependent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, identical particles, and relativistic electron theory.

  5. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate textbook begins with the Lagrangian formulation of Analytical Mechanics and then passes directly to the Hamiltonian formulation and the canonical equations, with constraints incorporated through Lagrange multipliers. Hamilton's Principle and the canonical equations remain the basis of the remainder of the text. Topics considered for applications include small oscillations, motion in electric and magnetic fields, and rigid body dynamics. The Hamilton-Jacobi approach is developed with special attention to the canonical transformation in order to provide a smooth and logical transition into the study of complex and chaotic systems. Finally the text has a careful treatment of relativistic mechanics and the requirement of Lorentz invariance. The text is enriched with an outline of the history of mechanics, which particularly outlines the importance of the work of Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton and Jacobi. Numerous exercises with solutions support the exceptionally clear and concise treatment...

  6. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, P K

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, mathematics and chemistry, provides a concise yet self-contained introduction to the formal framework of quantum mechanics, its application to physical problems and the interpretation of the theory. Starting with a review of some of the necessary mathematics, the basic concepts are carefully developed in the text. After building a general formalism, detailed treatment of the standard material - the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, symmetry transformations, approximation methods, identical particle and many-particle systems, and scattering theory - is presented. The concluding chapter discusses the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Some of the important topics discussed in the book are the rigged Hilbert space, deformation quantization, path integrals, coherent states, geometric phases, decoherene, etc. This book is characterized by clarity and coherence of presentation.

  7. Wave Mechanics or Wave Statistical Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Shangwu; Xu Laizi

    2007-01-01

    By comparison between equations of motion of geometrical optics and that of classical statistical mechanics, this paper finds that there should be an analogy between geometrical optics and classical statistical mechanics instead of geometrical mechanics and classical mechanics. Furthermore, by comparison between the classical limit of quantum mechanics and classical statistical mechanics, it finds that classical limit of quantum mechanics is classical statistical mechanics not classical mechanics, hence it demonstrates that quantum mechanics is a natural generalization of classical statistical mechanics instead of classical mechanics. Thence quantum mechanics in its true appearance is a wave statistical mechanics instead of a wave mechanics.

  8. Mechanical seals

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, E

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical Seals, Third Edition is a source of practical information on the design and use of mechanical seals. Topics range from design fundamentals and test rigs to leakage, wear, friction and power, reliability, and special designs. This text is comprised of nine chapters; the first of which gives a general overview of seals, including various types of seals and their applications. Attention then turns to the fundamentals of seal design, with emphasis on six requirements that must be considered: sealing effectiveness, length of life, reliability, power consumption, space requirements, and c

  9. Statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Clear and readable, this fine text assists students in achieving a grasp of the techniques and limitations of statistical mechanics. The treatment follows a logical progression from elementary to advanced theories, with careful attention to detail and mathematical development, and is sufficiently rigorous for introductory or intermediate graduate courses.Beginning with a study of the statistical mechanics of ideal gases and other systems of non-interacting particles, the text develops the theory in detail and applies it to the study of chemical equilibrium and the calculation of the thermody

  10. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This text offers the most comprehensive approach available to fluid mechanics. The author takes great care to insure a physical understanding of concepts grounded in applied mathematics. The presentation of theory is followed by engineering applications, helping students develop problem-solving skills from the perspective of a professional engineer. Extensive use of detailed examples reinforces the understanding of theoretical concepts

  11. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  12. Mechanical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Division provides the other NAC divisions with design and construction services. Items of special mechanical significance are discussed here. The projects which received major design attention during the past year were: a coupling capacitor for SPC2; a bending magnet and solenoid for ECR ion source; a scanner for outer orbits of the SSC; a scattering chamber for an experimental beamline; a beam swinger; a rotary target magazine for isotope production; a robot arm for isotope production; an isotope transport system and a target cooling system for isotope production. The major projects that were under construction are: a magnetic spectrometer; a second injector cyclotron (SPC2) and extensions to the high-energy beamlines. 4 figs

  13. Statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabl, Franz

    2006-01-01

    The completely revised new edition of the classical book on Statistical Mechanics covers the basic concepts of equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical physics. In addition to a deductive approach to equilibrium statistics and thermodynamics based on a single hypothesis - the form of the microcanonical density matrix - this book treats the most important elements of non-equilibrium phenomena. Intermediate calculations are presented in complete detail. Problems at the end of each chapter help students to consolidate their understanding of the material. Beyond the fundamentals, this text demonstrates the breadth of the field and its great variety of applications. Modern areas such as renormalization group theory, percolation, stochastic equations of motion and their applications to critical dynamics, kinetic theories, as well as fundamental considerations of irreversibility, are discussed. The text will be useful for advanced students of physics and other natural sciences; a basic knowledge of quantum mechan...

  14. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  15. Statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Statistical mechanics is self sufficient, written in a lucid manner, keeping in mind the exam system of the universities. Need of study this subject and its relation to Thermodynamics is discussed in detail. Starting from Liouville theorem gradually, the Statistical Mechanics is developed thoroughly. All three types of Statistical distribution functions are derived separately with their periphery of applications and limitations. Non-interacting ideal Bose gas and Fermi gas are discussed thoroughly. Properties of Liquid He-II and the corresponding models have been depicted. White dwarfs and condensed matter physics, transport phenomenon - thermal and electrical conductivity, Hall effect, Magneto resistance, viscosity, diffusion, etc. are discussed. Basic understanding of Ising model is given to explain the phase transition. The book ends with a detailed coverage to the method of ensembles (namely Microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical) and their applications. Various numerical and conceptual problems ar...

  16. Mechanical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Darbyshire, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Alan Darbyshire's best-selling text book provides five-star high quality content to a potential audience of 13,000 engineering students. It explains the most popular specialist units of the Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering and Operations & Maintenance Engineering pathways of the new 2010 BTEC National Engineering syllabus. This challenging textbook also features contributions from specialist lecturers, ensuring that no stone is left unturned.

  17. Impact Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronge, W. J.

    2004-03-01

    Impact mechanics is concerned with the reaction forces that develop during a collision and the dynamic response of structures to these reaction forces. The subject has a wide range of engineering applications, from designing sports equipment to improving the crashworthiness of automobiles. This book develops several different methodologies for analysing collisions between structures. These range from rigid body theory for structures that are stiff and compact, to vibration and wave analyses for flexible structures. The emphasis is on low-speed impact where damage is local to the small region of contact between the colliding bodies. The analytical methods presented give results that are more robust or less sensitive to initial conditions than have been achieved hitherto. As a text, Impact Mechanics builds upon foundation courses in dynamics and strength of materials. It includes numerous industrially relevant examples and end-of-chapter homework problems drawn from industry and sports. Practising engineers will also find the methods presented in this book useful in calculating the response of a mechanical system to impact.

  18. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.; Joffre, M.

    2008-01-01

    All physics is quantum from elementary particles to stars and to the big-bang via semi-conductors and chemistry. This theory is very subtle and we are not able to explain it without the help of mathematic tools. This book presents the principles of quantum mechanics and describes its mathematical formalism (wave function, Schroedinger equation, quantum operators, spin, Hamiltonians, collisions,..). We find numerous applications in the fields of new technologies (maser, quantum computer, cryptography,..) and in astrophysics. A series of about 90 exercises with their answers is included. This book is based on a physics course at a graduate level. (A.C.)

  19. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  20. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  1. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2007-01-01

    PREFACESINTRODUCTION The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Line Spectra and Atomic Structure De Broglie Waves Wave-Particle Duality The Rest of This Book THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation The Time-Independent Schrödinger Equation Boundary ConditionsThe Infinite Square Well The Finite Square Well Quantum Mechanical Tunneling The Harmonic Oscillator THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Wave Equations Separation in Cartesian Coordinates Separation in Spherical Polar Coordinates The Hydrogenic Atom THE BASIC POSTULATES OF QUANTUM MEC

  2. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandl, Franz

    1992-01-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scient

  3. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, A.K.; Lokanathan, S.

    1975-01-01

    This textbook on quantum mechanics is intended for students at the graduate and post-graduate level. A balanced account of theory and applications is presented. Emphasis is laid on making results plausible and methods to be followed in solving problems. The various chapters in the book are devoted to the following: (1) Wave particle duality and uncertainty principle (2) Wave packets and time-dependent Schroedinger equation (3) Simple solutions of Schroedinger equation (4) Vector spaces and linear operators : Dirac notation (5) Angular momentum and spin (6) Addition of angular momenta (7) Time independent perturbation theory (8) The variational method (9) The WKB approximation (10) Elementary theory of scattering (11) Time-dependent perturbation theory (12) Motion in a magnetic field (13) Interaction of radiation with matter and (14) Relativistic theory. (A.K.)

  5. Soil Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Sara Wisbech Jacobsen; Hededal, Ole; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    by stress and strain and their behaviour is convergent. Numerical models exist that simulate clay behaviour over time, the majority derived from Perzyna (1966). An empirical expression for the ‘index of viscosity’ was derived by Leinenkugel (1976). This suggests the change of strain rate is proportional......It is widely accepted that there is a connection between the undrained shear strength and the strain rate. Thixotropy and creep behaviour are connected to the mechanical properties of clay. Thixotropy is the ability of clay to recover its shear strength over time when the shear stress is released...... of equilibrium in viscosity over time at a given stress level for a thixotropic fluid. In rheology, this type of material is known as a non-Newtonian thixotropic fluid. A Newtonian fluid has no yield stress, resembling a strictly elastic material; whereas a non-Newtonian fluid cannot be expressed by a direct...

  6. One Target, Two Mechanisms: The Impact of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' and Its Vector, Diaphorina citri, on Citrus Leaf Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Nehela, Yasser

    2017-07-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is currently the largest threat to global citrus production. We examined the effect of HLB pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection or infestation by its vector, Diaphorina citri, on 'Valencia' sweet orange leaf pigments using high-performance liquid chromatography, followed by gene expression analysis for 46 involved genes in carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways. Both 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and D. citri alter the total citrus leaf pigment balance with a greater impact by 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Although zeaxanthin was accumulated in 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected leaves, chlorophyllide a was increased in D. citri-infested plants. Our findings support the idea that both 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and D. citri affect the citrus pigments and promote symptom development but using two different mechanisms. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' promotes chlorophyll degradation but accelerates the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigments, resulting in accumulation of abscisic acid and its precursor, zeaxanthin. Zeaxanthin also has a photoprotective role. By contrast, D. citri induced the degradation of most carotenoids and accelerated chlorophyll biosynthesis, leading to chlorophyllide a accumulation. Chlorophyllide a might have an antiherbivory role. Accordingly, we suggest that citrus plants try to defend themselves against 'Ca. L. asiaticus' or D. citri using multifaceted defense systems, based on the stressor type. These findings will help in better understanding the tritrophic interactions among plant, pathogen, and vector.

  7. Cyberspatial mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Jay S

    2008-06-01

    In support of a generalization of systems theory, this paper introduces a new approach in modeling complex distributed systems. It offers an analytic framework for describing the behavior of interactive cyberphysical systems (CPSs), which are networked stationary or mobile information systems responsible for the real-time governance of physical processes whose behaviors unfold in cyberspace. The framework is predicated on a cyberspace-time reference model comprising three spatial dimensions plus time. The spatial domains include geospatial, infospatial, and sociospatial references, the latter describing relationships among sovereign enterprises (rational agents) that choose voluntarily to organize and interoperate for individual and mutual benefit through geospatial (physical) and infospatial (logical) transactions. Of particular relevance to CPSs are notions of timeliness and value, particularly as they relate to the real-time governance of physical processes and engagements with other cooperating CPS. Our overarching interest, as with celestial mechanics, is in the formation and evolution of clusters of cyberspatial objects and the federated systems they form.

  8. Umbilical mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel R. (Inventor); Jasulaitis, Vytas (Inventor); Morrill, Brion F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus is described for automatically mating a pair of connectors and protecting them prior to mating, which minimizes weight and uses relatively simple and reliable mechanisms. Lower and upper connectors (24, 26) are held in lower and upper parts (14, 16) of a housing, with the upper connector mounted on a carrier (32) that is motor driven to move down and mate the connectors. A pair of movable members (36, 38) serve as shields, as coarse alignment aids, and as force transmitters. The movable members are pivotally mounted at the bottom of the upper housing, and as the carrier moves down it pivots the members out of the way. The movable members have socket elements (116) that closely receive pin elements (120) on the lower housing part, to coarsely align the connectors and to react mating and unmating forces between the housings. The carrier has a pair of plate portions (60, 62) with slots (64), and the movable members have cam followers engaged with the slot walls, to move the members with precision. The carrier plate-like portions engage follower members (82) that pivot open lower shield parts (44, 46) covering the lower connector, which is mounted on four stacks of Belleville washers (142).

  9. Mechanical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shook, Richard; /Marquette U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The particle beam of the SXR (soft x-ray) beam line in the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) has a high intensity in order to penetrate through samples at the atomic level. However, the intensity is so high that many experiments fail because of severe damage. To correct this issue, attenuators are put into the beam line to reduce this intensity to a level suitable for experimentation. Attenuation is defined as 'the gradual loss in intensity of any flux through a medium' by [1]. It is found that Beryllium and Boron Carbide can survive the intensity of the beam. At very thin films, both of these materials work very well as filters for reducing the beam intensity. Using a total of 12 filters, the first 9 being made of Beryllium and the rest made of Boron Carbide, the beam's energy range of photons can be attenuated between 800 eV and 9000 eV. The design of the filters allows attenuation for different beam intensities so that experiments can obtain different intensities from the beam if desired. The step of attenuation varies, but is relative to the thickness of the filter as a power function of 2. A relationship for this is f(n) = x{sub 0}2{sup n} where n is the step of attenuation desired and x{sub 0} is the initial thickness of the material. To allow for this desired variation, a mechanism must be designed within the test chamber. This is visualized using a 3D computer aided design modeling tool known as Solid Edge.

  10. Mechanical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The particle beam of the SXR (soft x-ray) beam line in the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) has a high intensity in order to penetrate through samples at the atomic level. However, the intensity is so high that many experiments fail because of severe damage. To correct this issue, attenuators are put into the beam line to reduce this intensity to a level suitable for experimentation. Attenuation is defined as 'the gradual loss in intensity of any flux through a medium' by (1). It is found that Beryllium and Boron Carbide can survive the intensity of the beam. At very thin films, both of these materials work very well as filters for reducing the beam intensity. Using a total of 12 filters, the first 9 being made of Beryllium and the rest made of Boron Carbide, the beam's energy range of photons can be attenuated between 800 eV and 9000 eV. The design of the filters allows attenuation for different beam intensities so that experiments can obtain different intensities from the beam if desired. The step of attenuation varies, but is relative to the thickness of the filter as a power function of 2. A relationship for this is f(n) = x 0 2 n where n is the step of attenuation desired and x 0 is the initial thickness of the material. To allow for this desired variation, a mechanism must be designed within the test chamber. This is visualized using a 3D computer aided design modeling tool known as Solid Edge.

  11. Simple Mechanisms for Broadspectrum Color Control in Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    located internally, particularly in the developing eggs of the ovaries regardless of the color pattern of the female (Figure 5). In fact, blue females ...trafficked in lipid droplets and accumulated in the ovaries of gravid female copepods. As these pigments accumulated in the eggs , the females own...have red ovaries and red egg cases. We hypothesized that this is to provide photoprotection and antioxidants (another property of carotenoid pigments

  12. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about sun exposure and photoprotection in outpatients attending dermatology clinics at four hospitals in Lima, Peru Exposição solar e conhecimento, atitudes e práticas de fotoproteção em pacientes de unidades ambulatoriais de dermatologia em quatro hospitais de Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas-Gavelan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To establish the knowledge, about sun exposure and photoprotection in outpatients treated at the dermatology clinics in four hospitals in Lima, Peru. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving a sample of 364 patients selected using a systematic random sampling process in the four participating hospitals. The selected patients were interviewed to determine their knowledge, behavior and practices in relation to sun exposure and photoprotection. The chi-square test was used to identify any significant differences between knowledge and practices. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this sample was 45.1 ± 21.4 years. Of the 364 patients, 55.9% were women and 54.8% had skin phototype IV. The principal risks related to sun exposure were skin cancer (80.5% and sunburn (77.8%. Knowledge regarding sun protection was more evident in individuals with university/college education (pFUNDAMENTOS: O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar o conhecimento, sobre a exposição solar e fotoproteção em pacientes ambulatoriais tratados nas unidades de dermatologia de quatro hospitais em Lima, Peru. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de corte transversal. A amostra foi formada por 364 pacientes originários dos quatro hospitais participantes. Os pacientes foram selecionados através de um processo de amostragem aleatória sistemática. Uma vez selecionados, os pacientes foram entrevistados para determinação do conhecimento, atitudes e práticas em relação à exposição ao sol e à fotoproteção. O teste do qui-quadrado foi usado para determinar diferenças significativas entre conhecimento e práticas. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes tinham em média 45,1±21,4 anos de idade, 55,9% eram mulheres e 54,8% tinham pele fototipo IV. Os principais riscos relacionados à exposição solar foram câncer de pele (80,5% e queimaduras solares (77,8%. Participantes com nível universitário apresentaram maior conhecimento sobre prote

  13. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract: Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepcion Parrado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS by ultraviolet (UV light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging.

  14. Topological Higgs mechanism with ordinary Higgs mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda Ichiro; Yahikozawa Shigeaki.

    1989-12-01

    Topological Higgs mechanism in higher dimensions is analyzed when ordinary Higgs potential exists. It is shown that if one-form B-field becomes massive by the ordinary Higgs mechanism, another D-2 form C-field also becomes massive through topological term in addition to the topological mass generation by the topological Higgs mechanism. Moreover we investigate this mechanism in three dimensional theories, that is to say, Chern-Simons theory and more general theory. (author). 10 refs

  15. Investigation of Nonholonomic Mechanics, Vakonomic Mechanics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, methods of modeling dynamic systems namely, Nonholonomic mechanics, Vakonomic mechanics and Chetaev methods for constrained dynamic system are investigated. The fact that Vakonomic mechanics gives a different motion equation to the other methods is verified using a particular example. It is shown ...

  16. The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu

    2013-01-01

    "The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks" presents historical views and mathematical models of mechanical watches and clocks. Although now over six hundred years old, mechanical watches and clocks are still popular luxury items that fascinate many people around the world. However few have examined the theory of how they work as presented in this book. The illustrations and computer animations are unique and have never been published before. It will be of significant interest to researchers in mechanical engineering, watchmakers and clockmakers, as well as people who have an engineering background and are interested in mechanical watches and clocks. It will also inspire people in other fields of science and technology, such as mechanical engineering and electronics engineering, to advance their designs. Professor Ruxu Du works at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, China. Assistant Professor Longhan Xie works at the South China University of Technology, China.

  17. Mechanical restraint in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Sestoft, Dorte Maria

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how potential mechanical restraint preventive factors in hospitals are associated with the frequency of mechanical restraint episodes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study employed a retrospective association design, and linear regression was used to assess the associations. FINDINGS......: Three mechanical restraint preventive factors were significantly associated with low rates of mechanical restraint use: mandatory review (exp[B] = .36, p mechanical...

  18. Advances in Applied Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Applied Mechanics draws together recent significant advances in various topics in applied mechanics. Published since 1948, Advances in Applied Mechanics aims to provide authoritative review articles on topics in the mechanical sciences, primarily of interest to scientists and engineers working in the various branches of mechanics, but also of interest to the many who use the results of investigations in mechanics in various application areas, such as aerospace, chemical, civil, en...

  19. Mechanical engineer's handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marghitu, Dan B

    2001-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineer's Handbook was developed and written specifically to fill a need for mechanical engineers and mechanical engineering students throughout the world. With over 1000 pages, 550 illustrations, and 26 tables the Mechanical Engineer's Handbook is very comprehensive, yet affordable, compact, and durable. The Handbook covers all major areas of mechanical engineering with succinct coverage of the definitions, formulas, examples, theory, proofs, and explanations of all principle subject areas. The Handbook is an essential, practical companion for all mechanic

  20. Mechanical engineering education

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical Engineering is defined nowadays as a discipline "which involves the application of principles of physics, design, manufacturing and maintenance of mechanical systems". Recently, mechanical engineering has also focused on some cutting-edge subjects such as nanomechanics and nanotechnology, mechatronics and robotics, computational mechanics, biomechanics, alternative energies, as well as aspects related to sustainable mechanical engineering.This book covers mechanical engineering higher education with a particular emphasis on quality assurance and the improvement of academic

  1. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  2. Mechanics of machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Mostafa, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    MechanismsDefinitions Degrees of Freedom of Planar Mechanisms Four-Revolute-Pairs Chains Single-Slider Chain Double-Slider Mechanisms Mechanisms with Higher Pairs Compound Mechanisms Special Mechanisms Analytical Position Analysis of Mechanisms Velocities and AccelerationsAbsolute Plane Motion of a Particle Relative Motion Applications to Common Links Analysis of Mechanisms: Graphical Method Method of Instantaneous Centers for Determining the VelocitiesAnalytical Analysis CamsIntroduction Types of Cams Modes of Input/Output Motion Follower Configurations Classes of Cams Spur GearsIntroduction

  3. Compliant Space Mechanisms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OBJECTIVES The proposed research will combine the areas of compliant mechanisms and space technology. Compliant mechanisms perform their function through the elastic...

  4. Analytical mechanics for relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Oliver Davis

    2011-01-01

    Analytical Mechanics for Relativity and Quantum Mechanics is an innovative and mathematically sound treatment of the foundations of analytical mechanics and the relation of classical mechanics to relativity and quantum theory. It is intended for use at the introductory graduate level. A distinguishing feature of the book is its integration of special relativity into teaching of classical mechanics. After a thorough review of the traditional theory, Part II of the book introduces extended Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods that treat time as a transformable coordinate rather than the fixed parameter of Newtonian physics. Advanced topics such as covariant Langrangians and Hamiltonians, canonical transformations, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods are simplified by the use of this extended theory. And the definition of canonical transformation no longer excludes the Lorenz transformation of special relativity. This is also a book for those who study analytical mechanics to prepare for a critical exploration of quantum...

  5. Classical Mechanics as Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    All measurable predictions of classical mechanics can be reproduced from a quantum-like interpretation of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The key observation leading to classical physics is the fact that a wave function that satisfies a linear equation is real and positive, rather than complex. This has profound implications on the role of the Bohmian classical-like interpretation of linear quantum mechanics, as well as on the possibilities to find a consistent interpretation of arbitrary nonlinear generalizations of quantum mechanics

  6. Current Solid Mechanics Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    About thirty years ago James Lighthill wrote an essay on “What is Mechanics?” With that he also included some examples of the applications of mechanics. While his emphasis was on fluid mechanics, his own research area, he also included examples from research activities in solid mechanics....

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Georg F

    2007-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Section I. General Mechanisms of Transformation 1. Theories of Carcinogenesis...

  8. Defense Mechanisms: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This bibliography includes studies of defense mechanisms, in general, and studies of multiple mechanisms. Defense mechanisms, briefly and simply defined, are the unconscious ego defendants against unpleasure, threat, or anxiety. Sigmund Freud deserves the clinical credit for studying many mechanisms and introducing them in professional literature.…

  9. Mechanics and Physics of Precise Vacuum Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Deulin, E. A; Panfilov, Yu V; Nevshupa, R. A

    2010-01-01

    In this book the Russian expertise in the field of the design of precise vacuum mechanics is summarized. A wide range of physical applications of mechanism design in electronic, optical-electronic, chemical, and aerospace industries is presented in a comprehensible way. Topics treated include the method of microparticles flow regulation and its determination in vacuum equipment and mechanisms of electronics; precise mechanisms of nanoscale precision based on magnetic and electric rheology; precise harmonic rotary and not-coaxial nut-screw linear motion vacuum feedthroughs with technical parameters considered the best in the world; elastically deformed vacuum motion feedthroughs without friction couples usage; the computer system of vacuum mechanisms failure predicting. This English edition incorporates a number of features which should improve its usefulness as a textbook without changing the basic organization or the general philosophy of presentation of the subject matter of the original Russian work. Exper...

  10. Handbook of compliant mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Larry L; Olsen, Brian M

    2013-01-01

    A fully illustrated reference book giving an easy-to-understand introduction to compliant mechanisms A broad compilation of compliant mechanisms to give inspiration and guidance to those interested in using compliant mechanisms in their designs, the Handbook of Compliant Mechanisms includes graphics and descriptions of many compliant mechanisms. It comprises an extensive categorization of devices that can be used to help readers identify compliant mechanisms related to their application. It also provides chapters on the basic background in compliant mechanisms, the categories o

  11. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  12. Introduction to analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gamalath, KAILW

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICAL MECHANICS is an attempt to introduce the modern treatment of classical mechanics so that transition to many fields in physics can be made with the least difficulty. This book deal with the formulation of Newtonian mechanics, Lagrangian dynamics, conservation laws relating to symmetries, Hamiltonian dynamics Hamilton's principle, Poisson brackets, canonical transformations which are invaluable in formulating the quantum mechanics and Hamilton-Jacobi equation which provides the transition to wave mechanics.

  13. Photosynthesis and photoprotective systems of plants in response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is the major factor limiting plant growth in acidic soils, which comprise up to 70% of the world's potentially arable lands. Although, Al toxicity and tolerance in plant roots have been extensively studied during the past decades because inhibition of root growth is one of the earliest symptoms of Al injury ...

  14. High light acclimation of Chromera velia points to photoprotective NPQ

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belgio, Erica; Trsková, Eliška; Kotabová, Eva; Ewe, Daniela; Prášil, Ondřej; Kaňa, Radek

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 135, 1-3 SI (2018), s. 263-274 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-10088S; GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-02363Y Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Nonphotochemical quenching * Photoinhibition * Chromera velia alga Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.864, year: 2016

  15. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids for Skin Photoprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Karl Perry

    2017-01-01

    Excessive human exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) continues to be amajor public health concern, with skin cancer rates increasing year on year. The major protectivemeasure is the use of synthetic UVR filters formulated into sunscreens, but there is agrowing concern that some of these chemicals cause damage to delicate marine ecosystems.One alternative is the use of biocompatible mycosporine-like amino acids (MAA), which occurnaturally and are found predominantly in a wide range of...

  16. Improving photoprotection attitudes in the tropics: sunburn vs vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A

    2014-01-01

    The ultraviolet radiation of type B (the UVB) stimulates both the production of vitamin D (VD) and the incorporation of erythema dose (ED). The UVA also contributes to ED. The turning point between the benefit of producing VD and the harm of incorporating ED cannot be determined easily. However, the casual behavior regarding the exposure to the Sun can be changed in order to improve the protoprotection attitudes and create a trend towards benefit. In the case, people living in the low latitudes should exposure themselves to the Sun for a determined time interval within the noon time and avoid the Sun in other periods. This would produce an adequate amount of VD through the VD dose (207-214 J m(-2)) against minimum ED (≈105 J m(-2)) for skin type II. For it, unprotected forearms and hands must be exposed to the noon Sun (cloudless) for 11 min (winter) and 5 min (summer). The exposure at other times different from noon can represent increases of up to 24% in ED and up to 12 times in the time interval to be in the Sun in relation to the minimum amounts of both ED and time interval at noon. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  17. Photoprotection in moisturizers and daily-care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seite, S; Fourtanier, A; Rougier, A

    2010-10-01

    During usual daily activities, an appropriate protection against solar UV exposure should prevent clinical, cellular and molecular changes potentially leading to photoaging. In skin areas regularly exposed to sun, UV-damage is superimposed to tissue degeneration resulting from chronological aging. It is, therefore, important to know if moisturizers and daily-care products containing UVA absorbers combined with UVB ones are able to prevent these skin damages. This review will summarize clinical studies evaluating this topic. These studies demonstrate that broad-spectrum protection in moisturizers or daily-care products can prevent the "silent" sub-erythemal cumulative effects of UVR from inadvertent sun exposure.

  18. Dose-dependent progressive sunscreens. A new strategy for photoprotection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Adaya; Teixidó, Jordi; Miralles, Ricardo; Raga, Manuel; Guglietta, Antonio; Marquillas, Francisco; Sallarès, Joan; Nonell, Santi

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of UV filters has been developed that act by limiting the dose of radiation rather than by blocking a fraction of the solar irradiance on the skin surface. Such progressive sunscreens are based on the photochemical transformation of suitable precursors upon exposure to sunlight. Broadband sunscreens are thus generated "on demand", affording protection when, where, and to the extent that it is needed, providing higher protection to more exposed areas, and increasing the UV blocking capacity as the radiation dose increases. Encapsulation in silica particles isolates the precursors and transformation products, further improving the efficacy, safety, and environmental impact of the use of sunscreens.

  19. Photoprotective Effect of Tea and its Extracts against Ultraviolet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure induces photodamage of skin. It is a matter of concern that the level of UV radiation reaching the earth surface is increasing as a result of depletion of the stratospheric ozone, and climate change. It is urgently necessary to develop strategies to protect the skin from UV-induced injuries. Tea extracts ...

  20. Photoprotective Effect of a Polyopes affinis (Harvey) Kawaguchi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anion or hydroxyl radical was detected using an electron spin resonance spectrometer after reaction with the nitrone spin trap. ... (A08-0000870) has been deposited at the herbarium of Jeju .... frosted microscopic slide pre-coated with 1 %.

  1. Mechanical engineers' handbook, materials and engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    Full coverage of materials and mechanical design inengineering Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, Fourth Edition provides aquick guide to specialized areas you may encounter in your work,giving you access to the basics of each and pointing you towardtrusted resources for further reading, if needed. The accessibleinformation inside offers discussions, examples, and analyses ofthe topics covered. This first volume covers materials and mechanical design, givingyou accessible and in-depth access to the most common topics you'llencounter in the discipline: carbon and alloy steels, stainlesssteels, a

  2. 507 mechanical movements mechanisms and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Henry T

    2005-01-01

    Epicyclic trains, oblique rollers, trip hammers, and lazy-tongs are among the ingenious mechanisms defined and illustrated in this intriguing collection. Spanning the first century of the Industrial Revolution, this 1868 compilation features simplified, concise illustrations of the mechanisms used in hydraulics, steam engines, pneumatics, presses, horologes, and scores of other machines.The movements of each of the 507 mechanisms are depicted in drawings on the left-hand page, and the facing page presents a brief description of the item's use and operation. Ranging from simple to intricately c

  3. Foundations of mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorski, Henryk; Bazanski, Stanislaw; Gutowski, Roman; Slawianowski, Jan; Wilmanski, Krysztof; Wozniak, Czeslaw

    1992-01-01

    In the last 3 decades the field of mechanics has seen spectacular progress due to the demand for applications in problems of cosmology, thermonuclear fusion, metallurgy, etc. This book provides a broad and thorough overview on the foundations of mechanics. It discusses theoretical mechanics and continuum mechanics, as well as phenomenological thermodynamics, quantum mechanics and relativistic mechanics. Each chapter presents the basic physical facts of interest without going into details and derivations and without using advanced mathematical formalism. The first part constitutes a classical exposition of Lagrange's and Hamiltonian's analytical mechanics on which most of the continuum theory is based. The section on continuum mechanics focuses mainly on the axiomatic foundations, with many pointers for further research in this area. Special attention is given to modern continuum thermodynamics, both for the foundations and applications. A section on quantum mechanics is also included, since the phenomenological description of various quantum phenomena is becoming of increasing importance. refs.; figs.; tabs

  4. Mechanics of Failure Mechanisms in Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, R L; Craig, J I

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on the mechanisms and underlying mechanics of failure in various classes of materials such as metallic, ceramic, polymeric, composite and bio-material.  Topics include tensile and compressive fracture, crack initiation and growth, fatigue and creep rupture in metallic materials, matrix cracking and delamination and environmental degradation in polymeric composites, failure of bio-materials such as prosthetic heart valves and prosthetic hip joints, failure of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites, failure of metallic matrix composites, static and dynamic buckling failure, dynamic excitations and creep buckling failure in structural systems. Chapters are devoted to failure mechanisms that are characteristic of each of the materials.  The work also provides the basic elements of fracture mechanics and studies in detail several niche topics such as the effects of toughness gradients, variable amplitude loading effects in fatigue, small fatigue cracks, and creep induced brittleness. Furthe...

  5. Mechanics rules cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang James HC

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cells in the musculoskeletal system are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo. Years of research have shown that these mechanical forces, including tension and compression, greatly influence various cellular functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation and differentiation, and secretion of matrix proteins. Cells also use mechanotransduction mechanisms to convert mechanical signals into a cascade of cellular and molecular events. This mini-review provides an overview of cell mechanobiology to highlight the notion that mechanics, mainly in the form of mechanical forces, dictates cell behaviors in terms of both cellular mechanobiological responses and mechanotransduction.

  6. Mechanical ventilator - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007240.htm Mechanical ventilator - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that assists with breathing. ...

  7. Mechanisms for supernova explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.I.

    1977-01-01

    This report discusses some of the recent developments in the study of one supernova mechanism, the neutrino transport mechanism, and indicates what future developments are needed before this model can be adequately understood. (Auth.)

  8. STRUCTURE OF ECONOMIC MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Podderegina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers and analyzes scientific approaches of economists to the essence and contents of the economic mechanism. Proposals for methodological formation of economic mechanism structure are substantiated in the paper.

  9. Supersymmetric classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.N.; Soni, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to construct a supersymmetric Lagrangian within the framework of classical mechanics which would be regarded as a candidate for passage to supersymmetric quantum mechanics. 5 refs. (author)

  10. Environmental Compliance Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkouris, Panagiotis; Fitzmaurice, Malgosia

    2017-01-01

    Compliance mechanisms can be found in treaties regulating such diverse issues as human rights, disarmament law, and environmental law. In this bibliography, the focus will be on compliance mechanisms of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). Compliance with norms of international

  11. Design of mechanical joints

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone publication that covers the basic principles and practical considerations of design methodology for joints held by rivets, bolts, weld seams, and adhesive materials, Design of Mechanical Joints gives engineers the practical results and formulas they need for the preliminary design of mechanical joints, combining the essential topics of joint mechanics...strength of materials...and fracture control to provide a complete treatment of problems pertinent to the field of mechanical connections.

  12. Methods of celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brouwer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Celestial Mechanics provides a comprehensive background of celestial mechanics for practical applications. Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that is devoted to the motions of celestial bodies. This book is composed of 17 chapters, and begins with the concept of elliptic motion and its expansion. The subsequent chapters are devoted to other aspects of celestial mechanics, including gravity, numerical integration of orbit, stellar aberration, lunar theory, and celestial coordinates. Considerable chapters explore the principles and application of various mathematical metho

  13. Project mechanisms challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perthuis, Ch. de

    2005-06-01

    The project mechanism complete the quotas systems concerning the carbon dioxide emissions market. The author explains and discusses these mechanisms and provides a panorama of the existing and developing projects. More specially she brings information on the mechanism of clean developments and renewable energies, the coordinated mechanisms, the agricultural projects, the financing of the projects and the exchange systeme of the New south Wales. (A.L.B.)

  14. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  15. Quantum mechanics. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesch, H.

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The way to quantum mechanics starting from thermal radiation and the stability of matter, Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, the impact of quantum mechanics on technology, the description of the big bang by means of quantum mechanics

  16. Verifiably Truthful Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina; Procaccia, Ariel D.

    2015-01-01

    the computational sense). Our approach involves three steps: (i) specifying the structure of mechanisms, (ii) constructing a verification algorithm, and (iii) measuring the quality of verifiably truthful mechanisms. We demonstrate this approach using a case study: approximate mechanism design without money...

  17. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drive mechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displacer rods through the reactor vessel. (author)

  18. Sectoral Market Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper first reviews proposals for the design of sectoral and related market mechanisms currently debated, both in the UNFCCC negotiations, and in different domestic legislative contexts. Secondly, it addresses the possible principles and technical requirements that Parties may wish to consider as the foundations for further elaboration of the mechanisms. The third issue explored herein is domestic implementation of sectoral market mechanisms by host countries, incentives to move to new market mechanisms, as well as how the transition between current and future mechanisms could be managed.

  19. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  20. Mechanisms, Transmissions and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    The first Workshop on Mechanisms, Transmissions and Applications -- MeTrApp-2011 was organized by the Mechatronics Department at the Mechanical Engineering Faculty, “Politehnica” University of Timisoara, Romania, under the patronage of the IFToMM Technical Committees Linkages and Mechanical Controls and Micromachines. The workshop brought together researchers and students who work in disciplines associated with mechanisms science and offered a great opportunity for scientists from all over the world to present their achievements, exchange innovative ideas and create solid international links, setting the trend for future developments in this important and creative field. The topics treated in this volume are mechanisms and machine design, mechanical transmissions, mechatronic and biomechanic applications, computational and experimental methods, history of mechanism and machine science and teaching methods.

  1. Mechanical seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  2. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  3. Mechanical Seal Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1999-06-18

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  4. The Antikythera mechanism and the mechanical universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, M. G.

    2014-10-01

    How did our view of the Universe develop? By the mid-eighteenth century, a world view had developed of a system constrained by physical laws. These laws, if not entirely understood, showed regularity and could be handled mathematically to provide both explanation and prediction of celestial phenomena. Most of us have at least some hazy idea of the fundamental shift that came through the work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and Newton. The idea of a 'Mechanical Universe' running rather like a clock tends to be associated with these sixteenth- and seventeenth-century pioneers. It remains a useful - and perhaps comforting - analogy. Yet, recent investigations based around the Antikythera Mechanism, an artefact from ancient Greece, reinforce a view that the 'Mechanical' conception has been around for a much longer time - indeed certainly as far back as the third century BC. The extent of mechanical design expertise existing around 100 BC as witnessed by the Antikythera Mechanism comes as a great surprise to most people. It is certainly a very ingenious device, often referred to as 'The World's First Computer' although it is really a sophisticated mechanical astronomical calculator with its functions pre-determined rather than programmable. In this review, the structure and functions of the Antikythera Mechanism are described. The astronomy, cosmology and technology inherent in the machine fit surprisingly well into the context of its contemporary Classical world. A strong claim will be made for the influence of such mechanisms on the development of astronomical and philosophical views, based on literary reference. There is evidence that the technology persisted until its spectacular and rather sudden re-appearance in Western Europe around 1300 AD. From then on it is not hard to chart a path through the astronomical clocks of the sixteenth century to Kepler's aim (expressed in a 1605 letter) to 'show that the heavenly machine is not a kind of divine, live being, but a

  5. Understanding the mechanisms of lung mechanical stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.N.B. Garcia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical forces affect both the function and phenotype of cells in the lung. Bronchial, alveolar, and other parenchymal cells, as well as fibroblasts and macrophages, are normally subjected to a variety of passive and active mechanical forces associated with lung inflation and vascular perfusion as a result of the dynamic nature of lung function. These forces include changes in stress (force per unit area or strain (any forced change in length in relation to the initial length and shear stress (the stress component parallel to a given surface. The responses of cells to mechanical forces are the result of the cell's ability to sense and transduce these stimuli into intracellular signaling pathways able to communicate the information to its interior. This review will focus on the modulation of intracellular pathways by lung mechanical forces and the intercellular signaling. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which lung cells transduce physical forces into biochemical and biological signals is of key importance for identifying targets for the treatment and prevention of physical force-related disorders.

  6. Robust Design of Sounds in Mechanical Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegedal Jensen, Annemette; Munch, Natasja; Howard, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    mechanism consisting of a toothed rack and a click arm. First several geometries of the teeth and the click arm’s head were investigated to identify the most robust and repeatable design. It was found that a flat surface in the valleys between the teeth is very beneficial in relation to repeatability...

  7. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  8. Nonholonomic mechanics and control

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, RM

    2015-01-01

    This book explores some of the connections between control theory and geometric mechanics; that is, control theory is linked with a geometric view of classical mechanics in both its Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations and in particular with the theory of mechanical systems subject to motion constraints. The synthesis of the topic is appropriate as there is a particularly rich connection between mechanics and nonlinear control theory. The book provides a unified treatment of nonlinear control theory and constrained mechanical systems and illustrates the elegant mathematics behind many simple, interesting, and useful mechanical examples. It is intended for graduate students who wish to learn this subject and researchers in the area who want to enhance their techniques. The book contains sections focusing on physical examples and elementary terms, as well as theoretical sections that use sophisticated analysis and geometry. The first four chapters offer preliminaries and background information, while the...

  9. Fractional quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Laskin, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Fractional quantum mechanics is a recently emerged and rapidly developing field of quantum physics. This is the first monograph on fundamentals and physical applications of fractional quantum mechanics, written by its founder. The fractional Schrödinger equation and the fractional path integral are new fundamental physical concepts introduced and elaborated in the book. The fractional Schrödinger equation is a manifestation of fractional quantum mechanics. The fractional path integral is a new mathematical tool based on integration over Lévy flights. The fractional path integral method enhances the well-known Feynman path integral framework. Related topics covered in the text include time fractional quantum mechanics, fractional statistical mechanics, fractional classical mechanics and the α-stable Lévy random process. The book is well-suited for theorists, pure and applied mathematicians, solid-state physicists, chemists, and others working with the Schrödinger equation, the path integral technique...

  10. Testing Nonassociative Quantum Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Büyükçam, Umut

    2015-11-27

    The familiar concepts of state vectors and operators in quantum mechanics rely on associative products of observables. However, these notions do not apply to some exotic systems such as magnetic monopoles, which have long been known to lead to nonassociative algebras. Their quantum physics has remained obscure. This Letter presents the first derivation of potentially testable physical results in nonassociative quantum mechanics, based on effective potentials. They imply new effects which cannot be mimicked in usual quantum mechanics with standard magnetic fields.

  11. Extended quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel Bona

    2000-01-01

    The work can be considered as an essay on mathematical and conceptual structure of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics which is related here to some other (more general, but also to more special and 'approximative') theories. Quantum mechanics is here primarily reformulated in an equivalent form of a Poisson system on the phase space consisting of density matrices, where the 'observables', as well as 'symmetry generators' are represented by a specific type of real valued (densely defined) functions, namely the usual quantum expectations of corresponding selfjoint operators. It is shown in this paper that inclusion of additional ('nonlinear') symmetry generators (i. e. 'Hamiltonians') into this reformulation of (linear) quantum mechanics leads to a considerable extension of the theory: two kinds of quantum 'mixed states' should be distinguished, and operator - valued functions of density matrices should be used in the role of 'nonlinear observables'. A general framework for physical theories is obtained in this way: By different choices of the sets of 'nonlinear observables' we obtain, as special cases, e.g. classical mechanics on homogeneous spaces of kinematical symmetry groups, standard (linear) quantum mechanics, or nonlinear extensions of quantum mechanics; also various 'quasiclassical approximations' to quantum mechanics are all sub theories of the presented extension of quantum mechanics - a version of the extended quantum mechanics. A general interpretation scheme of extended quantum mechanics extending the usual statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics is also proposed. Eventually, extended quantum mechanics is shown to be (included into) a C * -algebraic (hence linear) quantum theory. Mathematical formulation of these theories is presented. The presentation includes an analysis of problems connected with differentiation on infinite-dimensional manifolds, as well as a solution of some problems connected with the work with only densely defined unbounded

  12. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  13. Introduction to contact mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer-Cripps, Anthony C

    2000-01-01

    Contact mechanics deals with the elastic or plastic contact between two solid objects, and is thus intimately connected with such topics as fracture, hardness, and elasticity.This text, intended for advanced undergraduates, begins with an introduction to the mechanical properties of materials, general fracture mechanics, and fractures in brittle solids.This is followed by a detailed discussion of stresses and the nature of elastic and elastic-plastic contact.

  14. Lectures on statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, M G

    1982-01-01

    Anyone dissatisfied with the almost ritual dullness of many 'standard' texts in statistical mechanics will be grateful for the lucid explanation and generally reassuring tone. Aimed at securing firm foundations for equilibrium statistical mechanics, topics of great subtlety are presented transparently and enthusiastically. Very little mathematical preparation is required beyond elementary calculus and prerequisites in physics are limited to some elementary classical thermodynamics. Suitable as a basis for a first course in statistical mechanics, the book is an ideal supplement to more convent

  15. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  16. Mechanics and uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Science is a quest for certainty, but lack of certainty is the driving force behind all of its endeavors. This book, specifically, examines the uncertainty of technological and industrial science. Uncertainty and Mechanics studies the concepts of mechanical design in an uncertain setting and explains engineering techniques for inventing cost-effective products. Though it references practical applications, this is a book about ideas and potential advances in mechanical science.

  17. Mechanical Material Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mun Il

    1993-01-01

    This book introduced mechanical material with introduction, basic problems about metal ingredient of machine of metal and alloy, property of metal material mechanical metal material such as categorization of metal material and high tensile structure steel, mechanic design and steel material with three important points on using of steel materials, selection and directions machine structural steel, selection and directions of steel for tool, selection and instruction of special steel like stainless steel and spring steel, nonferrous metal materials and plastic.

  18. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  19. Quantum mechanics in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, George C

    2002-01-01

    Intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students, this text explores quantum mechanical techniques from the viewpoint of chemistry and materials science. Dynamics, symmetry, and formalism are emphasized. An initial review of basic concepts from introductory quantum mechanics is followed by chapters examining symmetry, rotations, and angular momentum addition. Chapter 4 introduces the basic formalism of time-dependent quantum mechanics, emphasizing time-dependent perturbation theory and Fermi's golden rule. Chapter 5 sees this formalism applied to the interaction of radiation and matt

  20. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  1. On obtaining classical mechanics from quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2007-01-01

    Constructing a classical mechanical system associated with a given quantum-mechanical one entails construction of a classical phase space and a corresponding Hamiltonian function from the available quantum structures and a notion of coarser observations. The Hilbert space of any quantum-mechanical system naturally has the structure of an infinite-dimensional symplectic manifold ('quantum phase space'). There is also a systematic, quotienting procedure which imparts a bundle structure to the quantum phase space and extracts a classical phase space as the base space. This works straightforwardly when the Hilbert space carries weakly continuous representation of the Heisenberg group and one recovers the linear classical phase space R 2N . We report on how the procedure also allows extraction of nonlinear classical phase spaces and illustrate it for Hilbert spaces being finite dimensional (spin-j systems), infinite dimensional but separable (particle on a circle) and infinite dimensional but non-separable (polymer quantization). To construct a corresponding classical dynamics, one needs to choose a suitable section and identify an effective Hamiltonian. The effective dynamics mirrors the quantum dynamics provided the section satisfies conditions of semiclassicality and tangentiality

  2. Photochemical efficiency of PSII and photoprotective pigments in seedlings and adults of two Proteaceae with different shade tolerance from the Chilean temperate rain forest Eficiencia fotoquímica del PSII y pigmentos fotoprotectores en plántulas y adultos de dos Proteáceas con diferente tolerancia a la sombra del bosque lluvioso templado chileno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIREN ALBERDI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation in energy quenching parameters of photosystem II and photoprotective pigments were studied in seedlings and adults of two Proteaceae: a shade-intolerant species (Embotrium coccineum J.R. et G. Forster and a shade-tolerant species (Lomatia ferruginea (Cav. R. Br.. We postúlate that the shade intolerant species favors photochemical energy driven processes (mainly C0(2 assimilation while the shade tolerant species exhibits higher non-photochemical energy dissipation under unfavorable conditions. Moreover, the shade tolerant species presents lower seasonal variations in these parameters that the shade intolerant species. Differences in energy dissipation should be more evident in seedlings than adults because of their contrasting light environments and temperatures are more evident at this stage. Their maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm was in the range 0.70-0.83. The effective photochemical efficiency (PSII, photochemical quenching (qP, and electrón transport rate (ETR were higher in seedlings of E. coccineum than in seedlings of L. ferruginea. Adults showed higher photochemical energy quenching parameters than seedlings. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ was frequently similar between daily periods, seasons, species, and developmental stages, with the exception of the lowest non-photochemical quenching in seedlings of E. coccineum in summer. Seedlings and adults showed a larger xanthophyll cycle pool contení at midday in summer than in winter, while the pool of antheraxanthin + zeaxanthin was always higher at midday. Lutein increased the most during summer. Thus, E. coccineum seedlings and adults maintained high photosynthesis, a higher fraction of open reaction centres, and higher ETR than the shade tolerant species. These differences are consistent with the ecological functions of both species: a pioneer character, higher growth rate, and wide altitudinal and latitudinal distribution of E. coccineum compared to L

  3. Locality and quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, W G

    2018-07-13

    It is argued that it is best not to think of quantum mechanics as non-local, but rather that it is non-realistic.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  4. Maximally causal quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new causal quantum mechanics in one and two dimensions developed recently at TIFR by this author and V. Singh. In this theory both position and momentum for a system point have Hamiltonian evolution in such a way that the ensemble of system points leads to position and momentum probability densities agreeing exactly with ordinary quantum mechanics. (author)

  5. Advances in applied mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Theodore Y; Wu, Theodore Y

    2000-01-01

    This highly acclaimed series provides survey articles on the present state and future direction of research in important branches of applied solid and fluid mechanics. Mechanics is defined as a branch of physics that focuses on motion and on the reaction of physical systems to internal and external forces.

  6. Questioning quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappier, Mélanie

    2018-03-01

    A century after its inception, quantum mechanics continues to puzzle us with dead-and-alive cats, waves "collapsing" into particles, and "spooky action at a distance." In his first book, What Is Real?, science writer and astrophysicist Adam Becker sets out to explore why the physics community is still arguing today about quantum mechanics's true meaning.

  7. Working group inciting mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This document deals with the inciting mechanisms under consideration in the framework of the greenhouse effect fight. The advantages and disadvantages, the coherence of these mechanisms and their articulation with the taxation, have been specified. A whole evaluation of the various scenario, taking into account the implementing problems and the evolution in an international context, is proposed. (A.L.B.)

  8. Mechanical response of composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camanho, Pedro P.; Dávila, C.G.; Pinho, Silvestre T.; Remmers, J.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    This book contains twelve selected papers presented at the ECCOMAS Thematic Conference ? Mechanical Response of Composites, and the papers presented by the three plenary speakers. It describes recent advances in the field of analysis models for the mechanical response of advanced composite

  9. Shooting mechanisms in nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakes, Aimée; Wiel, van der Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W.J.; Leeuwen, van Johan L.; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these

  10. Contact Hamiltonian mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravetti, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.bravetti@iimas.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A. P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Cruz, Hans, E-mail: hans@ciencias.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A. P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Tapias, Diego, E-mail: diego.tapias@nucleares.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    In this work we introduce contact Hamiltonian mechanics, an extension of symplectic Hamiltonian mechanics, and show that it is a natural candidate for a geometric description of non-dissipative and dissipative systems. For this purpose we review in detail the major features of standard symplectic Hamiltonian dynamics and show that all of them can be generalized to the contact case.

  11. Nilpotent mechanics and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplij, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Three formulations of the one dimensional nilpotent classical mechanics are given: Lagrange, Hamilton and Hamilton-Jacobi. The nilpotent part of the Lagrangian or Hamiltonian fully describes the nilpotent system. New nilpotent Poisson brackets are found. The Hamiltonian of SUSY mechanics is obtained

  12. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drivemechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displayer rods through the reactor vessel

  13. Problems in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Goldman, Iosif Ilich; Geilikman, B T

    2006-01-01

    This challenging book contains a comprehensive collection of problems in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of varying degrees of difficulty. It features answers and completely worked-out solutions to each problem. Geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, it provides an ideal adjunct to any textbook in quantum mechanics.

  14. Why quantum mechanics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    It is suggested that an oversight occurred in classical mechanics when time-derivatives of observables were treated on the same footing as the undifferentiated observables. Removal of this oversight points in the direction of quantum mechanics. Additional light is thrown on uncertainty relations and on quantum mechanics, as a possible form of a subtle statistical mechanics, by the formulation of a classical uncertainty relation for a very simple model. The existence of universal motion, i.e., of zero-point energy, is lastly made plausible in terms of a gravitational constant which is time-dependent. By these three considerations an attempt is made to link classical and quantum mechanics together more firmly, thus giving a better understanding of the latter

  15. Advanced Visual Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Thaller, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Visual Quantum Mechanics is a systematic effort to investigate and to teach quantum mechanics with the aid of computer-generated animations. It is a self-contained textbook that combines selected topics from atomic physics (spherical symmetry, the hydrogen atom, and particles with spin) with an introduction to quantum information theory (qubits, EPR paradox, teleportation, quantum computers). It explores relativistic quantum mechanics and the strange behavior of Dirac equation solutions. A series of appendices covers important topics from perturbation and scattering theory. The book places an emphasis on ideas and concepts, with a fair to moderate amount of mathematical rigor. Though this book stands alone, it can also be paired with Thaller Visual Quantum Mechanics to form a comprehensive course in quantum mechanics. The software for the first book earned the European Academic Software Award 2000 for outstanding innovation in its field.

  16. Relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollitrault, J.Y.

    1998-12-01

    These notes form an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. The mathematical formalism has been reduced to the minimum in order to enable the reader to calculate elementary physical processes. The second quantification and the field theory are the logical followings of this course. The reader is expected to know analytical mechanics (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian), non-relativistic quantum mechanics and some basis of restricted relativity. The purpose of the first 3 chapters is to define the quantum mechanics framework for already known notions about rotation transformations, wave propagation and restricted theory of relativity. The next 3 chapters are devoted to the application of relativistic quantum mechanics to a particle with 0,1/5 and 1 spin value. The last chapter deals with the processes involving several particles, these processes require field theory framework to be thoroughly described. (A.C.)

  17. Schrodinger's mechanics interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David B

    2018-01-01

    The interpretation of quantum mechanics has been in dispute for nearly a century with no sign of a resolution. Using a careful examination of the relationship between the final form of classical particle mechanics (the Hamilton–Jacobi Equation) and Schrödinger's mechanics, this book presents a coherent way of addressing the problems and paradoxes that emerge through conventional interpretations.Schrödinger's Mechanics critiques the popular way of giving physical interpretation to the various terms in perturbation theory and other technologies and places an emphasis on development of the theory and not on an axiomatic approach. When this interpretation is made, the extension of Schrödinger's mechanics in relation to other areas, including spin, relativity and fields, is investigated and new conclusions are reached.

  18. Engineering quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2011-01-01

    A clear introduction to quantum mechanics concepts Quantum mechanics has become an essential tool for modern engineering, particularly due to the recent developments in quantum computing as well as the rapid progress in optoelectronic devices. Engineering Quantum Mechanics explains the fundamentals of this exciting field, providing broad coverage of both traditional areas such as semiconductor and laser physics as well as relatively new yet fast-growing areas such as quantum computation and quantum information technology. The book begins with basic quantum mechanics, reviewing measurements and probability, Dirac formulation, the uncertainty principle, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum eigenstates, and perturbation theory. Then, quantum statistical mechanics is explored, from second quantization and density operators to coherent and squeezed states, coherent interactions between atoms and fields, and the Jaynes-Cummings model. From there, the book moves into elementary and modern applications, discussing s...

  19. Quantum mechanics for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction into the fundamentals of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In Part 1, the essential principles are developed. Applications and extensions of the formalism can be found in Part 2. The book includes not only material that is presented in traditional textbooks on quantum mechanics, but also discusses in detail current issues such as interaction-free quantum measurements, neutrino oscillations, various topics in the field of quantum information as well as fundamental problems and epistemological questions, such as the measurement problem, entanglement, Bell's inequality, decoherence, and the realism debate. A chapter on current interpretations of quantum mechanics concludes the book. To develop quickly and clearly the main principles of quantum mechanics and its mathematical formulation, there is a systematic change between wave mechanics and algebraic representation in the first chapters. The required mathematical tools are introduced step by step. Moreover, the appendix coll...

  20. Mechanical Testing of MLCCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Cracking of multilayer ceramic capacitors, MLCCs, remains a serious problem for space systems. This problem increases substantially for large size capacitors and in cases when manual soldering is involved or the system experiences mechanical shock or vibration. In any case, a fracture occurs when the sum of external and internal mechanical stresses exceeds the strength of the part. To reduce the probability of cracking, the level of stress should be reduced, e.g. by optimizing the assembly workmanship and rules for board design, and the strength of the parts increased by selecting the most mechanically robust capacitors. The latter might possibly be achieved by selecting MLCCs based on the in-situ measurements of mechanical characteristics using four types of tests: flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness, and flex bend testing. Note that military specifications MIL-PRF-123 and MIL-PRF-55681 do not have requirements for mechanical testing of the parts. However, specifications for automotive industry components employ two types of mechanical tests: beam load (break strength) test per AEC-Q200-003 and board flex test per AEC-Q200-005. A recent military specification for thin dielectric capacitors, MIL-PRF-32535, has one mechanical test, board flex testing, that is similar to AEC-Q200-005. The purpose of this report was assessment of the efficiency of different mechanical tests for selection robust capacitors and comparison of mechanical characteristics of Base Metal Electrode (BME) and Precious Metal Electrode (PME) capacitors. The report has three parts related to the first three mechanical tests mentioned above.

  1. Revisiting the Role of Xanthophylls in Nonphotochemical Quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Bart; Roy, Laura M; Xu, Pengqi; Lu, Yinghong; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph; Croce, Roberta

    2018-01-01

    Photoprotective nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of absorbed solar energy is vital for survival of photosynthetic organisms, and NPQ modifications significantly improve plant productivity. However, the exact NPQ quenching mechanism is obscured by discrepancies between reported mechanisms, involving

  2. Mechanisms in environmental control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeneg, K.

    1994-01-01

    The theory of implementation provides methods for decentralization of decisions in societies. By using mechanisms (game forms) it is possible (in theory) to implement attractive states in different economic environments. As an example the market mechanisms can implement Pareto-efficient and individual rational allocations in an Arrow-Debreu economic environment without market failures. And even when there exists externalities the market mechanism sometime can be used if it is possible to make a market for the goods not allocated on a market already - examples are marketable emission permits, and deposit refund systems. But environmental problems can often be explained by the existence of other market failures (e.g. asymmetric information), and then the market mechanism do not work properly. And instead of using regulation or traditional economic instruments (subsidies, charges, fees, liability insurance, marketable emission permits, or deposit refund systems) to correct the problems caused by market failures, some other methods can be used to deal with these problems. This paper contains a survey of mechanisms that can be used in environmental control when the problems are caused by the existence of public goods, externalities, asymmetric information, and indivisible goods in the economy. By examples it will be demonstrated how the Clarke-Groves mechanism, the Cournot-Lindahl mechanism, and other mechanisms can be used to solve specific environmental problems. This is only theory and examples, but a recent field study have used the Cournot-Lindahl mechanism to solve the problem of lake liming in Sweden. So this subject may be of some interests for environmental policy in the future. (au) 23 refs

  3. Dissecting molecular and physiological response mechanisms to high solar radiation in cyanic and acyanic leaves: a case study on red and green basil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattini, Massimiliano; Sebastiani, Federico; Brunetti, Cecilia; Fini, Alessio; Torre, Sara; Gori, Antonella; Centritto, Mauro; Ferrini, Francesco; Landi, Marco; Guidi, Lucia

    2017-04-01

    Photosynthetic performance and the expression of genes involved in light signaling and the biosynthesis of isoprenoids and phenylpropanoids were analysed in green ('Tigullio', TIG) and red ('Red Rubin', RR) basil. The aim was to detect the physiological and molecular response mechanisms to high sunlight. The attenuation of blue-green light by epidermal anthocyanins was shown to evoke shade-avoidance responses with consequential effects on leaf morpho-anatomical traits and gas exchange performance. Red basil had a lower mesophyll conductance, partially compensated by the less effective control of stomatal movements, in comparison with TIG. Photosynthesis decreased more in TIG than in RR in high sunlight, because of larger stomatal limitations and the transient impairment of PSII photochemistry. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway promoted above all the synthesis and de-epoxidation of violaxanthin-cycle pigments in TIG and of neoxanthin and lutein in RR. This enabled the green leaves to process the excess radiant energy effectively, and the red leaves to optimize light harvesting and photoprotection. The greater stomatal closure observed in TIG than in RR was due to enhanced abscisic acid (ABA) glucose ester deglucosylation and reduced ABA oxidation, rather than to superior de novo ABA synthesis. This study shows a strong competition between anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis, which occurs at the level of genes regulating the oxidation of the C2-C3 bond in the dihydro-flavonoid skeleton. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mechanical engineers data handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Carvill, James

    1994-01-01

    This text provides the student and professional mechanical engineer with a reference text of an essentially practical nature. It is uncluttered by text, and extensive use of illustrations and tables provide quick and clear access to information. It alsoincludes examples of detailed calculations on many of the applications of technology used by mechanical and production engineers, draughtsmen and engineering designers.Although mainly intended for those studying and practising mechanical engineering, a glance at the contents will show that it is also useful to those in related br

  5. Analytical elements of mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Elements of Mechanics, Volume 1, is the first of two volumes intended for use in courses in classical mechanics. The books aim to provide students and teachers with a text consistent in content and format with the author's ideas regarding the subject matter and teaching of mechanics, and to disseminate these ideas. The book opens with a detailed exposition of vector algebra, and no prior knowledge of this subject is required. This is followed by a chapter on the topic of mass centers, which is presented as a logical extension of concepts introduced in connection with centroids. A

  6. Rotary mechanical latch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Martinez, Michael A.; Marron, Lisa C.

    2012-11-13

    A rotary mechanical latch for positive latching and unlatching of a rotary device with a latchable rotating assembly having a latching gear that can be driven to latched and unlatched states by a drive mechanism such as an electric motor. A cam arm affixed to the latching gear interfaces with leading and trailing latch cams affixed to a flange within the drive mechanism. The interaction of the cam arm with leading and trailing latch cams prevents rotation of the rotating assembly by external forces such as those due to vibration or tampering.

  7. Statistical mechanics in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonchev, N.; Shumovskij, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The history of investigations, conducted at the JINR in the field of statistical mechanics, beginning with the fundamental works by Bogolyubov N.N. on superconductivity microscopic theory is presented. Ideas, introduced in these works and methods developed in them, have largely determined the ways for developing statistical mechanics in the JINR and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov variational principle has become an important method of the modern nucleus theory. A brief review of the main achievements, connected with the development of statistical mechanics methods and their application in different fields of physical science is given

  8. Applications in solid mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Kristian Breum; Wells, Garth N.

    2012-01-01

    Problems in solid mechanics constitute perhaps the largest field of application of finite element methods. The vast majority of solid mechanics problems involve the standard momentum balance equation, posed in a Lagrangian setting, with different models distinguished by the choice of nonlinear...... or linearized kinematics, and the constitutive model for determining the stress. For some common models, the constitutive relationships are rather complex. This chapter addresses a number of canonical solid mechanics models in the context of automated modeling, and focuses on some pertinent issues that arise...

  9. Supersymmetry in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Fred; Sukhatme, Uday

    2001-01-01

    This invaluable book provides an elementary description of supersymmetric quantum mechanics which complements the traditional coverage found in the existing quantum mechanics textbooks. It gives physicists a fresh outlook and new ways of handling quantum-mechanical problems, and also leads to improved approximation techniques for dealing with potentials of interest in all branches of physics. The algebraic approach to obtaining eigenstates is elegant and important, and all physicists should become familiar with this. The book has been written in such a way that it can be easily appreciated by

  10. Introduction to quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, A C

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Quantum Mechanics is an introduction to the power and elegance of quantum mechanics. Assuming little in the way of prior knowledge, quantum concepts are carefully and precisely presented, and explored through numerous applications and problems. Some of the more challenging aspects that are essential for a modern appreciation of the subject have been included, but are introduced and developed in the simplest way possible.Undergraduates taking a first course on quantum mechanics will find this text an invaluable introduction to the field and help prepare them for more adv

  11. Notes on continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, Eduardo W V

    2013-01-01

    This publication is aimed at students, teachers, and researchers of Continuum Mechanics and focused extensively on stating and developing Initial Boundary Value equations used to solve physical problems. With respect to notation, the tensorial, indicial and Voigt notations have been used indiscriminately.   The book is divided into twelve chapters with the following topics: Tensors, Continuum Kinematics, Stress, The Objectivity of Tensors, The Fundamental Equations of Continuum Mechanics, An Introduction to Constitutive Equations, Linear Elasticity, Hyperelasticity, Plasticity (small and large deformations), Thermoelasticity (small and large deformations), Damage Mechanics (small and large deformations), and An Introduction to Fluids. Moreover, the text is supplemented with over 280 figures, over 100 solved problems, and 130 references.

  12. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul Adrien Maurice

    1964-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  13. Fluid and particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  14. Mechanics, Waves and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan Jain, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; Acknowledgement; 1. Energy, mass, momentum; 2. Kinematics, Newton's laws of motion; 3. Circular motion; 4. The principle of least action; 5. Work and energy; 6. Mechanics of a system of particles; 7. Friction; 8. Impulse and collisions; 9. Central forces; 10. Dimensional analysis; 11. Oscillations; 12. Waves; 13. Sound of music; 14. Fluid mechanics; 15. Water waves; 16. The kinetic theory of gases; 17. Concepts and laws of thermodynamics; 18. Some applications of thermodynamics; 19. Basic ideas of statistical mechanics; Bibliography; Index.

  15. Mechanical design engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical Design Engineering Handbook is a straight-talking and forward-thinking reference covering the design, specification, selection, use and integration of machine elements fundamental to a wide range of engineering applications. Develop or refresh your mechanical design skills in the areas of bearings, shafts, gears, seals, belts and chains, clutches and brakes, springs, fasteners, pneumatics and hydraulics, amongst other core mechanical elements, and dip in for principles, data and calculations as needed to inform and evaluate your on-the-job decisions. Covering the full spectrum

  16. Beyond conventional quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, C.

    1991-10-01

    The author reviews some recent attempts to overcome the conceptual difficulties encountered by trying to interpret quantum mechanics as giving a complete, objective and unified description of natural phenomena. 38 refs

  17. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  18. Quantum mechanics symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Walter

    1989-01-01

    "Quantum Dynamics" is a major survey of quantum theory based on Walter Greiner's long-running and highly successful courses at the University of Frankfurt. The key to understanding in quantum theory is to reinforce lecture attendance and textual study by working through plenty of representative and detailed examples. Firm belief in this principle led Greiner to develop his unique course and to transform it into a remarkable and comprehensive text. The text features a large number of examples and exercises involving many of the most advanced topics in quantum theory. These examples give practical and precise demonstrations of how to use the often subtle mathematics behind quantum theory. The text is divided into five volumes: Quantum Mechanics I - An Introduction, Quantum Mechanics II - Symmetries, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Electrodynamics, Gauge Theory of Weak Interactions. These five volumes take the reader from the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics up to the latest research in partic...

  19. Classicality in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    In this article we propose a solution to the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. We point out that the measurement problem can be traced to an a priori notion of classicality in the formulation of quantum mechanics. If this notion of classicality is dropped and instead classicality is defined in purely quantum mechanical terms the measurement problem can be avoided. We give such a definition of classicality. It identifies classicality as a property of large quantum system. We show how the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics is a result of this notion of classicality. We also comment on what the implications of this view are for the search of a quantum theory of gravity

  20. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  1. Mechanical vaccum pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Chew, A D

    2007-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the technology of contemporary primary and secondary mechanical vacuum pumps. For reference a brief history of vacuum and a summary of important and basic vacuum concepts are first presented.

  2. Mechanics and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics provides an accessible and clear treatment of the fundamentals. Starting with particle mechanics and an early introduction to special relativity this textbooks enables the reader to understand the basics in mechanics. The text is written from the experimental physics point of view, giving numerous real life examples and applications of classical mechanics in technology. This highly motivating presentation deepens the knowledge in a very accessible way. The second part of the text gives a concise introduction to rotational motion, an expansion to rigid bodies, fluids and gases. Finally, an extensive chapter on thermodynamics and a short introduction to nonlinear dynamics with some instructive examples intensify the knowledge of more advanced topics. Numerous problems with detailed solutions are perfect for self study.

  3. Classicality in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Olaf [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    In this article we propose a solution to the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. We point out that the measurement problem can be traced to an a priori notion of classicality in the formulation of quantum mechanics. If this notion of classicality is dropped and instead classicality is defined in purely quantum mechanical terms the measurement problem can be avoided. We give such a definition of classicality. It identifies classicality as a property of large quantum system. We show how the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics is a result of this notion of classicality. We also comment on what the implications of this view are for the search of a quantum theory of gravity.

  4. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  5. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H.; Nielsen, Trine; Pedersen, Oluf.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of the composition and function of the gut microbiota have been associated with metabolic disorders including obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Studies on mice have demonstrated several underlying mechanisms including host signalling through bacterial lipopolysacchari...

  6. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  7. Computational Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shabana, Ahmed A

    2011-01-01

    This text presents the theory of continuum mechanics using computational methods. Ideal for students and researchers, the second edition features a new chapter on computational geometry and finite element analysis.

  8. Playing at Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul M.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of counting techniques of a sorting game to distributions and concepts in statistical mechanics. Included are the following distributions: Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and most probable. (RH)

  9. Physics: quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book is the second part of the physic lectures on quantum mechanics from Ecole Polytechnique. It contains some physic complements a little more thoroughly studied, mathematical complements to which refer, and an exercise and problem collection [fr

  10. Toward broadband mechanical spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Torchinsky, Darius; Klieber, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Diverse material classes exhibit qualitatively similar behavior when made viscous upon cooling toward the glass transition, suggesting a common theoretical basis. We used seven different measurement methods to determine the mechanical relaxation kinetics of a prototype molecular glass former over...

  11. Applied mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, Allan F

    2009-01-01

    Modern computer simulations make stress analysis easy. As they continue to replace classical mathematical methods of analysis, these software programs require users to have a solid understanding of the fundamental principles on which they are based. Develop Intuitive Ability to Identify and Avoid Physically Meaningless Predictions Applied Mechanics of Solids is a powerful tool for understanding how to take advantage of these revolutionary computer advances in the field of solid mechanics. Beginning with a description of the physical and mathematical laws that govern deformation in solids, the text presents modern constitutive equations, as well as analytical and computational methods of stress analysis and fracture mechanics. It also addresses the nonlinear theory of deformable rods, membranes, plates, and shells, and solutions to important boundary and initial value problems in solid mechanics. The author uses the step-by-step manner of a blackboard lecture to explain problem solving methods, often providing...

  12. Control rod driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooshima, Yoshio.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To perform reliable scram operation, even if abnormality should occur in a system instructing scram operation in FBR type reactors. Constitution: An aluminum alloy member to be melt at a predetermined temperature (about 600sup(o)C) is disposed to a connection part between a control rod and a driving mechanism, whereby the control rod is detached from the driving mechanism and gravitationally fallen to the reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. Cloud security mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has brought great benefits in cost and flexibility for provisioning services. The greatest challenge of cloud computing remains however the question of security. The current standard tools in access control mechanisms and cryptography can only partly solve the security challenges of cloud infrastructures. In the recent years of research in security and cryptography, novel mechanisms, protocols and algorithms have emerged that offer new ways to create secure services atop cloud...

  14. Statistical mechanics rigorous results

    CERN Document Server

    Ruelle, David

    1999-01-01

    This classic book marks the beginning of an era of vigorous mathematical progress in equilibrium statistical mechanics. Its treatment of the infinite system limit has not been superseded, and the discussion of thermodynamic functions and states remains basic for more recent work. The conceptual foundation provided by the Rigorous Results remains invaluable for the study of the spectacular developments of statistical mechanics in the second half of the 20th century.

  15. Mechanics of deformable bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1950-01-01

    Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume II covers topics on the mechanics of deformable bodies. The book discusses the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of deformable bodies; the vortex theory; as well as the theory of waves. The text also describes the flow with given boundaries. Supplementary notes on selected hydrodynamic problems and supplements to the theory of elasticity are provided. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking related courses will find the book useful.

  16. Generalized classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, M.; Rodrigues, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The geometrical study of Classical Mechanics shows that the Hamiltonian (respectively, Lagrangian) formalism may be characterized by intrinsical structures canonically defined on the cotangent (respectively, tangent) bundle of a differentiable manifold. A generalized formalism for higher order Lagrangians is developed. Then the Hamiltonian form of the theory is developed. Finally, the Poisson brackets are defined and the conditions under which a mapping is a canonical transformation are studied. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for this type of mechanics is established. (Auth.)

  17. Mechanical rebar splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljević Branko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanical rebar splicing systems are presented, and design situations where mechanical splicing has advantage over reinforcement splicing by overlapping and welding are defined in this paper. New international standards for testing and proof of systems for mechanical rebar splicing quality are considered. Mechanical splicing system for rebar and bolt connection, usable in steel and reinforced concrete structural elements connections, is presented in this paper. There are only few examples of mechanical rebar splicing in our country. The most significant one - the pylon and beam connection at Ada Bridge in Belgrade is presented in the paper. Intensive development of production and use of mechanical rebar splicing systems, research in this area, as well as the publication of international standards prescribing requirements for quality and procedures for proof of quality, represent very good base for development of the corresponding technical norms in Serbia. The legislation in this area would quicken proof of quality procedures, attest and approval issuing for individual products, leading to wider use of this system in all situations where it is in advantage over the classical reinforcement splicing.

  18. Theoretical physics. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, Eckhard

    2008-01-01

    From the first in two comprehensive volumes appeared Theoretical Physics of the author by this after Mechanics and Electrodynamics also Quantum mechanics appears as thinner single volume. First the illustrative approach via wave mechanics is reproduced. The more abstract Hilbert-space formulation introduces the author later by postulates, which are because of the preceding wave mechanics sufficiently plausible. All concepts of quantum mechanics, which contradict often to the intuitive understanding formed by macroscopic experiences, are extensively discussed and made by means of many examples as well as problems - in the largest part provided with solutions - understandable. To the interpretation of quantum mechanics an extensive special chapter is dedicated. this book arose from courses on theoretical physics, which the author has held at the Heinrich-Heine University in Duesseldorf, and was in numerous repetitions fitted to the requirement of the studyings. it is so designed that it is also after the study suited as reference book or for the renewing. All problems are very thoroughly and such extensively studied that each step is separately reproducible. About motivation and good understandability is cared much

  19. Nuclear Mechanics in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, cancer metastasis remains an incompletely understood process that is as complex as it is devastating. In recent years, there has been an increasing push to investigate the biomechanical aspects of tumorigenesis, complementing the research on genetic and biochemical changes. In contrast to the high genetic variability encountered in cancer cells, almost all metastatic cells are subject to the same physical constraints as they leave the primary tumor, invade surrounding tissues, transit through the circulatory system, and finally infiltrate new tissues. Advances in live cell imaging and other biophysical techniques, including measurements of subcellular mechanics, have yielded stunning new insights into the physics of cancer cells. While much of this research has been focused on the mechanics of the cytoskeleton and the cellular microenvironment, it is now emerging that the mechanical properties of the cell nucleus and its connection to the cytoskeleton may play a major role in cancer metastasis, as deformation of the large and stiff nucleus presents a substantial obstacle during the passage through the dense interstitial space and narrow capillaries. Here, we present an overview of the molecular components that govern the mechanical properties of the nucleus and we discuss how changes in nuclear structure and composition observed in many cancers can modulate nuclear mechanics and promote metastatic processes. Improved insights into this interplay between nuclear mechanics and metastatic progression may have powerful implications in cancer diagnostics and therapy and may reveal novel therapeutic targets for pharmacological inhibition of cancer cell invasion. PMID:24563360

  20. Clean Development Mechanism: Core of Kyoto Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Kyun [United Nations Environment Programme (Denmark)

    2000-06-01

    Kyoto protocol is a foundation for achieving an ultimate goal of UNFCCC, which is to stabilizing greenhouse gas concentration in the air. The clean development system is a core element for successful implementation of Kyoto protocol with other Kyoto mechanisms. While UNFCCC requires a new paradigm changing to sustainable development considering demand and future environment from the past supply-oriented resource consumption, the clean development system will be used as a means of successful establishment of a new paradigm in 21st century. As environmental problem is integrated with economic problem and each country is thriving for securing its own economic benefit in the issue of environmental conservation, Korea should do its best to have both of global environmental conservation and economic benefit for its own. 1 tab.

  1. Supersymmetry and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.; Sukhatme, U.

    1995-01-01

    In the past ten years, the ideas of supersymmetry have been profitably applied to many nonrelativistic quantum mechanical problems. In particular, there is now a much deeper understanding of why certain potentials are analytically solvable and an array of powerful new approximation methods for handling potentials which are not exactly solvable. In this report, we review the theoretical formulation of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and discuss many applications. Exactly solvable potentials can be understood in terms of a few basic ideas which include supersymmetric partner potentials, shape invariance and operator transformations. Familiar solvable potentials all have the property of shape invariance. We describe new exactly solvable shape invariant potentials which include the recently discovered self-similar potentials as a special case. The connection between inverse scattering, isospectral potentials and supersymmetric quantum mechanics is discussed and multi-soliton solutions of the KdV equation are constructed. Approximation methods are also discussed within the framework of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in particular it is shown that a supersymmetry inspired WKB approximation is exact for a class of shape invariant potentials. Supersymmetry ideas give particularly nice results for the tunneling rate in a double well potential and for improving large N expansions. We also discuss the problem of a charged Dirac particle in an external magnetic field and other potentials in terms of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Finally, we discuss structures more general than supersymmetric quantum mechanics such as parasupersymmetric quantum mechanics in which there is a symmetry between a boson and a para-fermion of order p. ((orig.))

  2. Noncanonical Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litteljohn, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Noncanonical variables in Hamiltonian mechanics were first used by Lagrange in 1808. In spite of this, most work in Hamiltonian mechanics has been carried out in canonical variables, up to this day. One reason for this is that noncanonical coordinates are seldom needed for mechanical problems based on Lagrangians of the form L = T - V, where T is the kinetic energy and V is the potential energy. Of course, such Lagrangians arise naturally in celestial mechanics, and as a result they form the paradigms of nineteenth-century mechanics and have become enshrined in all the mechanics textbooks. Certain features of modern problems, however, lead to the use of noncanonical coordinates. Among these are issues of gauge invariance and singular Lagrange a Poisson structures. In addition, certain problems, like the flow of magnetic-field lines in physical space, are naturally formulated in terms of noncanonical coordinates. None of these features is present in the nineteenth-century paradigms of mechanics, but they do arise in problems involving particle motion in the presence of magnetic fields. For example, the motion of a particle in an electromagnetic wave is an important one in plasma physics, but the usual Hamiltonian formulation is gauge dependent. For this problem, noncanonical approaches based on Lagrangians in phase space lead to powerful computational techniques which are gauge invariant. In the limit of strong magnetic fields, particle motion becomes 'guiding-center motion'. Guiding-center motion is also best understood in terms of noncanonical coordinates. Finally the flow of magnetic-field lines through physical space is a Hamiltonian system which is best understood with noncanonical coordinates. No doubt many more systems will arise in the future for which these noncanonical techniques can be applied. (author)

  3. Mechanism of charity activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman B. Golovkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to establish the essential properties of the mechanism of charitable activities and to formulate the concept of quotmechanism of charitable activityquot. Methods the objective of the study is achieved using the complex of methods which are based on the interaction of dialectical and metaphysical analysis the epistemological properties of which allowed to reveal various aspects of the charitable activities mechanism functioning taking into account the principles of comprehensiveness complexity specificity and objectivity of the research. Results the rules are stated of using the term quotmechanismquot to characterize actions of state and law the essence of the charity mechanism is defined the definition of quotthe mechanism of charitable activity quot is formulated. Scientific novelty for the first time at theoretical level in legal science the definition of quotthe mechanism of charitable activityquot is formulated and its essential properties are set. Practical significance the research will contribute to improving the legal regulation in the field of philanthropy as well as to improving the efficiency and quality of charitable activity in the Russian Federation. nbsp

  4. Advanced mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhns, Otto T

    2003-01-01

    Mechanics, and in particular, the mechanics of solids, forms the basis of all engi­ neering sciences. It provides the essential foundations for understanding the action of forces on bodies, and the effects of these forces on the straining of the body on the one hand, and on the deformation and motion of the body on the other. Thus, it provides the solutions of many problems with which the would-be engineer is going to be confronted with on a daily basis. In addition, in engineering studies, mechanics has a more vital importance, which many students appreciate only much later. Because of its clear, and analyt­ ical setup, it aids the student to a great extent in acquiring the necessary degree of abstraction ability, and logical thinking, skills without which no engineer in the practice today would succeed. Many graduates have confirmed to me that learning mechanics is generally per­ ceived as difficult. On the other hand, they always also declared that the preoccu­ pation with mechanics made an essential c...

  5. Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. L.

    2005-06-01

    Quantum mechanics has evolved from a subject of study in pure physics to one with a wide range of applications in many diverse fields. The basic concepts of quantum mechanics are explained in this book in a concise and easy-to-read manner emphasising applications in solid state electronics and modern optics. Following a logical sequence, the book is focused on the key ideas and is conceptually and mathematically self-contained. The fundamental principles of quantum mechanics are illustrated by showing their application to systems such as the hydrogen atom, multi-electron ions and atoms, the formation of simple organic molecules and crystalline solids of practical importance. It leads on from these basic concepts to discuss some of the most important applications in modern semiconductor electronics and optics. Containing many homework problems and worked examples, the book is suitable for senior-level undergraduate and graduate level students in electrical engineering, materials science and applied physics. Clear exposition of quantum mechanics written in a concise and accessible style Precise physical interpretation of the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics Illustrates the important concepts and results by reference to real-world examples in electronics and optoelectronics Contains homeworks and worked examples, with solutions available for instructors

  6. Mechanical Biological Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilitewski, B-; Oros, Christiane; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    The basic processes and technologies of composting and anaerobic digestion, as described in the previous chapters, are usually used for specific or source-separated organic waste flows. However, in the 1990s mechanical biological waste treatment technologies (MBT) were developed for unsorted...... or residual waste (after some recyclables removed at the source). The concept was originally to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill, but MBT technologies are today also seen as plants recovering fuel as well as material fractions. As the name suggests the technology combines mechanical treatment...... technologies (screens, sieves, magnets, etc.) with biological technologies (composting, anaerobic digestion). Two main technologies are available: Mechanical biological pretreatment (MBP), which first removes an RDF fraction and then biologically treats the remaining waste before most of it is landfilled...

  7. Concepts in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Vishnu S

    2008-01-01

    NEED FOR QUANTUM MECHANICS AND ITS PHYSICAL BASIS Inadequacy of Classical Description for Small Systems Basis of Quantum Mechanics Representation of States Dual Vectors: Bra and Ket Vectors Linear Operators Adjoint of a Linear Operator Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of a Linear Operator Physical Interpretation Observables and Completeness Criterion Commutativity and Compatibility of Observables Position and Momentum Commutation Relations Commutation Relation and the Uncertainty ProductAppendix: Basic Concepts in Classical MechanicsREPRESENTATION THEORY Meaning of Representation How to Set up a Representation Representatives of a Linear Operator Change of Representation Coordinate Representation Replacement of Momentum Observable p by -ih d/dqIntegral Representation of Dirac Bracket A2|F|A1> The Momentum Representation Dirac Delta FunctionRelation between the Coordinate and Momentum RepresentationsEQUATIONS OF MOTIONSchrödinger Equation of Motion Schrödinger Equation in the Coordinate Representation Equation o...

  8. Supersymmetric symplectic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Miralvo B.; Fernandes, M. C. B.; Martins, Maria das Graças R.; Santana, A. E.; Vianna, J. D. M.

    2018-02-01

    Symplectic Quantum Mechanics SQM considers a non-commutative algebra of functions on a phase space Γ and an associated Hilbert space HΓ to construct a unitary representation for the Galilei group. From this unitary representation the Schrödinger equation is rewritten in phase space variables and the Wigner function can be derived without the use of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. In this article we extend the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics SUSYQM to SQM. With the purpose of applications in quantum systems, the factorization method of the quantum mechanical formalism is then set within supersymmetric SQM. A hierarchy of simpler hamiltonians is generated leading to new computation tools for solving the eigenvalue problem in SQM. We illustrate the results by computing the states and spectra of the problem of a charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field as well as the corresponding Wigner function.

  9. Mechanics of ultrasound elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography enables in vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of living soft tissues in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner and has attracted considerable interest for clinical use in recent years. Continuum mechanics plays an essential role in understanding and improving ultrasound-based elastography methods and is the main focus of this review. In particular, the mechanics theories involved in both static and dynamic elastography methods are surveyed. They may help understand the challenges in and opportunities for the practical applications of various ultrasound elastography methods to characterize the linear elastic, viscoelastic, anisotropic elastic and hyperelastic properties of both bulk and thin-walled soft materials, especially the in vivo characterization of biological soft tissues. PMID:28413350

  10. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg combines his exceptional physical insight with his gift for clear exposition to provide a concise introduction to modern quantum mechanics. Ideally suited to a one-year graduate course, this textbook is also a useful reference for researchers. Readers are introduced to the subject through a review of the history of quantum mechanics and an account of classic solutions of the Schrödinger equation, before quantum mechanics is developed in a modern Hilbert space approach. The textbook covers many topics not often found in other books on the subject, including alternatives to the Copenhagen interpretation, Bloch waves and band structure, the Wigner–Eckart theorem, magic numbers, isospin symmetry, the Dirac theory of constrained canonical systems, general scattering theory, the optical theorem, the 'in-in' formalism, the Berry phase, Landau levels, entanglement and quantum computing. Problems are included at the ends of chapters, with solutions available for instructors at www.cam...

  11. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Third Edition is a clear and detailed introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications in chemistry and physics. All required math is clearly explained, including intermediate steps in derivations, and concise review of the math is included in the text at appropriate points. Most of the elementary quantum mechanical models-including particles in boxes, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, hydrogen atom-are clearly and completely presented. Applications of these models to selected “real world” topics are also included. This new edition includes many new topics such as band theory and heat capacity of solids, spectroscopy of molecules and complexes (including applications to ligand field theory), and small molecules of astrophysical interest.

  12. Graphene Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark; Kosmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2015-03-01

    Graphene provides an ideal system to test the statistical mechanics of thermally fluctuating elastic membranes. The high Young's modulus of graphene means that thermal fluctuations over even small length scales significantly stiffen the renormalized bending rigidity. We study the effect of thermal fluctuations on graphene ribbons of width W and length L, pinned at one end, via coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulations and compare with analytic predictions of the scaling of width-averaged root-mean-squared height fluctuations as a function of distance along the ribbon. Scaling collapse as a function of W and L also allows us to extract the scaling exponent eta governing the long-wavelength stiffening of the bending rigidity. A full understanding of the geometry-dependent mechanical properties of graphene, including arrays of cuts, may allow the design of a variety of modular elements with desired mechanical properties starting from pure graphene alone. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1435794

  13. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  14. Mathematical physics classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Knauf, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    As a limit theory of quantum mechanics, classical dynamics comprises a large variety of phenomena, from computable (integrable) to chaotic (mixing) behavior. This book presents the KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theory and asymptotic completeness in classical scattering. Including a wealth of fascinating examples in physics, it offers not only an excellent selection of basic topics, but also an introduction to a number of current areas of research in the field of classical mechanics. Thanks to the didactic structure and concise appendices, the presentation is self-contained and requires only knowledge of the basic courses in mathematics. The book addresses the needs of graduate and senior undergraduate students in mathematics and physics, and of researchers interested in approaching classical mechanics from a modern point of view.

  15. Heterogeneity of reward mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtha, A; Sershen, H

    2010-06-01

    The finding that many drugs that have abuse potential and other natural stimuli such as food or sexual activity cause similar chemical changes in the brain, an increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) in the shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAccS), indicated some time ago that the reward mechanism is at least very similar for all stimuli and that the mechanism is relatively simple. The presently available information shows that the mechanisms involved are more complex and have multiple elements. Multiple brain regions, multiple receptors, multiple distinct neurons, multiple transmitters, multiple transporters, circuits, peptides, proteins, metabolism of transmitters, and phosphorylation, all participate in reward mechanisms. The system is variable, is changed during development, is sex-dependent, and is influenced by genetic differences. Not all of the elements participate in the reward of all stimuli. Different set of mechanisms are involved in the reward of different drugs of abuse, yet different mechanisms in the reward of natural stimuli such as food or sexual activity; thus there are different systems that distinguish different stimuli. Separate functions of the reward system such as anticipation, evaluation, consummation and identification; all contain function-specific elements. The level of the stimulus also influences the participation of the elements of the reward system, there are possible reactions to even below threshold stimuli, and excessive stimuli can change reward to aversion involving parts of the system. Learning and memory of past reward is an important integral element of reward and addictive behavior. Many of the reward elements are altered by repeated or chronic stimuli, and chronic exposure to one drug is likely to alter the response to another stimulus. To evaluate and identify the reward stimulus thus requires heterogeneity of the reward components in the brain.

  16. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holder used in nuclear reactors. The closure mechanism is composed of a latching member which includes a generally circular chamber with a plurality of elongated latches depending therefrom. The latching member circumscribes part of an actuator member which is disposed within the latching member so as to be axially movable. The axial movement of the actuator actuates positioning of the latches between positions in which the latches are locked and secured within the actuator member. Means, capable of being remotely manipulated, are provided to move the actuator in order to position the latches and load the articles within the tube

  17. Classical mechanics with Maxima

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, Todd Keene

    2016-01-01

    This book guides undergraduate students in the use of Maxima—a computer algebra system—in solving problems in classical mechanics. It functions well as a supplement to a typical classical mechanics textbook. When it comes to problems that are too difficult to solve by hand, computer algebra systems that can perform symbolic mathematical manipulations are a valuable tool. Maxima is particularly attractive in that it is open-source, multiple-platform software that students can download and install free of charge. Lessons learned and capabilities developed using Maxima are easily transferred to other, proprietary software.

  18. Dynamically Assisted Schwinger Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetzhold, Ralf; Gies, Holger; Dunne, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    We study electron-positron pair creation from the Dirac vacuum induced by a strong and slowly varying electric field (Schwinger effect) which is superimposed by a weak and rapidly changing electromagnetic field (dynamical pair creation). In the subcritical regime where both mechanisms separately are strongly suppressed, their combined impact yields a pair creation rate which is dramatically enhanced. Intuitively speaking, the strong electric field lowers the threshold for dynamical particle creation--or, alternatively, the fast electromagnetic field generates additional seeds for the Schwinger mechanism. These findings could be relevant for planned ultrahigh intensity lasers

  19. Quantum mechanics selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Perelomov, Askold Mikhailovich

    1998-01-01

    It can serve as a good supplement to any quantum mechanics textbook, filling the gap between standard textbooks and higher-level books on the one hand and journal articles on the other. This book provides a detailed treatment of the scattering theory, multidimensional quasi-classical approximation, non-stationary problems for oscillators and the theory of unstable particles. It will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who wish to find new, interesting information hidden in the depths of non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

  20. Introduction to continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, W Michael; Rubin, David

    1996-01-01

    Introduction to Continuum Mechanics is a recently updated and revised text which is perfect for either introductory courses in an undergraduate engineering curriculum or for a beginning graduate course.Continuum Mechanics studies the response of materials to different loading conditions. The concept of tensors is introduced through the idea of linear transformation in a self-contained chapter, and the interrelation of direct notation, indicial notation, and matrix operations is clearly presented. A wide range of idealized materials are considered through simple static and dynamic problems, a

  1. Mechanics of soft materials

    CERN Document Server

    Volokh, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to soft matter modelling. It offers an up-to-date review of continuum mechanical description of soft and biological materials from the basics to the latest scientific materials. It includes multi-physics descriptions, such as chemo-, thermo-, electro- mechanical coupling. It derives from a graduate course at Technion that has been established in recent years. It presents original explanations for some standard materials and features elaborated examples on all topics throughout the text. PowerPoint lecture notes can be provided to instructors. .

  2. Effective mechanic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdge, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The need for the training of mechanics is discussed, and the increased interest within the utility industry of placing a similar importance on this training as it has traditionally placed on operator training, is expressed. Effective approaches and techniques are described. Fundamental mechanical maintenance concepts and their practical application are discussed, including the use of supporting video programs. The importance of follow-up practical shop exercise which reinforces classroom instruction is stressed, drawing from practical utility experience. Utilizing success in training as a measure of eligibility for advancement is discussed as well as the interface between training and the company bargaining unit

  3. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracca, A; Rechtman S, R

    1985-08-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject.

  4. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracca, A.; Rechtman S, R.

    1985-01-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject. (author)

  5. Mechanical engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Parrish, A

    1973-01-01

    Mechanical Engineer's Reference Book: 11th Edition presents a comprehensive examination of the use of Systéme International d' Unités (SI) metrication. It discusses the effectiveness of such a system when used in the field of engineering. It addresses the basic concepts involved in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Some of the topics covered in the book are the metallurgy of iron and steel; screw threads and fasteners; hole basis and shaft basis fits; an introduction to geometrical tolerancing; mechanical working of steel; high strength alloy steels; advantages of making components as castings

  6. Relativistic wave mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corinaldesi, Ernesto

    1963-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, this text provides readers with a background in relativistic wave mechanics and prepares them for the study of field theory. The treatment originated as a series of lectures from a course on advanced quantum mechanics that has been further amplified by student contributions.An introductory section related to particles and wave functions precedes the three-part treatment. An examination of particles of spin zero follows, addressing wave equation, Lagrangian formalism, physical quantities as mean values, translation and rotat

  7. Fundamentals of continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnicki, John W

    2014-01-01

    A concise introductory course text on continuum mechanics Fundamentals of Continuum Mechanics focuses on the fundamentals of the subject and provides the background for formulation of numerical methods for large deformations and a wide range of material behaviours. It aims to provide the foundations for further study, not just of these subjects, but also the formulations for much more complex material behaviour and their implementation computationally.  This book is divided into 5 parts, covering mathematical preliminaries, stress, motion and deformation, balance of mass, momentum and energ

  8. Physics: quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    From important experiment descriptions (sometimes, intentionally simplified), the essential concepts in Quantum Mechanics are first introduced. Wave function notion is described, Schroedinger equation is established, and, after applications rich in physical signification, quantum state and Hilbert space formalism are introduced, which will help to understand many essential phenomena. Then the quantum mechanic general formulation is written and some important consequences are deduced. This formalism is applied to a simple physical problem series (angular momentum, hydrogen atom, etc.) aiming at assimilating the theory operation and its application [fr

  9. Noncommutative quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J.; Loewe, M.; Rojas, J. C.

    2001-09-01

    A general noncommutative quantum mechanical system in a central potential V=V(r) in two dimensions is considered. The spectrum is bounded from below and, for large values of the anticommutative parameter θ, we find an explicit expression for the eigenvalues. In fact, any quantum mechanical system with these characteristics is equivalent to a commutative one in such a way that the interaction V(r) is replaced by V=V(HHO,Lz), where HHO is the Hamiltonian of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and Lz is the z component of the angular momentum. For other finite values of θ the model can be solved by using perturbation theory.

  10. Elementary quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxon, David S

    2012-01-01

    Based on lectures for an undergraduate UCLA course in quantum mechanics, this volume focuses on the formulas of quantum mechanics rather than applications. Widely used in both upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses, it offers a broad self-contained survey rather than in-depth treatments.Topics include the dual nature of matter and radiation, state functions and their interpretation, linear momentum, the motion of a free particle, Schrödinger's equation, approximation methods, angular momentum, and many other subjects. In the interests of keeping the mathematics as simple as possible, m

  11. Adventures in Celestial Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Szebehely, Victor G

    1998-01-01

    A fascinating introduction to the basic principles of orbital mechanics. It has been three hundred years since Isaac Newton first formulated laws to explain the orbits of the Moon and the planets of our solar system. In so doing he laid the groundwork for modern science's understanding of the workings of the cosmos and helped pave the way to the age of space exploration. Adventures in Celestial Mechanics offers students an enjoyable way to become acquainted with the basic principles involved in the motions of natural and human-made bodies in space. Packed with examples in which these principle

  12. Fracture mechanical materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Planman, T.; Nevalainen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental fracture mechanics development has been focused on the determination of reliable lower-bound fracture toughness estimates from small and miniature specimens, in particular considering the statistical aspects and loading rate effects of fracture mechanical material properties. Additionally, materials aspects in fracture assessment of surface cracks, with emphasis on the transferability of fracture toughness data to structures with surface flaws have been investigated. Further a modified crack-arrest fracture toughness test method, to increase the effectiveness of testing, has been developed. (orig.)

  13. Solid state mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Solid State Mechanics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research program domains are the following: investigations concerning the stability and bifurcation of the reversible or irreversible mechanical systems, the problems related to the theoretical and experimental determination of the materials rheological properties, the fatigue crack formation and propagation in multiple-axial stress conditions, the expert systems, and the software applied in the reinforced earth structures dimensioning. Moreover, the published papers, the books, the congress communications, the thesis, and the patents are listed [fr

  14. Probabilistic approach to mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Sandler, BZ

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the application of probabilistics to the investigation of mechanical systems. The book shows, for example, how random function theory can be applied directly to the investigation of random processes in the deflection of cam profiles, pitch or gear teeth, pressure in pipes, etc. The author also deals with some other technical applications of probabilistic theory, including, amongst others, those relating to pneumatic and hydraulic mechanisms and roller bearings. Many of the aspects are illustrated by examples of applications of the techniques under discussion.

  15. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  16. Mechanism of artificial heart

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  17. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  18. Modern logic and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garden, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The book applies the methods of modern logic and probabilities to ''interpreting'' quantum mechanics. The subject is described and discussed under the chapter headings: classical and quantum mechanics, modern logic, the propositional logic of mechanics, states and measurement in mechanics, the traditional analysis of probabilities, the probabilities of mechanics and the model logic of predictions. (U.K.)

  19. Word learning mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Angela Xiaoxue; Arunachalam, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    How do children acquire the meanings of words? Many word learning mechanisms have been proposed to guide learners through this challenging task. Despite the availability of rich information in the learner's linguistic and extralinguistic input, the word-learning task is insurmountable without such mechanisms for filtering through and utilizing that information. Different kinds of words, such as nouns denoting object concepts and verbs denoting event concepts, require to some extent different kinds of information and, therefore, access to different kinds of mechanisms. We review some of these mechanisms to examine the relationship between the input that is available to learners and learners' intake of that input-that is, the organized, interpreted, and stored representations they form. We discuss how learners segment individual words from the speech stream and identify their grammatical categories, how they identify the concepts denoted by these words, and how they refine their initial representations of word meanings. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1435. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1435 This article is categorized under: Linguistics > Language Acquisition Psychology > Language. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structured Mechanical Collage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhe; Wang, Jiang; Fu, Hongbo; Lau, Rynson W H

    2014-07-01

    We present a method to build 3D structured mechanical collages consisting of numerous elements from the database given artist-designed proxy models. The construction is guided by some graphic design principles, namely unity, variety and contrast. Our results are visually more pleasing than previous works as confirmed by a user study.

  1. Educational Mechanisms of Dioramas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Achiam, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    The diorama remains one of the most popular exhibit types in museums, and it has proven its educational potential time and time again. In spite of this, the specific mechanisms behind that educational potential remain unclear. In other words, museum practitioners and museum researchers know that ...

  2. Motorcycle Mechanic. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugus, Mickey; Fulkerson, Dan, Ed.

    These teacher's materials are for a 19-unit competency-based course on entry-level motorcycle mechanics at the secondary and postsecondary levels. The 19 units are: (1) introduction to motorcycle repair; (2) general safety; (3) tools and equipment; (4) metric measurements; (5) fasteners; (6) service department operations; (7) motorcycle engines;…

  3. Fuzzy clustering of mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described with reference to various attributes using the concept of ...... 0.20. 0.40. 0.10. 0.30. 0.20. 0.10. 0.80. 0.60. 0.80. 6. Economic and v ery con ...... I I 1977 Mechanisms in modern engineering design: A hand-book for engineers, designers.

  4. Principles of Mechanical Excavation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lislerud, A.

    1997-12-01

    Mechanical excavation of rock today includes several methods such as tunnel boring, raiseboring, roadheading and various continuous mining systems. Of these raiseboring is one potential technique for excavating shafts in the repository for spent nuclear fuel and dry blind boring is promising technique for excavation of deposition holes, as demonstrated in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto. In addition, there is potential for use of other mechanical excavation techniques in different parts of the repository. One of the main objectives of this study was to analyze the factors which affect the feasibility of mechanical rock excavation in hard rock conditions and to enhance the understanding of factors which affect rock cutting so as to provide an improved basis for excavator performance prediction modeling. The study included the following four main topics: (a) phenomenological model based on similarity analysis for roller disk cutting, (b) rock mass properties which affect rock cuttability and tool life, (c) principles for linear and field cutting tests and performance prediction modeling and (d) cutter head lacing design procedures and principles. As a conclusion of this study, a test rig was constructed, field tests were planned and started up. The results of the study can be used to improve the performance prediction models used to assess the feasibility of different mechanical excavation techniques at various repository investigation sites. (orig.)

  5. Mechanical Drawing and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulsky, Marilyn; McEnaney, Walter K.

    A syllabus is provided for a comprehensive foundation course in mechanical drawing and design for grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 that is prerequisite to advanced elective courses. Introductory materials include course objectives, an overview of basic concepts, and guidelines for implementation. Brief discussions of and suggestions for the areas of design…

  6. Mathematics and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santander, M.

    2000-01-01

    Several episodes in the relation between Mathematics and Quantum Mechanics are discussed; and the emphasis is put in the existence of multiple and sometimes unexpected connections between ideas originating in Mathematics and in Quantum Physics. The question of the unresasonable effectiveness of Mathematics in Physics is also presented in the same light. (Author) 3 refs

  7. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crombrugghe, M. de; Rittenberg, V.

    1982-12-01

    We give a general construction for supersymmetric Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics. We find that N-extended supersymmetry imposes very strong constraints, and for N > 4 the Hamiltonian is integrable. We give a variety of examples, for one-particle and for many-particle systems, in different numbers of dimensions. (orig.)

  8. Primer of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, Marvin

    2003-01-01

    Introductory text examines the classical quantum bead on a track: its state and representations; operator eigenvalues; harmonic oscillator and bound bead in a symmetric force field; and bead in a spherical shell. Also, spin, matrices and structure of quantum mechanics; simplest atom; indistinguishable particles; and stationary-state perturbation theory.

  9. Mechanical Measurements Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    The CERN mechanical measurements team check the sensors on one of the ATLAS inner detector end-caps using high precision measurement equipment. Remote checks like this must be made on these sensitive detector components before they can be transported to make sure that all systems are working correctly.

  10. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  11. Mechanism of Intermittent Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    6] and Dolenc [7] that the dynamic pressure input to the nozzle is very important to engine efficiency. In their dis- cussion of optimizing fuel...Injection in Diesel Engines." Proceedings of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Vol. 199 No. D3, 1985, ppl6l-174. [7] Dolenc , A. "The Injection

  12. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, a. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  13. Lifetime of Mechanical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, K.

    1999-07-01

    The gas plant at Kaarstoe was built as part of the Statpipe gas transport system and went on stream in 1985. In 1993 another line was routed from the Sleipner field to carry condensate, and the plant was extended accordingly. Today heavy additional supply- and export lines are under construction, and the plant is extended more than ever. The main role of the factory is to separate the raw gas into commercial products and to pump or ship it to the markets. The site covers a large number of well-known mechanical equipment. This presentation deals with piping, mechanical and structural disciplines. The lifetime of mechanical equipment is often difficult to predict as it depends on many factors, and the subject is complex. Mechanical equipment has been kept in-house, which provides detailed knowledge of the stages from a new to a 14 years old plant. The production regularity has always been very high, as required. The standard of the equipment is well kept, support systems are efficient, and human improvisation is extremely valuable.

  14. Mechanical meta-materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The emerging concept of mechanical meta-materials has received increasing attention during the last few years partially due to the advances in additive manufacturing techniques that have enabled fabricating materials with arbitrarily complex micro/nano-architectures. The rationally designed

  15. Memory Mechanisms in Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Constanze; Franz, Volker H.

    2009-01-01

    The availability of visual information influences the execution of goal-directed movements. This is very prominent in memory conditions, where a delay is introduced between stimulus presentation and execution of the movement. The corresponding effects could be due to a decay of the visual information or to different processing mechanisms used for…

  16. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Hansen, Morten; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been used for decades for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. Sequestering of bile acids in the intestinal lumen interrupts enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids, which initiate feedback mechanisms on the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids in the liver, ...

  17. Multidomain multiphase fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1976-10-01

    A set of multiphase field equations--conversion of mass, momentum and energy--based on multiphase mechanics is developed. Multiphase mechanics applies to mixtures of phases which are separated by interfaces and are mutually exclusive. Based on the multiphase mechanics formulation, additional terms appear in the field equations when the physical size of the dispersed phase (bubble or droplet) is many times larger than the inter-molecular spacing. These terms are the inertial coupling due to virtual mass and the additional viscous coupling due to unsteadiness of the flow field. The multiphase formulation given here takes into account the discreteness of particles of dispersed phases and, at the same time, the necessity of the distributive representation of field variables via space-time averaging when handling a large number of particles. The provision for multidomain transition further permits us to treat dispersed phases which are large compared to the characteristic dimension of the flow system via interdomain relations. The multidomain multiphase approach provides a framework for us to model the various flow regimes. Because some of the transport parameters associated with the system equations are not well known at the present time, an idealized two-domain two-phase solution approach is proposed as a first step. Finally, comparisons are made between the field equations formulated based on the multidomain-multiphase fluid mechanics and the pertinent existing models, and their relative significances are discussed. The desirability of consistent approximation and simplifications possible for dilute suspensions are discussed

  18. PIGMI mechanical fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, V.E.

    1976-01-01

    A prime goal of the mechanical design effort associated with the PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) program is to investigate new materials and fabrication techniques in an effort to obtain increased machine efficiency and reliability at a reasonable cost. The following discussion deals with the modeling program that LASL is pursuing for 450-MHz and 1350-MHz PIGMI development. (author)

  19. Mechanical cleaning of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.M.; Calado, V.E.; Barreiro, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of graphene due to residues from nanofabrication often introduces background doping and reduces electron mobility. For samples of high electronic quality, post-lithography cleaning treatments are therefore needed. We report that mechanical cleaning based on contact mode atomic force

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vitoratos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity/mortality. The pathogenesis of preeclampsia is still under investigation. The aim of this paper is to present the molecular mechanisms implicating in the pathway leading to preeclampsia.