WorldWideScience

Sample records for ocean dredged sediment

  1. Ocean Disposal of Dredged Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permits and authorizations for the ocean dumping of dredged material is issued by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Information is provided about where to dispose dredged material and the process for obtaining an ocean dumping permit for dredged material.

  2. Proposal of industrialization process of dredged sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Hadj Sadok

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study will focus on life cycle assessment (LCA of dredged sediments in its environment from sediment extraction to waste treatment. This tool is part of an environmental management approach, to compare the environmental loads of the different stages of the life cycle of the same product and to deduce which stage of the scenario is the most polluting in environmental terms. Optimize the modeling of industrialization process of dredged sediments using the SimaPro 8.2.3 software to propose a model that is the most respectful of the environment. We will focus on the environmental impacts; we will try to propose the most environmentally friendly scenario to exploit these dredged sediments in the field of building construction.

  3. Technical guidelines for environmental dredging of contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This report provides technical guidelines for evaluating : environmental dredging as a sediment remedy component. This document : supports the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for : Hazardous Waste Sites, released by the U.S. Environmental ...

  4. 78 FR 73097 - Ocean Dumping; Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW) Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA today designates four new Ocean... suitable dredged material generated from new work (construction) and future maintenance dredging from the... dredged material generated from new work (construction) and future maintenance dredging along the SNWW...

  5. Environmental management for dredging sediments - the requirement of developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manap, Norpadzlihatun; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research has characterized the effects of dredging, an underwater excavation process for navigational purposes or material extraction, and has shown its association with a number of chemical, physical and biological impacts. Due to this, much environmental management has been applied in the dredging industry in order to manage its detrimental effects. However, developing nations may have different approaches towards their dredging environmental management to compare to their companions with higher economic strength. Moreover, scientific evidence to make an informed decision is often lacking, hence affecting the number of research executed at these nations, limiting their efforts to preserve the environment. This paper reviews the dredging environmental impacts and its two important factors, dredging technology and sediment characteristic, that determine the magnitude of impacts through literature review, and discusses the need for a more integrated dredging environmental management to be developed for developing nations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  7. Summary of Measurement Protocols for Sediment Resuspended from Dredging Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    ... of all the data required to assess releases and mechanisms of releases from different types of dredges working in different sediment conditions such as cohesive, noncohesive, and rock materials...

  8. Dredged Material Testing and Evaluation for Ocean Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation and testing of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping is conducted to help protect human health and the marine environment. National guidance is provided by the Green Book. Regional Implementation Manuals are provided.

  9. 78 FR 29687 - Ocean Dumping; Atchafalaya-West Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... 228.5 and 40 CFR 228.6(a)). General Selection Criteria 1. The dumping of materials into the ocean will... maintenance material dredged from the ARBC by hydraulic cutterhead pipeline dredging and hopper dredging. If... site. Additionally, several large natural gas pipelines cross the ODMDS-West. Because of the dispersive...

  10. Effects of dredging operations on sediment quality. Contaminant mobilization in dredged sediments from the Port of Santos, SP, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Ronaldo J.; Santos, Fernando C.; Mozeto, Antonio A. [Lab. de Biogeoquimica Ambiental, Dept. de Quimica, Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abessa, Denis M.S.; Maranho, Luciane A.; Davanso, Marcela B. [Campus Experimental do Litoral Paulista, UNESP - Univ. Estadual Paulista ' Julio de Mesquita Filho' , Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nascimento, Marcos R.L. do [Lab. de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC), CNEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, MG (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Background, aim, and scope Contaminated sediments are a worldwide problem, and mobilization of contaminants is one of the most critical issues in environmental risk assessment insofar as dredging projects are concerned. The investigation of how toxic compounds are mobilized during dredging operations in the channel of the Port of Santos, Brazil, was conducted in an attempt to assess changes in the bioavailability and toxicity of these contaminants. Materials and methods Bulk sediment samples and their interstitial waters and elutriates were subjected to chemical evaluation and ecotoxicological assessment. Samples were collected from the channel before dredging, from the dredge's hopper, and from the disposal site and its surroundings. Results The results indicate that the bulk sediments from the dredging site are contaminated moderately with As, Pb, and Zn and severely with Hg, and that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations are relatively high. Our results also show a 50% increase in PAH concentrations in suspended solids in the water collected from the hopper dredge. This finding is of great concern, since it refers to the dredge overflow water which is pumped back into the ecosystem. Acute toxicity tests on bulk sediment using the amphipod Tiburonella viscana showed no toxicity, while chronic tests with the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus showed toxicity in the interstitial waters and elutriates. Results are compared with widely used sediment quality guidelines and with a sediment quality assessment scheme based on various lines of evidence. Conclusions The data presented here indicate that the sediments collected in this port show a certain degree of contamination, especially those from the inner part of the channel. The classification established in this study indicated that sediments from the dredged channel are impacted detrimentally and that sea disposal may disperse contaminants. According to this classification, the sediments are

  11. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  12. Solidification/stabilization of dredged marine sediments for road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong Xing; Abriak, Nor Edine; Zentar, Rachid; Xu, WeiYa

    2012-01-01

    Cement/lime-based solidification is an environmentally sound solution for the management of dredged marine sediments, instead of traditional solutions such as immersion. Based on the mineralogical composition and physical characteristics of Dunkirk sediments, the effects of cement and lime are assessed through Atterberg limits, modified Proctor compaction, unconfined compressive strength and indirect tensile strength tests. The variation of Atterberg limits and the improvement in strength are discussed at different binder contents. The potential of sediments solidified with cement or lime for road construction is evaluated through a proposed methodology from two aspects: I-CBR value and material classification. The test results show the feasibility of solidified dredged sediments for beneficial use as a material in road construction. Cement is superior to lime in terms of strength improvement, and adding 6% cement is an economic and reasonable method to stabilize fine sediments.

  13. Quantification of physical properties of dredged sediments during physical ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.; Dijk, S.G.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    The soil formation process ripening can be used as a bioremediation technique for dredged sediments that are polluted with organic chemicals. Currently, data are lacking that quantify the effects of physical ripening on parameters that affect aerobic bioremediation. We quantified the effects of

  14. The Performance of Nearshore Dredge Disposal at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Ocean Beach, California, contains an erosion hot spot in the shadow of the San Francisco ebb tidal delta that threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as the safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location a new plan for the management of sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay was implemented in May 2005 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE). The USACE designated a temporary nearshore dredge disposal site for the annual disposal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of sand about 750 m offshore and slightly south of the erosion hot spot, in depths between approximately 9 and 14 m. The site has now been used three times for a total sediment disposal of about 690,000 m3 (about 900,000 yds3). The disposal site was chosen because it is in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves can potentially feed sediment toward the littoral zone in the reach of the beach that is experiencing critical erosion, as well as prevent further scour on an exposed outfall pipe. The onshore migration of sediment from the target disposal location might feed the primary longshore bar or the nearshore zone, and provide a buffer to erosion that peaks during winter months when large waves impact the region. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring and modeling the bathymetric evolution of the test dredge disposal site and the adjacent coastal region since inception in May 2005. This paper reports on the first 2.5 years of this monitoring program effort (May 2005 to December 2007) and assesses the short-term coastal response. Here are the key findings of this report: *Approximately half of the sediment that has been placed in the nearshore dredge-disposal site during the 2.5 years of this study remains within the dredge focus area. *In the winter of 2006-7, large waves transported the dredge-mound material onshore. *High

  15. Marine dredged sediments as new materials resource for road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siham, Kamali; Fabrice, Bernard; Edine, Abriak Nor; Patrick, Degrugilliers

    2008-01-01

    Large volumes of sediments are dredged each year in Europe in order to maintain harbour activities. With the new European Union directives, harbour managers are encouraged to find environmentally sound solutions for these materials. This paper investigates the potential uses of Dunkirk marine dredged sediment as a new material resource for road building. The mineralogical composition of sediments is evaluated using X-ray diffraction and microscopy analysis. Since sediments contain a high amount of water, a dewatering treatment has been used. Different suitable mixtures, checking specific geotechnical criteria as required in French standards, are identified. The mixtures are then optimized for an economical reuse. The mechanical tests conducted on these mixtures are compaction, bearing capacity, compression and tensile tests. The experimental results show the feasibility of the beneficial use of Dunkirk marine dredged sand and sediments as a new material for the construction of foundation and base layers for roads. Further research is now needed to prove the resistance of this new material to various environmental impacts (e.g., frost damage).

  16. Life cycle assessment for dredged sediment placement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew E; Fox-Lent, Cate; Seymour, Linda; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Dredging to maintain navigable waterways is important for supporting trade and economic sustainability. Dredged sediments are removed from the waterways and then must be managed in a way that meets regulatory standards and properly balances management costs and risks. Selection of a best management alternative often results in stakeholder conflict regarding tradeoffs between local environmental impacts associated with less expensive alternatives (e.g., open water placement), more expensive measures that require sediment disposal in constructed facilities far away (e.g., landfills), or beneficial uses that may be perceived as risky (e.g., beach nourishment or island creation). Current sediment-placement decisions often focus on local and immediate environmental effects from the sediment itself, ignoring a variety of distributed and long-term effects from transportation and placement activities. These extended effects have implications for climate change, resource consumption, and environmental and human health, which may be meaningful topics for many stakeholders not currently considered. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a systematic and quantitative method for accounting for this wider range of impacts and benefits across all sediment management project stages and time horizons. This paper applies a cradle-to-use LCA to dredged-sediment placement through a comparative analysis of potential upland, open water, and containment-island placement alternatives in the Long Island Sound region of NY/CT. Results suggest that, in cases dealing with uncontaminated sediments, upland placement may be the most environmentally burdensome alternative, per ton-kilometer of placed material, due to the emissions associated with diesel fuel combustion and electricity production and consumption required for the extra handling and transportation. These results can be traded-off with the ecosystem impacts of the sediments themselves in a decision-making framework. Published by

  17. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  18. 75 FR 54497 - Ocean Dumping; Guam Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    .... SUMMARY: The EPA is designating the Guam Deep Ocean Disposal Site (G- DODS) as a permanent ocean dredged... administration of ocean disposal permits; (2) development and maintenance of a site monitoring program; (3... include: (1) Regulating quantities and types of material to be disposed, including the time, rates, and...

  19. Decontamination and functional reclamation of dredged brackish sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Iannelli, R; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

    2013-07-01

    The continuous stream of sediments, dredged from harbors and waterways for keeping shipping traffic efficiency, is a considerable ongoing problem recognized worldwide. This problem gets worse as most of the sediments dredged from commercial ports and waterways turn out to be polluted by a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. In this study, phytoremediation was explored as a sustainable reclamation technology for turning slightly-polluted brackish dredged sediments into a matrix feasible for productive use. To test this possibility, a phytoremediation experimentation was carried out in containers of about 0.7 m(3) each, filled with brackish dredged sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The sediments were pre-conditioned by adding an agronomic soil (30 % v/v) to improve their clayey granulometric composition, and by topping the mixture with high quality compost (4 kg m(-2)) to favour the initial adaptation of the selected vegetal species. The following plant treatments were tested: (1) Paspalum vaginatum, (2) Phragmites australis, (3) Spartium junceum + P. vaginatum, (4) Nerium oleander + P. vaginatum, (5) Tamarix gallica + P. vaginatum, and (6) unplanted control. Eighteen months after the beginning of the experimentation, all the plant species were found in healthy condition and well developed. Throughout the whole experiment, the monitored biological parameters (total microbial population and dehydrogenase activity) were generally observed as constantly increasing in all the planted sediments more than in the control, pointing out an improvement of the chemico-physical conditions of both microorganisms and plants. The concentration decrease of organic and inorganic contaminants (>35 and 20 %, respectively) in the treatments with plants, particularly in the T. gallica + P. vaginatum, confirmed the importance of the root-microorganism interaction in activating the decontamination processes. Finally, the healthy state of

  20. Characterization of Dredged Sediments from Santander Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, M.; Ibanez, R.; Viguri, J.R.; Irabien, A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the physico- chemical characterisation of Santander Bay (North Spain) inter-tidal sediments, with the determination of levels of selected organic compounds pollution. A sampling strategy has been developed based on characteristic parameters of the study. The physico-chemical seasonal characterisation of sediments has been performed by determination of waster content, Ph, density, humidity, lost on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, and chemical analysis of three categories of organic compounds (VOCs,EOX and PAHs) selected for its ubiquity, persistence and high potential of environmental hazard. The EOX analysis give a picture of the total load of organo halogen compounds in the estuarine area and the VOC and ph values obtained, allow the characterization of sediments in two areas in function of the closeness to the urban and industrial activities

  1. Predicting pollutant concentrations in the water column during dredging operations: Implications for sediment quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Julio Cesar; Wasserman, Maria Angélica V.; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens G.; Almeida, Aline Mansur

    2016-01-01

    The development of new dredging techniques that can reduce, or at least predict, the environmental impacts, is in high demand by governments in developing countries. In the present work, a new methodology was developed, to evaluate the level of metals contamination (i.e. cadmium, lead and zinc) of the water column, during a dredging operation. This methodology was used to evaluate the impacts of the construction of a new maritime terminal in Sepetiba Bay, Brazil. The methodology quantifies the amount of resuspended sediments and calculates the expected contaminants concentrations in the water column. The results indicated that sediment quality criteria were not compatible with water quality criteria, because the dredging of contaminated sediments does not necessarily yield contaminated water. It is suggested that the use of sediment quality criteria for dredging operations might be abandoned, and the methodology presented in this study applied to assess dredging's environmental impacts, predicting water contamination levels. - Graphical abstract: A graphic model showing transference of contaminants from the sediments to the water column. The dark sediment area represents the dredged sediments and the arrows emerging from them represent the resuspended sediments affecting the water column. - Highlights: •Developing countries demand for new dredging projects. •A new model evaluates concentrations of metals in the water, caused by dredging. •The model shows that water and sediment quality criteria are not compatible. •Local hydrodynamics have a strong influence on the contamination of the water. •Management of dredging operations reduces environmental contamination.

  2. A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material, Sediment Tracking, and Sediment Budget Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    geochemical markers such as radioisotopes and stable isotopes, organic matter, and mineralogy/elemental composition are recognized and established methods ...further elucidate the original erosion source of accumulating sediment (Hoefs 2009). 2.3 Radioisotopes Radioisotopic dating is based on measuring the...ER D C TR -1 7- 3 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material

  3. Dredging in Sediments Containing Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welp, Timothy; Follett, George; Crull, Michelle; Pollock, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    .... This report describes the different types of dredges and dredging projects that can encounter MEC, describes how these dredges' operational methodologies can be impacted by MEC, and summarizes past...

  4. Ripening of clayey dredged sediments during temporary upland disposal, A Bioremediation technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Joziasse, J.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Goal. In the Netherlands about 40 million m3 of sediment has to be dredged annually for both maintenance and environmental reasons. Temporary upland disposal is the most widely adopted alternative for dredged sediments worldwide. For good management of temporary disposal sites,

  5. Dredged sediments as a resource for brick production: Possibilities and barriers from a consumers’ perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuyns, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.cappuyns@kuleuven.be; Deweirt, Valentine; Rousseau, Sandra

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Consumers are suspicious towards bricks produced from dredged sediments. • Technical quality, safety and environmental impacts are considered key characteristics. • Public has insufficient knowledge on bricks produced from dredged sediments. • Sensitization and provision of information to customers are of primary importance. - Abstract: A possible solution for the oversupply of dredged sediments is their use as a raw material in brick production. Despite the fact that several examples (e.g., Agostini et al., 2007; Hamer and Karius, 2002; Xu et al., 2014) show that this application is feasible, some economic, technical and social limitations interfere with the development of a market of dredged materials in brick production in Flanders. While we describe the main characteristics of the supply side, we focus on the limitations and barriers from the demand side in the present study. Based on a consumers survey we analyze consumers’ risk perceptions and attitudes towards bricks produced from dredged sediments. Consumers in Flanders are rather suspicious with respect to bricks produced from dredged sediments and their risk perception is mainly determined by the possibility of a bad bargain (brick of inferior quality) and the connotation with chemical contamination. The willingness to pay for bricks made from dredged sediments is mainly influenced by the age of the respondents, as well environmental awareness, and the respondents’ belief in their ability to influence environmental problems. Sensitization and information of customers seems to be of primary importance to make dredged-sediment-derived bricks a successful product.

  6. Dredged sediments as a resource for brick production: Possibilities and barriers from a consumers’ perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappuyns, Valérie; Deweirt, Valentine; Rousseau, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Consumers are suspicious towards bricks produced from dredged sediments. • Technical quality, safety and environmental impacts are considered key characteristics. • Public has insufficient knowledge on bricks produced from dredged sediments. • Sensitization and provision of information to customers are of primary importance. - Abstract: A possible solution for the oversupply of dredged sediments is their use as a raw material in brick production. Despite the fact that several examples (e.g., Agostini et al., 2007; Hamer and Karius, 2002; Xu et al., 2014) show that this application is feasible, some economic, technical and social limitations interfere with the development of a market of dredged materials in brick production in Flanders. While we describe the main characteristics of the supply side, we focus on the limitations and barriers from the demand side in the present study. Based on a consumers survey we analyze consumers’ risk perceptions and attitudes towards bricks produced from dredged sediments. Consumers in Flanders are rather suspicious with respect to bricks produced from dredged sediments and their risk perception is mainly determined by the possibility of a bad bargain (brick of inferior quality) and the connotation with chemical contamination. The willingness to pay for bricks made from dredged sediments is mainly influenced by the age of the respondents, as well environmental awareness, and the respondents’ belief in their ability to influence environmental problems. Sensitization and information of customers seems to be of primary importance to make dredged-sediment-derived bricks a successful product

  7. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  8. The oceanic sediment barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, T.J.G.; Searle, R.C.; Wilson, T.R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Burial within the sediments of the deep ocean floor is one of the options that have been proposed for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. An international research programme is in progress to determine whether oceanic sediments have the requisite properties for this purpose. After summarizing the salient features of this programme, the paper focuses on the Great Meteor East study area in the Northeast Atlantic, where most oceanographic effort has been concentrated. The geological geochemical and geotechnical properties of the sediments in the area are discussed. Measurements designed to determine the rate of pore water movement through the sediment column are described. Our understanding of the chemistry of both the solid and pore-water phases of the sediment are outlined, emphasizing the control that redox conditions have on the mobility of, for example, naturally occurring manganese and uranium. The burial of instrumented free-fall penetrators to depths of 30 m beneath the ocean floor is described, modelling one of the methods by which waste might be emplaced. Finally, the nature of this oceanic environment is compared with geological environments on land and attention is drawn to the gaps in our knowledge that must be filled before oceanic burial can be regarded as an acceptable disposal option. (author)

  9. Dredging and disposal of fine sediments in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M C; de Souza Soares de Almeida, M

    2001-07-30

    Dredging is employed quite frequently in the state of Rio de Janeiro, especially for the installation and upkeep of commercial ports and rehabilitation of the hydraulic section of silted bodies of water. Until recently, all dredged material with no economic use was destined for marine disposal or stored at the edge of the water body. Since the 1990s, however, a new approach has been adopted for dredging as a result of pressure from the environmental organisations, encouraging closer interaction in Rio de Janeiro between the local and state public authorities and the universities on issues relating to licensing of this kind of activity. The recent experiments of the Civil and Ocean Engineering Programs of COPPE-UFRJ (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro) described herein are included in this context. The state of Rio de Janeiro has three bays, several coastal lagoon systems and a number of small and medium sized rivers in or close to urban areas, with a gentle slope as they near the sea. This is, then, a region highly susceptible to silting processes of water bodies, and therefore, to maintenance and/or environmental rehabilitation. As discussed in the article, fine and almost always organic sediments prevail, which is a considerable obstacle to the end disposal and possibility of reuse.

  10. Effects of dredged sediment disposal on the coastal marine macrobenthic assemblage in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Angonesi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the deposition impact of dredged material from Patos lagoon estuary on a benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage structure in an adjacent coastal marine area. Nine sampling stations were chosen at random in the disposal area, and nine others in the same way in an adjacent control area. Samples were collected at a 19 m depth before sediment disposal (11 July 2000, during dredging and disposal operations (25 Oct. 2000, and three months thereafter (24 Aug. 2001. Statistical analysis indicated that sampling periods presented similar characteristics in both the control and disposal sites. Disposal of dredged sediment from Patos lagoon had no detectable detrimental effects upon macrobenthic faunal assemblage at the dumping site. This result is attributed both to adaptation of resident biota to dynamic sedimentary conditions and to the fine estuarine sediment dredged, the dispersion of which in the water column might have minimized sediment deposition and consequent damage to the benthic fauna.

  11. Sediment Engineering thru Dredging and with Nature (SETDWN) - Fate of Fines in the Dredging and Placement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    operations and beach construction perspective, material is lost and a significant percent of fines is winnowed during the dredging and placement...discharged at the beach weather it is from a hopper pumpout, cuttersuction, or hydraulic offloader; experiences similar winnowing processes. The beach...of compliance with in situ percent fines criteria. This same process can be employed for the winnowing of other constituents in mixed sediments as

  12. Experimental Study on the Curing Effect of Dredged Sediments with Three Types of Curing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediment solidification technology is widely used to dispose dredged sediment, three types of curing agents were used in this study to solidified the dredged sediment from shallows in Nantong with three types of curing agents: JY, ZL and FJ. The results showed that the optimal additive amounts of these three curing agents were 140g JY, 16g ZL, 2.0g FJ per 1000g of the dredged sediment respectively, their 28d USC were up to 2.48 MPa, 2.96 MPa and 3.00 MPa. JY has obvious early strength effect, which of FJ is not that obvious, but the later-stage strength of sediment solidified by FJ are relatively higher.

  13. Chemical characterisation of dredged sediments in relation to their potential use in civil engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Tea; Mladenovič, Ana; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2016-04-01

    During capital and/or maintenance dredging operations, large amounts of material are produced. Instead of their discharge, dredged sediments may be a valuable natural resource if not contaminated. One of the possible areas of application is civil engineering. In the present work, the environmental status of seaport dredged sediment was evaluated in order to investigate its potential applicability as a secondary raw material. Sediments were analysed for element concentrations in digested samples, aqueous extracts and fractions from sequential extraction; for fluoride, chloride and sulphate concentrations in aqueous extracts; and for tributyltin (TBT). Granulometric and mineralogical compositions were also analysed. The elemental impact was evaluated by calculation of the enrichment factors. The total element concentrations determined showed moderate contamination of the dredged sediments as was confirmed also by their moderate enrichment factors, presumably as a result of industrial and port activities. Elemental concentrations in the aqueous extract were very low and therefore do not represent any hazard for the environment. The water-soluble element concentrations were under the threshold levels set by the EU Directive on the landfill of waste, on the basis of which the applicability of dredged sediments in civil engineering is evaluated, while the content of chloride and sulphate were above the threshold levels. It was found out that due to the large amounts of sediment available, civil engineering applications such as the construction of embankments and backfilling is the most beneficial recycling solution at present.

  14. Phytoremediation of metals contaminated dredged sediments: Use of synthetic chelates in metals phytoextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahut, C.; Geniaut, G.; Lillo, M. P.

    2003-05-01

    (in Times 10 points) The waterways maintenance leads to a large volume of dredged polluted sediments, to be disposed of, every year. As the economic disposal of dredged sediment is a single line along the stream they can behave as a sink of pollutant and a migration in the environment is observed. Chelate-enhanced phytoremediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of heavy metals from dredged sediment by plants. Lysimeters studies were conducted to study the phytoremediation of sediments with EDTA and lactic acid used as synthetic chelators. EDTA appeared to enhance metal solubility by plant uptake did not increase accordingly. Futhermore EDTA enhance metal leaching which could lead 10 groungwater pollution. To prevent these unwanted side-effects, careful management of phytoremediation and of the use of EDTA seems necessary.

  15. Risk-based decision-making framework for the selection of sediment dredging option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manap, Norpadzlihatun; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a risk-based decision-making framework for the selection of sediment dredging option. Descriptions using case studies of the newly integrated, holistic and staged framework were followed. The first stage utilized the historical dredging monitoring data and the contamination level in media data into Ecological Risk Assessment phases, which have been altered for benefits in cost, time and simplicity. How Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) can be used to analyze and prioritize dredging areas based on environmental, socio-economic and managerial criteria was described for the next stage. The results from MCDA will be integrated into Ecological Risk Assessment to characterize the degree of contamination in the prioritized areas. The last stage was later described using these findings and analyzed using MCDA, in order to identify the best sediment dredging option, accounting for the economic, environmental and technical aspects of dredging, which is beneficial for dredging and sediment management industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity of harbour canal sediments before dredging and after off shore disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Hurk, P.; Eertman, R.H.M.; Stronkhorst, J.

    1997-01-01

    Dredge material from an entrance waterway to the port of Rotterdam and sediments from the North Sea off-shore disposal site were tested for toxicity using three different sediment bioassays, The goals of the study were to evaluate if bioassays generate useful additional information to chemical based

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-polluted dredged peat sediments and earthworms: a mutual interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsackers, H.J.P.; Jonge, de S.; Muijs, B.; Slijkerman, D.; Gestel, van C.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    In lowland areas of the Netherlands, any peat sediments will gradually become enriched with anthropogenically derived Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Due to Dutch policy standards these (anaerobic) sediments are not allowed to be dredged and placed onto land. Under aerobic conditions, however,

  18. Metal uptake by young trees from dredged brackish sediment : Limitations and possibilities for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Jan; Vervaeke, Pieter; de Schrijver, A.; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2004-01-01

    Five tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus L., Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn., Fraxinus excelsior L., Populus alba L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L.) were planted on a mound constructed of dredged sediment. The sediment originated from a brackish river mouth and was slightly polluted with heavy metals. This

  19. United States of America Ocean Dumping Report for Calendar Year 1981. Dredged Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    ocean dumping rules and regulations, F.R. Vol 42 No. 7, 11 Jan 1977 (2) Metals: () esame as above(3) Orga& nics : same as above 1). Other :iiLvs.is: (I...results: (1) Nutrients: Meets chemical - biological testing criteria II (2) Metals: * B 1 t U S(3) Orga! nics : b. Other analyses: (1) Metals: (2...description of dredged material, dredging, and transportation made: a. Description: Silty sand to silty clay noncohesive Hydrogen Sulfide smell. BIDDLE b

  20. A field study on phytoremediation of dredged sediment contaminated by heavy metals and nutrients: the impacts of sediment aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Yang, Lihua; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2014-12-01

    Compared to traditional chemical or physical treatments, phytoremediation has proved to be a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for remediation of contaminated dredged sediment. A field study was conducted in a sediment disposal site predominantly colonized by Typha angustifolia under different sediment moisture conditions to estimate the phytoremediation effects of dredged sediment. The moisture content was 37.30 % and 48.27 % in aerated and waterlogged sediment, respectively. Total nitrogen (TN) content was higher in the waterlogged sediment than in the aerated sediment. The total Cd contents were lower in aerated sediment, which was mainly resulted from the lower exchangeable fraction of Cd. The bioaccumulation of P, Cu and Pb in T. angustifolia was promoted by waterlogging, and the belowground tissue concentrations and accumulation factors (AFs) of Cu were higher than that of other metals, which can be explained by that Cu is an essential micronutrient for plants. Consistent with many previous studies, T. angustifolia showed higher metal levels in roots than in above-ground tissues at both the sediment conditions. Due to the improved biomass produced in the aerated sediment, the removals of nutrients and the metals by plant harvest were higher from aerated sediment than from waterlogged sediment. It was indicated that maintaining the dredged sediment aerated can avoid release risk and plant uptake of metals, while the opposite management option can promote phytoextraction of these contaminants.

  1. Effect of cutter type on sediment pollutants release in channel dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y. R.; Chen, Y.; Dong, M. M.; Yang, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    Dredging activities are often used to maintain existing navigation channels. However’ traditional dredging equipment inevitably leads to sediment resuspension and nutrient loading in water. In this work’ the existing cutter used for dredging was transformed environmentally to reduce the release amount of sediment pollutants’ and to avoid the formation of secondary pollution to water bodies. Simulated tests with a general cutter’ a spiral cutter’ along with a general and spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device were conducted respectively in this study. The change of pollutants concentration in overlying water was examined. The environmental performance of each different structure cutter was comparatively analysed as well. The result revealed that in channel dredging with a spiral cutter’ the release amount of sediment pollutants was less than with a general cutter’ and that a general/spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device could effectively reduce the release amount of sediment contaminants’ particularly the release of the nitrogen nutrient during the 1h after the dredging treatment. The best transformation scheme for a cutter suction dredger (CSD) in its environmental-protection function may be: a spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device.

  2. Simulations of dredged sediment spreading on a Posidonia oceanica meadow off the Ligurian coast, Northwestern Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, M; Cutroneo, L; Ferranti, M P; Budillon, G; Bertolotto, R M; Ciappa, A; Cotroneo, Y; Castellano, M; Povero, P; Tucci, S

    2014-02-15

    The sandy deposits from dredging can have negative effects on the environment such as increase in suspended solids in the water column and their consequent transport. An experimental study was conducted to characterize water masses, dynamics, and sedimentation rates on the Ligurian continental shelf (Italy), where both a sand deposit, that could be used for beach nourishment, and a nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow coexist. The environmental plan provides a mathematical simulation of the sediment-dispersion to evaluate the possible impact on the meadow. It has been calculated that the dredging could double the concentration of suspended particles, but its scheduling will preclude a sediment accumulation. All the information obtained from this work will be used to study the environmental feasibility of the sand deposit exploitation and as starting point for drawing up the monitoring plan in case of dredging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting sedimentation impacts to coral reefs resulting from dredging the Port of Miami, Florida USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret W; Karazsia, Jocelyn; Groves, Carolyn E; Griffin, Sean; Moore, Tom; Wilber, Pace; Gregg, Kurtis

    2016-01-01

    The federal channel at Port of Miami, Florida, USA, was dredged between late 2013 and early 2015 to widen and deepen the channel. Due to the limited spatial extent of impact-assessment monitoring associated with the project, the extent of the dredging impacts on surrounding coral reefs has not been well quantified. Previously published remote sensing analyses, as well as agency and anecdotal reports suggest the most severe and largest area of sedimentation occurred on a coral reef feature referred to as the Inner Reef, particularly in the sector north of the channel. A confounding regional warm-water mass bleaching event followed by a coral disease outbreak during this same time frame made the assessment of dredging-related impacts to coral reefs adjacent to the federal channel difficult but still feasible. The current study sought to better understand the sedimentation impacts that occurred in the coral reef environment surrounding Port of Miami, to distinguish those impacts from other regional events or disturbances, and provide supplemental information on impact assessment that will inform discussions on compensatory mitigation requirements. To this end, in-water field assessments conducted after the completion of dredging and a time series analysis of tagged corals photographed pre-, during, and post-dredging, are used to discern dredging-related sedimentation impacts for the Inner Reef north. Results indicate increased sediment accumulation, severe in certain times and places, and an associated biological response (e.g., higher prevalence of partial mortality of corals) extended up to 700 m from the channel, whereas project-associated monitoring was limited to 50 m from the channel. These results can contribute to more realistic prediction of areas of indirect effect from dredging projects needed to accurately evaluate proposed projects and design appropriate compliance monitoring. Dredging projects near valuable and sensitive habitats subject to local and

  4. Detecting sedimentation impacts to coral reefs resulting from dredging the Port of Miami, Florida USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Miller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The federal channel at Port of Miami, Florida, USA, was dredged between late 2013 and early 2015 to widen and deepen the channel. Due to the limited spatial extent of impact-assessment monitoring associated with the project, the extent of the dredging impacts on surrounding coral reefs has not been well quantified. Previously published remote sensing analyses, as well as agency and anecdotal reports suggest the most severe and largest area of sedimentation occurred on a coral reef feature referred to as the Inner Reef, particularly in the sector north of the channel. A confounding regional warm-water mass bleaching event followed by a coral disease outbreak during this same time frame made the assessment of dredging-related impacts to coral reefs adjacent to the federal channel difficult but still feasible. The current study sought to better understand the sedimentation impacts that occurred in the coral reef environment surrounding Port of Miami, to distinguish those impacts from other regional events or disturbances, and provide supplemental information on impact assessment that will inform discussions on compensatory mitigation requirements. To this end, in-water field assessments conducted after the completion of dredging and a time series analysis of tagged corals photographed pre-, during, and post-dredging, are used to discern dredging-related sedimentation impacts for the Inner Reef north. Results indicate increased sediment accumulation, severe in certain times and places, and an associated biological response (e.g., higher prevalence of partial mortality of corals extended up to 700 m from the channel, whereas project-associated monitoring was limited to 50 m from the channel. These results can contribute to more realistic prediction of areas of indirect effect from dredging projects needed to accurately evaluate proposed projects and design appropriate compliance monitoring. Dredging projects near valuable and sensitive habitats

  5. Application of Long Distance Conveyance (LDC) of Dredged Sediments to Louisiana Coastal Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    generally use some type of bucket for digging the sediment, then hoist or boom the load to the surface. Most common hydraulic methods use a centrifugal...sediment. The loaded bucket is hoisted to the surface and side dumped into a transportation unit, or into the disposal site. Transportation units are...Conveyance (LDC) of Dredged Sediments to Louisiana Coastal Restoration Timothy Welp Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research

  6. PTM Modeling of Dredged Suspended Sediment at Proposed Polaris Point and Ship Repair Facility CVN Berthing Sites - Apra Harbor, Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    sedimentation outside of the channel footprint. For example, dredging near the edge of the footprint can be confined to time periods when tidal currents...Cases 1 or 2 due to the lower loss rate. Sedimentation rates outside the channel prism are further reduced because all sediment is introduced in the...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 16 PTM Modeling of Dredged Suspended Sediment at Proposed Polaris Point and Ship Repair Facility CVN Berthing

  7. Evaluation of the boundary condition influence on PAH concentrations in the water column during the sediment dredging of a port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, L; Castellano, M; Carbone, C; Consani, S; Gaino, F; Tucci, S; Magrì, S; Povero, P; Bertolotto, R M; Canepa, G; Capello, M

    2015-12-30

    The mobilisation of sediments and related contaminants connected to dredging activities is one of the most critical issues to the environmental risk and exposure assessment of a dredging project. The aim of this paper was an investigation of the mobilisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to the dredging of the Port of Genoa (Italy) to identify the temporal and spatial extent of the contaminant transport, and the influence of the dredging and the boundary conditions on it. The results showed relatively low background PAH concentrations in the water column and confirmed the dredging as the primary rising factor of concentrations in the water column, but also showed a complex scenario in which the different environmental and dredging factors forced the concentrations at different levels and moments. The post dredging phase showed PAH values close to the background conditions and the concentrations remained relatively high only for a few PAHs.

  8. Technical Guidelines for Environmental Dredging of Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    material from barges to adjacent rehandling facilities or to move material relatively short distances. Conveyors can also be used to transfer ...by direct dumping or unloading into a chute or conveyor . Truck transport of treated material to landfills may also be considered. The material...environmental dredging for purposes of a feasibility study, remedial design , and implementation. The scope of this document is limited to the technical

  9. Phytoremediation as a management option for contaminated sediments in tidal marshes, flood control areas and dredged sediment landfill sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Valérie; Seuntjens, Piet; Dejonghe, Winnie; Lacherez, Sophie; Thuy, Hoang Thi Thanh; Vandecasteele, Bart

    2009-11-01

    Polluted sediments in rivers may be transported by the river to the sea, spread over river banks and tidal marshes or managed, i.e. actively dredged and disposed of on land. Once sedimented on tidal marshes, alluvial areas or control flood areas, the polluted sediments enter semi-terrestrial ecosystems or agro-ecosystems and may pose a risk. Disposal of polluted dredged sediments on land may also lead to certain risks. Up to a few years ago, contaminated dredged sediments were placed in confined disposal facilities. The European policy encourages sediment valorisation and this will be a technological challenge for the near future. Currently, contaminated dredged sediments are often not valorisable due to their high content of contaminants and their consequent hazardous properties. In addition, it is generally admitted that treatment and re-use of heavily contaminated dredged sediments is not a cost-effective alternative to confined disposal. For contaminated sediments and associated disposal facilities used in the past, a realistic, low cost, safe, ecologically sound and sustainable management option is required. In this context, phytoremediation is proposed in the literature as a management option. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge on management, (phyto)remediation and associated risks in the particular case of sediments contaminated with organic and inorganic pollutants. This paper deals with the following features: (1) management and remediation of contaminated sediments and associated risk assessment; (2) management options for ecosystems on polluted sediments, based on phytoremediation of contaminated sediments with focus on phytoextraction, phytostabilisation and phytoremediation of organic pollutants and (3) microbial and mycorrhizal processes occurring in contaminated sediments during phytoremediation. In this review, an overview is given of phytoremediation as a management option for semi-terrestrial and terrestrial ecosystems

  10. Dredging effects on selected nutrient concentrations and ecoenzymatic activity in two drainage ditch sediments in the lower Mississippi River Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Moore

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural drainage ditches are conduits between production acreage and receiving aquatic systems. Often overlooked for their mitigation capabilities, agricultural drainage ditches provide an important role for nutrient transformation via microbial metabolism. Variations in ecoenzyme activities have been used to elucidate microbial metabolism and resource demand of microbial communities to better understand the relationship between altered nutrient ratios and microbial activity in aquatic ecosystems. Two agricultural drainage ditches, one in the northeast portion of the Arkansas Delta and the other in the lower Mississippi Delta, were monitored for a year. Sediment samples were collected prior to each ditch being dredged (cleaned, and subsequent post-dredging samples occurred as soon as access was available. Seasonal samples were then collected throughout a year to examine effects of dredging on selected nutrient concentrations and ecoenzymatic activity recovery in drainage ditch sediments. Phosphorus concentrations in sediments after dredging decreased 33–66%, depending on ditch and phosphorus extraction methodology. Additionally, ecoenzymatic activity was significantly decreased in most sediment samples after dredging. Fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis activity, an estimate of total microbial activity, decreased 56–67% after dredging in one of the two ditches. Many sample sites also had significant phosphorus and ecoenzymatic activity differences between the post-dredge samples and the year-long follow-up samples. Results indicate microbial metabolism in dredged drainage ditches may take up to a year or more to recover to pre-dredged levels. Likewise, while sediment nutrient concentrations may be decreased through dredging and removal, runoff and erosion events over time tend to quickly replenish nutrient concentrations in replaced sediments. Understanding nutrient dynamics and microbial metabolism within agricultural drainage ditches is

  11. Changing contaminant mobility in a dredged canal sediment during a three-year phytoremediation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Rosalind F.; Royle, Anna; Putwain, Philip D.; Dickinson, Nicholas M.

    2006-01-01

    Metal mobility and degradation of organic pollutants were investigated in a contaminated canal sediment in NW England. Sediment was dredged and exposed above the water surface, planted with multiple taxa of Salix, Populus and Alnus and monitored over 32 months. Short-term metal fractionation and phytotoxicity during sediment oxidation were also evaluated in separate laboratory studies. Zinc and Pb redistributed into more mobile fractions, which increased toxicity of the sediment to plants in the laboratory. In contrast, at the canal site, mobility of most elements decreased and total concentrations of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd fell. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations decreased, but the tree-planted treatments appeared less effective at reducing PAH concentrations than treatments colonised by invasive plants. Tree survivorship decreased over time, suggesting increasing phytotoxicity of the exposed sediment in the longer term. Trees provided little benefit in terms of sediment remediation. Options for future management of the sediment are evaluated. - Highly mobilised and toxic metals in a dredged canal sediment provided unexpected responses in a phytoremediation trial

  12. Sediment and turbidity associated with offshore dredging increase coral disease prevalence on nearby reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, F Joseph; Lamb, Joleah B; Field, Stuart N; Heron, Scott F; Schaffelke, Britta; Shedrawi, George; Bourne, David G; Willis, Bette L

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, coral reef ecosystems have declined to the extent that reefs are now threatened globally. While many water quality parameters have been proposed to contribute to reef declines, little evidence exists conclusively linking specific water quality parameters with increased disease prevalence in situ. Here we report evidence from in situ coral health surveys confirming that chronic exposure to dredging-associated sediment plumes significantly increase the prevalence of white syndromes, a devastating group of globally important coral diseases. Coral health surveys were conducted along a dredging-associated sediment plume gradient to assess the relationship between sedimentation, turbidity and coral health. Reefs exposed to the highest number of days under the sediment plume (296 to 347 days) had two-fold higher levels of disease, largely driven by a 2.5-fold increase in white syndromes, and a six-fold increase in other signs of compromised coral health relative to reefs with little or no plume exposure (0 to 9 days). Multivariate modeling and ordination incorporating sediment exposure level, coral community composition and cover, predation and multiple thermal stress indices provided further confirmation that sediment plume exposure level was the main driver of elevated disease and other compromised coral health indicators. This study provides the first evidence linking dredging-associated sedimentation and turbidity with elevated coral disease prevalence in situ. Our results may help to explain observed increases in global coral disease prevalence in recent decades and suggest that minimizing sedimentation and turbidity associated with coastal development will provide an important management tool for controlling coral disease epizootics.

  13. Evolution of mud-capped dredge pits following excavation: sediment trapping and slope instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obelcz, J.; Xu, K.; Bentley, S. J.; Li, C.; Miner, M. D.; O'Connor, M. C.; Wang, J.

    2016-02-01

    Many fluvial channels incised the Northern Gulf of Mexico inner continental shelf during the late Quaternary. Mud-capped dredge pits (MCDPs), which are generally elongate and deep (8-10 m) excavations, target sandy fluvial channel deposits for coastal restoration projects. The morphological evolution of dredge excavations in noncohesive sandy substrate is well studied, but MCDPs have up to a several-meter-thick veneer of Holocene shelf mud overlying sandy channel deposits. This stratigraphy is hypothesized to result in more complex post-dredge morphology than pit walls simply slumping to the angle of repose shortly after excavation. Numerical modeling of MCDP post-dredge response conducted prior to excavation indicates pit walls may retrogressively fail, which is accounted for in pit design by assigning no-dredge setback buffers from pipelines or cultural and environmental resources. To validate model results and test effectiveness of setback buffers, a geophysical survey of the Sandy Point MCDP (20 km west of the Mississippi River Delta in 10m deep water), where 1.7 million m3 of sandy sediment was excavated in 2012, was conducted May 2015. A total of 84 line-km of high-resolution chirp subbottom and a 27 km2 grid of swath bathymetry and sidescan sonar were collected. The data indicate the dredge pit walls are differentially slumping, with the western pit wall in a more active state of failure than the eastern wall. The western failures morphologically resemble features observed along the muddy Mississippi River Delta Front at water depths of 20-100 m, including bowl-shaped collapse failures and retrogressive stair-stepped slumps; these failures may play a key role in evaluating the distance of setback buffer zone to pipelines. These features indicate the cohesive mud overlying the sandy infill has a prominent role in pit wall stability. A 0.5-1 m thick acoustically transparent package overlies the entire pit floor (interpreted as a possible fluid mud layer

  14. Draft Site Management and Monitoring Plan for Corpus Christi Maintenance and New Work Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    USEPA Region 6 and the US Army Corps of Engineers submit for public comment the Draft Site Management and Monitoring Plan for Corpus Christi Maintenance and New Work Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site

  15. Quantifying Sediment Characteristics and Infilling Rate within a Ship Shoal Dredge Borrow Area, Offshore Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Z.; Wilson, C.; Bentley, S. J.; Xu, K.; Liu, H.; Li, C.; Miner, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier islands provide protection to interior wetlands and maintain estuarine gradients. Mississippi River delta plain barrier islands are undergoing rapid disintegration due to high rates of subsidence and a deficit in the coastal sand supply. To mitigate for barrier island land loss, Louisiana has implemented a restoration program that intends to supplement coastal sand deficits by introducing sand from outside of the active coastal system. Inner-shelf shoals offshore Louisiana are one of the only sand resource options containing large volumes of restoration quality sand. Ship Shoal is one of these inner-shelf shoals that was produced by marine reworking of former Mississippi River Delta barrier island sediments during late Holocene time. Though indirect effects to protected areas or infrastructure adjacent to excavations have been considered, there is a paucity of observational data on their evolution. Caminada borrow area, dredged in 2013-2016 for the Caminada Headland Restoration Project, provides a valuable opportunity to validate and improve predictive models for how borrow areas evolve. In July 2017, a subbottom and bathymetric geophysical survey was conducted and sediment cores were collected to test the hypothesis that sedimentation within the excavation is affected by lateral bedload transport after initial rapid infill as slopes equilibrate. Preliminary results show the sediment within the excavation is predominantly very fine sand with isolated mud drapes. These sediments overlay older delta complex muddy strata. This contrasts strongly with other dredge pits outside of shoal areas and closer to shore, which have been infilled largely by advection of fine suspended sediments of fluvial origin. Laboratory work on cores will include laser grain size, x-ray analyses of sedimentary structures, and radiochemistry analyses for rates and age of deposition. With the knowledge of stratigraphy and sediment dynamics surrounding the dredge pit, we can quantify

  16. Investigation of sediment transport and optimization of dredging operations in Indian ports using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    India has a long coastline of about 7,515 km and there are twelve major ports situated on the coastline. Out of them, six are situated on the West Coast whereas other six are situated on the East Coast. In addition to this, there are more than 140 minor ports and other marine establishments situated along the coastline. Each port and marine project has a navigation channel and depth of this navigation channel needs to be maintained to a level of at least 12-15 meters for smooth sailing of ships. Sediments continuously move along the coast due to alongshore currents generated by the waves and tides; and get deposited in navigation channels. For maintaining the required depth of the channels, the dredging operation is carried out. throughout the year or as and when required. Development of a new port or harbour also involves huge capital dredging. The dredged sediments generated during maintenance or capital dredging needs to be dumped at a suitable location, so that it does not find its way back to the channel and obstruct sailing of ships. Moreover the selected site should be such that the turn around time of the dredger is kept minimum to economize the dredging operation. In order to meet the above requirements, the knowledge of transport parameters such as the general direction of movement, extent of lateral and longitudinal movement, transport velocity, transport thickness and bed load movement rate is required. Radiotracer techniques are commonly used to investigate sediment transport on seabed and evaluate the suitability of the proposed dumping sites. Scandium-46 (half-life: 84 days, Gamma energies: 0.89 MeV (100%), 1.12 MeV (100%)) in the form of scandium glass powder is the most suitable radiotracer for tracing sediments on seabed. The activity used in an investigation ranges from 75-300 GBq (2-8 Ci). The suitably prepared particulate radiotracer is injected on seabed at the proposed site using a specially designed injection system and its movement is

  17. Stabilization / solidification of polluted marine dredged sediment of port en Bessin France, using hydraulic binders and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silitonga, Ernesto

    2017-09-01

    A large amount of sediment is dredged in France every year. Due to the increase of the amount of marine dredged sediments, environmentally reuse of dredged sediment is urgently needed in France. The first objective of this study is to find an application for reuse of marine dredged sediments materials, as new material for road construction. Hence, serial tests need to be realized to identify if marine dredged sediment could be utilized for road construction. The second goal is to enhance the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of the mix, by incorporating binders and sediments, and revealed the identification of the mechanical characteristics measured on the mixes is compatible with their use as a base course material. The results show that the treatment by hydraulics binders could satisfy the needed mechanical characteristics. The present of Silica Fume is aimed to reduce the pollution level, especially the heavy metal content. However, the proportion of hydraulics binders and silica fume needed to meet prescribed specification is important, so the reuse of the marine dredged sediments of Port-en-Bessin, France in road construction, as an alternative material could be achieved. After the geotechnical study in laboratory results shown as expected than the study to identify the chemical characteristic realized. To evaluate the environmental impacts of the used material, leaching test is performed. The leaching test was performed to verify the predicted release of pollutants based on total dissolution. And for the final part, the test results show that the polluted marine dredged sediments could be safely used (in term of environmental impact) as a new material in road construction.

  18. Spreading of sediment due to underwater blasting and dredging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Bach, Lis; Bollwerk, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    out in connection with the construction of a new quay at the existing harbour of Sisimiut, Greenland. Subsequent to the largest of a series of underwater blasts, the distribution of suspended sediment in the water column at and around the construction site was observed using a CTD (Conductivity...

  19. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect our environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions.

  20. [Calculation of environmental dredging depth of heavy sediments in Zhushan Bay of Taihu Lake metal polluted].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Wang, Wen-Wen; Wang, Shu-Hang; Jin, Xiang-Can

    2012-04-01

    Horizontal distribution of heavy metals in surface sediments of Zhushan Bay was investigated, and core sediment samples were collected in the representative area. Core sediments were divided into oxide layer (A), polluted layer (B), upper polluted transition layer(C1), lower polluted transition layer(C2) and normal mud layer(D) from top to bottom. The change of total contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb and contents of biological available Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb with depths were analyzed. Ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments was done by potential ecological risk index method. At last, environmental dredging depth was calculated. The results shows that the contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb are 30.56-216.58, 24.07-59.95, 16.71-140.30, 84.31-193.43, 3.39-22.30, 0.37-1.59, 0.00-0.80 and 9.67-99.35 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The average concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb are 79.74, 37.74, 44.83, 122.39, 10.39, 0.77, 0.14 and 40.08 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals in the surface sediments of Zhushan Bay mainly distribute in the west bank and the estuaries of Taige canal, Yincun Port, and Huanshan River,and Cd pollution is relatively serious. There is an accumulative effect of heavy metals in Zhushan Bay, and the contents of biological available metals decrease with depths. Ecological risk grades of Cd in layer A and B are high, and the comprehensive potential ecological risk grades of each layer are in middle or low. The environmental dredging layers are A and B, and the average dredging depth is 0.39 m.

  1. Metal availability in a highly contaminated, dredged-sediment disposal site: field measurements and geochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lions, Julie; Guérin, Valérie; Bataillard, Philippe; van der Lee, Jan; Laboudigue, Agnès

    2010-09-01

    Two complementary approaches were used to characterize arsenic and metal mobilizations from a dredged-sediment disposal site: a detailed field study combined with hydrogeochemical modeling. Contaminants in sediments were found to be mainly present as sulfides subject to oxidation. Secondary phases (carbonates, sulfates, (hydr)oxides) were also observed. Oxidative processes occurred at different rates depending on physicochemical conditions and contaminant contents in the sediment. Two distinct areas were identified on the site, each corresponding to a specific contaminant mobility behavior. In a reducing area, Fe and As were highly soluble and illustrated anoxic behavior. In well-oxygenated material, groundwater was highly contaminated in Zn, Cd and Pb. A third zone in which sediments and groundwater were less contaminated was also characterized. This study enabled us to prioritize remediation work, which should aim to limit infiltration and long-term environmental impact. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predicting dredging-associated effects to coral reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam - Part 1: Sediment exposure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailani, Joseph Z; Lackey, Tahirih C; King, David B; Bryant, Duncan; Kim, Sung-Chan; Shafer, Deborah J

    2016-03-01

    Model studies were conducted to investigate the potential coral reef sediment exposure from dredging associated with proposed development of a deepwater wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam. The Particle Tracking Model (PTM) was applied to quantify the exposure of coral reefs to material suspended by the dredging operations at two alternative sites. Key PTM features include the flexible capability of continuous multiple releases of sediment parcels, control of parcel/substrate interaction, and the ability to efficiently track vast numbers of parcels. This flexibility has facilitated simulating the combined effects of sediment released from clamshell dredging and chiseling within Apra Harbor. Because the rate of material released into the water column by some of the processes is not well understood or known a priori, the modeling approach was to bracket parameters within reasonable ranges to produce a suite of potential results from multiple model runs. Sensitivity analysis to model parameters is used to select the appropriate parameter values for bracketing. Data analysis results include mapping the time series and the maximum values of sedimentation, suspended sediment concentration, and deposition rate. Data were used to quantify various exposure processes that affect coral species in Apra Harbor. The goal of this research is to develop a robust methodology for quantifying and bracketing exposure mechanisms to coral (or other receptors) from dredging operations. These exposure values were utilized in an ecological assessment to predict effects (coral reef impacts) from various dredging scenarios. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ecotoxicological risk assessment linked to infilling quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrodin, Yves, E-mail: perrodin@entpe.fr [Universite de Lyon, ENTPE, CNRS, UMR 5023 LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Donguy, Gilles [Universite de Lyon, ENTPE, CNRS, UMR 5023 LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Bazin, Christine [INSAVALOR, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Volatier, Laurence; Durrieu, Claude [Universite de Lyon, ENTPE, CNRS, UMR 5023 LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain [Universite de Lyon, ENTPE, CNRS, UMR 5023 LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); INRA, USC IGH, UMR LEHNA, 2, rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Abdelghafour, Mohammed; Moretto, Robert [INSAVALOR, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2012-08-01

    The dredged sediments of polluted seaports now raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. This results in the need to manage them on land, raising other types of technical, economic and environmental problems. Regarding the technical and economic dimensions, traditional waste treatment methods have proved to be poorly adapted, due to very high costs and low absorbable volumes. In this context, filling quarries in coastal areas with treated sediments could represent an interesting alternative for these materials. Nevertheless, for the environmental dimension, it is necessary to demonstrate that this possibility is harmless to inland ecosystems. Consequently, a specific ecotoxicological risk assessment methodology has been formulated and tested on three sediments taken from seaboards of France, in view to providing an operational and usable tool for the prior validation of any operation to fill quarries with treated seaport sediments. This method incorporates the formulation of a global conceptual model of the scenario studied and the definition of protocols for each of its steps: the characterisation of exposures (based on a simulation of sediment deposit), the characterisation of effects (via the study of sediments ecotoxicity), and the final ecotoxicological risk assessment performed as a calculation of a risk quotient. It includes the implementation in parallel of two types of complementary approach: the 'substances' approach derived from the European methodology for assessing new substances placed on the market, and the 'matrix' approach which is similar to methods developed in France to assess ecological risks in other domains (waste management, polluted site management, Horizontal-Ellipsis ). The application of this dual approach to the three sediments tested led to conclude with reliability that the project to deposit sediments '1' and '2' presented a low risk for

  4. Ecotoxicological risk assessment linked to infilling quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Bazin, Christine; Volatier, Laurence; Durrieu, Claude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain; Abdelghafour, Mohammed; Moretto, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The dredged sediments of polluted seaports now raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. This results in the need to manage them on land, raising other types of technical, economic and environmental problems. Regarding the technical and economic dimensions, traditional waste treatment methods have proved to be poorly adapted, due to very high costs and low absorbable volumes. In this context, filling quarries in coastal areas with treated sediments could represent an interesting alternative for these materials. Nevertheless, for the environmental dimension, it is necessary to demonstrate that this possibility is harmless to inland ecosystems. Consequently, a specific ecotoxicological risk assessment methodology has been formulated and tested on three sediments taken from seaboards of France, in view to providing an operational and usable tool for the prior validation of any operation to fill quarries with treated seaport sediments. This method incorporates the formulation of a global conceptual model of the scenario studied and the definition of protocols for each of its steps: the characterisation of exposures (based on a simulation of sediment deposit), the characterisation of effects (via the study of sediments ecotoxicity), and the final ecotoxicological risk assessment performed as a calculation of a risk quotient. It includes the implementation in parallel of two types of complementary approach: the “substances” approach derived from the European methodology for assessing new substances placed on the market, and the “matrix” approach which is similar to methods developed in France to assess ecological risks in other domains (waste management, polluted site management, …). The application of this dual approach to the three sediments tested led to conclude with reliability that the project to deposit sediments “1” and “2” presented a low risk for the peripheral aquatic ecosystems while

  5. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J A; Word, J Q; Pinza, M R; Mayhew, H L; Barrows, E S; Lefkovitz, L F [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to determine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and three control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged- sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals,, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described in the Draft Implementation manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) test using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredged-sediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaete worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged from 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. Nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments. This report contains the data and test results.

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to determine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and three control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged- sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals,, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described in the Draft Implementation manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) test using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredged-sediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaete worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged from 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. Nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments. This report contains the data and test results

  7. Assessment of sediment quality in dredged and undredged areas of the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River, Michigan USA, using the sediment quality triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Giesy, John P.; Kubitz, Jody A.; Verbrugge, David A.; Coon, Thomas G.; Braselton, W. Emmett

    1996-01-01

    The “sediment quality triad” approach was used to assess the effects of dredging on the sediment quality of a new marina in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River, and to evaluate spatial and temporal variation in sediment quality in the Trenton Channel. Samples were collected in November of 1993 (10 months after dredging) and characterized by chemical analysis, sediment bioassays, and assessment of benthic invertebrate communities. The three study components indicated little difference in sediment quality at dredged sites in the marina relative to nearby areas in the Trenton Channel, and little change in sediment quality of Trenton Channel sites relative to conditions reported in the mid-1980s. These results suggest that improvement in sediment quality in the Trenton Channel, due to dredging or natural processes, will depend on elimination of sediment “hot spots” and other upstream contaminant sources. Concentrations of chemical contaminants, especially metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, exceeded concentrations associated with effects on biota and were significantly correlated with results of sediment bioassays and characteristics of benthic communities. Laboratory sediment bioassays with Hyalella azteca andChironomus tentans produced better discrimination among sites with differing degrees of contamination than did characterization of benthic communities, which were dominated by oligochaetes at all sites in the marina and the Trenton Channel.

  8. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Vera; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume), and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume). Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  9. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Van Lancker

    Full Text Available As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume, and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume. Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  10. Combining trace elements micro-analysis in deposited dredged sediments: EPMA and μ-XRF analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poitevin, A; Lerouge, C; Wille, G; Bataillard, P; Quinn, P; Hennet, L

    2012-01-01

    Since deposited dredged sediments are rich in metallic contaminants, they present a risk for environment. This work aims to study dredged sediments chemical composition, identify metal-carrier minerals and understand their mobility. Combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques at multi-scale for an integrative approach of trace elements (zinc, lead, iron) behaviour is therefore necessary. The global mineralogy and the chemistry of the sediment were determined by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence (XRF), respectively. Zn and Pb enriched fractions were separated using a sequential chemical extraction procedure and measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectroscopy. Microanalyses using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe microanalysis (EPMA), combined with synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) were carried out to characterize mineralogical phases and identify Zn and Pb carrier minerals. Iron oxyhydroxides and iron sulphides were consistently identify as Zn and Pb carriers. The assumption that carbonate fraction was the major Zn carried phase, as demonstrated by chemical extraction results, was not verified by EPMA or μ-XRF.

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

  12. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 2, Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

  13. Health risk assessment linked to filling coastal quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrodin, Yves, E-mail: yves.perrodin@entpe.fr [Université de Lyon, ENTPE, UMR CNRS 5023, Laboratoire LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Donguy, Gilles [Université de Lyon, ENTPE, UMR CNRS 5023, Laboratoire LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Emmanuel, Evens [Laboratoire de Qualité de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Université Quisqueya, BP 796 Port-au-Prince (Haiti); Winiarski, Thierry [Université de Lyon, ENTPE, UMR CNRS 5023, Laboratoire LEHNA, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France)

    2014-07-01

    Dredged seaport sediments raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. Traditional waste treatments are poorly adapted for these materials in terms of absorbable volumes and cost. In this context, filling quarries with treated sediments appears interesting but its safety regarding human health must be demonstrated. To achieve this, a specific methodology for assessing health risks has been developed and tested on three seaport sediments. This methodology includes the development of a conceptual model of the global scenario studied and the definition of specific protocols for each of its major steps. The approach proposed includes in particular the use of metrological and experimental tools that are new in this context: (i) an experimental lysimeter for characterizing the deposit emissions, and (ii) a geological radar for identifying potential preferential pathways between the sediment deposit and the groundwater. The application of this approach on the three sediments tested for the scenario studied showed the absence of health risk associated with the consumption of groundwater for substances having a “threshold effect” (risk quotient < 1), and an acceptable risk for substances having a “non-threshold effect”, with the notable exception of arsenic (individual risk equal to 3.10{sup −6}). - Highlights: • The release of polluted dredged seaport sediments into the sea must be avoided. • Their use after treatment for the filling-up of quarries is proposed by managers. • An original health risk assessment methodology was created to validate this option. • It includes the use of a lysimeter and a georadar for the exposure assessment stage. • The example studied concludes to a health risk linked to arsenic in the groundwater.

  14. Health risk assessment linked to filling coastal quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Emmanuel, Evens; Winiarski, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Dredged seaport sediments raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. Traditional waste treatments are poorly adapted for these materials in terms of absorbable volumes and cost. In this context, filling quarries with treated sediments appears interesting but its safety regarding human health must be demonstrated. To achieve this, a specific methodology for assessing health risks has been developed and tested on three seaport sediments. This methodology includes the development of a conceptual model of the global scenario studied and the definition of specific protocols for each of its major steps. The approach proposed includes in particular the use of metrological and experimental tools that are new in this context: (i) an experimental lysimeter for characterizing the deposit emissions, and (ii) a geological radar for identifying potential preferential pathways between the sediment deposit and the groundwater. The application of this approach on the three sediments tested for the scenario studied showed the absence of health risk associated with the consumption of groundwater for substances having a “threshold effect” (risk quotient −6 ). - Highlights: • The release of polluted dredged seaport sediments into the sea must be avoided. • Their use after treatment for the filling-up of quarries is proposed by managers. • An original health risk assessment methodology was created to validate this option. • It includes the use of a lysimeter and a georadar for the exposure assessment stage. • The example studied concludes to a health risk linked to arsenic in the groundwater

  15. A combination of bioleaching and bioprecipitation for deep removal of contaminating metals from dredged sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Di, E-mail: dfang@ouc.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Ruichang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Zhou Lixiang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Li Jie [Department of Environmental Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Bioleaching-bioprecipitation can deeply cleanup sediment-borne metal contaminants. {yields} Bioleaching results in a sufficient solubilisation of sediment-borne metals. {yields} Bioprecipitation removes most of solubilised metals from sediment leachate at pH 3.7. {yields} Bioremoval of soluble Zn, Cu and Cr is due to the formation of ZnS, Cu{sub 2}S and CrOOH. {yields} Alkalization of bioleached sediment by Ca(OH){sub 2} excludes the risk of re-acidification. - Abstract: A linked microbial process comprising bioleaching with sulfate-oxidizing bacteria and bioprecipitation with sulfate-reducing bacteria operating sequentially was investigated to deeply remove contaminating metals from dredged sediment. The results showed that sediment bioleaching resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH {approx}7.6 to pH {approx}2.5 within 10-20 days, approximately 65% of the main heavy metals present (Zn + Cu + Cr) were solubilized, and most of the unsolubilized metals existed in residual form of sediment. The acidic leachate that resulted from sediment bioleaching was efficiently stripped of metal sulfates using a bioprecipitation reactor when challenged with influent as low as pH {approx}3.7. More than 99% of Zn{sup 2+}, 99% of Cu{sup 2+} and 90% of Cr{sup 3+} were removed from the leachate, respectively, due to the formation of ZnS, Cu{sub 2}S and CrOOH precipitates, as confirmed by SEM-EDS and XRD detection. It was also found that alkalization of bioleached sediment using Ca(OH){sub 2} excluded the risk of sediment re-acidification. The ability of the combined process developed in this study to deeply remove heavy metals in insoluble sulfides or hydroxides forms makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of different types of metal contaminants.

  16. A combination of bioleaching and bioprecipitation for deep removal of contaminating metals from dredged sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Di; Zhang Ruichang; Zhou Lixiang; Li Jie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Bioleaching-bioprecipitation can deeply cleanup sediment-borne metal contaminants. → Bioleaching results in a sufficient solubilisation of sediment-borne metals. → Bioprecipitation removes most of solubilised metals from sediment leachate at pH 3.7. → Bioremoval of soluble Zn, Cu and Cr is due to the formation of ZnS, Cu 2 S and CrOOH. → Alkalization of bioleached sediment by Ca(OH) 2 excludes the risk of re-acidification. - Abstract: A linked microbial process comprising bioleaching with sulfate-oxidizing bacteria and bioprecipitation with sulfate-reducing bacteria operating sequentially was investigated to deeply remove contaminating metals from dredged sediment. The results showed that sediment bioleaching resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH ∼7.6 to pH ∼2.5 within 10-20 days, approximately 65% of the main heavy metals present (Zn + Cu + Cr) were solubilized, and most of the unsolubilized metals existed in residual form of sediment. The acidic leachate that resulted from sediment bioleaching was efficiently stripped of metal sulfates using a bioprecipitation reactor when challenged with influent as low as pH ∼3.7. More than 99% of Zn 2+ , 99% of Cu 2+ and 90% of Cr 3+ were removed from the leachate, respectively, due to the formation of ZnS, Cu 2 S and CrOOH precipitates, as confirmed by SEM-EDS and XRD detection. It was also found that alkalization of bioleached sediment using Ca(OH) 2 excluded the risk of sediment re-acidification. The ability of the combined process developed in this study to deeply remove heavy metals in insoluble sulfides or hydroxides forms makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of different types of metal contaminants.

  17. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from the nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from US waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect the environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions. The handling of contaminated sediments in the Port of New York/New Jersey (Port) exemplifies this problem. This paper describes a multicultural team that has formed as the result of a Congressional mandate for the development of procedures suitable for the decontamination of sediments in the Port under the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1992 (Section 405C) and 1996 (Section 226).

  18. Zinc and cadmium mobility in a 5-year-old dredged sediment deposit: experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lions, J. [BRGM, Orleans (France). Water Div.; Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, Douai (France); Lee, J. van der [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau (France). Geosciences - Reactive Hydrodynamics Group; Guerin, V.; Bataillard, P. [BRGM, Orleans (France). Environment and Process Div.; Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, Douai (France); Laboudigue, A. [Ecole des Mines de Douai (France). Environmental and Civil Engineering; Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, Douai (France)

    2007-08-15

    Background. Landfill deposits of contaminated, dredged sediments are subject to chemical alteration and especially to oxidation processes. Accordingly, sulphides are gradually oxidized leading to the formation of secondary phases and associated metals could become mobile and redistributed among the sediment components, such as carbonates, clay and freshly precipitated (hydr)oxides. Once mobilised, metals could represent a hazard for the environment and especially for drinking water supply facilities. Methods. In the present study, leaching experiments have been carried out on a dredged sediment to study metal mobilisation after 5 years of field aging. First, kinetic batch tests allowed one to evaluate the impact of solid-liquid contact time and to determine the kinetic parameters. Secondly, two types of dynamic experiments have been conducted: dynamic flush reactor and column leach test to evaluate the impact of solution renewing by excluding or not excluding the transport processes, respectively. In order to evaluate the impact of calcium on the metal mobilisation, the column leaching test is conducted with pure water and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution, at the beginning and at the end of the injection, respectively. Geochemical and reactive transport modelling of the experiments was performed using the geochemical code CHESS and the reactive transport model HYTEC. Results and Discussion. The studied sediment is complex with numerous reactive phases such as sulphides, (hydr)oxides, organic matter, phyllosilicates. All leaching tests highlight that zinc and cadmium are mobilised in significant concentrations and lead remains insoluble. A conceptual geochemical model of the sediment has been built to allow simulations of the whole experiments, based on a single, coherent phase description and parameter set. Simulations of the batch, flush and column experiments were performed taking into account the major reaction-controlling mechanisms including, among others, p

  19. Biochemical ripening of dredged sediments. Part 2. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and total petroleum hydorcarbons in slurried and consolidated sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.; Gool, van M.P.M.; Mentink, G.H.; Joziasse, J.; Bruning, H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2007-01-01

    Ripening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) polluted dredged sediment can be considered as a bioremediation technique. Aerobic biodegradation of PAH and TPH was studied in five previously anaerobic-slurried sediments during a 350-d laboratory incubation

  20. Ecotoxicological assessment of sediments from the Port of Santos and the disposal sites of dredged material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduinetty Ceci P. M. Sousa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The dredging of sediments from the Santos Channel is necessary to allow the navigation of ships operating in the Port of Santos. The disposal sites for such sediments are situated on the coastal zone, in front of the Santos Bay. The present paper aimed at evaluating the toxicity of sediments collected at the Santos Channel and at the former and current sediment disposal sites. Whole sediment tests with amphipods and elutriate assays with sea-urchin embryos were used. The samples from the Santos Channel were considered the most toxic: all the sediment samples from this area showed toxicity. Moreover, some samples from both former and new sediment disposal sites exhibited toxicity. Therefore, results showed that sediments from the studied areas present evidences of degradation; however, further studies are required to determine relationships between toxicity and contamination. Results also suggested that the disposal of dredged sediments should be re-evaluated.A dragagem dos sedimentos do Canal de Santos é necessária para permitir o trânsito de navios que operam no Porto de Santos. As áreas de disposição do material dragado estão situadas na zona costeira, em frente à Baía de Santos. Este estudo visou avaliar a qualidade dos sedimentos do Canal de Santos e das áreas de disposição atuais e antigas, utilizando testes de toxicidade de sedimento integral com anfípodos e de toxicidade de elutriatos com embriões de ouriço do mar. As amostras do Canal de Santos foram consideradas as mais tóxicas: todas as amostras dessa área foram consideradas significativamente tóxicas. Além disso, algumas amostras das áreas de disposição exibiram toxicidade. Os resultados mostraram, portanto, que os sedimentos apresentam evidências de degradação em sua qualidade, porém novos estudos devem ser conduzidos visando determinar as relações entre contaminação e toxicidade. Os resultados sugerem ainda que a disposição dos sedimentos dragados

  1. Ecotoxicological risk assessment linked to infilling quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Bazin, Christine; Volatier, Laurence; Durrieu, Claude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain; Abdelghafour, Mohammed; Moretto, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The dredged sediments of polluted seaports now raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. This results in the need to manage them on land, raising other types of technical, economic and environmental problems. Regarding the technical and economic dimensions, traditional waste treatment methods have proved to be poorly adapted, due to very high costs and low absorbable volumes. In this context, filling quarries in coastal areas with treated sediments could represent an interesting alternative for these materials. Nevertheless, for the environmental dimension, it is necessary to demonstrate that this possibility is harmless to inland ecosystems. Consequently, a specific ecotoxicological risk assessment methodology has been formulated and tested on three sediments taken from seaboards of France, in view to providing an operational and usable tool for the prior validation of any operation to fill quarries with treated seaport sediments. This method incorporates the formulation of a global conceptual model of the scenario studied and the definition of protocols for each of its steps: the characterisation of exposures (based on a simulation of sediment deposit), the characterisation of effects (via the study of sediments ecotoxicity), and the final ecotoxicological risk assessment performed as a calculation of a risk quotient. It includes the implementation in parallel of two types of complementary approach: the "substances" approach derived from the European methodology for assessing new substances placed on the market, and the "matrix" approach which is similar to methods developed in France to assess ecological risks in other domains (waste management, polluted site management, …). The application of this dual approach to the three sediments tested led to conclude with reliability that the project to deposit sediments "1" and "2" presented a low risk for the peripheral aquatic ecosystems while sediment "3

  2. Health risk assessment linked to filling coastal quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Emmanuel, Evens; Winiarski, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    Dredged seaport sediments raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. Traditional waste treatments are poorly adapted for these materials in terms of absorbable volumes and cost. In this context, filling quarries with treated sediments appears interesting but its safety regarding human health must be demonstrated. To achieve this, a specific methodology for assessing health risks has been developed and tested on three seaport sediments. This methodology includes the development of a conceptual model of the global scenario studied and the definition of specific protocols for each of its major steps. The approach proposed includes in particular the use of metrological and experimental tools that are new in this context: (i) an experimental lysimeter for characterizing the deposit emissions, and (ii) a geological radar for identifying potential preferential pathways between the sediment deposit and the groundwater. The application of this approach on the three sediments tested for the scenario studied showed the absence of health risk associated with the consumption of groundwater for substances having a "threshold effect" (risk quotient risk for substances having a "non-threshold effect", with the notable exception of arsenic (individual risk equal to 3.10(-6)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An evaluation of technologies for the heavy metal remediation of dredged sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, C N; Yong, R N; Gibbs, B F

    2001-07-30

    Sediments dewatering is frequently necessary after dredging to remediate and treat contaminants. Methods include draining of the water in lagoons with or without coagulants and flocculants, or using presses or centrifuges. Treatment methods are similar to those used for soil and include pretreatment, physical separation, thermal processes, biological decontamination, stabilization/solidification and washing. However, compared to soil treatment, few remediation techniques have been commercially used for sediments. In this paper, a review of the methods that have been used and an evaluation of developed and developing technologies is made. Sequential extraction technique can be a useful tool for determining metal speciation before and after washing. Solidification/stabilization techniques are successful but significant monitoring is required, since the solidification process can be reversible. In addition, the presence of organics can reduce treatment efficiency. Vitrification is applicable for sediments but expensive. Only if a useful glass product can be sold will this process be economically viable. Thermal processes are only applicable for removal of volatile metals, such as mercury and costs are high. Biological processes are under development and have the potential to be low cost. Since few low cost metal treatment processes for sediments are available, there exists significant demand for further development. Pretreatment may be one of the methods that can reduce costs by reducing the volumes of sediments that need to be treated.

  4. Fate of cadmium in the rhizosphere of Arabidopsis halleri grown in a contaminated dredged sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Séphanie, E-mail: huguet.st@gmail.com [ISTerre, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Institut des sciences analytiques et de physico-chimie pour l' environnement et les matériaux (IPREM UMR 5254), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour and CNRS, Hélioparc, 2 Av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); INERIS, Parc technologique Alata, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); EMDouai, MPE-GCE, 930 Boulevard Lahure, 59500 Douai (France); Isaure, Marie-Pierre [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Institut des sciences analytiques et de physico-chimie pour l' environnement et les matériaux (IPREM UMR 5254), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour and CNRS, Hélioparc, 2 Av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Bert, Valérie [INERIS, Parc technologique Alata, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Laboudigue, Agnès [EMDouai, MPE-GCE, 930 Boulevard Lahure, 59500 Douai (France); Proux, Olivier [OSUG, UMS832 CNRS/UJF, 414 rue de la piscine, 38400 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Flank, Anne-Marie; Vantelon, Delphine [Beamline LUCIA, SLS, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Sarret, Géraldine, E-mail: geraldine.sarret@ujf-grenoble.fr [ISTerre, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-01

    In regions impacted by mining and smelting activities, dredged sediments are often contaminated with metals. Phytotechnologies could be used for their management, but more knowledge on the speciation of metals in the sediment and on their fate after colonization by plant roots is needed. This work was focused on a dredged sediment from the Scarpe river (North of France), contaminated with Zn and Cd. Zn, Cd hyperaccumulating plants Arabidopsis halleri from metallicolous and non-metallicolous origin were grown on the sediment for five months in a pot experiment. The nature and extent of the modifications in Cd speciation with or without plant were determined by electron microscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and bulk and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition, changes in Cd exchangeable and bioavailable pools were evaluated, and Cd content in leachates was measured. Finally, Cd plant uptake and plant growth parameters were monitored. In the original sediment, Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide. After five months, although pots still contained reduced sulfur, Cd-bearing sulfides were totally oxidized in vegetated pots, whereas a minor fraction (8%) was still present in non-vegetated ones. Secondary species included Cd bound to O-containing groups of organic matter and Cd phosphates. Cd exchangeability and bioavailability were relatively low and did not increase during changes in Cd speciation, suggesting that Cd released by sulfide oxidation was readily taken up with strong interactions with organic matter and phosphate ligands. Thus, the composition of the sediment, the oxic conditions and the rhizospheric activity (regardless of the plant origin) created favorable conditions for Cd stabilization. However, it should be kept in mind that returning to anoxic conditions may change Cd speciation, so the species formed cannot be considered as stable on the long term. - Highlights: • Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide in the sediment before

  5. Fate of cadmium in the rhizosphere of Arabidopsis halleri grown in a contaminated dredged sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, Séphanie; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Bert, Valérie; Laboudigue, Agnès; Proux, Olivier; Flank, Anne-Marie; Vantelon, Delphine; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    In regions impacted by mining and smelting activities, dredged sediments are often contaminated with metals. Phytotechnologies could be used for their management, but more knowledge on the speciation of metals in the sediment and on their fate after colonization by plant roots is needed. This work was focused on a dredged sediment from the Scarpe river (North of France), contaminated with Zn and Cd. Zn, Cd hyperaccumulating plants Arabidopsis halleri from metallicolous and non-metallicolous origin were grown on the sediment for five months in a pot experiment. The nature and extent of the modifications in Cd speciation with or without plant were determined by electron microscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and bulk and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition, changes in Cd exchangeable and bioavailable pools were evaluated, and Cd content in leachates was measured. Finally, Cd plant uptake and plant growth parameters were monitored. In the original sediment, Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide. After five months, although pots still contained reduced sulfur, Cd-bearing sulfides were totally oxidized in vegetated pots, whereas a minor fraction (8%) was still present in non-vegetated ones. Secondary species included Cd bound to O-containing groups of organic matter and Cd phosphates. Cd exchangeability and bioavailability were relatively low and did not increase during changes in Cd speciation, suggesting that Cd released by sulfide oxidation was readily taken up with strong interactions with organic matter and phosphate ligands. Thus, the composition of the sediment, the oxic conditions and the rhizospheric activity (regardless of the plant origin) created favorable conditions for Cd stabilization. However, it should be kept in mind that returning to anoxic conditions may change Cd speciation, so the species formed cannot be considered as stable on the long term. - Highlights: • Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide in the sediment before

  6. 33 CFR 336.2 - Transportation of dredged material for the purpose of disposal into ocean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... quality certification and determine consistency with a Federally-approved coastal zone management plan for... the 401 certification process or the CZMA consistency determination process. Nevertheless, the Corps... quality certification for proposed Corps ocean disposal of dredged material within the limits of the...

  7. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, Joshua A.; Natali, Susan M.; Levinton, Jeffrey S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of remediating a well-recognized case of heavy metal pollution at Foundry Cove (FC), Hudson River, New York. This tidal freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953-1979) and dredged in 1994-1995. Eight years after remediation, dissolved and particulate metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Ag) were found to be lower than levels in the lower Hudson near New York City. Levels of metals (Co, Ni, Cd) on suspended particles were comparatively high. Concentrations of surface sediment Cd throughout the marsh system remain high, but have decreased both in the dredged and undredged areas: Cd was 2.4-230 mg/kg dw of sediment in 2005 vs. 109-1500 mg/kg in the same area in 1983. The rate of tidal export of Cd from FC has decreased by >300-fold, suggesting that dredging successfully stemmed a major source of Cd to the Hudson River. - Dredging of a hotspot of metal-contaminated sediment is associated with a recognizable local and river-wide decline in cadmium in the Hudson River, New York

  8. Physicochemical and biological characterisation of different dredged sediment deposit sites in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capilla, Xavier; Schwartz, Christophe; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Sterckeman, Thibault; Perrodin, Yves; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine sediment properties, metal contents and transfers of Cd and Zn from dredged sediments to plants. To this end 10 deposit sites with different contexts were visited in France. The main agronomic characteristics and metal contents for surface soil layers were measured, the plant species present at the sites, such as Brassicaceae and Fabaceae, were listed, and the distribution of their root systems described. Soil characteristics such as available P (Olsen) varied between sites, with values ranging from 0.01 to 0.49 g kg -1 . Total contents and enrichment factors were studied, highlighting metal contamination in most of the sites. Despite carrying out principal component analyses, it was not possible to group deposits by age or geographical localisation. However, deposits could be distinguished as a function of proximity of industrial facilities, sediment grain size and carbonate content. Associations between metals were also highlighted: (1) Cd, Pb and Zn, and (2) Al, Cr, Cu and Fe. Consequently, we propose classifying them as technogenic anthrosols. - The term technogenic arthrosols is suggested

  9. Physicochemical and biological characterisation of different dredged sediment deposit sites in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capilla, Xavier [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement a l' ENTPE, Rue Maurice Audin, 69 518 Vaulx-en-Velin Cedex (France); Schwartz, Christophe [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INPL (ENSAIA)/INRA UMR 1120, 2 avenue de la foret de Haye, BP 172, 54 505 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Bedell, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement a l' ENTPE, Rue Maurice Audin, 69 518 Vaulx-en-Velin Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bedell@entpe.fr; Sterckeman, Thibault [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INPL (ENSAIA)/INRA UMR 1120, 2 avenue de la foret de Haye, BP 172, 54 505 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Perrodin, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement a l' ENTPE, Rue Maurice Audin, 69 518 Vaulx-en-Velin Cedex (France); Morel, Jean-Louis [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INPL (ENSAIA)/INRA UMR 1120, 2 avenue de la foret de Haye, BP 172, 54 505 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this work is to determine sediment properties, metal contents and transfers of Cd and Zn from dredged sediments to plants. To this end 10 deposit sites with different contexts were visited in France. The main agronomic characteristics and metal contents for surface soil layers were measured, the plant species present at the sites, such as Brassicaceae and Fabaceae, were listed, and the distribution of their root systems described. Soil characteristics such as available P (Olsen) varied between sites, with values ranging from 0.01 to 0.49 g kg{sup -1}. Total contents and enrichment factors were studied, highlighting metal contamination in most of the sites. Despite carrying out principal component analyses, it was not possible to group deposits by age or geographical localisation. However, deposits could be distinguished as a function of proximity of industrial facilities, sediment grain size and carbonate content. Associations between metals were also highlighted: (1) Cd, Pb and Zn, and (2) Al, Cr, Cu and Fe. Consequently, we propose classifying them as technogenic anthrosols. - The term technogenic arthrosols is suggested.

  10. Effects of sediment dredging on nitrogen cycling in Lake Taihu, China: Insight from mass balance based on a 2-year field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juhua; Fan, Chengxin; Zhong, Jicheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Changhui; Yao, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Sediment dredging can permanently remove pollutants from an aquatic ecosystem, which is considered an effective approach to aquatic ecosystem restoration. In this work, a 2-year field simulation test was carried out to investigate the effect of dredging on nitrogen cycling across the sediment-water interface (SWI) in Lake Taihu, China. The results showed that simulated dredging applied to an area rich in total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) slightly reduced the NH4(+)-N release from sediments while temporarily enhanced the NH4(+)-N release in an area with lower TOC and/or TN (in the first 180 days), although the application had a limited effect on the fluxes of NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N in both areas. Further analysis indicated that dredging induced decreases in nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in sediments, notably by 76.9, 49.0, and 89.9%, respectively, in the TOC and/or TN-rich area. Therefore, dredging slowed down nitrogen cycling rates in sediments but did not increase N loading to overlying water. The main reason for the above phenomenon could be attributed to the removal of the surface sediments enriched with more TOC and/or TN (compared with the bottom sediments). Overall, to minimize internal N pollution, dredging may be more applicable to nutrient-rich sediments.

  11. Southeast Regional Implementation Manual for Requirements and Procedures for Evaluation of the Ocean Disposal of Dredged Material in Southeastern U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coast Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Regional Implementation Manual was prepared by EPA Region 4 to provide guidance for applicants proposing open-water disposal of dredged material in southeastern U.S. coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.

  12. Site Management and Monitoring Plan (SMMP) for the Mouth of Columbia River- Deep and Shallow Water Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites, OR/WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SMMP is intended to provide management and monitoring strategies for disposal in the Mouth of Columbia River- Deep and Shallow Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites on the border of Oregon and Washington.

  13. Selecting enhancing solutions for electrokinetic remediation of dredged sediments polluted with fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, F; Castellote, M

    2015-03-15

    In this paper a procedure for selecting the enhancing solutions in electrokinetic remediation experiments is proposed. For this purpose, dredged marine sediment was contaminated with fuel, and a total of 22 different experimental conditions were tested, analysing the influence of different enhancing solutions by using three commercial non-ionic surfactants, one bio-surfactant, one chelating agent, and one weak acid. Characterisation, microelectrophoretic and electrokinetic remediation trials were carried out. The results are explained on the basis of the interactions between the fuel, the enhancing electrolytes and the matrix. For one specific system, the electrophoretic zeta potential, (ζ), of the contaminated matrix in the solution was found to be related to the electroosmotic averaged ζ in the experiment and not to the efficiency in the extraction. This later was correlated to a parameter accounting for both contributions, the contaminant and the enhancing solution, calculated on the basis of differences in the electrophoretic ζ in different conditions which has allowed to propose a methodology for selection of enhancing solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 38672 - Ocean Dumping; Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW) Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... potential aquatic and non-aquatic (i.e., land-based) alternatives and the consequences of not designating a... uses of the ocean, that they would not be human pathogens, and would not be non-indigenous species. The... Department of Natural Resources (LDNR) and the Texas General Land Office (TGLO), the agencies implementing...

  15. Planting woody crops on dredged contaminated sediment provides both positive and negative effects in terms of remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, William; Riby, Philip; Dickinson, Nicholas M.; Shutes, Brian; Sparke, Shaun; Scholz, Miklas

    2011-01-01

    There is currently a requirement for studies focusing on the long-term sustainability of phytoremediation technologies. Trace element uptake by Salix, Populus and Alnus species planted in dredged contaminated canal sediment and concentrations in sediment and pore waters were investigated, eight years after a phytoremediation trial was initiated in NW England. Soil biological activity was also measured using invertebrate and microbial assays to determine soil quality improvements. Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and woody stems, and the most mobile trace element in sediment pore water (∼14 mg l -1 ). Biological activity had improved; earthworm numbers had increased from 5 to 24, and the QBS index (an index of microarthropod groups in soil) had increased from 70 to 88. It is concluded that biological conditions had improved and natural processes appear to be enhancing soil quality, but there remains a potential risk of trace element transfer to the wider environment. - Highlights: → Trees provide positive and negative effects for remediation of dredged sediment. → Biological conditions had improved and natural processes enhance soil quality. → Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and sediment pore waters. → Metal contaminants remain a problem in relation to their wider environmental fate. → A sustainable environment appears to be forming as a result of natural attenuation. - Soil biological quality improves in a woody crop stand eight years after a phytoremediation trial.

  16. Planting woody crops on dredged contaminated sediment provides both positive and negative effects in terms of remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, William, E-mail: w.hartley@salford.ac.uk [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Riby, Philip [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Department of Ecology, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, Canterbury (New Zealand); Shutes, Brian [Urban Pollution Research Centre, Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT (United Kingdom); Sparke, Shaun [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Scholz, Miklas [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    There is currently a requirement for studies focusing on the long-term sustainability of phytoremediation technologies. Trace element uptake by Salix, Populus and Alnus species planted in dredged contaminated canal sediment and concentrations in sediment and pore waters were investigated, eight years after a phytoremediation trial was initiated in NW England. Soil biological activity was also measured using invertebrate and microbial assays to determine soil quality improvements. Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and woody stems, and the most mobile trace element in sediment pore water ({approx}14 mg l{sup -1}). Biological activity had improved; earthworm numbers had increased from 5 to 24, and the QBS index (an index of microarthropod groups in soil) had increased from 70 to 88. It is concluded that biological conditions had improved and natural processes appear to be enhancing soil quality, but there remains a potential risk of trace element transfer to the wider environment. - Highlights: > Trees provide positive and negative effects for remediation of dredged sediment. > Biological conditions had improved and natural processes enhance soil quality. > Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and sediment pore waters. > Metal contaminants remain a problem in relation to their wider environmental fate. > A sustainable environment appears to be forming as a result of natural attenuation. - Soil biological quality improves in a woody crop stand eight years after a phytoremediation trial.

  17. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.A.; Gardiner, W.W.; Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The navigational channels of Winyah Bay, Georgetown Harbor, South Carolina require dredging to enable normal shipping traffic to use these areas. Before dredging, environmental assessments must be conducted to determine the suitability of this dredged sediment for unconfined, open-water disposal. The Charleston, South Carolina District Office of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requested that the Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) collect sediment samples and conduct the required physical/chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations as required in the 1991 Implementation Manual. This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the Entrance Channel and Inner Harbor sediments proposed disposal in the ocean

  18. Monitoring the effects of disposal of fine sediments from maintenance dredging on suspended particulate matter concentration in the Belgian nearshore area

    OpenAIRE

    Fettweis, M.; Baeye, M.; Francken, F.; Lauwaert, B.; Van den Eynde, D.; Van Lancker, V.; Martens, C.; Michielsen, T.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of continuous disposal of fine-grained sediments from maintenance dredging works on the suspended particulate matter concentration in a shallow nearshore turbidity maximum was investigated during dredging experiment (port of Zeebrugge, southern North Sea). Before, during and after the experiment monitoring of SPM concentration using OBS and ADV altimetry was carried out at a location 5 km west of the disposal site. A statistical analysis, based on the concept of populations and sub...

  19. Monitoring the effects of disposal of fine sediments from maintenance dredging on suspended particulate matter concentration in the Belgian nearshore area (southern North Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Fettweis, M.; Baeye, M.; Francken, F.; Lauwaert, B.; Van den Eynde, D.; Van Lancker, V.; Martens, C.; Michielsen, T.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of continuous disposal of fine-grained sediments from maintenance dredging works on the suspended particulate matter concentration in a shallow nearshore turbidity maximum was investigated during dredging experiment (port of Zeebrugge, southern North Sea). Before, during and after the experiment monitoring of SPM concentration using OBS and ADV altimetry was carried out at a location 5 km west of the disposal site. A statistical analysis, based on the concept of populations and sub...

  20. Laboratory Feasibility Study Concerning the Use of the SediMeter (trademark) to Detect Fine-Scale ( or = 1 mm) Sedimentation Resulting from Dredging Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Pages/Services.aspx). As a result of this dredging activity, bottom sediments are stirred up and resuspended into plumes. The transport of these...1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no...bed elevation changes as dredged material is pumped into an area such as a wetland. They could also be used to evaluate the geomorphic stability of

  1. Application of the Streamflow Prediction Tool to Estimate Sediment Dredging Volumes in Texas Coastal Waterways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, E.; Dreaper, G.; Afshari, S.; Tavakoly, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past six fiscal years, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has contracted an average of about a billion dollars per year for navigation channel dredging. To execute these funds effectively, USACE Districts must determine which navigation channels need to be dredged in a given year. Improving this prioritization process results in more efficient waterway maintenance. This study uses the Streamflow Prediction Tool, a runoff routing model based on global weather forecast ensembles, to estimate dredged volumes. This study establishes regional linear relationships between cumulative flow and dredged volumes over a long-term simulation covering 30 years (1985-2015), using drainage area and shoaling parameters. The study framework integrates the National Hydrography Dataset (NHDPlus Dataset) with parameters from the Corps Shoaling Analysis Tool (CSAT) and dredging record data from USACE District records. Results in the test cases of the Houston Ship Channel and the Sabine and Port Arthur Harbor waterways in Texas indicate positive correlation between the simulated streamflows and actual dredging records.

  2. Dendrochemical assessment of mercury releases from a pond and dredged-sediment landfill impacted by a chlor-alkali plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, François; Girardclos, Olivier; Assad, Mohamad; Zappelini, Cyril; Pérez Mena, Julia Maria; Yung, Loïc; Guyeux, Christophe; Chrétien, Stéphane; Bigham, Gary; Cosio, Claudia; Chalot, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Although current Hg emissions from industrial activities may be accurately monitored, evidence of past releases to the atmosphere must rely on one or more environmental proxies. We used Hg concentrations in tree cores collected from poplars and willows to investigate the historical changes of Hg emissions from a dredged sediment landfill and compared them to a nearby control location. Our results demonstrated the potential value of using dendrochemistry to record historical Hg emissions from past industrial activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the radiological impact due to the dredging of sediments in the Minimes harbour of La Rochelle. Workers and population exposure to reinforced natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    As the city of La Rochelle is implementing a project of expansion of the Minimes yachting harbour which comprises the dredging of sediments (which may have been polluted by a rare earth production plant), this document reports the assessment of the radiological impact of this dredging activity on workers and on the population. A campaign of sediment coring has been performed in order to validate the reference coring station selection, to measure sand radiological activity and to measure the activity of the sediments to be dredged. The computed maximum efficient doses for the workers and for the population appear to be low, and very much less to the 1 mSv/year threshold

  4. Thorium content in bottom sediments of Pacific and Indian oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurvich, E.G.; Lisitsyn, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of 232 Th distribution study in different substance-genetic types of bottom sediments of Pacific and Indian oceans. Th content determination has been carried out by the method of instrumental neutron activation analysis. Th distribution maps in the surface layer of bottom sediments of Pacific and Indian oceans are drawn. It is noted that Indian ocean sediments are much richer with Th moreover Th distribution in different types of sediments is very non-uniform. Non-uniformity of Th distribution in different types of Pacific ocean sediments is considerably less than that of Indian ocean and exceeds it only in red oozes

  5. Removal of trace metals and improvement of dredged sediment dewaterability by bioleaching combined with Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfeng; Twardowska, Irena; Wei, Shuhe; Sun, Lina; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Jianyu; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-05-15

    Bioleaching by Aspergillus niger strain SY1 combined with Fenton-like reaction was optimized to improve trace metal removal and dewaterability of dredged sediments. The major optimized parameters were the duration of bioleaching and H₂O₂ dose in Fenton-like process (5 days and 2g H₂O₂/L, respectively). Bioleaching resulted in the removal of ≈90% of Cd, ≈60% of Zn and Cu, ≈20% of Pb, and in decrease of sediment pH from 6.6 to 2.5 due to organic acids produced by A. niger. After addition of H₂O₂, Fenton-like reaction was initiated and further metal removal occurred. Overall efficiency of the combined process comprised: (i) reduction of Cd content in sediment by 99.5%, Cu and Zn by >70% and Pb by 39% as a result of metal release bound in all mobilizable fractions; (ii) decrease of sediment capillary suction time (CST) from 98.2s to 10.1s (by 89.8%) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) from 37.4×10(12)m/kg to 6.2×10(12)m/kg (by 83.8%), due to reducing amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by 68.7% and bound water content by 79.1%. The combined process was found to be an efficient method to remove trace metals and improve dewaterability of contaminated dredged sediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal transfer to plants grown on a dredged sediment: use of radioactive isotope 203Hg and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caille, Nathalie; Vauleon, Clotilde; Leyval, Corinne; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    Improperly disposed of dredged sediments contaminated with metals may induce long-term leaching and an increase of metal concentrations in ground waters and vegetal cover plants. The objective of the study was to quantify the sediment-to-plant transfer of Cu, Pb, Hg and Zn with a particular focus on the pathway of Hg and to determine whether the establishment of vegetal cover modifies the metal availability. A pot experiment with rape (Brassica napus), cabbage (Brassica oleraccea) and red fescue (Festuca rubra) was set up using a sediment first spiked with the radioisotope 203 Hg. Zinc concentrations (197-543 mg kg -1 DM) in leaves were higher than Cu concentration (197-543 mg kg -1 DM), Pb concentration (2.3-2.6 mg kg -1 DM) and Hg concentration (0.9-1.7 mg kg -1 DM). Leaves-to-sediment ratios decreased as follows: Zn>Cu>Hg>Pb. According to Ti measurements, metal contamination by dry deposition was less than 1%. Mercury concentration in plant leaves was higher than European and French thresholds. Foliar absorption of volatile Hg was a major pathway for Hg contamination with a root absorption of Hg higher in rape than in cabbage and red fescue. Growth of each species increased Cu solubility. Zinc solubility was increased only in the presence of rape. The highest increase of Cu solubility was observed for red fescue whereas this species largely decreased Zn solubility. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements suggested that Cu solubilisation could result from organic matter or release of natural plant exudates. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measures suggested that the high Zn solubility in the presence of rape could originate from a generation of acidity in rape rhizosphere and a subsequent dissolution of calcium carbonates. Consequently, emission of volatile Hg from contaminated dredged sediments and also the potential increase of metal solubility by a vegetal cover of grass when used in phytostabilisation must be taken into account by decision makers

  7. Metal transfer to plants grown on a dredged sediment: use of radioactive isotope 203Hg and titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Nathalie; Vauleon, Clotilde; Leyval, Corinne; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2005-04-01

    Improperly disposed of dredged sediments contaminated with metals may induce long-term leaching and an increase of metal concentrations in ground waters and vegetal cover plants. The objective of the study was to quantify the sediment-to-plant transfer of Cu, Pb, Hg and Zn with a particular focus on the pathway of Hg and to determine whether the establishment of vegetal cover modifies the metal availability. A pot experiment with rape (Brassica napus), cabbage (Brassica oleraccea) and red fescue (Festuca rubra) was set up using a sediment first spiked with the radioisotope 203Hg. Zinc concentrations (197-543 mg kg(-1) DM) in leaves were higher than Cu concentration (197-543 mg kg(-1) DM), Pb concentration (2.3-2.6 mg kg(-1) DM) and Hg concentration (0.9-1.7 mg kg(-1) DM). Leaves-to-sediment ratios decreased as follows: Zn > Cu > Hg > Pb. According to Ti measurements, metal contamination by dry deposition was less than 1%. Mercury concentration in plant leaves was higher than European and French thresholds. Foliar absorption of volatile Hg was a major pathway for Hg contamination with a root absorption of Hg higher in rape than in cabbage and red fescue. Growth of each species increased Cu solubility. Zinc solubility was increased only in the presence of rape. The highest increase of Cu solubility was observed for red fescue whereas this species largely decreased Zn solubility. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements suggested that Cu solubilisation could result from organic matter or release of natural plant exudates. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measures suggested that the high Zn solubility in the presence of rape could originate from a generation of acidity in rape rhizosphere and a subsequent dissolution of calcium carbonates. Consequently, emission of volatile Hg from contaminated dredged sediments and also the potential increase of metal solubility by a vegetal cover of grass when used in phytostabilisation must be taken into account by decision

  8. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENTS: A CASE STUDY AT THE JONES ISLAND CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jones Island Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) is a 44 acre in-lake area that receives dredged material from Milwaukee Harbor and the surrounding waterways. Some of those materials are contaminated with industrial waste and urban run-off. The CDF is nearing the end of its desi...

  9. [Pollution distribution and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments from the different eastern dredging regions of Lake Taihu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhi-Gang; Gu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Zeng, Qing-Fei; Gu, Xian-Kun; Li, Xu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the distribution characteristics of nutrients and heavy metals in sediments from different eastern dredging regions of Lake Taihu, the surface and core sediment samples at 5 sites (in East Taihu Lake and Xukou Bay) were collected in 2012. Contents of nutrients (TOC, TN and TP) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the sediments were measured and the pollution degrees of heavy metals were evaluated with the potential ecological risk method. The results showed that the heavy metal contents in Xukou Bay were generally higher than those in East Taihu Lake, whereas the nutrients contents showed the reverse trend. There were significant differences between the phytoplankton-dominated and culture lake regions. The concentrations of both nutrients and heavy metals decreased with increasing profile depth. Moreover, the contents of nutrients and heavy metals in the sediments of all dredged areas were lower than those in the un-dredged areas, suggesting that dredging may be a useful approach for decreasing nutrients and heavy metals loading in sediments, but its effectiveness decreased with time. Significant positive correlations were found among different heavy metals and nutrients, indicating that they were from the same pollution source. The Hakanson potential ecological risk index was applied for assessing the status of sediment heavy metal enrichment and the result indicated that sediment dredging could reduce the extent of potential ecological risk. The risk index in different sites followed the order: X1 > D1 > D3 > X2 > D2, while the risk index in site X1 of Xukou Bay was higher than that in site D1 of East Taihu Lake. And the comprehensive ecological risk grades in sites X1 and D1 were in the moderate range, while the sites D2, D3 and X2 were low.

  10. Dredge spoil disposal off Kavaratti Island, Lakshadweep, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; SanilKumar, V.; Jayakumar, S.

    Maintenance dredging has been carried out along the navigational channel at Kavaratii Island and dredge spoil is disposed in the open sea. This paper describes the movement of sediment plume while dredging and disposal. The study indicates...

  11. Thermophysical properties of deep ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, G.R.; McVey, D.F.; Morin, R.

    1980-01-01

    Here we report measurements of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of reconsolidated illite and smectite ocean sediments at a pore pressure of 600 bars and temperatures ranging from 25 to 420 0 C. The conductivity and diffusivity were found to be in the range of 0.8 to 1.0 W/m-K and 2.2 to 2.8 x 10 -7 m 2 /s, respectively. These data are consistent with a mixture model which predicts sediment thermal properties as a function of constituent properties and porosity. Comparison of pre- and post-test physical properties indicated a decrease in pore water content and an order of magnitude increase in shear strength and permeability

  12. Total Sediment Thickness of the World's Oceans & Marginal Seas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A digital total-sediment-thickness database for the world's oceans and marginal seas has been compiled by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). The data...

  13. Metal transfer to plants grown on a dredged sediment: use of radioactive isotope {sup 203}Hg and titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caille, Nathalie [ENSAIA-INRA/INPL, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); CNRSSP, 930 boulevard Lahure, F-59505 Douai (France); Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Mineraux-Matiere organique dans les sols, CNRS, 17 rue Notre-Dame des Pauvres, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Vauleon, Clotilde [CNRSSP, 930 boulevard Lahure, F-59505 Douai (France); Leyval, Corinne [Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Mineraux-Matiere organique dans les sols, CNRS, 17 rue Notre-Dame des Pauvres, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Morel, Jean-Louis [ENSAIA-INRA/INPL, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)]. E-mail: jean-louis.Morel@ensaia.inpl-nancy.fr

    2005-04-01

    Improperly disposed of dredged sediments contaminated with metals may induce long-term leaching and an increase of metal concentrations in ground waters and vegetal cover plants. The objective of the study was to quantify the sediment-to-plant transfer of Cu, Pb, Hg and Zn with a particular focus on the pathway of Hg and to determine whether the establishment of vegetal cover modifies the metal availability. A pot experiment with rape (Brassica napus), cabbage (Brassica oleraccea) and red fescue (Festuca rubra) was set up using a sediment first spiked with the radioisotope {sup 203}Hg. Zinc concentrations (197-543 mg kg{sup -1} DM) in leaves were higher than Cu concentration (197-543 mg kg{sup -1} DM), Pb concentration (2.3-2.6 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and Hg concentration (0.9-1.7 mg kg{sup -1} DM). Leaves-to-sediment ratios decreased as follows: Zn>Cu>Hg>Pb. According to Ti measurements, metal contamination by dry deposition was less than 1%. Mercury concentration in plant leaves was higher than European and French thresholds. Foliar absorption of volatile Hg was a major pathway for Hg contamination with a root absorption of Hg higher in rape than in cabbage and red fescue. Growth of each species increased Cu solubility. Zinc solubility was increased only in the presence of rape. The highest increase of Cu solubility was observed for red fescue whereas this species largely decreased Zn solubility. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements suggested that Cu solubilisation could result from organic matter or release of natural plant exudates. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measures suggested that the high Zn solubility in the presence of rape could originate from a generation of acidity in rape rhizosphere and a subsequent dissolution of calcium carbonates. Consequently, emission of volatile Hg from contaminated dredged sediments and also the potential increase of metal solubility by a vegetal cover of grass when used in phytostabilisation must be taken into account

  14. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Transformation, Fixation, and Mobilization of Arsenic and Antimony in Contaminated Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    and Edwards (1977) reported that whole cells of :ethaogenic bacteria in variod anaerobic environments ( rumen fluid, sewage sludge) nproduced...sediments were studied with emphasis placed on short- and long-term 14 leaching and sediment conditions that affect mobilization. -; Under anaerobic ...conditions, arsenate [As(V)] was reduced to arsenite [As(III)] in a wide range of sediments. In anaerobic Texas City sediment slur- ries, 70% of added As(V

  15. Evaluation of heavy metals transfer: impact of a dredged sediment deposit on a on-polluted soil; Migration des polluants metalliques: cas d'un depot de sediments contamines sur un sol non pollue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauleon, C.; Laboudigue, A. [Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, CNRSSP, 59 - Douai (France); Tiffreau, Ch. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    In many countries and especially in the North of France, inland waterways need to be dredged regularly to provide a high quality environment for customers, staff and local communities. However, dredging operations generate yearly large quantities of sediments, which in spite of their high pollutant contents, are often stored in non-specific sites. Thus, the threat of a spreading contamination for the surrounding environment is important. In order to evaluate this potential risk and to quantify the transfer of heavy metals from the dredged layer to the non-polluted soil below, an interdisciplinary research project was undertaken including, (i) the monitoring of an experimental sediment deposit, (ii) the microscopic study of metal distribution inside this deposit, (iii) the evaluation of microbial activity, (iv) the impact of natural vegetation growth on metal migration. Up to now, the main processes identified (oxidation of sulphur compounds, vertical migration of Zinc) allowed us to make several recommendations for the future management of dredged sediments by: (i) controlling the oxidation processes during dredging operations or (ii) assessing the high neutralizing capacity of the local environment of deposition. Moreover, an adequate vegetation management can reduce the heavy metals migration to groundwater's with maximum efficiency and at low costs. (author)

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from St. Andrew Bay, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.; Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Ward, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District, requested that the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct field sampling and chemical and biological testing to determine the suitability of potential dredged material for open ocean disposal. Sediment from St. Andrew Bay was chemically characterized and evaluated for biological toxicity and bioaccumulation of contaminants. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material). To meet these requirements, the MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, solid-phase toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation testing on sediment representing potential dredged material from Panama City Harbor. Physical and chemical characterization of sediment to support toxicity and bioaccumulation results was also conducted on both the test and reference sediments. The MSL collected sediment samples from five sites in St. Andrew Bay and one reference site near Lands End Peninsula. The five test sediments and the reference sediment were analyzed for physical and chemical sediment characteristics, SPP chemical contaminants, solid-phase toxicity, SPP toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants

  17. Zn speciation in a soil contaminated by the deposition of a dredged sediment by synchrotron X-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Manceau, Alain; Laboudigue, Agnes; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2003-09-01

    The nature and proportion of Zn species present in an agricultural soil overlaid by a dredged contaminated sediment have been untangled by the novel combination of three non-invasive synchrotron-based x-ray techniques: x-ray microfluorescence (μSXRF), microdiffraction (μXRD), and absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). One primary (franklinite) and two secondary (phyllomanganate and phyllosilicate) Zn-containing minerals were identified in the initial soil, and another primary (ZnS) and a new secondary (Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide) Zn species in the covered soil. The quantitative analysis of EXAFS spectra recorded on bulk samples indicated that ZnS and Zn-Fe (oxyhydr)oxides amounted to 71+-10 percent and 27+-10 percent, respectively, and the other Zn species to less than 10 percent. The two new Zn species found in the covered soil result from the gravitational migration of ZnS particles initially present in the sediment, and from their further oxidative dissolution and fixation of leached Zn on F e (oxyhydr) oxides

  18. Earthworm biomass as additional information for risk assessment of heavy metal biomagnification: a case study for dredged sediment-derived soils and polluted floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, Bart; Samyn, Jurgen; Quataert, Paul; Muys, Bart; Tack, Filip M.G.

    2004-01-01

    The important role of earthworms in the biomagnification of heavy metals in terrestrial ecosystems is widely recognised. Differences in earthworm biomass between sites is mostly not accounted for in ecological risk assessment. These differences may be large depending on soil properties and pollution status. A survey of earthworm biomass and colonisation rate was carried out on dredged sediment-derived soils (DSDS). Results were compared with observations for the surrounding alluvial plains. Mainly grain size distribution and time since disposal determined earthworm biomass on DSDS, while soil pollution status of the DSDS was of lesser importance. Highest earthworm biomass was observed on sandy loam DSDS disposed at least 40 years ago. - Polluted clayey dredged sediment-derived soils have a relatively low risk for heavy metal biomagnification due to slow earthworm colonisation

  19. Global Ocean Sedimentation Patterns: Plate Tectonic History Versus Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, A.; Reynolds, E.; Olson, P.; Hinnov, L. A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global sediment data (Whittaker et al., 2013) and carbonate content data (Archer, 1996) allows examination of ocean sedimentation evolution with respect to age of the underlying ocean crust (Müller et al., 2008). From these data, we construct time series of ocean sediment thickness and carbonate deposition rate for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian ocean basins for the past 120 Ma. These time series are unique to each basin and reflect an integrated response to plate tectonics and climate change. The goal is to parameterize ocean sedimentation tied to crustal age for paleoclimate studies. For each basin, total sediment thickness and carbonate deposition rate from 0.1 x 0.1 degree cells are binned according to basement crustal age; area-corrected moments (mean, variance, etc.) are calculated for each bin. Segmented linear fits identify trends in present-day carbonate deposition rates and changes in ocean sedimentation from 0 to 120 Ma. In the North and South Atlantic and Indian oceans, mean sediment thickness versus crustal age is well represented by three linear segments, with the slope of each segment increasing with increasing crustal age. However, the transition age between linear segments varies among the three basins. In contrast, mean sediment thickness in the North and South Pacific oceans are numerically smaller and well represented by two linear segments with slopes that decrease with increasing crustal age. These opposing trends are more consistent with the plate tectonic history of each basin being the controlling factor in sedimentation rates, rather than climate change. Unlike total sediment thickness, carbonate deposition rates decrease smoothly with crustal age in all basins, with the primary controls being ocean chemistry and water column depth.References: Archer, D., 1996, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 10, 159-174.Müller, R.D., et al., 2008, Science, 319, 1357-1362.Whittaker, J., et al., 2013, Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst. DOI: 10.1002/ggge.20181

  20. Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Modeling System (CMS) that were developed and applied previously for the Charleston Harbor numerical modeling study (Kashlan 2013) were used in...Particle Tracking Model; Report 1: Model theory, implementation, and example applications. ERDC/CHL TR-6-20. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research ...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 7 Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study

  1. Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study; Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Modeling System (CMS) that were developed and applied previously for the Charleston Harbor numerical modeling study (Kashlan 2013) were used in...Particle Tracking Model; Report 1: Model theory, implementation, and example applications. ERDC/CHL TR-6-20. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research ...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 7 Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study

  2. Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) Authorization and Short-Term FATE (STFATE) Model Analysis: 2014-2015 Working Group Findings Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    fractions A grain size or sieve analysis typically yields the mass fraction of each particle size class after dispersing all of the material. However...ER D C TR -1 6- 2 Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) Authorization and Short-Term FATE (STFATE) Model Analysis 2014 – 2015...Term FATE (STFATE) Model Analysis 2014 – 2015 Working Group Findings Report Jase D. Ousley Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer

  3. Predicting Sediment Thickness on Vanished Ocean Crust Since 200 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, A.; Müller, R. D.; Wang, X.; O'Callaghan, S.; Cannon, J.; Wright, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Tracing sedimentation through time on existing and vanished seafloor is imperative for constraining long-term eustasy and for calculating volumes of subducted deep-sea sediments that contribute to global geochemical cycles. We present regression algorithms that incorporate the age of the ocean crust and the mean distance to the nearest passive margin to predict sediment thicknesses and long-term decompacted sedimentation rates since 200 Ma. The mean sediment thickness decreases from ˜220 m at 200 Ma to a minimum of ˜140 m at 130 Ma, reflecting the replacement of old Panthalassic ocean floor with young sediment-poor mid-ocean ridges, followed by an increase to ˜365 m at present-day. This increase reflects the accumulation of sediments on ageing abyssal plains proximal to passive margins, coupled with a decrease in the mean distance of any parcel of ocean crust to the nearest passive margin by over 700 km, and a doubling of the total passive margin length at present-day. Mean long-term sedimentation rates increase from ˜0.5 cm/ky at 160 Ma to over 0.8 cm/ky today, caused by enhanced terrigenous sediment influx along lengthened passive margins, superimposed by the onset of ocean-wide carbonate sedimentation. Our predictive algorithms, coupled to a plate tectonic model, provide a framework for constraining the seafloor sediment-driven eustatic sea-level component, which has grown from ˜80 to 210 m since 120 Ma. This implies a long-term sea-level rise component of 130 m, partly counteracting the contemporaneous increase in ocean basin depth due to progressive crustal ageing.

  4. 77 FR 20590 - Ocean Dumping; Designation of Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites Offshore of Yaquina Bay, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... sediment, short-term disruption in avian foraging behavior, modification of bottom topography, loss of... species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of any critical habitat. The EPA prepared a...

  5. Geotechnical and mineralogical characterisations of marine-dredged sediments before and after stabilisation to optimise their use as a road material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussaye, L; van Veen, E; Rollinson, G; Boutouil, M; Andersen, J; Coggan, J

    2017-12-01

    Dredging activities to extend, deepen and maintain access to harbours generate significant volumes of waste dredged material. Some ways are investigated to add value to these sediments. One solution described here is their use in road construction following treatment with hydraulic binders. This paper presents the characterisation of four sediments, in their raw state and after 90 days of curing following stabilisation treatment with lime and cement, using a combination of novel and established analytical techniques to investigate subsequent changes in mineralogy. These sediments are classified as fine, moderately to highly organic and highly plastic and their behaviour is linked to the presence of smectite clays. The main minerals found in the sediments using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and automated mineralogy are quartz, calcite, feldspars, aluminium silicates, pyrite and halite. Stabilisation was found to improve the mechanical performances of all the sediments. The formation of cementitious hydrates was not specifically detected using automated mineralogy or XRD. However, a decrease in the percentage volume of aluminium silicates and aluminium-iron silicates and an increase of the percentage volume of feldspars and carbonates was observed.

  6. Guidelines for assessing the valorization of a waste into cementitious material: dredged sediment for production of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozas, F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some guidelines in order to analyse the feasibility of including a waste material in the production of a structural cementitious material. First of all, the compatibility of the waste with a cementitious material has to be assured; then, if necessary, a decontamination step will be carried out; after, decision on the type of material has to be taken based on different aspects, with special emphasis on the granulometry. As a last step, mechanical, environmental and durability properties have to be evaluated. Then the procedure is illustrated with a full example, obtaining a self compacting concrete (SCC including dredged sediment taken from a Spanish harbour.Este artículo presenta algunas directrices con el fin de analizar la posibilidad de incluir un material de desecho en la producción de un material base cemento estructural. En primer lugar, debe asegurarse la compatibilidad de los residuos con el material base cemento. Tras ello, si es necesario, se llevará a cabo la etapa de descontaminación del residuo. Después debe tomarse la decisión sobre el tipo de material a utilizar en base a diferentes aspectos, haciendo especial énfasis en la granulometría. Como último paso, deben evaluarse las propiedades mecánicas, ambientales y de durabilidad del producto final. El procedimiento a seguir se ilustra con un ejemplo concreto basado en la obtención de un hormigón autocompactante (SCC incluyendo en su fabricación sedimentos dragados tomados de un puerto español.

  7. Dredged Material Analysis Tools; Performance of Acute and Chronic Sediment Toxicity Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    NOAA SQuiRT Tables (1999), such as effects range median (ERM), were exceeded for PAHs, PCBs, ΣDDT, and metals in some sediments. Tributyl tins ( TBT ...Tetrabutyltin 2.0 5.7 5.3 2.9 5.2 4.0 4.8 4.0 4.9 2.7 NA Tributyltin 1.8 16 4.7 2.5 6.2 3.5 4.3 52 4.3 2.4 NA Dibutyltin 1.5 11 4.0 2.2 5.1 3.0 3.7 9.0 3.7

  8. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  9. Impact of pozzolanic binder addition on stabilization of polluted dredged sediments on its potential reuse as a new material resource for road construction in Basse Normandie, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silitonga, E.

    2018-02-01

    Due to the increase of the amount of marine dredged sediments (MDS) and the cost of managing the disposal site is very high, a reutilization of dredged sediment is urgently needed in France. The primary goal of this research is to find a domain for reuse of MDS materials as a new material regarding the environmental issues, and other requirement needed. In this study, the MDS was used as replacement material in road construction. Hence, various tests need to be realized to identify if MDS could achieve the requirement needed in this domain. The secondary objective is to enhance the geotechnical characteristic and to reduce the pollution content of the MDS, by incorporating binders and sediments, and revealed the geotechnical characteristic. The geotechnical test result shows that the stabilization by hydraulics binders improve the geotechnical characteristic and could fulfil the requirement needed. The present of Fly Ash and Silica Fume in this study is aimed to reduce the pollution level, especially the heavy metal content. After the geotechnical study in laboratory results shows as expected then the study to identify the chemical characteristic was realized. In order to evaluate the environmental impacts, leaching test was performed. The Leaching test result shows that with 7% of Silica Fume and 10% of Fly Ash capable to fulfil the criteria needed, hence, the use of MDS is consider safe in term of geotechnical and environmental impact, as a new material in road construction

  10. Three-dimensional visualization maps of suspended-sediment concentrations during placement of dredged material in 21st Avenue West Channel Embayment, Duluth-Superior Harbor, Duluth, Minnesota, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Mahoney, Mollie H.

    2016-06-30

    Excess sediment in rivers and estuaries poses serious environmental and economic challenges. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) routinely dredges sediment in Federal navigation channels to maintain commercial shipping operations. The USACE initiated a 3-year pilot project in 2013 to use navigation channel dredged material to aid in restoration of shoreline habitat in the 21st Avenue West Channel Embayment of the Duluth-Superior Harbor. Placing dredged material in the 21st Avenue West Channel Embayment supports the restoration of shallow bay aquatic habitat aiding in the delisting of the St. Louis River Estuary Area of Concern.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the USACE, collected turbidity and suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) in 2014 and 2015 to measure the horizontal and vertical distribution of SSCs during placement operations of dredged materials. These data were collected to help the USACE evaluate the use of several best management practices, including various dredge material placement techniques and a silt curtain, to mitigate the dispersion of suspended sediment.Three-dimensional visualization maps are a valuable tool for assessing the spatial displacement of SSCs. Data collection was designed to coincide with four dredged placement configurations that included periods with and without a silt curtain as well as before and after placement of dredged materials. Approximately 230 SSC samples and corresponding turbidity values collected in 2014 and 2015 were used to develop a simple linear regression model between SSC and turbidity. Using the simple linear regression model, SSCs were estimated for approximately 3,000 turbidity values at approximately 100 sampling sites in the 21st Avenue West Channel Embayment of the Duluth-Superior Harbor. The estimated SSCs served as input for development of 12 three-dimensional visualization maps.

  11. determination of area and volume from dredged geodata set

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    or volume of dredged materials can be determined for the purpose of costing and extent of the dredging. Therefore, ... To excavate pipeline, cable and tunnel trenches. ❖ To mine ores or ... depends, in part, on the sediment properties[9].An.

  12. Sediment Plumes Resulting from the Port of Miami Dredging: Analysis and Interpretation Using Satellite Data and Long Term Monitoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, B. B.; Hu, C.; Kovach, C.; Silverstein, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    From November 2013 through mid-2015, large turbidity plumes were observed offshore the Port of Miami (Florida, USA), likely associated with a project to deepen and widen the Miami Harbor channels. Using data from local monitoring programs, however, it is difficult to estimate the size, duration, extent, and severity (relative to natural turbidity events) of these plumes. In contrast, satellite observing systems offer a platform from which these plumes can be monitored and placed in historical context. As such, turbidity plumes captured by MODIS (Aqua) and Landsat 8 reflectance data were manually outlined. For MODIS, these delineations were refined using reflectance anomaly thresholds, determined from pre-dredging data. Long term records of local environmental conditions were used to account for conditions (e.g., wind speed, tidal stage) for which elevated reflectance data might be expected in the absence of dredging. The spatial extent of turbidity plumes observed in the Port of Miami region during the dredging period ranged from 127 and 228 km2, at least 5 times that immediately prior to dredging. The frequency of observed plumes in satellite imagery increased from 23% to 84% after dredging began, while temporal differences in plume location, severity, and size were also observed. Turbidity plumes may have large adverse effects on coral communities, and this region is home to many species of coral (including some considered threatened by the US Endangered Species Act). Indeed, over 11 km2 of coral area was affected by these plumes, with some locations within plume delineations on nearly 40% of images. The approaches developed in this work, in particular the focus on historical norms after considering all perturbation factors, may be included in monitoring and assessment of this and future dredging activities, especially where fragile marine ecosystems may potentially be impacted.

  13. Developing Sediment Transport and Dredging Prediction Model of Ohio River at Olmsted Locks and Dams Area using HEC-RAS (1D/2D)By Ganesh Raj Ghimire1 and Bruce A. Devantier 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment deposition is a serious issue in the construction and operation of large reservoir and inland navigation projects in the United States and around the world. Olmsted Locks and Dams in the Ohio River navigation system is facing similar challenges of huge sediment deposition during the ongoing in-wet construction methodology since 1993. HEC-RAS 5.0 integrated with ArcGIS, will be used to yield unsteady 2D hydrodynamic model of Ohio River at Olmsted area. Velocity, suspended sediment, bed sediment and hydrographic survey data acquired from public archives of USGS and USACE Louisville District will be input into the model. Calibration and validation of model will be performed against the measured stage, flow and velocity data. It will be subjected to completely unsteady 1D sediment transport modeling new to HEC-RAS 5.0 which incorporates sediment load and bed gradation via a DSS file, commercial dredging and BSTEM model. Sediment model will be calibrated to replicate the historical bed volume changes. Excavated cross-sections at Olmsted area will also be used to predict the sediment volume trapped inside the ditch over the period between excavations and placement of dam shells at site. Model will attempt to replicate historical dredging volume data and compare with the deposition volume from simulation model to formulate the dredging prediction model. Hence, the results of this research will generate a model that can form a basis for scheduling the dredging event prior to the placement of off-shore cast shells replacing the current as and when required approach of dredging plan. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603

  14. Volcanogenic sediments in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.

    for productivity. On the other hand, elements like Fe, Ti, Mg, Mn, Cu and Ni are all diluted by glass shards because these elements content is lower than the associated sediment. Therefore one has to careful while interpreting bulk chemical data without...

  15. Effect of cement dosage and early curing towards Kuala Perlis dredged marine sediments: a ɛv - σv and SEM-EDX approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syakeera Nordin, Nurul; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Cement is the primary material used in solidifying the soft soils. This material was applied in solidifying Kuala Perlis dredged marine sediments (DMS). These unwanted sediments are classified as high plasticity silt, MH with 3.36 LL of wc/LL value. At dosage 10 and 20 % of cemented-DMS and 3 days curing time, compression curve results shows the settlement criteria were enhanced than the natural DMS. Unfortunately, the settlement criteria are not complies with the permissible settlement limit and applicable pressure. The formation of cementing compounds appears in the SEM micrograph for 10 and 20 % of cemented-DMS. EDX analysis shows the Ca:Si ratio were increased for cemented-DMS due to the formation of C-S-H gel.

  16. Ion migration in ocean sediments: subseafloor radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Ray, A.K.; Davis, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    In this study of seabed disposal, analytical ion transport models were developed and used to elucidate ion migration through ocean sediments and to study the escape of ions from the ocean floor into the water column. An unsteady state isothermal diffusion model was developed for the region far from the canister to examine the effects of ion diffusion, adsorption, radioactive decay, sediment thickness and canister position. Analytical solutions were derived to represent the transient concentration profiles within the sediment, ion flux and the ion discharge rate to the water column for two types of initial conditions: instantaneous dissolution of the canister and constant canister leakage. Generalized graphs showing ion migration and behavior are presented

  17. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel: Phase 3 -- biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Karle, L.M.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; White, P.J.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The John F. Baldwin Ship Channel is a 28-mile-long portion of the San Francisco Bay to Stockton Ship Channel, the primary shipping lane through San Francisco Bay and Delta. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for construction of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel, which is authorized to be deepened to a project depth of {minus}45 ft relative to mean lower low water (MLLW). Approximately 8.5 million cubic yards (mcy) of sediment will be removed from the channel to reach this project depth. The USACE requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct testing for ocean disposal under the guidelines in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal-Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1991). This testing manual contains a tiered evaluation approach developed specifically for ocean disposal of dredged material at a selected site. In this study, John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediments were evaluated under the Tier III (biological) testing guidance, which is considered to be highly stringent and protective of the environment. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects, (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material).

  18. Widespread Anthropogenic Nitrogen in Northwestern Pacific Ocean Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haryun; Lee, Kitack; Lim, Dhong-Il; Nam, Seung-Il; Kim, Tae-Wook; Yang, Jin-Yu T; Ko, Young Ho; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Eunil

    2017-06-06

    Sediment samples from the East China and Yellow seas collected adjacent to continental China were found to have lower δ 15 N values (expressed as δ 15 N = [ 15 N: 14 N sample / 15 N: 14 N air - 1] × 1000‰; the sediment 15 N: 14 N ratio relative to the air nitrogen 15 N: 14 N ratio). In contrast, the Arctic sediments from the Chukchi Sea, the sampling region furthest from China, showed higher δ 15 N values (2-3‰ higher than those representing the East China and the Yellow sea sediments). Across the sites sampled, the levels of sediment δ 15 N increased with increasing distance from China, which is broadly consistent with the decreasing influence of anthropogenic nitrogen (N ANTH ) resulting from fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer use. We concluded that, of several processes, the input of N ANTH appears to be emerging as a new driver of change in the sediment δ 15 N value in marginal seas adjacent to China. The present results indicate that the effect of N ANTH has extended beyond the ocean water column into the deep sedimentary environment, presumably via biological assimilation of N ANTH followed by deposition. Further, the findings indicate that N ANTH is taking over from the conventional paradigm of nitrate flux from nitrate-rich deep water as the primary driver of biological export production in this region of the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study.

  20. Production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in Arctic Ocean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Seung-Il; Niessen, Frank; Hong, Wei-Li; Kang, Moo-Hee; Hur, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the anoxic oceanic sediments. In this study, sediment pore waters were sampled from four different sites in the Chukchi-East Siberian Seas area to examine the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and their optical properties. The production of FDOM, coupled with the increase of nutrients, was observed above the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ). The presence of FDOM was concurrent with sulfate reduction and increased alkalinity (R2 > 0.96, p  0.95, p CDOM and FDOM to the overlying water column, unearthing a channel of generally bio-refractory and pre-aged DOM to the oceans.

  1. Finite element analysis of thermal convection in deep ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartling, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Of obvious importance to the study and engineering of a seabed disposal is the determination of the temperature and fluid flow fields existing in the sediment layer and the perturbation of these fields due to the implantation of localized heat sources. The fluid mechanical and heat transfer process occurring in oceanic sediments may be characterized as free (or natural) convection in a porous material. In the case of an undisturbed sediment layer, the driving force for the natural circulation of pore water comes from the geothermal heat flux. Current theories for heat flow from the sea floor suggest the possibility of large scale hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust (see e.g., Ribando, et al. 1976) which is in turn coupled with a convection process in the overlying sediment layer (Anderson 1980, Anderson, et al. 1979). The introduction of a local heat source, such as a waste canister, into a saturated sediment layer would by itself initiate a convection process due to buoyancy forces. Since the mathematical description of natural convection in a porous medium is of sufficient complexity to preclude the use of most analytic methods of analysis, approximate numerical procedures are often employed. In the following sections, a particular type of numerical method is described that has proved useful in the solution of a variety of porous flow problems. However, rather than concentrate on the details of the numerical algorithm the main emphasis of the presentation will be on the types of problems and results that are encountered in the areas of oceanic heat flow and seabed waste disposal

  2. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.; van Rijswijk, P.; Pozzato, L.; Middelburg, J.J.

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer

  3. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sediment Processes in Shallow Waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.; van Rijswijk, P.; Pozzato, L.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer

  4. Characterization of sediment from the dredging of storm water channels in the city of Salvador-BA, Brazil aiming to use in structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, O.C.; Breitenbach, S.B.; Coelho, R.E.; Andrade, J.C.S.; Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Paskocimas, C.A.; Martinelli, A.E.; Nascimento, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize sediment from the dredging of storm water channels (Scp) in the city of Salvador, Bahia, aiming its maximum replacement by clay in structural ceramics, since this binary mixture is part of the pilot project of the standard mass, in the research of interlocked block ceramic formulation. Initially, the sediment was submitted to the following tests: plasticity index; chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence; mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction; thermal and particle size analyses. The morphology of the material was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Then, sediment (Scp) was added to clay from the municipality of Candelas, Bahia, in the proportions of 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%. Specimens were prepared by uniaxial pressing in dimensions of 60 mm x 20 mm, with compacting pressure of 25 MPa, and the material was humidified with 8% of water. Firing was conducted in resistive furnace at temperatures of 850, 950 and 1050 deg C, with 5 deg C / min heating rate. The properties evaluated were: linear shrinkage; water absorption and modulus of rupture. The results indicated the possibility of using SCP in structural ceramics by the prerequisites required in standards, in the manufacture of tiles, sealing blocks and bricks. (author)

  5. Electrodialytic remediation of sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    Sediments of harbors and freshwaters are regularly dredged for various reasons: maintenance of navigational depths, recovery of recreational locations, and even environmental recovery. In the past, sediments dredged from harbors have been dumped at sea, however, environmental regulations now, in ...

  6. Environmental dredging residual generation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patmont, Clay; LaRosa, Paul; Narayanan, Raghav; Forrest, Casey

    2018-05-01

    The presence and magnitude of sediment contamination remaining in a completed dredge area can often dictate the success of an environmental dredging project. The need to better understand and manage this remaining contamination, referred to as "postdredging residuals," has increasingly been recognized by practitioners and investigators. Based on recent dredging projects with robust characterization programs, it is now understood that the residual contamination layer in the postdredging sediment comprises a mixture of contaminated sediments that originate from throughout the dredge cut. This mixture of contaminated sediments initially exhibits fluid mud properties that can contribute to sediment transport and contamination risk outside of the dredge area. This article reviews robust dredging residual evaluations recently performed in the United States and Canada, including the Hudson River, Lower Fox River, Ashtabula River, and Esquimalt Harbour, along with other projects. These data better inform the understanding of residuals generation, leading to improved models of dredging residual formation to inform remedy evaluation, selection, design, and implementation. Data from these projects confirm that the magnitude of dredging residuals is largely determined by site conditions, primarily in situ sediment fluidity or liquidity as measured by dry bulk density. While the generation of dredging residuals cannot be avoided, residuals can be successfully and efficiently managed through careful development and implementation of site-specific management plans. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:335-343. © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  7. An experimental study on dredge spoil of estuarine sediments in the bay of seine (France): A morphosedimentary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmin, Stella; Lesueur, Patrick; Dauvin, Jean Claude; Samson, Sandrine; Tournier, Patrice; Gallicher Lavanne, Albert; Dubrulle-Brunaud, Carole; Thouroude, Coralie

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the consequences of dredging on estuarine morphology and its sedimentary dynamics are common, but the impacts of dumping dredge spoil in coastal open settings are rarely found in scientific literature. An experimental study was conducted over the period 2012-2013 to monitor the physical impacts of dredged material dumped at two adjacent sites (one million cubic metres at each) on the inner shelf of the Bay of Seine in France (eastern part of the English Channel, La Manche). As recently reinforced in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), knowledge on the location and intensity of human impacts (e.g. on marine ecosystems) is critical for effective marine management and conservation. So, two methods of disposition were tested to evaluate the impacts of dumping on the environment and thus propose recommendations for future dumping. The strategy is based on a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) approach, in which the spatio-temporal variability was studied by analysing the morphological and sedimentological characteristics over a period of 28 months, from November 2011 to April 2014, also including recovery of the seafloor after cessation of the dumping activities. The first experimental dumping operation (MASED) was carried out regularly for 8 months at a single point and generating a conical deposit of 5 m in height, while the second dumping (MABIO) lasted for 12 months involving four steps in the dumping process. In the second case, a wider area was covered, leading to the formation of a smaller deposit of 2 m in height. The dumped deposits consisted of muddy fine sand, whereas the inner shelf seafloor in this area is covered with fine to medium sand. As a result, muddy fine sand accumulated at or near the two dumping sites, with a maximum mud (i.e. particles4 Φ) content of 50% compared todredged material remained at the end of the dumping periods. After dumping ceased, a further 5% of material for MABIO and 20% for MASED, was transported out

  8. Introduction to Using Native Plant Community on Dredge Material Placement Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    solutions, such as riprap. In some cases, plants may also reduce offsite transport of particles from the surface of the sediments placed in the...to 30% of the in situ sediment volume). Hydraulic dredging, which involves re-suspension of sediments into a slurry that is then pumped through a...may be mechanically dredged and mechanically offloaded from barges, mechanically dredged and hydraulically offloaded, or hydraulically dredging and

  9. Physical and biological impact on marine benthic Polychaetes due to dredging in the Mormugao harbour, Goa and its restoration after dredging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.

    The proportion of gravel in the sediment of the dredged site increased after-dredging, while that of organic matter decreased The impact on community was estimated at species level, using both univariate and multivariate analyses Maximum negative effect...

  10. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 1 of -42-foot project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Steinhauer, W.; Hyland, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected sediment cores from 20 stations in Oakland Harbor, evaluated the cores geologically, analyzed sediment for selected contaminants, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates (Macoma nasuta, Nephtys caecoides, Ampelisca abdita, and Rhepoxynius abronius), and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in tissues of M. nasuta. Toxicological test results indicate that none of the sediment from the channel-area stations (CH-1 - CH-7), the Merritt Sand samples (MS-1 and MS-2), or the reference sediment sites (PR-C and PR-F) resulted in significant sediment toxicity to the four species tested. Sediment treatments showing no significant sediment toxicity as well as no significant bioaccumulation included CH-5, MS-1, MS-2, PR-coarse, and PR-fine. Stations that showed little or no significant sediment toxicity, but significant bioaccumulation included SS-2-L (PAHs); TS-1-L (Cu, PAHs, PCBs, tributyltin, and DDE); TS-1-U (tributyltin); TS-5-U (PAHs, PCBs, DDE, and tributyltin); SS-1-U (PB, PAHs, and PCBs); SS-5-L (PAHs, PCBs, and DDE); CH-6 and CH-7 (PAHs, PCBs, and DDE); Ch-4 and CH-1 (Cr); and CH-3 (DDE). 28 refs., 31 figs., 75 tabs

  11. Bacterial Diversity in Deep-Sea Sediments from Afanasy Nikitin Seamount, Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Meena, R.M.; Deobagkar, D.D.

    Deep-sea sediments can reveal much about the last 200 million years of Earth history, including the history of ocean life and climate. Microbial diversity in Afanasy Nikitin seamount located at Equatorial East Indian Ocean (EEIO) was investigated...

  12. Total Sediment Thickness of the World's Oceans & Marginal Seas, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC's global ocean sediment thickness grid (Divins, 2003) has been updated for the Australian-Antarctic region (60?? -155?? E, 30?? -70?? S). New seismic reflection...

  13. Archive of Geosample Information from the British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility (BOSCORF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility (BOSCORF), National Oceanography Centre, is a contributor to the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  14. Dynamic hole closure behind a deep ocean sediment penetrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzwilewski, P.T.; Karnes, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    A freefall or boosted penetrator is one concept being considered to dispose of nuclear waste in the deep ocean seabed. For this technique to be acceptable, the sediment must be an effective barrier to the migration of radioactive nuclides, which means that the hole behind the advancing penetrator must close. One mechanism which can cause the hole to close immediately behind the penetrator is the reduction in water pressure in the wake as water tries to follow the penetrator into the sediment. An approximate solution to this complex problem is presented which analyzes the deformation of the sediment with a nonlinear, large displacement and strain, Lagrangian finite-difference computer code (STEALTH). The water was treated by Bernoulli's Principle for flow in a pipe resulting in a pressure boundary condition applied to the sediment surface along the path after passage of the penetrator. Two one-dimensional and eight two-dimensional calculations were performed with various penetrator velocities (15, 30, and 60 m/s) and sediment shear strengths. In two of the calculations, the dynamic pressure reduction was neglected to see if geostatic stresses alone would close the hole. The results of this study showed that geostatic stresses alone would not close the hole but the dynamic pressure reduction would. The largest uncertainty in the analysis was the pressure conditions in the water behind the penetrator in which frictionless, steady-state flow, in a uniform diameter pipe was assumed. A more sophisticated and realistic pressure condition has been formulated and will be implemented in the computer code in the near future

  15. Vertical suspsended sediment fluxes observed from ocean gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckelbach, Lucas; Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Many studies trying to understand a coastal system in terms of sediment transport paths resort to numerical modelling - combining circulation models with sediment transport models. Two aspects herein are crucial: sediment fluxes across the sea bed-water column interface, and the subsequent vertical mixing by turbulence. Both aspects are highly complex and have relatively short time scales, so that the processes involved are implemented in numerical models as parameterisations. Due to the effort required to obtain field observations of suspended sediment concentrations (and other parameters), measurements are scarce, which makes the development and tuning of parameterisations a difficult task. Ocean gliders (autonomous underwater vehicles propelled by a buoyancy engine) provide a platform complementing more traditional methods of sampling. In this work we present observations of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and dissipation rate taken by two gliders, each equipped with optical sensors and a microstructure sensor, along with current observations from a bottom mounted ADCP, all operated in the German Bight sector of the North Sea in Summer 2014. For about two weeks of a four-week experiment, the gliders were programmed to fly in a novel way as Lagrangian profilers to water depths of about 40 m. The benefit of this approach is that the rate of change of SSC - and other parameters - is local to the water column, as opposed to an unknown composition of temporal and spatial variability when gliders are operated in the usual way. Therefore, vertical sediment fluxes can be calculated without the need of the - often dubious - assumption that spatial variability can be neglected. During the experiment the water column was initially thermally stratified, with a cross-pycnocline diffusion coefficient estimated at 7\\cdot10-5 m2 s-1. Halfway through the experiment the remnants of tropical storm Bertha arrived at the study site and caused a complete mixing of the water

  16. Influence of flooding and metal immobilising soil amendments on availability of metals for willows and earthworms in calcareous dredged sediment-derived soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, Bart, E-mail: bart.vandecasteele@ilvo.vlaanderen.b [Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Scientific Institute of the Flemish Government, Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 109, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium); Du Laing, Gijs [Ghent University, Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Coupure 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Lettens, Suzanna [Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Scientific Institute of the Flemish Government, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Jordaens, Kurt [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Tack, Filip M.G. [Ghent University, Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Coupure 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Soil amendments previously shown to be effective in reducing metal bioavailability and/or mobility in calcareous metal-polluted soils were tested on a calcareous dredged sediment-derived soil with 26 mg Cd/kg dry soil, 2200 mg Cr/kg dry soil, 220 mg Pb/kg dry soil, and 3000 mg Zn/kg dry soil. The amendments were 5% modified aluminosilicate (AS), 10% w/w lignin, 1% w/w diammonium phosphate (DAP, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}), 1% w/w MnO, and 5% w/w CaSO{sub 4}. In an additional treatment, the contaminated soil was submerged. Endpoints were metal uptake in Salix cinerea and Lumbricus terrestris, and effect on oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in submerged soils. Results illustrated that the selected soil amendments were not effective in reducing ecological risk to vegetation or soil inhabiting invertebrates, as metal uptake in willows and earthworms did not significantly decrease following their application. Flooding the polluted soil resulted in metal uptake in S. cinerea comparable with concentrations for an uncontaminated soil. - Some soil amendments resulted in higher metal uptake by earthworms and willows than when the polluted soil was not amended but submersion of the polluted soil resulted in reduced Cd and Zn uptake in Salix cinerea.

  17. Measurement of penetration depths of plutonium and americium in sediment from the ocean floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, S.; Friedman, A.; Hines, J.; Sjoblom, R.; Schmitz, G.; Schreiner, F.

    1979-01-01

    The clay-like sediment covering the ocean floor constitutes the last barrier that shields the biosphere from contamination by radionuclides stemming from the nuclear wastes of a subseabed repository. In the event of a failure of the engineered barriers the mobility of the released radionuclides in the sediment determines the rate and the extent of entry into the water of the ocean. The initial results of measurements designed to determine the mobility of transuranium elements in sediment from the ocean floor are presented. Data indicate very low migration rates and imply strong chemisorptive interaction with the sediment

  18. Eddy correlation measurements of oxygen uptake in deep ocean sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, P.; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Hume, A.

    2010-01-01

    .62 +/- 0.23 (SE, n = 7), 1.65 +/- 0.33 (n = 2), and 1.43 +/- 0.15 (n = 25) mmol m(-2) d(-1). The very good agreement between the eddy correlation flux and the chamber flux serves as a new, important validation of the eddy correlation technique. It demonstrates that the eddy correlation instrumentation......Abstract: We present and compare small sediment-water fluxes of O-2 determined with the eddy correlation technique, with in situ chambers, and from vertical sediment microprofiles at a 1450 m deep-ocean site in Sagami Bay, Japan. The average O-2 uptake for the three approaches, respectively, was 1...... available today is precise and can resolve accurately even very small benthic O-2 fluxes. The correlated fluctuations in vertical velocity and O-2 concentration that give the eddy flux had average values of 0.074 cm s(-1) and 0.049 mu M. The latter represents only 0.08% of the 59 mu M mean O-2 concentration...

  19. A Method for Simulating Sedimentation of Fish Eggs to Generate Biological Effects Data for Assessing Dredging Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    flocculation (Sutherland et al. 2014; Kranck 1980; Wechsler and Cogley 1977). An influential variable measured in exposure chambers was salinity of the test ... test water through the chamber without disturbing the sediment layer, and contain screens to prevent fish from escaping. The ability to accurately...both the inside and outside the chamber. This created a water-tight seal and prevented test organisms from escaping around the elbow. Silicone was

  20. Ocean floor sediment as a repository barrier: comparative diffusion data for selected radionuclides in sediments from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, F.; Sabau, C.; Friedman, A.; Fried, S.

    1986-01-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients for selected radionuclides have been measured in ocean floor sediments to provide data for the assessment of barrier effectiveness in subseabed repositories for nuclear waste. The sediments tested include illite-rich and smectite-rich red clays from the mid plate gyre region of the Pacific Ocean, reducing sediment from the continental shelf of the northwest coast of North America, and Atlantic Ocean sediments from the Southern Nares Abyssal Plain and the Great Meteor East region. Results show extremely small effective diffusion coefficients with values less than 10 -14 m 2 s -1 for plutonium, americium, curium, thorium, and tin. Radionuclides with high diffusion coefficients of approximately 10 -10 m 2 s - include the anionic species pertechnetate, TcO 4 - , iodide, I - , and selenite, SO 3 -2 . Uranyl(VI) and neptunyl(V) ions, which are stable in solution, have diffusion coefficients around 10 -12 m 2 s -1 . The diffusion behavior of most radionuclides is similar in the oxygenated Pacific sediments and in the anoxic sediments from the Atlantic. An exception is neptunium, which is immobilized by Great Meteor East sediment, but has high mobility in Southern Nares Abyssal Plain sediment. Under stagnant conditions a 30 m thick sediment layer forms an effective geologic barrier isolating radionuclides in a subseabed repository from the biosphere

  1. Ocean floor sediment as a repository barrier: comparative diffusion data for selected radionuclides in sediments from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, F.; Sabau, C.; Friedman, A.; Fried, S.

    1985-01-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients for selected radionuclides have been measured in ocean floor sediments to provide data for the assessment of barrier effectiveness in subseabed repositories for nuclear waste. The sediments tested include illite-rich and smectite-rich red clays from the mid-plate gyre region of the Pacific Ocean, reducing sediment from the continental shelf of the northwest coast of North America, and Atlantic Ocean sediments from the Southern Nares Abyssal Plain and the Great Meteor East region. Results show extremely small effective diffusion coefficients with values less than 10/sup -14/ m/sup 2/s/sup -1/ for plutonium, americium, curium, thorium, and tin. Radionuclides with high diffusion coefficients of approximately 10/sup -10/ m/sup 2/s/sup -1/ include the anionic species pertechnetate, TcO/sub 4//sup -/, iodide, I/sup -/, and selenite, SeO/sub 3//sup -2/. Uranyl(VI) and neptunyl(V) ions, which are stable in solution, have diffusion coefficients around 10/sup -12/ m/sup 2/s/sup -1/. The diffusion behavior of most radionuclides is similar in the oxygenated Pacific sediments and in the anoxic sediments from the Atlantic. An exception is neptunium, which is immobilized by Great Meteor East sediment, but has high mobility in Southern Nares Abyssal Plain sediment. Under stagnant conditions a 30 m thick sediment layer forms an effective geologic barrier isolating radionuclides in a subseabed repository from the biosphere. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Ocean floor sediment as a repository barrier: comparative diffusion data for selected radionuclides in sediments from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, F.; Sabau, C.; Friedman, A.; Fried, S.

    1985-01-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients for selected radionuclides have been measured in ocean floor sediments to provide data for the assessment of barrier effectiveness in subseabed repositories for nuclear waste. The sediments tested include illite-rich and smectite-rich red clays from the mid-plate gyre region of the Pacific Ocean, reducing sediment from the continental shelf of the northwest coast of North America, and Atlantic Ocean sediments from the Southern Nares Abyssal Plain and the Great Meteor East region. Results show extremely small effective diffusion coefficients with values less than 10 -14 m 2 s -1 for plutonium, americium, curium, thorium, and tin. Radionuclides with high diffusion coefficients of approximately 10 -10 m 2 s -1 include the anionic species pertechnetate, TcO 4 - , iodide, I - , and selenite, SeO 3 -2 . Uranyl(VI) and neptunyl(V) ions, which are stable in solution, have diffusion coefficients around 10 -12 m 2 s -1 . The diffusion behavior of most radionuclides is similar in the oxygenated Pacific sediments and in the anoxic sediments from the Atlantic. An exception is neptunium, which is immobilized by Great Meteor East sediment, but has high mobility in Southern Nares Abyssal Plain sediment. Under stagnant conditions a 30 m thick sediment layer forms an effective geologic barrier isolating radionuclides in a subseabed repository from the biosphere. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Dredging up the past -- removal of historic low-level radioactive sediment from the Port Hope harbour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, ON (Canada); Kolberg, M. [Baird, Oakville, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Port Hope is located on the northern shore of Lake Ontario at the confluence of the Ganaraska River and has existed as a Port of Entry since at least 1819. Once operated as a major Lake Ontario port, through periods of vibrant industrial growth, it is now a recreational anchorage for the local yacht club. The history of the Port Hope harbour from the early 1800s to today is typical of other small-town ports along Lake Ontario that have experienced growth and decline in direct relation to Great Lake shipping volumes and the shift in industry and commerce to larger urban areas. However, in the case of the Port Hope harbour, the presence of low-level radioactive sediment, resulting from a former radium and uranium refinery that operated alongside the harbour, currently limits redevelopment and revitalization opportunities. The presence of low-level radioactive waste is not limited to only harbour sediments. Several other on-land locations within the community are also affected by the low-level radioactive waste management practices of the past. To address these situations, the Port Hope Area Initiative project is currently underway to implement a local, safe, long-term waste management solution. The Port Hope Area Initiative is a community initiated undertaking that will result in the consolidation of an estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of the low-level radioactive waste from the various sites in Port Hope into a new engineered above ground long-term waste management facility. The remedial cleanup of the estimated 120,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediments from the Port Hope harbour is one of the more challenging components of the Initiative. This paper demonstrates how the historical development of the harbour over the past 200 years, the nature and extent of the contaminated sediments, and Municipality of Port Hope’s desires for future redevelopment of the waterfront area have all played a role in the design of the remedial cleanup plan for the Port Hope

  4. Dredging up the past -- removal of historic low-level radioactive sediment from the Port Hope harbour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, G.; Kolberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    Port Hope is located on the northern shore of Lake Ontario at the confluence of the Ganaraska River and has existed as a Port of Entry since at least 1819. Once operated as a major Lake Ontario port, through periods of vibrant industrial growth, it is now a recreational anchorage for the local yacht club. The history of the Port Hope harbour from the early 1800s to today is typical of other small-town ports along Lake Ontario that have experienced growth and decline in direct relation to Great Lake shipping volumes and the shift in industry and commerce to larger urban areas. However, in the case of the Port Hope harbour, the presence of low-level radioactive sediment, resulting from a former radium and uranium refinery that operated alongside the harbour, currently limits redevelopment and revitalization opportunities. The presence of low-level radioactive waste is not limited to only harbour sediments. Several other on-land locations within the community are also affected by the low-level radioactive waste management practices of the past. To address these situations, the Port Hope Area Initiative project is currently underway to implement a local, safe, long-term waste management solution. The Port Hope Area Initiative is a community initiated undertaking that will result in the consolidation of an estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of the low-level radioactive waste from the various sites in Port Hope into a new engineered above ground long-term waste management facility. The remedial cleanup of the estimated 120,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediments from the Port Hope harbour is one of the more challenging components of the Initiative. This paper demonstrates how the historical development of the harbour over the past 200 years, the nature and extent of the contaminated sediments, and Municipality of Port Hope’s desires for future redevelopment of the waterfront area have all played a role in the design of the remedial cleanup plan for the Port Hope

  5. Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations Program: Assessing Bioaccumulation in Aquatic Organisms Exposed to Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Wrd0 est t Or f mn1of ey O0 0 *WWI ttoth colme n fo, matlo, innl vd. q c e m s for redun tdn. tor• de I. to Wa.<fqgon NodQu~arten $e•vKVL a i. e...lower the affinity of a chemical for a compartment, the greater will be its tendency to escape from that compartment. Fugacity (from the Latin fuga ...fraction TOC content (Karickhoff, Brown, and Scott 21 1979). Such normalization can give a better idea of the’aount of chemical in a sediment that is

  6. Potential of Brassic rapa, Cannabis sativa, Helianthus annuus and Zea mays for phytoextraction of heavy metals from calcareous dredged sediment derived soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, E; Ruttens, A; Hopgood, M; Lesage, E; Tack, F M G

    2005-10-01

    Remediation of soil pollution is one of the many current environmental challenges. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in the contamination of extended areas of land, the remediation of which is both invasive and expensive by conventional means. Phytoextraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils has the prospect of being a more economic in situ alternative. In addition, phytoextraction targets ecotoxicologically the most relevant soil fraction of these metals, i.e. the bioavailable fraction. Greenhouse experiments were carried out to evaluate the potential of four high biomass crop species in their potential for phytoextraction of heavy metals, with or without with the use of soil amendments (EDTA or EDDS). A calcareous dredged sediment derived surface soil, with high organic matter and clay content and moderate levels of heavy metal pollution, was used in the experiments. No growth depression was observed in EDTA or EDDS treated pots in comparison to untreated controls. Metal accumulation was considered to be low for phytoextraction purposes, despite the use of chelating agents. The low observed shoot concentrations of heavy metals were attributed to the low phytoavailability of heavy metals in this particular soil substrate. The mobilising effects induced by EDTA in the soil were found to be too long-lived for application as a soil amendment in phytoextraction. Although EDDS was found to be more biodegradable, higher effect half lives were observed than reported in literature or observed in previous experiments. These findings caution against the use of any amendment, biodegradable or otherwise, without proper investigation of its effects and the longevity thereof.

  7. Reconciling surface ocean productivity, export fluxes and sediment composition in a global biogeochemical ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gehlen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on an improved representation of the biological soft tissue pump in the global three-dimensional biogeochemical ocean model PISCES. We compare three parameterizations of particle dynamics: (1 the model standard version including two particle size classes, aggregation-disaggregation and prescribed sinking speed; (2 an aggregation-disaggregation model with a particle size spectrum and prognostic sinking speed; (3 a mineral ballast parameterization with no size classes, but prognostic sinking speed. In addition, the model includes a description of surface sediments and organic carbon early diagenesis. Model output is compared to data or data based estimates of ocean productivity, pe-ratios, particle fluxes, surface sediment bulk composition and benthic O2 fluxes. Model results suggest that different processes control POC fluxes at different depths. In the wind mixed layer turbulent particle coagulation appears as key process in controlling pe-ratios. Parameterization (2 yields simulated pe-ratios that compare well to observations. Below the wind mixed layer, POC fluxes are most sensitive to the intensity of zooplankton flux feeding, indicating the importance of zooplankton community composition. All model parameters being kept constant, the capability of the model to reproduce yearly mean POC fluxes below 2000 m and benthic oxygen demand does at first order not dependent on the resolution of the particle size spectrum. Aggregate formation appears essential to initiate an intense biological pump. At great depth the reported close to constant particle fluxes are most likely the result of the combined effect of aggregate formation and mineral ballasting.

  8. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in sediment cores from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.; Banakar, V.K.; Tomer, A.; Kulkarni, M.

    Three sediment cores in a north–south transect (3 degrees N to 13 degrees S) from different sediment types of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are studied to understand the possible relationship between magnetic susceptibility (Chi) and Al, Fe...

  9. Creep of ocean sediments resulting from the isolation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.R.; Chavez, P.F.; Lipkin, J.; Silva, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Predictive models for the creep of deep ocean sediments resulting from the disposal of radioactive wastes are presented and preliminary observations of a program for evaluation of creep constitutive equation parameters are discussed. The models are used to provide calculated response of sediments under waste disposal conditions

  10. High rates of microbial carbon turnover in sediments in the deepest oceanic trench on Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, Ronnie N.; Wenzhoefer, Frank; Middelboe, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Microbes control the decomposition of organic matter in marine sediments. Decomposition, in turn, contributes to oceanic nutrient regeneration and influences the preservation of organic carbon(1). Generally, rates of benthic decomposition decline with increasing water depth, although given the vast...... extent of the abyss, deep-sea sediments are quantitatively important for the global carbon cycle(2,3). However, the deepest regions of the ocean have remained virtually unexplored(4). Here, we present observations of microbial activity in sediments at Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench in the central...

  11. Dredged Material Management Categories for Tracking Beneficial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    NDC) compiles the project level information and prepares statistics at the Corps-wide level. The NDC maintains information on type of dredge plant ...project level information and prepares statistics at the Corps-wide level. The NDC maintains information on type of dredge plant , volume of sediments...the volume of sediment used for a beneficial purpose. In addition, regulations associated with both the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries

  12. Geotechnical properties of deep-ocean sediments: a critical state approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.W.L.

    1988-11-01

    The possible disposal of high-level radioactive waste using the sediments of the deep-ocean floor as repositories has initiated research to establish an understanding of the fundamental behaviour of deep-ocean sediments. The work described in this thesis consisted of a series of triaxial stress path tests using microcomputer controlled hydraulic triaxial cells to investigate the strength and stress-strain behaviour for mainly anisotropically (K o ) consolidated 'undisturbed' (tubed) and reconstituted specimens of deep-ocean sediments taken from two study areas in the North Atlantic Ocean. The test results have been analysed within the framework of critical state soil mechanics to investigate sediment characteristics such as the state boundary surface, drained and undrained strength and stress-strain behaviour. While marked anisotropic behaviour is found in a number of respects, the results indicate that analysis in a critical state framework is as valid as for terrestrial sediments. Differences in behaviour between tubed and reconstituted specimens have been observed and the effect of the presence of carbonate has been investigated. An attempt has been made to develop an elasto-plastic constitutive K o model based on critical state concepts. This model has been found to agree reasonably well with experimental data for kaolin and deep-ocean sediments. (author)

  13. Deep ocean ventilation, carbon isotopes, marine sedimentation and the deglacial CO2 rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Heinze

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between the atmospheric CO2 level and the ventilation state of the deep ocean is an important building block of the key hypotheses put forth to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 fluctuations. In this study, we systematically examine the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and its carbon isotope composition to changes in deep ocean ventilation, the ocean carbon pumps, and sediment formation in a global 3-D ocean-sediment carbon cycle model. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that a break up of Southern Ocean stratification and invigorated deep ocean ventilation were the dominant drivers for the early deglacial CO2 rise of ~35 ppm between the Last Glacial Maximum and 14.6 ka BP. Another rise of 10 ppm until the end of the Holocene is attributed to carbonate compensation responding to the early deglacial change in ocean circulation. Our reasoning is based on a multi-proxy analysis which indicates that an acceleration of deep ocean ventilation during early deglaciation is not only consistent with recorded atmospheric CO2 but also with the reconstructed opal sedimentation peak in the Southern Ocean at around 16 ka BP, the record of atmospheric δ13CCO2, and the reconstructed changes in the Pacific CaCO3 saturation horizon.

  14. Transport and deposition of plutonium in the ocean: Evidence from Gulf of Mexico sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.R.; Salter, P.F.; Halverson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A study of sediments in the Gulf of Mexico shows dramatic gradients in Pu content and isotope ratios from the continental shelf to the Sigsbee Abyssal Plain. In terms of predicted direct fallout inventory of Pu, one shelf core contains 745% of the predicted inventory, while abyssal plain sediments contain only 15-20% of the predicted value. Absolute Pu concentrations of shelf sediments are also conspicuously high, up to 110 dpm/kg, compared to 13.5 dpm/kg in Mississippi River suspended sediment. There is no evidence of Pu remobilization in Gulf of Mexico shelf sediments, based on comparison of Pu profiles with Mn/Al and Fe/Al profiles. Horizontal transport of fallout nuclides from the open ocean to removal sites in ocean margin sediments is concluded to be the source of both the high concentrations and high inventories of Pu reported here. The shelf sediments show 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios close to 0.179, the average stratospheric fallout value, but the ratios decrease progressively across the Gulf to low values of 0.06 in abyssal plain sediments. The source of low-ratio Pu in deep-water sediments may be debris from low yield tests transported in the troposphere. Alternatively, it may represent a fraction of the Pu from global stratospheric fallout which has been separated in the water column from the remainder of the Pu in the ocean. In either case, the low-ratio material must have been removed rapidly to the sea floor where it composes a major fraction of the Pu in abyssal plain sediments. Pu delivered by global atmospheric fallout from the stratosphere has apparently remained for the most part in the water or has been transported horizontally and removed into shallow-water sediments. (orig.)

  15. Optimizing Dredge-and-Dump Activities for River Navigability Using a Hydro-Morphodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries J. Paarlberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, significant dredging activities of riverbed sediment are employed to ensure that freight transportation on rivers can continue year-round. Imbalances of sediment budget may produce relevant impacts regarding river morphology and related environmental services. This study shows that hydro-morphodynamic modeling tools can be used to optimize dredge-and-dump activities and, at the same time, mitigate problems deriving from these activities in rivers. As a case study, we focused on dredging activities on the Lower Parana River, Argentina. Navigation on this river is of crucial importance to the economies of the bordering countries, hence, each year significant dredging activities are employed. To estimate dredging loads under different strategies, a 25 km river reach of the Parana River was modeled using the Delft3D-modelling suite by Deltares. The Netherlands, to simulate flow-sediment interactions in a quasi-steady and uncoupled approach. Impacts of dredging activities were explicitly included. Different dredge-and-dump strategies included variations in dredging over-depth (clearance and variations in dumping locations. Our results indicate that dredge-and-dump strategies can be targeted to stimulate natural processes that improve the depth and stability of the navigation channel and to counteract unwanted bed level responses in the long-medium term. A ~40% reduction in dredging effort could be achieved by moving the dredged material to distant locations in the secondary channel rather than dumping to the side of the waterway in the main channel.

  16. Suspended sediment concentration and optical property observations of mixed-turbidity, coastal waters through multispectral ocean color inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multispectral satellite ocean color data from high-turbidity areas of the coastal ocean contain information about the surface concentrations and optical properties of suspended sediments and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Empirical and semi-analytical inversion algorit...

  17. Literature Review of Unconsolidated Sediment in San Francisco Bay and Nearby Pacific Ocean Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry R. Keller

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the geologic literature regarding sedimentation in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system shows that the main part of the bay occupies a structural tectonic depression that developed in Pleistocene time. Eastern parts, including San Pablo Bay and Suisun Bay, have had sedimentation throughout late Mesozoic and Tertiary. Carquinez Strait and the Golden Gate may represent antecedent stream erosion. Sedimentation has included estuarine, alluvial, and eolian deposition. The ages of estuarine deposition includes the modern high sea level stand and earlier Pleistocene interglacial periods. Sediment sources can be generally divided into the Coast Ranges, particularly the Franciscan Complex, and “Sierran.” Much of the estuarine system is floored by very fine sediment, with local areas of sand floor. Near the Golden Gate, sediment size decreases in both directions away from the deep channel. Bedforms include sand waves (submarine dunes, flat beds, and rock and boulders. These are interpreted in terms of dominant transport directions. Near the Golden Gate is an ebb-tidal delta on the outside (including San Francisco bar and a flood-tidal delta on the inside (parts of Central Bay. The large tidal prism causes strong tidal currents, which in the upper part of the estuary are normally much stronger than river currents, except during large floods. Cultural influences have altered conditions, including hydraulic mining debris, blasting of rocks, dredging of navigation channels, filling of the bay, and commercial sand mining. Many of these have served to decrease the tidal prism, correspondingly decreasing the strength of tidal currents.

  18. Organophosphate Ester Flame Retardants and Plasticizers in Ocean Sediments from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxin; Xie, Zhiyong; Lohmann, Rainer; Mi, Wenying; Gao, Guoping

    2017-04-04

    The presence of organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers in surface sediment from the North Pacific to Arctic Ocean was observed for the first time during the fourth National Arctic Research Expedition of China in the summer of 2010. The samples were analyzed for three halogenated OPEs [tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris(dichloroisopropyl) phosphate], three alkylated OPEs [triisobutyl phosphate (TiBP), tri-n-butyl phosphate, and tripentyl phosphate], and triphenyl phosphate. Σ 7 OPEs (total concentration of the observed OPEs) was in the range of 159-4658 pg/g of dry weight. Halogenated OPEs were generally more abundant than the nonhalogenated OPEs; TCEP and TiBP dominated the overall concentrations. Except for that of the Bering Sea, Σ 7 OPEs values increased with increasing latitudes from Bering Strait to the Central Arctic Ocean, while the contributions of halogenated OPEs (typically TCEP and TCPP) to the total OPE profile also increased from the Bering Strait to the Central Arctic Ocean, indicating they are more likely to be transported to the remote Arctic. The median budget of 52 (range of 17-292) tons for Σ 7 OPEs in sediment from the Central Arctic Ocean represents only a very small amount of their total production volume, yet the amount of OPEs in Arctic Ocean sediment was significantly larger than the sum of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the sediment, indicating they are equally prone to long-range transport away from source regions. Given the increasing level of production and usage of OPEs as substitutes of PBDEs, OPEs will continue to accumulate in the remote Arctic.

  19. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Environmental Dredging in South Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Yu; Feng, Jiang

    2007-08-01

    Environmental dredging is a primary remedial option for removal of the contaminated material from aquatic environment. Of primary concern in environmental dredging is the effectiveness of the intended sediment removal. A 5-year field monitoring study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the environmental dredging in South Lake, China. The concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphors, and heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Hg, and As) before and after dredging in sediment were determined and compared. Multiple ecological risk indices were employed to assess the contamination of heavy metals before and after dredging. Our results showed that the total phosphorus levels reduced 42% after dredging. Similar changes for Hg, Zn, As Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, and Ni were observed, with reduction percentages of 97.0, 93.1, 82.6, 63.9, 52.7, 50.1, 32.0, and 23.6, respectively, and the quality of sediment improved based on the criterion of Sediment Quality Guidelines by USEPA and contamination degree values (Cd) decreased significantly (paired t-test, p heavy metals from South Lake. Nevertheless, the dredging was ineffective to remove total nitrogen from sediment. We conclude that the reason for the observed increase in TN after dredging was likely ammonia release from the sediment impairing the dredging effectiveness.

  20. Enrichments in authigenic uranium in glacial sediments of the Southern Ocean; Enrichissement en uranium authigene dans les sediments glaciaires de l'ocean Austral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezileau, L. [Universidad de Conception, Programa Regional de Oceanografia Fisica y Climat PROFC, Y Centro de Investigacion Oceanografica (Chile); Bareille, G. [Pau Univ., Lab. de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, EP-CNRS 132, 64 (France); Reyss, J.L. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de L' environnement, Lab. Mixte CEA-CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2002-11-01

    Four sediment cores from the Polar frontal zone and the Antarctic zone in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean present an increase of authigenic uranium during glacial periods. We show that this increase in uranium is due to a combination of (i) an increase in the lateral transport of organic matter, (ii) a decrease in the oxygen in deep waters, and (iii) a process of diagenesis. It appears that uranium concentration cannot be used as a proxy of paleo-productivity in the Southern Ocean, as previously suggested by Kumar et al. in 1995. (authors)

  1. 33 CFR 336.1 - Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S. 336.1 Section 336.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... ENGINEERS DREDGING PROJECTS INVOLVING THE DISCHARGE OF DREDGED MATERIAL INTO WATERS OF THE U.S. AND OCEAN...

  2. Structural and functional biological assessment of aggregate dredging intensity on the Belgian part of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    De Backer, A.; Hillewaert, H.; Van Hoey, G.; Wittoeck, J.; Hostens, K.

    2014-01-01

    Marine aggregate dredging in the Belgian part of the North Sea (BPNS) is restricted to four dedicated concession zones. Within these zones, there are areas under different dredging pressure, but with the advantage that these are situated within a similar habitat (cfr. similar sediment characteristics) . As such, this study assessed how different degrees of dredging pressure executed on a similar sandy habitat affect the benthic ecosystem. Possible responses of the macrobenthos on the dredging...

  3. Methods and Metrics for Evaluating Environmental Dredging ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the objectives, approach, methodologies, results, and interpretation of a collaborative research study conducted by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and the National Exposure Research laboratory (NERL) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the U.S. EPA’s Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO). The objectives of the research study were to: 1) evaluate remedy effectiveness of environmental dredging as applied to contaminated sediments in the Ashtabula River in northeastern Ohio, and 2) monitor the recovery of the surrounding ecosystem. The project was carried out over 6 years from 2006 through 2011 and consisted of the development and evaluation of methods and approaches to assess river and ecosystem conditions prior to dredging (2006), during dredging (2006 and 2007), and following dredging, both short term (2008) and long term (2009-2011). This project report summarizes and interprets the results of this 6-year study to develop and assess methods for monitoring pollutant fate and transport and ecosystem recovery through the use of biological, chemical, and physical lines of evidence (LOEs) such as: 1) comprehensive sampling of and chemical analysis of contaminants in surface, suspended, and historic sediments; 2) extensive grab and multi-level real time water sampling and analysis of contaminants in the water column; 3) sampling, chemi

  4. Sediment tracing by `customised' magnetic fingerprinting: from the sub-catchment to the ocean scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, B.

    2009-04-01

    Robust identification of catchment suspended sediment sources is a prerequisite both for understanding sediment delivery processes and targeting of effective mitigation measures. Fine sediment delivery can pose management problems, especially with regard to nutrient run-off and siltation of water courses and bodies. Suspended sediment load constitutes the dominant mode of particulate material loss from catchments but its transport is highly episodic. Identification of suspended sediment sources and fluxes is therefore a prerequisite both for understanding of fluvial geomorphic process and systems and for designing strategies to reduce sediment transport, delivery and yields. Here will be discussed sediment ‘fingerprinting', using the magnetic properties of soils and sediments to characterise sediment sources and transport pathways over a very wide variety of spatial scales, from Lake Bassenthwaite in the English Lake District to the Burdekin River in Queensland and even the North Atlantic Ocean during the last glacial maximum. The applicability of magnetic ‘fingerprinting' to such a range of scales and environments has been significantly improved recently through use of new and site-appropriate magnetic measurement techniques, statistical processing and sample treatment options.

  5. Ammolagena clavata (Jones and Parker, 1860), an agglutinated benthic foraminiferal species - first report from the Recent sediments, Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Mazumder, A.; Saraswat, R.

    The rare presence of the agglutinated foraminiferal species Ammolagena clavata is presented for the first time from the Recent sediments of the Indian Ocean region. This species has previously been reported in Recent sediments from all other oceans...

  6. Sediment monitoring and benthic faunal sampling adjacent to the Sand Island ocean outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1986-2010 (NODC Accession 9900088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic fauna and sediment in the vicinity of the Sand Island ocean outfall were sampled from 1986-2010. To assess the environmental quality, sediment grain size and...

  7. Sediment Monitoring and Benthic Faunal Sampling Adjacent to the Barbers Point Ocean Outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1986-2010 (NODC Accession 9900098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic fauna and sediment in the vicinity of the Barbers Point (Honouliuli) ocean outfall were sampled from 1986-2010. To assess the environmental quality, sediment...

  8. Sediments and fossiliferous rocks from the eastern side of the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T.G.; Schlee, J.

    1967-01-01

    In August 1966, two dives were made with the deep-diving submersible Alvin along the eastern side of the Tongue of the Ocean to sample the rock and sediment. Physiographically, the area is marked by steep slopes of silty carbonate sediment and precipitous rock cliffs dusted by carbonate debris. Three rocks, obtained from the lower and middle side of the canyon (914-1676 m depth), are late Miocene-early Pliocene to late Pleistocene-Recent in age; all are deep-water pelagic limestones. They show (i) that the Tongue of the Ocean has been a deep-water area at least back into the Miocene, and (ii) that much shallow-water detritus has been swept off neighbouring banks to be incorporated with the deep-water fauna in the sediment. ?? 1967 Pergamon Press Ltd.

  9. Constitutive relationships for ocean sediments subjected to stress and temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, T.G.; Banerjee, P.K.

    1980-08-01

    The disposal of low-level nuclear wastes by burial in deep sea sediments is an option currently being considered. This report lays the groundwork for an investigation of the stability of canisters containing nuclear wastes against movement due to fluidisation of the surrounding sediments, where such fluidisation may result from thermally induced stresses. The requisite constitutive relationships for ocean sediments under stress and temperature gradients are derived from the theory of critical state soil mechanics. A parametric survey has been made of the behaviour of an element of soil in order to assess various models and the importance of the governing parameters, The formulation of a finite element algorithm is given for the solution of the sediment stability problem. (author)

  10. On the possible ''normalization'' of experimental curves of 230Th vertical distribution in abyssal oceanic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Al'terman, Eh.I.; Lisitsyn, A.P.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Okeanologii)

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities of the method of normalization of experimental ionic curves in reference to dating of abyssal sediments and establishing their accumulation rapidities are studied. The method is based on using correlation between ionic curves extrema and variations of Fe, Mn, C org., and P contents in abyssal oceanic sediments. It has been found that the above method can be successfully applied for correction of 230 Th vertical distribution data obtained by low-background γ-spectrometry. The method leads to most reliable results in those cases when the vertical distribution curves in sediments of elements concentrators of 230 Th are symbasic between themselves. The normalization of experimental ionic curves in many cases gives the possibility to realize the sediment age stratification [ru

  11. Fluvial fingerprints in northeast Pacific sediments: Unravelling terrestrial-ocean climate linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaningham, S. J.; Duncan, R.; Pisias, N.

    2004-12-01

    As the earth's climate history becomes better understood, it becomes clear that the terrestrial and oceanic systems interact in complex ways. This is seen in core sites offshore the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of North America. A correlation can be seen in oceanic biostratigraphic assemblages and down-core changes in terrestrial pollen types. However, it is difficult to determine whether this relationship is the result of a coupled migration of terrestrial vegetation and oceanic fauna on millennial timescales or the result of changes in ocean circulation patterns that create more complex pollen pathways to the core sites. This research begins to unravel the answers to this problem by examining down-core changes in sediment provenance on millennial timescales. Preliminary data characterize sediment of 24 rivers from ten geologic provinces between latitudes 36° N - 47° N. Through clay mineralogy, major and trace element geochemistry and Ar-Ar "province" ages, ten of the 24 rivers can be uniquely identified, while six of the ten geologic provinces can be uniquely constrained geochemically. With further Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic analyses, we hope to constrain the non-unique sediment sources. We will also be presenting initial down-core geochemical results from cores EW 9504-17PC and EW9504-13PC, offshore southern Oregon and central California, respectively.

  12. Earthquakes drive large-scale submarine canyon development and sediment supply to deep-ocean basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J; Howarth, Jamie D; Orpin, Alan R; Barnes, Philip M; Bowden, David A; Rowden, Ashley A; Schimel, Alexandre C G; Holden, Caroline; Horgan, Huw J; Nodder, Scott D; Patton, Jason R; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Gerstenberger, Matthew; Micallef, Aaron; Pallentin, Arne; Kane, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Although the global flux of sediment and carbon from land to the coastal ocean is well known, the volume of material that reaches the deep ocean-the ultimate sink-and the mechanisms by which it is transferred are poorly documented. Using a globally unique data set of repeat seafloor measurements and samples, we show that the moment magnitude ( M w ) 7.8 November 2016 Kaikōura earthquake (New Zealand) triggered widespread landslides in a submarine canyon, causing a powerful "canyon flushing" event and turbidity current that traveled >680 km along one of the world's longest deep-sea channels. These observations provide the first quantification of seafloor landscape change and large-scale sediment transport associated with an earthquake-triggered full canyon flushing event. The calculated interevent time of ~140 years indicates a canyon incision rate of 40 mm year -1 , substantially higher than that of most terrestrial rivers, while synchronously transferring large volumes of sediment [850 metric megatons (Mt)] and organic carbon (7 Mt) to the deep ocean. These observations demonstrate that earthquake-triggered canyon flushing is a primary driver of submarine canyon development and material transfer from active continental margins to the deep ocean.

  13. The effects of post-accretion sedimentation on the magnetization of oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Granot, R.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of marine magnetic anomalies related to seafloor spreading is often considered a key evidence to locate the continent-ocean boundary (COB) at passive margins. Conversely, thermal demagnetization is also advocated to explain the poor shape of such oceanic anomalies under thick sedimentary cover. To investigate the effects of post-accretion sedimentation on marine magnetic anomalies, we focus our study on two conjugate regions of the southern South Atlantic Ocean (Anomalies M4 to M0) that, although formed at the same time and along the same spreading segments, reveal contrasting characters. The anomalies exhibit strong amplitudes (>400 nT) and a well-marked shape off South Africa, where the sediments are less than 3 km-thick, but become weaker ( 200 nT) and much smoother off northern Argentina, where the sedimentary cover is thicker than 5 km. We interpret this observation as reflecting thermal demagnetization of the extrusive layer and its low Curie temperature titanomagnetite. We perform a series of thermo-magnetic models (Dyment and Arkani-Hamed, Geophys. J. Int., 1995, modified to include the sedimentary cover) to simulate the acquisition and loss of remanent magnetization in the oceanic lithosphere. We assume that most of the sediments accumulated shortly after crustal accretion. We investigate a range of possible thermal demagnetization temperatures for the extrusive layer and find that 200°C to 280ºC best explains the observations, in reasonable agreement with Curie temperatures of titanomagnetite, suggesting that most of the extrusive layer may be demagnetized under sediments thicker than 5 km. Thermal demagnetization should therefore be considered while interpreting marine magnetic anomalies for the age and nature of the crust (i.e., continental versus oceanic) in regions with thick sedimentary cover.

  14. Creep of ocean sediments resulting from the isolation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.R.; Chavez, P.F.; Lipkin, J.; Silva, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in subseabed sediments requires that the sediments constitute the principal barrier to the release of radionuclides over very long times. In this chapter the development of the components for mathematical modelling of creep deformations of marine sediments is presented. This development includes formulation of the conservation equations and constitutive equations that describe coupled movement and heating of the fully saturated porous sediments. Numerical methods for solving the system of governing equations for complicated two-dimensional geometrics are discussed, and the program of laboratory tests for understanding the mechanical behavior of the ocean sediments is presented. Using properties taken from published literature on the creep of clays, two problems were analyzed to obtain preliminary estimates of the behavior. Analysis of cavity closure following emplacement showed that the sediment would flow around the canister before heating would significantly alter the temperature field. Large-scale motion caused by density gradients in the sediment was predicted to be small

  15. Beneficial Use of Dredged Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important goal of managing dredged material is to ensure that the material is used or disposed of in an environmentally sound manner.Most of this dredged material could be used in a beneficial manner instead.

  16. Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

  17. Rare earth element geochemistry of oceanic ferromanganese nodules and associated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderfield, H.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Greaves, M. J.; Calvert, S. E.

    1981-04-01

    Analyses have been made of REE contents of a well-characterized suite of deep-sea (> 4000 m.) principally todorokite-bearing ferromanganese nodules and associated sediments from the Pacific Ocean. REE in nodules and their sediments are closely related: nodules with the largest positive Ce anomalies are found on sediments with the smallest negative Ce anomalies; in contrast, nodules with the highest contents of other rare earths (3 + REE) are found on sediments with the lowest 3 + REE contents and vice versa. 143Nd /144Nd ratios in the nodules (˜0.51244) point to an original seawater source but an identical ratio for sediments in combination with the REE patterns suggests that diagenetic reactions may transfer elements into the nodules. Analysis of biogenic phases shows that the direct contribution of plankton and carbonate and siliceous skeletal materials to REE contents of nodules and sediments is negligible. Inter-element relationships and leaching tests suggest that REE contents are controlled by a P-rich phase with a REE pattern similar to that for biogenous apatite and an Fe-rich phase with a pattern the mirror image of that for sea water. It is proposed that 3 + REE concentrations are controlled by the surface chemistry of these phases during diagenetic reactions which vary with sediment accumulation rate. Processes which favour the enrichment of transition metals in equatorial Pacific nodules favour the depletion of 3 + REE in nodules and enrichment of 3 + REE in associated sediments. In contrast, Ce appears to be added both to nodules and sediments directly from seawater and is not involved in diagenetic reactions.

  18. Distribution of 137Cs in samples of ocean bottom sediments of the baltic sea in 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedenov, L.I.; Flegontov, V.M.; Ivanova, L.M.; Kostandov, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration of Cs-137 in samples of ocean bottom sediments picked up in 1979 in the Gulf of Finland with a geological nozzle pipe varied within a wide interval of values. The results could indicate nonuniformity of the Cs-137 distribution in ocean bottom sediments as well as the penetration of significant amounts of Cs-137 to large depths. The main error resulted from the sampling technique employed because the upper part of the sediment could be lost. In 1982, a special ground-sampling device, with which the upper layer of sediments in the water layer close to the ocean bottom could be sampled, was tested in the Gulf of Finland and the Northeastern part of the Baltic Sea. The results of a layerwise determination of the Cs-137 concentration in samples of ocean bottom sediments of the Gulf of Finland and of the Baltic Sea are listed. The new soil-sampling device for picking samples of ocean sediments of undisturbed stratification will allow a correct determination of the radionuclide accumulation in the upper layers of ocean bottom sediments in the Baltic Sea

  19. Climate control on late Holocene high-energy sedimentation along coasts of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier , Clément; Tessier , Bernadette; Chaumillon , Eric

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Abundant sedimentological and geochronological data gathered on European sandy coasts highlight major phases of increased high-energy sedimentation in the North Atlantic Ocean during the late Holocene. Owing to an inconsistent use of the terminology, it is often difficult to determine whether studies have described storm-built or wave-built deposits. Both deposits can be identified by overall similar coarse-grained sedimentary facies, but may provide contradictory pale...

  20. Empirical evidence reveals seasonally dependent reduction in nitrification in coastal sediments subjected to near future ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeckman, U.; Van Colen, C.; Guilini, K.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Soetaert, K.; Vincx, M.; Vanaverbeke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Research so far has provided little evidence that benthic biogeochemical cycling is affected by ocean acidification under realistic climate change scenarios. We measured nutrient exchange and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) rates to estimate nitrification in natural coastal permeable

  1. Biological, physical, nutrients, sediment, and other data from sediment sampler-grab, bottle, and CTD casts in the Arabian Sea, Equatorial Pacific Ocean, Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Oceans as part of the Long Term Monitoring East-West Flower Garden Banks project from 08 January 1995 to 08 April 1998 (NODC Accession 0001155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, physical, nutrients, sediment, and other data were collected using sediment sampler-grab, bottle and CTD casts in the Arabian Sea, North/South Pacific...

  2. Numerical modeling of pore-scale phenomena during CO2 sequestration in oceanic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Qinjun; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Direct disposal of liquid CO 2 on the ocean floor is one of the approaches considered for sequestering CO 2 in order to reduce its concentration in the atmosphere. At oceanic depths deeper than approximately 3000 m, liquid CO 2 density is higher than the density of seawater and CO 2 is expected to sink and form a pool at the ocean floor. In addition to chemical reactions between CO 2 and seawater to form hydrate, fluid displacement is also expected to occur within the ocean floor sediments. In this work, we consider two different numerical models for hydrate formation at the pore scale. The first model consists of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method applied to a single-phase supersaturated solution in a constructed porous medium. The second model is based on the Invasion Percolation (IP) in pore networks, applied to two-phase immiscible displacement of seawater by liquid CO 2 . The pore-scale results are upscaled to obtain constitutive relations for porosity, both transverse and for the entire domain, and for permeability. We examine deposition and displacement patterns, and changes in porosity and permeability due to hydrate formation, and how these properties depend on various parameters including a parametric study of the effect of hydrate formation kinetics. According to the simulations, the depth of CO 2 invasion in the sediments is controlled by changes in the pore-scale porosity close to the hydrate formation front. (author)

  3. Water injection dredging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Some twenty years ago WIS-dredging has been developed in the Netherlands. By injecting water into the mud layer, the water content of the mud becomes higher, it becomes fluid mud and will start to flow. The advantages of this system are that there is no need of transporting the mud in a hopper, and

  4. Larval Fish Feeding Responses to Variable Suspended Sediment and Planktonic Prey Concentrations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colby, D

    2004-01-01

    ... impacts from dredging projects. For example, in the context of nearshore placement of mixed sediments, concerns have been raised that winnowing of fine sediments from deposited dredged material may elevate turbidity and have a...

  5. Residual β activity of particulate 234Th as a novel proxy for tracking sediment resuspension in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wuhui; Chen, Liqi; Zeng, Shi; Li, Tao; Wang, Yinghui; Yu, Kefu

    2016-01-01

    Sediment resuspension occurs in the global ocean, which greatly affects material exchange between the sediment and the overlying seawater. The behaviours of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, and other pollutants at the sediment-seawater boundary will further link to climate change, eutrophication, and marine pollution. Residual β activity of particulate 234Th (RAP234) is used as a novel proxy to track sediment resuspension in different marine environments, including the western Arctic Ocean, the South China Sea, and the Southern Ocean. Sediment resuspension identified by high activity of RAP234 is supported by different lines of evidence including seawater turbidity, residence time of total 234Th, Goldschmidt’s classification, and ratio of RAP234 to particulate organic carbon. A conceptual model is proposed to elucidate the mechanism for RAP234 with dominant contributions from 234Th-238U and 212Bi-228Th. The ‘slope assumption’ for RAP234 indicated increasing intensity of sediment resuspension from spring to autumn under the influence of the East Asian monsoon system. RAP234 can shed new light on 234Th-based particle dynamics and should benefit the interpretation of historical 234Th-238U database. RAP234 resembles lithophile elements and has broad implications for investigating particle dynamics in the estuary-shelf-slope-ocean continuum and linkage of the atmosphere-ocean-sediment system. PMID:27252085

  6. Residual β activity of particulate (234)Th as a novel proxy for tracking sediment resuspension in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wuhui; Chen, Liqi; Zeng, Shi; Li, Tao; Wang, Yinghui; Yu, Kefu

    2016-06-02

    Sediment resuspension occurs in the global ocean, which greatly affects material exchange between the sediment and the overlying seawater. The behaviours of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, and other pollutants at the sediment-seawater boundary will further link to climate change, eutrophication, and marine pollution. Residual β activity of particulate (234)Th (RAP234) is used as a novel proxy to track sediment resuspension in different marine environments, including the western Arctic Ocean, the South China Sea, and the Southern Ocean. Sediment resuspension identified by high activity of RAP234 is supported by different lines of evidence including seawater turbidity, residence time of total (234)Th, Goldschmidt's classification, and ratio of RAP234 to particulate organic carbon. A conceptual model is proposed to elucidate the mechanism for RAP234 with dominant contributions from (234)Th-(238)U and (212)Bi-(228)Th. The 'slope assumption' for RAP234 indicated increasing intensity of sediment resuspension from spring to autumn under the influence of the East Asian monsoon system. RAP234 can shed new light on (234)Th-based particle dynamics and should benefit the interpretation of historical (234)Th-(238)U database. RAP234 resembles lithophile elements and has broad implications for investigating particle dynamics in the estuary-shelf-slope-ocean continuum and linkage of the atmosphere-ocean-sediment system.

  7. Temporal Patterns in Seawater Quality from Dredging in Tropical Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Jones

    Full Text Available Maintenance and capital dredging represents a potential risk to tropical environments, especially in turbidity-sensitive environments such as coral reefs. There is little detailed, published observational time-series data that quantifies how dredging affects seawater quality conditions temporally and spatially. This information is needed to test realistic exposure scenarios to better understand the seawater-quality implications of dredging and ultimately to better predict and manage impacts of future projects. Using data from three recent major capital dredging programs in North Western Australia, the extent and duration of natural (baseline and dredging-related turbidity events are described over periods ranging from hours to weeks. Very close to dredging i.e. <500 m distance, a characteristic features of these particular case studies was high temporal variability. Over several hours suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs can range from 100-500 mg L-1. Less turbid conditions (10-80 mg L-1 can persist over several days but over longer periods (weeks to months averages were <10 mg L-1. During turbidity events all benthic light was sometimes extinguished, even in the shallow reefal environment, however a much more common feature was very low light 'caliginous' or daytime twilight periods. Compared to pre-dredging conditions, dredging increased the intensity, duration and frequency of the turbidity events by 10-, 5- and 3-fold respectively (at sites <500 m from dredging. However, when averaged across the entire dredging period of 80-180 weeks, turbidity values only increased by 2-3 fold above pre-dredging levels. Similarly, the upper percentile values (e.g., P99, P95 of seawater quality parameters can be highly elevated over short periods, but converge to values only marginally above baseline states over longer periods. Dredging in these studies altered the overall probability density distribution, increasing the frequency of extreme values. As

  8. Certified reference materials for radionuclides in Bikini Atoll sediment (IAEA-410) and Pacific Ocean sediment (IAEA-412)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, M. K.; van Beek, P.; Carvalho, F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of certified reference materials (CRMs) for radionuclide content in sediments collected offshore of Bikini Atoll (IAEA-410) and in the open northwest Pacific Ocean (IAEA-412) are described and the results of the certification process are presented. The certified...... radionuclides include: 40K, 210Pb (210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 234U, 238U, 239Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am for IAEA-410 and 40K, 137Cs, 210Pb (210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 239+240Pu for IAEA-412. The CRMs can be used for quality assurance and quality control purposes...

  9. Hydrothermal signature in the axial-sediments from the Carlsberg Ridge in the northwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zenghui; Li, Huaiming; Li, Mengxing; Zhai, Shikui

    2018-04-01

    30 sediments grabbed from 24 sites between the equator and 10°N along the Carlsberg Ridge (CR) in the northwest Indian Ocean has been analyzed for bulk chemical compositions. Hydrothermal components in the sediments are identified and characterized. They mainly occur at 6.3°N as sulfide debris and at 3.6°N as both sulfide and high temperature water-rock interaction products. The enrichment of chalcophile elements such as Zn, Cu, Pb and the depletion of alkalis metals such as K and Rb are the typical features of hydrothermal components. High U/Fe, low (Nd/Yb)N and negative Ce anomaly infer the uptake of seawater in the hydrothermal deposits by oxidizing after deposition. However, the general enrichment of Mn in hydrothermal plumed-derived materials is not found in the sediments, which may indicate the limited diffusion of fluids or plumes, at least in the direction along the Carlsberg spreading center. The hydrothermal components show their similarity to the hydrothermal deposits from the Indian Ocean Ridge. At 3.6°N ultramafic rocks or gabbroic intrusions, may be involved in the hydrothermal system.

  10. A numerical study on oceanic dispersion and sedimentation of radioactive cesium-137 from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Hironori; Morino, Yu; Ohara, Toshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We discussed a numerical model for oceanic dispersion and sedimentation of radioactive cesium-137 (Cs-137) in shallow water regions to clarify migration behavior of Cs-137 from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Our model considered oceanic transport by three dimensional ocean current, adsorption with large particulate matter (LPM), sedimentation and resuspension. The simulation well reproduced the spatial characteristics of sea surface concentration and sediment surface concentration of Cs-137 off Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures during May-December 2011. The simulated results indicated that the adsorption-sedimentation of Cs-137 significantly occurred during strong wind events because the large amount of LPM was transported to upward layer by resuspension and vertical mixing. (author)

  11. Processes of physical change to the seabed and bivalve recruitment over a 10-year period following experimental hydraulic clam dredging on Banquereau, Scotian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkinson, K.; King, E. L.; Li, M. Z.; Roddick, D.; Kenchington, E.; Han, G.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study on the effects of experimental hydraulic clam dredging on seabed habitat and commercial bivalve populations revealed a lack of recovery after a 3-year post-dredging period (1998-2001) on a deep (65-75 m) offshore sandy bank on the Scotian Shelf, Canada. Follow-up sidescan sonar surveys were carried out 5 and 10 years after dredging (2003, 2008) in order to identify long-term processes of seabed recovery. Grab sampling was carried out 10 years after dredging to identify post-dredging commercial bivalve recruitment. Changes in the seafloor, including dredge tracks, were documented with a series of 7 sidescan sonar surveys between 1998 and 2008. A sediment mobility model was constructed based on modeled tidal current and hindcast wave data over this time period to quantify natural seabed disturbance and interpret changes to the dredge tracks mapped by sidescan sonar surveys. The model indicated that tidal currents had minimal effect on sediment mobilization. The main driving force associated with re-working of surficial sediments as evidenced by deterioration of dredge tracks in sonograms was annual fall/winter storms. While the annual frequency of storms and associated wave heights was variable, the observations and sediment mobility calculations suggest that the most influential variable is the magnitude of individual large storms, specifically storms with a significant wave height of ∼11 m. These storms are capable of generating mobile sediment layers of 20-30 cm thickness, equivalent to the dredge blade cutting depth. It appears that, with minor exceptions, sediment properties have returned to pre-dredging conditions 10 years after dredging in this habitat. Based on known age-length relationships, the four commercial bivalve species showed very low recruitment at the experimental site over the 10-year post-dredging period. However, this is unlikely due to a dredging effect since a similar pattern was observed in non-dredged areas.

  12. Dredged Material Management in Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on Western and Central Long Island Sound Dredged Material Disposal Sites including the Dredged Material Management Plan and Regional Dredging Team. Information regarding the Eastern Long Island Sound Selected Site including public meetings.

  13. Study of elementary absorption in the marine sediments of the North Atlantic ocean deeps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancon, D.; Guegueniat, P.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the retention of actinide elements (Np, Pu, Am) and of Cs in the sediments of the ocean deeps around Cap-Vert. Plutonium: retention increases with temperatures of 4 to 30 0 C, then stays constant from 30 to 80 0 C. Desorption is slow. Americium: absorption is very strong at any temperature. Measurements of a wide variety of sediments show that retention is not affected by facies (including carbonated sediments). Neptunium: retention is more or less constant between 4 and 15 0 C, and distinctly higher at 30-50 0 C. It is reversible. Caesium: absorption decreases slightly from 4 to 30 0 C, but increases rapidly at 50 to 80 0 C. At the lowest temperatures it is reversible, but it appears to be irreversible at 50 0 . Cs absorption is subject to ponderal concentration. With equal amounts of activity, retention of Cs-135 is weaker than that of Cs-137: likewise the addition of the stable isotope causes in the amounts of Kd in Cs-137. Finally, this paper presents preliminary results showing the natural metallic element content of the sediments

  14. Earth system feedback statistically extracted from the Indian Ocean deep-sea sediments recording Eocene hyperthermals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Ikehara, Minoru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-12

    Multiple transient global warming events occurred during the early Palaeogene. Although these events, called hyperthermals, have been reported from around the globe, geologic records for the Indian Ocean are limited. In addition, the recovery processes from relatively modest hyperthermals are less constrained than those from the severest and well-studied hothouse called the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. In this study, we constructed a new and high-resolution geochemical dataset of deep-sea sediments clearly recording multiple Eocene hyperthermals in the Indian Ocean. We then statistically analysed the high-dimensional data matrix and extracted independent components corresponding to the biogeochemical responses to the hyperthermals. The productivity feedback commonly controls and efficiently sequesters the excess carbon in the recovery phases of the hyperthermals via an enhanced biological pump, regardless of the magnitude of the events. Meanwhile, this negative feedback is independent of nannoplankton assemblage changes generally recognised in relatively large environmental perturbations.

  15. A feasibility study of the disposal of radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments by drilled emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, M.R.C.

    1983-08-01

    This report describes the second phase of a study of the feasibility of disposal and isolation of high level radioactive waste in holes drilled deep into the sediments of the ocean. In this phase, work has concentrated on establishing the state of the art of the various operations and developing the design, in particular the drilling operation, the loading of flasks containing waste canisters from supply vessels onto the platform, the handling of radioactive waste on board, and its emplacement into predrilled holes. In addition, an outline design of the offshore platform has been prepared. (author)

  16. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  17. Impact on a fish assemblage of the maintenance dredging of a navigation channel in a tropical coastal ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Demarques Ribeiro da Silva Junior; Sérgio Ricardo Santos; Marcelo Travassos; Marcelo Vianna

    2012-01-01

    Dredging and dredge-spoil disposal are among the major problems in coastal management. Many of the scientific contributions concerning the impacts of this practice are based on the study of sessile organisms and subtropical environments. We evaluated changes in the composition and abundance of a fish assemblage resulting from dredging and sediment disposal at the mouth and in the adjacent waters of the Caravelas River on the north-eastern coast of Brazil. Samples were collected in two directl...

  18. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Economical Treatment of Dredged Material to Facilitate Beneficial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    reduction, dewatering and drying ; and the treatment ( kiln ) phase. Debris and solids larger than 1.3 cm (0.5 in.) (gravel, and cobbles) are removed and...11 ii Abstract Growing constraints on conventional dredged material disposal are motivating movement toward more sustainable alternatives. Given...Sediment Washing for the Treatment of Saginaw River Sediments (EPA 1994e) ................. 40 MetPro Maximum Density Separator and Dry Screening

  20. Metagenomic profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) between human impacted estuary and deep ocean sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baowei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Ximei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-11-19

    Knowledge of the origins and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential for understanding modern resistomes in the environment. The mechanisms of the dissemination of ARGs can be revealed through comparative studies on the metagenomic profiling of ARGs between relatively pristine and human-impacted environments. The deep ocean bed of the South China Sea (SCS) is considered to be largely devoid of anthropogenic impacts, while the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in south China has been highly impacted by intensive human activities. Commonly used antibiotics (sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) have been detected through chemical analysis in the PRE sediments, but not in the SCS sediments. In the relatively pristine SCS sediments, the most prevalent and abundant ARGs are those related to resistance to macrolides and polypeptides, with efflux pumps as the predominant mechanism. In the contaminated PRE sediments, the typical ARG profiles suggest a prevailing resistance to antibiotics commonly used in human health and animal farming (including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides), and higher diversity in both genotype and resistance mechanism than those in the SCS. In particular, antibiotic inactivation significantly contributed to the resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, and macrolides observed in the PRE sediments. There was a significant correlation in the levels of abundance of ARGs and those of mobile genetic elements (including integrons and plasmids), which serve as carriers in the dissemination of ARGs in the aquatic environment. The metagenomic results from the current study support the view that ARGs naturally originate in pristine environments, while human activities accelerate the dissemination of ARGs so that microbes would be able to tolerate selective environmental stress in response to anthropogenic impacts.

  1. An Ocean Sediment Core-Top Calibration of Foraminiferal (Cibicides) Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Mix, A. C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Peterson, C.; Mackensen, A.; Cartapanis, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) measured on calcium carbonate shells of benthic foraminifera (cibicides) from late Holocene sediments (δ13CCib) are compiled and compared with newly updated datasets of contemporary water-column δ13C observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) as the initial core-top calibration of the international Ocean Circulation and CarbonCycling (OC3) project. Using selection criteria based on the spatial distance between samples we find high correlation between δ13CCib and natural (pre-industrial) δ13CDIC, confirming earlier work. However, our analysis reveals systematic differences such as higher (lower) δ13CCib values in the Atlantic (Indian and Pacific) oceans. Regression analyses are impacted by anthropogenic carbon and suggest significant carbonate ion, temperature, and pressure effects, consistent with lab experiments with planktonic foraminifera and theory. The estimated standard error of core-top sediment data is generally σ ~= 0.25 ‰, whereas modern foram data from the South Atlantic indicate larger errors (σ ~= 0.4 ‰).

  2. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  3. Chemical composition of marine sediments in the Pacific Ocean from Sinaloa to Jalisco, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Ramos, A.; Navarrete, M.; Mulller, G.

    2014-01-01

    Marine sediments from Mexico's West coast in the Pacific Ocean from Sinaloa to Jalisco were analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique. Ten sediment samples were collected in May, 2010 between 55.5 and 1264 m water depth with a Reinneck type box nucleate sampler. Sediments were dried and fractioned by granulometry. Their physical and chemical properties were determined in laboratory by standard methods, pH, and conductivity. Concentration and distribution of K, Ca, Ti Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Pb, Br and Sr were analyzed. In order to determine the status of the elements, enrichment factors were calculated. Total, organic carbon and CaCO 3 were also determined. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show predominant groups of compounds. As quality-control method, Certified Reference Material was both processed and analyzed at even conditions. Enrichment factors for K, Ca, Ti, Mn Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ni, and Sr show they are conservative elements having concentrations in the range of unpolluted sites giving a base data line for the sampling zone In spite of moderately enrichment factors -1 ) and enrichment factor show the influence of anthropogenic sources with values between lowest effect level and a third part of 250 μg g -1 value, which is considered to have severe effect levels for aquatic life. (author)

  4. Managing dredged material in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Marta; Boniecka, Helena

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the legal and practical recommendations for the management of dredged material in the riparian countries of the Baltic Sea. The recommendations are contained in three conventions: LC, 2000. London Convention (1972), Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea area (Helsinki Convention) (1992), the OSPAR Convention (1972). Different approaches to evaluating the contamination level of dredge spoils, used by the Baltic Sea riparian countries, have been characterized. The differences in those approaches manifest themselves by various concentration limits for contaminants, which form a basis for the classification of dredged material as either contaminated or non-contaminated, and thus determine how the spoils will be processed further. Based on the collected information about the concentration limits for contaminants of surface sediments in the coastal ports, it was pointed out that it is necessary to conduct routine monitoring of heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, tributyltin, and petroleum hydrocarbons in dredged sediments in all the Baltic Sea states. On the other hand, the monitoring of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans, organochlorine, and organophosphoric pesticides is only needed in locations that are suspected of historical or being the local contamination sources. Due to significant economic limitations of chemical determinations, it is important to consider a simple screening test of sediment that would say whether sediment may be "contaminated" and qualifies for more detailed and costly chemical research. It may be typical basic physical-chemical analysis of sediments or ecotoxicological classification of sediments.Despite environmentally friendly tendencies, the practical application of dredged material within the Baltic Sea area is very limited. Dredged material is most frequently stored at the specifically designated sites. From among the practical uses of

  5. Chemistry of marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Some topics considered are as follows: characterization of sediments in the vicinity of offshore petroleum production; thermal alteration experiments on organic matter in recent marine sediments as a model for petroleum genesis; composition of polluted bottom sediments in Great Lakes harbors; distribution of heavy metals in sediment fractions; recent deposition of lead off the coast of southern California; release of trace constituents from sediments resuspended during dredging operations; and migration of chemical constituents in sediment-seawater interfaces

  6. The Nicobar Fan and sediment provenance: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 362, NE Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. T.; Pouderoux, H.; Milliken, K. L.; Carter, A.; Chemale, F., Jr.; Kutterolf, S.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Backman, J.; McNeill, L. C.; Dugan, B.; Expedition 362 Scientists, I.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Expedition 362 (6 Aug-6 Oct 2016) was designed to drill the input materials of the north Sumatran subduction zone, part of the 5000 km long Sunda subduction system and to understand the origin of the Mw 9.2 earthquake and tsunami that devastated coastal communities around the Indian Ocean in 2004 linked to unexpectedly shallow seismogenic slip and a distinctive forearc prism structure (1,2,3). Two sites, U1480 and U1481 on the Indian oceanic plate 250 km SW of the subduction zone on the eastern flank of the Ninetyeast Ridge, were drilled, cored, and logged to a maximum depth of 1500 m below seafloor. The input materials of the north Sumatran subduction zone are a thick (up to 4-5 km) succession mainly of Bengal-Nicobar Fan siliciclastic sediments overlying a mainly pelagic/hemipelagic succession, with igneous and volcaniclastic material above oceanic basement. At Sites U1480 and U1481, above the igneous basement ( 60-70 Ma), the sedimentary succession comprises deep-marine tuffaceous deposits with igneous intrusions, overlain by pelagic deposits, including chalk, and a thick Nicobar Fan succession of sediment gravity-flow (SGF) deposits, mainly turbidites and muddy debrites. The Nicobar Fan deposits (estimated total volume of 9.2 x 106 km3: 3) represent >90% of the input section at the drill sites and many of the beds are rich in plant material. These beds are intercalated with calcareous clays. Sediment accumulation rates reached 10-40 cm/kyr in the late Miocene to Pliocene, but were much reduced since 1.6 Ma. The onset of Nicobar Fan deposition at the drill sites ( 9.5 Ma; 2) is much younger than was anticipated precruise ( 30-40 Ma), based on previous regional analyses of Bengal-Nicobar Fan history and presumptions of gradual fan progradation. Our preliminary results suggest that the Nicobar Fan was active between 1.6 and 9.5 Ma, and possibly since 30 Ma (3). The observed mineralogical assemblage of the SGF deposits and zircon age dating are consistent with

  7. Increased terrestrial to ocean sediment and carbon fluxes in the northern Chesapeake Bay associated with twentieth century land alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, C.; Cronin, T. M.; Willard, D.; Halka, J.; Kerhin, R.

    2008-01-01

    We calculated Chesapeake Bay (CB) sediment and carbon fluxes before and after major anthropogenic land clearance using robust monitoring, modeling and sedimentary data. Four distinct fluxes in the estuarine system were considered including (1) the flux of eroded material from the watershed to streams, (2) the flux of suspended sediment at river fall lines, (3) the burial flux in tributary sediments, and (4) the burial flux in main CB sediments. The sedimentary maximum in Ambrosia (ragweed) pollen marked peak land clearance (~1900 a.d.). Rivers feeding CB had a total organic carbon (TOC)/total suspended solids of 0.24??0.12, and we used this observation to calculate TOC fluxes from sediment fluxes. Sediment and carbon fluxes increased by 138-269% across all four regions after land clearance. Our results demonstrate that sediment delivery to CB is subject to significant lags and that excess post-land clearance sediment loads have not reached the ocean. Post-land clearance increases in erosional flux from watersheds, and burial in estuaries are important processes that must be considered to calculate accurate global sediment and carbon budgets. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  8. Late Pleistocene sedimentation: A case study of the central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Borole, D

    -Sea Research 1, Vol 40, No 4, pp 761-775, 1993 0967-0637/93 $6 00 + 0 00 Printed m Great Britain © 1993 Pergamon Press Lid Late Pleistocene sedimentation: a case study of the central Indian Ocean Basin D. V. BOROLE* (Recetved 26 August 1988, in revised... 26 + 0 11 4 10 + 0.20 1 30 + 0 10 5 03 20-25 1 10 + 0.07 3 60 + 0.14 1 08 ___ 0 09 5 3 30-35 1 51 + 0.10 3.28 + 0 34 1.10 + 0.15 5 3 65-70 1.08 + 0 05 3 20 + 0.23 0 97 + 0.09 4 38 80-85 0 81 + 0 05 1 80 + 0.12 0 63 + 0 06 4 37 Conanued 766 D V...

  9. Bacterial diversity and biogeography in deep-sea sediments of the South Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauer, Regina; Bienhold, Christina; Ramette, Alban

    2010-01-01

    in 1051 sequences. Phylotypes affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria were present in all three basins. The distribution of these shared phylotypes seemed to be influenced neither by the Walvis Ridge nor by different deep water masses, suggesting a high dispersal......Microbial biogeographic patterns in the deep sea depend on the ability of microorganisms to disperse. One possible limitation to microbial dispersal may be the Walvis Ridge that separates the Antarctic Lower Circumpolar Deep Water from the North Atlantic Deep Water. We examined bacterial...... communities in three basins of the eastern South Atlantic Ocean to determine diversity and biogeography of bacterial communities in deep-sea surface sediments. The analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene clone libraries in each basin revealed a high diversity, representing 521 phylotypes with 98% identity...

  10. Driving forces and their contribution to the recent decrease in sediment flux to ocean of major rivers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yanxu; Fu, Bojie; Zhao, Wenwu

    2018-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind land-ocean sediment transport processes is crucial, due to the resulting impacts on the sustainable management of water and soil resources. This study investigated temporal trends and historical phases of sediment flux delivered to the sea by nine major rivers in China, while also quantifying the contribution of key anthropogenic and natural driving forces. During the past six decades, sediment flux from these nine major rivers exhibited a statistically significant negative trend, decreasing from 1.92Gtyr -1 during 1954-1968 to 1.39Gtyr -1 , 0.861Gtyr -1 and 0.335Gtyr -1 during 1969-1985, 1986-1999 and 2000-2016, respectively. We used a recently developed Sediment Identity approach and found that the sharp decrease in sediment load observed across China was mainly (~95%) caused by a reduction in sediment concentration. Reservoir construction exerted the strongest influence on land-ocean sediment fluxes, while soil conservation measures represented a secondary driver. Before 1999, soil erosion was not controlled effectively in China and reservoirs, especially large ones, played a dominant role in reducing riverine sediments. After 1999, soil erosion has gradually been brought under control across China, so that conservation measures directly accounted for ~40% of the observed decrease in riverine sediments. With intensifying human activities, it is predicted that the total sediment flux delivered to the sea by the nine major rivers will continue to decrease in the coming decades, although at a slower rate, resulting in severe challenges for the sustainable management of drainage basins and river deltas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Micrometer- and nanometer-sized platinum group nuggets in micrometeorites from deep-sea sediments of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; Parashar, K.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    We examined 378 micrometeorites collected from deep-sea sediments of the Indian Ocean of which 175, 180, and 23 are I-type, S-type, and G-type, respectively. Of the 175 I-type spherules, 13 contained platinum group element nuggets (PGNs...

  12. Late quaternary palaeo-oceanography and palaeo-climatology from sediment cores of the eastern Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagels, U.; Koehler, S.

    1991-01-01

    Box cores recovered along a N-S transect in the Eurasian Basin allow the establishment of a time scale for the Late Quaternary history of the Arctic Ocean, based on stable oxygen isotope stratigraphy and AMS 14 C dating of planktonic foraminifers (N. pachyderma I.c.). This high resolution stratigraphy, in combination with sedimentological investigations (e.g. coarse fraction analysis, carbonate content, productivity of foraminifers), was carried out to reconstruct the glacial and inter-glacial Arctic Ocean palaeo-environment The sediment cores, which can be correlated throughout the sampling area in the Eastern Arctic Ocean, were dated as representing oxygen isotope stages 1 to 4/5. The sedimentation rates varied between a few mm/ka in glacials and approximately one cm/ka during the Holocene. The sediments allow a detailed sedimentological description of the depositional regime and the palaeo-oceanography of the Eastern Arctic Ocean. Changing ratios of biogenic and lithogenic components in the sediments reflect variations in the oceanographic circulation pattern in the Eurasian Basin during the Late Quaternary. Carbonate content (1-9wt.%), productivity of foraminifers (high in interglacial, low in glacial stages) and the terrigenous components are in good correlation with glacial and inter-glacial climatic fluctuations

  13. Biogenic silica and organic carbon in sediments from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giglio, F.; Langone, L.; Morigi, C.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M.

    2002-01-01

    Four cores, collected during the 1995/96 Italian Antarctic cruise and located north and south of the Polar Front, provided both qualitative and quantitative information about changes of the sediment settings driven by climate changes. Biogenic silica and organic carbon flux variations and sedimentological analyses allow us to make inferences about the fluctuation of the Polar Front during the last climate cycles: the records of our cores Anta96-1 and Anta96-16 account for fluctuations of the Polar Front of at least 5 degrees with respect to the present position, with a concomitant movement of the Marginal Ice Zone. The very low accumulation rates at the study sites are probably due to the scarce availability of micronutrients. In the area south of the Polar Front, sediment accumulation, after a decrease, appears constant during the last 250,000 yr. A subdivision in glacial/interglacial stages has been proposed, which permits the identification of the warm stage 11, which is particularly important in the Southern Ocean. (author). 13 refs., 5 figs

  14. Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the gas production potential of disperse, low-saturation (S H H hydrate-bearing sediments subject to depressurization-induced dissociation over a 10-year production period. We investigate the sensitivity of items (a)-(c) to the following hydraulic properties, reservoir conditions, and operational parameters: intrinsic permeability, porosity, pressure, temperature, hydrate saturation, and constant pressure at which the production well is kept. The results of this study indicate that, despite wide variations in the aforementioned parameters (covering the entire spectrum of such deposits), gas production is very limited, never exceeding a few thousand cubic meters of gas during the 10-year production period. Such low production volumes are orders of magnitude below commonly accepted standards of economic viability, and are further burdened with very unfavorable gas-to-water ratios. The unequivocal conclusion from this study is that disperse, low-S H hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments are not promising targets for gas production by means of depressurization-induced dissociation, and resources for early hydrate exploitation should be focused elsewhere

  15. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Zeebe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  16. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  17. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  18. Assessment of 238Pu and 239+240Pu, in marine sediments of the oceans Atlantic and Pacific of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ochaita, L.

    2000-01-01

    In this investigation samples of marine sediments were taken from 14 places representatives of the oceans coast of Guatemala. For the assesment of 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu in sediments a radiochemical method was used to mineralize sediments and by ionic interchange it was separated from other elements, after that an electrodeposition of plutonium was made in metallic discs. The radioactivity of plutonium was measured by alpha spectrometry system and the alpha spectrums were obtained. The levels of plutonium are not higher than other countries that shown contamination. The contamination of isotope of 239+240 Pu is higher than 238 Pu and the contamination by two isotopes of plutonium is higher in the Atlantic than the Pacific ocean

  19. Distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengwei; Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Yanguang; Dong, Linsen; Jiao, Liping; Hu, Limin; Fan, Dejiang

    2016-03-15

    To analyze the distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and evaluate their potential ecological risks, the concentrations of 16 PAHs were measured in 43 surface sediment samples from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean. Total PAH (tPAH) concentrations ranged from 36.95 to 150.21 ng/g (dry weight). In descending order, the surface sediment tPAH concentrations were as follows: Canada Basin>northern Chukchi Sea>Chukchi Basin>southern Chukchi Sea>Aleutian Basin>Makarov Basin>Bering Sea shelf. The Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean mainly received PAHs of pyrogenic origin due to pollution caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The concentrations of PAHs in the sediments of the study areas did not exceed effects range low (ERL) values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial Production and Enzymatic Activities in Deep-Sea Sediments of the Pacific Ocean: Biogeochemical Implications of Different Temperature Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Corinaldesi, C.; dell'Anno, A.

    2002-12-01

    The deep-sea bed, acting as the ultimate sink for organic material derived from the upper oceans primary production, is now assumed to play a key role in biogeochemical cycling of organic matter on global scale. Early diagenesis of organic matter in marine sediments is dependent upon biological processes (largely mediated by bacterial activity) and by molecular diffusion. Organic matter reaching the sea floor by sedimentation is subjected to complex biogeochemical transformations that make organic matter largely unsuitable for direct utilization by benthic heterotrophs. Extracellular enzymatic activities in the sediment is generally recognized as the key step in the degradation and utilization of organic polymers by bacteria and a key role in biopolymeric carbon mobilization is played by aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucosidase activities. In the present study we investigated bacterial density, bacterial C production and exo-enzymatic activities (aminopeptidase, glucosidase and phosphatase activity) in deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean in relation with the biochemical composition of sediment organic matter (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids), in order to gather information on organic matter cycling and diagenesis. Benthic viral abundance was also measured to investigate the potential role of viruses on microbial loop functioning. Sediment samples were collected at eight stations (depth ranging from 2070-3100 m) along two transects located at the opposite side (north and south) of ocean seismic ridge Juan Fernandez (along latitudes 33° 20' - 33° 40'), constituted by the submerged vulcanoes, which connects the Chilean coasts to Rapa Nui Island. Since the northern and southern sides of this ridge apparently displayed small but significant differences in deep-sea temperature (related to the general ocean circulation), this sampling strategy allowed also investigating the role of different temperature constraints on bacterial activity and

  1. Nondestructive X-Ray Computed Tomography Analysis of Sediment Cores: A Case Study from the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Cook, A.; Dipre, G.

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of marine sediment records can help elucidate recent changes in the Arctic Ocean circulation and sea ice conditions. We examine sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean, representing Late to Early Quaternary age (potentially up to 1 Ma). Previous studies of Arctic sediment cores indicate that interglacial/interstadial periods with relatively high sea levels and reduced ice cover are characterized by vigorous bioturbation, while glacial intervals have little to no bioturbation. Traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, effectively destroying them. To treat this limitation, we evaluate archival sections of the cores using an X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) scanner, which noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions. The scanner produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis and for identification of bioturbation based on size, shape, and orientation. We use image processing software to isolate burrows from surrounding sediment, reconstruct them three-dimensionally, and then calculate their surface areas, volumes, and densities. Preliminary analysis of a core extending to the early Quaternary shows that bioturbation ranges from 0 to approximately 20% of the core's volume. In future research, we will quantitatively define the relationship between bioturbation activity and glacial regimes. XCT examination of bioturbation and other sedimentary features has the potential to shed light on paleoceanographic conditions such as sedimentation patterns and food flux. XCT is an alternative, underexplored investigation method that bears implications not only for illustrating paleoclimate variations but also for preserving cores for future, more advanced technologies.

  2. Effects of light attenuation on the sponge holobiont-implications for dredging management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Mari Carmen; Strehlow, Brian; Duckworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Dredging and natural sediment resuspension events can cause high levels of turbidity, reducing the amount of light available for photosynthetic benthic biota. To determine how marine sponges respond to light attenuation, five species were experimentally exposed to a range of light treatments......, indicating that light attenuation poses a risk to photosynthetic marine sponges. Examining benthic light levels over temporal scales would enable dredging proponents to be aware of conditions that could impact on sponge physiology....

  3. Measurement of changes in marine benthic ecosystem function following physical disturbance by dredging

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Hussin, Wan Mohd Rauhan

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the impact of physical disturbance on macrofaunal communities and sediment composition is important given the increased demand for the exploitation and disturbance of marine ecosystems. The aim of the present investigation was to provide a comprehensive study about the extent to which the disturbance (especially aggregate dredging) may affect benthic ecosystem function. The first part of the thesis concerns a field investigation of the impacts of dredging on the be...

  4. U- and Th-series nuclides in settling particles: implications to sediment transport through surface waters and interior ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarin, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Bay of Bengal is a unique ocean basin receiving large quantities of fresh water and sediment supply from several rivers draining the Indian subcontinent. The annual flux of suspended sediments discharged into the Bay of Bengal is one billion tons, about one-tenth of the global sediment discharge into the ocean. The water and sediment discharge to the Bay, show significant seasonal variation, with maximum transport coinciding with the SW-monsoon (July-September). Earlier studies on the distribution of clay minerals in sediments have led to the suggestion that the sediments of the western Bengal Fan are mainly derived from the Peninsular rivers, whereas rest of the Fan sediments is influenced by the Himalayan rivers. Settling fluxes of particulate matter through the water column of the Bay of Bengal show seasonal trends resulting from monsoon enhanced sediment supply via rivers and biological processes in the water column. It is, thus, important to understand the influence of the seasonally varying particle fluxes on the solute-particle interactions and chemical scavenging processes in the surface and deep waters of the Bay of Bengal. In this context, measurements of U- and Th-series nuclides in the settling particles are most relevant. The radionuclide fluxes ( 230 Th, 228 Th and 210 Pb) in the settling particles provide insight into the role of their removal by vertical particle flux and/or lateral transport (removal at the ocean boundaries). A study carried out in the Northern Bay of Bengal documents that the authigenic flux of 230 Th, as measured in sediment trap samples from deep waters, is balanced by its production in the overhead water column. The sediment mass flux, Al and 228 Th fluxes are similar in the settling particles through shallow and deep waters, suggesting predominant removal by vertical particle flux in the North Bay of Bengal. In the Central Bay, particulate mass, Al and 228 Th fluxes are higher in the trap material from deep waters relative

  5. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic seafloor and oceanic basement roughness: Spreading rate, crustal age and sediment thickness correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Robert T.; Pockalny, Robert A.

    1994-05-01

    Single-channel seismic data from the South Australian Basin and Argentine Basin, and bathymetry data from the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise and Southwest Indian Ridge are analysed to determine the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the seafloor and oceanic basement created at seafloor spreading rates ranging from 3 to 80 km/Ma (half-rate). For these data, crustal ages range from near zero to 85 Ma and sediment thicknesses range from near zero to over 2 km. Our results are consistent with a negative correlation of basement roughness and spreading rate where roughness decreases dramatically through the slow-spreading regime (oceanic basement roughness and spreading rate appears to have existed since the late Cretaceous for slow and intermediate spreading rates, suggesting that the fundamental processes creating abyssal hill topography may have remained the same for this time period. Basement roughness does not appear to decrease (smooth) with increasing crustal age, and therefore off-ridge degradation of abyssal hill topography by mass wasting is not detected by our data. Seismic data reveal that sediment thickness increases with increasing crustal age in the South Australian Basin and Argentine Basin, but not monotonically and with significant regional variation. We show that minor accumulations of sediment can affect roughness significantly. Average sediment accumulations of less that 50 m (for our 100 km long sample seismic profiles and half-spreading rates ocean ridges.

  6. Flow and suspended-sand behavior in large rivers after dredging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuill, B. T.; Wang, Y.; Allison, M. A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    Dredging is commonly used in large rivers to promote navigation and provide sediment for engineering projects. Channel bars typically have thicker, coarser sediment deposits than elsewhere on the channel bed and are often the focus of dredging projects. Bar dredging may create deep pits ("borrow pits") that significantly alter flow and sediment transport. Locally, the pit acts as a large bedform, contracting and expanding the flow field and enhancing turbulence. At the reach scale, the pit acts as a new sediment sink and disrupts the sediment budget which may have consequences for channel stability and aquatic ecosystem health. In this study, we focus on the local impact of the borrow pit and how it, similar to dunes, creates a turbulent wake within the downstream flow column. We hypothesize that this wake may have implications for the overlapping suspended-sediment transport fields. Efficient dredging operations requires the ability to predict channel infilling/recovery timescales and in large, sandy rivers, a substantial fraction of the sediment infilling results from the settling of suspended sediment. However, if the turbulent wake significantly alters pathways of sediment settling within the borrow pit, typical models of sediment deposition that do not account for the wake effects may not apply. To explore this problem, we use numerical modelling to predict sand behavior with and without resolving the effects of wake turbulence. Wake turbulence is resolved using detached-eddy simulation and sand settling is simulated using Lagrangian particle tracking. Our study area is a >1 km2 channel bar in the lower Mississippi River, which was dredged in October 2016. We used vessel-based measurements (MBES, ADCP) to characterize the post-dredge hydrodynamic environment. Study results indicate that the turbulent wake significantly impacted suspended-sand behavior as it entered the borrow pit and large eddies increased the vertical grain velocities, mean grain settling was

  7. Systems analysis approach to the disposal of high-level waste in deep ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsily, G. de; Hill, M.D.; Murray, C.N.; Talbert, D.M.; Van Dorp, F.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Among the different options being studied for disposal of high-level solidified waste, increasing attention is being paid to that of emplacement of glasses incorporating the radioactivity in deep oceanic sediments. This option has the advantage that the areas of the oceans under investigation appear to be relatively unproductive biologically, are relatively free from cataclysmic events, and are areas in which the natural processes are slow. Thus the environment is stable and predictable so that a number of barriers to the release and dispersion of radioactivity can be defined. Task Groups set up in the framework of the International Seabed Working Group have been studying many aspects of this option since 1976. In order that the various parts of the problem can be assessed within an integrated framework, the methods of systems analysis have been applied. In this paper the Systems Analysis Task Group members report the development of an overall system model. This will be used in an iterative process in which a preliminary analysis, together with a sensitivity analysis, identifies the parameters and data of most importance. The work of the other task groups will then be focussed on these parameters and data requirements so that improved results can be fed back into an improved overall systems model. The major requirements for the development of a preliminary overall systems model are that the problem should be separated into identified elements and that the interfaces between the elements should be clearly defined. The model evolved is deterministic and defines the problem elements needed to estimate doses to man

  8. Assessment of 210Po in agricultural soils and marine sediments of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Vela, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    A radiochemical method consisting of 210 Polonium extraction was made to measure radioactivity in samples of soil and marine sediments of Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. The solution of polonium it was treated to obtain the deposition of the metal over a zinc disc and was measured by alpha espectrometry system based on Planar Ion Planted Silice (PIPS) system. The concern about cultivated soils its consuption products from sea and soil come from these sources. The results shows that activity of 210 Polonium in agricultural soils and marine sediments are below of ALI recommended by international standards

  9. Low level spectrometry of Fe-Mn concretions from the Pacific Ocean bed and of Pierre St. Martin cave sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimchev, T.; Prodanov, Ya.

    1977-01-01

    Results of the nondestructive gamma-spectrometric analysis of the Fe-Mn nodules from the Pacific Ocean in the neighbourhood of the Raratonga Isles and Fiji Isles are reported. The cave sediments from the San Martin Cave in the Pyrenees and from other caves were also analyzed. The nondestructive method was used for analyzing samples using a low background scintillation gamma spectrometer. Results obtained for geological samples, soils, sediments, etc. are given for comparison. Statistical methods were applied for the quantitative analysis of the gamma spectra obtained. (author)

  10. Bibliography on ocean waste disposal. second edition. Final report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, H.G.; Kaplanek, D.W.

    1976-09-01

    This research bibliography is restricted to documents relevant to the field of ocean waste disposal. It is primarily limited to recent publications in the categories of: ocean waste disposal; criteria; coastal zone management; monitoring; pollution control; dredge spoil; dredge spoin disposal; industrial waste disposal; radioactive waste; oil spills; bioassay; fisheries resources; ocean incineration; water chemistry; and, Water pollution

  11. Crystal-chemical characteristics of nontronites from bottom sediments of Pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palchik, N. A.; Moroz, T. N.; Grigorieva, T. N.; Nikandrova, N. K.; Miroshnichenko, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    A crystal-chemical analysis of the nontronite samples formed in deep-water sediments of the underwater Juan-de-Fuca ridge in the Pacific ocean has been performed using powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A comparison with the previously investigated nontronites from different regions of the Sea of Okhotsk showed that the structural features of these formations are due to the difference in the physicochemical parameters of their crystallization. The values of the basal interplanar spacing d_0_0_1 (within 11–13 Å) in the samples analyzed are determined by the degree of hydration and cation filling of the interlayer space, while the differences in the IR spectra are due to isomorphic substitutions in the structure. The character of cation distribution and the nature and concentration of stacking faults in nontronite structures are determined. The differences in the composition, structure, and properties of nontronites of different origin are confirmed by theoretical calculations of their structural parameters.

  12. Crystal-chemical characteristics of nontronites from bottom sediments of Pacific ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palchik, N. A., E-mail: nadezhda@igm.nsc.ru; Moroz, T. N.; Grigorieva, T. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Nikandrova, N. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Mineralogy, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Miroshnichenko, L. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    A crystal-chemical analysis of the nontronite samples formed in deep-water sediments of the underwater Juan-de-Fuca ridge in the Pacific ocean has been performed using powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A comparison with the previously investigated nontronites from different regions of the Sea of Okhotsk showed that the structural features of these formations are due to the difference in the physicochemical parameters of their crystallization. The values of the basal interplanar spacing d{sub 001} (within 11–13 Å) in the samples analyzed are determined by the degree of hydration and cation filling of the interlayer space, while the differences in the IR spectra are due to isomorphic substitutions in the structure. The character of cation distribution and the nature and concentration of stacking faults in nontronite structures are determined. The differences in the composition, structure, and properties of nontronites of different origin are confirmed by theoretical calculations of their structural parameters.

  13. Application of systems analysis to the disposal of high level waste in deep ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marsily, G.; Dorp, F. van

    1982-01-01

    Emplacement in deep ocean sediments is one of the disposal options being considered for solidified high level radioactive waste. Task groups set up within the framework of the NEA Seabed Working Group have been studying many aspects of this option since 1976. The methods of systems analysis have been applied to enable the various parts of the problem to be assessed within an integrated framework. This paper describes the progress made by the Systems Analysis Task Group towards the development of an overall system model. The Task Group began by separating the problem into elements and defining the interfaces between these elements. A simple overall system model was then developed and used in both a preliminary assessment and a sensitivity analysis to identify the most important parameters. These preliminary analyses used a very simple model of the overall system and therefore the results cannot be used to draw any conclusions as to the acceptability of the sub-seabed disposal option. However they served to show the utility of the systems analysis method. The work of the other task groups will focus on the important parameters so that improved results can be fed back into an improved system model. Subsequent iterations will eventually provide an input to an acceptability decision. (Auth.)

  14. The record of India-Asia collision preserved in Tethyan ocean basin sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najman, Yani; Jenks, Dan; Godin, Laurent; Boudagher-Fadel, Marcelle; Bown, Paul; Horstwood, Matt; Garzanti, Eduardo; Bracialli, Laura; Millar, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The timing of India-Asia collision is critical to the understanding of crustal deformation processes, since, for example, it impacts on calculations regarding the amount of convergence that needs to be accommodated by various mechanisms. In this research we use sediments originally deposited in the Tethyan ocean basin and now preserved in the Himalayan orogeny to constrain the timing of collision. In the NW Himalaya, a number of workers have proposed a ca 55-50 Ma age for collision along the Indus suture zone which separates India from the Kohistan-Ladakh Intraoceanic Island arc (KLA) to the north. This is based on a number of factors including the age of youngest marine sediments in the Indus suture (e.g. Green et al. 2008), age of eclogites indicative of onset of Indian continental subduction (e.g. de Sigoyer et al. 2000), and first evidence of detritus from north of the suture zone deposited on the Indian plate (e.g. Clift et al. 2002). Such evidence can be interpreted as documenting the age of India-Asia collision if one takes the KLA to have collided with the Asian plate prior to its collision with India (e.g. Petterson 2010 and refs therein). However, an increasing number of workers propose that the KLA collided with Asia subsequent to its earlier collision with India, dated variously at 85 Ma (Chatterjee et al. 2013), 61 Ma (Khan et al. 2009) and 50 Ma (Bouilhol et al. 2013). This, plus the questioning of earlier provenance work (Clift et al. 2002) regarding the validity of their data for constraining timing of earliest arrival of material north of the suture deposited on the Indian plate (Henderson et al. 2011) suggests that the time is right for a reappraisal of this topic. We use a provenance-based approach here, using combined U-Pb and Hf on detrital zircons from Tethyan ocean basin sediments, along with petrography and biostratigraphy, to identify first arrival of material from north of the Indian plate to arrive on the Indian continent, to constrain

  15. Bacterial profiling of Saharan dust deposition in the Atlantic Ocean using sediment trap moorings – year one results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Chris; Brummer, Geert-Jan; van der Does, Michelle; Korte, Laura; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    Large quantities of dust are transported from the Sahara Desert across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean each year, with a large portion of it deposited in the ocean. This dust brings an array of minerals, nutrients and organic matter, both living and dead. This input potentially fertilizes phytoplankton growth, with resulting knock-on effects throughout the food chain. The input of terrestrial microbial life may also have an impact on the marine microbial community. The current multi-year project consists of a transect of floating dust collectors and sub-surface sediment traps placed at 12°N across the Atlantic Ocean. Sediment traps are located 1200m and 3500m below the sea surface and all are synchronized to collect samples for a period of two weeks. The aim is to understand the links between dust input and the bacterial community and how this relates to ocean productivity and the carbon cycle. The first set of sediment trap samples were recovered using the RV Pelagia in November 2013 with promising results. Results from 7 sediment traps (three at 1200m and four at 3500m) were obtained. In general, the total mass flux decreased as distance from the source increased and the upper traps generally held more material than those at 3500m. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) was used as a screening technique, revealing highly varied profiles, with the upper (1200m) traps generally showing more variation throughout the year. Several samples have been submitted for high throughput DNA sequencing which will identify the variations in these samples.

  16. A comparison of microbial communities in deep-sea polymetallic nodules and the surrounding sediments in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue-Hong; Liao, Li; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Ma, Wei-Lin; Meng, Fan-Xu; Wu, Min; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Deep-sea polymetallic nodules, rich in metals such as Fe, Mn, and Ni, are potential resources for future exploitation. Early culturing and microscopy studies suggest that polymetallic nodules are at least partially biogenic. To understand the microbial communities in this environment, we compared microbial community composition and diversity inside nodules and in the surrounding sediments. Three sampling sites in the Pacific Ocean containing polymetallic nodules were used for culture-independent investigations of microbial diversity. A total of 1013 near full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences and 640 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences with ~650 bp from nodules and the surrounding sediments were analyzed. Bacteria showed higher diversity than archaea. Interestingly, sediments contained more diverse bacterial communities than nodules, while the opposite was detected for archaea. Bacterial communities tend to be mostly unique to sediments or nodules, with only 13.3% of sequences shared. The most abundant bacterial groups detected only in nodules were Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, which were predicted to play a role in building matrix outside cells to induce or control mineralization. However, archaeal communities were mostly shared between sediments and nodules, including the most abundant OTU containing 290 sequences from marine group I Thaumarchaeota. PcoA analysis indicated that microhabitat (i.e., nodule or sediment) seemed to be a major factor influencing microbial community composition, rather than sampling locations or distances between locations.

  17. Metal release from contaminated coastal sediments under changing pH conditions: Implications for metal mobilization in acidified oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zaosheng; Wang, Yushao; Zhao, Peihong; Chen, Liuqin; Yan, Changzhou; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2015-12-30

    To investigate the impacts and processes of CO2-induced acidification on metal mobilization, laboratory-scale experiments were performed, simulating the scenarios where carbon dioxide was injected into sediment-seawater layers inside non-pressurized chambers. Coastal sediments were sampled from two sites with different contamination levels and subjected to pre-determined pH conditions. Sediment samples and overlying water were collected for metal analysis after 10-days. The results indicated that CO2-induced ocean acidification would provoke increased metal mobilization causing adverse side-effects on water quality. The mobility of metals from sediment to the overlying seawater was correlated with the reduction in pH. Results of sequential extractions of sediments illustrated that exchangeable metal forms were the dominant source of mobile metals. Collectively, our data revealed that high metal concentrations in overlying seawater released from contaminated sediments under acidic conditions may strengthen the existing contamination gradients in Maluan Bay and represent a potential risk to ecosystem health in coastal environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The concentration of "1"3"7Cs and organic carbon on sediment at Rat island in Indian ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muslim; Reza Agung Arjana; Wahyu Retno Prihatiningsih

    2016-01-01

    Rat Island is one of the islands in Indonesia, located in the Indian Ocean, about 10 kilometers west of Bengkulu, which has a beautiful scenery both on its land and on the seabed, making it a favorite tourist in Bengkulu. The purpose of this study was to determine the condition of "1"3"7Cs in sediments and its relation to the total carbon and sediment texture. Sediment sampling carried out on 17 September 2014 at six stations where three stations are still relatively close to The Rat island with water depth of ≤ 1 m and 3 others are far from Rat Island waters with a depth of 14-18 meters. Sediment texture and TOC content at waters depth of ≤ 1 m is sand and its TOC contents were <5.5%. On other hand at water depth of 14-18 meters sediment texture are silt sand mixture and the TOC content were ≥6%. The concentration of "1"3"7Cs in sediment were influenced by texture characteristic and TOC content. (author)

  19. Some Insights to the Reuse of Dredged Marine Soils by Admixing with Activated Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Ming Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular dredging is necessary for the development of coastal regions and the maintenance of shipping channels. The dredging process dislodges sediments from the seabed, and the removed materials, termed dredged marine soils, are generally considered a geowaste for dumping. However, disposal of the dredged soils offshores can lead to severe and irreversible impact on the marine ecosystem, while disposal on land often incurs exorbitant costs with no guarantee of zero-contamination. It is therefore desirable to reuse the material, and one option is solidification with another industrial waste, that is, steel slag. This paper describes the exploratory work of admixing dredged marine soil with activated steel slag for improvement of the mechanical properties. An optimum activation concentration of NaOH was introduced to the soil-slag mixture for uniform blending. Specimens were prepared at different mix ratios then left to cure for up to 4 weeks. The unconfined compressive strength test was conducted to monitor the changes in strength at predetermined intervals. It was found that the strength does not necessarily increase with higher steel slag content, indicating an optimum slag content required for the maximum solidification effect to take place. Also, regardless of the slag content, longer curing time produces greater strength gain. In conclusion, steel slag addition to dredged sediments can effectively strengthen the originally weak soil structure by both the “cementation” and “filler” effects, though the combined effects were not distinguished in the present study.

  20. Characterization of Dredged Oyster Shell Deposits at Mobile Bay, Alabama Using Geophysical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C. Nwokebuihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for disposing materials dredged from ship channels is a common problem in bays and lagoons. This study is aimed at investigating the suitability of scour features produced by dredging oyster shell deposits in Mobile Bay, Alabama, to dispose excavated channel material. A study area approximately 740 by 280 m lying about 5 km east of Gaillard Island was surveyed using underwater electrical resistivity tomography (UWERT and continuous electrical resistivity profiling (CERP tools. The geophysical survey was conducted with the intent to map scour features created by oyster shell dredging activities in the bay between 1947 and 1982. The geoelectrical surveys show that oyster beds are characterized by high resistivity values greater than 1.1 ohm.m while infilled dredge cuts show lower resistivity, generally from 0.6 to 1.1 ohm.m. The difference in resistivity mainly reflects the lithology and the consolidation of the shallow sediments: consolidated silty clay and sandy sediments rich in oyster shell deposits (with less clay content overlying unconsolidated clayey materials infilling the scours. Results show that most of the infilled dredge cuts are mostly distributed in the north-south direction. Considering that the scours are generally up to 6 m deep across the survey location, it is estimated that about 0.8 million cubic meters of oyster shells and overlying strata were dredged from the survey location.

  1. High-velocity basal sediment package atop oceanic crust, offshore Cascadia: Impacts on plate boundary processes and fluid migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Differences in fluid pressure and mechanical properties at megathrust boundaries in subduction zones have been proposed to create varying seismogenic behavior. In Cascadia, where large ruptures are possible but little seismicity occurs presently, new seismic transects across the deformation front (COAST cruise; Holbrook et al., 2012) image an unusually high-wavespeed sedimentary unit directly overlying oceanic crust. Wavespeed increases before sediments reach the deformation front, and the well-laminated unit, consistently of 1 km thickness, can be traced for 50 km beneath the accretionary prism before imaging quality declines. Wavespeed is modeled via iterative prestack time migration (PSTM) imaging and increases from 3.5 km/sec on the seaward end of the profile to >5.0 km/s near the deformation front. Landward of the deformation front, wavespeed is low along seaward-dipping thrust faults in the Quaternary accretionary prism, indicative of rapid dewatering along faults. The observed wavespeed of 5.5 km/sec just above subducting crust is consistent with porosity intersects the plate boundary at an oblique angle and changes the degree of hydration of the oceanic plate as it subducts within our area. Fluid flow out of oceanic crust is likely impeded by the low-porosity basal sediment package except along the focused thrust faults. Decollements are present at the top of oceanic basement, at the top of the high-wavespeed basal unit, and within sedimentary strata at higher levels; the decollement at the top of oceanic crust is active at the toe of the deformation front. The basal sedimentary unit appears to be mechanically strong, similar to observations from offshore Sumatra, where strongly consolidated sediments at the deformation front are interpreted to facilitate megathrust rupture to the trench (Hupers et al., 2017). A uniformly strong plate interface at Cascadia may inhibit microseismicity while building stress that is released in great earthquakes.

  2. Clay mineralogical and Sr, Nd isotopic investigations in two deep-sea sediment cores from Northeast Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anil Babu, G.; Masood Ahmad, S.; Padmakumari, V.M.; Dayal, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Sr and Nd isotopic studies in terrigenous component of the ocean sediments provide useful information about weathering patterns near source rock and climatic conditions existed on the continents. Variations in 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and 143 Nd/ 144 Nd isotopic ratios in clastic sediments depend on the source from the continents, volcanic input and circulation changes. The composition of clay minerals mainly depends on climate, geology and topography of the surrounding region. Chlorite and Illite are formed under physical weathering in arid cold climate and kaolinite and smectite are the characteristic products of chemical weathering in humid wet climatic conditions. Therefore, the variations in clay mineral composition in deep-sea sediments can be interpreted in terms of changes in the climatic conditions prevailed in the continental source areas

  3. Application of sediment core modelling to interpreting the glacial-interglacial record of Southern Ocean silica cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ridgwell

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Sediments from the Southern Ocean reveal a meridional divide in biogeochemical cycling response to the glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Neogene. South of the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, biogenic opal is generally much more abundant in sediments during interglacials compared to glacials. To the north, an anti-phased relationship is observed, with maximum opal abundance instead occurring during glacials. This antagonistic response of sedimentary properties provides an important model validation target for testing hypotheses of glacial-interglacial change against, particularly for understanding the causes of the concurrent variability in atmospheric CO2. Here, I illustrate a time-dependent modelling approach to helping understand climates of the past by means of the mechanistic simulation of marine sediment core records. I find that a close match between model-predicted and observed down-core changes in sedimentary opal content can be achieved when changes in seasonal sea-ice extent are imposed, whereas the predicted sedimentary response to iron fertilization on its own is not consistent with sedimentary observations. The results of this sediment record model-data comparison supports previous inferences that the changing cryosphere is the primary driver of the striking features exhibited by the paleoceanographic record of this region.

  4. Enhanced ocean carbon storage from anaerobic alkalinity generation in coastal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, H.; Schiettecatte, L.-S.; Suykens, K.; Koné, Y.J.M.; Shadwick, E.H.; Prowe, A.E.F.; Bozec, Y.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Borges, A.V.; Slomp, C.

    2009-01-01

    The coastal ocean is a crucial link between land, the open ocean and the atmosphere. The shallowness of the water column permits close interactions between the sedimentary, aquatic and atmospheric compartments, which otherwise are decoupled at long time scales (≅ 1000 yr) in the open oceans. Despite

  5. Sediment Lofting From Melt-Water Generated Turbidity Currents During Heinrich Events as a Tool to Assess Main Sediment Delivery Phases to Small Subpolar Ocean Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, R.

    2009-05-01

    Small subpolar ocean basins such as the Labrador Sea received a major portion (25%) of their sediment fill during the Pleistocene glaciations (less than 5% of the basin's lifetime), but the detailed timing of sediment supply to the basin remained essentially unknown until recently. The main sediment input into the basin was probably not coupled to major glacial cycles and associated sea-level changes but was related to Heinrich events. Discovery of the depositional facies of fine-grained lofted sediment provides a tool which suggests that the parent-currents from which lofting took place may have been sandy-gravelly turbidity currents that built a huge braided abyssal plain in the Labrador Sea (700 by 120 km underlain by 150 m on average of coarse- grained sediment) which is one of the largest sand accumulations (104 km3) on Earth. The facies of lofted sediment consists of stacked layers of graded muds that contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) which impart a bimodal grain-size distribution to the graded muds. The texturally incompatible grain populations of the muds (median size between 4 and 8 micrometers) and the randomly distributed coarse silt and sand-sized IRD require the combination of two transport processes that delivered the populations independently and allowed mixing at the depositional site: (i) sediment rafting by icebergs (dropstones) and (ii) the rise of turbid freshwater plumes out of fresh-water generated turbidity currents. Sediment lofting from turbidity currents is a process that occurs in density currents generated from sediment-laden fresh-water discharges into the sea that can produce reversed buoyancy, as is well known from experiments. When the flows have traveled long enough, their tops will have lost enough sediment by settling so that they become hypopycnal (their density decreasing below that of the ambient seawater) causing the current tops to lift up. The turbid fresh-water clouds buoyantly rise out of the turbidity current to a level of

  6. Antagonistic Effects of Ocean Acidification and Rising Sea Surface Temperature on the Dissolution of Coral Reef Carbonate Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Trnovsky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO2 is raising sea surface temperature (SST and increasing seawater CO2 concentrations, resulting in a lower oceanic pH (ocean acidification; OA, which is expected to reduce the accretion of coral reef ecosystems. Although sediments comprise most of the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 within coral reefs, no in situ studies have looked at the combined effects of increased SST and OA on the dissolution of coral reef CaCO3 sediments. In situ benthic chamber incubations were used to measure dissolution rates in permeable CaCO3 sands under future OA and SST scenarios in a coral reef lagoon on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (Heron Island. End of century (2100 simulations (temperature +2.7°C and pH -0.3 shifted carbonate sediments from net precipitating to net dissolving. Warming increased the rate of benthic respiration (R by 29% per 1°C and lowered the ratio of productivity to respiration (P/R; ΔP/R = -0.23, which increased the rate of CaCO3 sediment dissolution (average net increase of 18.9 mmol CaCO3 m-2 d-1 for business as usual scenarios. This is most likely due to the influence of warming on benthic P/R which, in turn, was an important control on sediment dissolution through the respiratory production of CO2. The effect of increasing CO2 on CaCO3 sediment dissolution (average net increase of 6.5 mmol CaCO3 m-2 d-1 for business as usual scenarios was significantly less than the effect of warming. However, the combined effect of increasing both SST and pCO2 on CaCO3 sediment dissolution was non-additive (average net increase of 5.6 mmol CaCO3 m-2 d-1 due to the different responses of the benthic community. This study highlights that benthic biogeochemical processes such as metabolism and associated CaCO3 sediment dissolution respond rapidly to changes in SST and OA, and that the response to multiple environmental changes are not necessarily additive.

  7. Characterization of sediment from the dredging of storm water channels in the city of Salvador-BA, Brazil aiming to use in structural ceramics; Caracterizacao de sedimento proveniente de dragagem de canais pluviais do municipio de Salvador-BA visando sua utilizacao em ceramica estrutural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, O.C.; Breitenbach, S.B.; Coelho, R.E., E-mail: engcruz@ig.com.br, E-mail: silviabb@ifba.edu.br, E-mail: rodrigoecoelho@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador (Brazil); Andrade, J.C.S.; Sales Junior, J.C.C., E-mail: jean.engmateriais@gmail.com, E-mail: jccalado@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Paskocimas, C.A.; Martinelli, A.E.; Nascimento, R.M., E-mail: paskocimas@uol.com.br, E-mail: aemart@uol.com.br, E-mail: rubensmaribondo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize sediment from the dredging of storm water channels (Scp) in the city of Salvador, Bahia, aiming its maximum replacement by clay in structural ceramics, since this binary mixture is part of the pilot project of the standard mass, in the research of interlocked block ceramic formulation. Initially, the sediment was submitted to the following tests: plasticity index; chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence; mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction; thermal and particle size analyses. The morphology of the material was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Then, sediment (Scp) was added to clay from the municipality of Candelas, Bahia, in the proportions of 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%. Specimens were prepared by uniaxial pressing in dimensions of 60 mm x 20 mm, with compacting pressure of 25 MPa, and the material was humidified with 8% of water. Firing was conducted in resistive furnace at temperatures of 850, 950 and 1050 deg C, with 5 deg C / min heating rate. The properties evaluated were: linear shrinkage; water absorption and modulus of rupture. The results indicated the possibility of using SCP in structural ceramics by the prerequisites required in standards, in the manufacture of tiles, sealing blocks and bricks. (author)

  8. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

  9. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinza, M.R.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Niyogi, D.K.; Kohn, N.P.

    1992-10-01

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of -40 ft MLLW (-38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites

  10. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program: Engineering Design and Environmental Assessment of Dredged Material Overflow from Hydraulically Filled Hopper Barges in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    turbid estuarine habitats such as Mobile Bay are very tolerant of moderately high concentrations of suspended sediments and thin layers of sediment...GULF OF MEXIC BAYOU 4M 2CAE SI2LTK Fiur 3. DsrbuinoAedmnTyesi oie a fo IsphordingLT anCLmb190 PART III: DREDGING EQUIPMENT AND OPERATIONAL TECHNIQUES...increase in ambient turbidity was noted. Water samples were collected at surface, middepth, and bottom. The sampling boats proceeded across their

  11. Thermal Consolidation of Dredge Sand for Artificial Reef Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Alexandro

    Coral Reef ecosystems have degraded over years due to a variety of environmental issues such as ocean acidification. The continuous stress has detrimental effects on coral reef ecosystems that can possibly lead to the loss of the ecosystem. Our research aims to construct a prototype of an artificial reef by consolidating dredge sand from the ship channels of South Texas. Consolidation is achieved through an aluminum polytetrafluoroethylene self-propagating high temperature process that yields a solid formation to mimic the physical properties of coral reef structures. Using thermodynamic calculations, the variation of initial components was determined that reached an adiabatic temperature with a maximum peak of 2000 K. The self-sustaining reaction front was obtained to rigidly consolidate the dredge sand only at composition concentrations exceeding a critical value of 24 wt.% Al, and 3 wt.% PTFE. The combustion synthesis produced a consolidated formation with a hardened and porous structure.

  12. Cohesive and mixed sediment in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.6 implemented in the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere–Wave–Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST r1234

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Sherwood

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe and demonstrate algorithms for treating cohesive and mixed sediment that have been added to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS version 3.6, as implemented in the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere–Wave–Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST Subversion repository revision 1234. These include the following: floc dynamics (aggregation and disaggregation in the water column; changes in floc characteristics in the seabed; erosion and deposition of cohesive and mixed (combination of cohesive and non-cohesive sediment; and biodiffusive mixing of bed sediment. These routines supplement existing non-cohesive sediment modules, thereby increasing our ability to model fine-grained and mixed-sediment environments. Additionally, we describe changes to the sediment bed layering scheme that improve the fidelity of the modeled stratigraphic record. Finally, we provide examples of these modules implemented in idealized test cases and a realistic application.

  13. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor Deepening Project and the intensive study of the Turning Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Word, J.Q.; Michaels, L.L. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Richmond Harbor is on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay and its access channels and several of the shipping berths are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modem deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (PL99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels in Richmond Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE: disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean disposal sites, or at uplands disposal sites. Purpose of this study was to conduct comprehensive evaluations, including chemical, biological, and bioaccumulation testing of sediments in selected areas of Richmond Harbor. This information was required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USACE. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected 20 core samples, both 4-in. and 12-in., to a project depth of -40 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) (-38 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdepth) using a vibratory-hammer core. These 20 field samples were combined to form five test composites plus an older bay mud (OBM) composite that were analyzed for physical/chemical parameters, biological toxicity, and tissue chemistry. Solid-phase tests were conducted with the amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius; the clam, Macoma nasuta; and the polychaete worm, Nephtys caecoides. Suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests were conducted with the sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus; the mysid, Holmesimysis costata; and the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Bioaccumulation of contaminants was measured in tissues of Macoma nasuta and Nereis virens. Sediments from one ocean reference sediment, and two in-bay reference sediments, were tested concurrently. Results from analysis of the five test treatments were statistically compared with the reference sediment R-OS in the first five sections of this report.

  14. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-;atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere–ocean–wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  15. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere–ocean–wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor’Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor’easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor’Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  16. Phytoplankton community indicators of changes associated with dredging in the Tagus estuary (Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This work reports changes in suspended particulate matter, turbidity, dissolved Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Hg and Pb concentrations, and phytoplankton biomass and composition during a 5-month period dredging operation, in a trace element contaminated area of the Tagus estuary (Portugal). Phytoplankton biomass, diatom:other groups ratio, benthic:pelagic diatom ratio, Margalef's, Simpson's diversity, Shannon–Wiever's, and Warwick and Clarke's taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices, and individual taxa were investigated as indicators of dredging induced changes. Significant rise in sediment resuspension and trace element mobilisation caused by dredging influenced the community structure but not the overall biomass. Benthic diatom displacement into the water column maintained species diversity, and therefore, none of the indices highlighted community changes. Contrastingly, diatom:other groups ratio and benthic:pelagic diatom ratio were reliable indicators for the assessment of dredging induced changes. A shift in composition towards species less susceptible to trace elements was observed, disclosing some individual taxa as potential indicators. - Highlights: • Phytoplankton community indicators of dredging induced changes were investigated. • Increased resuspension and trace element mobilisation changed community structure. • Diversity indices unsuitable to detect changes because species richness was maintained. • Diatom:other groups and benthic:pelagic diatom ratios were efficient indicators. • Individual taxa may be potential indicators but require site-specific validation. - Diatom:other groups ratio, benthic:pelagic diatom ratio and individual taxa were identified as efficient indicators for the assessment of water quality changes associated with dredging

  17. Sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff R. Hupp; Michael R. Schening

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation is arguably the most important water-quality concern in the United States. Sediment trapping is cited frequently as a major function of riverine-forested wetlands, yet little is known about sedimcntation rates at the landscape scale in relation to site parameters, including woody vegetation type, elevation, velocity, and hydraulic connection to the river...

  18. The Atlantic Coast of Maryland, Sediment Budget Update: Tier 2, Assateague Island and Ocean City Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    111 – Rivers and Harbors Act), the navigational structures at the Ocean City Inlet, and a number of Federally authorized channels (Figure 1). Reed...Tier 2, Assateague Island and Ocean City Inlet by Ernest R. Smith, Joseph C. Reed, and Ian L. Delwiche PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics...of the Atlantic Ocean shoreline within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Baltimore District’s Area of Responsibility, which for coastal

  19. Lasting Impact of a Tsunami Event on Sediment-Organism Interactions in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, Koji; Sassa, Shinji; Shirai, Kotaro; Kubota, Kaoru

    2018-02-01

    Although tsunami sedimentation is a short-term phenomenon, it may control the long-term benthic environment by altering seafloor surface characteristics such as topography and grain-size composition. By analyzing sediment cores, we investigated the long-term effect of the 2011 tsunami generated by the Tohoku Earthquake off the Pacific coast of Japan on sediment mixing (bioturbation) by an important ecosystem engineer, the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum. Recent tsunami deposits allow accurate estimation of the depth of current bioturbation by E. cordatum, because there are no preexisting burrows in the sediments. The in situ hardness of the substrate decreased significantly with increasing abundance of E. cordatum, suggesting that echinoid bioturbation softens the seafloor sediment. Sediment-core analysis revealed that this echinoid rarely burrows into the coarser-grained (medium-grained to coarse-grained) sandy layer deposited by the 2011 tsunami; thus, the vertical grain-size distribution resulting from tsunami sedimentation controls the depth of E. cordatum bioturbation. As sandy tsunami layers are preserved in the seafloor substrate, their restriction on bioturbation continues for an extended period. The results demonstrate that understanding the effects on seafloor processes of extreme natural events that occur on geological timescales, including tsunami events, is important in revealing continuing interactions between seafloor sediments and marine benthic invertebrates.

  20. Inventory of 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb in marine sediments cores of Southwest Atlantic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Alice M.R.; Oliveira, Joselene de; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Sousa, Silvia H.M.

    2015-01-01

    210 Pb (22.3 y) is a radioactive isotope successfully applied as tracer of sediment dating of the last 100-150 years. The application of 226 Ra and 228 Ra as paleoceanographic tracers (half-lives of 1,600 y and 5.7 y, respectively) also gives some information of ocean's role in past climate change. In this work, it was analyzed 2 sediment cores collect at Southwest Atlantic Ocean. The sediments samples were freeze-dried and acid digested in microwave. It was carried out a radiochemical separation of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb and performed a gross alpha and gross beta measurement of both precipitates Ba(Ra)SO 4 and PbCrO 4 in a low background gas-flow proportional counter. Activity concentrations of 226 Ra ranged from 45 Bq kg -1 to 70 Bq kg -1 in NAP-62 and from 57 Bq kg -1 to 82 Bq kg -1 in NAP-63 samples. The concentration of 228 Ra varied between 37 Bq kg -1 and 150 Bq kg -1 in NAP-62 and between 23 Bq kg -1 and 111 Bq kg -1 in NAP-63 samples. The concentration of total 210 Pb ranged from 126 Bq kg -1 to 256 Bq kg -1 in NAP-62 and from 63 Bq kg -1 to 945 Bq kg -1 in NAP-63 samples. Results of 210 Pb uns varied from 68 Bq kg -1 to 192 Bq kg -1 for NAP-62, while varied from <4.9 Bq kg -1 to 870 Bq kg -1 in NAP-63 profile. Increased values of 210 Pb uns were found on the top of both NAP-62 and NAP- 63 sediment profile. (author)

  1. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the surface sediments of world oceans and seas: distribution and relationship to bottom topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1980-06-01

    Information dealing with the distribution of organic carbon and nitrogen in the top sediments of world oceans and seas has been gathered and evaluated. Based on the available information a master chart has been constructed which shows world distribution of sedimentary organic matter in the oceans and seas. Since organic matter exerts an influence upon the settling properties of fine inorganic particles, e.g. clay minerals and further, the interaction between organic matter and clay minerals is maximal, a relationship between the overall bottom topography and the distribution of clay minerals and organic matter should be observable on a worldwide basis. Initial analysis of the available data indicates that such a relationship does exist and its significance is discussed.

  2. The effects of wind and rainfall on suspended sediment concentration related to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinfeng; Tang Danling; Li Zizhen; Zhang Fengpan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of rainfall and wind speed on the dynamics of suspended sediment concentration (SSC), during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, were analyzed using spatial statistical models. The results showed a positive effect of wind speed on SSC, and inconsistent effects (positive and negative) of rainfall on SSC. The effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC weakened immediately around the tsunami, indicating tsunami-caused floods and earthquake-induced shaking may have suddenly disturbed the ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and thus weakened the effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC. Wind speed and rainfall increased markedly, and reached their maximum values immediately after the tsunami week. Rainfall at this particular week exceeded twice the average for the same period over the previous 4 years. The tsunami-affected air-sea interactions may have increased both wind speed and rainfall immediately after the tsunami week, which directly lead to the variations in SSC.

  3. A new XRF probe for in-situ determining concentration of multi-elements in ocean sediments

    CERN Document Server

    Ge Liang Quan; Zhou Si Chun; Lin Ling; Lin Yan Chang; Ren Jia Fu

    2001-01-01

    The author introduces a new X-ray fluorescence probe for in-situ determining the concentration of multi-elements in ocean sediments. The probe consists of Si-Pin X-ray detector with an electro-thermal colder, two isotope sources, essential electrical signal processing units and a notebook computer. More than 10 elements can be simultaneously determined at a detection limit of (10-200) x 10 sup - sup 6 and precision of 5%-30% without liquid Nitrogen supply. tests show that the probe can perform the analytical tasks under the water at the depth of less than 1000 meters

  4. A new XRF probe for in-situ determining concentration of multi-elements in ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Liangquan; Lai Wanchang; Zhou Sichun; Lin Ling; Lin Yanchang; Ren Jiafu

    2001-01-01

    The author introduces a new X-ray fluorescence probe for in-situ determining the concentration of multi-elements in ocean sediments. The probe consists of Si-Pin X-ray detector with an electro-thermal colder, two isotope sources, essential electrical signal processing units and a notebook computer. More than 10 elements can be simultaneously determined at a detection limit of (10-200) x 10 -6 and precision of 5%-30% without liquid Nitrogen supply. tests show that the probe can perform the analytical tasks under the water at the depth of less than 1000 meters

  5. Open ocean pelago-benthic coupling: cyanobacteria as tracers of sedimenting salp faeces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, Olaf; Lochte, Karin

    1993-04-01

    Coupling between surface water plankton and abyssal benthos was investigated during a mass development of salps ( Salpa fusiformis) in the Northeast Atlantic. Cyanobacteria numbers and composition of photosynthetic pigments were determined in faeces of captured salps from surface waters, sediment trap material, detritus from plankton hauls, surface sediments from 4500-4800 m depth and Holothurian gut contents. Cyanobacteria were found in all samples containing salp faeces and also in the guts of deep-sea Holothuria. The ratio between zeaxanthin (typical of cyanobacteria) and sum of chlorophyll a pigments was higher in samples from the deep sea when compared to fresh salp faeces, indicating that this carotenoid persisted longer in the sedimenting material than total chlorophyll a pigments. The microscopic and chemical observations allowed us to trace sedimenting salp faeces from the epipelagial to the abyssal benthos, and demonstrated their role as a fast and direct link between both systems. Cyanobacteria may provide a simple tracer for sedimenting phytodetritus.

  6. Punctuated Sediment Input into Small Subpolar Ocean Basins During Heinrich Events and Preservation in the Stratigraphic Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, R.

    2006-12-01

    Small subpolar ocean basins such as the Labrador Sea received a major portion (25%) of their sediment fill during the Pleistocene glaciations (less than 5% of the basin's lifetime), but the timing of sediment supply to the basin remained essentially unknown until recently. Discovery of the hitherto little known depositional facies of fine-grained lofted sediment suggests that the main sediment input into the basin was not coupled to major glacial cycles and associated sea-level changes but was related to Heinrich events. Heinrich events are known as Late Pleistocene ice-rafting episodes of unparalleled intensity in the North Atlantic that were associated with major melt-water discharge pulses and, as it appears now, also were the times of the main sediment delivery to the basin. The facies of lofted sediment consists of stacked layers of graded muds that contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) which impart a bimodal grain-size distribution to the graded muds. The texturally incompatible grain populations of the muds (median size between 4 and 8 micrometers) and the coarse silt and sand-sized IRD require the combination of two transport processes that delivered the populations independently and allowed mixing at the depositional site: (i) sediment rafting by icebergs and (ii) the rise of turbid freshwater plumes out of fresh-water generated turbidity currents. Fresh-water generated turbidity currents have built a huge sand and gravel abyssal plain in the Labrador Sea (700 by 120 km underlain by 150 m of coarse-grained sediment on average) which is one of the largest sand accumulations (104 km3) on Earth. The hyperpycnal portion of individual discharge events that generated these currents would have had an estimated volume on the order of 103 km3 (1012 m3) which would have flowed for 10-15 days or less, assuming estimated discharge ranges for subglacial outburst floods of up to 106 m3/s. Sediment lofting from turbidity currents is a process that occurs in density currents

  7. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2......, 4 and 5, respectively. It is not the intention of the book to give a broad review of the literature on this very wide topic. The book tries to pick up information which is of engineering importance. An obstacle to the study of sedimentation is the scale effect in model tests. Whenever small...

  8. Literature Review of Dredging Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    This U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, special report presents a review of dredging physical ...model studies with the goal of understanding the most current state of dredging physical modeling, understanding conditions of similitude used in past...studies, and determining whether the flow field around a dredging operation has been quantified. Historical physical modeling efforts have focused on

  9. Overdepth Dredging and Characterization Depth Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    bucket is hoisted to the surface and usually side dumped into a barge or sidecast to its placement site. The general clamshell dredge’s horizontal...excavation accuracies vary as a function of type of dredging equipment used (mechanical or hydraulic ) and interaction with site-specific physical...surveys. Dredge excavation accuracies vary as a function of the type of dredging equipment used (mechanical or hydraulic ) and its respective

  10. The environmental impact and recovery at two dumping sites for dredged material in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronkhorst, J.; Ariese, F.; Hattum, van B.; Postma, J.F.; Kluijver, de M.; Besten, den P.; Bergman, M.J.N.; Daan, R.; Murk, A.J.; Vethaak, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental impact and recovery associated with the long and uninterrupted disposal of large volumes of moderately contaminated dredged material from the port of Rotterdam was studied at nearby dumping sites in the North Sea. Observations were made on sediment contamination, ecotoxicity,

  11. Controlling toxic cyanobacteria: Effects of dredging and phosphorus-binding clay on cyanobacteria and microcystins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; Faassen, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment dredging and Phoslock® addition were applied individually and in combination in an enclosure experiment in a Dutch hypertrophic urban pond. These measures were applied to control eutrophication and reduce the risk of exposure to cyanobacterial toxins. Over the 58 days course of the

  12. Comparisons of benthic filter feeder communities before and after a large-scale capital dredging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Wahab, Muhammad Azmi; Fromont, Jane; Gomez, Oliver; Fisher, Rebecca; Jones, Ross

    2017-09-15

    Changes in turbidity, sedimentation and light over a two year large scale capital dredging program at Onslow, northwestern Australia, were quantified to assess their effects on filter feeder communities, in particular sponges. Community functional morphological composition was quantified using towed video surveys, while dive surveys allowed for assessments of species composition and chlorophyll content. Onslow is relatively diverse recording 150 sponge species. The area was naturally turbid (1.1 mean P 80 NTU), with inshore sites recording 6.5× higher turbidity than offshore localities, likely influenced by the Ashburton River discharge. Turbidity and sedimentation increased by up to 146% and 240% through dredging respectively, with corresponding decreases in light levels. The effects of dredging was variable, and despite existing caveats (i.e. bleaching event and passing of a cyclone), the persistence of sponges and the absence of a pronounced response post-dredging suggest environmental filtering or passive adaptation acquired pre-dredging may have benefited these communities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effects of combined dredging-related stressors on sponges: a laboratory approach using realistic scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Mari-Carmen; Strehlow, Brian; Kamp, Jasmine; Duckworth, Alan; Jones, Ross; Webster, Nicole S

    2017-07-12

    Dredging can cause increased suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs), light attenuation and sedimentation in marine communities. In order to determine the combined effects of dredging-related pressures on adult sponges, three species spanning different nutritional modes and morphologies were exposed to 5 treatment levels representing realistic dredging scenarios. Most sponges survived under low to moderate turbidity scenarios (SSCs of ≤ 33 mg L -1 , and a daily light integral of ≥0.5 mol photons m -2 d -1 ) for up to 28 d. However, under the highest turbidity scenario (76 mg L -1 , 0.1 mol photons m -2 d -1 ) there was 20% and 90% mortality of the phototrophic sponges Cliona orientalis and Carteriospongia foliascens respectively, and tissue regression in the heterotrophic Ianthella basta. All three sponge species exhibited mechanisms to effectively tolerate dredging-related pressures in the short term (e.g. oscula closure, mucus production and tissue regression), although reduced lipids and deterioration of sponge health suggest that longer term exposure to similar conditions is likely to result in higher mortality. These results suggest that the combination of high SSCs and low light availability can accelerate mortality, increasing the probability of biological effects, although there is considerable interspecies variability in how adult sponges respond to dredging pressures.

  14. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Phase III - Analysis of Alternatives and Development of an LTMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palermo, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This report documents Phase III of a three-phase study to develop a Long-Term Management Study for disposal of dredged material unsuitable for ocean disposal from Pearl Harbor Naval Complex for the next 30 years...

  15. Bacteria, taxonomic code, and other data collected from G.W. PIERCE in North Atlantic Ocean from sediment sampler; 20 February 1976 to 23 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601642)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteria, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using sediment sampler and other instruments in the North Atlantic Ocean from G.W. PIERCE. Data were...

  16. Hydrothermal Alteration Promotes Humic Acid Formation in Sediments: A Case Study of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nittala S.; Kiran, Rayaprolu; Rama Reddy, M.; Iyer, Sridhar D.; Peketi, A.; Borole, D. V.; Krishna, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    Anomalously high concentrations of humic-rich dissolved organic matter (DOM) in extant submarine hydrothermal vent plumes traveled far from source are increasingly being reported. This DOM, able to mobilize trace metals (e.g., Fe2+) has been hypothesized as originating from organic matter produced by thermogenic bacteria. To eliminate a possible abiogenic origin of this DOM, study is required of well-preserved organic compounds that can be attributed to thermogenic bacteria. The Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) is part of a diffuse plate boundary and an intraplate deformation zone. Coarse fraction (>63 µ) characteristics, mineralogy, magnetic susceptibility, and geochemistry were examined in sediments of a core raised close to a north-south fracture zone near the Equator. Two horizons of distinctly brown-colored sediments were shown as hydrothermally altered from their charred fragments and geochemistry (CaCO3, Corg, Ti/Al, Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sr/Ba, Mg/Li, Mn micronodules, Fe/Mn). We examined whether humic substances were preserved in these sediments, and if so whether their carbon isotope distribution would support their hydrothermal origin. Alkali extraction of sediments afforded humic acids (HA) in yields up to 1.2% in the brown sediments. The remaining portions of the core had nil or low concentrations of HA. The carbon of hydrothermal HA is isotopically heavier (average δ13C, ˜ -16.3‰) compared to nonhydrothermal HA (-18.1‰), suggesting that they were probably formed from organic matter that remained after elimination of lighter carbon enriched functional groups during diagenesis. The results provide compelling evidence of HA formation from lipids originating from thermogenic bacteria.

  17. Efficacy of 230Th normalization in sediments from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kassandra; McManus, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    230Th normalization is an indispensable method for reconstructing sedimentation rates and mass fluxes over time, but the validity of this approach has generated considerable debate in the paleoceanographic community. 230Th systematics have been challenged with regards to grain size bias, sediment composition (CaCO3), water column advection, and other processes. In this study, we investigate the consequences of these effects on 230Th normalization from a suite of six cores on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The proximity of these cores (carbonate preservation, both of which may limit the usage of 230Th in this region. Despite anticipated complications, 230Th normalization effectively reconstructs nearly identical particle rain rates from all six cores, which are summarily unrelated to the total sedimentation rates as calculated from the age models. Instead the total sedimentation rates are controlled almost entirely by sediment focusing and winnowing, which are highly variable even over the short spatial scales investigated in this study. Furthermore, no feedbacks on 230Th systematics were detected as a consequence of sediment focusing, coarse fraction variability, or calcium carbonate content, supporting the robustness of the 230Th normalization technique.

  18. 15 CFR Appendix C to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Within the Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Sanctuary C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922—Dredged Material...

  19. Sedimentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rixen, T.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Ittekkot, V.

    opal ratios. Such changes are assumed to have lowered the atmospheric CO sub(2) concentration significantly during glacial times. The differences between estimated deep ocean fluxes derived from satellite data and measured deep fluxes are lower than...

  20. Basalt microlapilli in deep sea sediments of Indian Ocean in the vicinity of Vityaz fracture zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Iyer, S.D.

    Two cores recovered from the flanks of Mid-India oceanic ridge in the vicinity of Vityaz fracture zone consist of discrete pyroclastic layers at various depths. These layers are composed of coarse-grained, angular basaltic microlapilli in which...

  1. Development of an assessment methodology for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste into deep ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, C.N.; Stanners, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical study concerning the option of disposal of vitrified high activity waste (HAW) into deep ocean sediments. The development of a preliminary methodology is presented which concerns the assessment of the possible effects of a release of radioactivity on the ecosystem and eventually on man. As the long-term hazard is considered basically to be due to transuranic elements (and daughter products) the period studied for the assessment is from 10 3 to 10 6 years. A simple ecosystem model is developed so that the transfer of activity between different compartments of the systems, e.g. the sediment column, sediment-water interface, deep sea water column, can be estimated. A critical pathway analysis is made for an imaginary critical group in order to complete the assessment. A sensitivity analysis is undertaken using the computed minimum-maximum credible values for the different parameters used in the calculations in order to obtain a minimum-maximum dose range for a critical group. (Auth.)

  2. Enhanced ocean carbon storage from anaerobic alkalinity generation in coastal sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The coastal ocean is a crucial link between land, the open ocean and the atmosphere. The shallowness of the water column permits close interactions between the sedimentary, aquatic and atmospheric compartments, which otherwise are decoupled at long time scales (≅ 1000 yr in the open oceans. Despite the prominent role of the coastal oceans in absorbing atmospheric CO2 and transferring it into the deep oceans via the continental shelf pump, the underlying mechanisms remain only partly understood. Evaluating observations from the North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, we provide evidence that anaerobic degradation of organic matter, fuelled from land and ocean, generates total alkalinity (AT and increases the CO2 buffer capacity of seawater. At both the basin wide and annual scales anaerobic AT generation in the North Sea's tidal mud flat area irreversibly facilitates 7–10%, or taking into consideration benthic denitrification in the North Sea, 20–25% of the North Sea's overall CO2 uptake. At the global scale, anaerobic AT generation could be accountable for as much as 60% of the uptake of CO2 in shelf and marginal seas, making this process, the anaerobic pump, a key player in the biological carbon pump. Under future high CO2 conditions oceanic CO2 storage via the anaerobic pump may even gain further relevance because of stimulated ocean productivity.

  3. Coral reef sedimentation on Rodrigues and the Western Indian Ocean and its impact on the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Siwan A; Opdyke, Bradley N; Wilson, Paul A; Fifield, L Keith

    2005-01-15

    Coral reefs in the southwest Indian Ocean cover an area of ca. 18,530 km2 compared with a global reef area of nearly 300,000 km2. These regions are important as fishing grounds, tourist attractions and as a significant component of the global carbon cycle. The mass of calcium carbonate stored within Holocene neritic sediments is a number that we are only now beginning to quantify with any confidence, in stark contrast to the mass and sedimentation rates associated with pelagic calcium carbonate, which have been relatively well defined for decades. We report new data that demonstrate that the reefs at Rodrigues, like those at Reunion and Mauritius, only reached a mature state (reached sea level) by 2-3 ka: thousands of years later than most of the reefs in the Australasian region. Yet field observations show that the large lagoon at Rodrigues is already completely full of carbonate detritus (typical lagoon depth less than 1 m at low spring tide). The presence of aeolian dunes at Rodrigues indicates periodic exposure of past lagoons throughout the Pleistocene. The absence of elevated Pleistocene reef deposits on the island indicates that the island has not been uplifted. Most Holocene reefs are between 15 and 20 m in thickness and those in the southwest Indian Ocean appear to be consistent with this observation. We support the view that the CO2 flux associated with coral-reef growth acts as a climate change amplifier during deglaciation, adding CO2 to a warming world. southwest Indian Ocean reefs could have added 7-10% to this global flux during the Holocene.

  4. Responses of macroinvertebrates and local environment to short-term commercial sand dredging practices in a flood-plain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xingliang; Jiang, Xiaoming; Li, Zhengfei; Wang, Jun; Cooper, Keith M; Xie, Zhicai

    2018-08-01

    In parts of the developing world, the expansion of industrial sand mining activities has led to serious environmental concerns. However, current understanding of the effects of this activity on an inland water ecosystem remains limited. Herein, we choose the "most affected" lake in China (Dongting Lake), to assess short-term (1year) effects of sand dredging on key environmental parameters and on the structure of the macroinvertebrate assemblage. Within the dredged area we observed increases in water depth (on average 2.17m), turbidity and changes in sediment composition (e.g., increase in % medium sand, and a decrease in % clay). In addition, dredging was associated with a 50 % reduction in taxa richness, Simpson and Shannon-Wiener indices, and a 72 and 99 % reduction in abundance and biomass, respectively. Indirect effects were also observed in the zone surrounding the extraction sites (ca. 500m), most likely as a result of the dredging processes (e.g., sediment screening and overspill) and water flow. No such effects were observed at a nearby reference site. The direct removal of sediment and indirect alteration of physical conditions (e.g., water depth, turbidity and sediment composition) appear to be the most likely cause of variations in the benthic community. Implications of our findings for the planning, management and monitoring of sand dredging in inland waters are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fatty acids in sediments and phytoplankton data were collected from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study/Equatorial Pacific Basin Study (JGOFS/EQPAC) project., from 1992-02-03 to 1992-12-13 (NODC Accession 9700180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fatty acids in sediments and phytoplankton data were collected using plankton tow, sediments sampler - corer, pump and CTD casts from the R/V THOMAS THOMPSON in the...

  6. The Cenozoic western Svalbard margin: sediment geometry and sedimentary processes in an area of ultraslow oceanic spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ingrid Marie Hasle; Blinova, Maria; Hjelstuen, Berit Oline; Mjelde, Rolf; Haflidason, Haflidi

    2011-12-01

    The northeastern high-latitude North Atlantic is characterised by the Bellsund and Isfjorden fans on the continental slope off west Svalbard, the asymmetrical ultraslow Knipovich spreading ridge and a 1,000 m deep rift valley. Recently collected multichannel seismic profiles and bathymetric records now provide a more complete picture of sedimentary processes and depositional environments within this region. Both downslope and alongslope sedimentary processes are identified in the study area. Turbidity currents and deposition of glacigenic debris flows are the dominating downslope processes, whereas mass failures, which are a common process on glaciated margins, appear to have been less significant. The slide debrite observed on the Bellsund Fan is most likely related to a 2.5-1.7 Ma old failure on the northwestern Barents Sea margin. The seismic records further reveal that alongslope current processes played a major role in shaping the sediment packages in the study area. Within the Knipovich rift valley and at the western rift flank accumulations as thick as 950-1,000 m are deposited. We note that oceanic basement is locally exposed within the rift valley, and that seismostratigraphic relationships indicate that fault activity along the eastern rift flank lasted until at least as recently as 1.5 Ma. A purely hemipelagic origin of the sediments in the rift valley and on the western rift flank is unlikely. We suggest that these sediments, partly, have been sourced from the western Svalbard—northwestern Barents Sea margin and into the Knipovich Ridge rift valley before continuous spreading and tectonic activity caused the sediments to be transported out of the valley and westward.

  7. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  8. Velocity-porosity relationships for slope apron and accreted sediments in the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 315 Site C0001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Tobin, H. J.; Knuth, M.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we focused on the porosity and compressional wave velocity of marine sediments to examine the physical properties of the slope apron and the accreted sediments. This approach allows us to identify characteristic variations between sediments being deposited onto the active prism and those deposited on the oceanic plate and then carried into the prism during subduction. For this purpose we conducted ultrasonic compressional wave velocity measurements on the obtained core samples with pore pressure control. Site C0001 in the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment transect of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program is located in the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay thrust fault in the Nankai subduction zone offshore of the Kii peninsula (SW Japan), penetrating an unconformity at ˜200 m depth between slope apron sediments and the underlying accreted sediments. We used samples from Site C0001. Compressional wave velocity from laboratory measurements ranges from ˜1.6 to ˜2.0 km/s at hydrostatic pore pressure conditions estimated from sample depth. The compressional wave velocity-porosity relationship for the slope apron sediments shows a slope almost parallel to the slope for global empirical relationships. In contrast, the velocity-porosity relationship for the accreted sediments shows a slightly steeper slope than that of the slope apron sediments at 0.55 of porosity. This higher slope in the velocity-porosity relationship is found to be characteristic of the accreted sediments. Textural analysis was also conducted to examine the relationship between microstructural texture and acoustic properties. Images from micro-X-ray CT indicated a homogeneous and well-sorted distribution of small pores both in shallow and in deeper sections. Other mechanisms such as lithology, clay fraction, and abnormal fluid pressure were found to be insufficient to explain the higher velocity for accreted sediments. The higher slope in velocity-porosity relationship for

  9. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    rate averages 2.25 x 10/5 g.cm/2.y/1 and it is contributed from 33 to 50% of the total silica. Higher biogenic silica content of the surface sediment is well correlated with Mn, Cu and Ni concentration of the overlying manganese nodules. Higher biogenic...

  10. Geochemistry of deep-sea sediment cores from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mudholkar, A.V.; Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.

    , thought to be of diagenetic origin. Metals are suppliEd. by upward migration from a suboxic to anoxic zone at an intermediate depth of 12-35 cm below the sediment-water interface in all the cores. Buried maxima in transition metal concentration at depth...

  11. Inventory of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in marine sediments cores of Southwest Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alice M.R.; Oliveira, Joselene de, E-mail: alice.costa@usp.br, E-mail: jolivei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes. Lab. de Radiometria Ambiental; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Sousa, Silvia H.M., E-mail: rfigueira@usp.br, E-mail: mahiques@usp.br, E-mail: smsousa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanografico

    2015-07-01

    {sup 210}Pb (22.3 y) is a radioactive isotope successfully applied as tracer of sediment dating of the last 100-150 years. The application of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra as paleoceanographic tracers (half-lives of 1,600 y and 5.7 y, respectively) also gives some information of ocean's role in past climate change. In this work, it was analyzed 2 sediment cores collect at Southwest Atlantic Ocean. The sediments samples were freeze-dried and acid digested in microwave. It was carried out a radiochemical separation of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb and performed a gross alpha and gross beta measurement of both precipitates Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4} and PbCrO{sub 4} in a low background gas-flow proportional counter. Activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra ranged from 45 Bq kg{sup -1} to 70 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-62 and from 57 Bq kg{sup -1} to 82 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-63 samples. The concentration of {sup 228}Ra varied between 37 Bq kg{sup -1} and 150 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-62 and between 23 Bq kg{sup -1} and 111 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-63 samples. The concentration of total {sup 210}Pb ranged from 126 Bq kg{sup -1} to 256 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-62 and from 63 Bq kg{sup -1} to 945 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-63 samples. Results of {sup 210}Pb{sub uns} varied from 68 Bq kg{sup -1} to 192 Bq kg{sup -1} for NAP-62, while varied from <4.9 Bq kg{sup -1} to 870 Bq kg{sup -1} in NAP-63 profile. Increased values of {sup 210}Pb{sub uns} were found on the top of both NAP-62 and NAP- 63 sediment profile. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Koontz Lake (North Indiana) Ecological Restoration Options - Comparison of Dredging and Aeration - and Broad Application to USACE Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    necessity of dredging, special water treatment, and maintenance of shipping and stream channels (Glassner-Shwayder 1993). Influxes of sediment have an...eutrophication, harmful algae, invasive plants, and shallowing due to accumulation of sediment and muck. A study was conducted to assist in evaluating... sediments . (The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center does not endorse any specific products or brands). DISCLAIMER: The contents of this

  13. Sediment distribution in the oceans : the Atlantic between 10° and 19°N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collette, B.J.; Ewing, J.I.; Lagaay, R.A.; Truchan, M.

    Between 10° and 19°N the North Atlantic Ocean has been covered by four east-west crossings and one north-south section at 60°W, using a continuous seismic reflection recorder (air gun). The northernmost section extends to the Canary Islands. The region comprises a great variety of phenomena:

  14. Ferromanganese nodules and their associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Rare earth element geochemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Migdisov, A.A.; Colley, S.; Higgs, N.C.; Demidenko, L.

    FerromanganeseNodulesandtheirAssociatedSedimentsfromtheCentralIndianOceanBasin:RareEarthElementGeochemistry J.N.PATTANCH.M.RAONationalInstituteofOceanography,DonaPaula Goa,IndiaA.A.MIGDISOV InstituteofGeochemistry,RussianAcademyofSciencesMoscow,Russia S.COLLEY,N.C.HIGGSSouthamptonOceanographyCentre,EmpressDockSouthampton...

  15. @iGlobigerina pachyderma@@ (Ehrenberg) in the shelf-slope sediments of northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    ~' latitudes in the Arabian Sea and 18~' latitude in the Bay of Bengal is considered and compared with similar occurrence from other oceans of the world. Considering various factors like movement of low salinity, low temperate water masses, mixing and upwelling...

  16. Mineralogy of polymetallic nodules and associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P

    in montmorillonite, chlorite and illite, delta MnO sub(2) is the dominant mineral phase in the nodules of the southern Central Indian Ocean Basin. These nodules have a smooth surface texture, are relatively rich in Fe and Co, and are associated with pelagic clay...

  17. Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-05-07

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

  18. Late Eocene to present isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) and geochemical evolution of sediments from the Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean: Implications for continental sources and linkage with the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ross; Poirier, André; Véron, Alain; Carignan, Jean; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2015-09-01

    New geochemical and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) data are presented for a composite sedimentary record encompassing the past 50 Ma of history of sedimentation on the Lomonosov Ridge in the Arctic Ocean. The sampled sediments encompass the transition of the Arctic basin from an enclosed anoxic basin to an open and ventilated oxidized ocean basin. The transition from anoxic basin to open ventilated ocean is accompanied by at least three geochemical and isotopic shifts and an increase in elements (e.g., K/Al) controlled by detrital minerals highlighting significant changes in sediment types and sources. The isotopic compositions of the sediments prior to ventilation are more variable but indicate a predominance of older crustal contributions consistent with sources from the Canadian Shield. Following ventilation, the isotopic compositions are more stable and indicate an increased contribution from younger material consistent with Eurasian and Pan-African crustal sources. The waxing and waning of these sources in conjunction with the passage of water through Fram Strait underlines the importance of the exchange of water mass between the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans.

  19. Environmental impact and recovery at two dumping sites for dredged material in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stronkhorst, J.; Ariese, F.; Hattum, B. van; Postma, J.F.; Kluijver, M. de; Besten, P.J. den; Bergman, M.J.N.; Daan, R.; Murk, A.J.; Vethaak, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Marine benthic resources near dumping sites are adversely affected by physical disturbances, but a causal link to contaminant damage could not be found. - The environmental impact and recovery associated with the long and uninterrupted disposal of large volumes of moderately contaminated dredged material from the port of Rotterdam was studied at nearby dumping sites in the North Sea. Observations were made on sediment contamination, ecotoxicity, biomarker responses and benthic community changes shortly after dumping at the 'North' site had ceased and at the start of disposal at the new dumping site 'Northwest'. During the period of dumping, very few benthic invertebrates were found at the North site. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and tributyltin (TBT) in the fine sediment fraction ( 3 of moderately contaminated dredged material had been dumped at the new dumping site Northwest, the species richness and abundance of benthic invertebrates declined over an area extending about 1-2 km eastwards. This correlated with a shift in sediment texture from sand to silt. The contamination of the fine sediment fraction at the Northwest location doubled. It is concluded that marine benthic resources at and around the dumping sites have been adversely affected by physical disturbance (burial, smothering). However, no causal link could be established with sediment-associated contaminants from the dredged spoils

  20. Assessment of gamma radionuclides in sediments from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco Chilel, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The study consisted in the assesment of radioactivity levels in marine sediments of Guatemala due to gamma radionuclides. The samples were taken from 5 selected places, the activity of each sediment was measured by gamma spectrometry using an GE High-Purity detector. The methodology used consisted in to measure the efficiency of the Ge detector, then the calibration for Pb-210 was made. The radioactivity ranges from 1.69 Bq/Kg to 8.68 Bq/Kg for Cs-137, 356.99 Bq/Kg to 431.18 Bq/Kg for K-40, 48.71 Bq/Kg to 59.94 Bq/Kg for Ra-226 and 151.283 Bq/Kg to 224.47 Bq/Kg for Pb-210

  1. Nitrogen Cycling in Permeable Sediments: Process-based Models for Streams and the Coastal Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Azizian, Morvarid

    2017-01-01

    Bioavailable forms of nitrogen, such as nitrate, are necessary for aquatic ecosystem productivity. Excess nitrate in aquatic systems, however, can adversely affect ecosystems and degrade both surface water and groundwater. Some of this excess nitrate can be removed in the sediments that line the bottom of rivers and coastal waters, through the exchange of water between surface water and groundwater (known as hyporheic exchange).Several process-based models have been proposed for estimating ni...

  2. Determination of rare earth, major and trace elements in authigenic fraction of Andaman Sea (Northeastern Indian Ocean) sediments by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.; You, C.-F.; Nath, B.N.; SijinKumar, A.V.

    Downcore variation of rare earth elements (REEs) in the authigenic Fe-Mn oxides of a sediment core (covering a record of last approx. 40 kyr) from the Andaman Sea, a part of the Indian Ocean shows distinctive positive Ce and Eu anomalies...

  3. Nature, distribution and origin of clay minerals in grain size fractions of sediments from manganese nodule field, Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nath, B.N.

    DT, IR and X-ray diffraction analyses have been carried out on 3 grain size fractions (1, 1-2 and 2-4 mu m) of sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Results indicate that there are 2 smectite minerals (montmorillonite and Fe...

  4. Distribution of foraminifera and calcareous nannoplankton in quaternary sediments of the Eastern Angola Basin in response to climatic and oceanic fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachariasse, W.J.; Schmidt, R.R.; Leeuwen, R.J.W. van

    1984-01-01

    The impact of the Zaire River on the oceanic environment is clearly illustrated in the surface sediments by anomalously high carbonate dissolution rates over a large area off the river mouth. This anomaly results from the high supply of terrestrial organic matter brought into the Angola Basin by the

  5. Quantitative and phylogenetic study of the Deep Sea Archaeal Group in sediments of the arctic mid-ocean spreading ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Leth eJørgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In marine sediments archaea often constitute a considerable part of the microbial community, of which the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG is one of the most predominant. Despite their high abundance no members from this archaeal group have so far been characterized and thus their metabolism is unknown. Here we show that the relative abundance of DSAG marker genes can be correlated with geochemical parameters, allowing prediction of both the potential electron donors and acceptors of these organisms. We estimated the abundance of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea, Bacteria and DSAG in 52 sediment horizons from two cores collected at the slow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge, using qPCR. The results indicate that members of the DSAG make up the entire archaeal population in certain horizons and constitute up to ~ 50% of the total microbial community. The quantitative data were correlated to 30 different geophysical and geochemical parameters obtained from the same sediment horizons. We observed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of DSAG 16S rRNA genes and the content of organic carbon (p < 0.0001. Further, significant co-variation with iron oxide, and dissolved iron and manganese (all p < 0.0000, indicated a direct or indirect link to iron and manganese cycling. Neither of these parameters correlated with the relative abundance of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nor did any other major electron donor or acceptor measured. Phylogenetic analysis of DSAG 16S rRNA gene sequences reveals three monophyletic lineages with no apparent habitat-specific distribution. In this study we support the hypothesis that members of the DSAG are tightly linked to the content of organic carbon and directly or indirectly involved in the cycling of iron and/or manganese compounds. Further, we provide a molecular tool to assess their abundance in environmental samples and enrichment cultures.

  6. Uranium isotopes in rivers, estuaries and adjacent coastal sediments of western India: their weathering, transport and oceanic budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borole, D.V.; Krishnaswami, S.; Somayajulu, B.L.K.

    1982-01-01

    The two major river systems on the west coast of India, Narbada and Tapti, their estuaries and the coastal Arabian sea sediments have been extensively studied for their uranium concentrations and 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios. The 238 U concentrations in the aqueous phase of these river systems exhibit a strong positive correlation with the sum of the major cations, and with the HCO 3 - ion contents. The abundance ratio of dissolved U to the sum of the major cations in these waters is similar to their ratio in typical crustal rocks. In the estuaries, both 238 U and its great-grand daughter 234 U behave conservatively beyond chlorosities 0.14 g/l. A review of the uranium isotope measurements in river waters yield a discharge weighted-average 238 U concentration of 0.22 μg/l with a 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio of 1.20 +-0.06. The residence time of uranium isotopes in the oceans estimated from the 238 U concentration and the 234 U/ 238 U A.R. of the rivers yield conflicting results; the material balance of uranium isotopes in the marine environment still remains a paradox. If the disparity between the results is real, then an additional 234 U flux of about 0.25 dpm/cm 2 .10 3 yr into the oceans is necessitated. (author)

  7. Applying machine learning to global surface ocean and seabed data to reveal the controls on the distribution of deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Müller, Dietmar; O'Callaghan, Simon

    2017-04-01

    World's ocean basins contain a rich and nearly continuous record of environmental fluctuations preserved as different types of deep-sea sediments. The sediments represent the largest carbon sink on Earth and its largest geological deposit. Knowing the controls on the distribution of these sediments is essential for understanding the history of ocean-climate dynamics, including changes in sea-level and ocean circulation, as well as biological perturbations. Indeed, the bulk of deep-sea sediments comprises the remains of planktonic organisms that originate in the photic zone of the global ocean implying a strong connection between the seafloor and the sea surface. Machine-learning techniques are perfectly suited to unravelling these controls as they are able to handle large sets of spatial data and they often outperform traditional spatial analysis approaches. Using a support vector machine algorithm we recently created the first digital map of seafloor lithologies (Dutkiewicz et al., 2015) based on 14,400 surface samples. This map reveals significant deviations in distribution of deep-sea lithologies from hitherto hand-drawn maps based on far fewer data points. It also allows us to explore quantitatively, for the first time, the relationship between oceanographic parameters at the sea surface and lithologies on the seafloor. We subsequently coupled this global point sample dataset of 14,400 seafloor lithologies to bathymetry and oceanographic grids (sea-surface temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic nutrients) and applied a probabilistic Gaussian process classifier in an exhaustive combinatorial fashion (Dutkiewicz et al., 2016). We focused on five major lithologies (calcareous sediment, diatom ooze, radiolarian ooze, clay and lithogenous sediment) and used a computationally intensive five-fold cross-validation, withholding 20% of the data at each iteration, to assess the predictive performance of the machine learning method. We find that

  8. Fine-grained sediment dispersal along the California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-grained sediment (silt and clay) enters coastal waters from rivers, eroding coastal bluffs, resuspension of seabed sediment, and human activities such as dredging and beach nourishment. The amount of sediment in coastal waters is an important factor in ocean ecosystem health, but little information exists on both the natural and human-driven magnitudes of fine-grained sediment delivery to the coastal zone, its residence time there, and its transport out of the system—information upon which to base environmental assessments. To help fill these information gaps, the U.S. Geological Survey has partnered with Federal, State, and local agencies to monitor fine-grained sediment dispersal patterns and fate in the coastal regions of California. Results of these studies suggest that the waves and currents of many of the nearshore coastal settings of California are adequately energetic to transport fine-grained sediment quickly through coastal systems. These findings will help with the management and regulation of fine-grained sediment along the U.S. west coast.

  9. Selective separation of very small particles by flotation : in relation to soil and sediment remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulleneers, H.

    2001-01-01

    Next to numerous contaminated sites, also large quantities of polluted dredged sediments have to be cleaned in the near future in the Netherlands. Soil washing (classification) is one of the most common remediation techniques to remediate contaminated dredged sediment and excavated soil. It uses

  10. Study of Morphologic Change in Poyang Lake Basin Caused by Sand Dredging Using Multi-temporal Landsat Images and DEMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, S.; Zhang, X.; Wang, D.; Zhu, J.; Fang, C.

    2014-11-01

    Sand dredging has been practiced in rivers, lakes, harbours and coastal areas in recent years in China mostly because of demand from construction industry as building material. Sand dredging has disturbed aquatic ecosystems by affecting hydrological processes, increasing content of suspended sediments and reducing water clarity. Poyang Lake, connecting with Yangtze River in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, is the largest fresh water lake in China. Sand dredging in Poyang Lake has been intensified since 2001 because such practice was banned in Yangtze River and profitable. In this study, the morphologic change caused by sand dredging in Poyang Lake basin was analysed by overlaying two DEMs acquired in 1952 and 2010 respectively. Since the reflectance of middle infrared band for sand dredging vessel is much higher than that of water surface, sand dredging vessels were showed as isolated grey points and can be counted in the middle infrared band in 12 Landsat images acquired in flooding season during 2000~2010. Another two Landsat images (with low water level before 2000 and after 2010) were used to evaluate the morphologic change by comparing inundation extent and shoreline shape. The following results was obtained: (1) vessels for sand dredging are mainly distributed in the north of Poyang Lake before 2007, but the dredging area was enlarged to the central region and even to Gan River; (2) sand dredging area reached to about 260.4 km2 and is mainly distributed in the north of Songmen Mountain and has been enlarged to central of Poyang Lake from the distribution of sand vessels since 2007. Sand dredged from Poyang Lake was about 1.99 × 109 m3 or 2448 Mt assuming sediment bulk density of 1.23 t m-3. It means that the magnitude of sand mining during 2001-2010 is almost ten times of sand depositions in Poyang Lake during 1955-2010; (3) Sand dredging in Poyang Lake has alternated the lake capacity and discharge section area, some of the watercourse in the

  11. Coccolith distribution patterns in South Atlantic and Southern Ocean surface sediments in relation to environmental gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckel, B.; Baumann, K.-H.; Henrich, R.

    2006-01-01

    affinities were ascertained. In general, Emiliania huxleyi is the most abundant species of the recent coccolith assemblages in the study region. However, the lower photic zone taxa, composed of Florisphaera profunda and Gladiolithus flabellatus often dominate the assemblages between 20°N and 30°S. If E....... huxleyi is excluded, Calcidiscus leptoporus and F. profunda become the most abundant species, each dominating discrete oceanographic regimes. While F. profunda is very abundant in the sediments underneath warmer, stratified surface waters with a deep nutricline, Calcidiscus leptoporus is encountered...

  12. Geochemistry of ferromanganese nodule-sediment pairs from central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.

    analyses and remaining part of the solution was used for rare earth element separation using Dowex AG 50W-X8 (200-400 mesh) ion exchange resin following the procedure of Jarvis and Jarvis (1985). Major, few trace and rare earth elements were analysed... and precision based on duplicate sample analysis were ± 4 %. For total silica measurements, both nodules and sediments were fused with lithium metaborate in a furnace and clear solutions obtained were analysed with ICP-AES. Accuracy was better than ± 4...

  13. Dispersed Volcanic Ash in Sediment Entering NW Pacific Ocean Subduction Zones: Towards a Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, R. P.; Murray, R. W.; Underwood, M.; Kutterolf, S.; Plank, T.; Dyonisius, M.; Arshad, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic ash has long been recognized to be an important component of the global sedimentary system. Ash figures prominently in a number of sedimentary and petrophysical investigations, including how the fluid budget of subducting sediment will be affected by hydration/dehydration reactions. Additionally, many studies focus on discrete ash layers, and how to link their presence with volcanism, climate, arc evolution, biological productivity, and other processes. Less widely recognized is the ash that is mixed into the bulk sediment, or "dispersed" ash. Dispersed ash is quantitatively significant and is an under-utilized source of critical geochemical and tectonic information. Based on geochemical studies of ODP Site 1149, a composite of DSDP Sites 579 & 581, as well as IODP Sites C0011 & C0012 drilled during Expedition 322, we will show the importance of dispersed ash to the Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kurile-Kamchatka and Nankai subduction zones. Initial geochemical analyses of the bulk sediment, as related to dispersed ash entering these subduction systems are presented here. Geochemical analysis shows that the characteristics of the three sites exhibit some variability consistent with observed lithological variations. For example, the average SiO2/Al2O3 ratios at Site 1149, Site C0011 and Site C0012 average 3.7. The composite of Sites 579 & 581 exhibits a higher average of 4.6. There are contrasts between other key major elemental indicators as well (e.g., Fe2O3). Ternary diagrams such as K2O-Na2O-CaO show that there are at least two distinct geochemical fields with Sites 1149, C0011 and C0012 clustering in one and Sites 579 & 581 in the other. Q-mode Factor Analysis was performed on the bulk sediment chemical data in order to determine the composition of potential end members of these sites. The multivariate statistics indicate that Site 1149 has 3-4 end members, consistent with the results of Scudder et al. (2009, EPSL, v. 284, pp 639), while each of the other sites

  14. Multiphase CFD modeling of nearfield fate of sediment plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saremi, Sina; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Disposal of dredged material and the overflow discharge during the dredging activities is a matter of concern due to the potential risks imposed by the plumes on surrounding marine environment. This gives rise to accurately prediction of the fate of the sediment plumes released in ambient waters...

  15. Hydrothermal petroleum in the sediments of the Andaman Backarc Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, M.I.; Ruth, E.; Rao, P.S.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.

    inthesediments ofthe AndamanBackarc Basin, IndianOcean § M.I.Venkatesan a, *,E. Ruth b ,P.S. Rao c ,B.N. Nath c , B.R. Rao c a Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567, USA... b Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1593, USA c National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India Received 1 March 2002; accepted 13 August 2002 Editorial handling by B...

  16. Biodiversity of nematode assemblages from deep-sea sediments of the Atacama Slope and Trench (South Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, C.; Vanreusel, A.; Danovaro, R.

    2003-01-01

    Nematode assemblages were investigated (in terms of size spectra, sex ratio, Shannon diversity, trophic structure and diversity, rarefaction statistics, maturity index, taxonomic diversity and taxonomic distinctness) at bathyal and hadal depths (from 1050 to 7800 m) in the deepest trench of the South Pacific Ocean: the Trench of Atacama. This area, characterised by very high concentrations of nutritionally-rich organic matter also at 7800-m depth, displayed characteristics typical of eutrophic systems and revealed high nematode densities (>6000 ind. 10 cm -2). Nematode assemblages from the Atacama Trench displayed a different composition than at bathyal depths. At bathyal depths 95 genera and 119 species were found (Comesomatidae, Cyatholaimidae, Microlaimidae, Desmodoridae and Xyalidae being dominant), whereas in the Atacama Trench only 29 genera and 37 species were encountered (dominated by Monhysteridae, Chromadoridae, Microlaimidae, Oxystominidae and Xyalidae). The genus Monhystera (24.4%) strongly dominated at hadal depths and Neochromadora, and Trileptium were observed only in the Atacama Trench, but not at bathyal depths. A reduction of the mean nematode size (by ca. 67%) was observed between bathyal and hadal depths. Since food availability was not a limiting factor in the Atacama Trench sediments, other causes are likely to be responsible for the reduction of nematode species richness and body size. The presence of a restricted number of families and genera in the Atacama Trench might indicate that hadal sediments limited nematode colonisation. Most of the genera reaching very high densities in Trench sediments (e.g., Monhystera) are opportunistic and were responsible for the significant decrease of the maturity index. The dominance of opportunists, which are known to be characterised by small sizes, might have contributed to the reduced nematode size at hadal depths. Shannon diversity and species richness decreased in hadal water depth and this pattern

  17. Federal Standard: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this document is to provide national guidance that explains the role of the Federal Standard in implementing beneficial uses of dredged material from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ new and maintenance navigation projects.

  18. Distribution and burial of organic carbon in sediments from the Indian Ocean upwelling region off Java and Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Anne; Jennerjahn, Tim; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2010-03-01

    Sediments were sampled and oxygen profiles of the water column were determined in the Indian Ocean off west and south Indonesia in order to obtain information on the production, transformation, and accumulation of organic matter (OM). The stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C org) in combination with C/N ratios depicts the almost exclusively marine origin of sedimentary organic matter in the entire study area. Maximum concentrations of organic carbon (C org) and nitrogen (N) of 3.0% and 0.31%, respectively, were observed in the northern Mentawai Basin and in the Savu and Lombok basins. Minimum δ 15N values of 3.7‰ were measured in the northern Mentawai Basin, whereas they varied around 5.4‰ at stations outside this region. Minimum bottom water oxygen concentrations of 1.1 mL L -1, corresponding to an oxygen saturation of 16.1%, indicate reduced ventilation of bottom water in the northern Mentawai Basin. This low bottom water oxygen reduces organic matter decomposition, which is demonstrated by the almost unaltered isotopic composition of nitrogen during early diagenesis. Maximum C org accumulation rates (CARs) were measured in the Lombok (10.4 g C m -2 yr -1) and northern Mentawai basins (5.2 g C m -2 yr -1). Upwelling-induced high productivity is responsible for the high CAR off East Java, Lombok, and Savu Basins, while a better OM preservation caused by reduced ventilation contributes to the high CAR observed in the northern Mentawai Basin. The interplay between primary production, remineralisation, and organic carbon burial determines the regional heterogeneity. CAR in the Indian Ocean upwelling region off Indonesia is lower than in the Peru and Chile upwellings, but in the same order of magnitude as in the Arabian Sea, the Benguela, and Gulf of California upwellings, and corresponds to 0.1-7.1% of the global ocean carbon burial. This demonstrates the relevance of the Indian Ocean margin off Indonesia for the global OM burial.

  19. Radionuclide distributions in deep-ocean sediment cores. Progress report, 1 October 1976 -- 31 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1978-04-01

    Disruption, in the past year, of the supply of 237 Pu tracer from Oak Ridge caused us to put more of effort into analyses of core samples previously collected, and into data collation, than into the laboratory experiments originally projected. Accompanying this report are two review papers, one for a Congressional Committee and one in press, a report in press of a device for conducting microbiological tracer experiments under controlled atmospheres, and a description of radionuclide distributions in sediments of Atlantic and Pacific solid waste dump sites. Described in the body of the report are experiments relating the time course of association of 237 Pu tracer with diatoms (dead or alive) or glass beads, to the constitution of the media, the history of the cells, or the presence of exometabolites. Also described are studies of the differential removal of 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 137 Cs from coastal seawater currents contaminated by waste released from a fuel-reprocessing facility

  20. Rebuilding natural coastlines after sediment mining: the example of the Brittany coasts (English Channel and Atlantic Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnauld, Herve

    2016-04-01

    Rebuilding natural coastlines after sediment mining: the example of the Brittany coasts (English Channel and Atlantic Ocean). H.Regnauld (1) , J.N. Proust (2) and H.Mahmoud (1) (1) University of Rennes 2, (2) CNRS-University of Rennes 1, France A large part of the coasts of Brittany (western France) have been very heavily impacted by sand mining for the building of military equipments and of a large tidal power station. In some places more then 90 % of the sediment has been extracted during the late 40ies up to the 60ies. The mined site were all sink sites, were sediment had been accumulating for centuries. After the sand and or gravel extraction was stopped the coastal sites were largely used for tourism and most of the eroded dune fields were turned into car parks. Storms produced large floods inland as most of the gravel or sand barrier didn't exist any more. Some local outcrops of inherited Holocene periglacial material with archaeological remains were eroded, some disappeared. During the 80ies a complete shift in planning policies took place and these sites were progressively changed into nature preserves. The aim was to make them behave in a "natural" way again. The "natural" behaviour was intended in a very precise way: barriers should be able to withstand storms again and to protect inland fields from floods. In order to allow for dune re building wooden fences were erected and marram grass was artificially planted. As, from a sedimentological point of view, these sites were sink sites, accumulation was rather rapid (up to 0.25m a year behind wooden fences) and new barrier began to build. The only problem is that they did not always build-up exactly in the same place or with the same material. Some parts of the coasts were left "unprotected" by these new barriers, ancient exposed sites became protected. Today the system as a whole may be considered as having been able to reach some level of equilibrium with the average wave conditions. It has been able to

  1. Indirect Effects and Potential Cumulative Impacts of Dredging in an Urbanized Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfield, C. K.; Chen, J.; Ralston, D. K.; Geyer, W. R.

    2016-02-01

    For over two centuries, the Delaware River and Bay estuary has supported one of the most economically important ports in the United States. To accommodate ships of ever-increasing size, the 165-km axial shipping channel has been deepened to over twice the natural depth of the estuary. While it is known that the channel has modified tides and sedimentation patterns in the estuary, unknown are the impacts on the ecosystem as a whole. A concern is the influence of channelization on sediment movement to the tidal wetland coast, which is eroding at rates on the order of meters per year. Tidal wetlands frame the entire estuary and provide vital ecosystem services ranging from recreation to carbon sequestration. To identify shifts in baseline conditions, we are performing a retrospective analysis of estuarine dynamics using historical bathymetry, numerical modeling, and observational studies. The period of interest extends from 1848 (50 years prior to channel construction) to present. During this period the channel was progressively deepened from its natural depth of 5.5 m to the current depth of 14 m. Preliminary modeling results support independent evidence that the salt intrusion and zone of rapid sediment deposition migrated several 10s of kilometers up-estuary as an indirect effect of deepening. Ironically, the locus of intense deposition now falls squarely within the Wilmington-Philadelphia port complex; river sediment that initially settles in this area is removed by maintenance dredging before it can disperse seaward. Sediment budgetary analysis indicates that the mass of sediment dredged from the upper estuary on average exceeds the mass of the new sediment supplied from the drainage basin. Hence, a probable cumulative impact of dredging is a reduction in sediment delivery to the lower estuary and fringing wetlands. Connections among the shipping channel, wave-tide interactions, and marsh edge erosion are a topic of ongoing modeling and observational research.

  2. Early Paleogene variations in the calcite compensation depth: new constraints using old borehole sediments from across Ninetyeast Ridge, central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Lauretano, V.; Backman, J.; Dickens, G. R.; Sluijs, A.; Lourens, L.

    2015-03-01

    Major variations in global carbon cycling occurred between 62 and 48 Ma, and these very likely related to changes in the total carbon inventory of the ocean-atmosphere system. Based on carbon cycle theory, variations in the mass of the ocean carbon should be reflected in contemporaneous global ocean carbonate accumulation on the seafloor and, thereby, the depth of the calcite compensation depth (CCD). To better constrain the cause and magnitude of these changes, the community needs early Paleogene carbon isotope and carbonate accumulation records from widely separated deep-sea sediment sections, especially including the Indian Ocean. Several CCD reconstructions for this time interval have been generated using scientific drill sites in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans; however, corresponding information from the Indian Ocean has been extremely limited. To assess the depth of the CCD and the potential for renewed scientific drilling of Paleogene sequences in the Indian Ocean, we examine lithologic, nannofossil, carbon isotope, and carbonate content records for late Paleocene - early Eocene sediments recovered at three sites spanning Ninetyeast Ridge: Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Sites 213 (deep, east), 214 (shallow, central), and 215 (deep, west). The disturbed, discontinuous sediment sections are not ideal, because they were recovered in single holes using rotary coring methods, but remain the best Paleogene sediments available from the central Indian Ocean. The δ13C records at Sites 213 and 215 are similar to those generated at several locations in the Atlantic and Pacific, including the prominent high in δ13C across the Paleocene carbon isotope maximum (PCIM) at Site 215, and the prominent low in δ13C across the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) at both Site 213 and Site 215. The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and the K/X event are found at Site 213 but not at Site 215, presumably because of coring gaps. Carbonate content at both Sites 213 and

  3. Additive negative effects of anthropogenic sedimentation and warming on the survival of coral recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourney, Francesca; Figueiredo, Joana

    2017-09-28

    Corals worldwide are facing population declines due to global climate change and local anthropogenic impacts. Global climate change effects are hard to tackle but recent studies show that some coral species can better handle climate change stress when provided with additional energy resources. The local stressor that most undermines energy acquisition is sedimentation because it impedes coral heterotrophic feeding and their ability to photosynthesize. To investigate if reducing local sedimentation will enable corals to better endure ocean warming, we quantitatively assessed the combined effects of increased temperature and sedimentation (concentration and turbidity) on the survival of coral recruits of the species, Porites astreoides. We used sediment from a reef and a boat basin to mimic natural sediment (coarse) and anthropogenic (fine) sediment (common in dredging), respectively. Natural sediment did not negatively impact coral survival, but anthropogenic sediment did. We found that the capacity of coral recruits to survive under warmer temperatures is less compromised when anthropogenic sedimentation is maintained at the lowest level (30 mg.cm -2 ). Our study suggests that a reduction of US-EPA allowable turbidity from 29 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) above background to less than 7 NTU near coral reefs would facilitate coral recruit survival under current and higher temperatures.

  4. Increasing coastal slump activity impacts the release of sediment and organic carbon into the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ramage

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs are among the most active thermokarst landforms in the Arctic and deliver a large amount of material to the Arctic Ocean. However, their contribution to the organic carbon (OC budget is unknown. We provide the first estimate of the contribution of RTSs to the nearshore OC budget of the Yukon Coast, Canada, and describe the evolution of coastal RTSs between 1952 and 2011 in this area. We (1 describe the evolution of RTSs between 1952 and 2011; (2 calculate the volume of eroded material and stocks of OC mobilized through slumping, including soil organic carbon (SOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC; and (3 estimate the OC fluxes mobilized through slumping between 1972 and 2011. We identified RTSs using high-resolution satellite imagery from 2011 and geocoded aerial photographs from 1952 and 1972. To estimate the volume of eroded material, we applied spline interpolation on an airborne lidar dataset acquired in July 2013. We inferred the stocks of mobilized SOC and DOC from existing related literature. Our results show a 73 % increase in the number of RTSs and 14 % areal expansion between 1952 and 2011. In the study area, RTSs displaced at least 16.6×106 m3 of material, 53 % of which was ice, and mobilized 145.9×106 kg of OC. Between 1972 and 2011, 49 RTSs displaced 8.6×103 m3 yr−1 of material, adding 0.6 % to the OC flux released by coastal retreat along the Yukon Coast. Our results show that the contribution of RTSs to the nearshore OC budget is non-negligible and should be included when estimating the quantity of OC released from the Arctic coast to the ocean.

  5. Nematode communities in sediments of the Kermadec Trench, Southwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Daniel; Rowden, Ashley A.

    2018-04-01

    Hadal trenches are characterized by environmental conditions not found in any other deep-sea environment, such as steep topography and periodic disturbance by turbidity flows, which are likely responsible for the distinct nature of benthic communities of hadal trenches relative to those of the abyssal plain. Nematodes are the most abundant metazoans in the deep-sea benthos, but it is not yet clear if different trenches host distinct nematode communities, and no data are yet available on the communities of most trenches, including the Kermadec Trench in the Southwest Pacific. Quantitative core samples from the seafloor of the Kermadec Trench were recently obtained from four sites at 6000-9000 m depth which allowed for analyses of meiofauna, and nematodes in particular, for the first time. Nematode community and trophic structure was also compared with other trenches using published data. There was a bathymetric gradient in meiofauna abundance, biomass, and community structure within the Kermadec Trench, but patterns for species richness were ambiguous depending on which metric was used. There was a change in community structure from shallow to deep sites, as well as a consistent change in community structure from the upper sediment layers to the deeper sediment layers across the four sites. These patterns are most likely explained by variation in food availability within the trench, and related to trench topography. Together, deposit and microbial feeders represented 48-92% of total nematode abundance in the samples, which suggests that fine organic detritus and bacteria are major food sources. The relatively high abundance of epigrowth feeders at the 6000 and 9000 m sites (38% and 31%, respectively) indicates that relatively freshly settled microalgal cells represent another important food source at these sites. We found a significant difference in species community structure between the Kermadec and Tonga trenches, which was due to both the presence/absence of

  6. Reducing the impact of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) dredging on the ecosystem in shallow water soft bottom areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Poulsen, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Dredging blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and thus removing structural elements, inducing resuspension of sediment as well as reducing filtration capacity, will inevitably affect the ecosystem. The study demonstrates that the impacts of fishing can be reduced through gear developments. A new light d...

  7. A Case Study of the Effects of Dredging in Narrgansett Bay (RI, USA) on Winter Flounder Eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal dredging constraints have been established in several northeastern U.S. estuaries with the intent to protect winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). A major source of concern is impacts on demersal eggs due to elevated sedimentation rates during the winter-earl...

  8. Keeping ports accessible: Brazil is saving “millions” in dredging costs thanks to nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevenco, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    With a coastline of over 8500 kilometres, 90 per cent of Brazil’s total exports and imports pass through its ports. Many of the country’s major ports and harbours were built over 100 years ago. Keeping shipping lanes open and enabling these ports to accommodate larger vessels with ever bigger loads requires constant dredging, often at high cost. Over the years, the use of nuclear techniques to study sediment build-up and transport across major ports and harbours (see box) has saved Brazil millions of dollars in dredging costs, said Jefferson Vianna Bandeira, a senior researcher in the Environment Department of the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil. With IAEA assistance, Bandeira and a team of scientists have been using radiotracers to map sediment movements that affect Brazil’s major ports since the 1960s.

  9. Exopolysaccharide production by a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain isolated from Madeira Archipelago ocean sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Christophe; Lehmann, Mareen; Torres, Cristiana A V; Baptista, Sílvia; Gaudêncio, Susana P; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-06-25

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are polymers excreted by some microorganisms with interesting properties and used in many industrial applications. A new Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain, MD12-642, was isolated from marine sediments and cultivated in bioreactor in saline culture medium containing glucose as carbon source. Its ability to produce EPS under saline conditions was demonstrated reaching an EPS production of 4.4g/L within 17hours of cultivation, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 0.25g/Lh, the highest value so far obtained for Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains. The compositional analysis of the EPS revealed the presence of galacturonic acid (41-42mol%), glucuronic acid (25-26mol%), rhamnose (16-22mol%) and glucosamine (12-16mol%) sugar residues. The polymer presents a high molecular weight (above 1000kDa). These results encourage the biotechnological exploitation of strain MD12-642 for the production of valuable EPS with unique composition, using saline by-products/wastes as feedstocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sedimentation in a Submarine Seamount Apron at Site U1431, International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadd, K. A.; Clift, P. D.; Hyun, S.; Jiang, T.; Liu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349 Site U1431 is located near the relict spreading ridge in the East Subbasin of the South China Sea. Holes at this site were drilled close to seamounts and intersected the volcaniclastic apron. Volcaniclastic breccia and sandstone at Site U1431 are dated as late middle Miocene to early late Miocene (~8-13 Ma), suggesting a 5 m.y. duration of seamount volcanism. The apron is approximately 200 m thick and is sandwiched between non-volcaniclastic units that represent the background sedimentation. These comprise dark greenish gray clay, silt, and nannofossil ooze interpreted as turbidite and hemipelagic deposits that accumulated at abyssal water depths. At its base, the seamount sequence begins with dark greenish gray sandstone, siltstone, and claystone in upward fining sequences interpreted as turbidites intercalated with minor intervals of volcaniclastic breccia. Upsection the number and thickness of breccia layers increases with some beds up to 4.8 m and possibly 14.5 m thick. The breccia is typically massive, ungraded, and poorly sorted with angular to subangular basaltic clasts, as well as minor reworked subrounded calcareous mudstone, mudstone, and sandstone clasts. Basaltic clasts include nonvesicular aphyric basalt, sparsely vesicular aphyric basalt, highly vesicular aphyric basalt, and nonvesicular glassy basalt. Mudstone clasts are clay rich and contain foraminifer fossils. The matrix comprises up to 40% of the breccia beds and is a mix of clay, finer grained altered basalt clasts, and mafic vitroclasts with rare foraminifer fossils. Some layers have calcite cement between clasts. Volcaniclastic sandstone and claystone cycles interbedded with the breccia layers have current ripples and parallel laminations indicative of high-energy flow conditions during sedimentation. The breccia beds were most likely deposited as a series of debris flows or grain flows. This interpretation is supported by their

  11. Geotechnical engineering for ocean waste disposal. An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Homa J.; Demars, Kenneth R.; Chaney, Ronald C.; ,

    1990-01-01

    As members of multidisciplinary teams, geotechnical engineers apply quantitative knowledge about the behavior of earth materials toward designing systems for disposing of wastes in the oceans and monitoring waste disposal sites. In dredge material disposal, geotechnical engineers assist in selecting disposal equipment, predict stable characteristics of dredge mounds, design mound caps, and predict erodibility of the material. In canister disposal, geotechnical engineers assist in specifying canister configurations, predict penetration depths into the seafloor, and predict and monitor canister performance following emplacement. With sewage outfalls, geotechnical engineers design foundation and anchor elements, estimate scour potential around the outfalls, and determine the stability of deposits made up of discharged material. With landfills, geotechnical engineers evaluate the stability and erodibility of margins and estimate settlement and cracking of the landfill mass. Geotechnical engineers also consider the influence that pollutants have on the engineering behavior of marine sediment and the extent to which changes in behavior affect the performance of structures founded on the sediment. In each of these roles, careful application of geotechnical engineering principles can contribute toward more efficient and environmentally safe waste disposal operations.

  12. Distribution of PAHs and the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the high-latitude Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bai, X.; Sheng, H.; Jiao, L.; Zhou, H.; Shao, Z.

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common organic pollutants that can be transferred long distances and tend to accumulate in marine sediments. However, less is known regarding the distribution of PAHs and their natural bioattenuation in the open sea, especially the Arctic Ocean. In this report, sediment samples were collected at four sites from the Chukchi Plateau to the Makarov Basin in the summer of 2010. PAH compositions and total concentrations were examined with GC-MS. The concentrations of 16 EPA-priority PAHs varied from 2.0 to 41.6 ng g-1 dry weight and decreased with sediment depth and movement from the southern to the northern sites. Among the targeted PAHs, phenanthrene was relatively abundant in all sediments. The 16S rRNA gene of the total environmental DNA was analyzed with Illumina high-throughput sequencing (IHTS) to determine the diversity of bacteria involved in PAH degradation in situ. The potential degraders including Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Dietzia, Colwellia, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Salinisphaera and Shewanella, with Dietzia as the most abundant, occurred in all sediment samples. Meanwhile, enrichment with PAHs was initiated onboard and transferred to the laboratory for further enrichment and to obtain the degrading consortia. Most of the abovementioned bacteria in addition to Hahella, Oleispira, Oceanobacter and Hyphomonas occurred alternately as predominant members in the enrichment cultures from different sediments based on IHTS and PCR-DGGE analysis. To reconfirm their role in PAH degradation, 40 different bacteria were isolated and characterized, among which Cycloclasticus Pseudomonas showed the best degradation capability under low temperatures. Taken together, PAHs and PAH-degrading bacteria were widespread in the deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. We propose that bacteria of Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinomonas and Dietzia may

  13. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  14. Analysis of decision support system for dredging operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This research developed an improved method for optimizing the disposal of dredged material : at offshore disposal sites. A nonlinear programming model has been developed to assist in : the development of dredging plans at open water disposal sites. T...

  15. Stabilization of dredged spoils for pavement construction in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural soils underlying the East-West road are mainly clay and silt of poor quality ... on the dredged soils included particle size distribution, compaction and California Bearing Ratio. Cement stabilization was performed on the dredged spoil.

  16. stabilization of dredged spoils for pavement construction in the niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Tse

    Natural soils underlying the East-West road are mainly clay and silt of poor quality ... on the dredged soils included particle size distribution, compaction and California ... KEYWORDS: Stabilization, dredge spoil, pavement, Niger Delta, cement.

  17. Appearance and water quality of turbidity plumes produced by dredging in Tampa Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Carl R.; Michaelis, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Turbidity plumes in Tampa Bay, Florida, produced during ship-channel dredging operations from February 1977 to August 1978, were monitored in order to document plume appearance and water quality, evaluate plume influence on the characteristics of Tampa Bay water, and provide a data base for comparison with other areas that have similar sediment, dredge, placement, containment, and tide conditions. The plumes investigated originated from the operation of one hopper dredge and three cutterhead-pipeline dredges. Composition of bottom sediment was found to vary from 85 percent sand and shell fragments to 60 percent silt and clay. Placement methods for dredged sediment included beach nourishment, stationary submerged discharge, oscillating surface discharge, and construction of emergent dikes. Tidal currents ranged from slack water to flow velocities of 0.60 meter per second. Plumes were monitored simultaneously by (1) oblique and vertical 35-millimeter aerial photography and (2) water-quality sampling to determine water clarity and concentrations of nutrients, metals, pesticides, and industrial compounds. Forty-nine photographs depict plumes ranging in length from a few tens of meters to several kilometers and ranging in turbidity level from hopper-dredge unloading operations also produced plumes of low visibility. Primary turbidity plumes were produced directly by dredging and placement operations; secondary plumes were produced indirectly by resuspension of previously deposited material. Secondary plumes were formed both by erosion, in areas of high-velocity tidal currents, and by turbulence from vessels passing over fine material deposited in shallow areas. Where turbidity barriers were not used, turbidity plumes visible at the surface were good indicators of the location of turbid water at depth. Where turbidity barriers were used, turbid bottom water was found at locations having no visible surface plumes. A region of rapidly accelerating then decelerating flow

  18. An 'Early Warning System' for the prevention of dredging potential impacts on sensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Viviana; Martellucci, Riccardo; Pierattini, Alberto; Bonamano, Simone; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Albani, Marta; Stefanì, Chiara; Madonia, Alice; Fersini, Giorgio; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine ecosystems are increasingly subject to multiple pressures and stressors produced by the effects of human activities. Intense and frequent disturbances which affect marine environment can derive from dredging activity, which is a fundamental management for most ports and harbours. The potential environmental effects of dredging procedures are generally due to the excavation of material from the sea bottom and the relocation elsewhere for disposal, overflow from the dredger and loss of material from pipelines during transport. Depending on the location and the intensity of these activities the marine environment, particularly sensitive areas, may be affected by dredging. The main environmental effects can be associated with suspended sediments and increases in turbidity into the water column, which can have adverse effects on marine animals and plants by reducing light penetration and by physical disturbance. For this reason it is fundamental to implement a real time monitoring system to control and prevent negative effects, enabling a rapid response to adverse water quality conditions and a fast activation of mitigation procedures, in agreement with all the reference authorities. In this work we present the development of an innovative 'Early Warning System' based on fixed stations, ad hoc in situ surveys and forecasting models, which was applied to a dredging activity carried out in the Gulf of Gaeta (Latium, Italy). It represents an extension of the C-CEMS (Civitavecchia Coastal Environmental Monitoring System) network, which is operative in the Tyrrhenian sea since 2005.

  19. Water Resources Research Program. Abatement of malodors at diked, dredged-material disposal sites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Dravnieks, A.; Zussman, R.; Goltz, R.

    1976-06-01

    Samples of malodorous air and dredged material were collected at diked disposal sites at the following locations: Buffalo, NY; Milwaukee, WI; Mobile, AL; York Harbor, ME; Houston, TX; Detroit, MI; and Anacortes, WA; during the period July--October, 1975. Odorous compounds in the air samples were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, while the detection threshold, intensity, and character of the various odors were determined by experienced panelists using a dynamic, forced-choice-triangle olfactometer. Although significant problems with malodors were not observed beyond the disposal-area dikes during site visits, noteworthy odor episodes had occurred at some sites. An odor-abatement strategy is presented for handling the expected range of odor conditions at dredged-material disposal sites. Its aim is to reduce to an acceptable level the intensity of malodors in an affected community. The main steps in the strategy cover selection of the disposal site, site preparation, odor characterization of sediments to be dredged, malodor abatement during dredging and disposal operations, malodor abatement after filling of the disposal site, and the handling of malodor complaints.

  20. Seagrasses and sediment response to changing physical forcing in a coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Figueiredo da Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ria de Aveiro is an estuary–coastal lagoon system connected to the Atlantic Ocean by a channel with a cross-sectional area that, for more than a century, has increased steadily, partly because of dredging over the last 50 years. Local ocean tides, with amplitudes of up to 3 m, are today transmitted to the lagoon by the single, engineered inlet channel and propagate to the end of the lagoon channels as a damped progressive wave. The increase in tidal amplitude with time has affected the lagoon ecosystem and the water has become more saline. Seagrass beds are important indicators of ecosystem change; until 1980, much of the lagoon bed was covered by seagrasses (Zostera, Ruppia, Potamogeton, which were collected in large quantities for use in agriculture. After 1960, the harvesting declined and the seagrass beds became covered in sediment, so that the area of seagrasses decreased substantially despite the decline in the quantity collected. The change in the pattern of seagrass populations can be related to changes in the physical forcing associated with increased tidal wave penetration. This has, in turn, induced transport and redistribution of coarser, sandy sediment and increased re-suspension and turbidity in the water column. However, the initiating cause for this ecosystem change was dredging, which, since the 1950s, has been used increasingly to widen and deepen the channels of the system.

  1. DEEP BIOSPHERE. Exploring deep microbial life in coal-bearing sediment down to ~2.5 km below the ocean floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, F; Hinrichs, K-U; Kubo, Y; Bowles, M W; Heuer, V B; Hong, W-L; Hoshino, T; Ijiri, A; Imachi, H; Ito, M; Kaneko, M; Lever, M A; Lin, Y-S; Methé, B A; Morita, S; Morono, Y; Tanikawa, W; Bihan, M; Bowden, S A; Elvert, M; Glombitza, C; Gross, D; Harrington, G J; Hori, T; Li, K; Limmer, D; Liu, C-H; Murayama, M; Ohkouchi, N; Ono, S; Park, Y-S; Phillips, S C; Prieto-Mollar, X; Purkey, M; Riedinger, N; Sanada, Y; Sauvage, J; Snyder, G; Susilawati, R; Takano, Y; Tasumi, E; Terada, T; Tomaru, H; Trembath-Reichert, E; Wang, D T; Yamada, Y

    2015-07-24

    Microbial life inhabits deeply buried marine sediments, but the extent of this vast ecosystem remains poorly constrained. Here we provide evidence for the existence of microbial communities in ~40° to 60°C sediment associated with lignite coal beds at ~1.5 to 2.5 km below the seafloor in the Pacific Ocean off Japan. Microbial methanogenesis was indicated by the isotopic compositions of methane and carbon dioxide, biomarkers, cultivation data, and gas compositions. Concentrations of indigenous microbial cells below 1.5 km ranged from <10 to ~10(4) cells cm(-3). Peak concentrations occurred in lignite layers, where communities differed markedly from shallower subseafloor communities and instead resembled organotrophic communities in forest soils. This suggests that terrigenous sediments retain indigenous community members tens of millions of years after burial in the seabed. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. In Situ Enhancement of Anaerobic Microbial Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haeggblom, Max M; Fennell, Donna E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2006-01-01

    ... that is associated with dredging, and decrease the cost of sediment management. Reductive dehalogenation is a promising mechanism for the removal of toxic organohalides from estuarine and marine sediments...

  3. Can we constrain postglacial sedimentation in the western Arctic Ocean by ramped pyrolysis 14C? A case study from the Chukchi-Alaskan margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Omori, T.; Polyak, L.; Nam, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean underwent dramatic climate changes in the past. Variations in sea-ice extent and ocean current system in the Arctic cause changes in surface albedo and deep water formation, which have global climatic implications. However, Arctic paleoceanographic studies are lagging behind the other oceans due largely to chronostratigraphic difficulties. One of the reasons for this is a scant presence of material suitable for 14C dating in large areas of the Arctic seafloor. To enable improved age constraints for sediments impoverished in datable material, we apply ramped pyrolysis 14C method (Ramped PyrOx 14C, Rosenheim et al., 2008) to sedimentary records from the Chukchi-Alaska margin recovering Holocene to late-glacial deposits. Samples were divided into five fraction products by gradual heating sedimentary organic carbon from ambient laboratory temperature to 1000°C. The thermographs show a trimodal pattern of organic matter decomposition over temperature, and we consider that CO2 generated at the lowest temperature range was derived from autochthonous organic carbon contemporaneous with sediment deposition, similar to studies in the Antarctic margin and elsewhere. For verification of results, some of the samples treated for ramped pyrolysis 14C were taken from intervals dated earlier by AMS 14C using bivalve mollusks. Ultimately, our results allow a new appraisal of deglacial to Holocene deposition at the Chukchi-Alaska margin with potential to be applied to other regions of the Arctic Ocean.

  4. Study of the geochemistry of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be and the stable isotope 9Be in oceanic environment. Application to marine sediment dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourles, D.

    1988-01-01

    The radioisotope 10 Be is formed by spallation reactions in the atmosphere. It is transferred to the oceans in soluble form by precipitation and dry deposition. The stable isotope 9 Be comes from erosion of soils and rocks in the Earth's crust. It is transported by wind and rivers and introduced to the oceans probably in both soluble and insoluble form. 9 Be was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and 10 Be by A.M.S. The distribution of 10 Be and 9 Be between each phase extracted and the 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios associated were studied in recent marine sediments from Atlantic, Pacific, Indian oceans and Mediterranean sea. The results show that for beryllium the two essential constituent phases of marine sediments are: - the authigenic phase incorporates the soluble beryllium and the detritic phase. The 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio associated with the authigenic fraction varies with location. This suggests that the residence time of beryllium in the soluble phase is lower or comparable to the mixing time of the oceans. The evolution with time of the authigenic 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio is discussed [fr

  5. Geochemical fractionation of Ni, Cu and Pb in the deep sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: An insight into the mechanism of metal enrichment in sediment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sensarma, S.; Chakraborty, P.; Banerjee, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    speciation study suggests that Fe–Mn oxyhydroxide phase was the major binding phase for Ni, Cu and Pb in the sediments. The second highest concentrations of all these metals were present within the structure of the sediments. Easily reducible oxide phase...

  6. San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy for Dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy (LTMS) is a cooperative effort to develop a new approach to dredging and dredged material disposal in the San Francisco Bay area. The LTMS serves as the Regional Dredging Team for the San Francisco area.

  7. Multi-platform assessment of turbidity plumes during dredging operations in a major estuarine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Isabel; Navarro, Gabriel; Ruiz, Javier

    2018-06-01

    Dredging activities in estuaries frequently cause deleterious environmental effects on the water quality which can impact flora, fauna, and hydrodynamics, among others. A medium- and high-resolution satellite-based procedure is used in this study to monitor turbidity plumes generated during the dredging operations in the Guadalquivir estuary, a major estuarine system providing important ecosystem services in southwest Europe. A multi-sensor scheme is evaluated using a combination of five public and commercial medium- and high-resolution satellites, including Landsat-8, Sentinel-2A, WorldView-2, WorldView-3, and GeoEye-1, with pixel sizes ranging from 30 m to 0.3 m. Applying a multi-conditional algorithm after the atmospheric correction of the optical imagery with ACOLITE, Sen2Cor and QUAC processors, it is demonstrated the feasibility to monitoring suspended solids during dredging operations at a spatial resolution unachievable with traditional satellite-based ocean color sensors (>300 m). The frame work can be used to map on-going, post and pre-dredging activities and asses Total Suspended Solids (TSS) anomalies caused by natural and anthropogenic processes in coastal and inland waters. These promising results are suitable to effectively improve the assessment of features relevant to environmental policies for the challenging coastal management and might serve as a notable contribution to the Earth Observation Program.

  8. Nature and distribution of manganese nodules from three sediment domains of the Central Indian Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    from northern and central region, dominatEd. by terrigenous and terrigenous-siliceous mixed sediments, respectively. Effects of lysocline and sediment diagenesis are envisaged for trace metal enrichment in rough nodules of the southern region. Influence...

  9. Humboldt Open Ocean Disposal Site (HOODS) Survey Work 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Humboldt Open Ocean Disposal Site (HOODS) is a dredged material disposal site located 3 nautical miles (nm) offshore of Humboldt Bay in Northern California....

  10. Extensive lake sediment coring survey on Sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean Kerguelen Archipelago (French Austral and Antarctic Lands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Fabien; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Poulenard, Jérôme; Støren, Eivind; Leloup, Anouk; Bakke, Jostein; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Georgia (60°W) and New Zealand (170°E) precluding the establishment of paleoclimate records of past westerlies dynamics. Located around 50°S and 70°E, lost in the middle of the sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean, Kerguelen archipelago is a major, geomorphologically complex, land-mass that is covered by hundreds lakes of various sizes. It hence offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct past climate and environment dynamics in a region where virtually nothing is known about it, except the remarkable recent reconstructions based on a Lateglacial peatbog sequence(4). During the 2014-2015 austral summer, a French-Norwegian team led the very first extensive lake sediment coring survey on Kerguelen Archipelago under the umbrella of the PALAS program supported by the French Polar Institute (IPEV). Two main areas were investigated: i) the southwest of the mainland, so-called Golfe du Morbihan, where glaciers are currently absent and ii) the northernmost Kerguelen mainland peninsula so-called Loranchet, where cirque glaciers are still present. This double-target strategy aims at reconstructing various independent indirect records of precipitation (glacier advance, flood dynamics) and wind speed (marine spray chemical species, wind-borne terrigenous input) to tackle the Holocene climate variability. Despite particularly harsh climate conditions and difficult logistics matters, we were able to core 6 lake sediment sites: 5 in Golfe du Morbihan and one in Loranchet peninsula. Among them two sequences taken in the 4km-long Lake Armor using a UWITEC re-entry piston coring system by 20 and 100m water-depth (6 and 7m-long, respectively). One

  11. The influence of hypercapnia and the infaunal brittlestar Amphiura filiformis on sediment nutrient flux – will ocean acidification affect nutrient exchange?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Widdicombe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and the concomitant increased uptake of this by the oceans is resulting in hypercapnia-related reduction of ocean pH. Research focussed on the direct effects of these physicochemical changes on marine invertebrates has begun to improve our understanding of impacts at the level of individual physiologies. However, CO2-related impairment of organisms' contribution to ecological or ecosystem processes has barely been addressed. The burrowing ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis, which has a physiology that makes it susceptible to reduced pH, plays a key role in sediment nutrient cycling by mixing and irrigating the sediment, a process known as bioturbation. Here we investigate the role of A. filiformis in modifying nutrient flux rates across the sediment-water boundary and the impact of CO2- related acidification on this process. A 40 day exposure study was conducted under predicted pH scenarios from the years 2100 (pH 7.7 and 2300 (pH 7.3, plus an additional treatment of pH 6.8. This study demonstrated strong relationships between A. filiformis density and cycling of some nutrients; activity increases the sediment uptake of phosphate and the release of nitrite and nitrate. No relationship between A. filiformis density and the flux of ammonium or silicate were observed. Results also indicated that, within the timescale of this experiment, effects at the individual bioturbator level appear not to translate into reduced ecosystem influence. However, long term survival of key bioturbating species is far from assured and changes in both bioturbation and microbial processes could alter key biogeochemical processes in future, more acidic oceans.

  12. WODA Technical Guidance on Underwater Sound from Dredging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Frank; Borsani, Fabrizio; Clarke, Douglas; de Jong, Christ; de Wit, Pim; Goethals, Fredrik; Holtkamp, Martine; Martin, Elena San; Spadaro, Philip; van Raalte, Gerard; Victor, George Yesu Vedha; Jensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic biota and advice on underwater sound monitoring procedures. The paper follows a risk-based approach and provides guidance for standardization of acoustic terminology and methods for data collection and analysis. Furthermore, the literature on dredging-related sounds and the effects of dredging sounds on marine life is surveyed and guidance on the management of dredging-related sound risks is provided.

  13. Geotechnical Survey, Dredgeability Of Soil Sediments And Siltation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geotechnical Survey, Dredgeability Of Soil Sediments And Siltation Volume Of Brimsu Water Reservoir. ... of the sediments was characterized by geo-technical descriptor terms, indicating that the sediments could be dredged using cutter-type dredger for excava-tion, and transported by hydraulic pipelines to disposal sites.

  14. Merits of a Scenario Approach in Dredge Plume Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus; Chu, Amy Ling Chu; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Dredge plume modelling is a key tool for quantification of potential impacts to inform the EIA process. There are, however, significant uncertainties associated with the modelling at the EIA stage when both dredging methodology and schedule are likely to be a guess at best as the dredging...... contractor would rarely have been appointed. Simulation of a few variations of an assumed full dredge period programme will generally not provide a good representation of the overall environmental risks associated with the programme. An alternative dredge plume modelling strategy that attempts to encapsulate...... uncertainties associated with preliminary dredging programmes by using a scenario-based modelling approach is presented. The approach establishes a set of representative and conservative scenarios for key factors controlling the spill and plume dispersion and simulates all combinations of e.g. dredge, climatic...

  15. Green Ships: Keeping Oceans Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    The marine transport sector contributes significantly to air and water pollution, particularly in coastal areas. In the oceans, the threat to marine life comes in various forms, such as overexploitation and harvesting, dumping of waste, pollution, alien species, land reclamation, dredging, and global climate change. A congressional research report…

  16. Plutonium, radiocesium and radiocobalt in sediments of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY

    1981-01-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have reached the Hudson estuary as global fallout from nuclear weapons testing and through local releases from commercial nuclear reactors. Significant activities of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu (fallout-derived), 134 Cs and 60 Co (reactor-released), and 137 Cs (derived from both sources), have accumulated in the sediments throughout the estuary, with the primary zone of accumulation near the downstream end of the system in New York harbor. The estuary appears to have trapped nearly all of the 239 , 240 Pu delivered as fallout, and consequently, ocean dumping of dredged harbor sediment is currently the primary means for the net transport of these nuclides to coastal waters. In contrast, only 10-30% of the 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co delivered to the estuary have been retained on the fine particles which accumulate at a rapid rate in the harbor. (orig./HAE)

  17. Buried in time: Culturable fungi in a deep-sea sediment core from the Chagos Trench, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Raghukumar, S.; Sheelu, G.; Gupta, S.M.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.

    of sediments was determined by the ?Karbonat-Bombe? method (M?ller and Gastner, 1971). The DBD is one among the several physical properties of sediment including porosity and is inversely related to porosity as shown by the equation of Garg (1987... Karbonat-Bombe?, a simple device for the determination of carbonate content in sediments, soils and other material. Neues Jahrbuch Minearalogie, 10, 466-469. Mueller, V., Sengbusch, P. V., 1983. Visualization of aquatic fungi (Chytridiales...

  18. Effects of heavy metals on microbial diversity and bacterial resistance in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toes, A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In North-Western Europe alone more than 200 million cubic meters of contaminated sludge is dredged on an annual basis. Deposition of dredged harbour sediments in relatively undisturbed ecosystems is often considered a viable option, under the assumption that metals are not released into the

  19. Sediment failures within the Peach Slide (Barra Fan, NE Atlantic Ocean) and relation to the history of the British-Irish Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Matthew J.; Maslin, Mark A.; Day, Simon J.; Long, David

    2018-05-01

    The Peach Slide is the largest known submarine mass movement on the British continental margin and is situated on the northern flank of the glacigenic Barra Fan. The Barra Fan is located on the northwest British continental margin and is subject to cyclonic ocean circulation, with distinct differences between the circulation during stadial and inter-stadial periods. The fan has experienced growth since continental uplift during the mid-Pliocene, with the majority of sediments deposited during the Pleistocene when the fan was a major depocentre for the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). Surface and shallow sub-surface morphology of the fan has been mapped using newly digitised archival paper pinger and deep towed boomer sub-bottom profile records, side scan sonar and multibeam echosounder data. This process has allowed the interpretation and mapping of a number of different seismic facies, including: contourites, hemipelagites and debrites. Development of a radiocarbon based age model for the seismic stratigraphy constrains the occurrence of two periods of slope failure: the first at circa 21 ka cal BP, shortly after the BIIS's maximum advance during the deglaciation of the Hebrides Ice Stream; and the second between 12 and 11 ka cal BP at the termination of the Younger Dryas stadial. Comparison with other mass movement events, which have similar geological and oceanographic settings, suggests that important roles are played by contouritic and glacigenic sedimentation, deposited in inter-stadial and stadial periods respectively when different thermohaline regimes and sediment sources dominate. The effect of this switch in sedimentation is to rapidly deposit thick, low permeability, glacigenic layers above contourite and hemipelagite units. This process potentially produced excess pore pressure in the fan sediments and would have increased the likelihood of sediment failure via reduced shear strength and potential liquefaction.

  20. Marine Microbial Gene Abundance and Community Composition in Response to Ocean Acidification and Elevated Temperature in Two Contrasting Coastal Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R. Currie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine ecosystems are exposed to a range of human-induced climate stressors, in particular changing carbonate chemistry and elevated sea surface temperatures as a consequence of climate change. More research effort is needed to reduce uncertainties about the effects of global-scale warming and acidification for benthic microbial communities, which drive sedimentary biogeochemical cycles. In this research, mesocosm experiments were set up using muddy and sandy coastal sediments to investigate the independent and interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (750 ppm CO2 and elevated temperature (ambient +4°C on the abundance of taxonomic and functional microbial genes. Specific quantitative PCR primers were used to target archaeal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial/chloroplast 16S rRNA in both sediment types. Nitrogen cycling genes archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA and bacterial nitrite reductase (nirS were specifically targeted to identify changes in microbial gene abundance and potential impacts on nitrogen cycling. In muddy sediment, microbial gene abundance, including amoA and nirS genes, increased under elevated temperature and reduced under elevated CO2 after 28 days, accompanied by shifts in community composition. In contrast, the combined stressor treatment showed a non-additive effect with lower microbial gene abundance throughout the experiment. The response of microbial communities in the sandy sediment was less pronounced, with the most noticeable response seen in the archaeal gene abundances in response to environmental stressors over time. 16S rRNA genes (amoA and nirS were lower in abundance in the combined stressor treatments in sandy sediments. Our results indicated that marine benthic microorganisms, especially in muddy sediments, are susceptible to changes in ocean carbonate chemistry and seawater temperature, which ultimately may have an impact upon key benthic biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, H; Enrich-Prast, A

    2015-11-01

    Dredging is a catastrophic disturbance that directly affects key biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, especially in those small and shallow. In the tropics, metabolic responses could still be enhanced by the high temperatures and solar incidence. Here, we assessed changes in the aquatic primary production along a small section of low-flow tropical downstream (Imboassica Stream, Brazil) after dredging. Our results suggested that these ecosystems may show catastrophic shifts between net heterotrophy and autotrophy in waters based on three short-term stages following the dredging: (I) a strongly heterotrophic net primary production -NPP- coupled to an intense respiration -R- likely supported by high resuspended organic sediments and nutrients from the bottom; (II) a strongly autotrophic NPP coupled to an intense gross primary production -GPP- favored by the high nutrient levels and low solar light attenuation from suspended solids or aquatic macrophytes; and (III) a NPP near to the equilibrium coupled to low GPP and R rates following, respectively, the shading by aquatic macrophytes and high particulate sedimentation. In conclusion, changes in aquatic primary production could be an important threshold for controlling drastic shifts in the organic matter cycling and the subsequent silting up of small tropical streams after dredging events.

  2. Assessment of Mud-Capped Dredge Pit Evolution Offshore Louisiana: Implications to Sand Excavation and Coastal Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K.; Miner, M. D.; Bentley, S. J.; Li, C.; Obelcz, J.; O'Connor, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    The shelf offshore Louisiana is characterized by a dominantly muddy seafloor with a paucity of restoration-quality sand proximal to shore. Discrete sand deposits associated with ancient rivers that incised the shelf during lower sea-level positions occur close to shore. These shelf channel sands have been targeted for coastal restoration projects resulting in significant cost savings over more distal deposits. Several recent projects targeted shelf paleo-fluvial deposits comprising relatively deep (10 m) channel sands underlying a muddy overburden. Because of contrasting characteristics of cohesive mud vs. non-cohesive sand and potential modern fluvial mud supply from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, long term pit evolution is poorly understood relative to their more common sand-only counterparts. Alterations to seafloor topography from dredging shelf sediment resources can potentially affect oil and gas infrastructure or other resources of concern (i.e. historic shipwrecks) located proximal to dredge pits. Site-specific data required to make accurate predictions and empirical measurements to test and validate predictive models were only available for Peveto Channel offshore Holly Beach, Louisiana. Here we present new geophysical and geological data (bathymetry, sidescan, subbottom, and radionuclide of sediment cores) and physical oceanographic observations (hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics) collected at Raccoon Island (dredged in 2013) dredge pit in Louisiana. These field data collections along with pre-existing data provide a time-series to capture evolution at Raccoon Island post-excavation. Conceptual morphological models will be developed for dredge pit evolution and testing effectiveness of setback buffers protecting pipelines, habitats, and cultural resources. Our results will increase decision making ability regarding safety and protecting environmental and cultural resources, and better management of valuable sand resources.

  3. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P. Soupy; Baldwin, Sandra M.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Borden, Jonathan; Casso, Michael A.; Crusius, John; Goudreau, Joanne; Kalnejais, Linda H.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Martin, William R.; Martini, Marinna A.; Rendigs, Richard R.; Sayles, Frederick L.; Signell, Richard P.; Valentine, Page C.; Warner, John C.; Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  4. Preliminary study on detection sediment contamination in soil affected by the Indian Ocean giant tsunami 2004 in Aceh, Indonesia using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idris, Nasrullah, E-mail: nasrullah.idris@unsyiah.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Jl. Syech Abdurrauf No. 3 Darussalam, 23111 Banda Aceh, Aceh (Indonesia); Ramli, Muliadi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Jl. Syech Abdurrauf No. 3 Darussalam, 23111 Banda Aceh, Aceh (Indonesia); Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K. H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    This work is intended to asses the capability of LIBS for the detection of the tsunami sediment contamination in soil. LIBS apparatus used in this work consist of a laser system and an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system. The soil sample was collected from in Banda Aceh City, Aceh, Indonesia, the most affected region by the giant Indian Ocean tsunami 2004. The laser beam was focused onto surface of the soil pellet using a focusing lens to produce luminous plasma. The experiment was conducted under air as surrounding gas at 1 atmosphere. The emission spectral lines from the plasma were detected by the OMA system. It was found that metal including heavy metals can surely be detected, thus implying the potent of LIBS technique as a fast screening tools of tsunami sediment contamination.

  5. Impact of open-ocean convection on particle fluxes and sediment dynamics in the deep margin of the Gulf of Lions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stabholz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep outer margin of the Gulf of Lions and the adjacent basin, in the western Mediterranean Sea, are regularly impacted by open-ocean convection, a major hydrodynamic event responsible for the ventilation of the deep water in the western Mediterranean Basin. However, the impact of open-ocean convection on the flux and transport of particulate matter remains poorly understood. The variability of water mass properties (i.e., temperature and salinity, currents, and particle fluxes were monitored between September 2007 and April 2009 at five instrumented mooring lines deployed between 2050 and 2350-m depth in the deepest continental margin and adjacent basin. Four of the lines followed a NW–SE transect, while the fifth one was located on a sediment wave field to the west. The results of the main, central line SC2350 ("LION" located at 42°02.5′ N, 4°41′ E, at 2350-m depth, show that open-ocean convection reached mid-water depth (≈ 1000-m depth during winter 2007–2008, and reached the seabed (≈ 2350-m depth during winter 2008–2009. Horizontal currents were unusually strong with speeds up to 39 cm s−1 during winter 2008–2009. The measurements at all 5 different locations indicate that mid-depth and near-bottom currents and particle fluxes gave relatively consistent values of similar magnitude across the study area except during winter 2008–2009, when near-bottom fluxes abruptly increased by one to two orders of magnitude. Particulate organic carbon contents, which generally vary between 3 and 5%, were abnormally low (≤ 1% during winter 2008–2009 and approached those observed in surface sediments (≈ 0.6%. Turbidity profiles made in the region demonstrated the existence of a bottom nepheloid layer, several hundred meters thick, and related to the resuspension of bottom sediments. These observations support the view that open-ocean deep convection events in the Gulf of Lions can cause significant remobilization

  6. Disposal in sea-bed geological formations. Properties of ocean sediments in relation to the disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; Thomson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Work on the permeability and consolidation characteristics of sediment cores from the north-east Atlantic has shown that each sediment type studied has a unique void ratio/permeability relationship and that the permeability decreases with effective stress more rapidly for fine than for coarser grained material. Significant over-consolidation is also present in Pacific red clays from the deep-sea drilling project. Their permeability is less for a given void ratio than that of their Atlantic counterparts. A theoretical analysis is given of the effects on permeability of deep open burrows revealed by improved core handling techniques. Mineralogy and sediment and water chemistry of six cores from the Nares Abyssal Plain have demonstrated the effects of lateral sediment redistribution and have shown only mildly reducing conditions. Pore water studies on a 4 m Kasten core from Great Meteor East show oxygen falling to zero within 30 cm of the sediment surface

  7. Late-Middle Quaternary lithostratigraphy and sedimentation patterns on the Alpha Ridge, central Arctic Ocean: Implications for Arctic climate variability on orbital time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rujian; Polyak, Leonid; Xiao, Wenshen; Wu, Li; Zhang, Taoliang; Sun, Yechen; Xu, Xiaomei

    2018-02-01

    We use sediment cores collected by the Chinese National Arctic Research Expeditions from the Alpha Ridge to advance Quaternary stratigraphy and paleoceanographic reconstructions for the Arctic Ocean. Our cores show a good litho/biostratigraphic correlation to sedimentary records developed earlier for the central Arctic Ocean, suggesting a recovered stratigraphic range of ca. 0.6 Ma, suitable for paleoclimatic studies on orbital time scales. This stratigraphy was tested by correlating the stacked Alpha Ridge record of bulk XRF manganese, calcium and zirconium (Mn, Ca, Zr), to global stable-isotope (LR04-δ18O) and sea-level stacks and tuning to orbital parameters. Correlation results corroborate the applicability of presumed climate/sea-level controlled Mn variations in the Arctic Ocean for orbital tuning. This approach enables better understanding of the global and orbital controls on the Arctic climate. Orbital tuning experiments for our records indicate strong eccentricity (100-kyr) and precession (∼20-kyr) controls on the Arctic Ocean, probably implemented via glaciations and sea ice. Provenance proxies like Ca and Zr are shown to be unsuitable as orbital tuning tools, but useful as indicators of glacial/deglacial processes and circulation patterns in the Arctic Ocean. Their variations suggest an overall long-term persistence of the Beaufort Gyre circulation in the Alpha Ridge region. Some glacial intervals, e.g., MIS 6 and 4/3, are predominated by material presumably transported by the Transpolar Drift. These circulation shifts likely indicate major changes in the Arctic climatic regime, which yet need to be investigated. Overall, our results demonstrate applicability of XRF data to paleoclimatic studies of the Arctic Ocean.

  8. Geochemistry of sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    Considering the potential of elemental data in marine sediments as diagnostic tools of various geological and oceanographic processes, sediment geochemical data from the Indian Ocean region has been reviewed in this article. Emphasis is laid...

  9. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO).

  10. Habitat filtering of bacterioplankton communities above polymetallic nodule fields and sediments in the Clarion-Clipperton zone of the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Markus V; Maillot, Brianne M; Smith, Craig R; Church, Matthew J

    2018-04-01

    Deep-sea mining of commercially valuable polymetallic nodule fields will generate a seabed sediment plume into the water column. Yet, the response of bacterioplankton communities, critical in regulating energy and matter fluxes in marine ecosystems, to such disturbances is unknown. Metacommunity theory, traditionally used in general ecology for macroorganisms, offers mechanistic understanding on the relative role of spatial differences compared with local environmental conditions (habitat filtering) for community assembly. We examined bacterioplankton metacommunities using 16S rRNA amplicons from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) in the eastern Pacific Ocean and in global ocean transect samples to determine sensitivity of these assemblages to environmental perturbations. Habitat filtering was the main assembly mechanism of bacterioplankton community composition in the epi- and mesopelagic waters of the CCZ and the Tara Oceans transect. Bathy- and abyssopelagic bacterioplankton assemblages were mainly assembled by undetermined metacommunity types or neutral and dispersal-driven patch-dynamics for the CCZ and the Malaspina transect. Environmental disturbances may alter the structure of upper-ocean microbial assemblages, with potentially even more substantial, yet unknown, impact on deep-sea communities. Predicting such responses in bacterioplankton assemblage dynamics can improve our understanding of microbially-mediated regulation of ecosystem services in the abyssal seabed likely to be exploited by future deep-sea mining operations. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluating Sediment Mobility for Siting Nearshore Berms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    placement of dredged sediment that may contain more fine silts and clays than are allowed for placement directly on the beach. The United States Army...used in the density and viscosity calculations. For this technical note an example study site is selected and the sediment mobility indexes are...acceleration due to gravity, sρ is the sediment density, ρ is the water density, v is the kinematic viscosity of water, crθ is the Shields

  12. Dangerous compounds in the dredged material from the sea - Assessment of the current approach to the evaluation of contaminations based on the data from the Polish coastal zone (the Baltic Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Marta; Boniecka, Helena

    2018-05-01

    It has been shown that the current approach to the assessment of contamination in the sediments obtained during the dredging works in the Baltic countries indicates the presence of "non-contaminated" dredged material. The concentration limits of heavy metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) have been exceeded only in 1% of the samples obtained during the dredging works (2005-2015) within the Polish coastal zone. After 2008, no contaminated sediments have been found. Also, in the remaining Baltic countries, sediments are very rarely contaminated. As a result of this assessment, the sediments can be stored in the sea or have a practical application. However, it has been questioned whether the large cost of determining the numerous chemical parameters is justified. It has been proposed to carry out simple screening tests. Following the preliminary screening, the decision on more detailed (and expensive) chemical tests of individual pollutants would be made. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of @iNeogloboquadrina pachyderma@@ new subspecies in the shelf-slope sediments of northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    ~'N in the Bay of Bengal. Studies of hydrological conditions in the Indian Ocean reveal that the Subtropical Subsurface Water Mass is traceable as far north as the Gulf of Aden, and the Indian Ocean Deep Bottom Water Mass originating in the deepest...

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in sediments in the NW Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas. Results of the 1994-1995 Japanese-Korean-Russian expeditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.B.L.; Amano, H.; Berezhnov, V.I.; Nikitin, A.; Veletova, N.K.; Chaykovskaya, E.; Chumichev, V.B.; Chung, C.S.; Gastaud, J.; Hirose, K.; Hong, G.H.; Kim, C.K.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, S.H.; Morimoto, T.; Oda, K.; Povinec, P.P.; Togawa, O.; Suzuki, E.; Tkalin, A.; Volkov, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of contamination of anthropogenic radionuclides from past dumping of radioactive waste in areas of the Okhotsk Sea, NW Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan/East Sea has been performed. Two joint Japanese-Korean-Russian scientific expeditions were carried out in 1994-1995, where seawater and seabed sediments were samples from 22 sites. Results of sediment analysis are reported here, where concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu and 241Am in surface layer and bulk sediments showed on large spatial variations, ranging between -1 dry wt., -1 dry wt., -1 dry wt., 0.006 and 2.0 Bq kg -1 dry wt., 0.03 and 1.8 Bq kg -1 dry wt., respectively. However, the concentrations are comparable with those found in reference sites outside the dumping areas and they generally fall within ranges previously reported for non-dumping areas of the investigated seas. Estimates of sediment inventories indicated differences in radionuclide load between shelf/slope and basin type sediments as well as dependence on water depth. Except for the shallow areas, most of the inventories of 90Sr, 137Cs and Pu isotopes are still to be found in the water column. Total inventories (in water+sediment) show a surplus of 137Cs and Pu-isotopes compared to expected integrated global fall-out deposition, which is consistent with previous observations in non-dumping areas in the seas investigated. Analysis of sediment 238Pu/239,240Pu activity ratios showed values in accord with that of global fall-out. Analysis of radionuclide depth distributions in core samples from areas of the Sea of Okhotsk showed sedimentation rates of 0.2-0.4 g cm -2 year -1 and 0.03 g cm -2 year -1 for shelf and basin areas respectively, which is similar to values found in the Sea of Japan/East Sea. Depth profiles of 90Sr, 137Cs and Pu isotopes in cores of the basin area indicate a typical delay compared to the input records of global fall-out

  15. Geomechanical, Hydraulic and Thermal Characteristics of Deep Oceanic Sandy Sediments Recovered during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Cha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal characteristics of natural sandy sediments collected during the Ulleung Basin gas hydrate expedition 2, East Sea, offshore Korea. The studied sediment formation is considered as a potential target reservoir for natural gas production. The sediments contained silt, clay and sand fractions of 21%, 1.3% and 77.7%, respectively, as well as diatomaceous minerals with internal pores. The peak friction angle and critical state (or residual state friction angle under drained conditions were ~26° and ~22°, respectively. There was minimal or no apparent cohesion intercept. Stress- and strain-dependent elastic moduli, such as tangential modulus and secant modulus, were identified. The sediment stiffness increased with increasing confining stress, but degraded with increasing strain regime. Variations in water permeability with water saturation were obtained by fitting experimental matric suction-water saturation data to the Maulem-van Genuchen model. A significant reduction in thermal conductivity (from ~1.4–1.6 to ~0.5–0.7 W·m−1·K−1 was observed when water saturation decreased from 100% to ~10%–20%. In addition, the electrical resistance increased quasi-linearly with decreasing water saturation. The geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal properties of the hydrate-free sediments reported herein can be used as the baseline when predicting properties and behavior of the sediments containing hydrates, and when the hydrates dissociate during gas production. The variations in thermal and hydraulic properties with changing water and gas saturation can be used to assess gas production rates from hydrate-bearing deposits. In addition, while depressurization of hydrate-bearing sediments inevitably causes deformation of sediments under drained conditions, the obtained strength and stiffness properties and stress-strain responses of the sedimentary formation under drained loading conditions

  16. Dredging in Sediments Containing Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    UXO diver tech- niques to recover the targets. First, the diver using a fluxgate magnetometer attempted to verify the exist- ence of a target...MEC. These technologies included: 1. Synthetic Aperture SONAR. 2. Magnetometers and electromagnetic induction sensors. 3. Magnetometer /SONAR...4. Differential Magnetometer . 5. Mobile Underwater Debris Survey System. The feasibility of site characterization of the borrow area

  17. The composition and the source of hydrocarbons in sediments taken from the tectonically active Andaman Backarc Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chernova, T.G.; Rao, P.S.; Pikovskii, Yu.I.; Alekseeva, T.A.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rao, Ch.M.

    or hydrothermal organic matter. Anthropogenic sources in region studied are of minor importance. From the results obtained, it may be deduced that the hydrocarbons in the sediments of the tectonically active part of the Andaman Basin are mainly due...

  18. Hard substrate in the deep ocean: How sediment features influence epibenthic megafauna on the eastern Canadian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacharité, Myriam; Metaxas, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Benthic habitats on deep continental margins (> 1000 m) are now considered heterogeneous - in particular because of the occasional presence of hard substrate in a matrix of sand and mud - influencing the distribution of megafauna which can thrive on both sedimented and rocky substrates. At these depths, optical imagery captured with high-definition cameras to describe megafauna can also describe effectively the fine-scale sediment properties in the immediate vicinity of the fauna. In this study, we determined the relationship between local heterogeneity (10-100 sm) in fine-scale sediment properties and the abundance, composition, and diversity of megafauna along a large depth gradient (1000-3000 m) in a previously-unexplored habitat: the Northeast Fan, which lies downslope of submarine canyons off the Gulf of Maine (northwest Atlantic). Substrate heterogeneity was quantified using a novel approach based on principles of computer vision. This approach proved powerful in detecting gradients in sediment, and sporadic complex features (i.e. large boulders) in an otherwise homogeneous environment because it characterizes sediment properties on a continuous scale. Sediment heterogeneity influenced megafaunal diversity (morphospecies richness and Shannon-Wiener Index) and community composition, with areas of higher substrate complexity generally supported higher diversity. However, patterns in abundance were not influenced by sediment properties, and may be best explained by gradients in food supply. Our study provides a new approach to quantify fine-scale sediment properties and assess their role in shaping megafaunal communities in the deep sea, which should be included into habitat studies given their potential ecological importance.

  19. A comparison of sediment quality results with acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) ratio in Vojvodina (Serbia) sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prica, M; Dalmacija, B; Roncević, S; Krcmar, D; Becelić, M

    2008-01-25

    The acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), total metals, and pore-water metal concentrations were studied in Vojvodina (Serbia) sediments. In Serbia, there are no regulations concerning sediment quality standards and sediment management. Harmonization of legislation in the domain of environmental protection with EU requirements will increase the significance of the sediment issue. Sediment quality was assessed according to Dutch standards, but the results were also compared with Canadian and USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) guidelines for sediment quality. A comparison of the results based on different criteria for sediment quality assessment shows that they are sometimes contradictory. Therefore, a single approach to quality assessment may be insufficient. The Sigma[SEM]/[AVS] ratio was found to be greater than one at several locations that were already recognized as places of high risk based on Dutch standards. Some other samples had Sigma[SEM]/[AVS]AVS]>1 can cause increased toxicity because there are many other metal-binding phases in sediments. Metals that are associated with AVS may be released within sediments through storms, dredging activities, oxidation, etc., and may have adverse environmental impacts. This has to be taken into account during dredging, which is for some sediments necessary because the sediment is of class 4 (Dutch evaluation), because the dredging process will certainly increase the concentration of bioavailable heavy metals and disturb the sedimentation dynamics. The obtained results will be invaluable for future activities regarding dredging and sediment management in the country.

  20. On the necessity of ecotoxicological assessments of aquatic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, F.

    1992-01-01

    The guidelines for dredged material adopted by the Oslo Commission in June 1991 impose stricter obligations on its member states regarding the management of dredged material in the marine environment. It can be assumed that the basic ideas of these guidelines will become the model for inland waterways as well. For an environmentally acceptable management of dredging operations and the collection of evidence against polluters, ecotoxicological investigations on the behaviour of contaminants in waters are required in addition to chemical analyses. The practical application of these guidelines is hampered by the fact that no standardized biotests for sediments exist in Germany to date. The paper describes situations in which standardized biotest methods of aquatic ecotoxicology can already be used. A concept for the biological assessment of sediments is still lacking. It is necessary to define quality objectives for the evaluation of chemical and ecotoxicological data with a view to ecologically acceptable management of dredged material. (orig.) [de

  1. Regional variations in provenance and abundance of ice-rafted clasts in Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for the configuration of late Quaternary oceanic and atmospheric circulation in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.L.; Grantz, A.

    2001-01-01

    The composition and distribution of ice-rafted glacial erratics in late Quaternary sediments define the major current systems of the Arctic Ocean and identify two distinct continental sources for the erratics. In the southern Amerasia basin up to 70% of the erratics are dolostones and limestones (the Amerasia suite) that originated in the carbonate-rich Paleozoic terranes of the Canadian Arctic Islands. These clasts reached the Arctic Ocean in glaciers and were ice-rafted to the core sites in the clockwise Beaufort Gyre. The concentration of erratics decreases northward by 98% along the trend of the gyre from southeastern Canada basin to Makarov basin. The concentration of erratics then triples across the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge and siltstone, sandstone and siliceous clasts become dominant in cores from the ridge and the Eurasia basin (the Eurasia suite). The bedrock source for the siltstone and sandstone clasts is uncertain, but bedrock distribution and the distribution of glaciation in northern Eurasia suggest the Taymyr Peninsula-Kara Sea regions. The pattern of clast distribution in the Arctic Ocean sediments and the sharp northward decrease in concentration of clasts of Canadian Arctic Island provenance in the Amerasia basin support the conclusion that the modem circulation pattern of the Arctic Ocean, with the Beaufort Gyre dominant in the Amerasia basin and the Transpolar drift dominant in the Eurasia basin, has controlled both sea-ice and glacial iceberg drift in the Arctic Ocean during interglacial intervals since at least the late Pleistocene. The abruptness of the change in both clast composition and concentration on the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge also suggests that the boundary between the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift has been relatively stable during interglacials since that time. Because the Beaufort Gyre is wind-driven our data, in conjunction with the westerly directed orientation of sand dunes that formed during

  2. Strength characteristics of lightly solidified dredged marine clay admixed with bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Syazwana Tajul; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Strength characteristic is a significant parameter in measuring the effect of soil improvement and effective composition of solidification. In this study, the dredged marine sediment (DMS) collected from Kuala Perlis (Malaysia) was examined to determine its strength characteristics under light cement solidification with bentonite. Dredged marine clay generally has the low shear strength and high void ratio, and consists mainly of soil particles of the fine-grained type. As a discarded geo-waste, it can be potentially treated to for reuse as a backfill material instead of being disposed of, hence reducing the negative impact on the environment. Physico-chemical parameters of the dredged sample were first determined, then solidification was carried out to improve the engineering properties by admixing ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the binder and bentonite as a volume enhancer to the soil. The DMS was treated with the addition of 3 % and 6 % cement and bentonite within the range of 0-30 %. The specimens were cured at room temperature for 3, 7 and 14 days. The strength gain was measured by unconfined compression test and vane shear test. The laboratory test results were analyzed to establish the relationship between strength properties and solidification specifications. In summary, the strength of specimens increased with the increase of the quantity of bentonite and cement to get the effective composition of the specimen.

  3. Upper ocean carbon flux determined by the 234Th approach and sediment traps using size-fractionated POC and 234Th data from the Golf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Santschi, Peter H.; Guo, Laodong

    2004-01-01

    Size-fractionated particulate 234 Th and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes were measured in the Gulf of Mexico during 2000 and 2001 in order to obtain a better estimation of upper ocean organic carbon export out of the euphotic zone within cold core and warm core rings, and to assess the relative merit of sediment trap and POC/ 234 Th methods. In 2000, the flux of POC measured by sediment traps at 120 m ranged from 60 to 148 mg C m -2 d -1 , while 234 Th-derived POC fluxes in large particles (>53 μm) varied from 18 to 61 mg C m -2 d -1 using the ratio of POC/ 234 Th at 120 m, and from 51 to 163 mg C m -2 d -1 using an average ratio of POC/ 234 Th for the upper 120 m water column. In 2001, the fluxes of POC measured by traps deployed at 120 m water depth ranged from 39 to 48 mg C m -2 d -1 , while the 234 Th-derived POC fluxes in large particles (>53 μm) varied from 7 to 37 mg C m -2 d -1 using a ratio of POC/ 234 Th at 120 m, and from 37 to 45 mg C m -2 d -1 using an average ratio of POC/ 234 Th within the 0-120 m interval. The results show that POC fluxes estimated by the 234 Th method using the average ratio of POC/ 234 Th within the euphotic zone are similar to those measured by sediment traps. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the variability in POC export fluxes estimated by the 234 Th/ 238 U disequilibrium approach is strongly related to the ratio of POC/ 234 Th that is taken, and for which we have independent evidence that it may be controlled by the chemical composition of the suspended particles. The results also reveal that using POC/ 234 Th ratios in small particles may result in an estimate of the POC export flux that is considerably higher than when using POC/ 234 Th ratios in large particles (>53 μm). The POC flux calculated from ratios in large particles is, however, more comparable to the POC flux determined directly by sediment traps, but both of these estimates are much lower than that determined by using the POC/ 234 Th ratios in

  4. Magnetic Hysteresis of Deep-Sea Sediments in Korea Deep Ocean Study(KODOS) Area, NE Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Park, C.; Yoo, C.

    2001-12-01

    The KODOS area within the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone (C-C zone) is surrounded by the Hawaiian and Line Island Ridges to the west and the central American continent to the east. Topography of the seafloor consists of flat-topped abyssal hills and adjacent abyssal troughs, both of which run parallel in N-S direction. Sediments from the study area consist mainly of biogenic sediments. Latitudinal zonation of sedimentary facies was caused by the accumulation of biogenic materials associated with the equatorial current system and movement of the Pacific plate toward the north or northwest. The KODOS area belongs to the latitudinal transition zone having depositional characteristics between non-fossiliferous pelagic clay-dominated zone and calcareous sediment-dominated zone. The box core sediments of the KODOS area are analyzed in an attempt to obtain magnetic hysteresis information and to elucidate the relationship between hysteresis property and lithological facies. Variations in magnetic hysteresis parameters with unit layers reflect the magnetic grain-size and concentrations within the sediments. The ratios of remanant coercivity/coercive force (Hcr/Hc) and saturation remnance/saturation magnetization (Mrs/Ms) indicate that coarse magnetic grains are mainly distributed in dark brown sediments (lower part of the sediment core samples) reflecting high Hcr/Hc and low Mrs/Ms ratios. These results are mainly caused by dissolution differences with core depth. From the plotting of the ratios of hyteresis parameters, it is indicated that magnetic minerals in cubic samples are in pseudo-single domain (PSD) state.

  5. Flotation as a remediation technique for heavily polluted dredged material. 2. Characterisation of flotated fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwenberg, P; Verdonckt, F; Maes, A

    1998-01-19

    The particle size distribution and the metal speciation of the heavy metals were investigated on dredged sediment and on the fractions obtained by mechanical agitated (Denver) flotation. The transition metal ions (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) were flotated specifically independent of the particle size. Particle size analysis, EDTA extraction and sequential extracts indicated that during flotation a redistribution of metals occurred due to the oxidation of metal sulphides. This oxidation process was more pronounced when the flotation was performed at higher pH values and resulted in a decrease in flotation specificity.

  6. Dewatering of contaminated river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Ronald H.; Smith, Carl W.; Scheiner, Bernard J.

    1994-01-01

    Dewatering of slurries has been successfully accomplished by the proper use of polymers in flocculating the fine particulate matter suspended in mineral processing streams. The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) entered into a cooperative research effort with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) for the purpose of testing and demonstrating the applicability of mining flocculation technology to dredging activities associated with the removal of sediments from navigable waterways. The Corps has the responsibility for maintaining the navigable waterways in the United States. Current technology relies primarily on dredging operations which excavate the material from the bottom of waterways. The Corps is testing new dredging technology which may reduce resuspension of sediments by the dredging operation. Pilot plant dredging equipment was tested by the Corps which generated larger quantities of water when compared to conventional equipment, such as the clam shell. The transportation of this 'excess' water adds to the cost of sediment removal. The process developed by the USBM consists of feed material from the barge being pumped through a 4-in line by a centrifugal pump and exiting through a 4-in PVC delivery system. A 1,000-gal fiberglass tank was used to mix the polymer concentrate. The polymer was pumped through a 1-in line using a variable speed progressive cavity pump and introduced to the 4-in feed line prior to passing through a 6-in by 2-ft static mixer. The polymer/feed slurry travels to the clarifying tank where the flocculated material settled to the bottom and allowed 'clean' water to exit the overflow. A pilot scale flocculation unit was operated on-site at the Corps' 'Confined Disposal Facility' in Buffalo, NY.

  7. STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF TIDE ON SEDIMENTATION IN ESTUARIES OF THE NIGER DELTA, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chizom Dike

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Niger Delta Estuary Nigeria is influenced by tidal currents due to its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Tides in the region are mostly semidiurnal, having two high and low water levels each day, with tidal prism ranging from 0.4 to 1.5m. The effects of tidal current reduces with distance inland and are strongest at the inlets with velocity varying from 2.0 to 5.0m/sec. The depth of the Estuary Rivers is controlled by the strength of the tidal currents; areas very close to ocean with stronger tidal effect are very deep; while shallow rivers predominates the hub of the estuary. Tidal current provides the steady supply of energy that moves sediments in and out of the estuaries from the seashore thus determing river bathymetric shapes through modification of existing morphology by eroding or depositing of sediments along the river course, while further sediment deposition is curtailed at the bottom as the estuary gets shallower due to the increasing stirring by waves. Despite all the sediment coming into the estuaries, many canals in the region have remained as open-water bodies, even after some thousand years. This suggests that, the interaction between the tide and the shape of the canal floor helps to regulate long-term sedimentation. However, the Dredged Canals in the Niger Delta estuaries have suffered high siltation rates because of excessive supply of sediments generated by storm/flood waters from upland and disposal of spoils from dredging activities into the water bodies, which causes some imbalance in the estuarine self-cleaning mechanism. Sediment loads entering the mangrove swamp environment are essentially polycentric; suspended fines enter the system both from the sea and the rivers. A mathematical model was formulated to predict and study the behavior of the sea bed levels, tidal heights and currents, in other to understand how they interact with each other. The model was calibrated using data obtained from local field observations

  8. Biogeographical distribution and diversity of microbes in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments, on the Pacific Ocean Margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inagaki, F.; Nunoura, T.; Nakagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The deep subseafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass therein plays an important role for potential long-term controls on global biogeochemical cycles. We report here the vertical and geographical distribution of microbes and their ......The deep subseafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass therein plays an important role for potential long-term controls on global biogeochemical cycles. We report here the vertical and geographical distribution of microbes...... of the uncultivated Deep-Sea Archaeal Group were consistently the dominant phylotype in sediments associated with methane hydrate. Sediment cores lacking methane hydrates displayed few or no Deep-Sea Archaeal Group phylotypes. Bacterial communities in the methane hydrate-bearing sediments were dominated by members...

  9. 210Po/210Pb Activity Ratios as a Possible `Dating Tool' of Ice Cores and Ice-rafted Sediments from the Western Arctic Ocean - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, K.; Baskaran, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    We have collected and analyzed a suite of surface snow samples, ice cores, ice-rafted sediments (IRS) and aerosol samples from the Western Arctic for Po-210 and Pb-210 to examine the extent of disequilibrium between this pair to possibly use 210Po/210Pb activity ratio to date different layers of ice cores and time of incorporation of ice-rafted sediments into the sea ice. We have earlier reported that the activity concentrations of 210Pb in IRS vary over an order of magnitude and it is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of the benthic sediments (1-2 dpm/g in benthic sediments compared to 25 to 300 dpm/g in IRS). In this study, we have measured 210Po/210Pb activity ratios in aerosols from the Arctic Ocean to constrain the initial 210Po/210Pb ratio at the time of deposition during precipitation. The 210Po activity concentration in recent snow is compared to surface ice samples. The `age' of IRS incorporation can be calculated as follows: [210Po]measured = [210Po]initial + [210Pb] (1 - exp(-λt)) (1) where λ is the decay constant of 210Po, 138.4 days, and `t' is the in-growth time period. From this equation, `t' can be calculated as follows: t = (-1/λ) [ln (1- ((210Po/210Pb)measured - (210Po/210Pb)initial)] (2) The assumption involved in this approach are: i) there is no preferential uptake of 210Po (highly biogenic - S group); and iii) both 210Po and 210Pb remain as closed system. The calculated age using equation (2) will be discussed and presented.

  10. Dredging of sand from a creek adjacent to a sand-spit for reclamation: Its impact on spit stability and coastal zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajagopal, M.D.; Vethamony, P.; Ilangovan, D.; Jayakumar, S.; Sudheesh, K.; Murty, K.S.R.

    model to understand the flow pattern when the bathymetry is altered for dredging and (ii) GALENA to analyse the slope stability. 2. Coastal Environment of the Study Area Off Paradip, currents are of the order of 50–90 cm/s during southwest monsoon.... Assuming an average sedimentation depth of 0.5 m for a dredged area of ∼4.22 × 10 6 m 2 ,thematerial accumulated in this region (zone-I) works out to be ∼2.11×10 6 m 3 . Earlier studies proved that the mouth of JMC is a region of divergence...

  11. Major, trace, and rare earth elements in the sediments of the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Their source and distribution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Jauhari, P.

    The distribution maps of elements show that highest concentrations of Mn, Cu, Ni, Zn, Co, and biogenic opal in the surface sediment occurs between 10 degrees S and 16 degrees S latitude, where diagenetic ferromanganese nodules rich in Mn, Cu, Ni...

  12. Integrated ocean drilling program expedition 341 Preliminary report: Southern Alaska margin- Interactions of tectonics, climate, and sedimentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaeger, J.M.; Asahi, H.; Gulick, S.S.; Bahlburg, H.; LeVay, L.J.; Belanger, C.L.; Slagle, A.L.; Berbel, G.B.B.; Drab, L.; Childress, L.B.; Cowan, E.A.; Konno, S.; Forwick, M.; Marz, C.E.; Fukumura, A.; Matsuzaki, K.M.; Ge, S.; McClymont, E.L.; Gupta, S.M.; et al.

    global increase in erosion rates and sediment delivery to basins. The effects of this increased erosion may be profound, as worldwide analyses of orogenic belts have shown that Earth systems cannot be considered to be the product of a series of distinct...

  13. Rock magnetic and geochemical analyses of surface sediment characteristics in deep ocean environments: A case study across the Ryukyu Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, N.; Kawamura, K.; Ishikawa, N.

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic minerals in marine sediments are often dissolved or formed with burial depth, thereby masking the primary natural remanent magnetization and paleoclimate signals. In order to clarify the present sedimentary environment and the progressive changes with burial depth in the magnetic properties, we studied seven cores collected from the Ryukyu Trench, southwest Japan. Magnetic properties, organic geochemistry, and interstitial water chemistry of seven cores are described. Bottom water conditions at the landward slope, trench floor, and seaward slope are relatively suboxic, anoxic, and oxic, respectively. The grain size of the sediments become gradually finer with the distance from Okinawa Island and finer with increasing water depth. The magnetic carriers in the sediments are predominantly magnetite and maghemized magnetite, with minor amounts of hematite. In the topmost sediments from the landward slope, magnetic minerals are diluted by terrigenous materials and microfossils. The downcore variations in magnetic properties and geochemical data provided evidence for the dissolution of fine-grained magnetite with burial depth under an anoxic condition.

  14. An instrument to measure differential pore pressures in deep ocean sediments: Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; McPhail, S.D.; Packwood, A.R.; Hart, B.

    1985-01-01

    A Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI) has been developed to measure differential pore pressures in sediments. The differential pressure is the pressure above or below normal hydrostatic pressure at the depth of the measurement. It is designed to operate in water depths up to 6000 metres for periods of weeks or months, if required, and measures differential pore pressures at depths of up to 3 metres into the sediments with a resolution of 0.05 kPa. It is a free-fall device with a lance which penetrates the sediments. This lance and the ballast weight is disposed when the PUPPI is acoustically released from the sea floor. When combined with permeability and porosity values of deep-sea sediments the pore pressure measurements made using the PUPPI suggest advection velocities as low as 8.8 mm/yr. The mechanical, electrical and acoustic systems are described together with data obtained from both shallow and deep water trials. (author)

  15. WODA technical guidance on underwater sound from dredging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C. de; Wit, P. de; Goethals, F.; Holtkamp, M.; Martin, E.S.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Victor, G.Y.V.; Jensen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF DREDGING AND DISPOSAL (E2-D2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Army Corps of Engineers public web site for the "Environmental Effects of Dredging and Disposal" ("E2-D2") searchable database of published reports and studies about environmental impacts associated with dredging and disposal operations. Many of the reports and studies are ava...

  17. The WODA guidance paper on underwater sound from dredging (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Witt, P. de; Holtkamp, M.; Goethals, F.; San Martin, E.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The World Organisation of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) was established to provide a guidance paper on dredging sound, impact on aquatic biota and advice on

  18. A method for simulating sediment incipient motion varying with time and space in an ocean model (FVCOM): development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zichen; Wang, Yongzhi; Bian, Shuhua; Hu, Zejian; Liu, Jianqiang; Liu, Lejun

    2017-11-01

    We modified the sediment incipient motion in a numerical model and evaluated the impact of this modification using a study case of the coastal area around Weihai, China. The modified and unmodified versions of the model were validated by comparing simulated and observed data of currents, waves, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) measured from July 25th to July 26th, 2006. A fitted Shields diagram was introduced into the sediment model so that the critical erosional shear stress could vary with time. Thus, the simulated SSC patterns were improved to more closely reflect the observed values, so that the relative error of the variation range decreased by up to 34.5% and the relative error of simulated temporally averaged SSC decreased by up to 36%. In the modified model, the critical shear stress values of the simulated silt with a diameter of 0.035 mm and mud with a diameter of 0.004 mm varied from 0.05 to 0.13 N/m2, and from 0.05 to 0.14 N/m 2, respectively, instead of remaining constant in the unmodified model. Besides, a method of applying spatially varying fractions of the mixed grain size sediment improved the simulated SSC distribution to fit better to the remote sensing map and reproduced the zonal area with high SSC between Heini Bay and the erosion groove in the modified model. The Relative Mean Absolute Error was reduced by between 6% and 79%, depending on the regional attributes when we used the modified method to simulate incipient sediment motion. But the modification achieved the higher accuracy in this study at a cost of computation speed decreasing by 1.52%.

  19. Gender difference in walleye PCB concentrations persists following remedial dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Jude, David J.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.; Noguchi, George E.

    2009-01-01

    Eleven male walleyes (Sander vitreus) and 10 female walleyes from the Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) population were caught during the spawning run at Dow Dam (Midland, Michigan) in the Tittabawassee River during April 1996, and individual whole-fish polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) determinations were made. Total PCB concentrations averaged 7.95 and 3.17??mg/kg for males and females, respectively. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment remediation process, contaminated sediments from the Saginaw River, the main tributary to Saginaw Bay, were removed during 2000 and 2001. Total PCB concentrations of 10 male and 10 female walleyes caught at Dow Dam during April 2007 averaged 1.58 and 0.55??mg/kg, respectively. Thus, dredging of the Saginaw River appeared to be effective in reducing PCB concentrations of Saginaw Bay adult walleyes, as both males and females decreased in PCB concentration by more than 80% between 1996 and 2007. However, the ratio of male PCB concentration to female PCB concentration did not decline between 1996 and 2007. This persistent gender difference in PCB concentrations was apparently due to a gender difference in habitat utilization coupled with a persistent spatial gradient in prey fish PCB concentrations from the Saginaw River to Lake Huron.

  20. Rare earth element and neodymium isotope tracing of element input and past ocean circulation. Study from north and south pacific seawater and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froellje, Henning

    2016-08-09

    Ocean circulation and cycling of trace elements within the oceanic water column is of great significance for modern and past climates. The global overturning circulation is responsible for the distribution of water masses, heat and particulate and dissolved compounds, while biological and chemical processes, such as primary productivity or particle scavenging, control the cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the ocean, and ultimately influence the ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon. Rare earth elements (REE) and neodymium (Nd) isotopes are widely used as tracers for lithogenic element fluxes and modern and past ocean circulation and water mass mixing. The use of Nd isotopes in paleoceanographic investigations is based on the precise knowledge of processes involved in REE cycling and of the modern oceanic Nd isotope distribution. The Pacific is the largest of the world oceans, but it is highly underrepresented in present-day and past seawater Nd isotope and REE investigations compared to the Atlantic Ocean. In this study, Nd isotopes and REEs are analysed in North Pacific seawater (chapter 2) and sediment samples from the South Pacific (chapters 3-5) to contribute to a better understanding of sources and cycling of REEs and Nd isotopes in present-day seawater and to investigate past water mass mixing and circulation changes during the last glacial termination and throughout the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Neodymium isotopes in seawater and sedimentary archives (fossil fish teeth and debris, foraminifera, ferromanganese oxides, lithogenic particles) were analysed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS), and REE concentrations were analysed using isotope dilution ICP-MS. Results from combined analysis of REEs, and Nd and radium isotopes from North Pacific seawater (coastal seawaters of the Hawaiian Island of Oahu and seawater from the offshore Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA) show a clear influence of the

  1. Rare earth element and neodymium isotope tracing of element input and past ocean circulation. Study from north and south pacific seawater and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froellje, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Ocean circulation and cycling of trace elements within the oceanic water column is of great significance for modern and past climates. The global overturning circulation is responsible for the distribution of water masses, heat and particulate and dissolved compounds, while biological and chemical processes, such as primary productivity or particle scavenging, control the cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the ocean, and ultimately influence the ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon. Rare earth elements (REE) and neodymium (Nd) isotopes are widely used as tracers for lithogenic element fluxes and modern and past ocean circulation and water mass mixing. The use of Nd isotopes in paleoceanographic investigations is based on the precise knowledge of processes involved in REE cycling and of the modern oceanic Nd isotope distribution. The Pacific is the largest of the world oceans, but it is highly underrepresented in present-day and past seawater Nd isotope and REE investigations compared to the Atlantic Ocean. In this study, Nd isotopes and REEs are analysed in North Pacific seawater (chapter 2) and sediment samples from the South Pacific (chapters 3-5) to contribute to a better understanding of sources and cycling of REEs and Nd isotopes in present-day seawater and to investigate past water mass mixing and circulation changes during the last glacial termination and throughout the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Neodymium isotopes in seawater and sedimentary archives (fossil fish teeth and debris, foraminifera, ferromanganese oxides, lithogenic particles) were analysed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS), and REE concentrations were analysed using isotope dilution ICP-MS. Results from combined analysis of REEs, and Nd and radium isotopes from North Pacific seawater (coastal seawaters of the Hawaiian Island of Oahu and seawater from the offshore Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA) show a clear influence of the

  2. Projected entrainment of fish resulting from aggregate dredging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabble, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Previous research to assess impacts from aggregate dredging has focussed on infaunal species with few studies made of fish entrainment. Entrainment evidence from hydraulic dredging studies is reviewed to develop a sensitivity index for benthic fish. Environmental monitoring attendant with the granting of new licences in the Eastern Channel Region (ECR) in 2006 offers a unique opportunity to assess the effects of dredging upon fish. Projected theoretical fish entrainment rates are calculated based upon: abundance data from 4m beam trawl sampling of fish species over the period 2005–2008; sensitivity data; and dredging activity and footprint derived from Electronic monitoring System (EMS) data. Results have been compared with actual entrainment rates and also against summary results from independent analysis of the changes in fish population over the period 2005–2008 (). The case is made for entrainment surveys to form part of impact monitoring for marine aggregate dredging.

  3. Hydrothermal Fe cycling and deep ocean organic carbon scavenging: Model-based evidence for significant POC supply to seafloor sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    German, C.R.; Legendre, L.L.; Sander, S.G.;; Niquil, N.; Luther-III, G.W.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Han, X.; LeBris, N.

    by more than ~10% over background values, what the model does indicate is that scavenging of carbon in association with Fe-rich hydrothermal plume particles should play a significant role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon to deep ocean...

  4. Phytoremediation of TBT-contaminated Harbour Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Novak, Jana; DeClercq, Bartel

    This sub-project of the TBT CLEAN project investigated the feasibility of growing plants on dredged harbour sediments and the influence of vegetation on TBT degradation. The toxicity of TBT to vascular plants was determined with the willow tree transpiration test. Compared to other species, the t...

  5. High-resolution sub-bottom seismic and sediment core records from the Chukchi Abyssal Plain reveal Quaternary glaciation impacts on the western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. J.; Seokhoon, Y.; Nam, S. I.; Polyak, L.; Niessen, F.

    2017-12-01

    For regional context of the Quaternary history of Arctic marine glaciations, such as glacial events in northern North America and on the Siberian and Chukchi margins, we used CHIRP sub-bottom profiles (SBP) along with sediment cores, including a 14-m long piston core ARA06-04JPC taken from the Chukchi abyssal plain during the RV Araon expedition in 2015. Based on core correlation with earlier developed Arctic Ocean stratigraphies using distribution of various sedimentary proxies, core 04JPC is estimated to extend to at least Marine Isotope Stage 13 (>0.5 Ma). The stratigraphy developed for SBP lines from the Chukchi abyssal plain to surrounding slopes can be divided into four major seismostratigraphic units (SSU 1-4). SBP records from the abyssal plain show well preserved stratification, whereas on the surrounding slopes this pattern is disrupted by lens-shaped, acoustically transparent sedimentary bodies interpreted as glaciogenic debris flow deposits. Based on the integration of sediment physical property and SBP data, we conclude that these debris flows were generated during several ice-sheet grounding events on the Chukchi and East Siberian margins, including adjacent ridges and plateaus, during the middle to late Quaternary.

  6. SEDIMENT PROPERTIES and Other Data from FIXED PLATFORM and Other Platforms From North Pacific Ocean from 19881030 to 19911024 (NODC Accession 9300040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains data collected in North Pacific Ocean from Hawaiian Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project for years 1, 2 and 3 as part of Joint Global Ocean Flux...

  7. Microbial biomass and organic nutrients in the deep-sea sediments of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Sheelu, G.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Mohandass, C.

    PMNprogramoftheDepartmentofOceanDevelopment,GovernmentofIndia.TheauthorsarethankfultothescientistsandcrewAASidorentzoforcooperationandassistanceduringthelongcruisesinthesamplingarea.The authorsalsowishtothankMs.GowriRivonkarfortechnicalassistanceinthelaboratory.NIOContributionNo.3509.ThispaperispartoftheseriespublishedinthespecialissueofMarineGeoresourcesandGeotechnology,Volume18,Number3,2000. AddresscorrespondencetoChandralataRaghukumar,NationalInstituteof...%)wastwotimesmorethanthatofthe MicrobialBiomassandOrganicNutrientsinCIOB 9 Figure4.(a)± (e)ConcentrationofLOM,TOC,andlivingbiomass-Cin® vecoresatdiŒerentdepths. bacterialisolates(34%).Ontheotherhand,numberofbacterialisolatesproducingproteasewere2.5timesmorethanthefungalisolates...

  8. Short-term impact of blue mussel dredging ( Mytilus edulis L.) on a benthic community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, T.; Christiansen, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The short-term effect of mussel dredging in a brackish Danish sound was studied. A commercial dredging track was identified and an analysis of the species composition inside the track and at an adjacent control area showed that dredging changed the community structure by reducing the density...... of polychaetes. In order to investigate the extent and the duration of the dredging impact experimental dredging was conducted. The experimental dredging removed 50% of the mussels in two dredged areas. Immediately after dredging, a significantly lower number of species was measured inside the mussel beds...... in dredged areas compared to control and boundary areas. This effect lasted for at least 40 days. The analysis of the species composition showed that the dredged area had a significantly lower density, particularly of polychaetes compared to the boundary area. An increased number of species was recorded...

  9. Distribution of major, trace and rare-earth elements in surface sediments of the Wharton Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Higgs, N.C.; Colley, S.; Parthiban, G.

    indicate the presence of sodic feldspars in the clays (Nohara and Kato, 1985 ) or preferential biological removal of Na from seawater by certain calcareous organisms (EI- Wakeel and Riley, 1961 ). In deep-sea sediments, phosphorus is mainly present....C., 1991. The accumalation of barium in marine phytoplankton grown in culture. J. Mar. Res., 49: 339-354. Froelich, P.N., Bender, M.L., Luedtke, N.A., Heath, G.R. and De Vties, T., 1982. The marine phosphorus cycle. Am. J. Sci., 282:474-511. Glasby, G...

  10. Siderophile element concentrations in magnetic spherules from deep sea sediments revealed by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Ken-ichi; Shimamura, Tadashi; Tazawa, Yuji; Yamakoshi, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of deciding the extraterrestrial origin of the magnetic spherules found in deep sea sediments, the siderophile elements Co, Ni, Ir and/or Au etc., were measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Spherules were collected from red clay samples which were dredged from Mid Pacific Ocean. Only spherules which had smooth surfaces and relatively high specific gravities were chosen for analysis. Existence of Co, Ni and Ir in most spherules suggests the possibility of an extraterrestrial origin for these spherules. It is not clear whether these spherules are droplets ablated from iron meteorites entering into the Earth's atmosphere or they are cosmic iron grains themselves. X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that these spherules are the products of rapid cooling materials. (author)

  11. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Sander, S.G.; Jayachandran, S.; Nath, B.N.; Nagaraju, G.; Chennuri, K.; Vudamala, K.; Lathika, N.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.

    concentrations of TOC in the studied sediments reduced the concentrations of Cu associated with organic matter in all the studied sediments. Cu present as residual fraction (Fraction 4, Cures) were within the range of (~ 58-82%) and possibly bound to sulphides... Fraction 2 CuFe Fraction 3 CuCorg Fraction 4 Cures Cu- Feox1 Cu- Feox2 Cu- Femag AAS-61 BC 8 4-10cm 354±6 0.3±1 40.7±3.1 0.3±0.1 58.5±3.2 69.3±4.6 29.7±1.2 1.0±0.2 10-15cm 253±7 0.1±0.1 20.7±2.5 0.0 79.2±5.8 63.0±3.2 33.9±2.2 3...

  12. To what extend the dam dredging can influence the background level of metals in the Rhine River: using chemical and biological long-term monitoring to answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebrun Jérémie D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dredging generates remobilisation of sediments contaminated by non-degradable compounds such as metals, to which aquatic organisms can be exposed. This study aims at assessing the environmental impact of sediments remobilised in the Rhine River (France during the dredging of Marckolsheim dam by pumping/dilution in 2013 on metal speciation and organisms' exposure. The monitoring coupling chemical and biological tools was performed 2 years before dredging operation on 2 sampling sites, upstream and downstream from the discharge of pumping/dilution, to acquire data on the natural variability of labile (DGT as passive samplers, dissolved and particulate concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn in Rhine during full hydrological cycles. In parallel, size-calibrated zebra mussels were transplanted at both sites to monitor continuously metal bioavailability from particulate and dissolved fractions. This long-term monitoring allowed the establishment of reference baselines of Rhine water and mussels' contamination levels and subsequently, the detection of averred environmental changes due to the dredging. Indeed, Co and Mn accumulations in mussels exposed to the discharge were consistent with increasing labile species in Rhine whereas ones of Cr and Pb were likely due to an enhanced particulate bioavailability. Whatever the exposure route, the mussels recovered their basal metal contents 2 weeks after the end of dredging, suggesting a transient impact of sediment remobilisation on bioaccumulation. This long-term monitoring highlights the interest of coupling chemical and biological time-integrated tools for a better assessment of environmental risks because metallic exchanges between organisms and their media are complex and metal-specific.

  13. Anaerobic oxidation of methane at a marine methane seep in a forearc sediment basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSiegert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A cold methane-seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep centre of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of AOM was reflected by 13C depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO2 was confirmed in a 13C-labelling experiment. Methane fuelled a vital microbial and invertebrate community which was reflected in cell numbers of up to 4 x 109 cells cm 3 sediment and 13C depleted guts of crabs populating the seep area. The microbial community was analysed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition – fluorescence in situ hybridisation (CARD-FISH, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. CARD-FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9 and Anaerolineaceae were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible.

  14. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane at a Marine Methane Seep in a Forearc Sediment Basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Teichert, Barbara; Wiedicke, Michael; Schippers, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A cold methane seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep center of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was reflected by (13)C-depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO(2) was confirmed in a (13)C-labeling experiment. Methane fueled a vital microbial community with cell numbers of up to 4 × 10(9) cells cm(-3) sediment. The microbial community was analyzed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CARD-FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9, and Anaerolineaceae) were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM-related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible.

  15. Assessment of the Influence of Dredge Spoil Dumping on the Seafloor Geological Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonas J. Virtasalo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The European Marine Strategy Framework Directive requires the development of suitable indicators for regular reporting on the environmental state and achievement of a good environmental status of EU's marine waters by 2020. The development of indicators for determining seafloor integrity and its possible disturbance by human activities have so far largely ignored the geological properties of seafloor. This paper presents a study of Vuosaari and Uusikaupunki-D offshore dumping sites in Finland, the northern Baltic Sea. Full coverage multibeam bathymetry and relative backscatter data, and a number of sediment cores were collected over the sites. The areas covered by dumped dredge spoil stand out in the multibeam images because of their irregular surface and elevated backscatter. The short gravity cores were studied for lithology, and in 1-cm slices for 137Cs activity, organic content, and grain size distribution. The dumped material is represented in the cores by the gravelly mud lithofacies with massive texture and angular coarse particles. The dumped material is coarser, less sorted and has higher kurtosis compared to natural sediment due to the admixing of blasted rock during the dredging activities, and limited sorting during fall through the water column upon dumping. Dispersed dredge spoil, which was suspended in the water column during the dumping activities or reworked from the dumped material mounds and redistributed along the seafloor soon thereafter, was deposited over a wide area as a thin layer that is not necessarily readily identifiable by visual inspection in the cores. Cesium activity helped distinguish the dumped material from the 137Cs-enriched natural sediments deposited after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. Considering that the dumped material at many of the coring sites in the Vuosaari dumping area is covered by natural sediment, it probably is largely stable. In contrast, dumped material at the shallower Uusikaupunki-D site has

  16. Mussel dredging: Impact on epifauna in Limfjorden, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    Species composition and population density of epibenthos are described in two areas in Limfjorden, Denmark. Both areas covered both a mussel fishing ground and an area that has been permanently closed for mussel dredging since 1988. Furthermore, mussels were dredged in a part of the mussel fishing...... grounds in both areas four months before the investigations. The rest of the fishing grounds had not been exploited for at least four years. This study describes the short-term impact (4 mo) and long-term impact (>4 y) of mussel dredging using the permanently closed areas as controls. The data were...... analyzed by multivariate statistics. In both short-term study areas significant effects of dredging were observed. A number of taxa (sponges, echinoderms, anthozoans, molluscs, crustaceans, and ascidians) had a reduced density or were not observed in fished areas four months after the fishing was ended...

  17. Return to the Strangelove Ocean?: Preliminary results of carbon and oxygenisotope compositions of post-impact sediments, IODP Expedition 364 "Chicxulub Impact Crater"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, K. E.; Ikehara, M.; Hayama, H.; Takiguchi, S.; Masuda, S.; Ogura, C.; Fujita, S.; Kurihara, E.; Matsumoto, T.; Oshio, S.; Ishihata, K.; Fuchizawa, Y.; Noda, H.; Sakurai, U.; Yamane, T.; Morgan, J. V.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Chicxulub crater in the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico was formed by the asteroid impact at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (66.0 Ma). In early 2016 the IODP Exp. 364 successfully drilled the materials from the topographic peak ring within the crater that was previously identified by seismological observations. A continuous core was recovered. The 112m-thick uppermost part of the continuous core (505.7-1334.7 mbsf) is post-impact sediments, including the PETM, that are mainly composed of carbonate with intercalation of siliciclastics and variable contents of organic carbon. More than 300 samples from the post-impact section were finely powdered for a variety of geochemical analysis. Here we report their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate fraction (mostly in the lower part of the analyzed section) and carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of organic matter (mostly in the middle-upper part of the analyzed section). Isotope mass spectrometer Isoprime was used for the former analysis, and EA-irMS (elemental analyzer - isotope ratio mass spectrometer) was used for the latter analysis, both at CMCR, Kochi Univ. Depth profile of oxygen isotope compositions of carbonate fraction is variable and somewhat similar to those of Zachos et al. (2001; Science). Carbon isotope compositions of carbonate and organic carbon in the lower part of the analyzed section exhibit some excursions that could correspond to the hyperthemals in the early Paleogene. Their variable nitrogen isotope compositions reflect temporal changes in the style of biogeochemical cycles involving denitrification and nitrogen fixation. Coupled temporal changes in the carbon isotope compositions of organic and carbonate carbon immediately after the K-Pg boundary might support a Strangelove ocean (Kump, 1991; Geology), however high export production (Ba/Ti, nannoplankton and calcisphere blooms, high planktic foram richness, and diverse and abundant micro- and macrobenthic organisms

  18. High-resolution magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic study of Ethiopian traps-related products in Oligocene sediments from the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Yannick; Rochette, Pierre; Aubry, Marie Pierre; Michard, Annie

    2003-02-01

    Volcanic traps correspond typically to aerial emissions of more than 10 6 km 3 of magma over 1 Myr periods. The potential global impact of such emissions makes the precise correlation of traps with the global magnetobiochronologic timescale an important task. Our study is focused on the Ethiopian traps which correspond to the birth of the Afar hotspot at the triple junction between the Red Sea, Aden Gulf and East-African rift. The Ethiopian traps have a significant acidic component (about 10% of the traps by volume) which enables more efficient stratospheric aerosol diffusion than for the main basaltic eruptions. Furthermore, a magnetostratigraphy is well established for the traps: traps activity began in Chron C11r.2r and ended in Chron C11r.1r or C10r, with well clustered 40Ar/ 39Ar ages at 30±0.5 Ma. Four tephra layers, marked by prominent magnetic susceptibility peaks, occur in Oligocene sections of sites from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 115, drilled in the southern Indian Ocean near Madingley Rise, 2600 km away from the Ethiopian traps. In order to demonstrate that these tephra layers are related to the Ethiopian traps, a high-resolution study of sites 709 and 711 was undertaken, involving magnetostratigraphy and nannofossil stratigraphy, together with isotopic and geochemical characterization of the tephra. Geochemical analyses and isotope ratios of the glass shards indicate the same acid continental source for these tephras which is compatible with the Ethiopian signature. Moreover, Hole 711A provides a reliable magnetostratigraphy for the Oligocene (Chrons 13-9). The tephra layers occur in the interval spanning Chrons C11n.2n-C11n.1n which agrees with the positions of acidic layers in the traps. Calcareous nannofossil stratigraphy confirms the magnetostratigraphic interpretation, with the NP23/24 zonal boundary occurring within the interval containing the tephra layers. Hole 709B supports the results from Hole 711A. Thus, the Ethiopian traps can be

  19. Pleistocene Arid and Wet Climatic Variability: Imprint of Glacial Climate, Tectonics and Oceanographic Events in the Sediments of the se Indian Ocean, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, C. M.; Castaneda, J.; Kominz, M. A.; Gallagher, S. J.; Gurnis, M.; Ishiwa, T.; Mamo, B. L.; Henderiks, J.; Christensen, B. A.; Groeneveld, J.; Yokoyama, Y.; Mustaque, S.; Iqbal, F.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction between the evolving tectonic configuration of the Indo Pacific region as a result of the northward migration of the Australian continent, and its collision with the Banda Arc began in the Late Miocene ( 8 Ma ago). This constriction played an important role in the diversion of the Indonesian Throughflow and initiation of the Leeuwin Current. These events coupled to Pleistocene glaciations left a significant imprint in the sediments offshore western Australia. The International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 356 drilled in shelf depths of the Carnarvon and Perth Basins recovering a thick section of Pleistocene sediment from Sites U1461 (440 m thick) and U1460 (306 m), respectively. Analyses of the lithology (logs, grain size), chemistry (X-ray elemental analyses) and an initial age model constructed from biostratigraphy and radiocarbon ages were interpreted within the framework of multichannel seismic profiles. Radiocarbon ages provide control for MIS 1-4, and the identification of glacial cycles is based on shipboard biostratigraphy best developed for Site U1460. Arid and high productivity signals are linked with glacial stages. Wet conditions are associated with river discharge, terrigenous sediments and linked with interglacial stages. Except for one very pronounced interval the productivity signal during interglacials is low. High productivity during glacial stages is related to upwelling linked to the southward flowing Leeuwin Current. Comparison of the northernmost (U1461) with southernmost (U1460) sites reveals a strong arid and wet climatic variability beginning in the Pleistocene. This variability is most pronounced in the late Pleistocene post 0.8-1.0 Ma and can be correlated with glacial-interglacial cycles, especially in the more humid southern Site that was closer to the Subantarctic Front and influenced by the Westerlies. In Site U1461 we recovered the 135m thick Gorgon slide. Its occurrence at 1 Ma coincides with a rapid tectonic

  20. Nineteen-year time-series sediment trap study of Coccolithus pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi (calcareous nannoplankton) fluxes in the Bering Sea and subarctic Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hideto; Takahashi, Kozo; Asahi, Hirofumi; Jordan, Richard W.; Nishida, Shiro; Nishiwaki, Niichi; Yamamoto, Sumito

    2016-03-01

    Coccolithophore fluxes at two sediment trap stations, Station AB in the Bering Sea and Station SA in the subarctic Pacific Ocean, were studied over a nineteen-year (August 1990-July 2009) interval. Two major species, Coccolithus pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi, occur at both stations, with Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Umbilicosphaera sibogae, Braarudosphaera bigelowii, and Syracosphaera spp. as minor components. The mean coccolithophore fluxes at Stations AB and SA increased from 28.9×106 m2 d-1 and 61.9×106 m2 d-1 in 1990-1999 to 54.4×106 m2 d-1 and 130.2×106 m2 d-1 in 2002-2009, respectively. Furthermore, in late 1999 to early 2000, there was a significant shift in the most dominant species from E. huxleyi to C. pelagicus. High abundances of E. huxleyi correspond to the positive mode of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), while those of C. pelagicus respond to the PDO negative mode and are related to water temperature changes at huxleyi. At both stations the mean seawater temperature in the top 45 m from August to October increased ca. 1 °C with linear recurrence from 1990 to 2008. The coccosphere fluxes after Year 2000 at Stations AB and SA, and the shift in species dominance, may have been influenced by this warming.

  1. Water quality of a coastal Louisiana swamp and how dredging is undermining restoration efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Robert R.; Huang, Haosheng; Day, John W.; Justic, Dubravko; DeLaune, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    The Bayou Boeuf Basin (BBB), a sub-basin of the Barataria Basin estuary in coastal Louisiana, consists of forested and floating wetlands receiving drainage from surrounding agricultural fields and urban watersheds. We characterized surface water quality in the BBB, and determined through hydrologic modeling if a series of levee breaks along major drainage channels would significantly improve water quality by allowing flow into surrounding wetlands. Surface water monitoring found surrounding sugarcane farm fields to be major sources of nutrient and sediment loading. Hydrological modeling indicated that levee breaks would increase N reduction from the current 21.4% to only 29.2%, which is much lower than the anticipated 90-100% removal rate. This was due to several factors, one them being dredging of main drainage channels to such a degree that water levels do not rise much above the surrounding wetland elevation even during severe storms, so only a very small fraction of the stormwater carried in the channel is exposed to wetlands. These unexpected results provide insight into an undoubtedly pervasive problem in human dominated wetland systems; that of decreased flooding during storm events due to channel deepening by dredging activities. Additional water quality management practices should be implemented at the farm field level, prior to water entering major drainage canals.

  2. Combined environmental stress from shrimp farm and dredging releases in a subtropical coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Mohedano, J G; Páez-Osuna, F; Amezcua-Martínez, F; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Ramírez-Reséndiz, G; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2016-03-15

    Nutrient pollution causes environmental damages on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Eutrophication produces impacts in coastal ecosystems, affecting biota and ecosystem services. The Urias coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California) is a sub-tropical estuary under several environmental pressures such as nutrient inputs from shrimp farm effluents and dredging related to port operations, which can release substances accumulated in sediments. We assessed the water quality impacts caused by these activities and results showed that i) nitrogen was the limiting nutrient, ii) shrimp farm effluents increased particulate organic matter and chlorophyll a in the receiving stations, and iii) dredging activities increased nitrite and reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations. The co-occurrence of the shrimp farm releases and dredging activities was likely the cause of a negative synergistic effect on water quality which mainly decreases dissolved oxygen and increases nitrite concentrations. Coastal zone management should avoid the co-occurrence of these, and likely others, stressors in coastal ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Flotation of PAH contaminated dredged sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulleneers, H.; Roubroeks, S.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.; Koopal, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    The applicability of dissolved air flotation to remediate contaminated sediments of "Overschie" (Rotterdam) and "Petrol Harbor" (Amsterdam) is studied. Several flotation reagents (Diesel Fuel, Montanol, Aerophine, Aerofroth) are applied to enhance the flotation efficiency. The physical chemical

  4. Biodiesel production from sediments of a eutrophic reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchkina, A.Yu.; Gladyshev, M.I.; Sushchik, N.N.; Kravchuk, E.S.; Kalachova, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from eutrophic reservoir Bugach (Siberia, Russia) were tested for possibility to produce biodiesel. We supposed that the sediments could be a promising biodiesel producer. The major reason of high price of biodiesel fuel is cost of a raw material. The use of dredging sediments for biodiesel production reduces production costs, because the dredging sediments are by-products which originated during lake restoration actions, and are free of cost raw materials. Lipid content in sediments was 0.24% of dry weight. To assess the potential of from sediments as a substitute of diesel fuel, the properties of the biodiesel such as cetane number, iodine number and heat of combustion were calculated. All of this parameters complied with limits established by EN 14214 and EN 14213 related to biodiesel quality. -- Highlights: → Dredging sediments were considered as a new feedstock for biodiesel production. → Lipid and fatty acid content in the sediments were determined. → Main properties of the biodiesel were calculated basing on fatty acid composition. → The properties well complied with limits established in biodiesel standards.

  5. Inverse Relationship of Marine Aerosol and Dust in Antarctic Ice with Fine-Grained Sediment in the South Atlantic Ocean: Implications for Sea-Ice Coverage and Wind Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Kanfoush

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to test the hypothesis that natural gamma radiation (NGR from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1094, which displays variability over the last glacial-interglacial cycle similar to dust in the Vostok ice core, reflects fine-grained terrigenous sediment delivered by eolian processes. Grain size was measured on 400 samples spanning 0–20 m in a composite core. Accumulation of the <63μ size fraction at Site 1094 and dust in Vostok exhibit a negative correlation, suggesting the fine sediments are not dominantly eolian. However the technique used for grain size measurements cannot distinguish between terrigenous and biogenous materials; therefore it is possible much fine-grained material is diatoms. An inverse correlation between fine sediments and NGR supports this interpretation, and implies terrigenous materials were at times diluted by microfossils from high biological productivity. Fine marine sediments correlate positively with temperature and negatively with marine aerosol Na+ in Vostok. One plausible explanation is extensive sea-ice of cold intervals steepened ocean-continent temperature gradients, intensified winds, and led to increased transport of dust and marine aerosol to Antarctica yet also reduced biological productivity at Site 1094. Such a reduction despite increases in NGR, potentially representing Fe-rich dust influx, would require light limitation or stratification associated with sea-ice.

  6. Sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Lester J. McKee,

    2013-01-01

    The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal-estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The Golden Gate strait is the sole inlet connecting the Bay to the Pacific Ocean, and serves as the conduit for a tidal flow of ~ 8 x 109 m3/day, in addition to the transport of mud, sand, biogenic material, nutrients, and pollutants. Despite this physical, biological and chemical connection, resource management and prior research have often treated the Delta, Bay and adjacent ocean as separate entities, compartmentalized by artificial geographic or political boundaries. The body of work herein presents a comprehensive analysis of system-wide behavior, extending a rich heritage of sediment transport research that dates back to the groundbreaking hydraulic mining-impact research of G.K. Gilbert in the early 20th century.

  7. Predicting dredging-associated effects to coral reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam - Part 2: Potential coral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah Shafer; McManus, John; Richmond, Robert H; King, David B; Gailani, Joe Z; Lackey, Tahirih C; Bryant, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs are in decline worldwide due to anthropogenic stressors including reductions in water and substratum quality. Dredging results in the mobilization of sediments, which can stress and kill corals via increasing turbidity, tissue damage and burial. The Particle Tracking Model (PTM) was applied to predict the potential impacts of dredging-associated sediment exposure on the coral reef ecosystems of Apra Harbor, Guam. The data were interpreted using maps of bathymetry and coral abundance and distribution in conjunction with impact parameters of suspended sediment concentration (turbidity) and sedimentation using defined coral response thresholds. The results are presented using a "stoplight" model of negligible or limited impacts to coral reefs (green), moderate stress from which some corals would be expected to recover while others would not (yellow) and severe stress resulting in mortality (red). The red conditions for sediment deposition rate and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were defined as values exceeding 25 mg cm(-2) d(-1) over any 30 day window and >20 mg/l for any 18 days in any 90 day period over a column of water greater than 2 m, respectively. The yellow conditions were defined as values >10 mg cm(-2) d(-1) and <25 mg cm(-2) d(-1) over any 30 day period, and as 20% of 3 months' concentration exceeding 10 mg/l for the deposition and SSC, respectively. The model also incorporates the potential for cumulative effects on the assumption that even sub-lethal stress levels can ultimately lead to mortality in a multi-stressor system. This modeling approach can be applied by resource managers and regulatory agencies to support management decisions related to planning, site selection, damage reduction, and compensatory mitigation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Design improvements in box dredges to enhance the collection of manganese nodules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernando, V.; Sonawane, A.V.

    Design of three box dredges along with the technique and modifications effected to anable bulk sampling of manganese nodules is presented. Incorporation of a sled, angled cutting edges, retention plates and increased size of the dredge resulted...

  9. Climate Change on Discharge and Sedimentation of River Awara, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipa O. Idogho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of variation in effect of climate change on discharges and sedimentation mechanism of River Awara is investigated using 14-year data of rainfall (mm, discharges (m 3 /s, temperature ( 0 c and sediment load (t. Surface runoff (mm was computed using Water Balance Equation and some other empirical iteration based on the observed rainfall and temperature over a period of time. Analysis of Paired Sample reveals the relationship between tested hydrological variables: Rainfall-Runoff; Runoff-Sediment load; and DischargeSediment load are significant at 0.95 level of confidence interval. Logarithm calibration curve further illustrates that Rainfall-Runoff and Runoff-Sediment have coefficient values (R 2 of 0.996 and 0.822 respectively. Analytical iteration shows that the intensity and duration of precipitation determine the magnitude of river, generation of surface runoff and sedimentation rate. Increase in rainfall depth by 100 mm within the 14-year has resulted to serious erodobility and erositivity around River Awara. Cumulative average sediment load ratio of 0.46 has significantly reduced the reservoir capacity of the river by 10%. 78% of total annual surface runoff is lost to ocean; since reservoir capacity has been silted up which in turns reduces the volume of water that could be held for storage, treatment and distribution for its intended purposes. Comparative physics-based output indicates that temperature increase of 0.7 0 c between 1997 and 2004, due to internal processes of the Earth and some human activities. It is however projected that temperature will rise by 0.9 0 c by the end of 2015. Projected rise in temperature will adversely affect hydrological cycle and complicate already scarce-water resources due to intensive evapotranspiration, infiltration and reduction in stream flow. Holistic integration using bottom-up mechanism needs to be applied to address this constraint. Dredging of river Awara is very important to enhance

  10. Iceberg and meltwater discharge events in the western Arctic Ocean since MIS 5: a comparison of sediment cores off the East Siberian and Chukchi margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W.; Wang, R.; Zhang, T.; Duan, X.; Polyak, L.

    2017-12-01

    In the Pleistocene the western Arctic Ocean was affected by deglacial discharge events from ice sheets in northern North America as well as the East Siberian and Chukchi margins. Distribution of Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) >250 μm and planktonic foraminiferal N. pachyderma (sin.) (Nps) δ18O and δ13C was compared in CHINARE sediment cores ARC2-M03 (Wang et al., 2013) and ARC3-P37 from the Chukchi Abyssal Plain and Northwind Ridge, respectively, to identify the impacts of icebergs and meltwater on paleoceanographic environments since MIS 5. The IRD is mainly composed of quartz grains and fragments of clastic rocks and detrital carbonates. The carbonates, mostly dolomites characteristic of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) provenance, typically anti-correlate with quartz and clastic rocks, indicating different sources such as Chukchi-Alaskan or East Siberian margin. Most of the Nps δ18O depletions correspond to peaks in detrital carbonates, suggesting a strong influence of meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) on the western Arctic Ocean. A conspicuous dark gray interval interpreted to represent glacial/deglacial environments of MIS 4/3 age, shows a remarkable depletion in Nps δ13C along with high δ18O values and absence of IRD. This unusual signature may be related to a persistent sea-ice cover and/or high fluxes of terrigenous material with deglacial debris flows. In a younger grey interval corresponding to MIS2, high abundances of quartz and clastic rocks in the Northwind Ridge core ARC3-P37 indicate iceberg discharge from areas other than CAA, such as the Mackenzie LIS lobe or Chukchi-Alaskan margin. The MIS2-Holocene transition is marked by an increase in detrital carbonates co-occurring with Nps δ13C and δ18O depletion (Polyak et al., 2007), indicative of LIS iceberg/meltwater fluxes from the CAA. We note that stable-isotope events in the study area may go unnoticed because of gaps in foraminiferal records related to dissolution and/or adverse

  11. Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of suspended sediment at the mouth of the Amazon river: The role of continental and oceanic forcing, and implications for coastal geomorphology and mud bank formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensac, Erwan; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Vantrepotte, Vincent; Anthony, Edward J.

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained sediments supplied to the Ocean by the Amazon River and their transport under the influence of continental and oceanic forcing drives the geomorphic change along the 1500 km-long coast northward to the Orinoco River delta. The aim of this study is to give an encompassing view of the sediment dynamics in the shallow coastal waters from the Amazon River mouth to the Capes region (northern part of the Amapa region of Brazil and eastern part of French Guiana), where large mud banks are formed. Mud banks are the overarching features in the dynamics of the Amazon-Orinoco coast. They start migrating northward in the Capes region. Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentrations were calculated from satellite products (MODIS Aqua and Terra) acquired over the period 2000-2013. The Census-X11 decomposition method used to discriminate short-term, seasonal and long-term time components of the SPM variability has rendered possible a robust analysis of the impact of continental and oceanic forcing. Continental forcing agents considered are the Amazon River water discharge, SPM concentration and sediment discharge. Oceanic forcing comprises modelled data of wind speed and direction, wave height and direction, and currents. A 150 km-long area of accretion is detected at Cabo Norte that may be linked with a reported increase in the river's sediment discharge concurrent with the satellite data study period. We also assess the rate of mud bank migration north of Cabo Norte, and highlight its variability. Although we confirm a 2 km y-1 migration rate, in agreement with other authors, we show that this velocity may be up to 5 km y-1 along the Cabo Orange region, and we highlight the effect of water discharge by major rivers debouching on this coastal mud belt in modulating such rates. Finally, we propose a refined sediment transport pattern map of the region based on our results and of previous studies in the area such as the AMASSEDS programme, and discuss the

  12. Estimation of seafloor impact from demersal trawls, seines and dredges based on gear design and dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Bastardie, Francois; Breen, Michael

    a different approach using the gear itself (design and dimensions) for understanding and estimation of the physical interactions with the seafloor at the individual fishing operation level. With reference to the métier groupings of EU logbooks, we defined 17 distinct towed gear groups in European waters (11...... otter trawl groups, 3 beam trawl groups, 2 demersal seine groups, and 1 dredge group), for which we established seafloor “footprints”. The footprint of a gear was defined as the relative contribution from individual larger gear components, such as the trawl doors, sweeps and ground gear, to the total...... types based on a review of the scientific literature. For each defined gear group a vessel-size (kW or total length) – gear size (total gear width or circumference) relationship was estimated to enable the prediction of gear footprint area and sediment penetration from vessel size. The implications...

  13. Estimating seabed pressure from demersal trawls, seines, and dredges based on gear design and dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Bastardie, Francois; Breen, Mike

    2016-01-01

    such as logbook data. Here, we take a different approach starting from the gear itself (design and dimensions) to estimate the physical interactions with the seabed at the level of the individual fishing operation. We defined 14 distinct towed gear groups in European waters (eight otter trawl groups, three beam...... trawl groups, two demersal seine groups, and one dredge group), for which we established gear “footprints”. The footprint of a gear is defined as the relative contribution from individual larger gear components, such as trawl doors, sweeps, and groundgear, to the total area and severity of the gear...... to enable the prediction of gear footprint area and sediment penetration from vessel size. Application of these relationships with average vessel sizes and towing speeds provided hourly swept-area estimates by métier. Scottish seining has the largest overall gear footprint of ∼1.6 km2 h−1 of which 0.08 km2...

  14. Paleoclimate of Quaternary Costa Rica: Analysis of Sediment from ODP Site 1242 in the Eastern Tropical Pacific to Explore the Behavior of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Oceanic Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, C. R.; Joseph, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of grain size, magnetic fabric, and terrigenous mass accumulation rates (MAR) on oceanic sediment can provide insights into climatic conditions present at or near the time of deposition by helping to delineate changes in rainfall and oceanic circulation intensities. The fairly homogenous hemipelagic nannofossil clays and clayey nannofossil oozes collected in the upper portion of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1242 provide a 1.4 million year sediment record from the Cocos Ridge, in relatively shallow waters of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, off the coast of present day Central and South America. Information about shifts in rainfall and oceanic circulation provided by this study may be helpful in understanding changes in the location and behavior of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and/or other climatic factors, in this area during the Pleistocene and Holocene Epochs. Approximately 130 paired side-by-side samples were selected at approximately evenly spaced intervals throughout the uppermost 190 mcd of the core. To obtain terrigenous grain size and MARs, one set of sediment samples was subject to a five-step chemical extraction process to dissolve any oxy-hydroxy coatings, remove the biogenic carbonate and silicate components, and sieve out grains larger than 63 µm. The pre- and post-extraction weights were compared to calculate a terrigenous weight percent (%) from which the terrigenous MAR values were then calculated, with the use of linear sediment rates and dry bulk density measurements determined from shipboard ODP 1242 analyses. Magnetic fabric, or anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), was analyzed on a KLY4S-Kappabridge using the second set of samples taken in pmag cubes. Terrigenous MAR values range between 3.1 and 10.9 g/cm2/kyr, while P' (AMS) values range between 1.004 and 1.04 SI. A distinctive trend is noted in both factors, with both exhibiting relatively high initial values that then decrease from the beginning of the

  15. Sedimentation problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Roseires Dam and reservoir are located in Sudan, Africa on the Blue Nile River. The hydropower from the reservoir provides approximately 80% of the power used in Sudan, thus having a tremendous economic impact on the country. The reservoir was first impounded in 1966 and has been filled annually since then. The Blue Nile has historically been known to carry heavy sediment loads which is associated with erosion from overgrazing in Ethiopia, the Blue Nile's headwaters. During the flood season, the dam's turbine intakes become blocked with debris and sediment. After a severe blockage in 1981, which prevented hydropower generation for several days, consultants from USAID were asked to make recommendations on reducing the sediment and debris impacts on reservoir operations. This led to debris clearing and dredging equipment acquisitions in 1982. In 1988, blockage occurred again during the flood season. This writer was asked by the World Bank to travel to Sudan, investigate the sediment and debris problems, examine the USAID recommendations, comment on potential sediment and debris problems associated with a proposed plan to raise the dam, make additional recommendations, and return to Sudan several times to determine the effectiveness of there recommendations. This paper discussed the results of the aforementioned activities and describes the new recommendations made by this writer

  16. Sediment transport investigations in Hugli estuary using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.; Pant, H.J.; Kulkarni, U.P.; Pendharkar, A.S.; Chakraborty, Kalyan; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chaudhuri, Bikas

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes sediment transport investigations carried out at two different locations in Hugli estuary along the shipping channel leading to Haldia Dock Complex of the Kolkata Port Trust, Kolkata. The objectives of these investigations were to evaluate the suitability of the proposed dumping sites for optimizing the dredging operation and implementing the recommendations of the River Regulatory Measures, Kolkata Port Trust, Kolkata

  17. [Startup mechanism of moxibustion warming and dredging function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kaiyu; Liang, Shuang; Sun, Zheng; Zhang, Jianbin

    2017-09-12

    With "moxibustion" and "warm stimulation" as the keywords, the literature on moxibustion mechanism of warming and dredging from June 1st, 1995 to June 1st, 2016 was collected from PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang database. The startup mechanism of moxibustion warming and dredging function was analyzed in terms of moxibustion warming stimulation. The results were found that moxibustion was based on local rising temperature of acupoint. It activated local specific receptors, heat sensitive immune cells, heat shock proteins and so on to start the warming and dredging function and produce various local effects. The warming stimulation signals as well as subsequent effects through nerve and body fluid pathways induced the effects of further specific target organs and body systems.

  18. Sediment Management Methods to Reduce Dredging: Part 2, Sediment Collector Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    screen. Advantages of the closed cycle include minimal impingement velocity (reducing potential for clogging) on the hopper screen, reduced risk of...opportunity to take advantage of flexibility in siting, by helping to address issues with property ownership, road access, material handling and...technical note are not to be used for advertising , publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such products.

  19. Upper Triassic spongiomorph and coral association dredged off the northwestern Australian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, G. D.

    Upper Triassic corals and spongiomorphs dredged during BMR Cruise 95 from the Rowley Terrace, offshore Canning Basin of northwestern Australia, indicate possible new occurrences of reef facies. These are comparable to counterparts known from the Norhtern Limestone Alps of central Europe. A branching spongiomorph, represented by the genus Spongiomorpha sp. and two coral taxa, Pamiroseris rectilamellosa (Winkler) and Retiophyllia tellae (Stoppani), are reported herein. Collectively, these fossils indicate a Late Triassic (Noria-Rhaetian) age. Although different in taxonomic composition, the fauna compares with one previously reported from a Late Triassic Ocean Drilling Project reef site (site 764) on the Wombat Plateau, some 350 km to the west. The Rowley Terrace occurrences may represent an eastward extension of the Wombat reefs, developed along the rifted margin of Gondwana.

  20. 75 FR 19311 - Ocean Dumping; Guam Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... not all suitable materials can be re-used or stockpiled for future use given costs, logistical... not expected with regard to vessel safety and operational costs. The lack of impact is expected... reporting and record-keeping burden on the regulated community, as well as to minimize the cost of Federal...

  1. 78 FR 37759 - Ocean Dumping; Atchafalaya-West Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ....regulations.gov or email. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA... docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The proposed rule and draft EIS may both be obtained via the Internet...

  2. Mrica Reservoir Sedimentation: Current Situation and Future Necessary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji Utomo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mrica Reservoir is one of many reservoirs located in Central Java that experienced a considerably high sedimentation during the last ten years. This condition has caused a rapid decrease in reservoir capacity. Various countermeasures have been introduced to reduce the rate of the reservoir sedimentation through catchment management and reservoir operation by means of flushing and/or dredging. However, the sedimentation remains intensive so that the fulfillment of water demand for electrical power generation was seriously affected. This paper presents the results of evaluation on the dynamics of the purpose of this research is to evaluate the sediment balance of the Mrica Reservoir based on two different scenarios, i.e. the existing condition and another certain type of reservoir management. The study on sediment balance was carried out by estimating the sediment inflow applying sheet erosion method in combination with the analysis of sediment rating curve. The measurement of the deposited sediment rate in the reservoir was conducted through the periodic echo sounding, whereas identification of the number of sediment that has been released from the reservoir was carried out through the observation on both flushing and dredging activities. The results show that during the last decade, the rate of the sediment inflow was approximately 5.869 MCM/year, whereas the released sediment from the reservoir was 4.097 MCM/year. In order to maintain the reservoir capacity, therefore, at least 1.772 MCM/year should be released from the reservoir by means of either flushing or dredging. Sedimentation management may prolong the reservoir’s service life to exceed the design life. Without sediment management, the lifetime of the reservoir would have finished by 2016, whereas with the proper management the lifetime may be extended to 2025.

  3. Early Paleogene variations in the calcite compensation depth : New constraints using old borehole sediments from across Ninetyeast Ridge, central Indian Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Lauretano, V.; Backman, J.; Dickens, G. R.; Sluijs, A.; Lourens, L.

    2015-01-01

    Major variations in global carbon cycling occurred between 62 and 48 Ma, and these very likely related to changes in the total carbon inventory of the ocean-atmosphere system. Based on carbon cycle theory, variations in the mass of the ocean carbon should be reflected in contemporaneous global ocean

  4. Radiotracer investigations for sediment transport in ports of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Goswami, Sunil; Singh, Gursharan

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of mixing and transport of sediments in coastal region is of vital importance for evaluating suitability of dumping site for dredged sediments produced during maintenance of shipping channels, expansion of existing projects and construction of new projects. Gamma-emitting radiotracers are commonly used for investigation of movement of sediments on seabed using Scandium-46 (scandium glass powder) as radiotracer. The radiotracer is injected on seabed at a desired location and its movement followed over a period of time using waterproof NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. The recorded data is analyzed to obtain transport parameters and utilized for assessing the suitability of the dumping sites and optimization of the dredging operations. About 70 large-scale investigations have been carried out in different ports in India leading to significant economical benefits to the Ports. Present paper discusses various aspects of the radiotracer technique for sediment transport, methodology of data analysis and a specific case study. (author)

  5. Sediment tolerance mechanisms identified in sponges using advanced imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Strehlow

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial runoff, resuspension events and dredging can affect filter-feeding sponges by elevating the concentration of suspended sediments, reducing light intensity, and smothering sponges with sediments. To investigate how sponges respond to pressures associated with increased sediment loads, the abundant and widely distributed Indo-Pacific species Ianthella basta was exposed to elevated suspended sediment concentrations, sediment deposition, and light attenuation for 48 h (acute exposure and 4 weeks (chronic exposure. In order to visualise the response mechanisms, sponge tissue was examined by 3D X-ray microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Acute exposures resulted in sediment rapidly accumulating in the aquiferous system of I. basta, although this sediment was fully removed within three days. Sediment removal took longer (>2 weeks following chronic exposures, and I. basta also exhibited tissue regression and a smaller aquiferous system. The application of advanced imaging approaches revealed that I. basta employs a multilevel system for sediment rejection and elimination, containing both active and passive components. Sponges responded to sediment stress through (i mucus production, (ii exclusion of particles by incurrent pores, (iii closure of oscula and pumping cessation, (iv expulsion of particles from the aquiferous system, and (v tissue regression to reduce the volume of the aquiferous system, thereby entering a dormant state. These mechanisms would result in tolerance and resilience to exposure to variable and high sediment loads associated with both anthropogenic impacts like dredging programs and natural pressures like flood events.

  6. Study of the geochemistry of the cosmogenic isotope {sup 10}Be and the stable isotope {sup 9}Be in oceanic environment. Application to marine sediment dating; Etude de la geochimie de l`isotope cosmogenique {sup 10}Be et de son isotope stable {sup 9}Be en milieu oceanique. Application a la datation des sediments marins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourles, D

    1988-01-01

    The radioisotope {sup 10}Be is formed by spallation reactions in the atmosphere. It is transferred to the oceans in soluble form by precipitation and dry deposition. The stable isotope {sup 9}Be comes from erosion of soils and rocks in the Earth`s crust. It is transported by wind and rivers and introduced to the oceans probably in both soluble and insoluble form. {sup 9}Be was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and {sup 10}Be by A.M.S. The distribution of {sup 10}Be and {sup 9}Be between each phase extracted and the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios associated were studied in recent marine sediments from Atlantic, Pacific, Indian oceans and Mediterranean sea. The results show that for beryllium the two essential constituent phases of marine sediments are: - the authigenic phase incorporates the soluble beryllium and the detritic phase. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio associated with the authigenic fraction varies with location. This suggests that the residence time of beryllium in the soluble phase is lower or comparable to the mixing time of the oceans. The evolution with time of the authigenic {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio is discussed.

  7. Impact on a fish assemblage of the maintenance dredging of a navigation channel in a tropical coastal ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demarques Ribeiro da Silva Junior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dredging and dredge-spoil disposal are among the major problems in coastal management. Many of the scientific contributions concerning the impacts of this practice are based on the study of sessile organisms and subtropical environments. We evaluated changes in the composition and abundance of a fish assemblage resulting from dredging and sediment disposal at the mouth and in the adjacent waters of the Caravelas River on the north-eastern coast of Brazil. Samples were collected in two directly impacted and three adjacent areas. Differences among stations were not significant, but the dredged site had the least diverse station, as expected. The stations farthest from the directly impacted areas apparently were not influenced by the coastal work, thus suggesting localised effects. The contribution of the present study is particularly important because of the study area's proximity to others that have high conservation value such as mangrove forests and coral reefs, and the relevance of the subject given the continuing dredging activity.A dragagem e descarte de sedimento se destacam como atividades que geram grandes distúrbios aos ecossistemas marinhos e, consequentemente tornam-se um desafio ao manejo e ordenamento costeiro. Grande parte dos estudos que abordam seus impactos é baseada em pesquisas com organismos sésseis e em ambientes temperados, criando uma lacuna no entendimento de seus efeitos sobre a ictiofauna, principalmente nas regiões tropicais. No presente estudo foram avaliadas as alterações na composição e abundância da comunidade de peixes sob influência da dragagem e descarte de sedimento na foz do Rio Caravelas, costa da região Nordeste do Brasil. As amostras foram obtidas em duas estações diretamente afetadas e em três outras áreas adjacentes. Não houve diferença significativa na diversidade média obtida para cada estação, porém a estação correspondente à área dragada apresentou o menor valor dentre as

  8. Settling characteristics of fine-grained sediments used in Louisiana coastal land building and restoration projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose Hajra, M.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal property development, sea level rise, geologic subsidence, loss of barrier islands, increasing number and intensity of coastal storms and other factors have resulted in water quality degradation, wetlands loss, reduced storm and surge protection, ground settlement, and other challenges in coastal areas throughout the world. One of the goals towards reestablishing a healthy coastal ecosystem is to rebuild wetlands with river diversion or sediment conveyance projects that optimally manage and allocate sediments, minimally impact native flora and fauna, and positively affect the water quality. Engineering properties and material characteristics of the dredged material and foundation soils are input parameters in several mathematical models used to predict the long term behavior of the dredged material and foundation soil. Therefore, proper characterization of the dredged material and foundation soils is of utmost importance in the correct design of a coastal restoration and land reclamation project. The sedimentation and consolidation characteristics of the dredged material as well as their effects on the time rate of settlement of the suspended solid particles and underlying foundation soil depend, among other factors, on the (a) grain size distribution of the dredged material, (b) salinity (fresh, brackish, or saltwater environment) of the composite slurry, and (c) concentration of the solid particles in the slurry. This paper will present the results from column settling tests and self-weight consolidation tests performed on dredged samples obtained from actual restoration projects in Louisiana. The effects of salinity, grain size distribution, and initial particle concentration on the sedimentation and consolidation parameters of the dredged material will also be discussed.

  9. Long-term vegetation, climate and ocean dynamics inferred from a 73,500 years old marine sediment core (GeoB2107-3) off southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fang; Zonneveld, Karin A. F.; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Arz, Helge W.; Pätzold, Jürgen; Behling, Hermann

    2017-09-01

    Long-term changes in vegetation and climate of southern Brazil, as well as ocean dynamics of the adjacent South Atlantic, were studied by analyses of pollen, spores and organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) in marine sediment core GeoB2107-3 collected offshore southern Brazil covering the last 73.5 cal kyr BP. The pollen record indicates that grasslands were much more frequent in the landscapes of southern Brazil during the last glacial period if compared to the late Holocene, reflecting relatively colder and/or less humid climatic conditions. Patches of forest occurred in the lowlands and probably also on the exposed continental shelf that was mainly covered by salt marshes. Interestingly, drought-susceptible Araucaria trees were frequent in the highlands (with a similar abundance as during the late Holocene) until 65 cal kyr BP, but were rare during the following glacial period. Atlantic rainforest was present in the northern lowlands of southern Brazil during the recorded last glacial period, but was strongly reduced from 38.5 until 13.0 cal kyr BP. The reduction was probably controlled by colder and/or less humid climatic conditions. Atlantic rainforest expanded to the south since the Lateglacial period, while Araucaria forests advanced in the highlands only during the late Holocene. Dinocysts data indicate that the Brazil Current (BC) with its warm, salty and nutrient-poor waters influenced the study area throughout the investigated period. However, variations in the proportion of dinocyst taxa indicating an eutrophic environment reflect the input of nutrients transported mainly by the Brazilian Coastal Current (BCC) and partly discharged by the Rio Itajaí (the major river closest to the core site). This was strongly related to changes in sea level. A stronger influence of the BCC with nutrient rich waters occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 and in particular during the late MIS 3 and MIS 2 under low sea level. Evidence of Nothofagus pollen

  10. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. General Decisionmaking Framework for Management of Dredged Material: Example Application to Commencement Bay, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Figure 4) and was used to predict surface runoff water quality from dredged material as part of the CE/EPA FVP ( Westerdahl and Skogerboe 1981; Lee and...Sedimrnts," Miscellaneous Paper D-83-1, US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Westerdahl , H. E., and Skogerboe, J. G. 1981

  11. Utilisation of Sepidrud dam basin sediments in fired clay bricks: laboratory scale experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshidi-Chenari, R.; Rabanifar, H.; Veiseh, S.

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing disposal methods for dam basin sediments are not free from the environmental pollution and the ecological imbalance. At present, a new way to treat the dredged sediments to manufacture bricks is being investigated, prioritizing waste recovery over its deposition in landfills. However, construction materials such as clay bricks must comply with the international and local standards. Considering the perpetual availability of the sediments, particle sizing and their chemical compo...

  12. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Cottrell

    Full Text Available Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables.Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1% concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01 than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01 compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C. Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1 with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species' resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis.Lack of consideration for the role of organic matter and

  13. Sedimentation and the Economics of Selecting an Optimum Reservoir Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltz, David; White, David C.

    1987-08-01

    This paper attempts to develop an easily reproducible methodology for the economic selection of an optimal reservoir size given an annual sedimentation rate. The optimal capacity is that at which the marginal cost of constructing additional storage capacity is equal to the dredging costs avoided by having that additional capacity available to store sediment. The cost implications of misestimating dredging costs, construction costs, and sediment delivery rates are investigated. In general, it is shown that oversizing is a rational response to uncertainty in the estimation of parameters. The sensitivity of the results to alternative discount rates is also discussed. The theoretical discussion is illustrated with a case study drawn from Highland Silver Lake in southwestern Illinois.

  14. Challenges of ecosystem restoration in Louisiana - availability of sediment and its management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, S. M.; Freeman, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Human intervention has impaired the Mississippi River's ability to deliver sediment to its delta wetlands, and as a consequence acute land loss in coastal Louisiana has resulted in an unprecedented ecocatastrophe. To mitigate this degradation, an unparalleled restoration effort is underway. For this effort to be successful and sustainable, various sediment input mechanisms must be integrated, including: building appropriate sediment-diversions; beneficially using the millions of cubic metres of sediment dredged annually from navigational channels; harvesting deposits of sand and suitable sediment from the river and offshore; and related sediment management activities that are compatible with other uses of the river. A comprehensive sediment management plan has been developed to identify and delineate potential sediment sources for restoration, and to provide a framework for managing sediment resources wisely, cost effectively, and in a systematic manner. The Louisiana Sediment Management Plan provides regional strategies for improved comprehensive management of Louisiana's limited sediment resources.

  15. Cross-Scale Baroclinic Simulation of the Effect of Channel Dredging in an Estuarine Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Holistic simulation approaches are often required to assess human impacts on a river-estuary-coastal system, due to the intrinsically linked processes of contrasting spatial scales. In this paper, a Semi-implicit Cross-scale Hydroscience Integrated System Model (SCHISM is applied in quantifying the impact of a proposed hydraulic engineering project on the estuarine hydrodynamics. The project involves channel dredging and land expansion that traverse several spatial scales on an ocean-estuary-river-tributary axis. SCHISM is suitable for this undertaking due to its flexible horizontal and vertical grid design and, more importantly, its efficient high-order implicit schemes applied in both the momentum and transport calculations. These techniques and their advantages are briefly described along with the model setup. The model features a mixed horizontal grid with quadrangles following the shipping channels and triangles resolving complex geometries elsewhere. The grid resolution ranges from ~6.3 km in the coastal ocean to 15 m in the project area. Even with this kind of extreme scale contrast, the baroclinic model still runs stably and accurately at a time step of 2 min, courtesy of the implicit schemes. We highlight that the implicit transport solver alone reduces the total computational cost by 82%, as compared to its explicit counterpart. The base model is shown to be well calibrated, then it is applied in simulating the proposed project scenario. The project-induced modifications on salinity intrusion, gravitational circulation, and transient events are quantified and analyzed.

  16. APPLICATION OF SEDIMENT QUALITY GUIDELINES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MANGROVE SURFACE SEDIMENT IN MENGKABONG LAGOON, SABAH, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Praveena, M. Radojevic, M. H. Abdullah, A. Z. Aris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous sediment quality guidelines developed to monitor the sediments. Sediment quality guidelines are very useful to screen sediment contamination by comparing sediment contaminant concentration with the corresponding quality guideline, provide useful tools for screening sediment chemical data to identify pollutants of concern and prioritise problem sites and relatively good predictors of contaminations. However, these guidelines are chemical specific and do not include biological parameters. Aquatic ecosystems, including sediments, must be assessed in multiple components (biological data, toxicity, physicochemistry by using intregrated approaches in order to establish a complete and comprehensive set of sediment quality guidelines. Numerous sediment quality guidelines Washington Department of Ecology Sediment Quality Guideline, Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council, Swedish Environmental Sediment Quality, Screening Quick Reference Table, Portuguese Legislation on the Classification of Dredged Materials in Coastal Zones and Interim Sediment Quality Guideline for Hong Kong have been applied to the Mengkabong lagoon mangrove sediment and discussed. The most appropriate guideline that meets the prioritization criteria consistent with international initiatives and regulations is interim sediment quality values for Hong Kong. The guideline verifies that all the metals are below the Interim Sediment Quality Value-low. However, site-specific, biological testing and ecological analysis of exisiting benthics community structure related to sediment contamination are needed for final decision making in the case of Mengkabong lagoon.

  17. LDEO Carbonate Data - CaCO3 Percentages for 328 Sediments Cores, Principally from The Atlantic Ocean Spanning 100,000 to 200,000 Years bp

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LDEO Carbonate data were compiled under the direction of A. Esmay and W.F. Ruddiman at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Data include...

  18. Assessing Impacts of Navigation Dredging on Atlantic Sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    are known to be opportunistic benthivores, feeding primarily on mollusks, polychaete worms, amphipods, isopods, shrimps and small bottom-dwelling...fishes and insect larvae (Smith 1985, Dadswell 2006). Shallow water shoals located adjacent to both sides of the Federal navigation channel, provide a...and J. Hoeman (1982). Distribution and abundance of the Dungeness crab and Crangon shrimp , and dredging-related mortality of invertebrates and fish

  19. Dredging Equipment Modifications for Detection and Removal of Ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Electromagnet at a concrete recycler facility. ...........................................................71 viii TABLES Table 3-1. Hydraulic pipeline...discharge. The slurry only arched about 1.5 m (5 ft) from the spreader , and the solids rapidly settled from the fluid. When the original project was...dredge. 3.4.4 San Diego A concrete recycler was visited in two different sites in San Diego, California. The major interest for these visits was to

  20. SURVIVAL ESTIMATES OF BYCATCH INDIVIDUALS DISCARDED FROM BIVALVE DREDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Leitão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The fate of released bycatch is an issue of great interest for fisheries research and management. Survival experiments were carried out to assess the survival capacity of animals damaged and discarded during clam dredging operations. Three common bycatch species, two fish (Trachinus vipera; Dicologlossa cuneata and one crab (Polybius henslowii, were collected during the sorting of catches from a commercial dredging boat. An arbitrary score scale was used to quantify the type and extent of damage to the organisms. Onboard, damaged individuals were placed in tanks containing seawater which were subsequently transferred to the laboratory. Survival experiments were conducted during the subsequent 48h. D. cuneata exhibited the lowest mortality after 48h (54%, followed by P. henslowii (65% and T. vipera (81%. Despite the magnitude of the percentage mortalities determined, the average number of individuals estimated to die during a 15 minutes tow (standard commercial fishing time was relatively small: 1.2, 3.24 and 11 for D. cuneata, T. vipera and P. henslowii, respectively. Nevertheless, when these figures are extrapolated to cover all the dredging fleet the impact of this practice on the populations of the species studied can be significant, particulary for D. cuneata.

  1. Evalution and cost comparison of anti-siltation systems and traditional dredging methods

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, Victor V.

    2000-01-01

    CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document Maintaining the design depth of ship servicing facilities is a challenging task. Dredging technology has improved significantly in the past few decades and this should have driven the cost downwards. However, increased environmental awareness has placed limitations on how dredge spoils are handled, transported and disposed of and has effectively increased the costs of dredging operations. The United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Naval...

  2. Phytoremediation prospects of willow stands on contaminated sediment: a field trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vervaeke, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Mertens, J.; Meers, E.; Tack, F.M.G.; Lust, N.

    2003-01-01

    A field trial indicated increased degradation of mineral oil in sediments planted with willow. - Establishing fast growing willow stands on land disposed contaminated dredged sediment can result in the revaluation of this material and opens possibilities for phytoremediation. A field trial was designed to assess the impact of planting a willow stand (Salix viminalis L. 'Orm') on the dissipation of organic contaminants (mineral oil and PAHs) in dredged sediment. In addition, the accumulation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in the biomass was determined. After 1.5 years, a significant decrease of 57% in the mineral oil concentration in the sediment planted with willow was observed. Degradation of mineral oil in sediment which was left fallow, was only 15%. The mineral oil degradation under willow was most pronounced (79%) in the root zone of the stand. In the sediment which was left fallow there was a significant reduction of the total PAH content by 32% compared with a 23% reduction in the planted sediment. The moderate and selective metal uptake, measured in this study, limits the prospects for phytoextraction of metals from dredged sediment

  3. Phytoremediation prospects of willow stands on contaminated sediment: a field trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vervaeke, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Mertens, J.; Meers, E.; Tack, F.M.G.; Lust, N

    2003-11-01

    A field trial indicated increased degradation of mineral oil in sediments planted with willow. - Establishing fast growing willow stands on land disposed contaminated dredged sediment can result in the revaluation of this material and opens possibilities for phytoremediation. A field trial was designed to assess the impact of planting a willow stand (Salix viminalis L. 'Orm') on the dissipation of organic contaminants (mineral oil and PAHs) in dredged sediment. In addition, the accumulation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in the biomass was determined. After 1.5 years, a significant decrease of 57% in the mineral oil concentration in the sediment planted with willow was observed. Degradation of mineral oil in sediment which was left fallow, was only 15%. The mineral oil degradation under willow was most pronounced (79%) in the root zone of the stand. In the sediment which was left fallow there was a significant reduction of the total PAH content by 32% compared with a 23% reduction in the planted sediment. The moderate and selective metal uptake, measured in this study, limits the prospects for phytoextraction of metals from dredged sediment.

  4. Characterization of Underwater Sounds Produced by a Hydraulic Cutterhead Dredge during Maintenance Dredging in the Stockton Deepwater Shipping Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    underwater sound had not been linked to dredging projects. However, concerns for negative impacts of underwater noise on aquatic species (e.g. salmon ... METHODS Study site. The Port of Stockton is a major inland deepwater port in Stockton, California, located on the San Joaquin River before it joins... of Cook Inlet, Alaska. The authors reported that ambient sound levels ranged from 95 dB in the Knik Arm to 124 dB near Point Possession on an incoming

  5. Geophysical characterization of contaminated muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, I. R.; English, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    A non-intrusive, seismic subbottom profile survey of pond sediments was conducted on a former U.S.Naval Facility at Argentia, Newfoundland, to characterize the nature and extent of contamination. An IKB Seistec boomer was used in conjunction with C-CORE's HI-DAPT digital data acquisition and processing system and differential GPS system. The survey was successful in locating regions of soft muddy sediments and in determining the thickness of these deposits. Subsurface buried objects, which are potential sources of pollution, were also identified. Intrusive profiling of the sediment was done with a new tool, the Soil Stiffness Probe, which combines two geophysical measurement systems to determine bulk density and shear stiffness. The muddy sediments were found to be highly 'fluidized', indicating that they could be easily removed with a suction dredge. 4 refs., 5 figs

  6. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Materials from the Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Miller, Martin C.; Williams, Greg D.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, John R.

    2006-02-01

    -duration disposal scenarios, the shear force and surge currents estimated from the modeling and observed previously in the field at Palos Verdes, California appear to be sufficiently high to mobilize and transport the bottom sediment and at least juvenile crab. Behavioral response to surge currents probably occurs and may reduce the occurrence and extent of movement and any associated impacts. There evidence that burial by dredged materials can effect crab survival, but confounding factors in previous experiments preclude conclusions about thresholds and extent of effects. We recommend that future studies focus on burial effects during shallow water, short duration disposal events and take into account the potential for behavioral responses to mitigate any effects.

  7. Distribution and partitioning of heavy metals in estuarine sediment cores and implications for the use of sediment quality standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Spencer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Total metal concentrations in surface sediments and historically contaminated sediments were determined in sediment cores collected from three estuaries (Thames, Medway and Blackwater in south-east England. The partitioning behaviour of metals in these sediments was also determined using a sequential extraction scheme. These data were then compared with sediment quality values (SQVs to determine the potential ecotoxicological risk to sediment dwelling organisms. When total metal concentrations in surface sediments are examined, no risk to biota in any of the estuaries is indicated. However, when historically contaminated sediments at depth are also considered, risks to biota are apparent and are greatest for the Thames, followed by the Medway and then the Blackwater. This suggests that regulatory authorities should examine vertical metal profiles, particularly in estuaries that are experiencing low sediment accumulation rates where historically contaminated sediments are in the shallow sub-surface zone and where erosion or dredging activities may take place. When metal partitioning characteristics are also considered, the risk to biota is comparable for the Medway and the Blackwater with the potentially bioavailable fraction presenting no ecotoxicological risk. Conversely, over 70% of metals are labile in the Thames Estuary sediments and toxic effects are probable. This suggests that the application of SQVs using total sediment metal concentrations may over- or under-estimate the risk to biota in geochemically dissimilar estuarine sediments. Keywords: sediment quality values, estuarine sediments, metal contamination, partitioning, sequential extraction

  8. Electrodialytic remediation of harbour sediment in suspension - Evaluation of effects induced by changes in stirring velocity and current density on heavy metal removal and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation was used to remove heavy metals from a suspension of dredged harbour sediment. The studied metals Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd are normally strongly bound in anoxic sediment. Six electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments were made, lasting 14 days and under oxic conditions...

  9. Phytoremediation prospects of willow stands on contaminated sediment : A field trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervaeke, P; Luyssaert, S.; Mertens, J.; Meers, E.; Tack, F. M.G.; Lust, N

    2003-01-01

    Establishing fast growing willow stands on land disposed contaminated dredged sediment can result in the revaluation of this material and opens possibilities for phytoremediation. A field trial was designed to assess the impact of planting a willow stand (Salix viminalis L. 'Orm') on the dissipation

  10. USE OF ULVA LACTUCA TO DISTINGUISH PH DEPENDENT TOXICANTS IN MARINE WATERS AND SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) is a cosmopolitan marine attached green seaweed capable of sequestering high environmental levels of ammonia. Ammonia can be acutely toxic to marine organisms and is often found in dredged sediments from highly industrial areas or from areas with high c...

  11. Oil effect in freshly spiked marine sediment on Vibrio fischeri, Corophium volutator and Echinocardium cordatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brils, J.M.; Huwer, S.L.; Kater, B.J.; Schout, P.G.; Harmsen, J.; Delvigne, G.A.L.; Scholten, M.C.T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide data to be used in The Netherlands for development of ecotoxicologically based quality criteria for oil-contaminated sediments and dredged material. In addition, the relation of toxicity to specific oil boiling-point fraction ranges was explored. Natural

  12. The living lab for mud: integrated sediment management based on Building with Nature concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekelen, van E.M.M.; Sittoni, L.; Groot, van der F.; Nieboer, H.E.; Baptist, M.J.; Boer, J.; Tonneijck, F.H.

    2017-01-01

    World-wide the turbidity of many rivers, estuaries and shallow seas is increasing, leading to degradation of water quality and growing siltation. Large volumes of dredged sediments are disposed and lost offshore, while coastal regions and river banks are eroding, exposing towns to more recurrent

  13. Ripening of PAH and TPH polluted sediments : determination and quantification of bioremediation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, bioremediation parameters were determined and quantified for different clayey dredged sediments. The research described in this thesis increased the insight into the individual processes of physical ripening, biochemical ripening – including PAH and TPH degradation – that result from

  14. Secondary environmental impacts of remedial alternatives for sediment contaminated with hydrophobic organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongju; Thompson, Jay M; Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Ismail, Niveen S; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-03-05

    This study evaluates secondary environmental impacts of various remedial alternatives for sediment contaminated with hydrophobic organic contaminants using life cycle assessment (LCA). Three alternatives including two conventional methods, dredge-and-fill and capping, and an innovative sediment treatment technique, in-situ activated carbon (AC) amendment, are compared for secondary environmental impacts by a case study for a site at Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA. The LCA results show that capping generates substantially smaller impacts than dredge-and-fill and in-situ amendment using coal-based virgin AC. The secondary impacts from in-situ AC amendment can be reduced effectively by using recycled or wood-based virgin AC as production of these materials causes much smaller impacts than coal-based virgin AC. The secondary environmental impacts are highly sensitive to the dredged amount and the distance to a disposal site for dredging, the capping thickness and the distance to the cap materials for capping, and the AC dose for in-situ AC amendment. Based on the analysis, this study identifies strategies to minimize secondary impacts caused by different remediation activities: optimize the dredged amount, the capping thickness, or the AC dose by extensive site assessments, obtain source materials from local sites, and use recycled or bio-based AC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stabilization and in situ management of radioactive contaminated sediments of Port Hope harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, G.M.; Killey, R.W.D.; Philipase, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of laboratory and field studies undertaken to assess the feasibility of in situ management of contaminated sediments in Port Hope harbor. The contaminated sediments stem from historic releases from an adjacent radium and uranium refinery, and uranium, arsenic, and radium are the most abundant contaminants. With improved emission controls, currently accumulating sediments have much lower levels of contamination, and the harbor waters currently meet water quality limits for the contaminants of concern. Within a few years, however, the continuing sedimentation will render the harbor unusable. Field tests have confirmed the dredging will result in incomplete removal of the contaminated sediments and that sediment suspension and the release of pores waters during dredging will produce harbor water contaminant concentrations that would require the treatment of large volumes of water. In addition, no remedial work can start until a site for the dredged material can be found. The local community inquired whether in situ burial of the sediments and abandonment of the harbor would provide safe disposal

  16. Effects of suction-dredging for cockles on non-target fauna in the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, JG

    2003-01-01

    Suction dredging for cockles removes large cockles from tidal flats and may also cause mortality of non-target fauna and make the habitat less suitable for some species. This study examines whether suction dredging for cockles on tidal flats of the Dutch Wadden Sea had affected densities of

  17. Changes in water quality at Cochin harbour dredging site, south west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, T.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Venugopal, P.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    The water quality in the vicinity of the dredging did not show any appreciable change. All dissolved nutrients recorded sharp changes in the water column. After 20 minutes and 2 hours, the conditions at the dredging were much different from the pre...

  18. Dispersion of suspended material from an operating sand suction dredge in the Øresund (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of suspended material in the immediate vicinity of an operating sand suction dredge in the Oresund was 3-5000mg/l. Concentrations > 100 mg/l were restricted to a downstream distance of .apprx. 150m and ambient levels were reached within .apprx. 1 km of the dredge. The natural...

  19. Rapid sedimentation of iron oxyhydroxides in an active hydrothermal shallow semi-enclosed bay at Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, Kagoshima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Ueshiba, Takuya

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity is common in the fishing port of Nagahama Bay, a small semi-enclosed bay located on the southwest coast of Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island (38 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan). The bay contains red-brown iron oxyhydroxides and thick deposits of sediment. In this work, the high concentration and sedimentation rates of oxyhydroxide in this bay were studied and the sedimentary history was reconstructed. Since dredging work in 1998, a thickness of 1.0-1.5 m of iron oxyhydroxide-rich sediments has accumulated on the floor of the bay. To estimate the volume of iron oxyhydroxide sediments and the amount discharged from hydrothermal vents, sediment traps were operated for several years and 13 sedimentary core samples were collected to reconstruct the 10-year sedimentary history of Nagahama Bay. To confirm the timing of sedimentary events, the core data were compared with meteorological records obtained on the island, and the ages of characteristic key beds were thus identified. The sedimentation rate of iron oxyhydroxide mud was calculated, after correcting for sediment input from other sources. The sediments in the 13 cores from Nagahama Bay consist mainly of iron oxyhydroxide mud, three thick tephra beds, and a topmost thick sandy mud bed. Heavy rainfall events in 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004-2005 coincide with tephra beds, which were reworked from Iwo-Dake ash deposits to form tephra-rich sediment. Strong typhoon events with gigantic waves transported outer-ocean-floor sediments and supplied quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, and albite sands to Nagahama Bay. These materials were redeposited together with bay sediments as the sandy mud bed. Based on the results from the sediment traps and cores, it is estimated that the iron oxyhydroxide mud accumulated in the bay at the relatively rapid rate of 33.3 cm/year (from traps) and 2.8-4.9 cm/year (from cores). The pore water contents within the sediment trap and core sediments are 73%-82% and 47%-67%, respectively

  20. Tracing time in the ocean: Unraveling depositional and preservational timescales using compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of biomarkers from marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Kusch, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Carbon cycle dynamics between the different inorganic and organic carbon pools play an important role in controlling the atmospheric chemical composition, thus, regulating the Earth’s climate. Atmospheric CO2 is fixed into biomass by photosynthesis of terrestrial and marine primary producers. Until final burial in marine sediments, the biologically fixed carbon that escapes remineralisation undergoes exchange between various active carbon reservoirs. Until now, the timescales o...