WorldWideScience

Sample records for obstacles anti-plane s-wave

  1. Coupled fracture modes under anti-plane loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les P. Pook

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The linear elastic analysis of homogeneous, isotropic cracked bodies is a Twentieth Century development. It was recognised that the crack tip stress field is a singularity, but it was not until the introduction of the essentially two dimensional stress intensity factor concept in 1957 that widespread application to practical engineering problems became possible. The existence of three dimensional corner point effects in the vicinity of a corner point where a crack front intersects a free surface was investigated in the late 1970s: it was found that modes II and III cannot exist in isolation. The existence of one of these modes always induces the other. An approximate solution for corner point singularities by Bažant and Estenssoro explained some features of corner point effects but there were various paradoxes and inconsistencies. In an attempt to explain these a study was carried out on the coupled in-plane fracture mode induced by a nominal anti-plane (mode III loading applied to plates and discs weakened by a straight crack. The results derived from a large bulk of finite element models showed clearly that Bažant and Estenssoro’s analysis is incomplete. Some of the results of the study are summarised, together with some recent results for a disc under in-plane shear loading. On the basis of these results, and a mathematical argument, the results suggest that the stress field in the vicinity of a corner point is the sum of two singularities: one due to stress intensity factors and the other due to an as yet undetermined corner point singularity.

  2. Wigner functions of s waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J. P.; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.; Schleich, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius--that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle

  3. Wigner functions of s waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius-that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables......: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle....

  4. Three-dimensional effects on cracked components under anti-plane loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Berto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The existence of three-dimensional effects at cracks has been known for many years, but understanding has been limited, and for some situations still is. Understanding improved when the existence of corner point singularities and their implications became known. Increasingly powerful computers made it possible to investigate three-dimensional effects numerically in detail. Despite increased understanding, threedimensional effects are sometimes ignored in situations where they may be important. The purpose of the present investigation is to study by means of accurate 3D finite element (FE models a coupled fracture mode generated by anti-plane loading of a straight through-the-thickness crack in linear elastic plates. An extended version of the present work has recently been published in the literature. The results obtained from the highly accurate finite element analyses have improved understanding of the behaviour of through cracked components under anti-plane loading. The influence of plate bending is increasingly important as the thickness decreases. It appears that a new field parameter, probably a singularity, is needed to describe the stresses at the free surfaces. Discussion on whether KIII tends to zero or infinity as a corner point is approached is futile because KIII is meaningless at a corner point. The intensity of the local stress and strain state through the thickness of the cracked components has been evaluated by using the strain energy density (SED averaged over a control volume embracing the crack tip. The SED has been considered as a parameter able to control fracture in some previous contributions and can easily take into account also coupled three-dimensional effects. Calculation of the SED shows that the position of the maximum SED is independent of plate thickness. Both for thin plates and for thick ones the maximum SED is close to the lateral surface, where the maximum intensity of the coupled mode II takes place.

  5. Surface effects on anti-plane shear waves propagating in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Chunli; Chen, Weiqiu; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    Material surfaces may have a remarkable effect on the mechanical behavior of magneto-electro-elastic (or multiferroic) structures at nanoscale. In this paper, a surface magneto-electro-elasticity theory (or effective boundary condition formulation), which governs the motion of the material surface of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, is established by employing the state-space formalism. The properties of anti-plane shear (SH) waves propagating in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic plate with nanothickness are investigated by taking surface effects into account. The size-dependent dispersion relations of both antisymmetric and symmetric SH waves are presented. The thickness-shear frequencies and the asymptotic characteristics of the dispersion relations considering surface effects are determined analytically as well. Numerical results show that surface effects play a very pronounced role in elastic wave propagation in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, and the dispersion properties depend strongly on the chosen surface material parameters of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates. As a consequence, it is possible to modulate the waves in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates through surface engineering. (paper)

  6. Closed form solution for the finite anti-plane shear field for a class of hyperelastic incompressible brittle solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Claude

    2010-12-01

    The equilibrium solution of a damaged zone in finite elasticity is given for a class of hyperelastic materials which does not suffer tension when a critical stretching value is reached. The study is made for a crack in anti-plane shear loading condition. The prescribed loading is that of linearized elastostatics conditions at infinity. The geometry of the damaged zone is found and the stationary propagation is discussed when the inertia terms can be neglected.

  7. Dynamic Interaction of Interfacial Point Source Loading and Cylinder in an Elastic Quarter with Anti-plane Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Gao; Hui, Qi; Nan, Pan Xiang; Bo, Zhao Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Theoretical steady state solution of a semi-circular cylinder impacted by an anti-plane point loading in a vertical bound of an elastic quarter is formulated in this paper through using image method and wave function expansion series. The elastic quarter is extended as a half space, and the semi-circular interfacial cylinder is extended as a circular cylinder. Displacement field is constructed as series of Fourier-Hankel and Fourier-Bessel wave functions. At last, circular boundary is expanded as Fourier series to determine coefficients of wave function. Numerical results show that material parameters have two widely divergent effects on the radial and circumferential dynamic stress distribution.

  8. Existence of solutions for the anti-plane stress for a new class of “strain-limiting” elastic bodies

    KAUST Repository

    Bulí ček, Miroslav; Má lek, Josef; Rajagopal, K. R.; Walton, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The main purpose of this study is to establish the existence of a weak solution to the anti-plane stress problem on V-notch domains for a class of recently proposed new models that could describe elastic materials in which the stress can increase unboundedly while the strain yet remains small. We shall also investigate the qualitative properties of the solution that is established. Although the equations governing the deformation that are being considered share certain similarities with the minimal surface problem, the boundary conditions and the presence of an additional model parameter that appears in the equation and its specific range makes the problem, as well as the result, different from those associated with the minimal surface problem.

  9. Existence of solutions for the anti-plane stress for a new class of “strain-limiting” elastic bodies

    KAUST Repository

    Bulíček, Miroslav

    2015-04-21

    © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The main purpose of this study is to establish the existence of a weak solution to the anti-plane stress problem on V-notch domains for a class of recently proposed new models that could describe elastic materials in which the stress can increase unboundedly while the strain yet remains small. We shall also investigate the qualitative properties of the solution that is established. Although the equations governing the deformation that are being considered share certain similarities with the minimal surface problem, the boundary conditions and the presence of an additional model parameter that appears in the equation and its specific range makes the problem, as well as the result, different from those associated with the minimal surface problem.

  10. S-wave scattering of fermion revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Anisur

    2011-01-01

    A model where a Dirac fermion is coupled to background dilaton field is considered to study s-wave scattering of fermion by a back ground dilaton black hole. It is found that an uncomfortable situation towards information loss scenario arises when one loop correction gets involved during bosonization.

  11. Instabilities in dynamic anti-plane sliding of an elastic layer on a dissimilar elastic half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnath, R.

    2012-12-01

    The stability of dynamic anti-plane sliding at an interface between an elastic layer and an elastic half-space with dissimilar elastic properties is studied. Friction at the interface is assumed to follow a rate- and state-dependent law, with a positive instantaneous dependence on slip velocity and a rate weakening behavior in the steady state. The perturbations are of the form exp(ikx+pt), where k is the wavenumber, x is the coordinate along the interface, p is the time response to the perturbation and t is time. The results of the stability analysis are shown in Figs. 1 and 2 with the velocity weakening parameter b/a=5, shear wave speed ratio cs'/cs=1.2, shear modulus ratio μ'/μ=1.2 and non-dimensional layer thickness H=100. The normalized instability growth rate and normalized phase velocity are plotted as a function of wavenumber. Fig.1 is for a non-dimensional unperturbed slip velocity ɛ=5 (rapid sliding) while Fig. 2 is for ɛ=0.05 (slow sliding). The results show the destabilization of interfacial waves. For slow sliding, destabilization of interfacial waves is still seen, indicating that the quasi-static approximation to slow sliding is not valid. This is in agreement with the result of Ranjith (Int. J. Solids and Struct., 2009, 46, 3086-3092) who predicted an instability of long-wavelength Love waves in slow sliding.

  12. Dynamic propagation of a weak-discontinuous interface crack between two dissimilar functionally graded layers under anti-plane shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jeong Woo; Lee, Young Shin

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic propagation of an interface crack between two functionally graded material (FGM) layers under anti-plane shear is analyzed using the integral transform method. The properties of the FGM layers vary continuously along their thicknesses. The properties of the two FGM layers vary and the two layers are connected weak-discontinuously. A constant velocity Yoffe-type moving crack is considered. The Fourier transform is used to reduce the problem to a dual integral equation, which is then expressed to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. Numerical values on the dynamic energy release rate (DERR) are presented for the FGM to show the effect of the gradient of material properties, crack moving velocity, and thickness of FGM layers. The following are helpful to increase resistance to interface crack propagation in FGMs: a) increasing the gradient of material properties, b) an increase of shear modulus and density from the interface to the upper and lower free surface, and c) increasing the thickness of the FGM layer. The DERR increases or decreases with increase of the crack moving velocity

  13. Modeling fracture in the context of a strain-limiting theory of elasticity: a single anti-plane shear crack

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, K. R.

    2011-01-06

    This paper is the first part of an extended program to develop a theory of fracture in the context of strain-limiting theories of elasticity. This program exploits a novel approach to modeling the mechanical response of elastic, that is non-dissipative, materials through implicit constitutive relations. The particular class of models studied here can also be viewed as arising from an explicit theory in which the displacement gradient is specified to be a nonlinear function of stress. This modeling construct generalizes the classical Cauchy and Green theories of elasticity which are included as special cases. It was conjectured that special forms of these implicit theories that limit strains to physically realistic maximum levels even for arbitrarily large stresses would be ideal for modeling fracture by offering a modeling paradigm that avoids the crack-tip strain singularities characteristic of classical fracture theories. The simplest fracture setting in which to explore this conjecture is anti-plane shear. It is demonstrated herein that for a specific choice of strain-limiting elasticity theory, crack-tip strains do indeed remain bounded. Moreover, the theory predicts a bounded stress field in the neighborhood of a crack-tip and a cusp-shaped opening displacement. The results confirm the conjecture that use of a strain limiting explicit theory in which the displacement gradient is given as a function of stress for modeling the bulk constitutive behavior obviates the necessity of introducing ad hoc modeling constructs such as crack-tip cohesive or process zones in order to correct the unphysical stress and strain singularities predicted by classical linear elastic fracture mechanics. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Statistical analysis of s-wave neutron reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandita Anita; Agrawal, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    The fluctuations of the s-wave neutron reduced widths for many nuclei have been analyzed with emphasis on recent measurements by a statistical procedure which is based on the method of maximum likelihood. It is shown that the s-wave neutron reduced widths of nuclei follow single channel Porter Thomas distribution (x 2 -distribution with degree of freedom ν = 1) for most of the cases. However there are apparent deviations from ν = 1 and possible explanation and significance of this deviation is given. These considerations are likely to modify the evaluation of neutron cross section. (author)

  15. s -wave scattering length of a Gaussian potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszenszki, Peter; Cherny, Alexander Yu.; Brand, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    We provide accurate expressions for the s -wave scattering length for a Gaussian potential well in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. The Gaussian potential is widely used as a pseudopotential in the theoretical description of ultracold-atomic gases, where the s -wave scattering length is a physically relevant parameter. We first describe a numerical procedure to compute the value of the s -wave scattering length from the parameters of the Gaussian, but find that its accuracy is limited in the vicinity of singularities that result from the formation of new bound states. We then derive simple analytical expressions that capture the correct asymptotic behavior of the s -wave scattering length near the bound states. Expressions that are increasingly accurate in wide parameter regimes are found by a hierarchy of approximations that capture an increasing number of bound states. The small number of numerical coefficients that enter these expressions is determined from accurate numerical calculations. The approximate formulas combine the advantages of the numerical and approximate expressions, yielding an accurate and simple description from the weakly to the strongly interacting limit.

  16. Relativistic effects in decay of S-wave quarkoniums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The width of S-wave quarkonium decays η c ,η b → γγ and J/ψ, Y → e + e - are calculated using the quasipotential approach. The nontrivial dependence of decay amplitude on relative quark momentum is considered. It is shown that relativistic corrections reach values of 30-50% in the processes studied

  17. S-wave π-nucleus repulsion and dirac phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, S.; Jennings, B.K.

    1993-12-01

    A relativistic π-nucleon potential is extended to m* ≠ m to investigate the possibility of generating s-wave π-nucleus repulsion. We find that relativity does indeed generate significant repulsion, the exact amount depending on the details of the calculation. In contradistinction the tp approximation gives very little repulsion. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  18. Effect of disorder on S-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    1997-01-01

    Experiment on conventional s-wave superconducting thin films have found a strong suppression of T c , with a subsequent transition from a superconductor (SC) to an insulator (I) with increasing disorder. Anderson proposed that even in the presence of disorder the Cooper pairs can be formed by pairing the time-reversed exact eigenstates of the non interacting disordered problem. Hence he argued that T c and the thermodynamic properties should be unaffected by disorder (Anderson's theorem). This is however valid for extremely small disorder. The aim here is to calculate the properties of a superconductor at high disorder, close to the SC-I transition

  19. Exploring AdS waves via nonminimal coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy; Hassaiene, Mokhtar

    2006-01-01

    We consider nonminimally coupled scalar fields to explore the Siklos spacetimes in three dimensions. Their interpretation as exact gravitational waves propagating on AdS space restrict the source to behave as a pure radiation field. We show that the related pure radiation constraints single out a unique self-interaction potential depending on one coupling constant. For a vanishing coupling constant, this potential reduces to a mass term with a mass fixed in terms of the nonminimal-coupling parameter. This mass dependence allows the existence of several free cases including massless and tachyonic sources. There even exists a particular value of the nonminimal-coupling parameter for which the corresponding mass exactly compensates the contribution generated by the negative scalar curvature, producing a genuinely massless field in this curved background. The self-interacting case is studied in detail for the conformal coupling. The resulting gravitational wave is formed by the superposition of the free and the self-interaction contributions, except for a critical value of the coupling constant where a nonperturbative effect relating the strong and weak regimes of the source appears. We establish a correspondence between the scalar source supporting an AdS wave and a pp wave by showing that their respective pure radiation constraints are conformally related, while their involved backgrounds are not. Finally, we consider the AdS waves for topologically massive gravity and its limit to conformal gravity

  20. Three-dimensional S-wave tomography under Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillard, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Arnulf, A. F.; Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.

    2017-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a submarine volcano located at the intersection of the Juande Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg hotspot 500 km off the coast of thenorthwestern United States. The seamount, which rises 1 km above the seafloor, ischaracterized by a shallow caldera that is elongated in the N-S direction, measure 8km by 3 km and sits on top of a 14 km by 3 km magma reservoir. Two eruptive eventsin 1998 and 2011 motivated the deployment in 2014 of a real time cabled observatorywithin the Axial caldera, as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).Theobservatory includes a network of seven seismometers that span the southern half ofthe caldera. Five months after the observatory came on-line in November 2014, thevolcano erupted on April 24, 2015. Well over 100,000 events were located in thevicinity of the caldera, delineating an outward dipping ring fault that extends fromnear the surface to the magma body at 2 km depth and which accommodatesinflation and deflation of the volcano.The initial earthquake locations have beenobtained with a one-dimensional velocity model but the travel time residuals suggeststrong heterogeneities. A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model, obtained bycombining multichannel and ocean bottom seismometer refraction data, is being usedto refine locations but the three-dimensional S-wave structure is presently unknown.In most mid-ocean ridge settings, the distribution of earthquakes is not conducive forjoint inversions for S-wave velocity and hypocentral parameters because there are fewcrossing ray paths but at Axial the presence of a ring fault that is seismically active atall depths on both the east and west side of the caldera, provides a reasonablegeometry for such efforts. We will present the results of joint inversions that assumethe existing three-dimensional P wave velocity model and solve for VP/VS structure andhypocentral parameters using LOTOS, an algorithm that solves the forward problemusing ray bending.The resulting model

  1. Power output from Tage Basse's Wave Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossen, E.A.; Mikkelsen, R.

    2000-10-01

    Tage Basse's Wave Turbine is a floating, slack moored device, placed in deep water. Via a long vertical shaft a Wells turbine is connected to a circular horizontal plate, below the turbine. The plate is in still water, preventing the device from moving up and down in the waves. At the top end of the shaft there is a float containing the power take off. The efficiency was measured to 5.1 % as an average over the year. This is measured with a rigid suspension of the turbine. If the bottom plate, in the floating version, is designed properly the result is still applicable. One reason for the large increase in efficiency shown could be that when the vertical kinetic energy in the wave is tapped by the turbine, part of the potential energy in the wave is transformed into vertical kinetic energy and is then accessible to the turbine. Turbine efficiency might increase in a full-scale device due to more favorable Reynolds number. Reynolds number in the model tests is approx. 80,000. (EHS)

  2. S-wave tomography of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, W. B.; Allen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present an S-wave tomographic model of the Pacific Northwestern United States using regional seismic arrays, including the amphibious Cascadia Initiative. Offshore, our model shows a rapid transition from slow velocities beneath the ridge to fast velocities under the central Juan de Fuca plate, as seen in previous studies of the region (c.f., Bell et al., 2016; Byrnes et al., 2017). Our model also shows an elongated low-velocity feature beneath the hinge of the Juan de Fuca slab, similar to that observed in a P-wave study (Hawley et al., 2016). The addition of offshore data also allows us to investigate along-strike variations in the structure of the subducting slab. Of particular note is a `gap' in the high velocity slab between 44N and 46N, beginning around 100km depth. There exist a number of explanations for this section of lower velocities, ranging from a change in minerology along strike, to a true tear in the subducting slab.

  3. Short range correlations in the pion s-wave self-energy of pionic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, L. L.; Holinde, K.; Oset, E.; Schütz, C.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluate the contribution of second order terms to the pion-nucleus s-wave optical potential of pionic atoms generated by short range nuclear correlation. The corrections are sizeable because they involve the isoscalar s-wave $\\pi N$ amplitude for half off-shell situations where the amplitude is considerably larger than the on-shell one. In addition, the s-wave optical potential is reanalyzed by looking at all the different conventional contributions together lowest order, Pauli corrected ...

  4. Obstacle problems in mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, J-F

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this research monograph is to present a general account of the applicability of elliptic variational inequalities to the important class of free boundary problems of obstacle type from a unifying point of view of classical Mathematical Physics.The first part of the volume introduces some obstacle type problems which can be reduced to variational inequalities. Part II presents some of the main aspects of the theory of elliptic variational inequalities, from the abstract hilbertian framework to the smoothness of the variational solution, discussing in general the properties of the free boundary and including some results on the obstacle Plateau problem. The last part examines the application to free boundary problems, namely the lubrication-cavitation problem, the elastoplastic problem, the Signorini (or the boundary obstacle) problem, the dam problem, the continuous casting problem, the electrochemical machining problem and the problem of the flow with wake in a channel past a profile.

  5. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew; Latypov, Daniel; Amato, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming

  6. A nonlocal potential form for s-wave α-α scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Bennett, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    Low energy s-wave α-α phase shifts that agree well with the measured set, have been extracted using a nonlocal interaction formed by folding (local real) nucleon -α particle interactions with density matrix elements of the (projectile) α particle. The resultant nonlocal s-wave α-α interaction is energy dependent and has a nonlocality range of about 2 fm

  7. Surface obstacles in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Flows past obstacles mounted on flat surfaces have been widely studied due to their ubiquity in nature and engineering. For nearly all of these studies, the freestream flow over the obstacle was steady, i.e., constant velocity, unidirectional flow. Unsteady, pulsatile flows occur frequently in biology, geophysics, biomedical engineering, etc. Our study is aimed at extending the comprehensive knowledge base that exists for steady flows to considerably more complex pulsatile flows. Characterizing the vortex and wake dynamics of flows around surface obstacles embedded in pulsatile flows can provide insights into the underlying physics in all wake and junction flows. In this study, we experimentally investigate the wake of two canonical obstacles: a cube and a circular cylinder with an aspect ratio of unity. Our previous studies of a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow are used as a baseline for these two new, more complex geometries. Phase-averaged PIV and hot-wire anemometry are used to characterize the dynamics of coherent structures in the wake and at the windward junction of the obstacles. Complex physics occur during the deceleration phase of the pulsatile inflow. We propose a framework for understanding these physics based on self-induced vortex propagation, similar to the phenomena exhibited by vortex rings.

  8. Development of S-wave portable vibrator; S ha potable vibrator shingen no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaida, Y; Matsubara, Y [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nijhof, V; Brouwer, J

    1996-05-01

    An S-wave portable vibrator to serve as a seismic source has been developed for the purpose of applying the shallow-layer reflection method to the study of the soil ground. The author, et al., who previously developed a P-wave portable vibrator has now developed an S-wave version, considering the advantage of the S-wave over the P-wave in that, for example, the S-wave velocity may be directly compared with the N-value representing ground strength and that the S-wave travels more slowly than the P-wave through sticky soil promising a higher-resolution exploration. The experimentally constructed S-wave vibrator consists of a conventional P-wave vibrator and an L-type wooden base plate combined therewith. Serving as the monitor for vibration is a conventional accelerometer without any modification. The applicability test was carried out at a location where a plank hammering test was once conducted for reflection aided exploration, and the result was compared with that of the plank hammering test. As the result, it was found that after some preliminary treatment the results of the two tests were roughly the same but that both reflected waves were a little sharper in the S-wave vibrator test than in the plank hammering test. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mathematical Models of Smart Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Matematica “G. Castelnuovo” Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2 00185 Roma Italy Ph. N. +39-06-49913282, FAX N. +39-06...Dipartimento di Matematica G. Castelnuovo Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2 00185 Roma Italy 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9... Matematica G. Castelnuovo Università di Roma “La Sapienza” 00185 Roma, Italy 2 Smart (or active) obstacles are obstacles that when illuminated by an

  10. Temporal change in shallow subsurface P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy inferred from coda wave interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Takeda, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent progresses in theoretical and observational researches on seismic interferometry reveal the possibility to detect subtle change in subsurface seismic structure. This high sensitivity of seismic interferometry to the medium properties may thus one of the most important ways to directly observe the time-lapse behavior of shallow crustal structure. Here, using the coda wave interferometry, we show the co-seismic and post-seismic changes in P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy associated with the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (M9.0). In this study, we use the acceleration data recorded at KiK-net stations operated by NIED, Japan. Each KiK-net station has a borehole whose typical depth is about 100m, and two three-component accelerometers are installed at the top and bottom of the borehole. To estimate the shallow subsurface P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy between two sensors and their temporal change, we select about 1000 earthquakes that occurred between 2004 and 2012, and extract body waves propagating between borehole sensors by computing the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of 3 x 3 component pairs. We use frequency bands of 2-4, 4-8, 8-16 Hz in our analysis. Each averaged CCF shows clear wave packets traveling between borehole sensors, and their travel times are almost consistent with those of P- and S-waves calculated from the borehole log data. Until the occurrence of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the estimated travel time at each station is rather stable with time except for weak seasonal/annual variation. On the other hand, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and its aftershocks cause sudden decrease in the S-wave velocity at most of the KiK-net stations in eastern Japan. The typical value of S-wave velocity changes, which are measured by the time-stretching method, is about 5-15%. After this co-seismic change, the S-wave velocity gradually recovers with time, and the recovery continues for over one year following the

  11. Robust obstacle detection for unmanned surface vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yueming; Zhang, Xiuzhi

    2018-03-01

    Obstacle detection is of essential importance for Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USV). Although some obstacles (e.g., ships, islands) can be detected by Radar, there are many other obstacles (e.g., floating pieces of woods, swimmers) which are difficult to be detected via Radar because these obstacles have low radar cross section. Therefore, detecting obstacle from images taken onboard is an effective supplement. In this paper, a robust vision-based obstacle detection method for USVs is developed. The proposed method employs the monocular image sequence captured by the camera on the USVs and detects obstacles on the sea surface from the image sequence. The experiment results show that the proposed scheme is efficient to fulfill the obstacle detection task.

  12. Neuroepigenomics: Resources, Obstacles, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, John S; Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Little, Roger; Procaccini, Dena; Rutter, Joni L; Lossie, Amy C

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived post-mitotic cells, such as the majority of human neurons, must respond effectively to ongoing changes in neuronal stimulation or microenvironmental cues through transcriptional and epigenomic regulation of gene expression. The role of epigenomic regulation in neuronal function is of fundamental interest to the neuroscience community, as these types of studies have transformed our understanding of gene regulation in post-mitotic cells. This perspective article highlights many of the resources available to researchers interested in neuroepigenomic investigations and discusses some of the current obstacles and opportunities in neuroepigenomics.

  13. Neuroepigenomics: resources, obstacles, and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Satterlee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived postmitotic cells, such as most human neurons, must respond effectively to ongoing changes in neuronal stimulation or microenvironmental cues through transcriptional and epigenomic regulation of gene expression. The role of epigenomic regulation in neuronal function is of fundamental interest to the neuroscience community, as these types of studies have transformed our understanding of gene regulation in postmitotic cells. This perspective article highlights many of the resources available to researchers interested in neuroepigenomic investigations and discusses some of the current obstacles and opportunities in neuroepigenomics.

  14. Nuclear power: obstacles and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power has a history extending over more than 50 years; it has been pursued both for military power applications (primarily aircraft carrier and submarine propulsion) and for commercial power applications. Nuclear power has benefited from many hundreds of billions of dollars in research, development, design, construction, and operations expenditures, and has received substantial attention and support world-wide, having being implemented by most developed countries, including all of the G-7 countries, and several developing countries (for example, India, China, and Republic of Korea). In spite of this long history, massive development effort, and unprecedented financial commitment, nuclear power has failed to achieve commercial success, having captured less than 5% of the world's primary energy supply market. There are many factors contributing to the stagnation/decline of the commercial nuclear power business. These factors include: non competitive economics, lengthy construction schedules, large and demanding human resource requirements, safety concerns, proliferation concerns, waste management concerns, the high degree of government financial and political involvement necessary, and the incompatibility of the available nuclear power plant designs with most process heat applications due to their temperature limitations and/or large heat output. An examination of the obstacles to deployment of nuclear power plants of current design suggest a set of requirements for new nuclear power plants, which may overcome or circumvent these obstacles. These requirements include: inherent characteristics that will achieve reactor shutdown under any postulated accident condition; the removal of decay heat by natural and passive means; no safety dependence on operator actions and tolerant to operator error, and malicious or incompetent operator action; and, economic viability in relatively small unit sizes. Many innovative reactor technologies and concepts are under

  15. Nuclear power: obstacles and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power has a history extending over more than 50 years; it has been pursued both for military power applications (primarily aircraft carrier and submarine propulsion) and for commercial power applications. Nuclear power has benefited from many hundreds of billions of dollars in research, development, design, construction, and operations expenditures, and has received substantial attention and support world-wide, having being implemented by most developed countries, including all of the G-7 countries, and several developing countries (for example, India, China, and Republic of Korea). In spite of this long history, massive development effort, and unprecedented financial commitment, nuclear power has failed to achieve commercial success, having captured less than 5% of the world's primary energy supply market. There are many factors contributing to the stagnation/decline of the commercial nuclear power business. These factors include: non competitive economics, lengthy construction schedules, large and demanding human resource requirements, safety concerns, proliferation concerns, waste management concerns, the high degree of government financial and political involvement necessary, and the incompatibility of the available nuclear power plant designs with most process heat applications due to their temperature limitations and/or large heat output. An examination of the obstacles to deployment of nuclear power plants of current design suggest a set of requirements for new nuclear power plants, which may overcome or circumvent these obstacles. These requirements include: inherent characteristics that will achieve reactor shutdown under any postulated accident condition; the removal of decay heat by natural and passive means; no safety dependence on operator actions and tolerant to operator error, and malicious or incompetent operator action; and, economic viability in relatively small unit sizes. Many innovative reactor technologies and concepts are under

  16. Evasion of HSR in S-wave charmonium decaying to P-wave light hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang [Qufu Normal University, Department of Physics, Qufu (China); Liu, Xiao-Hai [Peking University, Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Qiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); CAS, Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Beijing (China)

    2013-09-15

    The S-wave charmonium decaying to a P-wave and S-wave light hadron pairs are supposed to be suppressed by the helicity selection rule in the perturbative QCD framework. With an effective Lagrangian method, we show that the intermediate charmed meson loops can provide a possible mechanism for the evasion of the helicity selection rule, and result in sizeable decay branching ratios in some of those channels. The theoretical predictions can be examined by the forthcoming BES-III data in the near future. (orig.)

  17. Theory of s-wave superconductor containing impurities with retarded interaction with quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K V Grigorishin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a perturbation theory and diagram technique for a disordered metal when scattering of quasiparticles by nonmagnetic impurities is caused with a retarded interaction. The perturbation theory generalizes a case of elastic scattering in a disordered metal. Eliashberg equations for s-wave superconductivity are generalized for such a disordered superconductor. Anderson's theorem is found to be violated in the sense that embedding of the impurities into an s-wave superconductor increases its critical temperature. We show that the amplification of superconducting properties is a result of nonelastic effects in a scattering by the impurities. (paper)

  18. S-wave kaon-nucleon phase shifts with instanton induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2003-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts have been calculated, for both isospin channels I=0 and I=1, in the framework of a semirelativistic quark potential model which includes an instanton induced force. The agreement with experimental phase shifts is poor essentially because of a dominant attraction coming from instantons. The low-energy behaviour of S-wave phase shifts, for I=0 and I=1 channels, obtained in the kaon-nucleon system is characteristic of a potential which can produce one loosely bound state

  19. S-wave kaon-nucleon phase shifts with instanton induced effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, S. E-mail: lemaire@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B

    2003-09-22

    The kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts have been calculated, for both isospin channels I=0 and I=1, in the framework of a semirelativistic quark potential model which includes an instanton induced force. The agreement with experimental phase shifts is poor essentially because of a dominant attraction coming from instantons. The low-energy behaviour of S-wave phase shifts, for I=0 and I=1 channels, obtained in the kaon-nucleon system is characteristic of a potential which can produce one loosely bound state.

  20. Time-dependent approach to electron scattering and ionization in the s-wave model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihra, W.; Draeger, M.; Handke, G.; Friedrich, H.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is integrated for continuum states of two-electron atoms in the framework of the s-wave model, in which both electrons are restricted to having vanishing individual orbital angular momenta. The method is suitable for studying the time evolution of correlations in the two-electron wave functions and yields probabilities for elastic and inelastic electron scattering and for electron-impact ionization. The spin-averaged probabilities for electron-impact ionization of hydrogen in the s-wave model reproduce the shape of the experimentally observed integrated ionization cross section remarkably well for energies near and above the maximum

  1. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  2. VISION BASED OBSTACLE DETECTION IN UAV IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Badrloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and preventing incidence with obstacles is crucial in UAV navigation and control. Most of the common obstacle detection techniques are currently sensor-based. Small UAVs are not able to carry obstacle detection sensors such as radar; therefore, vision-based methods are considered, which can be divided into stereo-based and mono-based techniques. Mono-based methods are classified into two groups: Foreground-background separation, and brain-inspired methods. Brain-inspired methods are highly efficient in obstacle detection; hence, this research aims to detect obstacles using brain-inspired techniques, which try to enlarge the obstacle by approaching it. A recent research in this field, has concentrated on matching the SIFT points along with, SIFT size-ratio factor and area-ratio of convex hulls in two consecutive frames to detect obstacles. This method is not able to distinguish between near and far obstacles or the obstacles in complex environment, and is sensitive to wrong matched points. In order to solve the above mentioned problems, this research calculates the dist-ratio of matched points. Then, each and every point is investigated for Distinguishing between far and close obstacles. The results demonstrated the high efficiency of the proposed method in complex environments.

  3. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  4. Geological structure analysis in Central Java using travel time tomography technique of S waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.; Nurdian, S. W.; Giamboro, W. S.; Santoso, A.

    2016-01-01

    Java is one of the islands in Indonesia that is prone to the earthquakes, in south of Java, there is the Australian Plate move to the Java island and press with perpendicular direction. This plate movement formed subduction zone and cause earthquakes. The earthquake is the release of energy due to the sudden movement of the plates. When an earthquake occurs, the energy is released and record by seismometers in the waveform. The first wave recorded is called the P waves (primary) and the next wave is called S waves (secondary). Both of these waves have different characteristics in terms of propagation and direction of movement. S wave is composed of waves of Rayleigh and Love waves, with each direction of movement of the vertical and horizontal, subsurface imaging by using S wave tomography technique can describe the type of the S wave through the medium. The variation of wave velocity under Central Java (esearch area) is ranging from -10% to 10% at the depth of 20, 30 and 40 km, the velocity decrease with the depth increase. Moho discontinuity is lies in the depth of 32 km under the crust, it is indicates there is strong heterogenity in Moho. (paper)

  5. S-wave Qanti Qqanti q states in the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K T [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1981-06-01

    The static potential energy for an S-wave Qanti Qqanti q system is discussed in an adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) approximation. Both spherical bag and arbitrary bag are considered. We concentrate on those Qanti Qqanti q states in which both (Qanti Q) and (qanti q) are colour singlets. Their energy level, wave function, and possible experimental observation are studied.

  6. How to parametrize an S-wave resonance and how to identify two-hadron composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernqvist, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    The question of how one can distinguish quark model states from two-hadron states near an S-wave threshold is discussed, and the usefulness of the running mass is emphasized as the meeting ground for experiment and theory and for defining resonance parameters

  7. In- and outbound spreading of a free-particle s-wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, i.; Cirone, M. A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    We show that a free quantum particle in two dimensions with zero angular momentum (s wave) in the form of a ring-shaped wave packet feels an attraction towards the center of the ring, leading first to a contraction followed by an expansion. An experiment to demonstrate this effect is also outlined....

  8. Kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts in a QCD-motivated quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, I.; Dosch, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    We calculate kaon-nucleon central potentials and S-wave phase shifts for I = 0 and I = 1 in an QCD-motivated quark model. In our model the K-N interaction is derived from short-range perturbative quark-quark interactions. (orig.)

  9. S/WAVES: The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation on the STEREO Mission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bougeret, J. L.; Goetz, K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bale, S. D.; Kellogg, P. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Monge, N.; Monson, S. J.; Astier, P. L.; Davy, S.; Dekkali, M.; Hinze, J. J.; Manning, R. E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Bonnin, X.; Briand, C.; Cairns, I. H.; Cattell, C. A.; Cecconi, B.; Eastwood, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Fainberg, J.; Hoang, S.; Huttunen, K. E. J.; Krucker, S.; Lecacheux, A.; MacDowall, R. J.; Macher, W.; Mangeney, A.; Meetre, C. A.; Moussas, X.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Oswald, T. H.; Pulupa, M.; Reiner, M. J.; Robinson, P. A.; Rucker, H.; Salem, c.; Santolík, Ondřej; Silvis, J. M.; Ullrich, R.; Zarka, P.; Zouganelis, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 136, 1-4 (2008), s. 487-528 ISSN 0038-6308 Grant - others: NASA (US) NAS5-03076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : S/WAVES * STEREO * plasma waves * radio waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2008

  10. Anomalous Fluctuations of s-Wave Reduced Neutron Widths of 192,194Pt Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Harvey, J. A.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Guber, K. H.

    2010-01-01

    We obtained an unprecedentedly large number of s-wave neutron widths through R-matrix analysis of neutron cross-section measurements on enriched Pt samples. Careful analysis of these data rejects the validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution with a statistical significance of at least 99.997%.

  11. Obstacle detection system for underground mining vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P.; Polotski, V.; Piotte, M.; Melamed, F. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1998-01-01

    A device for detecting obstacles by autonomous vehicles navigating in mine drifts is described. The device is based upon structured lighting and the extraction of relevant features from images of obstacles. The system uses image profile changes, ground and wall irregularities, disturbances of the vehicle`s trajectory, and impaired visibility to detect obstacles, rather than explicit three-dimensional scene reconstruction. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Exploring performance obstacles of intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, Ayse P; Carayon, Pascale

    2009-05-01

    High nursing workload, poor patient safety, and poor nursing quality of working life (QWL) are major issues in intensive care units (ICUs). Characteristics of the ICU and performance obstacles may contribute to these issues. The goal of this study was to comprehensively identify the performance obstacles perceived by ICU nurses. We used a qualitative research design and conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 ICU nurses of a medical-surgical ICU. Based on this qualitative study and a previously reported quantitative study, we identified seven main types of performance obstacles experienced by ICU nurses. Obstacles related to the physical environment (e.g., noise, amount of space), family relations (e.g., distractions caused by family, lack of time to spend with family), and equipment (e.g., unavailability, misplacement) were the most frequently experienced performance obstacles. The qualitative interview data provided rich information regarding the factors contributing to the performance obstacles. Overall, ICU nurses experience a variety of performance obstacles in their work on a daily basis. Future research is needed to understand the impact of performance obstacles on nursing workload, nursing QWL, and quality and safety of care.

  13. Ep for efficient stochastic control with obstacles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, T.; Verbeek, J.; Kappen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. We address the problem of continuous stochastic optimal control in the presence of hard obstacles. Due to the non-smooth character of the obstacles, the traditional approach using dynamic programming in combination with function approximation tends to fail. We consider a recently

  14. Electromagnetic obstacle detection in close distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzela, Michał; Burd, Aleksander

    2016-09-01

    The main topic is the electronic system, designed and built to help car drivers during parking. It uses electromagnetism phenomena for making an estimation of arrangement of obstacles. The device works with close distance (about 5-15cm), depending on the material from which the obstacle is made.

  15. S -wave K π contributions to the hadronic charmonium B decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Zhou; Wang, Wen-Fei

    2018-02-01

    We extend our recent works on the two-pion S -wave resonance contributions to the kaon-pion ones in the B meson hadronic charmonium decay modes based on the perturbative QCD approach. The S -wave K π timelike form factor in its distribution amplitudes is described by the LASS parametrization, which consists of the K0*(1430 ) resonant state together with an effective range nonresonant component. The predictions for the decays B →J /ψ K π in this work agree well with the experimental results from the BABAR and Belle collaborations. We also discuss theoretical uncertainties, indicating that the results of this work, which can be tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments, are reasonably accurate.

  16. Interplay between the energy gap and heat capacity in S-wave superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonczarek, R.; Mulak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from the postulated, generalized form of the BCS gap equation, suitable for a wide class of microscopic models, the thermodynamic properties of S-wave superconductors are studied. The precise analytical formulas for the main thermodynamic quantities are given and discussed in the characteristic temperature limits. In particular the inversion of the equations defining the specific heat as a function of Δ(T), i.e. the temperature dependence of the energy gap in S-wave superconductor is presented. It makes possible a reconstruction of the energy gap as a function of temperature from the heat capacity data. As predicted, in the frame of the model, the other thermodynamic quantities from the Δ(T) function seem also to be interesting. (orig.)

  17. Coupled channel analysis of s-wave ππ and K anti-K photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chueng-Ryong Ji; Szczepaniak, A.; Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Williams, R.

    1997-10-01

    We present a coupled channel partial wave analysis of non-diffractive S-wave π + π - and K + K - photoproduction focusing on the K anti-K threshold. Final state interactions are included. We calculate total cross sections, angular and effective mass distributions in both ππ and K anti-K channels. Our results indicate that these processes are experimentally measurable and valuable information on the f 0 (980) resonance structure can be obtained. (author)

  18. S-wave pion-nucleon phase shifts in PADE approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achuthan, P.; Chandramohan, T.; Venkatesan, K.

    1978-01-01

    The two S-wave pion nucleon pahse shifts delta( 1 ) (I = 1/2) and delta( 3 ) (I = 3/2) have been calculated in the Pade approximation using epsilon(700), rho(770), f(1260), Δ(1236) and N(938) for the energy range W = 1085 MeV - 1820 MeV in the centre of mass. Contributions from suitable resonance combinations which agree nearest with the delta( 3 ) experimental values are given. (orig.) [de

  19. Influence of a relativistic kinematics on s-wave KN phase shifts in a quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2001-01-01

    The I = 1 and I = 0 kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM) and a relativistic kinematics. The spinless Salpeter equation has been solved numerically using the Fourier grid Hamiltonian method. The results have been compared to the non-relativistic ones. For each isospin channel the phase shifts obtained are not so far from the non-relativistic results. (author)

  20. S WAVE IN PULMONARY EMBOLISM, A NEW ECG SIGN TO AID THROMBOLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a devastating disease that often leads to mortality . Previous investigators have found that thrombolysis reduces mortality in men but not significantly in women with pulmonary embolism. Many of the previous studies are with tenecteplase and alteplase. Here, we describe intra - venous thrombolysis with streptokinase in seven patients with pulmonary embolism who survived including two women. Further, we have one patient who had a new onset of S wave in lead I which subsequently disappeared after embolectomy. We also comment on the usefulness of shock sign in 2 deciding on thrombolysis .We propose a new sign for noninvasive assessment of need for thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism. New onset S wave in Lead I in pulmonary embolism can be used as a new sign for deciding the need for thrombolysis. When added to the shock sign it can be used in the emergency deparment to decide the need for thrombolysis. Further, there are no clear end points as to when to stop thrombolysis. In all 4 patients we switched to heparin when spontaneous bleeding or oozing started. In all 4 patients subsequent CT scans showed that the patient has mild to moderate resolution of the pulmonary embolism and patients remained stable and have been discharged and are under regular follow up. Hence we propose that bleeding can be used as an end point for thrombolysis in acute pulmonary embolism. We also describe a patient who had new onset S wave that disappeared after successful pulmonary embolectomy. Probably, the S wave is a marker of main pulmonary artery branch occlusions.

  1. Scaling properties of S-wave level density for heavy quarkonium from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of a specific scheme of the QCD sum rules for S-wave of the heavy quarkonium one derives an expression, relating the energetic density of quarkonium states and universal characteristics in the heavy quarkonium physics, such as the difference between the masses of a heavy quark Q and meson and the number of heavy quarkonium levels below the threshold decay. 20 refs

  2. ESTIMA, Neutron Width Level Spacing, Neutron Strength Function of S- Wave, P-Wave Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, E.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ESTIMA calculates level spacing and neutron strength function of a mixed sequence of s- and p-wave resonances given a set of neutron widths as input parameters. Three algorithms are used, two of which calculate s-wave average parameters and assume that the reduced widths obey a Porter-Thomas distribution truncated by a minimum detection threshold. The third performs a maximum likelihood fit to a truncated chi-squared distribution of any specified number of degrees of freedom, i.e. it can be used for calculating s-wave or p-wave average parameters. Resonances of undeclared angular orbital momentum are divided into groups of probable s-wave and probable p-wave by a simple application of Bayes' Theorem. 2 - Method of solution: Three algorithms are used: i) GAMN method, based on simple moments properties of a Porter-Thomas distribution. ii) Missing Level Estimator, a simplified version of the algorithm used by the program BAYESZ. iii) ESTIMA, a maximum likelihood fit. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: A maximum of 400 resonances is allowed in the version available from NEADB, however this restriction can be relaxed by increasing array dimensions

  3. Women's orgasm obstacles: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoolaltak, Maryam; Keshavarz, Zohreh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Nazari, Ali Mohammad; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2017-08-01

    Woman's orgasm plays a vital role in sexual compatibility and marital satisfaction. Orgasm in women is a learnable phenomenon that is influenced by several factors. The aim of this study is exploring obstacles to orgasm in Iranian married women. This qualitative study with directed content analysis approach was conducted in 2015-2016, on 20 Iranian married women who were individually interviewed at two medical clinics in Tehran, Iran. Orgasm obstacles were explored in one category, 4 subcategories, and 25 codes. The main category was "Multidimensionality of women's orgasm obstacles". Subcategories and some codes included: Physical obstacles (wife's or husband's boredom, vaginal infection, insufficient vaginal lubrication), psychological obstacles (lack of sexual knowledge, shame, lack of concentration on sex due to household and children problems), relational obstacles (husband's hurry, having a dispute and annoyance with spouse) and contextual obstacles (Irregular sleep hours, lack of privacy and inability to separate children's bedroom from their parents, lack of peace at home). For prevention or treatment of female orgasm disorders, attention to physical factors is not enough. Obtaining a comprehensive history about physical, psychological, relational and contextual dimensions of woman's life is necessary.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of P-waves and S-waves to gas hydrate in the Shenhu area using OBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Huaishan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zizheng; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-02-01

    Compared to towed streamers, ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) obtain both S-wave data and richer wavefield information. In this paper, the induced polarization method is used to conduct wavefield separation on OBS data obtained from the Shenhu area in the South China Sea. A comparison of the changes in P- and S-waves, and a comprehensive analysis of geological factors within the area, enable analysis and description of the occurrence of natural gas hydrate in the study area. Results show an increase in P-wave velocity when natural gas hydrate exists in the formation, whereas the S-wave velocity remains almost constant, as S-waves can only propagate through the rock skeleton. Therefore, the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) response of the P-wave is better than that of the S-wave in the frequency analysis profile. In a wide-angle section, the refractive wave of the hydrate layer is evident when using P-wave components but identification is difficult with S-wave components. This velocity model illustrates the sensitivity of P- and S-wave components to gas hydrate. The use of this polarization method and results of analysis provide technical and theoretical support for research on hydrate deposits and other geological features in the Shenhu area.

  5. Laser Obstacle Detection System Flight Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    ...). The Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) was contracted to mount the HELLAS sensor on the nose of a UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter and to conduct flight tests to evaluate the HELLAS obstacle detection sensor...

  6. Optical Flow based Robot Obstacle Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlouche Souhila

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we try to develop an algorithm for visual obstacle avoidance of autonomous mobile robot. The input of the algorithm is an image sequence grabbed by an embedded camera on the B21r robot in motion. Then, the optical flow information is extracted from the image sequence in order to be used in the navigation algorithm. The optical flow provides very important information about the robot environment, like: the obstacles disposition, the robot heading, the time to collision and the depth. The strategy consists in balancing the amount of left and right side flow to avoid obstacles, this technique allows robot navigation without any collision with obstacles. The robustness of the algorithm will be showed by some examples.

  7. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Obstacles is to give a theoretical treatment of the scattering phenomena, and to illustrate numerical computations of some canonical scattering problems for different geometries and materials.

  8. Resonances for Obstacles in Hyperbolic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Peter; Zworski, Maciej

    2017-12-01

    We consider scattering by star-shaped obstacles in hyperbolic space and show that resonances satisfy a universal bound { Im λ ≤ - 1/2 } , which is optimal in dimension 2. In odd dimensions we also show that { Im λ ≤ - μ/ρ } for a universal constant {μ} , where { ρ } is the radius of a ball containing the obstacle; this gives an improvement for small obstacles. In dimensions 3 and higher the proofs follow the classical vector field approach of Morawetz, while in dimension 2 we obtain our bound by working with spaces coming from general relativity. We also show that in odd dimensions resonances of small obstacles are close, in a suitable sense, to Euclidean resonances.

  9. Advection endash diffusion around a curved obstacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, D.S.; Keller, J.B.; Knessl, C.

    1998-01-01

    Advection and diffusion of a substance around a curved obstacle is analyzed when the advection velocity is large compared to the diffusion velocity, i.e., when the Peclet number is large. Asymptotic expressions for the concentration are obtained by the use of boundary layer theory, matched asymptotic expansions, etc. The results supplement and extend previous ones for straight obstacles. They apply to electrophoresis, the flow of ground water, chromatography, sedimentation, etc. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Homogenization of variational inequalities for obstacle problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrakov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Results on the convergence of solutions of variational inequalities for obstacle problems are proved. The variational inequalities are defined by a non-linear monotone operator of the second order with periodic rapidly oscillating coefficients and a sequence of functions characterizing the obstacles. Two-scale and macroscale (homogenized) limiting variational inequalities are obtained. Derivation methods for such inequalities are presented. Connections between the limiting variational inequalities and two-scale and macroscale minimization problems are established in the case of potential operators.

  11. Algorithm for Spatial Clustering with Obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed E.; El-Zawawy, Mohamed A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient clustering technique to solve the problem of clustering in the presence of obstacles. The proposed algorithm divides the spatial area into rectangular cells. Each cell is associated with statistical information that enables us to label the cell as dense or non-dense. We also label each cell as obstructed (i.e. intersects any obstacle) or non-obstructed. Then the algorithm finds the regions (clusters) of connected, dense, non-obstructed cells. Finally, th...

  12. What is the difference in the p-wave and s-wave photodetachment in an electric field?

    OpenAIRE

    Du, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    By applying closed-orbit theory to an existing model, a simple formula is derived for the modulation function of s-wave photo-detachment in the presence of a static electric field. We then compare the s-wave modulation function with the p-wave modulation function. We show the maximums (minimums) in the s-wave modulation function correspond to the minimums (maximums) in the p-wave modulation function because of a phase difference of $\\pi$ in their oscillations. The oscillation amplitude in the...

  13. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A. [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Bhattacharya, M., E-mail: mishreyee@vecc.gov.in; Barat, P. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  14. Obstacles to nutrition labeling in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, B A; Nelson, D; Chai, S

    1997-02-01

    This study determined the major obstacles that foodservices face regarding nutrition labeling. Survey questionnaire was conducted in May 1994. In addition to demographic questions, the directors were asked questions addressing willingness, current practices, and perceived obstacles related to nutrition labeling. Sixty-eight research and development directors of the largest foodservice corporations as shown in Restaurants & Institutions magazine's list of the top 400 largest foodservices (July 1993). P tests were used to determine significance within a group for the number of foodservices that were currently using nutrition labeling, perceived impact of nutrition labeling on sales, and perceived responsibility to add nutrition labels. Regression analysis was used to determine the importance of factors on willingness to label. Response rate was 45.3%. Most companies were neutral about their willingness to use nutrition labeling. Two thirds of the respondents were not currently using nutrition labels. Only one third thought that it was the foodservice's responsibility to provide such information. Several companies perceived that nutrition labeling would have a potentially negative effect on annual sales volume. Major obstacles were identified as menu or personnel related, rather than cost related. Menu-related obstacles included too many menu variations, limited space on the menu for labeling, and loss of flexibility in changing the menu. Personnel-related obstacles included difficulty in training employees to implement nutrition labeling, and not enough time for foodservice personnel to implement nutrition labeling. Numerous opportunities will be created for dietetics professionals in helping foodservices overcome these menu- or personnel-related obstacles.

  15. Obstacle detection method, obstacle removing method, device and production line for practicing the methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Takao; Ishimatsu, Tsuneo; Komata, Hisashi; Suzuki, Keisaburo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides techniques for detecting and removing obstacles, which can be applied to pipelines and vessels to be used in structures such as nuclear power structures and electric power generation facilities. Namely, when the pipelines or vessels are in any of the stages, namely, production, installation, before the use after installation and before the reuse after inspection, obstacles remaining in the pipelines and vessels are blown off by using a fluid jetting mechanism (air compressor). Elastic waves generated when the blown off obstacles abut against the pipelines and vessels are detected by using a sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be detected during any one of the stages described above. The blowing is repeated till the absence of the obstacles is confirmed by elastic wave signals detected by the sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be removed. (I.S.)

  16. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  17. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10 -16 -10 -4 a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature

  18. Electron-helium scattering in the S-wave model using exterior complex scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2004-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation and ionization of helium is studied in the S-wave model. The problem is treated in full dimensionality using a time-dependent formulation of the exterior complex scaling method that does not involve the solution of large linear systems of equations. We discuss the steps that must be taken to compute stable ionization amplitudes. We present total excitation, total ionization and single differential cross sections from the ground and n=2 excited states and compare our results with those obtained by others using a frozen-core model

  19. On the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germond, J.F.; Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of pion absorption to the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is calculated with Slater determinantal antisymmetrized nuclear wave funtions, taking fully into accout the spin and isospin degrees of freedom. The potential obtained has an explicit dependence on the proton and neutron nuclear densities whose coefficients are directly related to the two-nucleon absorption coupling constants. The values of these coefficients extracted from mesic atoms data are in good agreement with those deduced from exclusive pion absorption experiments in 3 He, but larger than the predictions of the pion rescattering model. (orig.)

  20. px+ipy Superfluid from s-Wave Interactions of Fermionic Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional (p x +ip y ) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p x +ip y superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid

  1. The S-wave model for electron-hydrogen scattering revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-03-01

    The R-matrix with pseudo-states (RMPS) and convergent close-coupling (CCC) methods are applied to the calculation of elastic, excitation, and total as well as single-differential ionization cross sections for the simplified S-wave model of electron-hydrogen scattering. Excellent agreement is obtained for the total cross section results obtained at electron energies between 0 and 100 eV. The two calculations also agree on the single-differential ionization cross section at 54.4 eV for the triplet spin channel, while discrepancies are evident in the singlet channel which shows remarkable structure. 18 refs., 3 figs

  2. Holographic s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction with backreaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Shuai [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University,Lanzhou 730000, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-11-22

    In this paper, we study the holographic models of s-wave and p-wave Josephoson junction away from probe limit in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime, respectively. With the backreaction of the matter, we obtained the anisotropic black hole solution with the condensation of matter fields. We observe that the critical temperature of Josephoson junction decreases with increasing backreaction. In addition to this, the tunneling current and condenstion of Josephoson junction become smaller as backreaction grows larger, but the relationship between current and phase difference still holds for sine function. Moreover, condenstion of Josephoson junction deceases with increasing width of junction exponentially.

  3. S-wave Kπ scattering in chiral perturbation theory with resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamin, Matthias; Oller, Jose Antonio; Pich, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of S-wave Kπ scattering up to 2 GeV, making use of the resonance chiral Lagrangian predictions together with a suitable unitarisation method. Our approach incorporates known theoretical constraints at low and high energies. The present experimental status, with partly conflicting data from different experiments, is discussed. Our analysis allows to resolve some experimental ambiguities, but better data are needed in order to determine the cross-section in the higher-energy range. Our best fits are used to determine the masses and widths of the relevant scalar resonances in this energy region

  4. Upper-mantle velocities below the Scandinavian Mountains from P- and S- wave traveltime tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2017-01-01

    More than 20000 arrival-times of teleseismic P- and S-waves were measured over a period of more than 10 years in five separate temporary and two permanent seismic networks covering the Scandinavian (Scandes) Mountains and adjacent areas of the Baltic Shield. The relative traveltime residuals were...... between Lofoten and the crest of the Northern Scandes Mountains and stays off the coast further north. Seismic velocities in the depth interval 100-300 km change across the UMVB from low relative VP and even lower relative VS on the western side to high relative VP and even higher relative VS to the east...

  5. Upper-mantle P- and S- wave velocities across the Northern Tornquist Zone from traveltime tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents P- and S-wave velocity variations for the upper mantle in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany based on teleseismic traveltime tomography. Tectonically, this region includes the entire northern part of the prominent Tornquist Zone which follows along the transition from old...... delineated between shield areas (with high seismic mantle velocity) and basins (with lower velocity). It continues northwards into southern Norway near the Oslo Graben area and further north across the Southern Scandes Mountains. This main boundary, extending to a depth of at least 300 km, is even more...

  6. The number of degrees of freedom for statistical distribution of s wave reduced neutron width for several nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhixiang, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The least squares fit has been performed using chi-squared distribution function for all available evaluated data for s-wave reduced neutron width of several nuclei. The number of degrees of freedom and average value have been obtained. The missing levels of weak s-wave resonances and extra p-wave levels have been taken into account, if any. For 75 As and 103 Rh, s-wave population has been separated by Bayes' theorem before making fit. The results thus obtained are consistent with Porter-Thomas distribution, i.e., chi-squared distribution with γ=1, as one would expect. It has not been found in this work that the number of degrees of freedom for the distribution of s-wave reduced neutron width might be greater than one as reported by H.C.Sharma et al. (1976) at the international conference on interactions of neutrons with nuclei. (Auth.)

  7. Deuteron polarizability and S-wave π+d scattering at energies below 1 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupyshev, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of deuteron polarizability on the S-wave π + d-scattering in a low-energy limit is explored in the framework of the variable phase method. It is shown that the nonoscillating part of the S-wave cross section of π + d-scattering has a deep and sharp minimum in the energy region ∼ 0.4 keV

  8. Analytical assessment of some characteristic ratios for s-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczarek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Mateusz; Gonczarek, Adam; Jacak, Lucjan

    2018-04-01

    We evaluate some thermodynamic quantities and characteristic ratios that describe low- and high-temperature s-wave superconducting systems. Based on a set of fundamental equations derived within the conformal transformation method, a simple model is proposed and studied analytically. After including a one-parameter class of fluctuations in the density of states, the mathematical structure of the s-wave superconducting gap, the free energy difference, and the specific heat difference is found and discussed in an analytic manner. Both the zero-temperature limit T = 0 and the subcritical temperature range T ≲ T c are discussed using the method of successive approximations. The equation for the ratio R 1, relating the zero-temperature energy gap and the critical temperature, is formulated and solved numerically for various values of the model parameter. Other thermodynamic quantities are analyzed, including a characteristic ratio R 2, quantifying the dynamics of the specific heat jump at the critical temperature. It is shown that the obtained model results coincide with experimental data for low- T c superconductors. The prospect of application of the presented model in studies of high- T c superconductors and other superconducting systems of the new generation is also discussed.

  9. Laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave anisotropy in synthetic rocks by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Ostadhassan, M.; Tamimi, N.; Li, C.; Alexeyev, A.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic rocks have been widely used to realize the models with controlled factors in rock physics and geomechanics experiments. Additive manufacturing technology, known as 3D printing, is becoming a popular method to produce the synthetic rocks as the advantages of timesaving, economics, and control. In terms of mechanical properties, the duplicability of 3D printed rock towards a natural rock has been studied whereas the seismic anisotropy still remains unknown as being the key factor in conducting rock physics experiments. This study utilized a 3D printer with gypsum as the ink to manufacture a series of synthetic rocks that have the shapes of octagonal prisms, with half of them printed from lateral and another half from the bottom. An ultrasonic investigation system was set up to measure the P- and S- wave velocities at different frequencies while samples were under dry conditions. The results show the impact of layered property on the P- and S- wave velocities. The measurement results were compared with the predicted results of Hudson model, demonstrating that the synthetic rock from 3D printing is a transverse isotropic model. The seismic anisotropy indicates that the availability of using 3D printed rocks to duplicate natural rocks for the purpose of recreating the experiments of rock physics. Future experiments will be performed on the dependence of seismic anisotropy on fracture geometry and density in 3D printed synthetic rocks.

  10. S-wave elastic scattering of ${\\it o} $-Ps from $\\text {H} _2 $ at low energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J. -Y.

    2018-03-08

    The confined variational method is applied to investigate the low-energy elastic scattering of ortho-positronium from $\\\\text{H}_2$ by first-principles quantum mechanics. Describing the correlation effect with explicitly correlated Gaussians, we obtain accurate $S$-wave phase shifts and pick-off annihilation parameters for different incident momenta. By a least-squares fit of the data to the effective-range theory, we determine the $S$-wave scattering length, $A_s=2.06a_0$, and the zero-energy value of the pick-off annihilation parameter, $^1\\\\!\\\\text{Z}_\\\\text{eff}=0.1858$. The obtained $^1\\\\!\\\\text{Z}_\\\\text{eff}$ agrees well with the precise experimental value of $0.186(1)$ (J.\\\\ Phys.\\\\ B \\\\textbf{16}, 4065 (1983)) and the obtained $A_s$ agrees well with the value of $2.1(2)a_0$ estimated from the average experimental momentum-transfer cross section for Ps energy below 0.3 eV (J.\\\\ Phys.\\\\ B \\\\textbf{36}, 4191 (2003)).

  11. Localization of small obstacles in Stokes flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caubet, Fabien; Dambrine, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We want to detect small obstacles immersed in a fluid flowing in a larger bounded domain Ω in the three-dimensional case. We assume that the fluid motion is governed by the steady-state Stokes equations. We make a measurement on a part of the exterior boundary ∂Ω and then take a Kohn–Vogelius approach to locate these obstacles. We use here the notion of the topological derivative in order to determine the number of objects and their rough locations. Thus we first establish an asymptotic expansion of the solution of the Stokes equations in Ω when we add small obstacles inside. Then, we use it to find a topological asymptotic expansion of the considered Kohn–Vogelius functional which gives us the formula of its topological gradient. Finally, we make some numerical simulations exploring the efficiency and the limits of this method. (paper)

  12. Overcoming Obstacles to Drug Repositioning in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Nishimura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning (DR is the process of identifying new indications for existing drugs. DR usually focuses on drugs that have cleared phase-I safety trials but has yet to show efficacy for the intended indication. Therefore, DR can probably skip the preclinical and phase-I study, which can reduce the cost throughout drug development. However, the expensive phase-II/III trials are required to establish efficacy. The obstacles to DR include identification of new indications with a high success rate in clinical studies, obtaining funding for clinical studies, patent protection, and approval systems. To tackle these obstacles, various approaches have been applied to DR worldwide. In this perspective, we provide representative examples of DR and discuss the ongoing efforts to overcome obstacles to DR in Japan.

  13. Student Obstacles in Solving Algebraic Thinking Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andini, W.; Suryadi, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this research is to analize the student obstacles on solving algebraic thinking problems in low grades elementary school. This research is a preliminary qualitative research, and involved 66 students of grade 3 elementary school. From the analysis student test results, most of student experience difficulty in solving algebraic thinking problems. The main obstacle is the student’s difficulty in understanding the problem of generalizing the pattern because the students are not accustomed to see the rules that exist in generalize the pattern.

  14. Obstacle mean-field game problem

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Patrizi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce and study a first-order mean-field game obstacle problem. We examine the case of local dependence on the measure under assumptions that include both the logarithmic case and power-like nonlinearities. Since the obstacle operator is not differentiable, the equations for first-order mean field game problems have to be discussed carefully. Hence, we begin by considering a penalized problem. We prove this problem admits a unique solution satisfying uniform bounds. These bounds serve to pass to the limit in the penalized problem and to characterize the limiting equations. Finally, we prove uniqueness of solutions. © European Mathematical Society 2015.

  15. S-wave velocity measurements along levees in New Orleans using passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Craig, M. S.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop non-invasive methods for levee inspection, geophysical investigations were carried out at four sites along levees in the New Orleans area: 17th Street Canal, London Avenue Canal, Marrero Levee, and Industrial Canal. Three of the four sites sustained damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and have since been rebuilt. The geophysical methods used include active and passive surface wave methods, and capacitively coupled resistivity. This paper summarizes the acquisition and analysis of the 1D and 2D passive surface wave data. Twelve wireless seismic data acquisition units with 2 Hz vertical component geophones were used to record data. Each unit includes a GPS receiver so that all units can be synchronized over any distance without cables. The 1D passive method used L shaped arrays of three different sizes with geophone spacing ranging from 5 to 340 m. Ten minutes to one hour of ambient noise was recorded with each array, and total data acquisition took approximately two hours at each site. The 2D method used a linear array with a geophone spacing of 5m. Four geophones were moved forward every 10 minutes along 400 1000 m length lines. Data acquisition took several hours for each line. Recorded ambient noise was processed using the spatial autocorrelation method and clear dispersion curves were obtained at all sites (Figure 1a). Minimum frequencies ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 Hz and maximum frequencies ranged from 10 to 30 Hz depending on the site. Non-linear inversion was performed and 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models were obtained. The 1D method penetrated to depths ranging from 200 to 500 m depending on the site (Figure 1b). The 2D method penetrated to a depth of 40 60 m and provided 400 1000 m cross sections along the levees (Figure 2). The interpretation focused on identifying zones beneath the levees or canal walls having low S-wave velocities corresponding to saturated, unconsolidated sands, or low-rigidity clays. Resultant S-wave velocity profiles

  16. Earthquake early warning using P-waves that appear after initial S-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Y.

    2017-12-01

    As measures for underprediction for large earthquakes with finite faults and overprediction for multiple simultaneous earthquakes, Hoshiba (2013), Hoshiba and Aoki (2015), and Kodera et al. (2016) proposed earthquake early warning (EEW) methods that directly predict ground motion by computing the wave propagation of observed ground motion. These methods are expected to predict ground motion with a high accuracy even for complicated scenarios because these methods do not need source parameter estimation. On the other hand, there is room for improvement in their rapidity because they predict strong motion prediction mainly based on the observation of S-waves and do not explicitly use P-wave information available before the S-waves. In this research, we propose a real-time P-wave detector to incorporate P-wave information into these wavefield-estimation approaches. P-waves within a few seconds from the P-onsets are commonly used in many existing EEW methods. In addition, we focus on P-waves that may appear in the later part of seismic waves. Kurahashi and Irikura (2013) mentioned that P-waves radiated from strong motion generation areas (SMGAs) were recognizable after S-waves of the initial rupture point in the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) (the Tohoku-oki earthquake). Detecting these P-waves would enhance the rapidity of prediction for the peak ground motion generated by SMGAs. We constructed a real-time P-wave detector that uses a polarity analysis. Using acceleration records in boreholes of KiK-net (band-pass filtered around 0.5-10 Hz with site amplification correction), the P-wave detector performed the principal component analysis with a sliding window of 4 s and calculated P-filter values (e.g. Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014). The application to the Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) showed that (1) peaks of P-filter that corresponded to SMGAs appeared in several stations located near SMGAs and (2) real-time seismic intensities (Kunugi et al

  17. Effect of Inhomogeneity on s-wave Superconductivity in the Attractive Hubbard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryanpour, K. A. [University of California, Davis; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL; Mayr, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fur Feskorperforschung, Stuttgart, Germany; Paiva, T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Pickett, W. E. [University of California, Davis; Scalettar, Richard T [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Inhomogeneous s-wave superconductivity is studied in the two-dimensional, square lattice attractive Hubbard Hamiltonian using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes BdG mean field approximation. We find that at weak coupling, and for densities mainly below half-filling, an inhomogeneous interaction in which the on-site interaction Ui takes on two values, Ui=0, 2U results in a larger zero temperature pairing amplitude, and that the superconducting Tc can also be significantly increased, relative to a uniform system with Ui=U on all sites. These effects are observed for stripe, checkerboard, and even random patterns of the attractive centers, suggesting that the pattern of inhomogeneity is unimportant. Monte Carlo calculations which reintroduce some of the fluctuations neglected within the BdG approach see the same effect, both for the attractive Hubbard model and a Hamiltonian with d-wave pairing symmetry.

  18. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming; Liu, Qiancheng

    2017-01-01

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  19. KN s-wave phase shifts in the non-relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Labarsouque, J.

    1995-01-01

    The I=1 and 0 kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). The Hill-Wheeler equation has been solved numerically without any parametrization of the KN relative wave-function. The kaon and the nucleon wave-functions have been expanded as sums of several well-chosen gaussian functions, and the sensitivity of the results to the number of terms was analyzed carefully. The I=0 phase shifts are in agreement with the experimental data. In the I=1 channel too much repulsion is obtained, probably due to the lack of medium-range boson exchange type attraction. ((orig.))

  20. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming

    2017-12-12

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  1. Dynamic Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles Based on an Improved Velocity Obstacle Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In view of a dynamic obstacle environment with motion uncertainty, we present a dynamic collision avoidance method based on the collision risk assessment and improved velocity obstacle method. First, through the fusion optimization of forward-looking sonar data, the redundancy of the data is reduced and the position, size and velocity information of the obstacles are obtained, which can provide an accurate decision-making basis for next-step collision avoidance. Second, according to minimum meeting time and the minimum distance between the obstacle and unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV, this paper establishes the collision risk assessment model, and screens key obstacles to avoid collision. Finally, the optimization objective function is established based on the improved velocity obstacle method, and a UUV motion characteristic is used to calculate the reachable velocity sets. The optimal collision speed of UUV is searched in velocity space. The corresponding heading and speed commands are calculated, and outputted to the motion control module. The above is the complete dynamic obstacle avoidance process. The simulation results show that the proposed method can obtain a better collision avoidance effect in the dynamic environment, and has good adaptability to the unknown dynamic environment.

  2. Nonlinear attenuation of S-waves and Love waves within ambient rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Erickson, Brittany A.

    2014-04-01

    obtain scaling relationships for nonlinear attenuation of S-waves and Love waves within sedimentary basins to assist numerical modeling. These relationships constrain the past peak ground velocity (PGV) of strong 3-4 s Love waves from San Andreas events within Greater Los Angeles, as well as the maximum PGV of future waves that can propagate without strong nonlinear attenuation. During each event, the shaking episode cracks the stiff, shallow rock. Over multiple events, this repeated damage in the upper few hundred meters leads to self-organization of the shear modulus. Dynamic strain is PGV divided by phase velocity, and dynamic stress is strain times the shear modulus. The frictional yield stress is proportional to depth times the effective coefficient of friction. At the eventual quasi-steady self-organized state, the shear modulus increases linearly with depth allowing inference of past typical PGV where rock over the damaged depth range barely reaches frictional failure. Still greater future PGV would cause frictional failure throughout the damaged zone, nonlinearly attenuating the wave. Assuming self-organization has taken place, estimated maximum past PGV within Greater Los Angeles Basins is 0.4-2.6 m s-1. The upper part of this range includes regions of accumulating sediments with low S-wave velocity that may have not yet compacted, rather than having been damaged by strong shaking. Published numerical models indicate that strong Love waves from the San Andreas Fault pass through Whittier Narrows. Within this corridor, deep drawdown of the water table from its currently shallow and preindustrial levels would nearly double PGV of Love waves reaching Downtown Los Angeles.

  3. P and S wave Coda Calibration in Central Asia and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Mayeda, K.; Gok, R.; Barno, J.; Roman-Nieves, J. I.

    2017-12-01

    Empirically derived coda source spectra provide unbiased, absolute moment magnitude (Mw) estimates for events that are normally too small for accurate long-period waveform modeling. In this study, we obtain coda-derived source spectra using data from Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan networks - KN and KR, and Tajikistan - TJ) and South Korea (Korea Meteorological Administration, KMA). We used a recently developed coda calibration module of Seismic WaveForm Tool (SWFT). Seismic activities during this recording period include the recent Gyeongju earthquake of Mw=5.3 and its aftershocks, two nuclear explosions from 2009 and 2013 in North Korea, and a small number of construction and mining-related explosions. For calibration, we calculated synthetic coda envelopes for both P and S waves based on a simple analytic expression that fits the observed narrowband filtered envelopes using the method outlined in Mayeda et al. (2003). To provide an absolute scale of the resulting source spectra, path and site corrections are applied using independent spectral constraints (e.g., Mw and stress drop) from three Kyrgyzstan events and the largest events of the Gyeongju sequence in Central Asia and South Korea, respectively. In spite of major tectonic differences, stable source spectra were obtained in both regions. We validated the resulting spectra by comparing the ratio of raw envelopes and source spectra from calibrated envelopes. Spectral shapes of earthquakes and explosions show different patterns in both regions. We also find (1) the source spectra derived from S-coda is more robust than that from the P-coda at low frequencies; (2) unlike earthquake events, the source spectra of explosions have a large disagreement between P and S waves; and (3) similarity is observed between 2016 Gyeongju and 2011 Virginia earthquake sequence in the eastern U.S.

  4. South Ilan Plain High-Resolution 3-D S-Wave Velocity from Ambient Noise Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Xun Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan is located at a pivotal point where the Ryukyu trench subduction zone, the northern Taiwan crustal stretching zone, and the ongoing arc-continent collision zone converge. In contrast to the North Ilan Plain, the South Ilan Plain exhibits a thin unconsolidated sedimentary layer with depths ranging from 0 - 1 km, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements relative to Penghu island. We deployed a dense network of 43 short-period vertical component Texan instruments from June to November 2013 in this study, covering most of the South Ilan Plain and its vicinity. We then used the ambient noise tomography method for simultaneous phase and group Rayleigh wave velocity measurements to invert a high-resolution 3-D S-wave for shallow structures (up to a depth of 2.5 km in the South Ilan Plain. We used the fast marching method for ray tracing to deal with ray bending in an inhomogeneous medium. The resulting rays gradually bend toward high velocity zones with increasing number of iterations. The high velocity zone results are modified by more iterations and the resolutions become higher because ray crossings are proportional to ray densities for evenly distributed stations. The final results agreed well with known sedimentary basement thickness patterns. We observed nearly EW trending fast anomalies beneath the mountainous terrain abutting to the South Ilan Plain. The Chingshui location consistently exhibited a low S-wave velocity zone to a depth of 1.5 km.

  5. Neutron capture in s-wave resonances of 56Fe, 58Ni, and 60Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.

    1983-07-01

    The neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56 Fe (27.7 keV), 58 Ni(15.4 keV) and 60 Ni (12.5 keV) have been determined using a setup completely different from previous experiments. A pulsed 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator and a kinematically collimated neutron beam, produced via the 7 Li (p,n) reaction, was used in the experiments. Capture gamma-rays were observed by three Moxon-Rae detectors with graphite-, bismuth-graphite-, and bismuth-converters, respectively. The samples were positioned at a neutron flight path of only 8 cm. Thus events due to capture of resonance scattered neutrons in the detectors or in surrounding materials are completely discriminated by their additional time of flight. The high neutron flux at the sample position allowed the use of very thin samples (0.15 mm-0.45 mm), avoiding large multiple scattering corrections. The data obtained with the individual detectors were corrected for the efficiency of the respective converter materials. For that purpose, detailed theoretical calculations of the capture gamma-ray spectra of the measured isotopes and of gold, which was used as a standard, were performed. The final results are: GAMMAsub(γ)(27.7 keV, 56 Fe) = 1.06 +- 0.05 eV, GAMMAsub(γ)(15.4 keV, 58 Ni) = 1.53 +- 0.10 eV and GAMMAsub(γ)(12.5 keV, 60 Ni) = 2.92 +- 0.19 eV. The accuracy obtained with the present experimental method represents an improvement of a factor 3-6 compared to previous experiments. The investigated s-wave resonances contribute 10-40% to the total capture rate of the respective isotopes in a typical fast reactor. (orig.) [de

  6. Visualizing news: obstacles, challenges, and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker; Gerard Smit; Yael de Haan; Laura Buijs

    2013-01-01

    Depicting news graphically is considered an apt way to deal with challenges of modern journalism: to disclose big data, and present news attractively, visually, and fast to grasp. This study delves into reported obstacles and challenges for the production of news visualizations. It focuses on the

  7. Obstacles to Gender Parity in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatynskyj, Marta; Davidson, Valerie; Stiver, Warren; Hayward, Maren

    2008-01-01

    Low rates of women's enrolment in engineering programs has been identified as a global problem within the general concern to enable women to attain parity in education in all areas. A Western women in engineering meta-narrative is identified which contains a complex of obstacles that typify the situation of Western women. The question is asked…

  8. Design of railway obstacle detection prototype

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Xungu, Sipho A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Survey Inspection Device (SID) test prototype platform to serve as an early warning system for locomotives and was to travel 2km ahead of a locomotive in order to inspect the railway for possible obstacles such as human beings, livestock and collisions...

  9. Recovering an obstacle using integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Rundell, William

    2009-01-01

    . It is assumed that the physical situation is modelled by harmonic functions and the boundary condition on the obstacle is one of Dirichlet type. The purpose of this paper is to answer some of the questions raised in a recent paper that introduced a nonlinear

  10. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  11. Simple Obstacle Avoidance Algorithm for Rehabilitation Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuyt, Floran H.A.; Römer, GertWillem R.B.E.; Stuyt, Harry .J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of a rehabilitation robot is improved by offering record-and-replay to operate the robot. While automatically moving to a stored target (replay) collisions of the robot with obstacles in its work space must be avoided. A simple, though effective, generic and deterministic algorithm

  12. Estimation of S-wave Velocity Structures by Using Microtremor Array Measurements for Subsurface Modeling in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ridwan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jakarta is located on a thick sedimentary layer that potentially has a very high seismic wave amplification. However, the available information concerning the subsurface model and bedrock depth is insufficient for a seismic hazard analysis. In this study, a microtremor array method was applied to estimate the geometry and S-wave velocity of the sedimentary layer. The spatial autocorrelation (SPAC method was applied to estimate the dispersion curve, while the S-wave velocity was estimated using a genetic algorithm approach. The analysis of the 1D and 2D S-wave velocity profiles shows that along a north-south line, the sedimentary layer is thicker towards the north. It has a positive correlation with a geological cross section derived from a borehole down to a depth of about 300 m. The SPT data from the BMKG site were used to verify the 1D S-wave velocity profile. They show a good agreement. The microtremor analysis reached the engineering bedrock in a range from 359 to 608 m as depicted by a cross section in the north-south direction. The site class was also estimated at each site, based on the average S-wave velocity until 30 m depth. The sites UI to ISTN belong to class D (medium soil, while BMKG and ANCL belong to class E (soft soil.

  13. Localization of s-Wave and Quantum Effective Potential of a Quasi-free Particle with Position-Dependent Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Guoxing; Xiang Yang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the s-wave for a quasi-free particle with position-dependent mass (PDM) have been discussed in details. Differed from the system with constant mass in which the localization of the s-wave for the free quantum particle around the origin only occurs in two dimensions, the quasi-free particle with PDM can experience attractive forces in D dimensions except D = 1 when its mass function satisfies some conditions. The effective mass of a particle varying with its position can induce effective interaction, which may be attractive in some cases. The analytical expressions of the eigenfunctions and the corresponding probability densities for the s-waves of the two- and three-dimensional systems with a special PDM are given, and the existences of localization around the origin for these systems are shown.

  14. Apparent motion perception in lower limb amputees with phantom sensations: "obstacle shunning" and "obstacle tolerance".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetta, Gianluca; Grond, Ilva; Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Tsay, Anthony J; Giummarra, Melita J

    2018-03-21

    Phantom limbs are the phenomenal persistence of postural and sensorimotor features of an amputated limb. Although immaterial, their characteristics can be modulated by the presence of physical matter. For instance, the phantom may disappear when its phenomenal space is invaded by objects ("obstacle shunning"). Alternatively, "obstacle tolerance" occurs when the phantom is not limited by the law of impenetrability and co-exists with physical objects. Here we examined the link between this under-investigated aspect of phantom limbs and apparent motion perception. The illusion of apparent motion of human limbs involves the perception that a limb moves through or around an object, depending on the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) for the two images. Participants included 12 unilateral lower limb amputees matched for obstacle shunning (n = 6) and obstacle tolerance (n = 6) experiences, and 14 non-amputees. Using multilevel linear models, we replicated robust biases for short perceived trajectories for short SOA (moving through the object), and long trajectories (circumventing the object) for long SOAs in both groups. Importantly, however, amputees with obstacle shunning perceived leg stimuli to predominantly move through the object, whereas amputees with obstacle tolerance perceived leg stimuli to predominantly move around the object. That is, in people who experience obstacle shunning, apparent motion perception of lower limbs was not constrained to the laws of impenetrability (as the phantom disappears when invaded by objects), and legs can therefore move through physical objects. Amputees who experience obstacle tolerance, however, had stronger solidity constraints for lower limb apparent motion, perhaps because they must avoid co-location of the phantom with physical objects. Phantom limb experience does, therefore, appear to be modulated by intuitive physics, but not in the same way for everyone. This may have important implications for limb experience post

  15. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  16. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  17. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  18. Obstacles Facing the Iranian Basketball Academy

    OpenAIRE

    Hamta Hadian; Mohamad Reza Boroumand; Saeed Amirnejad; Masoud Najafi

    2016-01-01

    This study, which is a strategic study with a mixed research approach aimed to identify obstacles facing the academies of Iranian Basketball Federation. The population comprises board of directors and committees responsible for Education and Talent Spotting Association, academy administrators, physical education instructors, qualified experts, professors, coaches, referees and heads of delegations who were asked via interviews and questionnaire (exploratory manner) to state internal and exter...

  19. Nonholonomic feedback control among moving obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stephen Gregory

    A feedback controller is developed for navigating a nonholonomic vehicle in an area with multiple stationary and possibly moving obstacles. Among other applications the developed algorithms can be used for automatic parking of a passenger car in a parking lot with complex configuration or a ground robot in cluttered environment. Several approaches are explored which combine nonholonomic systems control based on sliding modes and potential field methods.

  20. Clustering with Obstacles in Spatial Databases

    OpenAIRE

    El-Zawawy, Mohamed A.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed E.

    2009-01-01

    Clustering large spatial databases is an important problem, which tries to find the densely populated regions in a spatial area to be used in data mining, knowledge discovery, or efficient information retrieval. However most algorithms have ignored the fact that physical obstacles such as rivers, lakes, and highways exist in the real world and could thus affect the result of the clustering. In this paper, we propose CPO, an efficient clustering technique to solve the problem of clustering in ...

  1. Obstacle detection and avoiding of quadcopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dizhong; Lin, Jiajian

    2017-10-01

    Recent years, the flight control technology over quadcopter has been boosted vigorously and acquired the comprehensive application in a variety of industries. However, it is prominent for there to be problems existed in the stable and secure flight with the development of its autonomous flight. Through comparing with the characteristics of ultrasonic ranging and laser Time-of-Flight(abbreviated to ToF) distance as well as vision measurement and its related sensors, the obstacle detection and identification sensors need to be installed in order to effectively enhance the safety flying for aircraft, which is essential for avoiding the dangers around the surroundings. That the major sensors applied to objects perception at present are distance measuring instruments which based on the principle and application of non-contact detection technology . Prior to acknowledging the general principles of flight and obstacle avoiding, the aerodynamics modeling of the quadcopter and its object detection means has been initially determined on this paper. Based on such premise, this article emphasized on describing and analyzing the research on obstacle avoiding technology and its application status, and making an expectation for the trend of its development after analyzing the primary existing problems concerning its accuracy object avoidance.

  2. Neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56Fe, 5860Ni and 27Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56 Fe (27.7 keV), 58 Ni (15.4 keV), 60 Ni (12.5 keV) and 27 Al (35.3 keV) have been determined, using a setup completely different from LINAC experiments. A pulsed 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and the 7 Li(p,n) reaction served as a neutron source. The proton energy was adjusted just above the reaction threshold to obtain a kinematically collimated neutron beam. This allowed to position the samples at a flight path as short as approx. 90 mm. Capture events were detected by three Moxon-Rae detectors with graphite, bismuth-graphite and pure bismuth converter, respectively. The measurements were performed relative to a gold standard. The setup allows to discriminate capture of scattered neutrons completely by time of flight and to use very thin samples (0.15 mm) in order to reduce multiple scattering. After correction for deviations of the detector efficiency from a linear increase with gamma-ray energy, the results obtained with different detectors agree within their remaining systematic uncertainty of approx. 5%. Only preliminary results are presented

  3. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance.

  4. S-wave attenuation structure beneath the northern Izu-Bonin arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    To understand temperature structure or magma distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle, it is essential to know their attenuation structure. This study estimated the 3-D S-wave attenuation structure in the crust and uppermost mantle at the northern Izu-Bonin arc, taking into account the apparent attenuation due to multiple forward scattering. In the uppermost mantle, two areas of high seismic attenuation (high Q -1) imaged beneath the volcanic front were mostly colocated with low-velocity anomalies. This coincidence suggests that these high- Q -1 areas in low-velocity zones are the most likely candidates for high-temperature regions beneath volcanoes. The distribution of random inhomogeneities indicated the presence of three anomalies beneath the volcanic front: Two were in high- Q -1 areas but the third was in a moderate- Q -1 area, indicating a low correlation between random inhomogeneities and Q -1. All three anomalies of random inhomogeneities were rich in short-wavelength spectra. The most probable interpretation of such spectra is the presence of volcanic rock, which would be related to accumulated magma intrusion during episodes of volcanic activity. Therefore, the different distributions of Q -1 and random inhomogeneities imply that the positions of hot regions in the uppermost mantle beneath this arc have changed temporally; therefore, they may provide important constraints on the evolutionary processes of arc crust and volcanoes.

  5. Type-I and type-II topological nodal superconductors with s -wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beibing; Yang, Xiaosen; Xu, Ning; Gong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Topological nodal superconductors with protected gapless points in momentum space are generally realized based on unconventional pairings. In this work we propose a minimal model to realize these topological nodal phases with only s -wave interaction. In our model the linear and quadratic spin-orbit couplings along the two orthogonal directions introduce anisotropic effective unconventional pairings in momentum space. This model may support different nodal superconducting phases characterized by either an integer winding number in BDI class or a Z2 index in D class at the particle-hole invariant axes. In the vicinity of the nodal points the effective Hamiltonian can be described by either type-I or type-II Dirac equations, and the Lifshitz transition from type-I nodal phases to type-II nodal phases can be driven by external in-plane magnetic fields. We show that these nodal phases are robust against weak impurities, which only slightly renormalizes the momentum-independent parameters in the impurity-averaged Hamiltonian, thus these phases are possible to be realized in experiments with real semi-Dirac materials. The smoking-gun evidences to verify these phases based on scanning tunneling spectroscopy method are also briefly discussed.

  6. Universal relations for spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas near an s -wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Ning

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases have been widely studied both experimentally and theoretically in the past decade. As shown in previous studies, this modification of single-body dispersion will in general couple different partial waves of the two-body scattering and thus distort the wave function of few-body bound states which determines the short-distance behavior of many-body wave function. In this work, we focus on the two-component Fermi gas with one-dimensional or three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling (SOC) near an s -wave resonance. Using the method of effective field theory and the operator product expansion, we derive universal relations for both systems, including the adiabatic theorem, viral theorem, and pressure relation, and obtain the momentum distribution matrix 〈ψa†(q ) ψb(q ) 〉 at large q (a ,b are spin indices). The momentum distribution matrix shows both spin-dependent and spatial anisotropic features. And the large momentum tail is modified at the subleading order thanks to the SOC. We also discuss the experimental implication of these results depending on the realization of the SOC.

  7. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. I. Single ionization and single excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    A full four-body implementation of the propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method [J. Phys. B 37, L69 (2004)] is developed and applied to the electron-impact of helium in an S-wave model. Time-independent solutions to the Schrödinger equation are found numerically in coordinate space over a wide range of energies and used to evaluate total and differential cross sections for a complete set of three- and four-body processes with benchmark precision. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the full electron-helium system. Here we detail the theoretical and computational development of the four-body PECS method and present results for three-body channels: single excitation and single ionization. Four-body cross sections are presented in the sequel to this article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022716 (2010)]. The calculations reveal structure in the total and energy-differential single-ionization cross sections for excited-state targets that is due to interference from autoionization channels and is evident over a wide range of incident electron energies.

  8. Thorium s-wave neutron widths from 21 to 2006 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ingle, R.W.; Portney, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A 232 Th total cross section measurement in the resolved resonance region has been requested with a 2% accuracy in order to obtain resonance parameters with a 5% accuracy. These data are required for both fast and light-water breeder reactor studies. Inspection of the prior 232 Th differential data base shows several problems: the thermal cross sections seem inconsistent; the measured capture widths have large uncertanties; the two rather complete sets of measured neutron widths are systematically discrepant; and the differential data appear to give Cd capture ratios and shielded-capture resonance integrals smaller than those required by integral measurements. In order to improve the differential data base we have measured neutron transmission spectra through eight samples of 232 Th. Resonance parameters have been obtained from these data using the computer code S10B. Fits to these data up to 440 eV, which concentrated on the capture widths, have been previously reported. The results of extending these fits to 2.0 keV are reported and discussed in terms of the s-wave strength function and the dilute-capture resonance integral

  9. Obstacles: their impact on thinking and beyond thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marguc, J.; van Kleef, G.A.; Förster, J.; Contreras, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    People encounter myriads of obstacles throughout their lives. Those can be big or small, such as a fallen tree blocking the road to work or life circumstances that make it hard for an adolescent to obtain a university degree. What are the effects of such obstacles? Could it be that obstacles have an

  10. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Yamaguchi, K; Yokota, T; Kiguchi, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Anisotropy has been investigated using S-wave as a technique for detecting fractures. In this study, fundamental experiments were carried out with slightly changing the measuring conditions at a place where anisotropy was expected. This paper describes the fundamental data acquisition of anisotropy analysis using S-wave, and a part of the results. The experiments were conducted on the agricultural road in Yamadera district, Matsuyama-machi, Yamagata Prefecture. Two flat unpaved roads meeting at right angles were used as traverse lines. In this place, several reflection surfaces were certainly detected by P-wave, and anisotropy of S-wave was confirmed from the velocity of refracted wave of S-wave. Data were processed for individual traverse lines meeting at right angles. Firstly, signal sweeping, correlation, and vertical superposition were made. Six kinds of data were prepared, i.e., three-component receiving records of data at 0{degree} of generating direction and three-component receiving records of data at 90{degree} of generating direction. Records of T-component at 0{degree} and R-component at 90{degree} were used for processing of the seismic reflection method. These records would be considered to be data of SH-wave and SV-wave, respectively. 4 figs.

  11. S wave Kπ scattering and effects of κ in J/ψ->K-bar *0(892)K+π-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.-K.; Ping, R.-G.; Shen, P.-N.; Chiang, H.-C.; Zou, B.-S.

    2006-01-01

    S wave scattering is studied using a chiral unitary approach (ChUT) taking into account coupled channels. With the amplitudes derived from the lowest order chiral Lagrangian as the kernel of a set of coupled channel Bathe-Salpeter equations, the I=1/2S wave Kπ scattering phase shifts below 1.2 GeV can be fitted by one parameter, a subtraction constant, and a scalar resonance corresponding to the controversial κ (K 0 *(800)) can be generated dynamically. A good description of the I=3/2S wave Kπ scattering phase shifts below 1.2 GeV can also be obtained. An artificial singularity in the cut-off method of the 2-meson loop integral of the ChUT is found. The formalism is applied to deal with the S wave Kπ final state interaction (FSI) in the decay J/ψ->K-bar * 0 (892)K + π - , and a qualitatively good fit to the data is achieved. The role of κ in the decay is discussed

  12. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-12-01

    The most common type of waves used for probing anisotropy of rocks in laboratory is the direct P wave. Information potential of the measured P-wave velocity, however, is limited. In rocks displaying weak triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends just on 15 linear combinations of 21 elastic parameters, called the weak-anisotropy parameters. In strong triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends on the whole set of 21 elastic parameters, but inversion for six of them is ill-conditioned and these parameters are retrieved with a low accuracy. Therefore, in order to retrieve the complete elastic tensor accurately, velocities of S waves must also be measured and inverted. For this purpose, we developed a lab facility which allows the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 directions distributed regularly over the sphere. The velocities are measured using a pair of P-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized along the radial direction and using two pairs of S-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized tangentially to the spherical sample in mutually perpendicular directions. We present inversion methods of phase and ray velocities for elastic parameters describing general triclinic anisotropy. We demonstrate on synthetic tests that the inversion becomes more robust and stable if the S-wave velocities are included. This applies even to the case when the velocity of the S waves is measured in a limited number of directions and with a significantly lower accuracy than that of the P wave. Finally, we analyse velocities measured on a rock sample from the Outokumpu deep drill hole, Finland. We present complete sets of elastic parameters of the sample including the error analysis for several levels of confining pressure ranging from 0.1 to 70 MPa.

  13. Dynamics of nanoparticules detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belheouane, Soraya; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Mann, Ingrid

    In order to interpret in detail the S/WAVES data on the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO at 1 AU [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009], we study the dynamics of nanoparticles in the inner interplanetary medium as well as the distribution of their velocities and directions of arrival, with a model based on [Czechowski and Mann, 2012]. We deduce the charges released by their impacts on the STEREO spacecraft at 1 AU and their dependence on the position of the spacecraft on their orbits. The model studies nanoparticles of size equal or smaller than about 70 nm, assumed to be created via collisional fragmentation of dust grains of larger size moving on keplerian orbits, and sublimation of dust, meteoroids and comets. The nanoparticles are released near the Sun with initial velocities close to keplerian, and mainly subjected to the Lorentz force calculated with a simple solar wind model. A part of the nanoparticles is accelerated to high speeds of the order of 300 km/s, thereby providing impact charges between 10(-14) and 10(-11) Cb [Belheouane, 2014] which enable them to be detected by S/WAVES, whereas another part is trapped within about 0.2 AU from the Sun. We discuss how the fluxes and direction of arrival at 1 AU are expected to change in function of the solar cycle. These results enable us to interpret in detail the STEREO/WAVES observations [Zaslavsky et al., 2012]; [Pantellini et al., 2013]; [Le Chat et al., 2013]. Belheouane, S. (2014). Nanoparticules dans le vent solaire, observations spatiales et theorie. PhD thesis, Pierre and Marie Curie University UPMC. Czechowski, A. and Mann, I. (2012). Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space, chapter Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Le Chat, G., Zaslavsky, A., Meyer-Vernet, N., Issautier, K., Belheouane, S., Pantellini, F., Maksimovic, M., Zouganelis, I., Bale, S., and Kasper, J. (2013). Interplanetary Nanodust Detection by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES Low

  14. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  15. S-Wave's Velocities of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere System in the Caribbean Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, O'Leary; Alvarez, Jose Leonardo; Moreno, Bladimir; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2010-06-01

    An overview of the S-wave velocity (Vs) structural model of the Caribbean is presented with a resolution of 2 o x2 o . As a result of the frequency time analysis (FTAN) of more than 400 trajectories epicenter-stations in this region, new tomographic maps of Rayleigh waves group velocity dispersion at periods ranging from 10 s to 40 s have been determined. For each 2 o x2 o cell, group velocity dispersion curves were determined and extended to 150 s adding data from a larger scale tomographic study (Vdovin et al., 1999). Using, as independent a priori information, the available geological and geophysical data of the region, each dispersion curve has been mapped, by non-linear inversion, into a set of Vs vs. depth models in the depth range from 0 km to 300 km. Due to the non-uniqueness of the solutions for each cell a Local Smoothness Optimization (LSO) has been applied to the whole region to identify a tridimensional model of Vs vs. depth in cells of 2 o x2 o , thus satisfying the Occam razor concept. Through these models some main features of the lithosphere and asthenosphere are evidenced, such as: the west directed subduction zone of the eastern Caribbean region with a clear mantle wedge between the Caribbean lithosphere and the subducted slab; the complex and asymmetric behavior of the crustal and lithospheric thickness in the Cayman ridge; the diffused presence of oceanic crust in the region; the presence of continental type crust in the South America, Central America and North America plates, as well as the bottom of the upper asthenosphere that gets shallower going from west to east. (author)

  16. Joint inversion of high resolution S-wave velocity structure underneath North China Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2017-12-01

    North China basin is one of earthquake prone areas in China. Many devastating earthquakes occurred in the last century and before, such as the 1937 M7.0 Heze Earthquake in Shandong province, the 1966 M7.2 Xingtai Earthquake and 1976 Tangshan Earthquake in Hebei province. Knowing the structure of the sediment cover is of great importance to predict strong ground motion caused by earthquakes. Unconsolidated sediments are loose materials, ranging from clay to sand to gravel. Earthquakes can liquefy unconsolidated sediments, thus knowing the distribution and thickness of the unconsolidated sediments has significant implication in seismic hazard analysis of the area. Quantitative estimates of the amount of extension of the North China basin is important to understand the thinning and evolution of the eastern North China craton and the underlying mechanism. In principle, the amount of lithospheric stretching can be estimated from sediment and crustal thickness. Therefore an accurate estimate of the sediment and crustal thickness of the area is also important in understanding regional tectonics. In this study, we jointly invert the Rayleigh wave phase-velocity dispersion and Z/H ratio data to construct a 3-D S-wave velocity model beneath North China area. We use 4-year ambient noise data recorded from 249 temporary stations, and 139 earthquake events to extract Rayleigh wave Z/H ratios. The Z/H ratios obtained from ambient noise data and earthquake data show a good agreement within the overlapped periods. The phase velocity dispersion curve was estimated from the same ambient noise data. The preliminary result shows a relatively low Z/H ratio and low velocity anomaly at the shallow part of sediment basins.

  17. Lower Mantle S-wave Velocity Model under the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Grand, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    Deep mantle plumes created by thermal instabilities at the core-mantle boundary has been an explanation for intraplate volcanism since the 1970's. Recently, broad slow velocity conduits in the lower mantle underneath some hotspots have been observed (French and Romanowicz, 2015), however the direct detection of a classical thin mantle plume using seismic tomography has remained elusive. Herein, we present a seismic tomography technique designed to image a deep mantle plume under the Yellowstone Hotspot located in the western United States utilizing SKS and SKKS waves in conjunction with finite frequency tomography. Synthetic resolution tests show the technique can resolve a 235 km diameter lower mantle plume with a 1.5% Gaussian velocity perturbation even if a realistic amount of random noise is added to the data. The Yellowstone Hotspot presents a unique opportunity to image a thin plume because it is the only hotspot with a purported deep origin that has a large enough aperture and density of seismometers to accurately sample the lower mantle at the length scales required to image a plume. Previous regional tomography studies largely based on S wave data have imaged a cylindrically shaped slow anomaly extending down to 900km under the hotspot, however they could not resolve it any deeper (Schmandt et al., 2010; Obrebski et al., 2010).To test if the anomaly extends deeper, we measured and inverted over 40,000 SKS and SKKS waves' travel times in two frequency bands recorded at 2400+ stations deployed during 2006-2012. Our preliminary model shows narrow slow velocity anomalies in the lower mantle with no fast anomalies. The slow anomalies are offset from the Yellowstone hotspot and may be diapirs rising from the base of the mantle.

  18. Do characteristics of a stationary obstacle lead to adjustments in obstacle stepping strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Timothy A; De Jong, Audrey F; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Navigating cluttered and complex environments increases the risk of falling. To decrease this risk, it is important to understand the influence of obstacle visual cues on stepping parameters, however the specific obstacle characteristics that have the greatest influence on avoidance strategies is still under debate. The purpose of the current work is to provide further insight on the relationship between obstacle appearance in the environment and modulation of stepping parameters. Healthy young adults (N=8) first stepped over an obstacle with one visible top edge ("floating"; 8 trials) followed by trials where experimenters randomly altered the location of a ground reference object to one of 7 different positions (8 trials per location), which ranged from 6cm in front of, directly under, or up to 6cm behind the floating obstacle (at 2cm intervals). Mean take-off and landing distance as well as minimum foot clearance values were unchanged across different positions of the ground reference object; a consistent stepping trajectory was observed for all experimental conditions. Contrary to our hypotheses, results of this study indicate that ground based visual cues are not essential for the planning of stepping and clearance strategies. The simultaneous presentation of both floating and ground based objects may have provided critical information that lead to the adoption of a consistent strategy for clearing the top edge of the obstacle. The invariant foot placement observed here may be an appropriate stepping strategy for young adults, however this may not be the case across the lifespan or in special populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Robust Obstacle Avoidance for Service Robot Using Bayesian Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo Budiharto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a robust obstacle avoidance method for service robot in indoor environment. The method for obstacles avoidance uses information about static obstacles on the landmark using edge detection. Speed and direction of people that walks as moving obstacle obtained by single camera using tracking and recognition system and distance measurement using 3 ultrasonic sensors. A new geometrical model and maneuvering method for moving obstacle avoidance introduced and combined with Bayesian approach for state estimation. The obstacle avoidance problem is formulated using decision theory, prior and posterior distribution and loss function to determine an optimal response based on inaccurate sensor data. Algorithms for moving obstacles avoidance method proposed and experiment results implemented to service robot also presented. Various experiments show that our proposed method very fast, robust and successfully implemented to service robot called Srikandi II that equipped with 4 DOF arm robot developed in our laboratory.

  20. APPLICATION OF DSM IN OBSTACLE CLEARANCE SURVEYING OF AERODROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the wide use of digital elevation model (DEM, digital surface model (DSM receives less attention because that it is composed by not only terrain surface, but also vegetations and man-made objects which are usually regarded as useless information. Nevertheless, these objects are useful for the identification of obstacles around an aerodrome. The primary objective of the study was to determine the applicability of DSM in obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome. According to the requirements of obstacle clearance surveying at QT airport, aerial and satellite imagery were used to generate DSM, by means of photogrammetry, which was spatially analyzed with the hypothetical 3D obstacle limitation surfaces (OLS to identify the potential obstacles. Field surveying was then carried out to retrieve the accurate horizontal position and height of the obstacles. The results proved that the application of DSM could make considerable improvement in the efficiency of obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome.

  1. Obstacles using amorphous materials for volume applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Albert [Festo AG and Co. KG, 73734, Esslingen (Germany); Reininger, Thomas, E-mail: drn@de.festo.com [Festo AG and Co. KG, 73734, Esslingen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    This contribution is especially focussed on the attempt to use amorphous or nanocrystalline metals in position sensor applications and to describe the difficulties and obstacles encountered in coherence with the development of appropriate industrial high volume series products in conjunction with the related quality requirements. The main motivation to do these investigations was to beat the generally known sensors especially silicon based Hall-sensors as well as AMR- and GMR-sensors - well known from mobile phones and electronic storage devices like hard discs and others - in terms of cost-effectiveness and functionality.

  2. Recovering an obstacle using integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Rundell, William

    2009-05-01

    We consider the inverse problem of recovering the shape, location and surface properties of an object where the surrounding medium is both conductive and homogeneous and we measure Cauchy data on an accessible part of the exterior boundary. It is assumed that the physical situation is modelled by harmonic functions and the boundary condition on the obstacle is one of Dirichlet type. The purpose of this paper is to answer some of the questions raised in a recent paper that introduced a nonlinear integral equation approach for the solution of this type of problem.

  3. Error identities for variational problems with obstacles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Repin, S.; Valdman, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 4 (2018), s. 635-658 ISSN 0044-2267 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GF16-34894L; GA ČR GA17-04301S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB16AT015 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : variational problems with obstacles * coincidence set * convex functionals * error identities Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.332, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/valdman-0483574.pdf

  4. The comparison of spatial accessibility measures between non-obstacle and obstacle oriented based on gravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Cai-Hui

    2009-10-01

    Spatial accessibility denotes the ease with which activities may be reached from a given location using a particular transportation system. There are a number of accessibility measures methods and models, such as time of access to city centre, mean travel costs and opportunity accessibility. But these methods or models ignore the existence of obstacles. In fact, there are many kinds of obstacles in the world, such as rivers, railways, etc. The paper reviews the progress of accessibility measures, and introduces the obstacle to the accessibility measures. Meanwhile, through the analysis of A* algorithm, the advantage of A* algorithm that could avoid obstacles is put forward. Based on the above mentioned, the obstacle oriented accessibility measures based on simple gravity model is discussed in details. Finally, a case study is fulfilled by comparison between the obstacle oriented and non-obstacle accessibility measures.

  5. Zika virus: Vaccine initiatives and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Mukherjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 130,000 humans in Brazil are infected with Zika virus (ZIKV since March 2015, and presently 29 countries in Americas have reported local autochthonous ZIKV transmission. Besides the associated clinical features, Brazil has also reported a temporal and spatial association of ZIKV with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS and Zika fetal syndrome. ZIKV vaccine approaches include purified inactivated virus, nucleic acid-based vaccines (DNA, RNA, live vector vaccines, subunit vaccines, virus-like particle technologies, and live recombinant vaccines similar to the technologies used against other human flaviviruses. At present, 15 commercial entities are involved in the development of ZIKV vaccine. Vaccines developed through different approaches would have their own inherent advantages and disadvantages. The presentation of disease in different populations and lack of clarity on the pathogenesis and complications is the most important obstacle. Second, Zika belongs to a genus that is notorious for the antibody-mediated enhancement of infection, which proved to be a stumbling block during the development of the dengue vaccine. Identifying large naive and yet uninfected at-risk populations may be an obstacle to demonstrating efficacy. Next, the association of Zika with GBS is being researched since the vaccine may have the potential to provoke similar neuropathophysiologic mechanisms. Zika's association with adverse fetal outcomes necessitates that pregnant women and women of childbearing age are considered for evaluating vaccines, which form a vulnerable group for vaccine trials.

  6. CONCERT MANAGEMENT IN CROATIA: OBSTACLES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Basara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of concert management in the Republic of Croatia encounters numerous obstacles in any attempt to institutionalize it. Unlike other countries in the European Union, there is no register of the concert stages, venues as well as facilities for the provision of hearing / consumption of music in the form of performances. Process management organization is incomplete, and institutions that are closely associated with such events do not carry out the classification, categorization and analysis of events that are within the concerts' domain. Commercial music, economically far most cost-effective, is completely ignored and within the framework of cultural events not even the slightest attention is given to it. On the contrary, it is considered the music of poor quality and completely irrelevant. This paper tries to frame the mentioned genre, which includes various musical directions that economically bring significant benefits and help the survival of these related activities indirectly, and ultimately have a positive impact on the economy. Comparing global trends it speaks about the position of the Croatian music industry and lists the main obstacles for setting up a solid foundation for the construction of an adequate system of indexation of concert businesses that, as part of the creative industries records a meteoric economic growth.

  7. Obstacles in the climate policy arena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manders, T.; Tang, P.

    2001-01-01

    Implementing climate policy is not a straightforward matter. International negotiations during the recent climate conference in The Hague ended in disagreement. With the present position of the United States chances to reach an agreement are even slimmer than ever. One of the obstacles is to what extent trade in emission rights should be allowed. Economically speaking, there are strong arguments for allowing as much flexibility as possible. Ironically, our analysis shows that the party favouring restrictions on emissions trade, the European Union, suffers most from curtailing flexibility. Another obstacle which comes up when addressing more ambitious goals in climate policy is the involvement of developing countries. A treaty should aim at emissions reductions in developing countries as well. If the potentially serious consequences of the greenhouse effect are to be avoided, that is even essential. To induce these reductions, the developed countries could consider to compensate the developing countries. For industrialised countries compensation has the effect to raise the costs of climate policy considerably

  8. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40–80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150–200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove

  9. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-04-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40-80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150-200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove uplift

  10. Detecting P and S-wave of Mt. Rinjani seismic based on a locally stationary autoregressive (LSAR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhaida, Subanar, Abdurakhman, Abadi, Agus Maman

    2017-08-01

    Seismic data is usually modelled using autoregressive processes. The aim of this paper is to find the arrival times of the seismic waves of Mt. Rinjani in Indonesia. Kitagawa algorithm's is used to detect the seismic P and S-wave. Householder transformation used in the algorithm made it effectively finding the number of change points and parameters of the autoregressive models. The results show that the use of Box-Cox transformation on the variable selection level makes the algorithm works well in detecting the change points. Furthermore, when the basic span of the subinterval is set 200 seconds and the maximum AR order is 20, there are 8 change points which occur at 1601, 2001, 7401, 7601,7801, 8001, 8201 and 9601. Finally, The P and S-wave arrival times are detected at time 1671 and 2045 respectively using a precise detection algorithm.

  11. Exploration of deep S-wave velocity structure using microtremor array technique to estimate long-period ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Higashi, Sadanori; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2007-01-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 9 sites in the Niigata plain to explore deep S-wave velocity structures for estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion. The 1D S-wave velocity profiles in the Niigata plain are characterized by 5 layers with S-wave velocities of 0.4, 0.8, 1.5, 2.1 and 3.0 km/s, respectively. The depth to the basement layer is deeper in the Niigata port area located at the Japan sea side of the Niigata plain. In this area, the basement depth is about 4.8 km around the Seirou town and about 4.1 km around the Niigata city, respectively. These features about the basement depth in the Niigata plain are consistent with the previous surveys. In order to verify the profiles derived from microtremor array exploration, we estimate the group velocities of Love wave for four propagation paths of long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake by multiple filter technique, which were compared with the theoretical ones calculated from the derived profiles. As a result, it was confirmed that the group velocities from the derived profiles were in good agreement with the ones from long-period earthquake ground motion records during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. Furthermore, we applied the estimation method of design basis earthquake input for seismically isolated nuclear power facilities by using normal mode solution to estimate long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. As a result, it was demonstrated that the applicability of the above method for the estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion were improved by using the derived 1D S-wave velocity profile. (author)

  12. KN s-wave phase shifts in a quark model with gluon and boson exchange at the quark level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Leandri, J.

    1997-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). The interquark potential includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges. The kaon and nucleon wave functions are expanded as a sum of Gaussian functions and the Hill-Wheeler (HW) equation is solved numerically. The I=0 phase shifts present too much attraction and in the I=1 channel too much repulsion is obtained. (orig.)

  13. Third-order non-Coulomb correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions at the origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Schuller, K.

    2008-01-01

    We compute the third-order correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions |ψ n (0)| 2 at the origin from non-Coulomb potentials in the effective non-relativistic Lagrangian. Together with previous results on the Coulomb correction and the ultrasoft correction computed in a companion paper, this completes the third-order calculation up to a few unknown matching coefficients. Numerical estimates of the new correction for bottomonium and toponium are given

  14. Amplitude analysis for the process K-p→(π+π-)sub(s-wave)Σ0(1385)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Zalewski, K.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Hemingway, R.J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Losty, M.J.; Kluyver, J.G.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Timmermans, J.J.; Walle, R.T. van de

    1977-01-01

    Transversity amplitudes and spin density matrix elements are determined for the process K - p→(π + π - )sub(s-wave)Σ 0 (1385). Predictions of the additive quark model and of duality diagrams are tested and found consistent with the data; this is the first information about the applicability of these models to processes where a scalar object is produced at the mesonic vertex. (Auth.)

  15. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in π-p→π+π-n reaction on polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K.

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction π - p→π + π - n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the ππ energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c π - momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude (π exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a 1 exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a 1 exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar ππ phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ''up'' and the well-known ''down'' solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective ππ mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f o (1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  16. Chiral dynamics, S-wave contributions and angular analysis in D → ππl anti ν

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yu-Ji; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Shuai [Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of the D{sup -} → π{sup +}π{sup -}l anti ν and anti D{sup 0} → π{sup +}π{sup 0}l anti ν decays. We construct a general angular distribution which can include arbitrary partial waves of ππ. Retaining the S-wave and P-wave contributions we study the branching ratios, forward-backward asymmetries and a few other observables. The P-wave contribution is dominated by ρ{sup 0} resonance, and the S-wave contribution is analyzed using the unitarized chiral perturbation theory. The obtained branching fraction for D → ρlν, at the order 10{sup -3}, is consistent with the available experimental data. The S-wave contribution has a branching ratio at the order of 10{sup -4}, and this prediction can be tested by experiments like BESIII and LHCb. Future measurements can also be used to examine the π-π scattering phase shift. (orig.)

  17. Giving up nuclear energy. Obstacles, conditions, consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegel-Dorfs, H.

    1990-01-01

    Life on this earth is not possible without using energy. The resources of the energies used so far are limited and their utilization carries certain risks which have now become obvious: climatic problems on the one hand, safety problems on the other. Chernobyl, Wackersdorf, tornados and population growth are issues mentioned all the time in the fight for the best solution. Even church synodes have spoken up and demanded to give up nuclear energy. The energy issue, however, has become a question of survival. This study, worked out by a group of scientists (natural science, energy science, lawyers, theologians) analyses the obstacles, conditions and consequences of such a step. The possible solution of rational energy utilization and substitution of energy services and regenerative energies is discussed in depth. The book concludes that problems can only be coped with if there is a feeling of joint responsibility and global social consensus. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Investing in CIS: obstacles and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The CIS (Community of Independent States) needs the help of foreign investments to develop its huge hydrocarbon potentialities. Because of the uncertainties concerning the legal and fiscal context of their activities, the role of the international oil companies has remained limited so far. These problems were discussed in May 1996 during an important ''General Session'' of the OTC 96 congress. Proven and explored onshore oil reserves in Russia are enormous, in particular in Western and Eastern Siberia. However, the economically most interesting resources are located in the offshore zones of the Barents, Pechora and Kara seas and of Eastern Siberia and Okhotsk. This paper describes the last years decay of oil production in CIS and its causes, in particular the obstacles to foreign investments (exportation and transport taxes), the recent contracts and joint-ventures with American major companies (Exxon, Amoco..), and the situation of the Russian industry in petroleum engineering and field exploitation materials. (J.S.)

  19. International Cooperation in Physics - Opportunities and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, James P.

    2000-03-01

    The rapid advances in high speed digital communications are making new scientific achievements feasible. This presents a new opportunity for all scientists, especially those in developing countries, to participate in world-class science at a reasonable cost. ``Virtual Laboratories" or ``Collaboratories" provide promising mechanisms to bridge geographical boundaries and infrastructure disparities. While science and technology are recognized as engines of economic development, they are also keys to addressing societal problems and fostering peace. Following the historical precedent of CERN founded after World War II, an initiative organized by UNESCO to create a world-class research institute in the Middle East is underway. A synchrotron light-source is being offered by Germany as the key experimental facility. This project called ``Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East" or ``SESAME" offers a special opportunity for basic and applied science in the Arab nations of the Middle East to take a giant leap forward. I will review the current status of this initiative and indicate the opportunities and challenges for countries of the Middle East. An emerging mega-science project in Astronomy is the ``Southern Africa Large Telescope" or ``SALT" which, when completed, will be the Southern Hemisphere's largest single telescope. University partners in the US are pledging support for SALT’s construction and operation. SALT promises to become a focal point of world-class basic science in Sub-Saharan Africa. The primary obstacles to international cooperation involving scientists in developing countries stem from scarce financial resources needed to allow potential collaborators to meet and explore where the win-win opportunities reside. Follow up support is a second major obstacle.

  20. Directed cell migration in the presence of obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grima Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotactic movement is a common feature of many cells and microscopic organisms. In vivo, chemotactic cells have to follow a chemotactic gradient and simultaneously avoid the numerous obstacles present in their migratory path towards the chemotactic source. It is not clear how cells detect and avoid obstacles, in particular whether they need a specialized biological mechanism to do so. Results We propose that cells can sense the presence of obstacles and avoid them because obstacles interfere with the chemical field. We build a model to test this hypothesis and find that this naturally enables efficient at-a-distance sensing to be achieved with no need for a specific and active obstacle-sensing mechanism. We find that (i the efficiency of obstacle avoidance depends strongly on whether the chemotactic chemical reacts or remains unabsorbed at the obstacle surface. In particular, it is found that chemotactic cells generally avoid absorbing barriers much more easily than non-absorbing ones. (ii The typically low noise in a cell's motion hinders the ability to avoid obstacles. We also derive an expression estimating the typical distance traveled by chemotactic cells in a 3D random distribution of obstacles before capture; this is a measure of the distance over which chemotaxis is viable as a means of directing cells from one point to another in vivo. Conclusion Chemotactic cells, in many cases, can avoid obstacles by simply following the spatially perturbed chemical gradients around obstacles. It is thus unlikely that they have developed specialized mechanisms to cope with environments having low to moderate concentrations of obstacles.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF FRANCHISING IN CROATIA OBSTACLES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alpeza, Mirela; Erceg, Aleksandar; Oberman Peterka, Sunčica

    2015-01-01

    Franchising is very popular growth model but despite the wide application of franchising in the developed countries of the world, its impact on the Croatian economy is still marginal. The purpose of this research is to identify the obstacles and challenges to a wider application of franchising in Croatia and generate policy recommendations for removing the identified obstacles. Obstacles and recommendations are identified on the basis of a conducted longitudinal qualitative research, the firs...

  2. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  3. Obstacles to the use of natural gas in electric markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A brief overview of the New England Electric System (NEES) and its current and planned natural gas fired generation is presented. Some statistics are given that indicate that electric generation is the biggest growth market for natural gas, underscoring the importance of overcoming the obstacles to the use of gas in electric generation markets. What is seen as the major obstacles to gas use in the electric power industry and some ways to overcome these obstacles are reviewed

  4. S-Wave Velocity Structure beneath Southwest North America from Seismogram Comparisons of the Mexico Earthquake on 22 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagus Jaya Santosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates earth structure beneath the Southwest North America landmass, especially between Mexico and California. Models based on S wave velocities for this area were obtained by carrying out seismogram fitting in time domain and three Cartesian components simultaneously. The data used is from an event, coded as C052297B that occurred in the state of Guerrero, Mexico and it was fitted to synthetic data computed with the GEMINI program at TS network stations. Earth model IASPEI91 and SPREM were used as input to create the synthetic data. Real and synthetic seismograms were subjected to a low-pass filter with a frequency corner of 20 mHz.Waveform analysis results show very unsystematic and strong deviations in the waveform, arrival times, amount of oscillation and the height of the wave amplitude. Discrepancies are met on S, Love, Rayleigh and ScS waves, where the stations epicentral distances are below 300. Deviation in analysis waveform because of the usage of model 1-D of SPREM and IASPEI91, because the 1-D was a kind of average value an elastic property at one particular depth of global earth. With the method of waveform analysis we can see how sensitive waveform is to structures within the layers of the Earth.To explain the discrepancies, a correction to the earth structure is essential. The corrections account for the thickness of the crust, speed gradient of bh, the coefficient for the bh and bv in the upper mantle for surface wave fitting, a small variation of the S speed structure at a layer under the upper mantle above 771 km for S wave fitting, and a small variation at the base the mantle layers for ScS wave fitting. At some stations, a correction for S speed structure have yielded P wave fitting. Results of this research indicate that the 1-D earth model obtained through seismogram fitting at every hypocenter-observation station pair is unique. The S-wave velocity on the upper mantle has strong negative anomalies. This

  5. Obstacle detection by stereo vision of fast correlation matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seung Hoon; Kim, Byung Kook

    1997-01-01

    Mobile robot navigation needs acquiring positions of obstacles in real time. A common method for performing this sensing is through stereo vision. In this paper, indoor images are acquired by binocular vision, which contains various shapes of obstacles. From these stereo image data, in order to obtain distances to obstacles, we must deal with the correspondence problem, or get the region in the other image corresponding to the projection of the same surface region. We present an improved correlation matching method enhancing the speed of arbitrary obstacle detection. The results are faster, simple matching, robustness to noise, and improvement of precision. Experimental results under actual surroundings are presented to reveal the performance. (author)

  6. Effect of form of obstacle on speed of crowd evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the form of an obstacle on the time that a crowd takes to evacuate a room, using a toy model. Pedestrians are modeled as active soft matter moving toward a point with intended velocities. An obstacle is placed in front of the exit, and it has one of four shapes: a cylindrical column, a triangular prism, a quadratic prism, or a diamond prism. Numerical results indicate that the evacuation-completion time depends on the shape of the obstacle. Obstacles with a circular cylinder (C.C.) shape yield the shortest evacuation-completion time in the proposed model.

  7. Locomotor circumvention strategies are altered by stroke: I. Obstacle clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darekar, Anuja; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2017-06-15

    Functional locomotion requires the ability to adapt to environmental challenges such as the presence of stationary or moving obstacles. Difficulties in obstacle circumvention often lead to restricted community ambulation in individuals with stroke. The objective of this study was to contrast obstacle circumvention strategies between post-stroke (n = 12) and healthy individuals (n = 12) performing locomotor and perceptuomotor (joystick navigation) tasks with different obstacle approaches. Participants walked and navigated with a joystick towards a central target, in a virtual environment simulating a large room, while avoiding an obstacle that either remained stationary at the pre-determined point of intersection or moved from head-on or diagonally 30° left/right. The outcome measures included dynamic clearance (DC), instantaneous distance from obstacle at crossing (IDC), number of collisions and preferred side of circumvention. These measures were compared between groups (stroke vs. healthy), obstacle parameter (stationary vs. moving head-on) and direction of approach (left/paretic vs. right/non-paretic). DC was significantly larger when circumventing a moving obstacle that approached head-on as compared to a stationary obstacle for both groups during both tasks, while not significantly different in either diagonal approach in either group. IDC was smaller in the stroke group while walking and larger in both groups during joystick navigation when avoiding moving as compared to stationary obstacle. IDC was significantly larger in the stroke group compared to controls for diagonal approaches during walking, wherein two different strategies emerged amongst individuals with stroke: circumventing to the same (V same n = 6) or opposite (V opp n = 4) side of obstacle approach. This behavior was not seen in the perceptuomotor task, wherein post-stroke participants circumvented to opposite side of the obstacle approach as seen in healthy participants. In the

  8. Performance characteristics of solar air heater with surface mounted obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekele, Adisu; Mishra, Manish; Dutta, Sushanta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar air heater with delta shaped obstacles have been studied. • Obstacle angle of incidence strongly affects the thermo-hydraulic performance. • Thermal performance of obstacle mounted collectors is superior to smooth collectors. • Thermo-hydraulic performance of the present SAH is higher than those in previous studies. - Abstract: The performance of conventional solar air heaters (SAHs) can be improved by providing obstacles on the heated wall (i.e. on the absorber plate). Experiments have been performed to collect heat transfer and flow-friction data from an air heater duct with delta-shaped obstacles mounted on the absorber surface and having an aspect ratio 6:1 resembling the conditions close to the solar air heaters. This study encompassed for the range of Reynolds number (Re) from 2100 to 30,000, relative obstacle height (e/H) from 0.25 to 0.75, relative obstacle longitudinal pitch (P l /e) from 3/2 to 11/2, relative obstacle transverse pitch (P t /b) from 1 to 7/3 and the angle of incidence (α) varied from 30° to 90°. The thermo-hydraulic performance characteristics of SAH have been compared with the previous published works and the optimum range of the geometries have been explored for the better performance of such air-heaters compared to the other designs of solar air heaters

  9. Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin's theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that…

  10. Foot strike patterns after obstacle clearance during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Shane D; Stergiou, Nicholas; Hreljac, Alan; Houser, Jeremy; Blanke, Daniel; Alberts, L Russell

    2002-01-01

    Running over obstacles of sufficient height requires heel strike (HS) runners to make a transition in landing strategy to a forefoot (FF) strike, resulting in similar ground reaction force patterns to those observed while landing from a jump. Identification of the biomechanical variables that distinguish between the landing strategies may offer some insight into the reasons that the transition occurs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in foot strike patterns and kinetic parameters of heel strike runners between level running and running over obstacles of various heights. Ten heel strike subjects ran at their self-selected pace under seven different conditions: unperturbed running (no obstacle) and over obstacles of six different heights (10%, 12.5%, 15%, 17.5%, 20%, and 22.5% of their standing height). The obstacle was placed directly before a Kistler force platform. Repeated measures ANOVAs were performed on the subject means of selected kinetic parameters. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences (P strike patterns were affected by the increased obstacle height. Between the 12.5% and 15% obstacle conditions, the group response changed from a heel strike to a forefoot strike pattern. At height > 15%, the pattern was more closely related to the foot strike patterns found in jumping activities. This strategy change may represent a gait transition effected as a mechanism to protect against increased impact forces. Greater involvement of the ankle and the calf muscles could have assisted in attenuating the increased impact forces while maintaining speed after clearing the obstacle.

  11. Biologically-Inspired Adaptive Obstacle Negotiation Behavior of Hexapod Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis eGoldschmidt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurobiological studies have shown that insects are able to adapt leg movements and posture for obstacle negotiation in changing environments. Moreover, the distance to an obstacle where an insect begins to climb is found to be a major parameter for successful obstacle negotiation. Inspired by these findings, we present an adaptive neural control mechanism for obstacle negotiation behavior in hexapod robots. It combines locomotion control, backbone joint control, local leg reflexes, and neural learning. While the first three components generate locomotion including walking and climbing, the neural learning mechanism allows the robot to adapt its behavior for obstacle negotiation with respect to changing conditions, e.g., variable obstacle heights and different walking gaits. By successfully learning the association of an early, predictive signal (conditioned stimulus, CS and a late, reflex signal (unconditioned stimulus, UCS, both provided by ultrasonic sensors at the front of the robot, the robot can autonomously find an appropriate distance from an obstacle to initiate climbing. The adaptive neural control was developed and tested first on a physical robot simulation, and was then successfully transferred to a real hexapod robot, called AMOS II. The results show that the robot can efficiently negotiate obstacles with a height up to 85% of the robot's leg length in simulation and 75% in a real environment.

  12. Minimum-link paths among obstacles in the plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, J.S.B.; Rote, G.; Woeginger, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    Given a set of nonintersecting polygonal obstacles in the plane, thelink distance between two pointss andt is the minimum number of edges required to form a polygonal path connectings tot that avoids all obstacles. We present an algorithm that computes the link distance (and a corresponding

  13. Swarm Robotics with Circular Formation Motion Including Obstacles Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil M. Hewahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The robots science has been developed over the past few years, where robots have become used to accomplish difficult, repetitive or accurate tasks, which are very hard for humans to carry out. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to control the motion of a swarm of robots and make them able to avoid obstacles. The proposed solution is based on forming the robots in circular fashion. A group set of robots consists of multiple groups of robots, each group of robots consists of robots forming a circular shape and each group set is a circular form of robots. The proposed algorithm is concerned with first locating the randomly generated robots in groups and secondly with the swarm robot motion and finally with the swarm obstacle avoidance and swarm reorganization after crossing the obstacle. The proposed algorithm has been simulated with five different obstacles with various numbers of randomly generated robots. The results show that the swarm in the circular form can deal with the obstacles very effectively by passing the obstacles smoothly. The proposed algorithm has been compared with flocking algorithm and it is shown that the circular formation algorithm does not need extensive computation after obstacle avoidance whereas the flocking algorithm needs extensive computation. In addition, the circular formation algorithm maintains every robot in its group after avoiding the obstacles whereas with flocking algorithm does not.

  14. 2.5D S-wave velocity model of the TESZ area in northern Poland from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function (RF) locally provides the signature of sharp seismic discontinuities and information about the shear wave (S-wave) velocity distribution beneath the seismic station. The data recorded by "13 BB Star" broadband seismic stations (Grad et al., 2015) and by few PASSEQ broadband seismic stations (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2008) are analysed to investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in northern Poland. The TESZ is one of the most prominent suture zones in Europe separating the young Palaeozoic platform from the much older Precambrian East European craton. Compilation of over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles, vertical seismic profiling in over one hundred thousand boreholes and magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods allowed for creation a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Grad et al. 2016). On the other hand the receiver function methods give an opportunity for creation the S-wave velocity model. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) are used to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. 3D P-wave velocity model are interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and synthetic back-azimuthal sections of receiver function are calculated for different Vp/Vs ratio. Densities are calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Next, the synthetic back-azimuthal sections of RF are compared with observed back-azimuthal sections of RF for "13 BB Star" and PASSEQ seismic stations to find the best 2.5D S-wave models down to 60 km depth. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  15. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  16. S-Wave Velocity Structure of the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) Site Using Microtremor Array Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Huey-Chu

    2015-10-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) drilled a 2-km-deep hole 2.4 km east of the surface rupture of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake ( M w 7.6), near the town of Dakeng. Geophysical well logs at the TCDP site were run over depths ranging from 500 to 1,900 m to obtain the physical properties of the fault zones and adjacent damage zones. These data provide good reference material for examining the validity of velocity structures using microtremor array measurement; therefore, we conduct array measurements for a total of four arrays at two sites near the TCDP drilling sites. The phase velocities at frequencies of 0.2-5 Hz are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber ( f- k) spectrum method. Then the S-wave velocity structures are estimated by employing surface wave inversion techniques. The S-wave velocity from the differential inversion technique gradually increases from 1.52 to 2.22 km/s at depths between 585 and 1,710 m. This result is similar to those from the velocity logs, which range from 1.4 km/s at a depth of 597 m to 2.98 km/s at a depth of 1,705 m. The stochastic inversion results are similar to those from the seismic reflection methods and the lithostratigraphy of TCDP-A borehole, comparatively. These results show that microtremor array measurement provides a good tool for estimating deep S-wave velocity structure.

  17. Induced vibrations facilitate traversal of cluttered obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, George; Yu, Siyuan; Kang, Yucheng; Li, Chen

    When negotiating cluttered terrains such as grass-like beams, cockroaches and legged robots with rounded body shapes most often rolled their bodies to traverse narrow gaps between beams. Recent locomotion energy landscape modeling suggests that this locomotor pathway overcomes the lowest potential energy barriers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that body vibrations induced by intermittent leg-ground contact facilitate obstacle traversal by allowing exploration of locomotion energy landscape to find this lowest barrier pathway. To mimic a cockroach / legged robot pushing against two adjacent blades of grass, we developed an automated robotic system to move an ellipsoidal body into two adjacent beams, and varied body vibrations by controlling an oscillation actuator. A novel gyroscope mechanism allowed the body to freely rotate in response to interaction with the beams, and an IMU and cameras recorded the motion of the body and beams. We discovered that body vibrations facilitated body rolling, significantly increasing traversal probability and reducing traversal time (P locomotor pathways in complex 3-D terrains.

  18. Logical obstacles in learning planetary motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, V.; Sathe, D. V.

    Daniel Schaffer wrote now-a-days scientists and particularly theoretical physicists are not held in unquestioned esteem in his editorial This became the starting point of my presentation which was dedicated to the memory of Abdus Salam 1 Had he survived to witness the IYP he would have become surprised on knowing that Frank Wilczek had maximum trouble in learning classical mechanics 2 These facts require us to restudy learning O level physics from the logical point of view - in order to attract promising young students to take up challenges of physics and astronomy of the 21 st century Newton s laws of motion are known for more than 300 years and so there should not be any problems in learning and teaching these laws now in the 21 st century But findings of educators reported in the last 30 years show that there are some serious and global problems I have shown that there are some logical obstacles which make adverse effect on the comprehension of circular motion and related topics 3 In this presentation relevant aspects are discussed References begin enumerate item D V Sathe August 2001 Chemical Education International http www iupac org publications cei vol2 0201x0026 html item Frank Wilczek October 2004 Physics Today p 11 item D V Sathe December 2001 COSPAR Info Bulletin 152 p 53 end enumerate

  19. Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Undersea Vehicle in Unknown Unstructured Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheping Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To avoid obstacle in the unknown environment for unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV, an obstacle avoiding system based on improved vector field histogram (VFH is designed. Forward looking sonar is used to detect the environment, and the divisional sonar modal is applied to deal with the measure uncertainty. To adapt to the VFH, rolling occupancy grids are used for the map building, and high accuracy details of local environment are obtained. The threshold is adaptively adjusted by the statistic of obstacles to solve the problem that VFH is sensitive to threshold. To improve the environment adaptability, the hybrid-behaviors strategy is proposed, which selects the optimal avoidance command according to the motion status and environment character. The simulation shows that UUV could avoid the obstacles fast and escape from the U shape obstacles.

  20. Simulation of Molecular Transport in Systems Containing Mobile Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanowski, Piotr; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2016-08-04

    In this paper, we investigate the movement of molecules in crowded environments with obstacles undergoing Brownian motion by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Our investigations were performed using the dynamic lattice liquid model, which was based on the cooperative movement concept and allowed to mimic systems at high densities where the motion of all elements (obstacles as well as moving particles) were highly correlated. The crowded environments are modeled on a two-dimensional triangular lattice containing obstacles (particles whose mobility was significantly reduced) moving by a Brownian motion. The subdiffusive motion of both elements in the system was analyzed. It was shown that the percolation transition does not exist in such systems in spite of the cooperative character of the particles' motion. The reduction of the obstacle mobility leads to the longer caging of liquid particles by mobile obstacles.

  1. Charge transport in 2DEG/s-wave superconductor junction with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We study spin-dependent charge transport in superconducting junctions. We consider ballistic two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)/s-wave superconductor junctions with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling (DSOC). We calculate the conductance normalized by that in the normal state of superconductor in order to study the effect of DSOC in 2DEG on conductance, changing the height of insulating barrier. We find the DSOC suppresses the conductance for low insulating barrier, while it can slightly enhance the conductance for high insulating barrier. It has a reentrant dependence on DSOC for middle strength insulating barrier. The effect of DSOC is weaken as the insulating barrier becomes high

  2. Gas-hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2004-05-01

    We estimate the concentration of gas hydrate at the Mallik 2L-38 research site using P- and S-wave velocities obtained from well logging and vertical seismic profiles (VSP). The theoretical velocities are obtained from a generalization of Gassmann's modulus to three phases (rock frame, gas hydrate and fluid). The dry-rock moduli are estimated from the log profiles, in sections where the rock is assumed to be fully saturated with water. We obtain hydrate concentrations up to 75%, average values of 37% and 21% from the VSP P- and S-wave velocities, respectively, and 60% and 57% from the sonic-log P- and S-wave velocities, respectively. The above averages are similar to estimations obtained from hydrate dissociation modeling and Archie methods. The estimations based on the P-wave velocities are more reliable than those based on the S-wave velocities.

  3. Validation of the Wiedemann–Franz law in a granular s-wave superconductor in the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefvand, A; Salehi, H; Shoushtari, M Zargar

    2017-01-01

    The present study tries to evaluate the validity of the Wiedemann–Franz law in a granular s-wave superconductor in the presence of concentrated impurities. By using Green’s function method and the Kubo formula technique, three distinct contributions of the Aslamazov–Larkin, the Maki–Thompson and, the density of states are calculated for both the electrical conductivity and the thermal conductivity in a granular s-wave superconductor. It is demonstrated that these different contributions to the fluctuation conductivity depend differently on the tunneling because of their different natures. This study examines the transport in a granular superconductor system in three dimensions in the limit of large tunneling conductance, which makes it possible to ignore all localization effects and the Coulomb interaction. We find that the tunneling is efficient near the critical temperature and that there is a crossover to the characteristic behavior of a homogeneous system. When it is far from the critical temperature, the tunneling is not effective and the system behaves as an ensemble of real zero-dimensional grains. The results show that the Wiedemann–Franz law is violated in both temperature regions. (paper)

  4. Further study of the ππ S-wave isoscalar amplitude below the K(anti)K threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K.

    1999-01-01

    We continue the analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction π - p→π + π - n involving the data obtained by the CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration on a transversely polarized target at 17.2 GeV π - momentum. This study deals with the region below the (anti)KK threshold. In particular, we study the ''up-steep'' solution containing a narrow S-wave resonance under the ρ(770). This solution exhibits a considerable inelasticity η which does not have any physical interpretation. Assuming that this inelasticity behaviour represents an unlikely fluctuation we impose η≡1 for all data points. This leads to non-physical results in one third of the π + π - effective mass bins and in the remaining mass bins some parameters behave in a queer way. The situation is even worse for the ''down-steep'' solution. We conclude that the 17.2 GeV data cannot be described by a relatively narrow f 0 (750). The ''down-flat'' and ''up-flat'' solutions which easily pass the η≡1 constraint exhibit a slow increase of phase shifts in the ρ(770) mass range. (author)

  5. Semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Xiao, Ying [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Information Engineering, Tangshan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B{sub c} branching fractions to J/ψπ{sup +} and J/ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ} final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B{sub c} → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B{sub c} meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10{sup -7} up to 10{sup -2} and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψπ{sup +}))/(BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ})) is in good agreement with the data. For B{sub c} → Vlν{sub l} decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  6. Semileptonic decays of B_c meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B_c branching fractions to J/ψπ"+ and J/ψμ"+ν_μ final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B_c meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B_c → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B_c meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10"-"7 up to 10"-"2 and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B_c"+→J/Ψπ"+))/(BR(B_c"+→J/Ψμ"+ν_μ)) is in good agreement with the data. For B_c → Vlν_l decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  7. Further study of the $\\pi\\pi$ S-wave isoscalar amplitude below the $K\\overline{K}$ threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, R; Rybicki, K; CERN-Cracow-Munich

    2000-01-01

    We continue the analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction pi /sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/n involving the data obtained by the CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration on a transversely polarized target at 17.2 GeV/c pi /sup $/momentum. This study deals with the region below the KK threshold. In particular, we study the "up-steep" solution containing a narrow S-wave resonance under the rho (770). This solution exhibits a considerable inelasticity eta which does not have any physical interpretation. Assuming that this inelasticity behaviour represents an unlikely fluctuation we impose eta identical to 1 for all data points. This leads to non-physical results in one third of the pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ effective mass bins and in the remaining mass bins some parameters behave in a queer way. The situation is even worse for the "down-steep" solution. We conclude that the 17.2 GeV data cannot be described by a relatively narrow f/sub 0/(750). The "down-flat" and "up-flat" solutions which easily pass the ...

  8. Obstacles to and motivation for successful breast-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-M Bergh

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determined obstetric physiotherapists' perceptions about major obstacles to and methods of motivation for successful breast-feeding by means of the Friedman non-parametric procedure for the two-way analysis of variance. Three categories of obstacles were identified: maternal obstacles, health professionals and society. Maternal obstacles mentioned most were insufficient motivation (25% and knowledge (24%, anxiety (14%, fatigue (14%, and employment (14%. Obstacles related to health professionals included tack of support for mothers (20%, inappropriate lactation management (19%, lack of knowledge (15%, negative attitudes (5% and staff shortages (5%. With regard to society, lack of support (27% and life-styles (29% were identified as significant obstacles. The two most significantly important methods of motivation were information and education (53% and contact with other breast-feeders (27%. It is concluded that breast-feeding education efforts can be improved by identifying obstacles to breast-feeding and methods of motivation and that the Friedman test may be a statistical procedure to consider for determining priorities.

  9. Multiple Moving Obstacles Avoidance of Service Robot using Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Jazidie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a multiple moving obstacles avoidance using stereo vision for service robots in indoor environments. We assume that this model of service robot is used to deliver a cup to the recognized customer from the starting point to the destination. The contribution of this research is a new method for multiple moving obstacle avoidance with Bayesian approach using stereo camera. We have developed and introduced 3 main modules to recognize faces, to identify multiple moving obstacles and to maneuver of robot. A group of people who is walking will be tracked as a multiple moving obstacle, and the speed, direction, and distance of the moving obstacles is estimated by a stereo camera in order that the robot can maneuver to avoid the collision. To overcome the inaccuracies of vision sensor, Bayesian approach is used for estimate the absense and direction of obstacles. We present the results of the experiment of the service robot called Srikandi III which uses our proposed method and we also evaluate its performance. Experiments shown that our proposed method working well, and Bayesian approach proved increasing the estimation perform for absence and direction of moving obstacle.

  10. A stereo vision-based obstacle detection system in vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Park, Jaehak; Hwang, Junyeon; Hong, Daegun

    2008-02-01

    Obstacle detection is a crucial issue for driver assistance systems as well as for autonomous vehicle guidance function and it has to be performed with high reliability to avoid any potential collision with the front vehicle. The vision-based obstacle detection systems are regarded promising for this purpose because they require little infrastructure on a highway. However, the feasibility of these systems in passenger car requires accurate and robust sensing performance. In this paper, an obstacle detection system using stereo vision sensors is developed. This system utilizes feature matching, epipoplar constraint and feature aggregation in order to robustly detect the initial corresponding pairs. After the initial detection, the system executes the tracking algorithm for the obstacles. The proposed system can detect a front obstacle, a leading vehicle and a vehicle cutting into the lane. Then, the position parameters of the obstacles and leading vehicles can be obtained. The proposed obstacle detection system is implemented on a passenger car and its performance is verified experimentally.

  11. Echoic Sensory Substitution Information in a Single Obstacle Circumvention Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Scarfe, Amy C; Moore, Brian C J; Pardhan, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Accurate motor control is required when walking around obstacles in order to avoid collisions. When vision is unavailable, sensory substitution can be used to improve locomotion through the environment. Tactile sensory substitution devices (SSDs) are electronic travel aids, some of which indicate the distance of an obstacle using the rate of vibration of a transducer on the skin. We investigated how accurately such an SSD guided navigation in an obstacle circumvention task. Using an SSD, 12 blindfolded participants navigated around a single flat 0.6 x 2 m obstacle. A 3-dimensional Vicon motion capture system was used to quantify various kinematic indices of human movement. Navigation performance under full vision was used as a baseline for comparison. The obstacle position was varied from trial to trial relative to the participant, being placed at two distances 25 cm to the left, right or directly ahead. Under SSD guidance, participants navigated without collision in 93% of trials. No collisions occurred under visual guidance. Buffer space (clearance between the obstacle and shoulder) was larger by a factor of 2.1 with SSD guidance than with visual guidance, movement times were longer by a factor of 9.4, and numbers of velocity corrections were larger by a factor of 5 (all p<0.05). Participants passed the obstacle on the side affording the most space in the majority of trials for both SSD and visual guidance conditions. The results are consistent with the idea that SSD information can be used to generate a protective envelope during locomotion in order to avoid collisions when navigating around obstacles, and to pass on the side of the obstacle affording the most space in the majority of trials.

  12. Echoic Sensory Substitution Information in a Single Obstacle Circumvention Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Kolarik

    Full Text Available Accurate motor control is required when walking around obstacles in order to avoid collisions. When vision is unavailable, sensory substitution can be used to improve locomotion through the environment. Tactile sensory substitution devices (SSDs are electronic travel aids, some of which indicate the distance of an obstacle using the rate of vibration of a transducer on the skin. We investigated how accurately such an SSD guided navigation in an obstacle circumvention task. Using an SSD, 12 blindfolded participants navigated around a single flat 0.6 x 2 m obstacle. A 3-dimensional Vicon motion capture system was used to quantify various kinematic indices of human movement. Navigation performance under full vision was used as a baseline for comparison. The obstacle position was varied from trial to trial relative to the participant, being placed at two distances 25 cm to the left, right or directly ahead. Under SSD guidance, participants navigated without collision in 93% of trials. No collisions occurred under visual guidance. Buffer space (clearance between the obstacle and shoulder was larger by a factor of 2.1 with SSD guidance than with visual guidance, movement times were longer by a factor of 9.4, and numbers of velocity corrections were larger by a factor of 5 (all p<0.05. Participants passed the obstacle on the side affording the most space in the majority of trials for both SSD and visual guidance conditions. The results are consistent with the idea that SSD information can be used to generate a protective envelope during locomotion in order to avoid collisions when navigating around obstacles, and to pass on the side of the obstacle affording the most space in the majority of trials.

  13. Using Thermal Radiation in Detection of Negative Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A method of automated detection of negative obstacles (potholes, ditches, and the like) ahead of ground vehicles at night involves processing of imagery from thermal-infrared cameras aimed at the terrain ahead of the vehicles. The method is being developed as part of an overall obstacle-avoidance scheme for autonomous and semi-autonomous offroad robotic vehicles. The method could also be applied to help human drivers of cars and trucks avoid negative obstacles -- a development that may entail only modest additional cost inasmuch as some commercially available passenger cars are already equipped with infrared cameras as aids for nighttime operation.

  14. Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

    2010-06-01

    Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

  15. The efficient presentation - obstacles, strategies, success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Radu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The making of presentations has become an omnipresent act of communication in the companies practice, but also in the didactic one. The notoriety and the increase of the importance of an efficient presentation lie in the transformations felt by a society of knowledge, communication being the answer in front of a constant information wave.Business people look in fear at the preparation of a presentation, the interaction with the audience andtheir feedback, all these leading to a low efficiency in transmitting the message.The speaker must overcome a group of obstacles, the most important being the reduced human capacityto capture the information transmitted orally; in this respect, he has available a group of visual instruments and strategies to capture the attention. In order to achieve efficiency one needs mental and emotional preparation, knowing the audience and the presentation’s objective and eliminating the old listing format in PowerPoint, for focusing the communication of the audience’s necessities. The present essay aims to analyze the verbal, non-verbal and para-verbal communication act that constitutes the base of any presentation, the reasons that lead to failure and the ways to increase efficiency, in order to succeed in transmitting a well structured and easy to remember message.Many researchers and practice workers within the communication, economic but also IT fields, have tried to find the solution for organizing and transmitting the message during a presentation, in accordance with the new technologies. In elaborating the present paper, we have used our personal experience and data obtained through 30 in-depth interviews,with managers in companies such Bostina Asociatii Skoda, Petrom etc.; we have used in our research articles of honored professors in social sciences from the Harvard and Stanford Universities , researches of the Minnesota and Ulster Universities, as well as works of specialists in marketing and information

  16. 76 FR 4061 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ..., Randolph County, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig El Dorado, KS, Captain Jack Thomas/El Dorado... Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 3 Cook, MN, Cook Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Duluth, MN...

  17. Ultrasonic P- and S-Wave Attenuation and Petrophysical Properties of Deccan Flood Basalts, India, as Revealed by Borehole Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanti, Nimisha; Malkoti, Ajay; Pandey, O. P.; Shrivastava, J. P.

    2018-03-01

    Petrophysical properties and ultrasonic P- and S-wave attenuation measurements on 35 Deccan basalt core specimens, recovered from Killari borehole site in western India, provide unique reference data-sets for a lesser studied Deccan Volcanic Province. These samples represent 338-m-thick basaltic column, consisting four lava flows each of Ambenali and Poladpur Formations, belonging to Wai Subgroup of the Deccan volcanic sequence. These basalt samples are found to be iron-rich (average FeOT: 13.4 wt%), but relatively poor in silica content (average SiO2: 47.8 wt%). The saturated massive basalt cores are characterized by a mean density of 2.91 g/cm3 (range 2.80-3.01 g/cm3) and mean P- and S-wave velocities of 5.89 km/s (range 5.01-6.50 km/s) and 3.43 km/s (range 2.84-3.69 km/s), respectively. In comparison, saturated vesicular basalt cores show a wide range in density (2.40-2.79 g/cm3) as well as P-wave (3.28-4.78 km/s) and S-wave (1.70-2.95 km/s) velocities. Based on the present study, the Deccan volcanic sequence can be assigned a weighted mean density of 2.74 g/cm3 and a low V p and V s of 5.00 and 3.00 km/s, respectively. Such low velocities in Deccan basalts can be attributed mainly to the presence of fine-grained glassy material, high iron contents, and hydrothermally altered secondary mineral products, besides higher porosity in vesicular samples. The measured Q values in saturated massive basalt cores vary enormously (Q p: 33-1960 and Q s: 35-506), while saturated vesicular basalt samples exhibit somewhat lesser variation in Q p (6-46) as well as Q s (5-49). In general, high-porosity rocks exhibit high attenuation, but we observed the high value of attenuation in some of the massive basalt core samples also. In such cases, energy loss is mainly due to the presence of fine-grained glassy material as well as secondary alteration products like chlorophaeite, that could contribute to intrinsic attenuation. Dominance of weekly bound secondary minerals might also be

  18. Sedimentation control in the reservoirs by using an obstacle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University, Ahwaz, Iran. 3Department of ... some experiments were carried out without an obstacle. Results showed ..... Design and management of dams, reservoirs and watersheds ...

  19. UOBPRM: A uniformly distributed obstacle-based PRM

    KAUST Repository

    Yeh, Hsin-Yi; Thomas, Shawna; Eppstein, David; Amato, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new sampling method for motion planning that can generate configurations more uniformly distributed on C-obstacle surfaces than prior approaches. Here, roadmap nodes are generated from the intersections between C

  20. Biologically-Inspired Adaptive Obstacle Negotiation Behavior of Hexapod Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    by these findings, we present an adaptive neural control mechanism for obstacle negotiation behavior in hexapod robots. It combines locomotion control, backbone joint control, local leg reflexes, and neural learning. While the first three components generate locomotion including walking and climbing, the neural...... learning mechanism allows the robot to adapt its behavior for obstacle negotiation with respect to changing conditions, e.g., variable obstacle heights and different walking gaits. By successfully learning the association of an early, predictive signal (conditioned stimulus, CS) and a late, reflex signal...... (unconditioned stimulus, UCS), both provided by ultrasonic sensors at the front of the robot, the robot can autonomously find an appropriate distance from an obstacle to initiate climbing. The adaptive neural control was developed and tested first on a physical robot simulation, and was then successfully...

  1. Understanding Obstacles to Peace: Actors, Interests, and Strategies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-24

    Feb 24, 2011 ... Understanding Obstacles to Peace: Actors, Interests, and Strategies in Africa's ... The case studies all employ methods of “thick description” process tracing ... Addressing Africa's unmet need for family planning by intensifying ...

  2. Surrounding Moving Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Driving Using Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection and tracking surrounding moving obstacles such as vehicles and pedestrians are crucial for the safety of mobile robotics and autonomous vehicles. This is especially the case in urban driving scenarios. This paper presents a novel framework for surrounding moving obstacles detection using binocular stereo vision. The contributions of our work are threefold. Firstly, a multiview feature matching scheme is presented for simultaneous stereo correspondence and motion correspondence searching. Secondly, the multiview geometry constraint derived from the relative camera positions in pairs of consecutive stereo views is exploited for surrounding moving obstacles detection. Thirdly, an adaptive particle filter is proposed for tracking of multiple moving obstacles in surrounding areas. Experimental results from real-world driving sequences demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed framework.

  3. Overcoming the Obstacles to Establishing a Democratic State in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Dennis O

    2007-01-01

    .... This project looks at several of those obstacles to democracy in Afghanistan, to include the absence of a democratic history and tradition, an endemic culture of corruption, a pervasive narcotics...

  4. Obstacles to implementation; Huerden auf dem Weg in die Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klempert, Oliver

    2010-11-23

    Photovoltaic systems have always promised autonomy to customers. The new German Renewables Act (Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz) provides reimbursement for self-consumption of power generated on site. However, there are still many obstacles to overcome. (orig.)

  5. OBSTACLES IN THE APPLICATION OF MICROENCAPSULATION IN ISLET TRANSPLANTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVOS, P; WOLTERS, GHJ; FRITSCHY, WM; VANSCHILFGAARDE, R

    Several factors stand in the way of successful clinical transplantation of alginate-polylysine-alginate microencapsulated pancreatic islets. These obstacles can be classified into three categories. The first regards the technical aspects of the production process. Limiting factors are the

  6. Excavating obstacles and enablers to internationalization at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, Jos; Woldegiyorgis, Ayenachew A.; Rumbley, Laura E.; de Wit, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Gives an overview of my research as a visiting scholar at The Boston College Center for International Higher Education. This research classifies these obstacles and enablers in four categories: disciplinary, external, internal and personal.

  7. UOBPRM: A uniformly distributed obstacle-based PRM

    KAUST Repository

    Yeh, Hsin-Yi

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a new sampling method for motion planning that can generate configurations more uniformly distributed on C-obstacle surfaces than prior approaches. Here, roadmap nodes are generated from the intersections between C-obstacles and a set of uniformly distributed fixed-length segments in C-space. The results show that this new sampling method yields samples that are more uniformly distributed than previous obstacle-based methods such as OBPRM, Gaussian sampling, and Bridge test sampling. UOBPRM is shown to have nodes more uniformly distributed near C-obstacle surfaces and also requires the fewest nodes and edges to solve challenging motion planning problems with varying narrow passages. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Advancing Army Women as Senior Leaders - Understanding the Obstacles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellefson, Kristi

    1998-01-01

    This paper examined through research, whether any evidence exists which indicates that, army women are confronted with inherent obstacles as they try to advance through the ranks to senior level positions...

  9. Dynamic Obstacle Clearing for Real-time Character Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Glardon, Pascal; Boulic, Ronan; Thalmann, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to control virtual characters in dynamic environments. A virtual character is animated by a locomotion and jumping engine, enabling production of continuous parameterized motions. At any time during runtime, flat obstacles (e.g. a puddle of water) can be created and placed in front of a character. The method first decides whether the character is able to get around or jump over the obstacle. Then the motion parameters are accordingly modified. The transition...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF FRANCHISING IN CROATIA OBSTACLES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Alpeza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Franchising is very popular growth model but despite the wide application of franchising in the developed countries of the world, its impact on the Croatian economy is still marginal. The purpose of this research is to identify the obstacles and challenges to a wider application of franchising in Croatia and generate policy recommendations for removing the identified obstacles. Obstacles and recommendations are identified on the basis of a conducted longitudinal qualitative research, the first phase of which was conducted in 2006, and second in 2014. The overall results of this research were presented in a form of PEST analysis and compared with the results of the 2006 research aiming to detect changes (improvements/ deterioration in individual areas of the research political, economic, legal and technologic factors of influence on the development of franchising in Croatia. Based on the detected changes, conclusions and policy recommendations were identified.The obstacles can be divided in two categories: franchising specific barriers and general business related obstacles for doing business in Croatia. Without removing most of these obstacles, it is unrealistic to expect high growth of franchising activities in Croatia in near future.

  11. Women’s orgasm obstacles: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoolaltak, Maryam; Keshavarz, Zohreh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Nazari, Ali Mohammad; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Woman’s orgasm plays a vital role in sexual compatibility and marital satisfaction. Orgasm in women is a learnable phenomenon that is influenced by several factors. Objective: The aim of this study is exploring obstacles to orgasm in Iranian married women. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study with directed content analysis approach was conducted in 2015-2016, on 20 Iranian married women who were individually interviewed at two medical clinics in Tehran, Iran. Results: Orgasm obstacles were explored in one category, 4 subcategories, and 25 codes. The main category was “Multidimensionality of women’s orgasm obstacles”. Subcategories and some codes included: Physical obstacles (wife’s or husband’s boredom, vaginal infection, insufficient vaginal lubrication), psychological obstacles (lack of sexual knowledge, shame, lack of concentration on sex due to household and children problems), relational obstacles (husband’s hurry, having a dispute and annoyance with spouse) and contextual obstacles (Irregular sleep hours, lack of privacy and inability to separate children’s bedroom from their parents, lack of peace at home). Conclusion: For prevention or treatment of female orgasm disorders, attention to physical factors is not enough. Obtaining a comprehensive history about physical, psychological, relational and contextual dimensions of woman’s life is necessary. PMID:29082366

  12. The influence of roughness and obstacle on wind power map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abas Ab Wahab; Mohd Fadhil Abas; Mohd Hafiz Ismail

    2006-01-01

    In the development of wind energy in Malaysia, the need for wind power map of Peninsular Malaysia has aroused. The map is needed to help in determining the potential areas where low wind speed wind turbines could operate optimally. In establishing the wind power map the effects of roughness and obstacles have been investigated. Wind data from 24 meteorological stations around the country have been utilized in conjunction with the respective local roughness and obstacles. Two sets of wind power maps have been developed i.e. the wind power maps with and without roughness and obstacles. These two sets of wind power maps exhibit great significant amount of difference in the wind power values especially in the inland areas where the wind power map without roughness and obstacles gives much lower values than those with roughness and obstacles. This paper outlines the process of establishing the two sets of wind power map as well as discussing the influence of roughness and obstacles based on the results obtained

  13. A Hybrid Architecture for Vision-Based Obstacle Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Serdar Güzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new obstacle avoidance method using a single monocular vision camera as the only sensor which is called as Hybrid Architecture. This architecture integrates a high performance appearance-based obstacle detection method into an optical flow-based navigation system. The hybrid architecture was designed and implemented to run both methods simultaneously and is able to combine the results of each method using a novel arbitration mechanism. The proposed strategy successfully fused two different vision-based obstacle avoidance methods using this arbitration mechanism in order to permit a safer obstacle avoidance system. Accordingly, to establish the adequacy of the design of the obstacle avoidance system, a series of experiments were conducted. The results demonstrate the characteristics of the proposed architecture, and the results prove that its performance is somewhat better than the conventional optical flow-based architecture. Especially, the robot employing Hybrid Architecture avoids lateral obstacles in a more smooth and robust manner than when using the conventional optical flow-based technique.

  14. Plant root and shoot dynamics during subsurface obstacle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Nathaniel; Aguilar, Jeffrey; Benfey, Philip; Goldman, Daniel

    As roots grow, they must navigate complex underground environments to anchor and retrieve water and nutrients. From gravity sensing at the root tip to pressure sensing along the tip and elongation zone, the complex mechanosensory feedback system of the root allows it to bend towards greater depths and avoid obstacles of high impedance by asymmetrically suppressing cell elongation. Here we investigate the mechanical and physiological responses of roots to rigid obstacles. We grow Maize, Zea mays, plants in quasi-2D glass containers (22cm x 17cm x 1.4cm) filled with photoelastic gel and observe that, regardless of obstacle interaction, smaller roots branch off the primary root when the upward growing shoot (which contains the first leaf) reaches an average length of 40 mm, coinciding with when the first leaf emerges. However, prior to branching, contacts with obstacles result in reduced root growth rates. The growth rate of the root relative to the shoot is sensitive to the angle of the obstacle surface, whereby the relative root growth is greatest for horizontally oriented surfaces. We posit that root growth is prioritized when horizontal obstacles are encountered to ensure anchoring and access to nutrients during later stages of development. NSF Physics of Living Systems.

  15. Gendered Obstacles Faced by Historical Women in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen M.

    2007-12-01

    A gender gap still exists in modern science; this is especially evident in the fields of physics and astronomy. The cause of such a gap is the center of debate. Is this discrepancy the result of inherent ability or socialization? Most studies have focused on modern issues and how women are socialized today. The role of historical gender perspectives and social opinions in creating the field of modern science and any discrepancies within it has not yet been explored in depth. This project investigates the obstacles faced by historical women in physics and astronomy that stem from the officialized gender biases that accompanied the establishment of modern science. Such obstacles are both formal and informal. Four women were chosen to span the three hundred year period between the standardization of the field and the modern day: Laura Bassi, Mary Somerville, Lise Meitner, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell. The investigation reveals that formal obstacles significantly decreased over the time period, while informal obstacles eroded more gradually. Obstacles also reflected historical events such as the World Wars and the Enlightenment. Trends in obstacles faced by four prominent women physicists indicate that education, finances, support networks, and social opinion played a large role in determining success in the field. The applicability to modern day physics issues and the gender gap is discussed. Many thanks to the Pathways Scholars Program and the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program for funding for this project.

  16. Women’s orgasm obstacles: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nekoolaltak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Woman’s orgasm plays a vital role in sexual compatibility and marital satisfaction. Orgasm in women is a learnable phenomenon that is influenced by several factors. Objective: The aim of this study is exploring obstacles to orgasm in Iranian married women. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study with directed content analysis approach was conducted in 2015-2016, on 20 Iranian married women who were individually interviewed at two medical clinics in Tehran, Iran. Results: Orgasm obstacles were explored in one category, 4 subcategories, and 25 codes. The main category was “Multidimensionality of women’s orgasm obstacles”. Subcategories and some codes included: Physical obstacles (wife’s or husband’s boredom, vaginal infection, insufficient vaginal lubrication, psychological obstacles (lack of sexual knowledge, shame, lack of concentration on sex due to household and children problems, relational obstacles (husband’s hurry, having a dispute and annoyance with spouse and contextual obstacles (Irregular sleep hours, lack of privacy and inability to separate children’s bedroom from their parents, lack of peace at home. Conclusion: For prevention or treatment of female orgasm disorders, attention to physical factors is not enough. Obtaining a comprehensive history about physical, psychological, relational and contextual dimensions of woman’s life is necessary.

  17. Cellular neural networks for motion estimation and obstacle detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Feiden

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle detection is an important part of Video Processing because it is indispensable for a collision prevention of autonomously navigating moving objects. For example, vehicles driving without human guidance need a robust prediction of potential obstacles, like other vehicles or pedestrians. Most of the common approaches of obstacle detection so far use analytical and statistical methods like motion estimation or generation of maps. In the first part of this contribution a statistical algorithm for obstacle detection in monocular video sequences is presented. The proposed procedure is based on a motion estimation and a planar world model which is appropriate to traffic scenes. The different processing steps of the statistical procedure are a feature extraction, a subsequent displacement vector estimation and a robust estimation of the motion parameters. Since the proposed procedure is composed of several processing steps, the error propagation of the successive steps often leads to inaccurate results. In the second part of this contribution it is demonstrated, that the above mentioned problems can be efficiently overcome by using Cellular Neural Networks (CNN. It will be shown, that a direct obstacle detection algorithm can be easily performed, based only on CNN processing of the input images. Beside the enormous computing power of programmable CNN based devices, the proposed method is also very robust in comparison to the statistical method, because is shows much less sensibility to noisy inputs. Using the proposed approach of obstacle detection in planar worlds, a real time processing of large input images has been made possible.

  18. s-wave scattering for deep potentials with attractive tails falling off faster than -1/r2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander; Friedrich, Harald

    2011-01-01

    For potentials with attractive tails, as occur in typical atomic interactions, we present a simple formula for the s-wave phase shift δ 0 . It exposes a universal dependence of δ 0 (E) on the potential tail and the influence of effects specific to a given potential, which enter via the scattering length a, or equivalently, the noninteger part Δ th of the threshold quantum number n th . The formula accurately reproduces δ 0 (E) from threshold up to the semiclassical regime, far beyond the validity of the effective-range expansion. We derive the tail functions occurring in the formula for δ 0 (E) and demonstrate the validity of the formula for attractive potential tails proportional to 1/r 6 or to 1/r 4 , and also for a mixed potential tail consisting of a 1/r 4 term together with a non-negligible 1/r 6 contribution.

  19. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  20. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. II. Double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    The propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method is extended to all four-body processes in electron impact on helium in an S-wave model. Total and energy-differential cross sections are presented with benchmark accuracy for double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation (to autoionizing states) for incident-electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. While the PECS three-body cross sections for this model given in the preceding article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022715 (2010)] are in good agreement with other methods, there are considerable discrepancies for these four-body processes. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the electron-helium system.

  1. Upper mantle seismic structure beneath southwest Africa from finite-frequency P- and S-wave tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southwestern Africa region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by the amphibious WALPASS network. We used 40 temporary stations in southwestern Africa with records for a period of 2 years (the OBS operated...... for 1 year), between November 2010 and November 2012. The array covers a surface area of approximately 600 by 1200 km and is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge, the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Major questions that need to be understood......, probably related to surficial suture zones and the presence of fertile material. A shallower depth extent of the lithospheric plate of ∼100 km was observed beneath the ocean, consistent with plate-cooling models. In addition to tomographic images, the seismic anisotropy measurements within the upper mantle...

  2. Determination of the S-wave scattering shape parameter P from the zero-energy wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermode, M.W.; van Dijk, W.

    1990-01-01

    We show that for S-wave scattering at an energy k 2 by a local potential which supports no more than one bound state, the shape parameter P and coefficients of higher powers of k 2 in the effective range expansion function cotδ=-1/a+1/2 r 0 k 2 -Pr 0 3 k 3 +Qr 0 5 k 6 +..., where δ is the phase shift, may be obtained from the zero-energy wave function, u 0 (r). Thus δ itself may be determined from u 0 . We show that Pr 0 3 =∫ 0 R [β(r)u 0 2 (r)-bar β(r)bar u 0 2 (r)]dr, where r 0 is the effective range, β(r) is determined from an integral involving the wave function, and bar β(r) is a simple function of r which involves the scattering length and effective range

  3. Manipulatable Andreev reflection due to the interplay between the DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yi, Guang-Yu; Han, Yu; Jiang, Cui; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2018-07-01

    We construct one mesoscopic circuit in which one quantum dot couples to one DIII-class topological superconductor and one s-wave superconductor, in addition to its connection with the metallic lead. And then, the Andreev reflection current in the metallic lead is evaluated. It is found that the two kinds of superconductors drive the Andreev reflection in the constructive manner. Next as finite superconducting phase difference is taken into account, the Andreev reflection oscillates in period π/2, and it can be suppressed in the low-energy region if the superconducting phase difference is (n + 1/2) π/2 (n ∈ Integer). Such a result is almost independent of the increase of the intradot Coulomb interaction. Therefore, this structure can assist to realize the manipulation of the Andreev reflection. Also, the result in this work provides useful information for understanding the property of the DIII-class topological superconductor.

  4. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  5. Propagation of spiral waves pinned to circular and rectangular obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthiopad, Malee; Luengviriya, Jiraporn; Porjai, Porramain; Phantu, Metinee; Kanchanawarin, Jarin; Müller, Stefan C; Luengviriya, Chaiya

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of spiral waves pinned to circular and rectangular obstacles with different circumferences in both thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and numerical simulations with the Oregonator model. For circular objects, the area always increases with the circumference. In contrast, we varied the circumference of rectangles with equal areas by adjusting their width w and height h. For both obstacle forms, the propagating parameters (i.e., wavelength, wave period, and velocity of pinned spiral waves) increase with the circumference, regardless of the obstacle area. Despite these common features of the parameters, the forms of pinned spiral waves depend on the obstacle shapes. The structures of spiral waves pinned to circles as well as rectangles with the ratio w/h∼1 are similar to Archimedean spirals. When w/h increases, deformations of the spiral shapes are observed. For extremely thin rectangles with w/h≫1, these shapes can be constructed by employing semicircles with different radii which relate to the obstacle width and the core diameter of free spirals.

  6. Interaction of turbulent deflagrations with representative flow obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, B.; Ardey, N.; Mayinger, F.

    1997-01-01

    In the case of a gradual release of hydrogen in the course of an assumed, severe accident in a light water reactor, the combustion will normally start out as a slow deflagration. Acceleration of an initially slow flame due to interactions of chemical kinetics and turbulent heat and mass transfer can result in very high flame speeds. Therefore, in order to assess hydrogen mitigation techniques, detailed knowledge about flame acceleration and interaction of flames with obstacles is required. The reported investigations are aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms responsible for turbulent flame acceleration and improving present correlations for estimates and models for numerical simulations of hydrogen combustion processes. A medium-scale square cross-section setup is employed, using flow obstacles with shapes representative for reactor containments. The global flame speed is deduced from measurements using thermocouples, pressure transducers and photodiodes. Measurements using a two-component LDA-system are being carried through in order to correlate global flame spread and local turbulence parameters. Results indicate that low blockage-ratio obstacles only marginally influence the flame, as disturbances which are induced remain local to the vicinity of the obstacle and die out very quickly downstream thereof. Flow visualizations by means of a Schlieren setup indicate very complex flow structures in the vicinity of obstacles. The results are being used to validate turbulent reaction models. A model based on probability density functions (pdf) of assumed shape has been developed and initial calculations are presented. (author)

  7. High frequency measurement of P- and S-wave velocities on crystalline rock massif surface - methodology of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Slavík, Lubomír

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of non-destructive monitoring of rock properties in the underground excavation it is possible to perform repeated high-accuracy P- and S-wave velocity measurements. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained during the preparation of micro-seismic long-term monitoring system. The field velocity measurements were made by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock outcrop (granite) in Bedrichov gallery (northern Bohemia). The gallery at the experimental site was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) and it is used for drinking water supply, which is conveyed in a pipe. The stable measuring system and its automatic operation lead to the use of piezoceramic transducers both as a seismic source and as a receiver. The length of measuring base at gallery wall was from 0.5 to 3 meters. Different transducer coupling possibilities were tested namely with regard of repeatability of velocity determination. The arrangement of measuring system on the surface of the rock massif causes better sensitivity of S-transducers for P-wave measurement compared with the P-transducers. Similarly P-transducers were found more suitable for S-wave velocity determination then P-transducers. The frequency dependent attenuation of fresh rock massif results in limited frequency content of registered seismic signals. It was found that at the distance between the seismic source and receiver from 0.5 m the frequency components above 40 kHz are significantly attenuated. Therefore for the excitation of seismic wave 100 kHz transducers are most suitable. The limited frequency range should be also taken into account for the shape of electric impulse used for exciting of piezoceramic transducer. The spike pulse generates broad-band seismic signal, short in the time domain. However its energy after low-pass filtration in the rock is significantly lower than the energy of seismic signal generated by square wave pulse. Acknowledgments: This work was partially

  8. C1,1 regularity for degenerate elliptic obstacle problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalopoulos, Panagiota; Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2016-03-01

    The Heston stochastic volatility process is a degenerate diffusion process where the degeneracy in the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the square root of the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. The generator of this process with killing, called the elliptic Heston operator, is a second-order, degenerate-elliptic partial differential operator, where the degeneracy in the operator symbol is proportional to the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. In mathematical finance, solutions to the obstacle problem for the elliptic Heston operator correspond to value functions for perpetual American-style options on the underlying asset. With the aid of weighted Sobolev spaces and weighted Hölder spaces, we establish the optimal C 1 , 1 regularity (up to the boundary of the half-plane) for solutions to obstacle problems for the elliptic Heston operator when the obstacle functions are sufficiently smooth.

  9. Path Generation by Avoiding Obstacles using the Intersection of Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komák Martin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We will discuss the problem of path finding in 3D space with an obstacle. The thesis deals with the problem of searching for the shortest path between the individual points in the space so that this path does not come into collision with an obstacle. A system has been designed to construct paths in cross-sectional planes of the given object representing an obstacle, based on its surface contour. The system solves the issue of loading STL format, creating cross-sectional planes of the object, intersection between geometric shapes, and generation of lines around the contour of the object in 2D. An experiment was performed, in which we have been moving around a model of a jet aircraft and its results are described in the conclusion.

  10. Factors influencing obstacle crossing performance in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yi Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tripping over obstacles is the major cause of falls in community-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Understanding the factors associated with the obstacle crossing behavior may help to develop possible training programs for crossing performance. This study aimed to identify the relationships and important factors determining obstacle crossing performance in patients with PD. METHODS: Forty-two idiopathic patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stages I to III participated in this study. Obstacle crossing performance was recorded by the Liberty system, a three-dimensional motion capture device. Maximal isometric strength of the lower extremity was measured by a handheld dynamometer. Dynamic balance and sensory integration ability were assessed using the Balance Master system. Movement velocity (MV, maximal excursion (ME, and directional control (DC were obtained during the limits of stability test to quantify dynamic balance. The sum of sensory organization test (SOT scores was used to quantify sensory organization ability. RESULTS: Both crossing stride length and stride velocity correlated significantly with lower extremity muscle strength, dynamic balance control (forward and sideward, and sum of SOT scores. From the regression model, forward DC and ankle dorsiflexor strength were identified as two major determinants for crossing performance (R(2 = .37 to.41 for the crossing stride length, R(2 = .43 to.44 for the crossing stride velocity. CONCLUSIONS: Lower extremity muscle strength, dynamic balance control and sensory integration ability significantly influence obstacle crossing performance. We suggest an emphasis on muscle strengthening exercises (especially ankle dorsiflexors, balance training (especially forward DC, and sensory integration training to improve obstacle crossing performance in patients with PD.

  11. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection Using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new...... show that the estimated maps follow the terrain shape, while protrusions are identified and may be isolated as potential obstacles. Representing the data with a covariance function allows a dramatic reduction of the amount of data to process, while maintaining the statistical properties of the measured...... and interpolated features....

  12. Collective rotations of active particles interacting with obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Zahra; Aspelmeier, Timo; Zippelius, Annette

    2017-10-01

    We consider active particles in a heterogeneous medium, modeled by static, random obstacles. In accordance with the known tendency of active particles to cluster, we observe accumulation and crystallization of active particles around the obstacles which serve as nucleation sites. In the limit of high activity, the crystals start to rotate spontaneously, resembling a rotating rigid body. We trace the occurrence of these oscillations to the enhanced attraction of particles whose orientation points along the rotational velocity as compared to those whose orientation points in the opposite direction.

  13. Entire solutions for bistable lattice differential equations with obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Aaron; Vleck, E S Van

    2018-01-01

    The authors consider scalar lattice differential equations posed on square lattices in two space dimensions. Under certain natural conditions they show that wave-like solutions exist when obstacles (characterized by "holes") are present in the lattice. Their work generalizes to the discrete spatial setting the results obtained in Berestycki, Hamel, and Matuno (2009) for the propagation of waves around obstacles in continuous spatial domains. The analysis hinges upon the development of sub and super-solutions for a class of discrete bistable reaction-diffusion problems and on a generalization of a classical result due to Aronson and Weinberger that concerns the spreading of localized disturbances.

  14. Kinect-Based Moving Human Tracking System with Obstacle Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Mehsen Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of work originally presented and published in IEEE International Multidisciplinary Conference on Engineering Technology (IMCET. This work presents a design and implementation of a moving human tracking system with obstacle avoidance. The system scans the environment by using Kinect, a 3D sensor, and tracks the center of mass of a specific user by using Processing, an open source computer programming language. An Arduino microcontroller is used to drive motors enabling it to move towards the tracked user and avoid obstacles hampering the trajectory. The implemented system is tested under different lighting conditions and the performance is analyzed using several generated depth images.

  15. Electric and magnetic dipole transitions from broad s-wave neutron resonance in even-even sd-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, H.; Igashira, M.; Shimizu, M.; Muto, K.; Oda, T.; Achiha, Y.; Lee, Y.; Mukai, N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations have been performed for electromagnetic transitions from the broad s-wave neutron resonances at 658 keV in 24 Mg, at 180 keV in 28 Si, and at 103 keV in 32 S. Capture gamma rays were measured with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) detector, using a neutron time-of-flight technique. E1 and M1 transitions from those resonances to low-lying states with a strong single-particle character were found. The deduced partial radiative widths for E1 transition are in excellent agreement with the Lane-Mughabghab valence-capture model calculations taking the neutron effective charge, -Ze/A. Moreover, it is shown that essential features of the observed E1 and M1 transitions can be well explained by assuming a configuration-mixing wave function, Ψ i (1/2 + )=a(0 + direct-product 1/2 + )+b(1 + direct-product 1/2 + )+c(1 + direct-product 3/2 + ), for each resonance. The M1 transition strengths are compared also with more detailed shell model calculations in the model space of full (sd) n configurations, using the Wildenthal effective interaction

  16. Attenuation of S-waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete according to OBS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S. A.; Kuzin, I. P.; Shoda, O. Yu.; Soloviev, S. L.

    1991-11-01

    Five OBS were installed in the Sea of Crete in 1987. During a period of nine days 430 local earthquakes were recorded. Hypocentres were determined for 85 microearthquakes. A correlation between magnitude ML and duration of seismic events on the records of the ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) was found from data of 14 shocks recorded simultaneously by OBS and some land-based Greek stations. A magnitude-frequency relationship for earthquakes recorded by OBS was obtained in the magnitude range ML = 2-4. Amplitude curves describing the attenuation of body waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete were compiled. Assessment of quality factor Qs was made by comparison of empirical and theoretical amplitude curves. The values of Qs for the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete were calculated and found equal to 200-300. Low values of Qs and consequently strong attenuation of S-waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete could be explained by extension of the lithosphere accompanied by its partial contamination with melted magma.

  17. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Kiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, K [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yokota, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Investigations and discussions were given by using P-S logging on anisotropy of refracted waves in the fundamental experiments conducted in the Matsuyama town, Yamagata Prefecture. In the investigations, S-wave was transmitted into two to three directions at four locations in total: one at the opening of a well with a depth of 100 m and three locations having offset of 50 m from the well opening, and anisotropy of direct waves in the depth direction was investigated. Data were recorded on the ground at the same time by using a 3-component receiver. As a result of the experiment, detection of the anisotropy by means of measurement inside the well was found more difficult than anticipated due to anomaly in the refracted waves, hence no clear velocity anisotropy has been observed. It appears that no azimuth anisotropy exists at depths shallower than at least 24 m. No anisotropy due to incident angles was made clear in the present experiment. Offset recording experienced poor S/N ratio, having made the data analysis difficult. The data for zero offset do not harmonize with the refracted wave analysis on the data derived by using the reflection method, whose cause requires further discussions. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A microscopic description of the S-wave πN-scattering lengths and the (pπ-)-atom lifetime in the quark confinement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Rusetskij, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The S-wave πN-scattering lengths and the (pπ - )-atom lifetime are in the quark confinement model. Nucleon is treated as a quark-diquark system. The fulfillment of the Weinberg-Tomozawa relations is checked. The agreement is achieved with the experiment and with the results obtained within other approaches. 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. Measurements of the S-wave fraction in B-0 -> K+ pi(-) mu(+) mu(-) decays and the B-0 -> K*(892)(0) mu(+) mu(-) differential branching fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Dufour, L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the differential branching fraction of the decay B-0 -> K* (892)(0) mu(+)mu(-) is presented together with a determination of the S-wave fraction of the K+ pi(-) system in the decay B-0 -> K+ pi-mu(+)mu(-). The analysis is based on pp-collision data corresponding to an integrated

  20. GENERAL P, TYPE-I S, AND TYPE-II S WAVES IN ANELASTIC SOLIDS; INHOMOGENEOUS WAVE FIELDS IN LOW-LOSS SOLIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1985-01-01

    The physical characteristics for general plane-wave radiation fields in an arbitrary linear viscoelastic solid are derived. Expressions for the characteristics of inhomogeneous wave fields, derived in terms of those for homogeneous fields, are utilized to specify the characteristics and a set of reference curves for general P and S wave fields in arbitrary viscoelastic solids as a function of wave inhomogeneity and intrinsic material absorption. The expressions show that an increase in inhomogeneity of the wave fields cause the velocity to decrease, the fractional-energy loss (Q** minus **1) to increase, the deviation of maximum energy flow with respect to phase propagation to increase, and the elliptical particle motions for P and type-I S waves to approach circularity. Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous type-I S waves is shown to be greater than that for type-II S waves, with the deviation first increasing then decreasing with inhomogeneity. The mean energy densities (kinetic, potential, and total), the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean energy flux, and Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous waves are shown to be greater than corresponding characteristics for homogeneous waves, with the deviations increasing as the inhomogeneity is increased for waves of fixed maximum displacement amplitude.

  1. Poisson's ratio model derived from P- and S-wave reflection seismic data at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Tanner, David C.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Research Group Protect

    2014-05-01

    Compressional wave (P-wave) reflection seismic field measurements are a standard tool for subsurface exploration. 2-D seismic measurements are often used for overview measurements, but also as near-surface supplement to fill gaps that often exist in 3-D seismic data sets. Such supplementing 2-D measurements are typically simple with respect to field layout. This is an opportunity for the use of shear waves (S-waves). Within the last years, S-waves have become more and more important. One reason is that P- and S-waves are differently sensitive to fluids and pore fill so that the additional S-wave information can be used to enhance lithological studies. Another reason is that S-waves have the advantage of higher spatial resolution. Within the same signal bandwidth they typically have about half the wavelength of P-waves. In near-surface unconsolidated sediments they can even enhance the structural resolution by one order of magnitude. We make use of these capabilities within the PROTECT project. In addition to already existing 2-D P-wave data, we carried out a near surface 2-D S-wave field survey at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, close to Warrnambool, Australia in November 2013. The combined analysis of P-wave and S-wave data is used to construct a Poisson's Ratio 2-D model down to roughly 600 m depth. The Poisson's ratio values along a 1 km long profile at the site are surprisingly high, ranging from 0.47 in the carbonate-dominated near surface to 0.4 at depth. In the literature, average lab measurements of 0.22 for unfissured carbonates and 0.37 for fissured examples have been reported. The high values that we found may indicate areas of rather unconsolidated or fractured material, or enhanced fluid contents, and will be subject of further studies. This work is integrated in a larger workflow towards prediction of CO2 leakage and monitoring strategies for subsurface storage in general. Acknowledgement: This work was sponsored in part by the Australian

  2. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Donato, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.didonato@unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Mathematics (Italy); Mugnai, Dimitri, E-mail: dimitri.mugnai@unipg.it [Università di Perugia, Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We consider a non-quadratic optimal control problem associated to a nonlinear elliptic variational inequality, where the obstacle is the control itself. We show that, fixed a desired profile, there exists an optimal solution which is not far from it. Detailed characterizations of the optimal solution are given, also in terms of approximating problems.

  3. Stumbling over obstacles in older adults compared to young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillings, AM; Mulder, T; Duysens, J

    Falls are a major problem in older adults. Many falls occur because of stumbling. The aim of the present study is to investigate stumbling reactions of older adults and to compare them with young adults. While subjects walked on a treadmill, a rigid obstacle unexpectedly obstructed the forward sway

  4. Aquaponics business in Europe: some legal obstacles and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Joly

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors gathered information on perceived impact of current legislation on entrepreneurial possibilities in developing commercial aquaponics in Europe. The paper highlights the detected obstacles, and the solutions developed to address the legislative issues. Three main issues outlined are: administration, environment, and safety.

  5. Uniqueness and numerical methods in inverse obstacle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The inverse problem we consider in this tutorial is to determine the shape of an obstacle from the knowledge of the far field pattern for scattering of time-harmonic plane waves. In the first part we will concentrate on the issue of uniqueness, i.e., we will investigate under what conditions an obstacle and its boundary condition can be identified from a knowledge of its far field pattern for incident plane waves. We will review some classical and some recent results and draw attention to open problems. In the second part we will survey on numerical methods for solving inverse obstacle scattering problems. Roughly speaking, these methods can be classified into three groups. Iterative methods interpret the inverse obstacle scattering problem as a nonlinear ill-posed operator equation and apply iterative schemes such as regularized Newton methods, Landweber iterations or conjugate gradient methods for its solution. Decomposition methods, in principle, separate the inverse scattering problem into an ill-posed linear problem to reconstruct the scattered wave from its far field and the subsequent determination of the boundary of the scatterer from the boundary condition. Finally, the third group consists of the more recently developed sampling methods. These are based on the numerical evaluation of criteria in terms of indicator functions that decide whether a point lies inside or outside the scatterer. The tutorial will give a survey by describing one or two representatives of each group including a discussion on the various advantages and disadvantages

  6. Step characteristics during obstacle avoidance in hemiplegic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, A; Haart, M; Mulder, T; Duysens, J

    Whereas several animal studies have indicated the important role of the motor cortex in the control of voluntary gait modifications, little is known about the effects of cortical lesions on gait adaptability in humans. Obstacle avoidance tasks provide an adequate paradigm to study the adaptability

  7. Social isolation: a learning obstacle in the primary school | Bester ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teaching methodology of Outcomes-based Education is mainly based on group work. For this reason it would be extremely difficult for social isolates to benefit from Outcomes-based Education because of their inability to form relationships or work together with others in groups. In the light of this obstacle the aim of the ...

  8. Organizational factors in fire prevention: roles, obstacles, and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Christiansen; William S. Folkman; Keith W. Warner; Michael L. Woolcott

    1976-01-01

    Problems being encountered in implementing fire prevention programs were explored by studying the organization for fire prevention at the Fish Lake, Uinta, and Wasatch National Forests in Utah. The study focused on role congruency in fire prevention activities and on the social and organizational obstacles to effective programs. The problems identified included lack of...

  9. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V; Dimitrieva, N F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium. (paper)

  10. Circumvention of suddenly appearing obstacles in young and older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnappels, M.; Kingma, I.; Van Dieën, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced ability to circumvent an obstacle, which is noticed only shortly before collision, could be a cause of falls and injury, especially in older adults. In this study, we investigated differences in strategies and their characteristics between young and older adults when circumventing a suddenly

  11. A vibrating thermoelastic plate in a contact with an obstacle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bock, I.; Jarušek, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2015), s. 39-52 ISSN 1210-3195 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : thermoelastic plate * unilateral dynamic contact * rigid obstacle Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://tatra.mat.savba.sk/paper.php?id_paper=1244

  12. Slow maturation of planning in obstacle avoidance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corporaal, Sharissa H A; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Duysens, Jacques; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.

    2016-01-01

    Complex gait (e.g., obstacle avoidance) requires a higher cognitive load than simple steady-state gait, which is a more automated movement. The higher levels of the central nervous system, responsible for adjusting motor plans to complex gait, develop throughout childhood into adulthood. Therefore,

  13. Aquaponics business in Europe : some legal obstacles and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Joly, Agnes; Junge, Ranka; Bardocz, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    The authors gathered information on perceived impact of current legislation on entrepreneurial possibilities in developing commercial aquaponics in Europe. The paper highlights the detected obstacles, and the solutions developed to address the legislative issues. Three main issues outlined are: administration, environment, and safety.

  14. Obstacle Avoidance Control Design: An Experimental Evaluation in Vehicle Platooning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goos, J.; Alirezaei, M.; Semsar-Kazerooni, E.; Ploeg, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an obstacle avoidance controller (OA) based on the impedance control method is developed. The main goal of the OA controller is to guarantee robust gap making for a merging vehicle within a platoon of vehicles which are longitudinally automated. The proposed OA controller is developed

  15. Sex Education in Spain: Teachers' Views of Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jose L.; Carcedo, Rodrigo J.; Fuertes, Antonio; Vicario-Molina, Isabel; Fernandez-Fuertes, Andres A.; Orgaz, Begona

    2012-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of the current state, difficulties, limitations and future possibilities for sex education in Spain. On the basis of a study involving 3760 teachers from all provinces in Spain, a detailed analysis of the obstacles at legislative, school and teacher levels was developed. Significant weaknesses were found at each of…

  16. Multigrid Computation of Stratified Flow over Two-Dimensional Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, M. F.

    1997-09-01

    A robust multigrid method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented and applied to the computation of viscous flow over obstacles in a bounded domain under conditions of neutral stability and stable density stratification. Two obstacle shapes have been used, namely a vertical barrier, for which the grid is Cartesian, and a smooth cosine-shaped obstacle, for which a boundary-conforming transformation is incorporated. Results are given for laminar flows at low Reynolds numbers and turbulent flows at a high Reynolds number, when a simple mixing length turbulence model is included. The multigrid algorithm is used to compute steady flows for each obstacle at low and high Reynolds numbers in conditions of weak static stability, defined byK=ND/πU≤ 1, whereU,N, andDare the upstream velocity, bouyancy frequency, and domain height respectively. Results are also presented for the vertical barrier at low and high Reynolds number in conditions of strong static stability,K> 1, when lee wave motions ensure that the flow is unsteady, and the multigrid algorithm is used to compute the flow at each timestep.

  17. Special Semiotic Characters: What is an Obstacle-Sign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Genosko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article regains an understudied exposition from Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish concerning the nuanced semio-techniques that constitute a punitive city perfused with obstacle-signs. The semiotic import of these signs are explicated and then brought into contemporary focus with regard to their political efficacy in drunk-driving campaigns.

  18. Flow through a very porous obstacle in a shallow channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, M J; Draper, S; Nishino, T; Borthwick, A G L

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model, informed by numerical simulations based on the shallow water equations, is developed to predict the flow passing through and around a uniform porous obstacle in a shallow channel, where background friction is important. This problem is relevant to a number of practical situations, including flow through aquatic vegetation, the performance of arrays of turbines in tidal channels and hydrodynamic forces on offshore structures. To demonstrate this relevance, the theoretical model is used to (i) reinterpret core flow velocities in existing laboratory-based data for an array of emergent cylinders in shallow water emulating aquatic vegetation and (ii) reassess the optimum arrangement of tidal turbines to generate power in a tidal channel. Comparison with laboratory-based data indicates a maximum obstacle resistance (or minimum porosity) for which the present theoretical model is valid. When the obstacle resistance is above this threshold the shallow water equations do not provide an adequate representation of the flow, and the theoretical model over-predicts the core flow passing through the obstacle. The second application of the model confirms that natural bed resistance increases the power extraction potential for a partial tidal fence in a shallow channel and alters the optimum arrangement of turbines within the fence.

  19. Autonomous Navigation and Obstacle Avoidance of a Micro-Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, the topic of automated vehicles is one of the most promising research areas in the field of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS. The use of automated vehicles for public transportation also contributes to reductions in congestion levels and to improvements in traffic flow. Moreover, electrical public autonomous vehicles are environmentally friendly, provide better air quality and contribute to energy conservation. The driverless public transportation systems, which are at present operating in some airports and train stations, are restricted to dedicated roads and exhibit serious trouble dynamically avoiding obstacles in the trajectory. In this paper, an electric autonomous mini-bus is presented. All datasets used in this article were collected during the experiments carried out in the demonstration event of the 2012 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium that took place in Alcalá de Henares (Spain. The demonstration consisted of a route 725 metres long containing a list of latitude-longitude points (waypoints. The mini-bus was capable of driving autonomously from one waypoint to another using a GPS sensor. Furthermore, the vehicle is provided with a multi-beam Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging (LIDAR sensor for surrounding reconstruction and obstacle detection. When an obstacle is detected in the planned path, the planned route is modified in order to avoid the obstacle and continue its way to the end of the mission. On the demonstration day, a total of 196 attendees had the opportunity to get a ride on the vehicles. A total of 28 laps were successfully completed in full autonomous mode in a private circuit located in the National Institute for Aerospace Research (INTA, Spain. In other words, the system completed 20.3 km of driverless navigation and obstacle avoidance.

  20. Doctors' health: obstacles and enablers to returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Rhydderch, M; Reading, P; Williams, S

    2015-08-01

    For doctors returning to work after absence due to ill-health or performance concerns, the obstacles can seem insurmountable. Doctors' perspectives of these obstacles have been investigated. To support them more effectively, the perspectives of organizations that interact with such doctors should also be considered. To explore the obstacles and enablers to doctors' return to work after long-term absence from the perspective of key organizations involved in assessment and support. We identified organizations operating in the field of doctors' health, well-being and performance. We conducted semi-structured, 30-45 min telephone interviews with representatives of the organizations, exploring problems that they had encountered that were experienced by doctors with health or performance concerns returning to work after absence of a month or longer. We analysed our field notes using theoretical analysis. We conducted 11 telephone interviews. Data analysis identified four key themes of obstacles and enablers to returning to work: 'communication', 'return to work', 'finance and funding' and 'relationships and engagement'. Sub-themes relating to the organization and the individual also emerged. Organizations responsible for supporting doctors back to work reported poor communication as a significant obstacle to doctors returning to work after illness. They also reported differences between specialities, employing organizations, occupational health departments and human resources in terms of knowledge and expertise in supporting doctors with complex issues. Clear communication channels, care pathways and support processes, such as workplace advocates, were perceived as strong enablers to return to work for doctors after long-term absence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Classification of obstacle shape for generating walking path of humanoid robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Soo; Kim, Do Ik

    2013-01-01

    To generate the walking path of a humanoid robot in an unknown environment, the shapes of obstacles around the robot should be detected accurately. However, doing so incurs a very large computational cast. Therefore this study proposes a method to classify the obstacle shape into three types: a shape small enough for the robot to go over, a shape planar enough for the robot foot to make contact with, and an uncertain shape that must be avoided by the robot. To classify the obstacle shape, first, the range and the number of the obstacles is detected. If an obstacle can make contact with the robot foot, the shape of an obstacle is accurately derived. If an obstacle has uncertain shape or small size, the shape of an obstacle is not detected to minimize the computational load. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm efficiently classifies the shapes of obstacles around the robot in real time with low computational load

  2. Classification of obstacle shape for generating walking path of humanoid robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Soo; Kim, Do Ik [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    To generate the walking path of a humanoid robot in an unknown environment, the shapes of obstacles around the robot should be detected accurately. However, doing so incurs a very large computational cast. Therefore this study proposes a method to classify the obstacle shape into three types: a shape small enough for the robot to go over, a shape planar enough for the robot foot to make contact with, and an uncertain shape that must be avoided by the robot. To classify the obstacle shape, first, the range and the number of the obstacles is detected. If an obstacle can make contact with the robot foot, the shape of an obstacle is accurately derived. If an obstacle has uncertain shape or small size, the shape of an obstacle is not detected to minimize the computational load. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm efficiently classifies the shapes of obstacles around the robot in real time with low computational load.

  3. The Study of Cooperative Obstacle Avoidance Method for MWSN Based on Flocking Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with the space fixed feature of traditional wireless sensor network (WSN, mobile WSN has better robustness and adaptability in unknown environment, so that it is always applied in the research of target tracking. In order to reach the target, the nodes group should find a self-adaptive method to avoid the obstacles together in their moving directions. Previous methods, which were based on flocking control model, realized the strategy of obstacle avoidance by means of potential field. However, these may sometimes lead the nodes group to fall into a restricted area like a trap and never get out of it. Based on traditional flocking control model, this paper introduced a new cooperative obstacle avoidance model combined with improved SA obstacle avoidance algorithm. It defined the tangent line of the intersection of node’s velocity line and the edge of obstacle as the steering direction. Furthermore, the cooperative obstacle avoidance model was also improved in avoiding complex obstacles. When nodes group encounters mobile obstacles, nodes will predict movement path based on the spatial location and velocity of obstacle. And when nodes group enters concave obstacles, nodes will temporarily ignore the gravity of the target and search path along the edge of the concave obstacles. Simulation results showed that cooperative obstacle avoidance model has significant improvement on average speed and time efficiency in avoiding obstacle compared with the traditional flocking control model. It is more suitable for obstacle avoidance in complex environment.

  4. The study of cooperative obstacle avoidance method for MWSN based on flocking control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuo; Ding, Lei; Chen, Kai; Li, Renfa

    2014-01-01

    Compared with the space fixed feature of traditional wireless sensor network (WSN), mobile WSN has better robustness and adaptability in unknown environment, so that it is always applied in the research of target tracking. In order to reach the target, the nodes group should find a self-adaptive method to avoid the obstacles together in their moving directions. Previous methods, which were based on flocking control model, realized the strategy of obstacle avoidance by means of potential field. However, these may sometimes lead the nodes group to fall into a restricted area like a trap and never get out of it. Based on traditional flocking control model, this paper introduced a new cooperative obstacle avoidance model combined with improved SA obstacle avoidance algorithm. It defined the tangent line of the intersection of node's velocity line and the edge of obstacle as the steering direction. Furthermore, the cooperative obstacle avoidance model was also improved in avoiding complex obstacles. When nodes group encounters mobile obstacles, nodes will predict movement path based on the spatial location and velocity of obstacle. And when nodes group enters concave obstacles, nodes will temporarily ignore the gravity of the target and search path along the edge of the concave obstacles. Simulation results showed that cooperative obstacle avoidance model has significant improvement on average speed and time efficiency in avoiding obstacle compared with the traditional flocking control model. It is more suitable for obstacle avoidance in complex environment.

  5. Constraint on the magma sources in Luzon Island Philippines by using P and S wave local seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, N. C.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    The subduction of South China Sea beneath the Luzon Island has caused a complex setting of seismicity and magmatism because of the proposed ridge subduction and slab tearing. To constrain the validity of slab tearing induced by ridge subduction and their effect, we performed a P and S wave seismic tomography travel time inversion using LOTOS code. The dataset has been retrieved from International Seismological Centre from 1960 to 2008. A 1D velocity inverted by using VELEST with a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.74 is used as the starting input velocity for tomographic inversion. Total of 20905 P readings and 8126 S readings from 2355 earthquakes events were used to invert for velocity structure beneath Luzon Island. The horizontal tomographic results show low-velocity, high Vp/Vs regions at the shallow depth less than 50 km which are interpreted as the magmatic chambers of the volcanic system in Luzon. At the suspected region of slab tearing at 16oN to 18oN, two sources of magma have been indentified: slab window magma at shallow depth (< 50 km) and magma induced by mantle wedge partial melting from higher depth. This slab melting may have changed the composition of magmatic to become more silicic with high viscosity, which explains the volcanic gap in this region. At the region of 14oN to 15oN, large magma chambers under active volcanos are identified which explain the active volcanism in this region. Contrast to the region of slab tearing, in this region, the magma chambers are fed by only magma from partial melting of mantle wedge from the depth higher than 100 km. These observations are consistent with previous work on the slab tearing of South China Sea and the activities of volcanism in the Luzon Island.

  6. Prefrontal cortex activation during obstacle negotiation: What's the effect size and timing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidan, Inbal; Shustak, Shiran; Sharon, Topaz; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Geffen, Nimrod; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Mirelman, Anat

    2018-04-01

    Obstacle negotiation is a daily activity that requires the integration of sensorimotor and cognitive information. Recent studies provide evidence for the important role of prefrontal cortex during obstacle negotiation. We aimed to explore the effects of obstacle height and available response time on prefrontal activation. Twenty healthy young adults (age: 30.1 ± 1.0 years; 50% women) walked in an obstacle course while negotiating anticipated and unanticipated obstacles at heights of 50 mm and 100 mm. Prefrontal activation was measured using a functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. Kinect cameras measured the obstacle negotiation strategy. Prefrontal activation was defined based on mean level of HbO 2 before, during and after obstacle negotiation and the HbO 2 slope from gait initiation and throughout the task. Changes between types of obstacles were assessed using linear-mix models and partial correlation analyses evaluated the relationship between prefrontal activation and the distance between the feet as the subjects traversed the obstacles. Different obstacle heights showed similar changes in prefrontal activation measures (p > 0.210). However, during unanticipated obstacles, the slope of the HbO 2 response was steeper (p = 0.048), as compared to anticipated obstacles. These changes in prefrontal activation during negotiation of unanticipated obstacles were correlated with greater distance of the leading foot after the obstacles (r = 0.831, p = 0.041). These findings are the first to show that the pattern of prefrontal activation depends on the nature of the obstacle. More specifically, during unanticipated obstacles the recruitment of the prefrontal cortex is faster and greater than during negotiating anticipated obstacles. These results provide evidence of the important role of the prefrontal cortex and the ability of healthy young adults to tailor the activation pattern to different types of obstacles. Copyright © 2018

  7. Teleseismic P and S wave attenuation constraints on temperature and melt of the upper mantle in the Alaska Subduction Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Castaneda, R. A.; Abers, G. A.; Eilon, Z.; Christensen, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Recent broadband deployments in Alaska provide an excellent opportunity to advance our understanding of the Alaska-Aleutians subduction system, with implications for subduction processes worldwide. Seismic attenuation, measured from teleseismic body waves, provides a strong constraint on thermal structure as well as an indirect indication of ground shaking expected from large intermediate-depth earthquakes. We measure P and S wave attenuation from pairwise amplitude and phase spectral ratios for teleseisms recorded at 204 Transportable Array, Alaska Regional, and Alaska Volcano Observatory, SALMON (Southern Alaska Lithosphere & Mantle Observation Network) and WVLF (Wrangell Volcanics & subducting Lithosphere Fate) stations in central Alaska. The spectral ratios are inverted in a least squares sense for differential t* (path-averaged attenuation operator) and travel time anomalies at every station. Our preliminary results indicate a zone of low attenuation across the forearc and strong attenuation beneath arc and backarc in the Cook Inlet-Kenai region where the Aleutian-Yakutat slab subducts, similar to other subduction zones. This attenuation differential is observed in both the volcanic Cook Inlet segment and amagmatic Denali segments of the Aleutian subduction zone. By comparison, preliminary results for the Wrangell-St. Elias region past the eastern edge of the Aleutian slab show strong attenuation beneath the Wrangell Volcanic Field, as well as much further south than in the Cook Inlet-Kenai region. This pattern of attenuation seems to indicate a short slab fragment in the east of the subduction zone, though the picture is complex. Results also suggest the slab may focus or transmit energy with minimal attenuation, adding to the complexity. To image the critical transition between the Alaska-Aleutian slab and the region to its east, we plan to incorporate new broadband data from the WVLF array, an ongoing deployment of 37 PASSCAL instruments installed in 2016

  8. Upper mantle seismic structure beneath southwest Africa from finite-frequency P- and S-wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssof, Mohammad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik; Heit, Benjamin; Weber, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Geissler, Wolfram; Laske, Gabi; Eken, Tuna; Lushetile, Bufelo

    2015-04-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southwestern Africa region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by the amphibious WALPASS network. We used 40 temporary stations in southwestern Africa with records for a period of 2 years (the OBS operated for 1 year), between November 2010 and November 2012. The array covers a surface area of approximately 600 by 1200 km and is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge, the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Major questions that need to be understood are related to the impact of asthenosphere-lithosphere interaction, (plume-related features), on the continental areas and the evolution of the continent-ocean transition that followed the break-up of Gondwana. This process is supposed to leave its imprint as distinct seismic signature in the upper mantle. Utilizing 3D sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals to image velocity perturbations in the upper mantle down to 1000 km depth. To test the robustness of our tomographic image we employed various resolution tests which allow us to evaluate the extent of smearing effects and help defining the optimum inversion parameters (i.e., damping and smoothness) used during the regularization of inversion process. Resolution assessment procedure includes also a detailed investigation of the effect of the crustal corrections on the final images, which strongly influenced the resolution for the mantle structures. We present detailed tomographic images of the oceanic and continental lithosphere beneath the study area. The fast lithospheric keel of the Congo Craton reaches a depth of ~250 km. Relatively low velocity perturbations have been imaged within the orogenic Damara Belt down to a depth of ~150 km, probably related to surficial suture zones and the presence of fertile material. A shallower depth extent of the lithospheric plate of ~100 km was observed beneath the ocean

  9. Scattering theory of walking droplets in the presence of obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Hubert, Maxime; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Bastin, Thierry; Martin, John

    2016-01-01

    We aim to describe a droplet bouncing on a vibrating bath using a simple and highly versatile model inspired from quantum mechanics. Close to the Faraday instability, a long-lived surface wave is created at each bounce, which serves as a pilot wave for the droplet. This leads to so called walking droplets or walkers. Since the seminal experiment by Couder et al (2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 154101) there have been many attempts to accurately reproduce the experimental results.We propose to describe the trajectories of a walker using a Green function approach. The Green function is related to the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions on the obstacle(s) and outgoing boundary conditions at infinity. For a single-slit geometry our model is exactly solvable and reproduces some general features observed experimentally. It stands for a promising candidate to account for the presence of arbitrary boundaries in the walker’s dynamics. (paper)

  10. Solution of Contact Problems for Nonlinear Gao Beam and Obstacle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Machalová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact problem for a large deformed beam with an elastic obstacle is formulated, analyzed, and numerically solved. The beam model is governed by a nonlinear fourth-order differential equation developed by Gao, while the obstacle is considered as the elastic foundation of Winkler’s type in some distance under the beam. The problem is static without a friction and modeled either using Signorini conditions or by means of normal compliance contact conditions. The problems are then reformulated as optimal control problems which is useful both for theoretical aspects and for solution methods. Discretization is based on using the mixed finite element method with independent discretization and interpolations for foundation and beam elements. Numerical examples demonstrate usefulness of the presented solution method. Results for the nonlinear Gao beam are compared with results for the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam model.

  11. Overcoming obstacles against effective solar lighting interventions in South Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Basing on our devised World Bank’s ‘Design Principles’ for effective renewable energy projects in developing countries and an in-depth analysis of our two solar lighting projects in Bangladesh and India, this paper explores three key obstacles that constrain poor people from obtaining solar lighting: financial exclusion, weak governance, and passive NGO and customer participation. The low take-up rate has a social and psychological impact. This paper recommends creating easy access to credit, establishing a robust complaint system, and developing strategic partnership to overcome the obstacles. - Research Highlights: ► To provide a critical analysis of the World Bank's 'Design Principles' for renewable energy policies in developing countries. ► To explain why some solar lighting projects do not work and how the barriers can be overcome. ► To highlight the roles of poverty, governance and technical support in solar lighting design.

  12. Women in academic medicine: perceived obstacles to advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, N M; Nickerson, K G

    1992-01-01

    To investigate perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine, we sent a questionnaire assessing perceptions of the fairness and supportiveness of the academic environment to the 229 female teaching and research faculty of the School of Physicians & Surgeons at Columbia University. The overall response rate was 85%. Forty-six percent believed that they had not had the same professional opportunities as their male colleagues, 52% believed that salaries were not equivalent for men and women in similar positions, and 50% believed that promotions were awarded in a biased manner. Thirty percent reported that sexist behavior was common and that sexual harassment occurred in the workplace. Eighty-one percent experienced conflicts between their professional and personal lives and most believed that the institution failed to adequately address the needs of women with children. This survey indicates that there are significant perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine that must be addressed.

  13. Random walk of passive tracers among randomly moving obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Matteo; Donato, Irene; Floriani, Elena; Nardecchia, Ilaria; Pettini, Marco

    2016-04-14

    This study is mainly motivated by the need of understanding how the diffusion behavior of a biomolecule (or even of a larger object) is affected by other moving macromolecules, organelles, and so on, inside a living cell, whence the possibility of understanding whether or not a randomly walking biomolecule is also subject to a long-range force field driving it to its target. By means of the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) technique the topic of random walk in random environment is here considered in the case of a passively diffusing particle among randomly moving and interacting obstacles. The relevant physical quantity which is worked out is the diffusion coefficient of the passive tracer which is computed as a function of the average inter-obstacles distance. The results reported here suggest that if a biomolecule, let us call it a test molecule, moves towards its target in the presence of other independently interacting molecules, its motion can be considerably slowed down.

  14. Obstacle-avoiding robot with IR and PIR motion sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Omar, Z.; Suaibun, S.

    2016-10-01

    Obstacle avoiding robot was designed, constructed and programmed which may be potentially used for educational and research purposes. The developed robot will move in a particular direction once the infrared (IR) and the PIR passive infrared (PIR) sensors sense a signal while avoiding the obstacles in its path. The robot can also perform desired tasks in unstructured environments without continuous human guidance. The hardware was integrated in one application board as embedded system design. The software was developed using C++ and compiled by Arduino IDE 1.6.5. The main objective of this project is to provide simple guidelines to the polytechnic students and beginners who are interested in this type of research. It is hoped that this robot could benefit students who wish to carry out research on IR and PIR sensors.

  15. Experimental Observation of Non-'S-Wave' Superconducting Behavior in Bulk Superconducting Tunneling Junctions of Yba2Cu3O7-δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Jose Guerra

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of non-s-wave superconductivity from normal tunneling experiments in bulk tunneling junctions of YBa2Cu3O7-δ is presented. The I-V and dI/dV characteristics of bulk superconducting tunneling junctions of YBa2Cu3O7-δ have been measured at 77.0K and clear deviation from s-wave superconducting behavior has been observed. The result agrees with d-wave symmetry, and interpreting the data in this way, the magnitude of the superconducting energy gap, 2Δ, is found to be (0.038 ± 0.002 eV. Comparing this energy gap with Tc (2Δ/kB Tc = 5.735, indicates that these high-Tc superconductors are strongly correlated materials, which in contrast with BCS-superconductors are believed to be weakly correlated.

  16. The Development of Biogas Technology in Denmark: Achievements & Obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Sannaa, Mohamed Najib

    2004-01-01

    Denmark is one of the most advanced countries in biogas technology. This country added several improvements to the biogas process in order to increase the biogas yield and thereby improve the economical profitability. Consequently, this project studied the developments of biogas technology in Denmark. The study includes a historical progress of biogas plants since 1970s; the different problems interrupted the expansion of this technology and the actions taken to overcome these obstacles. This...

  17. Water in the presence of inert Lennard-Jones obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtjak, Mario; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-04-01

    Water confined by the presence of a 'sea' of inert obstacles was examined. In the article, freely mobile two-dimensional Mercedes-Benz (MB) water put to a disordered, but fixed, matrix of Lennard-Jones disks was studied by the Monte Carlo computer simulations. For the MB water molecules in the matrix of Lennard-Jones disks, we explored the structures, hydrogen-bond-network formation and thermodynamics as a function of temperature and size and density of matrix particles. We found that the structure of model water is perturbed by the presence of the obstacles. Density of confined water, which was in equilibrium with the bulk water, was smaller than the density of the bulk water and the temperature dependence of the density of absorbed water did not show the density anomaly in the studied temperature range. The behaviour observed as a consequence of confinement is similar to that of increasing temperature, which can for a matrix lead to a process similar to capillary evaporation. At the same occupancy of space, smaller matrix molecules cause higher destruction effect on the absorbed water molecules than the bigger ones. We have also tested the hypothesis that at low matrix densities the obstacles induce an increased ordering and 'hydrogen bonding' of the MB model molecules, relative to pure fluid, while at high densities the obstacles reduce MB water structuring, as they prevent the fluid to form good 'hydrogen-bonding' networks. However, for the size of matrix molecules similar to that of water, we did not observe this effect.

  18. Intuitive Robot Tasks with Augmented Reality and Virtual Obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Gaschler, Andre;Springer, Maximilian;Rickert, Markus;Knoll, Alois

    2017-01-01

    Today's industrial robots require expert knowledge and are not profitable for small and medium sized enterprises with their small lot sizes. It is our strong belief that more intuitive robot programming in an augmented reality robot work cell can dramatically simplify re-programming and leverage robotics technology in short production cycles. In this paper, we present a novel augmented reality system for defining virtual obstacles, specifying tool positions, and specifying robot tasks. We eva...

  19. Direction of single obstacle circumvention in middle-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Amy L; Van Ruymbeke, Nicole; Bryden, Pamela J; Cinelli, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    When required to walk around a stationary object, adults use the location of the goal to set up their locomotor axis and obstacles presented along the locomotor axis will repel the individual towards the side that affords more space [1]. Research has yet to examine whether children can identify the locomotor axis and choose their paths accordingly. Therefore, the current study examined the factors that influence the direction in which children choose to deviate around a single obstacle and whether the presence or absence of a goal influences path selection and trajectory. Ten children (age: 7.1 years±0.8) walked along a 9 m path and avoided a single obstacle that was located in one of three locations (midline, 15 cm to the right or 15 cm to the left). On half the trials, an end-goal was visible from the start of the path while the other half of the trials had no visible goal. The results demonstrate that: (1) children are able to perceive and move towards more open space but are more variable when the end-goal is not visible; (2) children are capable of maintaining an elliptical-shaped protective envelope when avoiding a single obstacle regardless of whether or not the locomotor axis is established; and (3) although children are capable of choosing paths that afford the most space, the manner in which they arrive at their goal is not driven by factors similar to adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Supersonic flows past an obstacle in Yukawa liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2018-04-01

    Shock formation, when a supersonic flow passes a stationary obstacle, is ubiquitous in nature. Considering particles mediating via a Yukawa-type interaction as a prototype for a strongly coupled complex plasma, characterized by coupling strength (Γ, ratio of the average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of the mean inter-particle distance to the shielding length), we address the fundamental problem of supersonic fluid flow U0, past a stationary obstacle immersed in this strongly coupled system. We here report the results on the bow shocks formed in Yukawa liquids when the liquid flows at speeds larger than the speed of sound in the system. Depending on the values of Mach number MC L=U/0 CL , where CL is the longitudinal speed of sound in the system, the bow shocks are found to be either traveling or localized. We find that for the transonic flows (0.8 ≲ MC L≲ 1.2), the bow shocks travel in the upstream direction opposite to the incoming fluid. The phase velocity of the traveling bow shocks is found to be a non-monotonous function of κ, varying as ∝1 /k1.11 at a fixed value of Γ, and is found to be independent of Γ at a fixed value of κ. It is observed that for the flow values with MC L>1.5 , the shock waves do not travel in the upstream direction but instead form a stationary arc like structure around the obstacle. For the fluid flows with 1 ≲ MC L≲ 2.6 , secondary bow shocks are seen to emerge behind the stationary obstacle which travel in the downstream direction, and the phase velocity of these secondary bow shocks is found to be equal to that of the primary bow shocks.

  1. Japan’s Rearmament Dilemma: Obstacles to Rearmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    aircraft carrier Enterprise, and the problems with the first Japanese nuclear -powered ship , the Mutsu , have continued to keep the issue of nuclear weapons...4 Formation of the Psychology. .. ............... 4 Nuclear Allergy .. .................... 7 Self-Defense Force .. ................... 10 ARTICLE 9... nuclear weapons, would elicit a strong reaction from the U.S. This specter of the U.S. reaction is another obstacle to rearmament. While most scholars

  2. Interaction of Interstellar Shocks with Dense Obstacles: Formation of ``Bullets''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    The so-called cumulative effect take place in converging conical shock waves arising behind dense obstacles overtaken by incident interstellar shock. A significant part of energy of converging flow of matter swept-up by a radiative conical shock can be transferred to a dense jet-like ejection (``bullet'') directed along the cone axis. Possible applications of this effect for star-forming regions (e.g., OMC-1) and supernova remnants (e.g., Vela SNR) are discussed.

  3. Collaborative learning practices : teacher and student perceived obstacles to effective student collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Nhu Ngoc Ha, H.; Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Wubbels, Theo

    2018-01-01

    While the educational literature mentions several obstacles affecting the effectiveness of collaborative learning (CL), they have often been investigated through the perceptions of only one actor, either teachers or students. Therefore, some sources of obstacles that teachers and students encounter

  4. A Real-Time Reaction Obstacle Avoidance Algorithm for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Unknown Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheping; Li, Jiyun; Zhang, Gengshi; Wu, Yi

    2018-02-02

    A novel real-time reaction obstacle avoidance algorithm (RRA) is proposed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that must adapt to unknown complex terrains, based on forward looking sonar (FLS). To accomplish this algorithm, obstacle avoidance rules are planned, and the RRA processes are split into five steps Introduction only lists 4 so AUVs can rapidly respond to various environment obstacles. The largest polar angle algorithm (LPAA) is designed to change detected obstacle's irregular outline into a convex polygon, which simplifies the obstacle avoidance process. A solution is designed to solve the trapping problem existing in U-shape obstacle avoidance by an outline memory algorithm. Finally, simulations in three unknown obstacle scenes are carried out to demonstrate the performance of this algorithm, where the obtained obstacle avoidance trajectories are safety, smooth and near-optimal.

  5. Relay Placement for FSO Multihop DF Systems With Link Obstacles and Infeasible Regions

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Bingcheng; Cheng, Julian; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Wu, Lenan

    2015-01-01

    Optimal relay placement is studied for free-space optical multihop communication with link obstacles and infeasible regions. An optimal relay placement scheme is proposed to achieve the lowest outage probability, enable the links to bypass obstacles

  6. Research on UAV Intelligent Obstacle Avoidance Technology During Inspection of Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chuanhu; Zhang, Fei; Yin, Chaoyuan; Liu, Yue; Liu, Liang; Li, Zongyu; Wang, Wanguo

    Autonomous obstacle avoidance of unmanned aerial vehicle (hereinafter referred to as UAV) in electric power line inspection process has important significance for operation safety and economy for UAV intelligent inspection system of transmission line as main content of UAV intelligent inspection system on transmission line. In the paper, principles of UAV inspection obstacle avoidance technology of transmission line are introduced. UAV inspection obstacle avoidance technology based on particle swarm global optimization algorithm is proposed after common obstacle avoidance technologies are studied. Stimulation comparison is implemented with traditional UAV inspection obstacle avoidance technology which adopts artificial potential field method. Results show that UAV inspection strategy of particle swarm optimization algorithm, adopted in the paper, is prominently better than UAV inspection strategy of artificial potential field method in the aspects of obstacle avoidance effect and the ability of returning to preset inspection track after passing through the obstacle. An effective method is provided for UAV inspection obstacle avoidance of transmission line.

  7. Distance Determination Method for Normally Distributed Obstacle Avoidance of Mobile Robots in Stochastic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Noh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle avoidance methods require knowledge of the distance between a mobile robot and obstacles in the environment. However, in stochastic environments, distance determination is difficult because objects have position uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to determine the distance between a robot and obstacles represented by probability distributions. Distance determination for obstacle avoidance should consider position uncertainty, computational cost and collision probability. The proposed method considers all of these conditions, unlike conventional methods. It determines the obstacle region using the collision probability density threshold. Furthermore, it defines a minimum distance function to the boundary of the obstacle region with a Lagrange multiplier method. Finally, it computes the distance numerically. Simulations were executed in order to compare the performance of the distance determination methods. Our method demonstrated a faster and more accurate performance than conventional methods. It may help overcome position uncertainty issues pertaining to obstacle avoidance, such as low accuracy sensors, environments with poor visibility or unpredictable obstacle motion.

  8. 75 FR 22215 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Pauls Valley, OK, Pauls Valley Muni, RNAV (GPS) RWY 17, Orig Madras, OR..., Amdt 1 Honesdale, PA, Cherry Ridge, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 4 Pickens, SC, Pickens...

  9. Thermal activation of dislocations in large scale obstacle bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Dislocation dynamics simulations have been used extensively to predict hardening caused by dislocation-obstacle interactions, including irradiation defect hardening in the athermal case. Incorporating the role of thermal energy on these interactions is possible with a framework provided by harmonic transition state theory (HTST) enabling direct access to thermally activated reaction rates using the Arrhenius equation, including rates of dislocation-obstacle bypass processes. Moving beyond unit dislocation-defect reactions to a representative environment containing a large number of defects requires coarse-graining the activation energy barriers of a population of obstacles into an effective energy barrier that accurately represents the large scale collective process. The work presented here investigates the relationship between unit dislocation-defect bypass processes and the distribution of activation energy barriers calculated for ensemble bypass processes. A significant difference between these cases is observed, which is attributed to the inherent cooperative nature of dislocation bypass processes. In addition to the dislocation-defect interaction, the morphology of the dislocation segments pinned to the defects play an important role on the activation energies for bypass. A phenomenological model for activation energy stress dependence is shown to describe well the effect of a distribution of activation energies, and a probabilistic activation energy model incorporating the stress distribution in a material is presented.

  10. TB case detection in Tajikistan – analysis of existing obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Korobitsyn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tajikistan National TB Control ProgramObjective: (1 To identify the main obstacles to increasing TB Detection in Tajikistan. (2 To identify interventions that improve TB detection.Methods: Review of the available original research data, health normative base, health systems performance and national economic data, following WHO framework for detection of TB cases, which is based on three scenarios of why incident cases of TB may not be notified.Results: Data analysis revealed that some aspects of TB case detection are more problematic than others and that there are gaps in the knowledge of specific obstacles to TB case detection. The phenomenon of “initial default” in Tajikistan has been documented; however, it needs to be studied further. The laboratory services detect infectious TB cases effectively; however, referrals of appropriate suspects for TB diagnosis may lag behind. The knowledge about TB in the general population has improved. Yet, the problem of TB related stigma persists, thus being an obstacle for effective TB detection. High economic cost of health services driven by under-the-table payments was identified as another barrier for access to health services.Conclusion: Health system strengthening should become a primary intervention to improve case detection in Tajikistan. More research on reasons contributing to the failure to register TB cases, as well as factors underlying stigma is needed.

  11. Usage of Business Simulation Games in Croatia: Perceived Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Zoroja

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Business simulation games (BSGs enhance learning, since they actively involve students in the educational process through game playing. They began to play important role in business education in many universities in Croatia. However, quantitative information on their usage in higher educational institutions (HEIs in Croatia is still scarce. Goals of the paper are to explore: (1 differences among BSGs users and non-users according to demographic characteristics, (2 differences among BSGs users and non-users according to perceived obstacles of BSGs usage, and (3 impact of both demographic characteristics and perceived obstacles on the decision on usage or not-usage of BSGs. A survey was taken in business and economics departments of HEIs in Croatia. A regression model has been used to test the impact of demographic characteristics of educators and the perceived obstacles to the usage of BSGs in educational practice. Results indicate that BSGs usage is currently at a low level, mainly due to the lack of funds and management support. Academic rank, gender, and attitude toward new technologies also impact BSGs usage.

  12. An observational study of foot lifts asymmetry during obstacle avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjawal Singh Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Specific information regarding obstacle-clearance strategies used by community-dwelling young and elderly is scant in the literature, and physical barriers encountered in real-life situations have not been used in most of the studies. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine foot lift asymmetry during obstacle avoidance in young and elderly subjects. Settings and Design: This was an observational study. Materials and Methods: Thirty elderly and 30 young individuals were taken for the study. All the subjects were evaluated using different scales and foot lift asymmetry was measured on a walkway using three obstacles of different heights. Results: The mean and standard deviation (SD value of the asymmetric index of the young was 3.25±0.28 and the mean and SD value of the asymmetric index of the elderly was 3.53±0.47. The asymmetric index of the elderly population was found to be higher than that of the younger population. Conclusion: The asymmetric index of the elderly population was found to be higher than that of the younger population, though it is not clinically significant.

  13. A Method to Identify Flight Obstacles on Digital Surface Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; LIN Xinggang; SUN Shouyu; WANG Youzhi

    2005-01-01

    In modern low-altitude terrain-following guidance, a constructing method of the digital surface model (DSM) is presented in the paper to reduce the threat to flying vehicles of tall surface features for safe flight. The relationship between an isolated obstacle size and the intervals of vertical- and cross-section in the DSM model is established. The definition and classification of isolated obstacles are proposed, and a method for determining such isolated obstacles in the DSM model is given. The simulation of a typical urban district shows that when the vertical- and cross-section DSM intervals are between 3 m and 25 m, the threat to terrain-following flight at low-altitude is reduced greatly, and the amount of data required by the DSM model for monitoring in real time a flying vehicle is also smaller. Experiments show that the optimal results are for an interval of 12.5 m in the vertical- and cross-sections in the DSM model, with a 1:10 000 DSM scale grade.

  14. ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ LEARNING OBSTACLES ON LEARNING INVERS FUNCTION MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna Satrio Perbowo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on the presence of obstacle in learning mathematics on inverse function. This research aims to analyze the learning obstacle, to know the types of error that is suffered by the students in learning inverse function. Kind of this kualitative research descriptive with data triangulation. The research subjects are high school students which is contained of 74 students and was taken 6 students to be main sample. The data of students’ error is obtained from the writen test result, the students’ false answers are identified into the type of error. Then it was chosen several students to be interviewed. Which the analysis result finding data in this research showed there are 4 types of errors, which are concept error, procedure error, counting error and concluding error. An obstacle which appear in learning inverse function is influenced by two factors, i.e internal factor and eksternal factor. Internal factor is showed by the students’ motivation in following learning and students’ skill in receiving learning material. While the eksternal factor is showed by the curriculum which applied in school with acceleration class caused many narrow learning time, teaching materials that is less complete with the discussion of question sample.

  15. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  16. Locating S-wave sources for the SPE-5 explosion using time reversal methods and a close-in, 1000 sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Mellors, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is producing new data to study the generation of seismic waves from explosive sources. Preliminary results show that far-field S-waves are generated both within the non-elastic volume surrounding explosive sources and by P- to S-wave scattering. The relative contribution of non-elastic phenomenology and elastic-wave scattering to far-field S-waves has been debated for decades, and numerical simulations based on the SPE experiments are addressing this question. The match between observed and simulated data degrades with event-station distance and with increasing time in each seismogram. This suggests that a more accurate model of subsurface elastic properties could result in better agreement between observed and simulated seismograms. A detailed model of subsurface structure has been developed using geologic maps and the extensive database of borehole logs, but uncertainty in structural details remains high. The large N instrument deployment during the SPE-5 experiment offers an opportunity to use time-reversal techniques to back project the wave field into the subsurface to locate significant sources of scattered energy. The large N deployment was nominally 1000, 5 Hz sensors (500 Z and 500 3C geophones) deployed in a roughly rectangular array to the south and east of the SPE-5 shot. Sensor spacing was nominally 50 meters in the interior portion of the array and 100 meters in the outer region, with two dense lines at 25 m spacing. The array covers the major geologic boundary between the Yucca Flat basin and the granitic Climax Stock in which the SPE experiments have been conducted. Improved mapping of subsurface scatterers is expected to result in better agreement between simulated and observed seismograms and aid in our understanding of S-wave generation from explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Amplitude analysis for the process K/sup -/p to ( pi /sup +/ pi /sup - /)/sub s-wave/ Sigma /sup 0/(1385)

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro, F; Hemingway, R J; Holmgren, S O; Kluyver, J G; Losty, Michael J; Massaro, G G G; Timmermans, J; Van de Walle, R T; Zalewski, K

    1977-01-01

    Transversity amplitudes and spin density matrix elements are determined for the process K/sup -/p to ( pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/) Sigma /sup 0/(1385)/sub s-wave/. Predictions of the additive quark model and of duality diagrams are tested and found consistent with the data; this is the first information about the applicability of these models to processes where a scalar object is produced at the mesonic vertex. (5 refs).

  18. Age-associated changes in obstacle negotiation strategies: Does size and timing matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidan, I; Eyal, S; Kurz, I; Geffen, N; Gazit, E; Ravid, L; Giladi, N; Mirelman, A; Hausdorff, J M

    2018-01-01

    Tripping over an obstacle is one of the most common causes of falls among older adults. However, the effects of aging, obstacle height and anticipation time on negotiation strategies have not been systematically evaluated. Twenty older adults (ages: 77.7±3.4years; 50% women) and twenty young adults (age: 29.3±3.8years; 50% women) walked through an obstacle course while negotiating anticipated and unanticipated obstacles at heights of 25mm and 75mm. Kinect cameras captured the: (1) distance of the subject's trailing foot before the obstacles, (2) distance of the leading foot after the obstacles, (3) clearance of the leading foot above the obstacles, and (4) clearance of the trailing foot above the obstacles. Linear-mix models assessed changes between groups and conditions. Older adults placed their leading foot closer to the obstacle after landing, compared to young adults (p<0.001). This pattern was enhanced in high obstacles (group*height interaction, p=0.033). Older adults had lower clearance over the obstacles, compared to young adults (p=0.007). This was more pronounced during unanticipated obstacles (group*ART interaction, p=0.003). The distance of the leading foot and clearance of the trailing foot after the obstacles were correlated with motor, cognitive, and functional abilities. These findings suggest that there are age-related changes in obstacle crossing strategies that are dependent on the specific characteristics of the obstacle. The results have important implications for clinical practice, suggesting that functional exercise should include obstacle negotiation training with variable practice of height and available response times. Further studies are needed to better understand the effects of motor and cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Automatic detection of P- and S-wave arrival times: new strategies based on the modified fractal method and basic matching pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Durán, R. K.; Comte, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Silva, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, new strategies for automatic identification of P- and S-wave arrival times from digital recorded local seismograms are proposed and analyzed. The database of arrival times previously identified by a human reader was compared with automatic identification techniques based on the Fourier transformation in reduced time (spectrograms), fractal analysis, and the basic matching pursuit algorithm. The first two techniques were used to identify the P-wave arrival times, while the third was used for the identification of the S-wave. For validation, the results were compared with the short-time average over long-time average (STA/LTA) of Rietbrock et al., Geophys Res Lett 39(8), (2012) for the database of aftershocks of the 2010 Maule Mw = 8.8 earthquake. The identifiers proposed in this work exhibit good results that outperform the STA/LTA identifier in many scenarios. The average difference from the reference picks (times obtained by the human reader) in P- and S-wave arrival times is 1 s.

  20. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n reaction on polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the {pi}{pi} energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude ({pi} exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a{sub 1} exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a{sub 1} exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar {pi}{pi} phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ``up`` and the well-known ``down`` solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective {pi}{pi} mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f{sub o}(1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  1. Transdimensional inversion of scattered body waves for 1D S-wave velocity structure - Application to the Tengchong volcanic area, Southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkui; Zhang, Shuangxi; Bodin, Thomas; Lin, Xu; Wu, Tengfei

    2018-06-01

    Inversion of receiver functions is commonly used to recover the S-wave velocity structure beneath seismic stations. Traditional approaches are based on deconvolved waveforms, where the horizontal component of P-wave seismograms is deconvolved by the vertical component. Deconvolution of noisy seismograms is a numerically unstable process that needs to be stabilized by regularization parameters. This biases noise statistics, making it difficult to estimate uncertainties in observed receiver functions for Bayesian inference. This study proposes a method to directly invert observed radial waveforms and to better account for data noise in a Bayesian formulation. We illustrate its feasibility with two synthetic tests having different types of noises added to seismograms. Then, a real site application is performed to obtain the 1-D S-wave velocity structure beneath a seismic station located in the Tengchong volcanic area, Southwestern China. Surface wave dispersion measurements spanning periods from 8 to 65 s are jointly inverted with P waveforms. The results show a complex S-wave velocity structure, as two low velocity zones are observed in the crust and uppermost mantle, suggesting the existence of magma chambers, or zones of partial melt. The upper magma chambers may be the heart source that cause the thermal activity on the surface.

  2. Protonium spectrosopy and identification of P-wave and S-wave initial states of p-p annihilations at rest with the ASTERIX experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, U.; Ahmad, S.; Amsler, C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses an experiment designed to study the general features of p - p interactions at rest, to extend work done in the spectroscopy of light mesons produced in p - p annihilations at rest, and to search with high sensitivity for gluonium, qq - qq baryonium structures and NN states bound by strong interactions. The effect of using a gas target and a large acceptance X-ray detector is examined. The rate and the signature of antiprotons stopping in the gas target are investigated. Topics covered include the protonium cascade and spectroscopy; a comparison of S-wave and P-wave p - p annihilations at rest; - p stop and the formation of p - p atoms; the x-ray detector (projection chamber, electronics, tests); and examples of estimations of signal and background (protonium spectroscopy, search of resonances in P-wave annihilations, search of resonances in S-wave annihilations). The distinctive features of the ASTERIX experiment are the use of a gaseous H 2 target instead of a conventional liquid H 2 one; an X-ray detector of large overall detection efficiency, low energy threshold and low background rate that enables identification of P-wave and S-wave annihilation events from 2P and 1S levels of protonium; a detection system for the products of p - p annihilations; and a trigger system that enables filtration of the acquisition of events by means of two independent chains of processors working in parallel

  3. Virtual obstacle crossing: Reliability and differences in stroke survivors who prospectively experienced falls or no falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Wittink, Harriet; van de Port, Ingrid G; Wubbels, Gijs; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2017-10-01

    Stroke survivors often fall during walking. To reduce fall risk, gait testing and training with avoidance of virtual obstacles is gaining popularity. However, it is unknown whether and how virtual obstacle crossing is associated with fall risk. The present study assessed whether obstacle crossing characteristics are reliable and assessed differences in stroke survivors who prospectively experienced falls or no falls. We recruited twenty-nine community dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Participants crossed five virtual obstacles with increasing lengths. After a break, the test was repeated to assess test-retest reliability. For each obstacle length and trial, we determined; success rate, leading limb preference, pre and post obstacle distance, margins of stability, toe clearance, and crossing step length and speed. Subsequently, fall incidence was monitored using a fall calendar and monthly phone calls over a six-month period. Test-retest reliability was poor, but improved with increasing obstacle-length. Twelve participants reported at least one fall. No association of fall incidence with any of the obstacle crossing characteristics was found. Given the absence of height of the virtual obstacles, obstacle avoidance may have been relatively easy, allowing participants to cross obstacles in multiple ways, increasing variability of crossing characteristics and reducing the association with fall risk. These finding cast some doubt on current protocols for testing and training of obstacle avoidance in stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stepping back to see the big picture: when obstacles elicit global processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marguc, J.; Förster, J.; van Kleef, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Can obstacles prompt people to look at the "big picture" and open up their minds? Do the cognitive effects of obstacles extend beyond the tasks with which they interfere? These questions were addressed in 6 studies involving both physical and nonphysical obstacles and different measures of global

  5. Smart Sensor Based Obstacle Detection for High-Speed Unmanned Surface Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Dan; Galeazzi, Roberto; Andersen, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an obstacle detection system for a high-speed and agile unmanned surface vehicle (USV), running at speeds up to 30 m/s. The aim is a real-time and high performance obstacle detection system using both radar and vision technologies to detect obstacles within a range of 175 m. ...... performance using sensor fusion of radar and computer vision....

  6. Thermally activated plastic flow in the presence of multiple obstacle types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y; Curtin, W A

    2012-01-01

    The rate- and temperature-dependent plastic flow in a material containing two types of thermally activatable obstacles to dislocation motion is studied both numerically and theoretically in a regime of relative obstacle densities for which the zero-temperature stress is additive. The numerical methods consider the low-density ‘forest’ obstacles first as point obstacles and then as extended obstacles having a finite interaction length with the dislocation, while the high-density ‘solute’ obstacles are treated as point obstacles. Results show that the finite-temperature flow stresses due to different obstacle strengthening mechanisms are additive, as proposed by Kocks et al, only when all strengthening obstacles can be approximated as point-like obstacles. When the activation distance of the low-density extended obstacles exceeds the spacing between the high-density obstacles, the finite-temperature flow stress is non-additive and the effective activation energy differs from that of the Kocks et al model. An analytical model for the activation energy versus flow stress is proposed, based on analysis of the simulation results, to account for the effect of the finite interaction length. In this model, for high forest activation energies, the point-pinning solute obstacles provide a temperature-dependent backstress σ b on dislocation and the overall activation energy is otherwise controlled by the forest activation energy. The model predictions agree well with numerical results for a wide range of obstacle properties, clearly showing the effect due to the finite interaction between dislocation and the obstacles. The implications of our results on the activation volume are discussed with respect to experimental results on solute-strengthened fcc alloys. (paper)

  7. Convenient method for estimating underground s-wave velocity structure utilizing horizontal and vertical components microtremor spectral ratio; Bido no suiheido/jogedo supekutoru hi wo riyoshita kan`i chika s ha sokudo kozo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H; Yoshioka, M; Saito, T [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Studies were conducted about the method of estimating the underground S-wave velocity structure by inversion making use of the horizontal/vertical motion spectral ratio of microtremors. For this purpose, a dynamo-electric velocity type seismograph was used, capable of processing the east-west, north-south, and vertical components integratedly. For the purpose of sampling the Rayleigh wave spectral ratio, one out of all the azimuths was chosen, whose horizontal motion had a high Fourier frequency component coherency with the vertical motions. For the estimation of the underground S-wave velocity structure, parameters (P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and layer thickness) were determined from the minimum residual sum of squares involving the observed microtremor spectral ratio and the theoretical value calculated by use of a model structure. The known boring data was utilized for the study of the S-wave velocity in the top layer, and it was determined using an S-wave velocity estimation formula for the Morioka area constructed using the N-value, depth, and geological classification. It was found that the optimum S-wave velocity structure even below the top layer well reflects the S-wave velocity obtained by the estimation formula. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Stepping back to see the big picture: when obstacles elicit global processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguc, Janina; Förster, Jens; Van Kleef, Gerben A

    2011-11-01

    Can obstacles prompt people to look at the "big picture" and open up their minds? Do the cognitive effects of obstacles extend beyond the tasks with which they interfere? These questions were addressed in 6 studies involving both physical and nonphysical obstacles and different measures of global versus local processing styles. Perceptual scope increased after participants solved anagrams in the presence, rather than the absence, of an auditory obstacle (random words played in the background; Study 1), particularly among individuals low in volatility (i.e., those who are inclined to stay engaged and finish what they do; Study 4). It also increased immediately after participants encountered a physical obstacle while navigating a maze (Study 3A) and when compared with doing nothing (Study 3B). Conceptual scope increased after participants solved anagrams while hearing random numbers framed as an "obstacle to overcome" rather than a "distraction to ignore" (Study 2) and after participants navigated a maze with a physical obstacle, compared with a maze without a physical obstacle, but only when trait (Study 5) or state (Study 6) volatility was low. Results suggest that obstacles trigger an "if obstacle, then start global processing" response, primarily when people are inclined to stay engaged and finish ongoing activities. Implications for dealing with life's obstacles and related research are discussed.

  9. The Influence of Topographic Obstacles on Basaltic Lava Flow Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A. P.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.; Samuels, R.

    2014-12-01

    Smooth pāhoehoe and jagged ´áā represent two end-members of a textural spectrum that reflects the emplacement characteristics of basaltic lava flows. However, many additional textures (e.g., rubbly and slabby pāhoehoe) reflect a range of different process due to lava flow dynamics or interaction with topography. Unfortunately the influence of topography on the distribution of textures in basaltic lava flows is not well-understood. The 18 ± 1.0 ka Twin Craters lava flow in the Zuni-Bandera field (New Mexico, USA) provides an excellent site to study the morphological changes of a lava flow that encountered topographic obstacles. The flow field is 0.2-3.8 km wide with a prominent central tube system that intersects and wraps around a 1000 m long ridge, oriented perpendicular to flow. Upstream of the ridge, the flow has low-relief inflation features extending out and around the ridge. This area includes mildly to heavily disrupted pāhoehoe with interdispersed agglutinated masses, irregularly shaped rubble and lava balls. Breakouts of ´áā and collapse features are also common. These observations suggest crustal disruption due to flow-thickening upstream from the ridge and the movement of lava out and around the obstacle. While the ridge influenced the path of the tube, which wraps around the southern end of the ridge, the series of collapse features and breakouts of ´áā along the tube system are more likely a result of changes in flux throughout the tube system because these features are found both upstream and downstream of the obstacle. This work demonstrates that topography can significantly influence the formation history and surface disruption of a flow field, and in some cases the influence of topography can be separated from the influences of changes in flux along a tube system.

  10. Obstacles to engaging in young driver licensing: Perspectives of parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Sehana; Scott-Parker, Bridie

    2017-02-01

    Young novice drivers remain at greater risk of injury and death despite a wealth of interventions including graduated driver licensing (GDL) programs. The key to implementing safer practices inherent in GDL appears to lie with optimising the role of parents. This qualitative research explored the parent's perspectives of obstacles to engaging in the driver licensing process within a GDL program. Parents also shared advice on what they found helpful, and where relevant, recommended changes in the process to enable safer practices for young drivers. Twenty-three parents (aged 35-60 years, M=49.52, SD=8.01, 11 males) participated in semi-structured interviews regarding licensing experiences with their young driver children. The young drivers included learner (n=11), provisional (restricted/intermediate) (n=9) and open (unrestricted/full) licence drivers (n=3), ranging from 16 to 24 years (M=18.04, SD=2.21, 13 males). Content analysis revealed that most obstacles were encountered at the learner licensing phase, with the parent-reported difficult temperament of the learner driver the most prominent. Unsurprisingly, advice to other parents to be patient and remain calm featured heavily during the same phase. Anxiety from not having control of the vehicle was another obstacle at the learner phase, translating to anxieties for child safety in the early stages of provisional driving. Recommendations for the current GDL included more rigorous road rule testing, with general support for the program, professional driver training at learner and provisional stages facilitated parental engagement through the licensing phases. The findings overwhelmingly suggest a need for parents to be educated regarding their importance in, and of, the driver licensing process, and the efficacy of their instruction, content and practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Path Planning Method in Multi-obstacle Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinpeng; Sun, Hanxv

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an improved algorithm for particle swarm optimization is proposed for the application of underwater robot in the complex marine environment. Not only did consider to avoid obstacles when path planning, but also considered the current direction and the size effect on the performance of the robot dynamics. The algorithm uses the trunk binary tree structure to construct the path search space and A * heuristic search method is used in the search space to find a evaluation standard path. Then the particle swarm algorithm to optimize the path by adjusting evaluation function, which makes the underwater robot in the current navigation easier to control, and consume less energy.

  12. Automatic guidance and control laws for helicopter obstacle avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Lam, T.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the implementation of a full-function guidance and control system for automatic obstacle avoidance in helicopter nap-of-the-earth (NOE) flight. The guidance function assumes that the helicopter is sufficiently responsive so that the flight path can be readily adjusted at NOE speeds. The controller, basically an autopilot for following the derived flight path, was implemented with parameter values to control a generic helicopter model used in the simulation. Evaluation of the guidance and control system with a 3-dimensional graphical helicopter simulation suggests that the guidance has the potential for providing good and meaningful flight trajectories.

  13. Intelligent Surveillance Robot with Obstacle Avoidance Capabilities Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo Budiharto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For specific purpose, vision-based surveillance robot that can be run autonomously and able to acquire images from its dynamic environment is very important, for example, in rescuing disaster victims in Indonesia. In this paper, we propose architecture for intelligent surveillance robot that is able to avoid obstacles using 3 ultrasonic distance sensors based on backpropagation neural network and a camera for face recognition. 2.4 GHz transmitter for transmitting video is used by the operator/user to direct the robot to the desired area. Results show the effectiveness of our method and we evaluate the performance of the system.

  14. Obstacle Avoidance of a Mobile Robot with Hierarchical Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Gyu [Yeungnam College of Science and Technolgy, Taegu (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    This paper proposed a new hierarchical fuzzy-neural network algorithm for navigation of a mobile robot within unknown dynamic environment. Proposed navigation algorithm used the learning ability of the neural network and the feasibility of control highly nonlinear system of fuzzy theory. The proposed navigation algorithm used fuzzy algorithm for goal approach and fuzzy-network for effective collision avoidance. Some computer simulation results for a mobile robot equipped with ultrasonic range sensors show that the suggested navigation algorithm is very effective to escape in stationary and moving obstacles environment. (author). 11 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Addressing Mathematization Obstacles with Unformalized Problems in Physics Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Solving a physics problem requires that the problem solver either implicitly or explicitly structure the problem situation in such a way that she can set up the mathematical equations based on the relevant physics. This part of the mathematization process has been shown to cause obstacles...... for students (Niss, 2016). In the paper, we show how the students’ ability to perform this mathematization process can be trained by using so-called unformalized physics problems. Some examples of how this training can be done are provided from a course on problem solving in physics taught at Roskilde...

  16. Observation of three dimensional optical rogue waves through obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Conti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We observe three-dimensional rogue waves in the speckle distribution of a spatially modulated optical beam. Light is transmitted beyond a partially reflecting obstacle generating optical rogue waves at a controlled position in the shadow of the barrier. When the barrier transmits only 0.07% of the input laser power, we observe the mostly localized event. These results demonstrate that an optimum amount of spatial non-homogeneity maximizes the probability of a gigantic event while the technique we exploit enables to control light behind a fully reflective wall

  17. Obstacles to performance in the South African autocomponents industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granerud, Lise

    2003-01-01

    The auto-components industry has improved its performance significantly in South Africa during the second half of the 1990's. However, it has not yet reached the level of the international competitors. The present paper suggests that a focus on the firms' internal conditions is a way to identify...... obstacles preventing further improvement of performance and competitiveness. Organisational behaviour has increasingly become important internationally in the understanding of firm development and learning in the recent years. This paper argues that it is crucial to take into account the behaviour...

  18. A Mobile Robot Sonar System with Obstacle Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    WITH OBSTACLE - AVOIDANCE __ by __ Patrick Gerard Byrne March 1994 Thesis Advisor : Yutaka Kanayama Approved for public release; distribution is...point p is on a line L whose normal has an orientation a and whose distance from the origin is r (Figure 5). This method has an advantage in expressing...sonar(FRONTR); Wine(&pl); while(hitl I >’- 100.0 11 hitl 1 - 0.0 ){ hitl I = sonar(FRONTR); I skipO; line(&p3); gat- robO (&posit 1); while(positl.x

  19. Les obstacles à la gestion des Risques Psycho-Sociaux

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wassenhove , Wim

    2014-01-01

    National audience; Cet article propose une analyse de la gestion des risques psychosociaux au sein des entreprises. Cette gestion se heurte à plusieurs obstacles. Premièrement, le caractère polymorphe et plurifactoriel des RPS n'aide pas à sa compréhension dans le monde professionnel. En deuxième lieu, les coûts associés sont peu visibles pour une entreprise, ce qui n'incite pas à l'action. De plus, les méthodes et outils d'évaluation généralement disponibles sont peu adaptés aux pratiques tr...

  20. Gaze and motor behavior of people with PD during obstacle circumvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simieli, Lucas; Vitório, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Sérgio Tosi; Zago, Paula Fávaro Polastri; Ignacio Pereira, Vinícius Alota; Baptista, André Macari; de Paula, Pedro Henrique Alves; Penedo, Tiago; Almeida, Quincy J; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the motor and visual strategies used when walking around (circumvention) an obstacle in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in addition to the effects of dopaminergic medication on these strategies. To answer the study question, people with PD (15) and neurologically healthy individuals (15 - CG) performed the task of obstacle circumvention during walking (5 trials of unobstructed walking and obstacle circumvention). The following parameters were analyzed: body clearance (longer mediolateral distance during obstacle circumvention of the center of mass -CoM- to the obstacle), horizontal distance (distance of the CoM at the beginning of obstacle circumvention to the obstacle), circumvention strategy ("lead-out" or "lead-in" strategy), spatial-temporal of each step, and number of fixations, the mean duration of the fixations and time of fixations according to areas of interest. In addition, the variability of each parameter was calculated. The results indicated that people with PD and the CG presented similar obstacle circumvention strategies (no differences between groups for body clearance, horizontal distance to obstacle, or obstacle circumvention strategy), but the groups used different adjustments to perform these strategies (people with PD performed adjustments during both the approach and circumvention steps and presented greater visual dependence on the obstacle; the CG adjusted only the final step before obstacle circumvention). Moreover, without dopaminergic medication, people with PD reduced body clearance and increased the use of a "lead-out" strategy, variability in spatial-temporal parameters, and dependency on obstacle information, increasing the risk of contact with the obstacle during circumvention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of debris with a solid obstacle: Numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this research is the propagation of a cloud of solid particles formed from an explosion-damaged construction. The main objective is the interaction of the cloud (debris) with a solid beam located at some distance from the explosion. The mathematical model involves the flow of the gas using standard conservation equations, and this part of the model is solved numerically. The solid particles are treated as a system of solid points (so-called Lagrangian approach), whose motion is the result of the flowing gas as well as collisions with obstacles. These two issues are described respectively by Newton's second law and the hard-sphere model. The model is used to simulate various cases where the influence of different parameters like the value of the pressure of the explosion, the particle size, the number of particles and the obstacle location are investigated. The results are presented as snapshots of particle location, and also as the particle total momentum during collision with the beam.

  2. Interaction of debris with a solid obstacle: numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinska, Anna

    2010-05-15

    The subject of this research is the propagation of a cloud of solid particles formed from an explosion-damaged construction. The main objective is the interaction of the cloud (debris) with a solid beam located at some distance from the explosion. The mathematical model involves the flow of the gas using standard conservation equations, and this part of the model is solved numerically. The solid particles are treated as a system of solid points (so-called Lagrangian approach), whose motion is the result of the flowing gas as well as collisions with obstacles. These two issues are described respectively by Newton's second law and the hard-sphere model. The model is used to simulate various cases where the influence of different parameters like the value of the pressure of the explosion, the particle size, the number of particles and the obstacle location are investigated. The results are presented as snapshots of particle location, and also as the particle total momentum during collision with the beam. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Obstacles against Order of Law in Safavid Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ebadollahi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While focusing on the teleological matters, most of the studies about the roots of disorder and anarchy in Iran attempt to explain the “present” obstacles against order of law; the present study aims to analyze the structural-historical conditions affecting the “possibility and impossibility of the order of law in Iran”. In the former studies, “Iran’s history” is inversely applied in order to explain the present situation of society. Instead of interpreting the determining social structures in the history, such studies attempts to understand “contemporary Iran”. Furthermore, applying comparative-fundamentalist method, they base their analysis on the economic or political conditions of the matter. However, the present study claims that the general theory of social transformation –either the Marxian or Weberian- -that is produced approaching western medieval societies- could not explain roots of disorder and anarchy in Iran. Instead, applying a structuralist model, and focusing on “articulation” in analysis, the present study aims to explore the historical obstacles against the order of law in the history of Iran (rather than western medieval history. Thus, it claims that the main root of “disorder in the history of Iran” is the governing system of political, martial, and economic management in Iran.

  4. Religion, an obstacle to workplace spirituality and employee wellness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Bester

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A desperate need for employee wellness is echoed in work-related stories. Workplace spirituality is presented as an integral part of achieving and maintaining employee wellness. However, there is an observed gap of spirituality in employee wellness programmes and in the absence of the workplace spiritual helper in multidisciplinary wellness teams. Using a postfoundational notion of practical theology, I have explored one of the reasons for this gap, namely workplace spirituality�s association to religion. When spirituality is viewed through the lens of religion, it is overlooked as a vehicle of help. This is a consequence of the obstacles of the taboo of religious discussion, the complexity of religious plurality, the dominant voice of secularism and unhelpful religiosity. A proposal is made for a definition of spirituality that describes the relationship between spirituality and religion that overcomes the religionrelated obstacles to the development of workplace spirituality and so enable spirituality�s contribution in wellness.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The research includes an interdisciplinary collaboration with a Human Resource (HR manager, social worker, arts therapist, clinical pastoral counsellor, medical practitioner, psychologist, businessperson and two psychiatrists that underscores the collaborative effort in wellness. There is an intradisciplinary challenge to those who restrict the view of spirituality to the experience of religion.

  5. Emergent oscillations assist obstacle negotiation during ant cooperative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelblum, Aviram; Pinkoviezky, Itai; Fonio, Ehud; Gov, Nir S.; Feinerman, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion by animal groups is affected by internal interactions, external constraints, and the influx of information. A quantitative understanding of how these different factors give rise to different modes of collective motion is, at present, lacking. Here, we study how ants that cooperatively transport a large food item react to an obstacle blocking their path. Combining experiments with a statistical physics model of mechanically coupled active agents, we show that the constraint induces a deterministic collective oscillatory mode that facilitates obstacle circumvention. We provide direct experimental evidence, backed by theory, that this motion is an emergent group effect that does not require any behavioral changes at the individual level. We trace these relaxation oscillations to the interplay between two forces; informed ants pull the load toward the nest whereas uninformed ants contribute to the motion’s persistence along the tangential direction. The model’s predictions that oscillations appear above a critical system size, that the group can spontaneously transition into its ordered phase, and that the system can exhibit complete rotations are all verified experimentally. We expect that similar oscillatory modes emerge in collective motion scenarios where the structure of the environment imposes conflicts between individually held information and the group’s tendency for cohesiveness. PMID:27930304

  6. Strategies for overcoming market obstacles. Strategien zur Ueberwindung von Markthindernissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heumann, P

    1983-01-01

    In this paper saving of energy is seen as a process of adaption. It consists of four parts. Part I contains a brief analysis of the energy problem from an economic viewpoint. The central question is whether there are any scarcity indicators which trigger off the adaptation process. According to the conception of political economy the theory of scarcity is one of its main research objects. Anything that political economy says about scarcity should be applicable to energy as well. Part II therefore contains a survey of literature on welfare economy and especially about market failure. Part II presents a microeconomic analysis of the energy demand of private households and tries to find out which strategy would allow the most efficient adaptation to changed relative prices. Adaptation possibilities of the energy-related capital stock is described for all those cases where the present legal situation presents an obstacle to flexibility. This concerns for example the relationship between tenant and landlord but also the contract between builder and purchaser of real estate. Strategies are proposed for those sectors where market obstacles render the adaption to a situation of scarcity difficult or impossible. Especially the consequences for the laws governing tenancy and an Act of Energy industry are described. Part IV finally contains a summarizing evaluation of the strategies proposed. A comparison with the present official energy policy is made.

  7. Crustal and mantle structure of the greater Jan Mayen-East Greenland region (NE Atlantic) from combined 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P.; Sippel, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Meeßen, C.; Breivik, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The study area is located between the Jan Mayen Ridge and the east coast of Greenland. It has a complex geological setting with the ultraslow Kolbeinsey and Mohn's spreading ridges, the anomalously shallow Eggvin Bank, the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMMC), and the tectonically active West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (WJMFZ). In this study, we present the results of forward 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling which provide new insights into the deep crust and mantle structure and the wide-ranging influence of the Iceland Plume. The crustal parts of the presented 3D structural model are mainly constrained by local seismic refraction and reflection data. Accordingly, greatest crustal thicknesses (24 km) are observed on the northern boundary of the JMMC, while the average crustal thickness is 8.5 km and 4 km in the Kolbeinsey and Mohn's Ridge, respectively. The densities of the crustal parts are from previous studies. Additionally, the mantle density is derived from S-wave velocity data (between 50 and 250 km depth), while densities of the lithospheric mantle between the Moho and 50 km are calculated assuming isostatic equilibrium at 250 km depth. This is used as a starting density model which is further developed to obtain a reasonable fit between the calculated and measured (free-air) gravity fields. The observed S-wave tomographic data and the gravity modeling prove that the Iceland plume anomaly in the asthenosphere affects the lithospheric thickness and temperature, from the strongly influenced Middle Kolbeinsey Ridge, to the less affected North Kolbeinsey Ridge (Eggvin Bank), and to the little impacted Mohn's Ridge. Thus, the age-temperature relations of the different mid-ocean ridges of the study area are perturbed to different degrees controlled by the distance from the Iceland Plume. Furthermore, we find that the upper 50 km of lithospheric mantle are thermally affected by the plume only in the southwestern parts of the study area.

  8. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults.

  9. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corge, Ch.

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [fr

  10. Obstacle detection contribution for automotive applications; Contribution a la detection d'obstacles pour la voiture intelligente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, M.

    1997-12-05

    On the one hand, this Ph-D Thesis deals with a new architectural approach for automotive applications implementing heterogeneous sensor data fusion, and on the other hand, it explains the data pre-processing algorithm of a microwave radar. Firstly, the analysis of both PROCHIP2 and PROLAB2 obstacle detection demonstrators (cf. the European PROMETHEUS research program about smart cars) has led us to propose a new functional architecture. Our approach introduces a sensor data pre-processing level. Data are then running at the local sensor before being transferred to data fusion architectures (that classically receives data whose meaning has also been noised by the application distribution). Secondly, an elementary simulator has been designed in order to complement our database composed of experimental microwave radar data. It is able to generate radar data for basic highway traffic scenarios. With both experimental and simulated data, a deterministic radar data pre-processing algorithm has been designed. It reduces the amount of data to be transferred by converting the local radar data into a higher semantic information: it gives more pertinent data (for example: velocities...) to the data fusion level; in particular, it predicts the obstacle path. Finally, some perspectives have been set out. Firstly, an H {infinity} estimation approach is used to reduce the data disruption effect that alters the radar data and, secondly, a controller has been proposed with the goal of decreasing the effect of car pitching. (author)

  11. Cumulative effects in Swedish EIA practice - difficulties and obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waernbaeck, Antoienette; Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija

    2009-01-01

    The importance of considering cumulative effects (CE) in the context of environmental assessment is manifested in the EU regulations. The demands on the contents of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) documents explicitly ask for CE to be described. In Swedish environmental assessment documents CE are rarely described or included. The aim of this paper is to look into the reasons behind this fact in the Swedish context. The paper describes and analyse how actors implementing the EIA and SEA legislation in Sweden perceive the current situation in relation to the legislative demands and the inclusion of cumulative effects. Through semi-structured interviews the following questions have been explored: Is the phenomenon of CE discussed and included in the EIA/SEA process? What do the actors include in and what is their knowledge of the term and concept of CE? Which difficulties and obstacles do these actors experience and what possibilities for inclusion of CE do they see in the EIA/SEA process? A large number of obstacles and hindrances emerged from the interviews conducted. It can be concluded from the analysis that the will to act does seem to exist. A lack of knowledge in respect of how to include cumulative effects and a lack of clear regulations concerning how this should be done seem to be perceived as the main obstacles. The knowledge of the term and the phenomenon is furthermore quite narrow and not all encompassing. They experience that there is a lack of procedures in place. They also seem to lack knowledge of methods in relation to how to actually work, in practice, with CE and how to include CE in the EIA/SEA process. It can be stated that the existence of this poor picture in relation to practice concerning CE in the context of impact assessment mirrors the existing and so far rather vague demands in respect of the inclusion and assessment of CE in Swedish EIA and SEA legislation, regulations, guidelines and

  12. High-resolution S-wave reflection survey in a linear depression; Senjo kubochi ni okeru kobunkaino S ha hanshaho tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazaki, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Y [Kyushu Regional Construction Bureau, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    An attempt was made to apply a method combining the high-resolution S-wave reflection survey with boring to a fault survey at the Kuju town, Oita Prefecture. The investigation area has a linear depression area as small as about 600 m from east to west and about 100 m from north to south surround by mountain slopes. The boundary section with mountain peaks at the north ridge of the depression area is linear, and existence of a southward falling normal fault has been indicated. The seismic investigation has employed an artificial plank hammering method, and the derived data were processed by using the processing software, Vista for Windows. The Bin interval was 25 cm, the S-wave velocity ranged from 100 to 150 m/s, and the spatial resolution was estimated at several ten centimeters or less. The resolution is thought sufficient for assessing the fault location and displacement. The acquired depth cross sections presented distinct structural discontinuity, from which the fault locations were estimated. However, for displacements in the base bed and upper beds, the reflected waves fell into disorder at the faults, having made a detailed assessment difficult. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Life on Mount Obstacle: Disease of existence as condition and possibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm, Kenneth; Jespersen, Ejgil

    will analyze various kinds of human meaning that can be found on Mount Obstacle, departing from two key positions: First, Camus (1967) used The Myth of Sisyphus to describe how the experience of obstacles is a human condition. In cases of disability this condition is of course more evident, but the task...... is still to create meaning from this absurd condition. Sisyphus is to Camus an ’absurd hero’ because he is aware of and acknowledges the challenge that he is condemned to. This means that the struggle to overcome the necessary obstacle can become a meaningful pursuit, wherefore Camus concluded: ”The...... be illustrated by Suits’ (2005) classical treatise on game playing. By choosing to climb Mount Obstacle the activity of climbing becomes an end in itself, which opens for experiencing the intrinsic value related to voluntarily attempting to overcome the unnecessary obstacle. In both cases life on Mount Obstacle...

  14. Range Sensor-Based Efficient Obstacle Avoidance through Selective Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Youngbo; Kim, Gon-Woo

    2018-03-29

    In this paper, we address a collision avoidance method for mobile robots. Many conventional obstacle avoidance methods have been focused solely on avoiding obstacles. However, this can cause instability when passing through a narrow passage, and can also generate zig-zag motions. We define two strategies for obstacle avoidance, known as Entry mode and Bypass mode. Entry mode is a pattern for passing through the gap between obstacles, while Bypass mode is a pattern for making a detour around obstacles safely. With these two modes, we propose an efficient obstacle avoidance method based on the Expanded Guide Circle (EGC) method with selective decision-making. The simulation and experiment results show the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Range Sensor-Based Efficient Obstacle Avoidance through Selective Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbo Shim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address a collision avoidance method for mobile robots. Many conventional obstacle avoidance methods have been focused solely on avoiding obstacles. However, this can cause instability when passing through a narrow passage, and can also generate zig-zag motions. We define two strategies for obstacle avoidance, known as Entry mode and Bypass mode. Entry mode is a pattern for passing through the gap between obstacles, while Bypass mode is a pattern for making a detour around obstacles safely. With these two modes, we propose an efficient obstacle avoidance method based on the Expanded Guide Circle (EGC method with selective decision-making. The simulation and experiment results show the validity of the proposed method.

  16. Investigation of obstacles against effective crisis management in earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nekoei-Moghadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Floods, hurricanes, landslides, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes are events that a large group of people on earth are affected. In December 2003, the residents of Bam, Iran experienced an earthquake that measured 6.6 on the Richter scale and destroyed more than 90% of the city. The purpose of this study was to investigate obstacles against effective crisis management with considering service received by individuals in the Bam earthquake. In this study, domestic journals, foreign dissertations in Persian bases such as Google scholar, Magiran, IranMedex, SID and in English bases such as PubMed, Web of Science, Google scholar were used. The results of this study showed that there were many problems in various aspects of planning including: lack of coherent programs, lack of attention to the needs of health care, poor coordination between agencies and organizations and lack of appropriate training of volunteers and people.

  17. Avoiding obstacles by using a proximity infrared sensor skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Zhengcai; Fu Yili; Wu Qidi; Wang Shuguo; Wang Guangguo

    2007-01-01

    Placement and wiring of vast amount of sensor elements on the 3-dimensionally configured robot surface to form soft sensor skin is very difficult with the traditional technology, hi this paper we propose a new method to realize such a skin. By implanting infrared sensors array in an elastic body, we obtain an elastic and tough sensor skin that can be shaped freely. The developed sensor skin is a large-area, flexible array of infrared sensors with data processing capabilities. Depending on the skin electronics, it endows its carrier with an ability to sense its surroundings. The structure, the method of infrared sensor signal processing, and basic experiments of sensor skin are presented. The validity of the infrared sensor skin is investigated by preliminary obstacle avoidance trial.

  18. The Applications and Obstacles of Metabonomics in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, a wide range of metabonomic technologies are widely used in the modern research of traditional chinese medicine (TCM. At present, the most prevailing methods for TCM research are mainly nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. With these techniques, metabonomics will help to understand syndromes, efficacy and toxicity of TCM. However, every analytical technique has its advantages and drawbacks, and there exist some obstacles of its applications on TCM. So, we discuss metabonomics in TCM and analyze some problems of its applications to study TCM in recent years. We believe that with the further development of metabonomic analytical technology, especially multianalysed techniques, metabonomics will greatly promote TCM research and be beneficial to the modernization of TCM.

  19. Understanding Supplier Resistance - Overcoming Obstacles to Supply Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Steve

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores an important but unexplored theme in the development of 'total quality' relationships in the supply chain: why suppliers may exhibit resistance to quality initiatives, and why what seems to customers as cooperation can appear as unwelcome interference or even exploitation to suppliers. This is a question of great relevance to all those seeking to understand current business practice, and also to those seeking to bring about practical improvements in supply chain quality. Too much of the supply chain and quality literature assumes the issue of supplier's compliance with customer initiatives is unproblematic (unable to understand this sentence; experience suggests it is one of the major obstacles in developing the quality-oriented, integrated supply chain.

  20. Obstacles to Brain Tumor Therapy: Key ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwina Wijaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The delivery of cancer chemotherapy to treat brain tumors remains a challenge, in part, because of the inherent biological barrier, the blood–brain barrier. While its presence and role as a protector of the normal brain parenchyma has been acknowledged for decades, it is only recently that the important transporter components, expressed in the tightly knit capillary endothelial cells, have been deciphered. These transporters are ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters and, so far, the major clinically important ones that functionally contribute to the blood–brain barrier are ABCG2 and ABCB1. A further limitation to cancer therapy of brain tumors or brain metastases is the blood–tumor barrier, where tumors erect a barrier of transporters that further impede drug entry. The expression and regulation of these two transporters at these barriers, as well as tumor derived alteration in expression and/or mutation, are likely obstacles to effective therapy.

  1. Knowledge Management in Accomodation: Infrastructure, Applications and Obstacles Encountered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Bahar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary administrations have to manage their knowledge in an effective and systematic way so that they can maintain both their existence and their competition advantages with long term differentiated superiority. As a result of globalization, the effects of the development in information technology on all sectors can also be observed in tourism sector. In this study, the applications of accommodation establishments, their knowledge management background, and the obstacles met in practice are determined. The benefits of information technologies in enterprises involved in this study have been seen in a concrete way and the necessary infrastructure have been identified. But human capital, organizational structure and organizational culture were inadequacies about knowledge management.

  2. Persona Usage in Software Development: Advantages and Obstacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Jane; Stage, Jan; Nielsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The Personas technique has been promoted as a strong tool for providing software developers with a better understanding of the prospective users of their software. This paper reports from a questionnaire survey regarding knowledge about Personas and their usage in software development companies....... The questionnaire survey was conducted in a limited geographical area to establish the extent of Personas usage within all companies in the chosen region and determine whether software development companies used Personas during the development process. Several issues were identified as reasons for either not using...... the technique or for poor application of it. The study showed that 55% of the respondents had never heard about Personas. Among those who had heard about the Personas technique, the following obstacles towards usage of the technique were identified: Lack of knowledge of the technique, lack of resources (time...

  3. Socket sclerosis--an obstacle for orthodontic space closure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Sebastian

    2009-07-01

    Socket sclerosis is a rare reaction to tooth extraction resulting in high-density bone in the center of the alveolar process, where, under normal circumstances, cancellous bone is to be expected. In an adult orthodontic patient, routine extractions of the mandibular first permanent bicuspids were performed, resulting in socket sclerosis and unsuccessful orthodontic space closure. Orthodontic mini-implants were inserted to augment anchorage and aid in space closure. In the presence of socket sclerosis, conventional orthodontic mechanics failed to close the extraction spaces. However, with absolute anchorage in place, space closure occurred at a nearly normal rate. After treatment, no signs of socket sclerosis were discernible on the periapical radiographs. Socket sclerosis can be an obstacle for orthodontic space closure if traditional mechanics are employed. However, mini-implant-reinforced anchorage can lead to successful space closure, resulting in complete resolution of the sclerotic sites.

  4. Transition to Motherhood as an Immigrant: Risks and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruveyde Aydin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The process of transition to motherhood that brings along a number of vital changes may be full of risks and difficulties for immigrant mothers. Poverty, being unfamiliar with the language of the country that the mother migrated, inability of healthcare policies in covering healthcare expenses of immigrants, insufficiency of social assistance and loneliness may negatively affect health of mother and infant. Postpartum immigrant mothers are seen depression, anxiety, stress and social isolation because of these obstacles. Therefore, health care professionals, who provide care to immigrant mothers, should clarify immigrant mothers' religious, cultural beliefs and attitudes. Procurement of peer support is important by developing care programs special to immigrant mothers and ensuring immigrant women to come together. Increase in the number of translators in hospitals and prepara-tion of education materials in native language of mothers will improve the level of benefiting from healthcare services. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 250-262

  5. Transmitting information of an object behind the obstacle to infinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bai Bing; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Meng, Ling Ling; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-08-01

    We propose an illusion device that transforms a metallic cylinder into a Luneburg lens by using transformation optics. Such a transformed focusing lens guides electromagnetic waves to propagate around the central metallic cylinder smoothly and be focused on one spot, and thus the information of an object behind the obstacle can be transmitted to infinity. In order to realize the required-anisotropic parameters with high permittivity and low permeability, we design embedded split-ring resonators (SRRs) to increase the permittivity of the traditional SRR structures. In experiments, we fabricate and measure the transformed lens, and the tested results agree well with the numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The proposed transformation lens can mimic some properties of Einstein gravitational lens because their wave propagation behaviors are very similar.

  6. Modifications in children's goals when encountering obstacles to conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Asher, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that children's goals are associated with their success in peer relationships. The current study extends earlier findings by examining changes in children's goals during hypothetical conflicts. Participants were 252 children ages 9 to 12 years old (133 boys, 119 girls). As predicted, children's goals changed significantly when they encountered obstacles to conflict resolution, and these changes were predictive of their subsequent strategy choices. Both aggressive- and submissive-rejected children were more likely to evidence antisocial changes in their goals, including an increased desire to retaliate. They also showed reluctance to forego instrumental objectives. Other findings highlighted the need to investigate the combinations of goals children pursue as predictors of their strategies and the quality of their peer relationships.

  7. Comparative analysis of organizational obstacles to CHP/DH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, W.

    1986-04-01

    An explanation is given of the vast differences between the countries of Western Europe in the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) for district heating (DH). The history of this technology in FR Germany and the UK is analysed in detail, and experiences of other countries are reviewed. It is concluded that the over centralization of the electricity supply industry is a major obstacle in the widespread adoption of combined heat and power and district heating. Significant improvements of energy efficiency would thus require organizational reforms giving greater powers to local energy organizations. This, however, should not imply total decentralization of energy supply. Instead, a two-tier system is proposed in which central organizations remain responsible for bulk supply but where local or regional bodies are in charge of all gas, electricity and heat supplies to the final user.

  8. Croatian repository construction project - present status and main obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucar Dragicevic, S.; Subasic, D.; Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Cerskov Klika, M.

    1999-01-01

    Croatia has been preparing backgrounds for the construction of the repository for low and intermediate radioactive waste on its territory, almost for a decade, now. In the name of Hrvtaska elektroprivreda, the co-owner of the NE Krsko, APO has been co-ordinating and organising numerous activities and projects during that time period. Siting process, safety assessment, disposal technology and repository design and public acceptance issues are the main fields of activities. The overall status of the project at the moment, including the overview of the present status of the main four aspects of activities, will be presented. Relatively, big and important progress made on the project work out during the last two years, as well as the main obstacles we were faced with during that time period, will be discussed.(author)

  9. Whole-arm obstacle avoidance system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Butler, P.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Ericson, M.N.; Britton, C.L. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Whole-arm obstacle avoidance is needed for a variety of robotic applications in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) Program. Typical industrial applications of robotics involve well-defined workspaces, allowing a predetermined knowledge of collision-free paths for manipulator motion. In the unstructured or poorly defined hazardous environments of the ER ampersand WM Program, the potential for significant problems resulting from collisions between manipulators and the environment in which they are utilized is great. The conceptual design for a sensing system that will provide protection against such collisions is described herein. The whole-arm obstacle avoidance system consists of a set of sensor ''bracelets,'' which cover the surface area of the manipulator links to the maximum extent practical, and a host processor. The host processor accepts commands from the robot control system, controls the operation of the sensors, manipulates data received from the bracelets, and makes the data available to the manipulator control system. The bracelets consist of a subset of the sensors, associated sensor interface electronics, and a bracelet interface. Redundant communications links between the host processor and the bracelets are provided, allowing single-point failure protection. The system allows reporting of 8-bit data from up to 1000 sensors at a minimum of 50 Hz. While the initial prototype implementation of the system utilizes capacitance proximity sensor, the system concept allows multiple types of sensors. These sensors are uniquely addressable, allowing remote calibration, thresholding at the bracelet, and correlation of a sensor measurement with the associated sensor and its location on the manipulator. Variable resolution allows high-speed, single-bit sensing as well as lower-speed higher-resolution sensing, which is necessary for sensor calibration and potentially useful in control

  10. Obstacle evasion in free-space optical communications utilizing Airy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guoxuan; Wen, Yuanhui; Wu, Xiong; Chen, Yujie; Liu, Jie; Yu, Siyuan

    2018-03-01

    A high speed free-space optical communication system capable of self-bending signal transmission around line-of-sight obstacles is proposed and demonstrated. Airy beams are generated and controlled to achieve different propagating trajectories, and the signal transmission characteristics of these beams around the obstacle are investigated. Our results confirm that, by optimising their ballistic trajectories, Airy beams are able to bypass obstacles with more signal energy and thus improve the communication performance compared with normal Gaussian beams.

  11. Modeling spatial navigation in the presence of dynamic obstacles: a differential games approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darekar, Anuja; Goussev, Valery; McFadyen, Bradford J; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2018-03-01

    Obstacle circumvention strategies can be shaped by the dynamic interaction of an individual (evader) and an obstacle (pursuer). We have developed a mathematical model with predictive and emergent components, using experimental data from seven healthy young adults walking toward a target while avoiding collision with a stationary or moving obstacle (approaching head-on, or diagonally 30° left or right) in a virtual environment. Two linear properties from the predictive component enable the evader to predict the minimum distance between itself and the obstacle at all times, including the future intersection of trajectories. The emergent component uses the classical differential games model to solve for an optimal circumvention while reaching the target, wherein the locomotor strategy is influenced by the obstacle, target, and the evader velocity. Both model components were fitted to a different set of experimental data obtained from five poststroke and healthy participants to derive the minimum predicted distance (predictive component) and obstacle influence dimensions (emergent component) during circumvention. Minimum predicted distance between evader and pursuer was kept constant when the evader was closest to the obstacle in all participants. Obstacle influence dimensions varied depending on obstacle approach condition and preferred side of circumvention, reflecting differences in locomotor strategies between poststroke and healthy individuals. Additionally, important associations between model outputs and observed experimental outcomes were found. The model, supported by experimental data, suggests that both predictive and emergent processes can shape obstacle circumvention strategies in healthy and poststroke individuals. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Obstacle circumvention during goal-directed locomotion is modeled with a new mathematical approach comprising both predictive and emergent elements. The major novelty is using differential games solutions to illustrate the

  12. Constructing target product profiles (TPPs) to help vaccines overcome post-approval obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Burke, Donald S.

    2009-01-01

    As history has demonstrated, post-approval obstacles can impede a vaccine’s use and potentially lead to its withdrawal. Addressing these potential obstacles when changes in a vaccine’s technology can still be easily made may improve a vaccine’s chances of success. Augmented vaccine target product profiles (TPPs) can help vaccine scientists better understand and anticipate these obstacles and galvanize conversations among various vaccine stakeholders (e.g., scientists, marketers, business deve...

  13. Obstacle avoidance handling and mixed integer predictive control for space robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Lijun; Luo, Jianjun; Wang, Mingming; Yuan, Jianping

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a novel obstacle avoidance constraint and a mixed integer predictive control (MIPC) method for space robots avoiding obstacles and satisfying physical limits during performing tasks. Firstly, a novel kind of obstacle avoidance constraint of space robots, which needs the assumption that the manipulator links and the obstacles can be represented by convex bodies, is proposed by limiting the relative velocity between two closest points which are on the manipulator and the obstacle, respectively. Furthermore, the logical variables are introduced into the obstacle avoidance constraint, which have realized the constraint form is automatically changed to satisfy different obstacle avoidance requirements in different distance intervals between the space robot and the obstacle. Afterwards, the obstacle avoidance constraint and other system physical limits, such as joint angle ranges, the amplitude boundaries of joint velocities and joint torques, are described as inequality constraints of a quadratic programming (QP) problem by using the model predictive control (MPC) method. To guarantee the feasibility of the obtained multi-constraint QP problem, the constraints are treated as soft constraints and assigned levels of priority based on the propositional logic theory, which can realize that the constraints with lower priorities are always firstly violated to recover the feasibility of the QP problem. Since the logical variables have been introduced, the optimization problem including obstacle avoidance and system physical limits as prioritized inequality constraints is termed as MIPC method of space robots, and its computational complexity as well as possible strategies for reducing calculation amount are analyzed. Simulations of the space robot unfolding its manipulator and tracking the end-effector's desired trajectories with the existence of obstacles and physical limits are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed obstacle avoidance

  14. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent αmovement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles.

  15. The quality of visual information about the lower extremities influences visuomotor coordination during virtual obstacle negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Kretch, Kari S; Zhou, Zixuan; Finley, James M

    2018-05-09

    Successful negotiation of obstacles during walking relies on the integration of visual information about the environment with ongoing locomotor commands. When information about the body and environment are removed through occlusion of the lower visual field, individuals increase downward head pitch angle, reduce foot placement precision, and increase safety margins during crossing. However, whether these effects are mediated by loss of visual information about the lower extremities, the obstacle, or both remains to be seen. Here, we used a fully immersive, virtual obstacle negotiation task to investigate how visual information about the lower extremities is integrated with information about the environment to facilitate skillful obstacle negotiation. Participants stepped over virtual obstacles while walking on a treadmill with one of three types of visual feedback about the lower extremities: no feedback, end-point feedback, or a link-segment model. We found that absence of visual information about the lower extremities led to an increase in the variability of leading foot placement after crossing. The presence of a visual representation of the lower extremities promoted greater downward head pitch angle during the approach to and subsequent crossing of an obstacle. In addition, having greater downward head pitch was associated with closer placement of the trailing foot to the obstacle, further placement of the leading foot after the obstacle, and higher trailing foot clearance. These results demonstrate that the fidelity of visual information about the lower extremities influences both feed-forward and feedback aspects of visuomotor coordination during obstacle negotiation.

  16. Obstacle detectors for automated transit vehicles: A technoeconomic and market analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerby, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A search was conducted to identify the technical and economic characteristics of both NASA and nonNASA obstacle detectors. The findings, along with market information were compiled and analyzed for consideration by DOT and NASA in decisions about any future automated transit vehicle obstacle detector research, development, or applications project. Currently available obstacle detectors and systems under development are identified by type (sonic, capacitance, infrared/optical, guided radar, and probe contact) and compared with the three NASA devices selected as possible improvements or solutions to the problems in existing obstacle detection systems. Cost analyses and market forecasts individually for the AGT and AMTV markets are included.

  17. On the debate about teleology in biology: the notion of "teleological obstacle".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Manuel Gustavo Leitão; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Caldas, Lúcio Ayres; Garcia, Tomás Coelho; Terra, Letícia Labati; Herbst, Marcelo Hawrylak; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-12-01

    Among the epistemological obstacles described by Gaston Bachelard, we contend that unitary and pragmatic knowledge is correlated to the teleological categories of Ernst Mayr and is the basis for prevailing debate on the notion of "function" in biology. Given the proximity of the aspects highlighted by these authors, we propose to associate the role of teleological thinking in biology and the notion of unitary and pragmatic knowledge as an obstacle to scientific knowledge. Thus, teleological thinking persists acting as an epistemological obstacle in biology, according to Bachelardian terminology. Our investigation led us to formulate the "teleological obstacle," which we consider important for the future of biology and possibly other sciences.

  18. A Framework for Obstacles Avoidance of Humanoid Robot Using Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo Budiharto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a framework for multiple moving obstacles avoidance strategy using stereo vision for humanoid robot in indoor environment. We assume that this model of humanoid robot is used as a service robot to deliver a cup to customer from starting point to destination point. We have successfully developed and introduced three main modules to recognize faces, to identify multiple moving obstacles and to initiate a maneuver. A group of people who are walking will be tracked as multiple moving obstacles. Predefined maneuver to avoid obstacles is applied to robot because the limitation of view angle from stereo camera to detect multiple obstacles. The contribution of this research is a new method for multiple moving obstacles avoidance strategy with Bayesian approach using stereo vision based on the direction and speed of obstacles. Depth estimation is used to obtain distance calculation between obstacles and the robot. We present the results of the experiment of the humanoid robot called Gatotkoco II which is used our proposed method and evaluate its performance. The proposed moving obstacles avoidance strategy was tested empirically and proved effective for humanoid robot.

  19. Autonomous dynamic obstacle avoidance for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs with modified vector field histogram.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyeon Kim

    Full Text Available In order to broaden the use of microrobots in practical fields, autonomous control algorithms such as obstacle avoidance must be further developed. However, most previous studies of microrobots used manual motion control to navigate past tight spaces and obstacles while very few studies demonstrated the use of autonomous motion. In this paper, we demonstrated a dynamic obstacle avoidance algorithm for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs using electric field in fluidic environments. A BPM consists of an artificial body, which is made of SU-8, and a high dense layer of harnessed bacteria. BPMs can be controlled using externally applied electric fields due to the electrokinetic property of bacteria. For developing dynamic obstacle avoidance for BPMs, a kinematic model of BPMs was utilized to prevent collision and a finite element model was used to characteristic the deformation of an electric field near the obstacle walls. In order to avoid fast moving obstacles, we modified our previously static obstacle avoidance approach using a modified vector field histogram (VFH method. To validate the advanced algorithm in experiments, magnetically controlled moving obstacles were used to intercept the BPMs as the BPMs move from the initial position to final position. The algorithm was able to successfully guide the BPMs to reach their respective goal positions while avoiding the dynamic obstacles.

  20. Autonomous dynamic obstacle avoidance for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) with modified vector field histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoyeon; Cheang, U Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-01-01

    In order to broaden the use of microrobots in practical fields, autonomous control algorithms such as obstacle avoidance must be further developed. However, most previous studies of microrobots used manual motion control to navigate past tight spaces and obstacles while very few studies demonstrated the use of autonomous motion. In this paper, we demonstrated a dynamic obstacle avoidance algorithm for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) using electric field in fluidic environments. A BPM consists of an artificial body, which is made of SU-8, and a high dense layer of harnessed bacteria. BPMs can be controlled using externally applied electric fields due to the electrokinetic property of bacteria. For developing dynamic obstacle avoidance for BPMs, a kinematic model of BPMs was utilized to prevent collision and a finite element model was used to characteristic the deformation of an electric field near the obstacle walls. In order to avoid fast moving obstacles, we modified our previously static obstacle avoidance approach using a modified vector field histogram (VFH) method. To validate the advanced algorithm in experiments, magnetically controlled moving obstacles were used to intercept the BPMs as the BPMs move from the initial position to final position. The algorithm was able to successfully guide the BPMs to reach their respective goal positions while avoiding the dynamic obstacles.

  1. Difference of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of observed earthquakes and microtremors and its application to S-wave velocity inversion based on the diffuse field concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Hiroshi; Mori, Yuta; Nagashima, Fumiaki

    2018-01-01

    We have been discussing the validity of using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVRs) as a substitute for S-wave amplifications after Nakamura first proposed the idea in 1989. So far a formula for HVRs had not been derived that fully utilized their physical characteristics until a recent proposal based on the diffuse field concept. There is another source of confusion that comes from the mixed use of HVRs from earthquake and microtremors, although their wave fields are hardly the same. In this study, we compared HVRs from observed microtremors (MHVR) and those from observed earthquake motions (EHVR) at one hundred K-NET and KiK-net stations. We found that MHVR and EHVR share similarities, especially until their first peak frequency, but have significant differences in the higher frequency range. This is because microtremors mainly consist of surface waves so that peaks associated with higher modes would not be prominent, while seismic motions mainly consist of upwardly propagating plain body waves so that higher mode resonances can be seen in high frequency. We defined here the spectral amplitude ratio between them as EMR and calculated their average. We categorize all the sites into five bins by their fundamental peak frequencies in MHVR. Once we obtained EMRs for five categories, we back-calculated EHVRs from MHVRs, which we call pseudo-EHVRs (pEHVR). We found that pEHVR is much closer to EHVR than MHVR. Then we use our inversion code to invert the one-dimensional S-wave velocity structures from EHVRs based on the diffuse field concept. We also applied the same code to pEHVRs and MHVRs for comparison. We found that pEHVRs yield velocity structures much closer to those by EHVRs than those by MHVRs. This is natural since what we have done up to here is circular except for the average operation in EMRs. Finally, we showed independent examples of data not used in the EMR calculation, where better ground structures were successfully identified from p

  2. A tomographic image of upper crustal structure using P and S wave seismic refraction data in the southern granulite terrain (SGT), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, B.; Behera, Laxmidhar; Rao, P. Koteswara

    2006-07-01

    We present a 2-D tomographic P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs) image with Vp/Vs ratios along N-S trending 220 km long deep seismic profile acquired in 2005, which traverses across major shear and tectonically disturbed zones in southern granulite terrain (SGT), India. The 2-D velocity model constrained down to maximum 8 km depth shows velocity anomalies (>0.2 km/s) beneath major shear zones with good spatial resolution (>0.05 km/s). The presence of high Vp (6.3-6.5 km/s), Vs (3.5-3.8 km/s), Vp/Vs (>1.75) and Poisson's ratio (0.25-0.29) indicate significant compositional changes of rocks at shallow depths (0.5 to 8 km) reveal rapid crustal exhumation of mid to lower crustal rocks. This crustal exhumation could be responsible due to Pan-African tectonothermal activity during Neoproterozoic period.

  3. Two S-wave gap symmetry for single crystals of the superconductor BaFe1.8Co0.2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ki-Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Choi, Changho; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Wang, X.F.; Chen, X.H.; Noh, Jae Dong; Lee, Sung-IK

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the gap structure of the iron-pnictide superconductors, we synthesized optimally doped single crystals of BaFe 1.8 Co 0.2 As 2 , which had a critical temperature, T c , of 23.6 K. The initial M-H curve was used to find the lower critical field, H c1 . The full range of the temperature dependence of H c1 was explained by using a two S-wave gap symmetry. We estimate the two gap as Δ 1 (0) = 1.64 ± 0.2 meV for the small gap and Δ 2 (0) = 6.20 ± 0.2 meV for the large gap.

  4. Coupling of the orthorhombic distortion to the depression of the Tc's due to Zn2+ doping in the ''RE-123'' HTSC's: A (d + s)-wave picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, I.M.; Thongruang, R.; Charoenthai, N.

    1999-01-01

    The depressions of the T c 's of the 123 REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 HTSC's due to the substitution of Zn 2+ ions into the Cu(2) layer are studied. The orthorhombic distortion which occurs in the 123 ceramics is assumed to induce a modification to the spin-fluctuation (SF) mediated pairing interaction which in turn causes the order parameters of these HTSC's to be of mixed (d + s)-wave symmetry. It is shown that part of the rapid depression of the T c 's caused by Zn 2+ substitution into the CuO 2 is due to a reduction of the SF-mediated pairing interaction. The differences in the rates of suppression of T c due to Zn 2+ doping in the different RE-123 HTSC's are shown to be due to the changes in the orthorhombicity which depend on the size of the rare earth ions

  5. Coupling of the Orthorhombic Distortion to the Depression of the Tc'S due to Zn2+ Doping in the "RE-123" Htsc's:. a (d+s)-WAVE Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I. M.; Charoenthai, N.; Thongruang, R.

    The depressions of the Tc's of the "123" REBa2Cu3O7 HTSC's due to the substitution of Zn2+ ions into the Cu(2) layer are studied. The orthorhombic distortion which occurs in the "123" ceramics is assumed to induce a modification to the spin-fluctuation (SF) mediated pairing interaction which inturn causes the order parameters of these HTSC's to be of mixed (d+s)-wave symmetry. It is shown that part of the rapid depression of the Tc's caused by Zn2+ substitution into the CuO2 is due to a reduction of the SF-mediated pairing interaction. The differences in the rates of suppression of Tc due to Zn2+ doping in the different "RE-123" HTSC's are shown to be due to the changes in the orthorhombicity which depend on the size of the rare earth ions.

  6. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data, 2nd Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallman, Ann R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Water Power Technologies; Neary, Vincent S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Water Power Technologies

    2015-09-01

    This report presents met-ocean data and wave energy characteristics at eight U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites. Its purpose is to enable the comparison of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the selection of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives. It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment, and operations and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Speci cation (IEC 62600-101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of occurrence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services.

  7. s-wave threshold in electron attachment - Results in 2-C4F6 and CFCl3 at ultra-low electron energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.; Ajello, J. M.; Orient, O. J.

    1984-01-01

    Electron attachment lineshapes and cross sections are reported for the processes 2-C4F6(-)/2-C4F6 and Cl(-)/CFCl3 at electron energies of 0-120 and 0-140 meV, and at resolutions of 6 and 7 meV (FWHM), respectively. As in previous measurements in CCl4 and SF6, the results show resolution-limited narrow structure in the cross section at electron energies below 15 meV. This structure arises from the divergence of the s-wave cross section in the limit of zero electron energy. Comparisons are given with swarm-measured results, and with collisional ionization (high-Rydberg attachment) data in this energy range.

  8. Evidence for a magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis of Taiwan from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2016-12-23

    There are more than 7 million people living near the Tatun volcano group in northern Taiwan. For the safety of the Taipei metropolis, in particular, it has been debated for decades whether or not these volcanoes are active. Here I show evidence of a deep magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays. The reservoir is probably composed of either a thin magma layer overlay or many molten sills within thick partially molten rocks. Assuming that 40% of the reservoir is partially molten, its total volume could be approximately 350 km 3 . The exact location and geometry of the magma reservoir will be obtained after dense seismic arrays are deployed in 2017-2020.

  9. Deeply Bound 1s and 2p Pionic States in 205Pb and Determination of the s-Wave Part of the Pion-Nucleus Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Hirenzaki, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Münch, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Schott, W.; Suzuki, K.; Tomono, D.; Weick, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Yoneyama, T.

    2002-03-01

    We observed well-separated 1s and 2p π- states in 205Pb in the 206Pb(d,3He) reaction at Td = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are B1s = 6.762+/-0.061 MeV, Γ1s = 0.764+0.171-0.154 MeV, B2p = 5.110+/-0.045 MeV, and Γ2p = 0.321+0.060-0.062 MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, which translates into a positive mass shift of π- in 205Pb.

  10. Time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting in the first year after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan: shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Snieder, Roel

    2013-04-01

    We detect time-lapse changes in P- and S-wave velocities (hereafter, VP and VS, respectively) and shear wave splitting parameters associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan, at depths between 0 and 504 m. We estimate not only medium parameters but also the 95 per cent confidence interval of the estimated velocity change by applying a new least squares inversion scheme to the deconvolution analysis of KiK-net vertical array records. Up to 6 per cent VS reduction is observed at more than half of the analysed KiK-net stations in northeastern Japan with over 95 per cent confidence in the first month after the main shock. There is a considerable correlation between the S-wave traveltime delay and the maximum horizontal dynamic strain (MDS) by the main shock motion when the strain exceeds 5 × 10- 4 on the ground surface. This correlation is not clearly observed for MDS at the borehole bottom. On the contrary, VP and shear wave splitting parameters do not show systematic changes after the Tohoku earthquake. These results indicate that the time-lapse change is concentrated near the ground surface, especially in loosely packed soil layers. We conclude that the behaviour of VP, VS and shear wave splitting parameters are explained by the generation of omnidirectional cracks near the ground surface and by the diffusion of water in the porous subsurface. Recovery of VS should be related to healing of the crack which is proportional to the logarithm of the lapse time after the main shock and/or to decompaction after shaking.

  11. Numerical investigation on layout optimization of obstacles in a three-dimensional passive micromixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueye; Zhao, Zhongyi

    2017-04-29

    This paper aims at layout optimization design of obstacles in a three-dimensional T-type micromixer. Numerical analysis shows that the direction of flow velocity change constantly due to the obstacles blocking, which produces the chaotic convection and increases species mixing effectively. The orthogonal experiment method was applied for determining the effects of some key parameters on mixing efficiency. The weights in the order are: height of obstacles > geometric shape > symmetry = number of obstacles. Based on the optimized results, a multi-units obstacle micromixer was designed. Compared with T-type micromixer, the multi-units obstacle micromixer is more efficient, and more than 90% mixing efficiency were obtained for a wide range of peclet numbers. It can be demonstrated that the presented optimal design method of obstacles layout in three-dimensional microchannels is a simple and effective technology to improve species mixing in microfluidic devices. The obstacles layout methodology has the potential for applications in chemical engineering and bioengineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Obstacles to Disarmament Education. Centre for Peace Studies Occasional Paper No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    Obstacles to disarmament education fall into three general categories: political, perceptual, and pedagogical. At the elementary school level, these obstacles occur because of: (1) a lack of opportunities for cross-cultural experiences; (2) the socialization processes that enforce the belief that a child's culture is superior to and competitive…

  13. Overcoming Obstacles and Academic Hope: An Examination of Factors Promoting Effective Academic Success Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michele Joann; Trujillo, Daniel J.; Boland, Donna L.; MacKinnon, Joyce L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the underlying non-cognitive processes and institutional factors that allowed first-year students to enact effective strategies for attaining academic success and persisting despite obstacles. The varying levels of academic preparation and unique obstacles faced by the student participants…

  14. Obstacles of Teaching Mathematics Faced by the Class Teachers in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejem, Khamis Mousa; Muhanna, Waffa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the obstacles of teaching mathematics faced by the class teachers in Jordan. To achieve this purpose a study sample of 192 male and female class teachers was selected randomly from government schools. The instrument of the study was a questionnaire used to investigate the obstacles of mathematics…

  15. Obstacles and Affordances for Integer Reasoning: An Analysis of Children's Thinking and the History of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Jessica Pierson; Lamb, Lisa L.; Philipp, Randolph A.; Whitacre, Ian; Schappelle, Bonnie P.; Lewis, Melinda L.

    2014-01-01

    We identify and document 3 cognitive obstacles, 3 cognitive affordances, and 1 type of integer understanding that can function as either an obstacle or affordance for learners while they extend their numeric domains from whole numbers to include negative integers. In particular, we highlight 2 key subsets of integer reasoning: understanding or…

  16. Obstacles to Scientific Research in Light of a Number of Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algadheeb, Nourah A.; Almeqren, Monira A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the scientific research obstacles facing faculty members in the College of Education at Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University (PNU) and to determine the differences in the obstacles according to age, academic rank, scientific specialty, marital status, number of completed studies, and time since the last…

  17. The effect of submerged obstacles on circular fronts propagating into water at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mvungi, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of vertical walled obstacles on circular fronts propagating on the surface of shallow water is discussed. The amplitude of the transmitted acceleration waves is determined together with a recurrence relation for the reflection and transmission coefficients at successive obstacle walls. (author)

  18. 77 FR 41668 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Swainsboro, GA, Emanuel County, VOR/DME-A, Amdt 3, CANCELED Tifton, GA, Henry Tift... Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 1 Pensacola, FL, Pensacola Gulf Coast Rgnl, VOR RWY 8, Amdt 4 Augusta, GA, Augusta Rgnl at Bush Field, ILS OR LOC RWY 17, Amdt 9 Augusta, GA, Augusta Rgnl at Bush Field, ILS OR LOC...

  19. On Stationary Navier-Stokes Flows Around a Rotating Obstacle in Two-Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Mitsuo; Maekawa, Yasunori; Nakahara, Yuu

    2018-05-01

    We study the two-dimensional stationary Navier-Stokes equations describing the flows around a rotating obstacle. The unique existence of solutions and their asymptotic behavior at spatial infinity are established when the rotation speed of the obstacle and the given exterior force are sufficiently small.

  20. An Empirical Analysis of Chinese College Learners' Obstacles to MOOC Learning in an English Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangxing

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study applying an exploratory factor analysis to discovering the underlying factor structure of Chinese college students' obstacles to learning MOOC in an English context. Seven obstacle factors are identified: 1. academic and language skills; 2. internet skills; 3. course instruction/management; 4. learning motivations; 5.…

  1. Multi-Modal Obstacle Detection in Unstructured Environments with Conditional Random Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel; Underwood, James

    modality. Geometrically, tall grass, fallen leaves, or terrain roughness can mistakenly be perceived as non-traversable or might even obscure actual obstacles. Likewise, traversable grass or dirt roads and obstacles such as trees and bushes might be visually ambiguous. In this paper, we combine appearance...

  2. Can weak-resilience-signals (WRS) reveal obstacles compromising (rail-)system resilience?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, A.W.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of accidents in socio-technical systems frequently reveals unnoticed obstacles, which have grown to become the main cause of incubation and surprise at failure (Dekker, 2011). Thus far, it has proven to be a challenge to identify those unnoticed obstacles upfront among the tremendous number

  3. Interaction of a vacuum arc plasma beam with an obstacle positioned normal to the plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarchin, O; Zhitomirsky, V N; Goldsmith, S; Boxman, R L

    2003-01-01

    The effect of an obstacle positioned normal to a plasma jet produced by a vacuum arc plasma source on the radial distribution of ion flux in the vicinity of the obstacle was studied. This study was motivated by interest in the mutual influence of tightly packed substrates on coatings in industrial vacuum arc deposition systems. The experimental system consisted of a vacuum arc plasma source, a straight plasma duct, and a multi-probe consisting of a removable disc obstacle and a set of ring probes for measuring the radial ion flux. A dc arc discharge was ignited in vacuum between a truncated cone-shaped Cu cathode and an annular anode. The plasma jet produced by cathode spots passed through the anode aperture into the straight plasma duct. An axial magnetic field guided the plasma jet in the duct. The multi-probe consisted of a removable disc obstacle and a set of five ring probes for measuring the radial plasma flux as a function of distance from the disc obstacle. The rings and the disc probes were coaxially arranged on the multi-probe assembly and positioned so that plasma from the source passed through the ring probes and then encountered the disc. The influence of the obstacle was determined by measuring the ring ion currents, both in the presence of the obstacle, and when the disc obstacle was removed. The difference between the measured ion currents with and without the obstacle was interpreted to be the contribution of reflected or sputtered particles from the obstacle to the radial ion flux. The ring probes were biased by -60 V with respect to the grounded anode, to collect the saturated ion current. The multi-probe was connected to a movable stem, and positioned at different distances from the plasma source. A plasma density of ∼6 x 10 17 m -3 was estimated in this study based on the ion current to the obstacle. The radial ion flux collected by the ring probes increased by 20-25% due to the presence of the obstacle. As the calculated mean free path for

  4. An Aggregated Method for Determining Railway Defects and Obstacle Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktev, Daniil; Loktev, Alexey; Stepanov, Roman; Pevzner, Viktor; Alenov, Kanat

    2018-03-01

    The method of combining algorithms of image blur analysis and stereo vision to determine the distance to objects (including external defects of railway tracks) and the speed of moving objects-obstacles is proposed. To estimate the deviation of the distance depending on the blur a statistical approach, logarithmic, exponential and linear standard functions are used. The statistical approach includes a method of estimating least squares and the method of least modules. The accuracy of determining the distance to the object, its speed and direction of movement is obtained. The paper develops a method of determining distances to objects by analyzing a series of images and assessment of depth using defocusing using its aggregation with stereoscopic vision. This method is based on a physical effect of dependence on the determined distance to the object on the obtained image from the focal length or aperture of the lens. In the calculation of the blur spot diameter it is assumed that blur occurs at the point equally in all directions. According to the proposed approach, it is possible to determine the distance to the studied object and its blur by analyzing a series of images obtained using the video detector with different settings. The article proposes and scientifically substantiates new and improved existing methods for detecting the parameters of static and moving objects of control, and also compares the results of the use of various methods and the results of experiments. It is shown that the aggregate method gives the best approximation to the real distances.

  5. Innovating Responsibly in ICT for Ageing: Drivers, Obstacles and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Chatfield

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Responsible research and innovation (RRI is a nascent concept, promoted actively by the European Union and other policy makers around the world. Hitherto, this concept has been associated primarily with publicly funded activities but given the considerable proportion of research and innovation that is undertaken in the private sector, RRI will be rendered irrelevant unless it is adopted by industry. This paper introduces a private sector perspective of RRI, specifically that of the information and communication technology (ICT industry, working in the field of healthy ageing. Drawing upon empirical data from 30 in-depth interviews with key industry representatives from across Europe, it explores: (a the level of awareness of RRI; (b the drivers and obstacles influencing its implementation; and (c the factors deemed vital for facilitation of RRI in industry. The findings paint a varied picture, including significant concerns about adoption of RRI in an industry environment where the economic implications of all activities must be considered carefully. However, some companies have found their own ways to balance financial and altruistic goals, suggesting that there is both a willingness and a place for an RRI-type governance framework within the private sector.

  6. Residents' Perspectives on Careers in Academic Medicine: Obstacles and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Nguyen, Cathina; Walters, Emily; Gordon, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Worsening faculty shortages in medical schools and residency programs are threatening the US medical education infrastructure. Little is known about the factors that influence the decision of family medicine residents to choose or not choose academic careers. Our study objective was to answer the following question among family medicine residents: "What is your greatest concern or fear about pursuing a career in academic family medicine?" Participants were family medicine residents who attended the Faculty for Tomorrow Workshop at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in 2016 and 2017. Free responses to the aforementioned prompt were analyzed using a constant comparative method and grounded theory approach. A total of 156 participants registered for the workshops and 95 (61%) answered the free response question. Eight distinct themes emerged from the analysis. The most frequently recurring theme was "lack of readiness or mentorship," which accounted for nearly one-third (31%) of the codes. Other themes included work-life balance and burnout (17%), job availability and logistics (15%), lack of autonomy or flexibility (11%), competing pressures/roles (10%), lower financial rewards (4%), politics and bureaucracy (4%), and research (3%). To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify barriers and disincentives to pursuing a career in academic medicine from the perspective of family medicine residents. There may be at least eight major obstacles, for which we summarize and consider potential interventions. More research is needed to understand why residents choose, or don't choose, academic careers.

  7. Bioprospecting for bioactives from seaweeds: potential, obstacles and alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are potential sources of high biotechnological interest due to production of a great diversity of compounds exhibiting a broad spectrum of biological activities. On the other hand, there is an urgent need for management options for a sustainable approach to the use of marine organisms as a source of bioactive compounds. This review discusses the bioprospection for bioactive seaweed compounds as pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents, encompassing their potential and possible obstacles and alternatives. In spite of their potential, research on pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents from seaweeds includes mainly the search for molecules that exhibit these biological activities, but lacks of consideration of fundamental and limiting aspects such as the development of alternatives to sustainable supply. However, for the complete development of pharmaceuticals and antifouling compounds in Brazil, marine bioprospection should be more comprehensive, associating the search for molecules with an analysis of their supply. In this way, it is possible to promote sustainable development and conservation of biodiversity, as well as to assert the economic development of Brazil.

  8. Bioprospecting for bioactives from seaweeds: potential, obstacles and alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Pereira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are potential sources of high biotechnological interest due to production of a great diversity of compounds exhibiting a broad spectrum of biological activities. On the other hand, there is an urgent need for management options for a sustainable approach to the use of marine organisms as a source of bioactive compounds. This review discusses the bioprospection for bioactive seaweed compounds as pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents, encompassing their potential and possible obstacles and alternatives. In spite of their potential, research on pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents from seaweeds includes mainly the search for molecules that exhibit these biological activities, but lacks of consideration of fundamental and limiting aspects such as the development of alternatives to sustainable supply. However, for the complete development of pharmaceuticals and antifouling compounds in Brazil, marine bioprospection should be more comprehensive, associating the search for molecules with an analysis of their supply. In this way, it is possible to promote sustainable development and conservation of biodiversity, as well as to assert the economic development of Brazil.

  9. Legal and Political Obstacles and Opportunities for Successful Nuclear Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskiy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Every business suffers from excessive regulations, unpredictable changes in legislation, various kinds of the political rent, extorting practices like 'big business social responsibility' and more. The industries with long-term return-of-investment (ROI) are most vulnerable to political and legal risks. For the nuclear industry, long-lasted public perception of radiation as an imminent threat caused the present over-regulation look natural. Therefore ROI is above two decades, essentially precluding private entrepreneurship activity. While durable solution includes changing public perception and updating regulation, both are 'facts on the ground' and 'habits are hard to break'. Political alliances, appeal to public opinion and lobbying are legitimate methods for promoting industry's interests in a democratic state. However in case of the nuclear industry, bureaucratic and political interests seem too strong to be overpowered by regular lobbying activities. Durable solutions we are searching for should not only eliminate the present legal and political obstacles, but also prevent them in near- to middle-term future. Such solutions would mitigate risks and remove barriers in number of industries, including nuclear industry as well. Particularly, 'not in my backyard' (NIMBY) attitude to nuclear installations is often viewed as a formidable problem. However, this problem has pretty old and reliable solution via compensation for real estate devaluation, if such takes place. Such solution may preclude some projects, but makes others predictable and reliable (e.g. in sparsely populated or relatively poor areas)

  10. Obstacle of Team Teaching and Collaborative Learning in Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marn-Ling Shing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of information security includes diverse contents such as network security and computer forensics which are highly technical-oriented topics. In addition, information forensic requires the background of criminology. The information security also includes non-technical content such as information ethics and security laws. Because the diverse nature of information security, Shing et al. has proposed the use of team teaching and collaborative learning for the information security classes. Although team teaching seems to be efficient in information security, practically it needs a few challenges. The Purdue's case mentioned in Shing's paper has funding support of National Security Agency (NSA. However, a vast amount of resources may not be available for an instructor in a normal university. In addition, many obstacles are related to the administration problems. For example, how are the teaching evaluations computed if there are multiple instructors for a single course? How will instructors in a computer forensics class prepare students (criminal justice majors and information technology majors before taking the same class with diverse background? The paper surveyed approximately 25 students in a university in Virginia concerning the satisfaction of team-teaching. Finally, this paper describes ways to meet those challenges.

  11. Institutional obstacles to expansion of world food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, P R

    1975-05-09

    It was argued that over the near-to-medium term-roughly to the mid-1980's-there is enough potential for growth in existing Green Revolution technology and in technical capacity of farmers that institutions affecting these two sources of increased food production probably will not be seriously constraining. The principal bottlenecks likely will be found among those institutions affecting farmers' incentives to innovate. There is impressive evidence that when other conditions for innovation are favorable the supply of marketing services, for both inputs and outputs, is quite elastic. This seems to include the supply of funds from rural saving and informal credit sources, although the evidence is less clear in this respect. The situation concerning price relations and availability of inputs appears mixed. If national income growth targets are achieved, then the growth in total demand for food in the LDC's should be fast enough to support incentive prices for farmers. This advantage could be lost, however, if governments adopt policies to suppress food prices to keep down the cost of living. The price of fertilizers is expected to fall from the high levels of 1974, the amount of the fall depending in good measure on the success of the LDC's in increasing fertilizer production. Historically, their efforts to expand capacity have been relatively inefficient. Moreover, many countries still lack adequate capacity to produce the HYV's and pesticides. Even with good progress in expanding domestic production of inputs, imports will continue to be an important source of supply. Maintenance of present high prices of petroleum products could be a major obstacle to financing these imports on the necessary scale because of the drain it would place on available foreign exchange. I conclude, on balance, that prices and availability of fertilizers, pesticides, and seeds could have important negative effects on farmers' incentives to adopt Green Revolution technology. Rigidities in

  12. Obstacles to TQM success in health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare organisations have found it difficult to implement total quality management (TQM) successfully. The aim of this paper is to explore the barriers to TQM successful implementation in the healthcare sector. This paper reports a literature review exploring the major reasons for the failure of TQM programmes in healthcare organisations. TQM implementation and its impact depend heavily on the ability of managers to adopt and adapt its values and concepts in professional healthcare organisations. Unsuccessful TQM efforts in healthcare organisations can be attributed to the strongly departmentalised, bureaucratic and hierarchical structure, professional autonomy, tensions between managers and professionals and the difficulties involved in evaluating healthcare processes and outcomes. Other obstacles to TQM success include lack of consistent managers' and employees' commitment to and involvement in TQM implementation, poor leadership and management, lack of a quality-oriented culture, insufficient training, and inadequate resources. The review was limited to empirical articles written in the English language during the past 30 years (1980-2010). The findings of this article provide policy makers and managers with a practical understanding of the factors that are likely to obstruct TQM implementation in the healthcare sector. Understanding the factors that obstruct TQM implementation would enable managers to develop more effective strategies for implementing TQM successfully in healthcare organisations.

  13. Overcoming the Obstacle of Poor Knowledge in Proving Geometry Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatan Magajna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Proving in school geometry is not just about validating the truth of a claim. In the school setting, the main function of the proof is to convince someone that a claim is true by providing an explanation. Students consider proving to be difficult; in fact, they find the very concept of proof demanding. Proving a claim in planar geometry involves several processes, the most salient being visual observation and deductive argumentation. These two processes are interwoven, but often poor observation hinders deductive argumentation. In the present article, we consider the possibility of overcoming the obstacle of a student’s poor observation by making use of computer-aided observation with appropriate software. We present the results of two small-scale research projects, both of which indicate that students are able to work out considerably more deductions if computer-aided observation is used. Not all students use computer-aided observation effectively in proving tasks: some find an exhaustive computer-provided list of properties confusing and are not able to choose the properties that are relevant to the task.

  14. 2D Hand Tracking Based on Flocking with Obstacle Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihong Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hand gesture-based interaction provides a natural and powerful means for human-computer interaction. It is also a good interface for human-robot interaction. However, most of the existing proposals are likely to fail when they meet some skin-coloured objects, especially the face region. In this paper, we present a novel hand tracking method which can track the features of the hand based on the obstacle avoidance flocking behaviour model to overcome skin-coloured distractions. It allows features to be split into two groups under severe distractions and merge later. The experiment results show that our method can track the hand in a cluttered background or when passing the face, while the Flocking of Features (FoF and the Mean Shift Embedded Particle Filter (MSEPF methods may fail. These results suggest that our method has better performance in comparison with the previous methods. It may therefore be helpful to promote the use of the hand gesture-based human-robot interaction method.

  15. Optimal partial mass transportation and obstacle Monge-Kantorovich equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbida, Noureddine; Nguyen, Van Thanh

    2018-05-01

    Optimal partial mass transport, which is a variant of the optimal transport problem, consists in transporting effectively a prescribed amount of mass from a source to a target. The problem was first studied by Caffarelli and McCann (2010) [6] and Figalli (2010) [12] with a particular attention to the quadratic cost. Our aim here is to study the optimal partial mass transport problem with Finsler distance costs including the Monge cost given by the Euclidian distance. Our approach is different and our results do not follow from previous works. Among our results, we introduce a PDE of Monge-Kantorovich type with a double obstacle to characterize active submeasures, Kantorovich potential and optimal flow for the optimal partial transport problem. This new PDE enables us to study the uniqueness and monotonicity results for the active submeasures. Another interesting issue of our approach is its convenience for numerical analysis and computations that we develop in a separate paper [14] (Igbida and Nguyen, 2018).

  16. Achievements and obstacles of remyelinating therapies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangel, Martin; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Matthews, Paul M; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2017-12-01

    Remyelination in the CNS is the natural process of damage repair in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, remyelination becomes inadequate in many people with MS, which results in axonal degeneration and clinical disability. Enhancement of remyelination is a logical therapeutic goal; nevertheless, all currently licensed therapies for MS are immunomodulatory and do not support remyelination directly. Several molecular pathways have been identified as potential therapeutic targets to induce remyelination, and some of these have now been assessed in proof-of-concept clinical trials. However, trial design faces several obstacles: optimal clinical or paraclinical outcome measures to assess remyelination remain ill-defined, and identification of the ideal timing of therapy is also a crucial issue. In addition, realistic expectations are needed concerning the probable benefits of such therapies. Nevertheless, approaches that enhance remyelination are likely to be protective for axons and so could prevent long-term neurodegeneration. Future MS treatment paradigms, therefore, are likely to comprise a combinatorial approach that involves both immunomodulatory and regenerative treatments.

  17. Communication and development. Obstacles in implementing development programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, M L

    1989-01-01

    In developing countries communication is an important part of development, but will not generate development itself. In agricultural development in Third World countries 2 models are used: the innovation diffusion model and the package program model. These methods did not meet the needs of the small farmer, since they focused on single crop production. Most of these services do not spend time diagnosing the needs of individual farmers and give standard recommendations that do not suit many clients. Irrigation development projects require special communications skills, and in some cases in Mexico and Peru there were poor communications between farmers and the technical experts. Some argue that a strong state irrigation bureaucracy is needed to build and maintain a complex system, but others state farmer participation and cooperation as mandatory. In the health education area, the mass media is in question on its role as an educator. The confusion caused by advertising of Western medicine and miracle healings can be a major obstacle to health education. In family planning programs in these countries failures have been due to poor communication strategies that were built on false assumptions. The use of mass media including radio, television, and satellite has had some successes and failures in literacy programs. The communication factors that cause failures in these various programs are the lack of understanding and insight of the planners on the needs of their clients. Poorly developed messages, improper channels, and top down methods also cause these poor results.

  18. Automatic Quadcopter Control Avoiding Obstacle Using Camera with Integrated Ultrasonic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Hanafi; Haris Indra Fadhillah, Ahmad; Darma, Surya; Soekirno, Santoso

    2018-04-01

    Automatic navigation on the drone is being developed these days, a wide variety of types of drones and its automatic functions. Drones used in this study was an aircraft with four propellers or quadcopter. In this experiment, image processing used to recognize the position of an object and ultrasonic sensor used to detect obstacle distance. The method used to trace an obsctacle in image processing was the Lucas-Kanade-Tomasi Tracker, which had been widely used due to its high accuracy. Ultrasonic sensor used to complement the image processing success rate to be fully detected object. The obstacle avoidance system was to observe at the program decisions from some obstacle conditions read by the camera and ultrasonic sensors. Visual feedback control based PID controllers are used as a control of drones movement. The conclusion of the obstacle avoidance system was to observe at the program decisions from some obstacle conditions read by the camera and ultrasonic sensors.

  19. A method of real-time detection for distant moving obstacles by monocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bao-zhi; Zhu, Ming

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for detection of distant moving obstacles like cars and bicycles by a monocular camera to cooperate with ultrasonic sensors in low-cost condition. We are aiming at detecting distant obstacles that move toward our autonomous navigation car in order to give alarm and keep away from them. Method of frame differencing is applied to find obstacles after compensation of camera's ego-motion. Meanwhile, each obstacle is separated from others in an independent area and given a confidence level to indicate whether it is coming closer. The results on an open dataset and our own autonomous navigation car have proved that the method is effective for detection of distant moving obstacles in real-time.

  20. Assisting the Visually Impaired: Obstacle Detection and Warning System by Acoustic Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Cela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is focused on the design of an obstacle detection system for assisting visually impaired people. A dense disparity map is computed from the images of a stereo camera carried by the user. By using the dense disparity map, potential obstacles can be detected in 3D in indoor and outdoor scenarios. A ground plane estimation algorithm based on RANSAC plus filtering techniques allows the robust detection of the ground in every frame. A polar grid representation is proposed to account for the potential obstacles in the scene. The design is completed with acoustic feedback to assist visually impaired users while approaching obstacles. Beep sounds with different frequencies and repetitions inform the user about the presence of obstacles. Audio bone conducting technology is employed to play these sounds without interrupting the visually impaired user from hearing other important sounds from its local environment. A user study participated by four visually impaired volunteers supports the proposed system.

  1. ASPECTS OF OBSTACLES FOR APPLYING ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru STEFEA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following investigation aims to determine the aspects of obstacles for applying Activity Based Costing (ABC system in the Egyptian case and the significant differences among the effects of such obstacles . The Study used the survey method to describe and analyze the obstacles in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. This survey used the number of 392 questionnaires that were used throughout the total of 23 Egyptian manufacturing firms, during the first half of 2013. Finally, the study found some influencing obstacles for applying this system (ABC and there were significant differences among the aspects of obstacles for applying ABC system in the Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  2. Convective heat transfer in supercritical flows of CO_2 in tubes with and without flow obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eter, Ahmad; Groeneveld, Dé; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Measurements of supercritical heat transfer in tubes equipped with obstacles were obtained and compared with results in base tubes. • In general, flow obstacles improve supercritical heat transfer, but under certain conditions have a negative effect on it. • New correlations describing obstacle-enhanced supercritical heat transfer in the liquid-like and gas-like regimes are fitted to the data. - Abstract: Heat transfer measurements to CO_2-cooled tubes with and without flow obstacles at supercritical pressures were obtained at the University of Ottawa’s supercritical pressure test facility. The effects of obstacle geometry (obstacle pitch, obstacle shape, flow blockage) on the wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient were investigated. Tests were performed for vertical upward flow in a directly heated 8 mm ID tube for a pressure range from 7.69 to 8.36 MPa, a mass flux range from 200 to 1184 kg/m"2 s, and a heat flux range from 1 to 175 kW/m"2. The results are presented graphically in plots of wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk specific enthalpy of the fluid. The effects of flow parameters and flow obstacle geometry on supercritical heat transfer for both normal and deteriorated heat transfer are discussed. A comparison of the measurements with leading prediction methods for supercritical heat transfer in bare tubes and for spacer effects is also presented. The optimum increase in heat transfer coefficient was found to be for blunt obstacles, having a large flow blockage, and a short obstacle pitch.

  3. Does osteoporosis predispose falls? a study on obstacle avoidance and balance confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duysens Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis is associated with changes in balance and physical performance and has psychosocial consequences which increase the risk of falling. Most falls occur during walking; therefore an efficient obstacle avoidance performance might contribute to a reduction in fall risk. Since it was shown that persons with osteoporosis are unstable during obstacle crossing it was hypothesized that they more frequently hit obstacles, specifically under challenging conditions. The aim of the study was to investigate whether obstacle avoidance ability was affected in persons with osteoporosis compared to a comparison group of a community sample of older adults. Methods Obstacle avoidance performance was measured on a treadmill and compared between persons with osteoporosis (n = 85 and the comparison group (n = 99. The obstacle was released at different available response times (ART to create different levels of difficulty by increasing time pressure. Furthermore, balance confidence, measured with the short ABC-questionnaire, was compared between the groups. Results No differences were found between the groups in success rates on the obstacle avoidance task (p = 0.173. Furthermore, the persons with osteoporosis had similar levels of balance confidence as the comparison group (p = 0.091. The level of balance confidence was not associated with the performance on the obstacle avoidance task (p = 0.145. Conclusion Obstacle avoidance abilities were not impaired in persons with osteoporosis and they did not experience less balance confidence than the comparison group. These findings imply that persons with osteoporosis do not have an additional risk of falling because of poorer obstacle avoidance abilities.

  4. Obstacles to Self-Care From The Viewpoint of TypeII Diabetic Patients and Guidelines to Remove Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Zalak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Little studies using a limited number of questionnaires cannot reflect the depth and complication of diabetic patients about self-care. However, using the qualitative research method, it is possible to find out the depth of patients’ experiences of this illness. The purpose of this study was to find individual and environmental obstacles which affect self-care on these patients and to investigate patients’ viewpoint of this disease.Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, group interview and case interview have been used. This study was carried out in two phases and at the end of the interview patients were provided with necessary teaching about the principals of self-care.Results: In general, 5 categories of obstacles to self-care in type 2 diabetes were identified which include: physical obstacles, economical obstacles, social obstacles, educational obstacles, and psychic obstacles. Social, educational and psychic obstacles are in latter classes.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that a high percentage of patients with type 2 diabetes face serious obstacles in the way of self-care and the most numerous and important obstacles in their opinion are physical and economical obstacles. Considering that developing countries face a shortage of resources, dealing with physical obstacles can bring satisfaction to patients and on the other hand, dealing with these obstacles requires less cooperation from exterior organizations.

  5. Pre-hospital Obstacles in Thrombolytic Therapy and Suggested Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Tekin Güveli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute ischemic stroke is frequently encountered in emergency neurology clinics. Especially when administered within 3 hours of symptom onset, thrombolytic therapy is important in reducing ischemic injury and neurological disability. In this study, we aimed to investigate the demographic and clinical characteristics according to application time, to identify situations which pose an obstacle to thrombolytic therapy and to review the thrombolytic therapy results in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: The patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were evaluated and their age, gender, complaints, risk factors, previous history of stroke, with whom they live, how they arrived at the hospital and their application time information were recorded. Those who were admitted within 3 hours of symptom onset were assessed as early, those admitted after 3 hours were assessed as late admission. Then the rate of thrombolytic therapy, final results and the clinical status in early admission patients and the reasons for delay in late admission patients were discussed. RESULTS: Among 361 acute ischemic stroke patients, the mean age was 66±14,1. 111 patients were admitted within 3 hours of symptom onset, 246 patients were admitted after three hours. Patients arriving to emergency room with 112 Ambulance Service were admitted earlier than those brought in by family, and this difference was statistically significant. The most common causes of time loss in late admissions were the patients being referred from other centers and the unawareness of family about the importance of the disease. There were 13 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, and complications occurred in one patient. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Thrombolytic therapy is important in acute ischemic stroke for suitable patients.Our study suggested that the most important factors in spreading of performing the thrombolytic therapy are informing the public about

  6. Legal and Regulatroy Obstacles to Nuclear Fission Technology in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Melissa K.

    2013-09-01

    In forecasting the prospective use of small nuclear reactors for spacecraft and space-based power stations, the U.S. Air Force describes space as "the ultimate high ground," providing access to every part of the globe. But is it? A report titled "Energy Horizons: United States Air Force Energy Science &Technology Vision 2011-2026," focuses on core Air Force missions in space energy generation, operations and propulsion and recognizes that investments into small modular nuclear fission reactors can be leveraged for space-based systems. However, the report mentions, as an aside, that "potential catastrophic outcomes" are an element to be weighed and provides no insight into the monumental political and legal will required to overcome the mere stigma of nuclear energy, even when referring only to the most benign nuclear power generation systems - RTGs. On the heels of that report, a joint Department of Energy and NASA team published positive results from the demonstration of a uranium- powered fission reactor. The experiment was perhaps most notable for exemplifying just how effective the powerful anti-nuclear lobby has been in the United States: It was the first such demonstration of its kind in nearly fifty years. Space visionaries must anticipate a difficult war, consisting of multiple battles that must be waged in order to obtain a license to fly any but the feeblest of nuclear power sources in space. This paper aims to guide the reader through the obstacles to be overcome before nuclear fission technology can be put to use in space.

  7. Control of micronutrient deficiencies in India: obstacles and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K

    2002-05-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies of vitamin A, iron, and iodine continue to be of public health significance in India. The government of India initiated national programs to prevent, control and combat these deficiencies and their serious consequences. The interventions involved (1) distribution of iodized salt in the endemic areas, (2) administration of semiannual massive dose of vitamin A to young children, and (3) distribution of iron-folic acid tablets to the vulnerable groups. Evaluations revealed that the biologic impact of these interventions was unsatisfactory. Inadequate allocation of funds (10% of the actual needs) necessary to cover the enormous number of beneficiaries was one of the important obstacles. Consequently, the allocation of supplies to different provinces was far short of the requirements (10-30%). As a result of poor orientation, the functionaries were not adhering to the guidelines, leading to woefully inadequate (1-20%) and irregular coverage. There was no proper monitoring or supervision to make midcourse corrections to improve the functioning. The community was not informed of the purpose and details of each intervention. Hence, it did not utilize the resources completely and remained passive recipients. The community was not aware of the dietary approaches to prevent micronutrient disorders owing to absence of nutrition education. With the adoption of National Nutrition Policy by the government of India, a concerted and focused approach should be adopted. The future strategies should include a mix of short-term supplementation and food-based strategy encompassing food fortification and home gardening. Innovative approaches in information, education, and communication (such as social marketing strategy) for making the interventions sustainable should be adopted.

  8. An assessment of auditory-guided locomotion in an obstacle circumvention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Scarfe, Amy C; Moore, Brian C J; Pardhan, Shahina

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how effectively audition can be used to guide navigation around an obstacle. Ten blindfolded normally sighted participants navigated around a 0.6 × 2 m obstacle while producing self-generated mouth click sounds. Objective movement performance was measured using a Vicon motion capture system. Performance with full vision without generating sound was used as a baseline for comparison. The obstacle's location was varied randomly from trial to trial: it was either straight ahead or 25 cm to the left or right relative to the participant. Although audition provided sufficient information to detect the obstacle and guide participants around it without collision in the majority of trials, buffer space (clearance between the shoulder and obstacle), overall movement times, and number of velocity corrections were significantly (p < 0.05) greater with auditory guidance than visual guidance. Collisions sometime occurred under auditory guidance, suggesting that audition did not always provide an accurate estimate of the space between the participant and obstacle. Unlike visual guidance, participants did not always walk around the side that afforded the most space during auditory guidance. Mean buffer space was 1.8 times higher under auditory than under visual guidance. Results suggest that sound can be used to generate buffer space when vision is unavailable, allowing navigation around an obstacle without collision in the majority of trials.

  9. Effects of Delta-Shaped Obstacles on the Thermal Performance of Solar Air Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisu Bekele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the effect of delta-shaped obstacles mounted on the absorber surface of an air heater duct with an aspect ratio 6 : 1 resembling the conditions close to solar air heaters. This study encompassed the Reynolds number (Re ranging from 3400 to 27600, longitudinal pitch of the obstacle (Pl/e varied from 3/2 to 11/2, and relative obstacle height (e/H varied from 0.25 to 0.75. The relative obstacle transverse pitch (Pt/b=7/3 and the angle of attack of flow on obstacle = 90° are kept constant during the whole experimentation. By comparing the heat transfer data obtained from the obstacle-mounted duct with that of smooth duct under similar geometrical and flow conditions, the obstacle-mounted duct enhances the heat transfer by 3.6-times at Re = 7276.82, Pl/e=3/2, and e/H=0.75.

  10. Unsupervised obstacle detection in driving environments using deep-learning-based stereovision

    KAUST Repository

    Dairi, Abdelkader; Harrou, Fouzi; Senouci, Mohamed; Sun, Ying

    2017-01-01

    A vision-based obstacle detection system is a key enabler for the development of autonomous robots and vehicles and intelligent transportation systems. This paper addresses the problem of urban scene monitoring and tracking of obstacles based on unsupervised, deep-learning approaches. Here, we design an innovative hybrid encoder that integrates deep Boltzmann machines (DBM) and auto-encoders (AE). This hybrid auto-encode (HAE) model combines the greedy learning features of DBM with the dimensionality reduction capacity of AE to accurately and reliably detect the presence of obstacles. We combine the proposed hybrid model with the one-class support vector machines (OCSVM) to visually monitor an urban scene. We also propose an efficient approach to estimating obstacles location and track their positions via scene densities. Specifically, we address obstacle detection as an anomaly detection problem. If an obstacle is detected by the OCSVM algorithm, then localization and tracking algorithm is executed. We validated the effectiveness of our approach by using experimental data from two publicly available dataset, the Malaga stereovision urban dataset (MSVUD) and the Daimler urban segmentation dataset (DUSD). Results show the capacity of the proposed approach to reliably detect obstacles.

  11. Does physical exercise improve obstacle negotiation in the elderly? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagnin, Eliane C; da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Duysens, Jacques; Carpes, Felipe P

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise improves walking in the elderly but much less is known about its effect on more challenged gait, such as obstacle negotiation. We conducted a systematic review to discuss the effects of regular physical exercise on kinematics and kinetics of obstacle negotiation in the elderly. A comprehensive literature search revealed 859 citations for review, whereof 206 studies entered the full-text analysis. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 studies were included in this systematic review. Most of them presented a reasonable quality (average 0.68) but none of them reached the level of a randomized control trial. Interventions were heterogeneous, with training periods lasting from 5 days to 10 months. Studies assessed obstacle negotiation basically considering 3 types of testing paradigm, namely a walkway with either a single obstacle crossing, or with multiple obstacles, or else a treadmill with an obstacle avoidance task under time pressure. In general, longer training programs had better results and very short ones were not effective. A weekly frequency of 2-3 times was the most common among the studies showing positive effects. Regardless of exercises types performed, most of them were effective and so far, there is no consensus about the best exercise for improving obstacle negotiation. A lack of studies on this topic still is evident. Including a record of fall score can further help in deciding which programs are to be preferred. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel artificial immune algorithm for spatial clustering with obstacle constraint and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Luo, Yonglong; Ding, Xintao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE) algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect.

  13. A Novel Artificial Immune Algorithm for Spatial Clustering with Obstacle Constraint and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect.

  14. Unsupervised obstacle detection in driving environments using deep-learning-based stereovision

    KAUST Repository

    Dairi, Abdelkader

    2017-12-06

    A vision-based obstacle detection system is a key enabler for the development of autonomous robots and vehicles and intelligent transportation systems. This paper addresses the problem of urban scene monitoring and tracking of obstacles based on unsupervised, deep-learning approaches. Here, we design an innovative hybrid encoder that integrates deep Boltzmann machines (DBM) and auto-encoders (AE). This hybrid auto-encode (HAE) model combines the greedy learning features of DBM with the dimensionality reduction capacity of AE to accurately and reliably detect the presence of obstacles. We combine the proposed hybrid model with the one-class support vector machines (OCSVM) to visually monitor an urban scene. We also propose an efficient approach to estimating obstacles location and track their positions via scene densities. Specifically, we address obstacle detection as an anomaly detection problem. If an obstacle is detected by the OCSVM algorithm, then localization and tracking algorithm is executed. We validated the effectiveness of our approach by using experimental data from two publicly available dataset, the Malaga stereovision urban dataset (MSVUD) and the Daimler urban segmentation dataset (DUSD). Results show the capacity of the proposed approach to reliably detect obstacles.

  15. A Game Theory-Based Obstacle Avoidance Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujun Bi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The obstacle avoidance problem in geographic forwarding is an important issue for location-based routing in wireless sensor networks. The presence of an obstacle leads to several geographic routing problems such as excessive energy consumption and data congestion. Obstacles are hard to avoid in realistic environments. To bypass obstacles, most routing protocols tend to forward packets along the obstacle boundaries. This leads to a situation where the nodes at the boundaries exhaust their energy rapidly and the obstacle area is diffused. In this paper, we introduce a novel routing algorithm to solve the obstacle problem in wireless sensor networks based on a game-theory model. Our algorithm forms a concave region that cannot forward packets to achieve the aim of improving the transmission success rate and decreasing packet transmission delays. We consider the residual energy, out-degree and forwarding angle to determine the forwarding probability and payoff function of forwarding candidates. This achieves the aim of load balance and reduces network energy consumption. Simulation results show that based on the average delivery delay, energy consumption and packet delivery ratio performances our protocol is superior to other traditional schemes.

  16. A bio-inspired kinematic controller for obstacle avoidance during reaching tasks with real robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Sundareswara, Rashmi; Lee, Craig; Grossberg, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a redundant robot arm that is capable of learning to reach for targets in space in a self-organized fashion while avoiding obstacles. Self-generated movement commands that activate correlated visual, spatial and motor information are used to learn forward and inverse kinematic control models while moving in obstacle-free space using the Direction-to-Rotation Transform (DIRECT). Unlike prior DIRECT models, the learning process in this work was realized using an online Fuzzy ARTMAP learning algorithm. The DIRECT-based kinematic controller is fault tolerant and can handle a wide range of perturbations such as joint locking and the use of tools despite not having experienced them during learning. The DIRECT model was extended based on a novel reactive obstacle avoidance direction (DIRECT-ROAD) model to enable redundant robots to avoid obstacles in environments with simple obstacle configurations. However, certain configurations of obstacles in the environment prevented the robot from reaching the target with purely reactive obstacle avoidance. To address this complexity, a self-organized process of mental rehearsals of movements was modeled, inspired by human and animal experiments on reaching, to generate plans for movement execution using DIRECT-ROAD in complex environments. These mental rehearsals or plans are self-generated by using the Fuzzy ARTMAP algorithm to retrieve multiple solutions for reaching each target while accounting for all the obstacles in its environment. The key aspects of the proposed novel controller were illustrated first using simple examples. Experiments were then performed on real robot platforms to demonstrate successful obstacle avoidance during reaching tasks in real-world environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Obstacle avoidance for kinematically redundant robots using an adaptive fuzzy logic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheshti, M.T.H.; Tehrani, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper the Adaptive Fuzzy Logic approach for solving the inverse kinematics of redundant robots in an environment with obstacles is presented. The obstacles are modeled as convex bodies. A fuzzy rule base that is updated via an adaptive law is used to solve the inverse kinematic problem. Additional rules have been introduced to take care of the obstacles avoidance problem. The proposed method has advantages such as high accuracy, simplicity of computations and generality for all redundant robots. Simulation results illustrate much better tracking performance than the dynamic base solution for a given trajectory in cartesian space, while guaranteeing a collision-free trajectory and observation of a mechanical joint limit

  18. The Obstacles Facing the Flow of the Electronic Information in the Arab World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Yahya Umri

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This research views the most important obstacles facing the flow of electronic information in Arab world; with an illustration about the effect of each obstacle on the flowing of the information, and the special recommendation to overcome it. the research states 4 main obstacles; they are: number of internet users and the weakness of the infrastructure in our Arab world, the spam e-mails, the Bugs and vulnerabilities in the operating systems that allow hackers to attack the information systems, and the spread of the electronic pornography on the internet

  19. Consumer energy-conservation policy in Canada: behavioural and institutional obstacles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, G.H.G. (Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, Ontario); Mank, R.B.

    1982-09-01

    This paper posits that if consumer energy-conservation policy is to succeed in Canada, both behavioral and institutional obstacles must be identified and overcome. The behavioral barriers, identified through a national household survey, include consumer resistance to policies that affect their lifestyles. The institutional barriers obtained from a series of interviews with government officials, include weak federal-provincial relations. Viewed from a federal perspective, these obstacles are discussed and then linked to policy types. A prior understanding of the obstacles that a particular program type is likely to face should allow more-effective execution of the program and enhance the probability of success. 11 references, 7 tables.

  20. P- and S-wave models and statistical characterization of scatterers at the Solfatara Volcano using active seismic data from RICEN experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Marcello; Festa, Gaetano; Roux, Philippe; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Gresse, Marceau; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    RICEN (Repeated and InduCed Earthquakes and Noise) is an active and passive experiment organized at the Solfatara volcano, in the framework of the European project MEDSUV. It was aimed to reveal and track the variations in the elastic properties of the medium at small scale through repeated observations over time. It covered an area of 90m x 115m by a regular grid of 240 receivers and 100 shotpoints at the center of the volcano. A Vibroseis truck was used as seismic source . We cross-correlated the seismograms by the source time function to obtain the Green's functions filtered in the frequency band excited by the source. To estimate the phase and the group velocities of the Rayleigh-waves we used the coherence of the signal along the seismic sections. In subgrids of 40m x 40m we realigned the waveforms or their envelope in different frequency bands, to maximize the amplitude of the stack function, the phase or the group velocities being those speeds proving this maximum. We jointly inverted the dispersion curves to obtain a locally layered 1-D medium in term of S-waves. Finally the collection of all the models provides us with a 3-D image of the investigated area. The S-wave velocity decreases toward the "Fangaia", due to the water saturation of the medium, as confirmed by geoelectric results. Since the Solfatara is a strongly heterogeneous medium, it is not possible to localize the velocity anomalies at different scales and a description of the medium through statistical parameters, such as the mean free path (MFP) and the transport mean free path (TMFP) was provided. The MFP was recovered from the ratio between coherent and incoherent intensities of the surface waves measured in different frequency bands. It decreases with frequency from about 40m at 8.5 Hz to 10m at 21.5 Hz, this behavior being typical of volcanic areas. The TMFP was measured fitting the decay of the coda of the energy at different distances. As expected it is larger than the MFP and strongly

  1. A compendium of P- and S-wave velocities from surface-to-borehole logging; summary and reanalysis of previously published data and analysis of unpublished data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, David M.

    2003-01-01

    For over 28 years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been acquiring seismic velocity and geologic data at a number of locations in California, many of which were chosen because strong ground motions from earthquakes were recorded at the sites. The method for all measurements involves picking first arrivals of P- and S-waves from a surface source recorded at various depths in a borehole (as opposed to noninvasive methods, such as the SASW method [e.g., Brown et al., 2002]). The results from most of the sites are contained in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports (see References). Until now, none of the results have been available as computer files, and before 1992 the interpretation of the arrival times was in terms of piecemeal interval velocities, with no attempt to derive a layered model that would fit the travel times in an overall sense (the one exception is Porcella, 1984). In this report I reanalyze all of the arrival times in terms of layered models for P- and for S-wave velocities at each site, and I provide the results as computer files. In addition to the measurements reported in the open-file reports, I also include some borehole results from other reports, as well as some results never before published. I include data for 277 boreholes (at the time of this writing; more will be added to the web site as they are obtained), all in California (I have data from boreholes in Washington and Utah, but these will be published separately). I am also in the process of interpreting travel time data obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer at hundreds of sites; these data can be interpreted in the same way of those obtained from surface-to-borehole logging. When available, the data will be added to the web site (see below for information on obtaining data from the World Wide Web (WWW)). In addition to the basic borehole data and results, I provide information concerning strong-motion stations that I judge to be close enough to the boreholes

  2. Overcoming the obstacles: Life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Crista Marie

    Scientific discovery is at the heart of solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Scientists are retiring at rates that exceed the numbers of new scientists. Unfortunately, scientific careers still appear to be outside the reach of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities in their preparation and performance as scientists. This narrative inquiry involved the researcher writing the life stories of four scientists. These life stories were generated from extensive interviews in which each of the scientists recounted their life histories. The researcher used narrative analysis to "make sense" of these learning disabled scientists' life stories. The narrative analysis required the researcher to identify and describe emergent themes characterizing each scientist's life. A cross-case analysis was then performed to uncover commonalities and differences in the lives of these four individuals. Results of the cross-case analysis revealed that all four scientists had a passion for science that emerged at an early age, which, with strong drive and determination, drove these individuals to succeed in spite of the many obstacles arising from their learning disabilities. The analysis also revealed that these scientists chose careers based on their strengths; they actively sought mentors to guide them in their preparation as scientists; and they developed coping techniques to overcome difficulties and succeed. The cross-case analysis also revealed differences in the degree to which each scientist accepted his or her learning disability. While some demonstrated inferior feelings about their successes as scientists, still other individuals revealed feelings of having superior abilities in areas such as visualization and working with people. These individuals revealed

  3. FOREWORD: Special section on electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesselier, Dominique; Chew, Weng Cho

    2004-12-01

    This Inverse Problems special section on electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles contains a selection of 14 invited papers, involving 41 authors and 19 research groups worldwide. (Though this section consists of invited papers, the standard refereeing procedures of Inverse Problems have been rigorously observed.) We do not claim to have reached all the high-level researchers in the field, but we believe that we have made a fair attempt. As illustrated by the variety of contributions included, the aim of this special section is to address theoretical and practical inversion problems (and the solutions thereof) that arise in the field of electromagnetic characterization of obstacles (artificial or natural) buried on the Earth or in planetary subsoil. Civil and military engineering, archaeological and environmental issues are typically among those within the scope of the investigation. An example is the characterization of a single (or multiple) obstacle(s) located near the interface or at shallow depths via electromagnetic means operating within relevant frequency bands. However, we also welcomed novel and thought-provoking investigations, even though their direct application to the real world, or even to laboratory-controlled settings, may still be far off. Within this general mathematical and applied framework, the submitted papers focused on a combination of theoretical, computational and experimental developments. They either reviewed the most recent advances in a particular area of research or were an original and specialized contribution. Let us now take the opportunity to remind the readers that this special section harks back (in addition to sharing some common contributors) to two special sections already published in the journal which possessed the same flavour of wave-field inversion and its many applications. They were `Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface', which was published in October 2000 (volume 16, issue 5

  4. Experimental evidence for s-wave pairing symmetry in superconducting Cu(x)Bi2Se3 single crystals using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Niv; Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Sharifi, Fred; Talin, A Alec; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2013-03-15

    Topological superconductors represent a newly predicted phase of matter that is topologically distinct from conventional superconducting condensates of Cooper pairs. As a manifestation of their topological character, topological superconductors support solid-state realizations of Majorana fermions at their boundaries. The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) has been theoretically proposed as an odd-parity superconductor in the time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor class, and point-contact spectroscopy measurements have reported the observation of zero-bias conductance peaks corresponding to Majorana states in this material. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the superconducting energy gap in Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) as a function of spatial position and applied magnetic field. The tunneling spectrum shows that the density of states at the Fermi level is fully gapped without any in-gap states. The spectrum is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory with a momentum independent order parameter, which suggests that Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) is a classical s-wave superconductor contrary to previous expectations and measurements.

  5. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics around an urban sinkhole: evidence of enhanced dissolution in a strike-slip fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Tanner, David C.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-12-01

    In November 2010, a large sinkhole opened up in the urban area of Schmalkalden, Germany. To determine the key factors which benefited the development of this collapse structure and therefore the dissolution, we carried out several shear-wave reflection-seismic profiles around the sinkhole. In the seismic sections we see evidence of the Mesozoic tectonic movement in the form of a NW-SE striking, dextral strike-slip fault, known as the Heßleser Fault, which faulted and fractured the subsurface below the town. The strike-slip faulting created a zone of small blocks ( sinkholes and dissolution-induced depressions. Since the processes are still ongoing, the occurrence of a new sinkhole cannot be ruled out. This case study demonstrates how S-wave seismics can characterize a sinkhole and, together with geological information, can be used to study the processes that result in sinkhole formation, such as a near-surface fault zone located in soluble rocks. The more complex the fault geometry and interaction between faults, the more prone an area is to sinkhole occurrence.

  6. Determination of the S-wave $\\pi \\pi$ scattering lengths from a study of $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R; Kalmus, G; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, N; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, D; Falaleev, V; Fidecaro, Maria; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Kubischta, W; Norton, A; Maier, A; Patel, M; Peters, A; Balev, S; Frabetti, P L; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Marinova, E; Molokanova, N; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A; Monnier, E; Swallow, E; Winston, R; Rubin, P; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Wahl, H; Calvetti, M; Iacopini, E; Ruggiero, G; Bizzeti, A; Lenti, M; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Renk, B; Wache, M; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Coward, D; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Shieh, M; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Wood, M D; Anzivino, G; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Piccini, M; Raggi, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Cenci, P; Pepé, M; Pettrucci, M C; Cerri, C; Fantechi, R; Collazuol, G; Di Lella, L; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Michetti, A; Costantini, F; Doble, N; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Pierazzini, G; Sozzi, M; Venditti, S; Bloch-Devaux, B; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Bifani, S; Clemencic, M; Goy-Lopez, S; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Markytan, M; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2009-01-01

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of $~6.031 x 10^{7} K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ invariant mass (M_00) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around $M_{00} = 2m_{+}$, where m_{+} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} \\to \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ in $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decay. Fits to the M_{00} distribution using two different theoretical models provide the presently most precise determination of $a_{0}-a_{2}$, the difference between the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order pi pi rescattering terms, included in the two models, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a_2.

  7. Measurement of Rayleigh wave Z/H ratio and joint inversion for a high-resolution S wave velocity model beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, W.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on the 3D sediment structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin is not only important to explore the oil and gas resources in the area, but also essential to decipher the deep crust and mantle structure beneath the margin with teleseismic data. In this study, we conduct a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 6-40 s to construct a 3-D S wave velocity model in a rectangular area of 100°-87° west and 28°-37° north. We use ambient noise data from a total of 215 stations of the Transportable Array deployed under the Earthscope project. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio is mostly sensitive to shallow sediment structure, while the dispersion data are expected to have reasonably good resolution to uppermost mantle depths. The Z/H ratios measured from stations inside the Gulf Coastal Plain are distinctly lower in comparison with those measured from the inland stations. We also measured the phase velocity dispersion from the same ambient noise dataset. Our preliminary 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies at shallow depth, which are spatially well correlated with Gulf Cost, East Texas, and the Lower Mississippi basins. We will discuss other features of the 3-D models once the model is finalized.

  8. Deeply bound 1s and 2p pionic states in 205Pb and determination of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.

    2001-06-01

    We observed well separated 1s and 2p π - states in 205 Pb in the 206 Pb(d, 3 He) reaction at T d = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are: B 1s = 6.768 ± 0.044 (stat) ± 0.041 (syst) MeV, Γ 1s = 0.778 -0.130 +0.150 (stat) ± 0.055 (syst) MeV, B 2p = 5.110 ± 0.015 (stat) ± 0.042 (syst) MeV, and Γ 2p = 0.371 ± 0.037 (stat) ± 0.048 (syst) MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, yielding 26.1 -1.5 +1.7 MeV as a pion mass shift in the center of 205 Pb. (orig.)

  9. 75 FR 60304 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... are available online free of charge. Visit http://www.nfdc.faa.gov to register. Additionally... (RNP) Z RWY 26, Amdt 1 Rifle, CO, Garfield County Rgnl, SQUAT THREE GRAPHIC OBSTACLE DP Rifle, CO...

  10. Wide-Baseline Stereo-Based Obstacle Mapping for Unmanned Surface Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaozheng; Wang, Han

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a wide-baseline stereo-based static obstacle mapping approach for unmanned surface vehicles (USVs). The proposed approach eliminates the complicated calibration work and the bulky rig in our previous binocular stereo system, and raises the ranging ability from 500 to 1000 m with a even larger baseline obtained from the motion of USVs. Integrating a monocular camera with GPS and compass information in this proposed system, the world locations of the detected static obstacles are reconstructed while the USV is traveling, and an obstacle map is then built. To achieve more accurate and robust performance, multiple pairs of frames are leveraged to synthesize the final reconstruction results in a weighting model. Experimental results based on our own dataset demonstrate the high efficiency of our system. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to address the task of wide-baseline stereo-based obstacle mapping in a maritime environment. PMID:29617293

  11. Obstacle Detection for Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Deep Stacked Autoencoder and k-Nearest Neighbor Scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Dairi, Abdelkader; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Senouci, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Obstacle detection is an essential element for the development of intelligent transportation systems so that accidents can be avoided. In this study, we propose a stereovisionbased method for detecting obstacles in urban environment. The proposed method uses a deep stacked auto-encoders (DSA) model that combines the greedy learning features with the dimensionality reduction capacity and employs an unsupervised k-nearest neighbors algorithm (KNN) to accurately and reliably detect the presence of obstacles. We consider obstacle detection as an anomaly detection problem. We evaluated the proposed method by using practical data from three publicly available datasets, the Malaga stereovision urban dataset (MSVUD), the Daimler urban segmentation dataset (DUSD), and Bahnhof dataset. Also, we compared the efficiency of DSA-KNN approach to the deep belief network (DBN)-based clustering schemes. Results show that the DSA-KNN is suitable to visually monitor urban scenes.

  12. Early Obstacle Detection and Avoidance for All to All Traffic Pattern in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Florian; Jarry, Aubin; Leone, Pierre; Moraru, Luminita; Nikoletseas, Sotiris; Rolim, Jose

    This paper deals with early obstacles recognition in wireless sensor networks under various traffic patterns. In the presence of obstacles, the efficiency of routing algorithms is increased by voluntarily avoiding some regions in the vicinity of obstacles, areas which we call dead-ends. In this paper, we first propose a fast convergent routing algorithm with proactive dead-end detection together with a formal definition and description of dead-ends. Secondly, we present a generalization of this algorithm which improves performances in all to many and all to all traffic patterns. In a third part we prove that this algorithm produces paths that are optimal up to a constant factor of 2π + 1. In a fourth part we consider the reactive version of the algorithm which is an extension of a previously known early obstacle detection algorithm. Finally we give experimental results to illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms in different scenarios.

  13. [Educational obstacles in the everyday living of the nurse teacher's pedagogical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Malvina Thaís Pacheco; Mendes Sobrinho, José Augusto de Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    University teaching emerges as a theme frequently discussed in the educational scene. This article aims to investigate the educational obstacles emerging in the everyday living of the pedagogical practice of the nurse teacher from the Nursing Graduation Course at UEPSI, wishing to subsidize the elaboration of proposals for overcoming of these obstacles. It is a study of qualitative approach with data collection, questionnaire and semi-structured interview and data analysis through content analysis. According to the analysis, it is clear that the educational obstacles relate to the teacher person, to the students and to the institution. Thus, an establishment of a continuing education program in the action-reflection-action perspective is proposed as a way of overcoming the obstacles.

  14. Adaptive Tracking and Obstacle Avoidance Control for Mobile Robots with Unknown Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Cui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive control approach is proposed for trajectory tracking and obstacle avoidance for mobile robots with consideration given to unknown sliding. A kinematic model of mobile robots is established in this paper, in which both longitudinal and lateral sliding are considered and processed as three time-varying parameters. A sliding model observer is introduced to estimate the sliding parameters online. A stable tracking control law for this nonholonomic system is proposed to compensate the unknown sliding effect. From Lyapunov-stability analysis, it is proved, regardless of unknown sliding, that tracking errors of the controlled closed-loop system are asymptotically stable, the tracking errors converge to zero outside the obstacle detection region and obstacle avoidance is guaranteed inside the obstacle detection region. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed control system are verified by simulation results.

  15. 75 FR 76626 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ..., Norman County Ada/Twin Valley, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Buffalo, MN, Buffalo Muni, Takeoff... 10 Bowling Green, OH, Wood County, RNAV (GPS) RWY 10, Orig-B Bowling Green, OH, Wood County, RNAV...

  16. Mittag–Leffler's function, Vekua transform and an inverse obstacle scattering problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies a prototype of inverse obstacle scattering problems whose governing equation is the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. An explicit method to extract information about the location and shape of unknown obstacles from the far-field operator with a fixed wave number is given. The method is based on an explicit construction of a modification of Mittag–Leffler's function via the Vekua transform and the study of the asymptotic behaviour; an explicit density in the Herglotz wavefunction that approximates the modification of Mittag–Leffler's function in the bounded domain surrounding unknown obstacles; a system of inequalities derived from Kirsch's factorization formula of the far-field operator. Then an indicator function which can be calculated from the far-field operator acting on the density is introduced. It is shown that the asymptotic behaviour of the indicator function yields information about the visible part of the exterior of the obstacles

  17. Recovering an elastic obstacle containing embedded objects by the acoustic far-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fenglong; Yang, Jiaqing; Zhang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Consider the inverse scattering problem of time-harmonic acoustic waves by a 3D bounded elastic obstacle which may contain embedded impenetrable obstacles inside. We propose a novel and simple technique to show that the elastic obstacle can be uniquely recovered by the acoustic far-field pattern at a fixed frequency, disregarding its contents. Our method is based on constructing a well-posed modified interior transmission problem on a small domain and makes use of an a priori estimate for both the acoustic and elastic wave fields in the usual H 1-norm. In the case when there is no obstacle embedded inside the elastic body, our method gives a much simpler proof for the uniqueness result obtained previously in the literature (Natroshvili et al 2000 Rend. Mat. Serie VII 20 57-92 Monk and Selgas 2009 Inverse Problems Imaging 3 173-98).

  18. Visually guided obstacle avoidance in the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora and Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, A; O'Connor, M; Parkefelt, L

    2007-01-01

    Box jellyfish, cubomedusae, possess an impressive total of 24 eyes of four morphologically different types. Two of these eye types, called the upper and lower lens eyes, are camera-type eyes with spherical fish-like lenses. Compared with other cnidarians, cubomedusae also have an elaborate...... behavioral repertoire, which seems to be predominantly visually guided. Still, positive phototaxis is the only behavior described so far that is likely to be correlated with the eyes. We have explored the obstacle avoidance response of the Caribbean species Tripedalia cystophora and the Australian species...... a tendency to follow the intensity contrast between the obstacle and the surroundings (chamber walls). In the flow chamber Tripedalia cystophora displayed a stronger obstacle avoidance response than Chiropsella bronzie since they had less contact with the obstacles. This seems to follow differences...

  19. Research of Obstacle Recognition Technology in Cross-Country Environment for Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Being aimed at the obstacle recognition problem of unmanned ground vehicles in cross-country environment, this paper uses monocular vision sensor to realize the obstacle recognition of typical obstacles. Firstly, median filtering algorithm is applied during image preprocessing that can eliminate the noise. Secondly, image segmentation method based on the Fisher criterion function is used to segment the region of interest. Then, morphological method is used to process the segmented image, which is preparing for the subsequent analysis. The next step is to extract the color feature S, color feature a and edge feature “verticality” of image are extracted based on the HSI color space, the Lab color space, and two value images. Finally multifeature fusion algorithm based on Bayes classification theory is used for obstacle recognition. Test results show that the algorithm has good robustness and accuracy.

  20. Performance and wake conditions of a rotor located in the wake of an obstacle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2016-01-01

    and associated pulsations as a function of the incoming flow structures were measured by strain gauges. The flow condition in front of the rotor was measured with high temporal accuracy using LDA and power coefficients were determine as function of tip speed ratio for different obstacle positions. Furthermore......Obstacles like forests, ridges and hills can strongly affect the velocity profile in front of a wind turbine rotor. The present work aims at quantifying the influence of nearby located obstacles on the performance and wake characteristics of a downstream located wind turbine. Here the influence......, PIV measurements were carried out to study the development of the mean velocity deficit profiles of the wake behind the wind turbine model under the influence of the wake generated by the obstacle. By use of regression techniques to fit the velocity profiles it was possible to determine velocity...

  1. 75 FR 25760 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ..., ME, Wiscasset, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Alpena, MI, Alpena County Rgnl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 19, Orig Alpena, MI, Alpena County Rgnl, VOR RWY 19, Amdt 15 Oscoda, MI, Oscoda-Wurtsmith, RNAV...

  2. Real-Time Obstacle Avoidance for Telerobotic Systems Based on Equipotential Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Redundant manipulators offer a dual advantage of flexibility and dexterity and can be used in many civilian and military areas. However, operating such systems by teleoperation is challenging because of the redundancy and unstructured task environment, which result in the human operator suffering a huge burden when telemanipulator is facing the complicated obstacles. The existing methods usually use some off-line algorithms to solve the problem of obstacle avoidance. It is difficult for them to meet the requirements of real-time teleoperation in some unknown environment. This paper presents an on-line method for a telerobotic system to take advantage of redundancy to avoid obstacle, which is based on real-time sensor information. With this method, the human operator can focus attention on the end-effector operation regardless of the obstacle avoidance of other parts. The effectiveness and advantage of the method are well demonstrated by experiments.

  3. Obstacle Detection for Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Deep Stacked Autoencoder and k-Nearest Neighbor Scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Dairi, Abdelkader

    2018-04-30

    Obstacle detection is an essential element for the development of intelligent transportation systems so that accidents can be avoided. In this study, we propose a stereovisionbased method for detecting obstacles in urban environment. The proposed method uses a deep stacked auto-encoders (DSA) model that combines the greedy learning features with the dimensionality reduction capacity and employs an unsupervised k-nearest neighbors algorithm (KNN) to accurately and reliably detect the presence of obstacles. We consider obstacle detection as an anomaly detection problem. We evaluated the proposed method by using practical data from three publicly available datasets, the Malaga stereovision urban dataset (MSVUD), the Daimler urban segmentation dataset (DUSD), and Bahnhof dataset. Also, we compared the efficiency of DSA-KNN approach to the deep belief network (DBN)-based clustering schemes. Results show that the DSA-KNN is suitable to visually monitor urban scenes.

  4. 76 FR 8291 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... specifies the types of SIAPs and the effective dates of the associated Takeoff Minimums and ODPs. This..., Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Dallas, TX, Dallas Love Field, RNAV (GPS) Z RWY 13L, Orig-B...

  5. 78 FR 28135 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... the affected CFR sections and specifies the types of SIAPs and the effective dates of the, associated..., Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 2 Dallas, TX, Dallas Love Field, ILS OR LOC RWY 31R, ILS RWY 31R...

  6. 76 FR 61038 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... types of SIAPs and the effective dates of the, associated Takeoff Minimums and ODPs. This amendment also..., TN, Memphis Intl, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 3 Dallas, TX, Dallas-Love Field, Takeoff...

  7. Obstacles towards small business development in the Emfuleni district / Guillaume de Swardt

    OpenAIRE

    De Swardt, Guillaume

    2006-01-01

    Small businesses are essential for stimulating growth and alleviating poverty. The main aim of this study is to gather information regarding obstacles that withhold the small business sector from further development. This implies that attention will be given to the role of the entrepreneur, the small business sector and the role that business planning plays, in order to identify, minimise and possibly overcome the identified obstacles. Although small business is not an absolute...

  8. Effect of flow obstacles with various leading and trailing edges on critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioro, I.L.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Cheng, S.C.; Antoshko, Y.V.

    2001-01-01

    A joint investigation has been performed by the University of Ottawa and Chalk River Laboratories that examined the effect of the shape of the leading and trailing edges of the turbulence enhancing devices ('flow obstacles') on critical heat flux (CHF). The objective of this study was to gain a better overall understanding of the limit of CHF improvement for various obstacle designs and the impact of flow conditions on the improvements. (author)

  9. THE GROWING NATURAL FOODS MARKET: OPPORTUNITIES AND OBSTACLES FOR MASS MARKET SUPERMARKETS

    OpenAIRE

    Richman, Nessa J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven serious obstacles hinder the success of mass market grocery stores that try to succeed in the natural foods market. Finding timely and complete market information, linking with natural foods suppliers, and pricing and marketing natural foods are the three most important. Uncertainty about future standards for natural foods is the only major obstacle for natural foods stores. The problems facing mass market stores trying to succeed in the natural foods market are related to the market st...

  10. Experimental Investigation on the Detection of Obstacles by a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan-Iosif Korka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental investigation regarding the detection of obstacles in the workspace of a mobile robot. The traveling time of mobile robot on wheels, while moving on four with same length routes but with different shapes, was investigated. In this context, the average time to avoid an obstacle was determined, concluding with regard to the sensorial system of the robot.

  11. Energy dissipation by submarine obstacles during landslide impact on reservoir - potentially avoiding catastrophic dam collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Jeevan; Kattel, Parameshwari; Mergili, Martin; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Tuladhar, Bhadra Man; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2017-04-01

    Dense geophysical mass flows such as landslides, debris flows and debris avalanches may generate super tsunami waves as they impact water bodies such as the sea, hydraulic reservoirs or mountain lakes. Here, we apply a comprehensive and general two-phase, physical-mathematical mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) that consists of non-linear and hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equations for mass and momentum balances, and present novel, high-resolution simulation results for two-phase flows, as a mixture of solid grains and viscous fluid, impacting fluid reservoirs with obstacles. The simulations demonstrate that due to the presence of different obstacles in the water body, the intense flow-obstacle-interaction dramatically reduces the flow momentum resulting in the rapid energy dissipation around the obstacles. With the increase of obstacle height overtopping decreases but, the deflection and capturing (holding) of solid mass increases. In addition, the submarine solid mass is captured by the multiple obstacles and the moving mass decreases both in amount and speed as each obstacle causes the flow to deflect into two streams and also captures a portion of it. This results in distinct tsunami and submarine flow dynamics with multiple surface water and submarine debris waves. This novel approach can be implemented in open source GIS modelling framework r.avaflow, and be applied in hazard mitigation, prevention and relevant engineering or environmental tasks. This might be in particular for process chains, such as debris impacts in lakes and subsequent overtopping. So, as the complex flow-obstacle-interactions strongly and simultaneously dissipate huge energy at impact such installations potentially avoid great threat against the integrity of the dam. References: Pudasaini, S. P. (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res. 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/ 2011JF002186.

  12. Challenges (Obstacles) in Reaching Leadership Positions – Experiences of Women Professors at Novi Sad University Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Andrić Marijana Mišić; Markov Slobodanka

    2017-01-01

    Underrepresentation of women in leadership positions in universities is a phenomenon present in most countries of the world, with some significant differences. In our work we focused on obstacles that women professors in Novi Sad University (Serbia) faced in reaching leadership positions. Analysis is based on qualitative research using a semi structured interview, statistical data and selected secondary sources. Obstacles, mentorship and networking have been researched from an idiographic per...

  13. SMART STICK DESIGN WITH OBSTACLE DETECTION AND NAVIGATION AS THE HELPING TOOL FOR BLIND PEOPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Sumar Hadi*, Susilo Adi Widyanto, Paryanto, Kurnia Chamid, Rachmat Muhamad Andika

    2018-01-01

    Smart stick designed for the blind people, this appliance can help detect obstacles with the use of infrared sensor, ultrasonic and water. The obstacles in a distance of about 3 m can be detected assistance from this sensor. In addition, we use GPS (Global Positioning System) to give the position and navigation on the stick. Using GPS (Global Positioning System) help the blind people reaches its destination. GPS (Global Positioning System) recipients to get the location of the latest and the ...

  14. Real-Time Autonomous Obstacle Avoidance for Low-Altitude Fixed-Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owlia, Shahboddin

    The GeoSurv II is an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) being developed by Carleton University and Sander Geophysics. This thesis is in support of the GeoSurv II project. The objective of the GeoSurv II project is to create a fully autonomous UAV capable of performing geophysical surveys. In order to achieve this level of autonomy, the UAV, which due to the nature of its surveys flies at low altitude, must be able to avoid potential obstacles such as trees, powerlines, telecommunication towers, etc. Developing a method to avoid these obstacles is the objective of this thesis. The literature is rich in methods for trajectory planning and mid-air collision avoidance with other aircraft. In contrast, in this thesis, a method for avoiding static obstacles that are not known a priori is developed. The potential flow theory and panel method are borrowed from fluid mechanics and are employed to generate evasive maneuvers when obstacles are encountered. By means of appropriate modelling of obstacles, the aircraft's constraints are taken into account such that the evasive maneuvers are feasible for the UAV. Moreover, the method is developed with consideration of the limitations of obstacle detection in GeoSurv II. Due to the unavailability of the GeoSurv II aircraft, and the lack of a complete model for GeoSurv II, the method developed is implemented on the non-linear model of the Aerosonde UAV. The Aerosonde model is then subjected to various obstacle scenarios and it is seen that the UAV successfully avoids the obstacles.

  15. Real-Time Obstacle Avoidance for Telerobotic Systems Based on Equipotential Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Li; Aiguo Song; Huijun Li; Wei Lu; Chen Mao

    2012-01-01

    Redundant manipulators offer a dual advantage of flexibility and dexterity and can be used in many civilian and military areas. However, operating such systems by teleoperation is challenging because of the redundancy and unstructured task environment, which result in the human operator suffering a huge burden when telemanipulator is facing the complicated obstacles. The existing methods usually use some off-line algorithms to solve the problem of obstacle avoidance. It is difficult for them ...

  16. Existence of solutions to nonlinear parabolic unilateral problems with an obstacle depending on time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Bellal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the penalty method, we prove the existence of solutions to nonlinear parabolic unilateral problems with an obstacle depending on time. To find a solution, the original inequality is transformed into an equality by adding a positive function on the right-hand side and a complementary condition. This result can be seen as a generalization of the results by Mokrane in [11] where the obstacle is zero.

  17. Role of curvatures in determining the characteristics of a string vibrating against a doubly curved obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkirat; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-08-01

    The motion of a string in the presence of a doubly curved obstacle is investigated. A mathematical model has been developed for a general shape of the obstacle. However, detailed analysis has been performed for a shape relevant to the Indian stringed musical instruments like Tanpura and Sitar. In particular, we explore the effect of obstacle's curvature in the plane perpendicular to the string axis on its motion. This geometrical feature of the obstacle introduces a coupling between motions in mutually perpendicular directions over and above the coupling due to the stretching nonlinearity. We find that only one planar motion is possible for our system. Small amplitude planar motions are stable to perturbations in the perpendicular direction resulting in non-whirling motions while large amplitude oscillations lead to whirling motions. The critical amplitude of oscillations, across which there is a transition in the qualitative behavior of the non-planar trajectories, is determined using Floquet theory. Our analysis reveals that a small obstacle curvature in a direction perpendicular to the string axis leads to a considerable reduction in the critical amplitudes required for initiation of whirling motions. Hence, this obstacle curvature has a destabilizing effect on the planar motions in contrast to the curvature along the string axis which stabilizes planar motions.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of protein micropatterning in biomembranes: effects of immobile sticky obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Andreas M; Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule trajectories of lipids and proteins can yield valuable information about the nanoscopic organization of the plasma membrane itself. The interpretation of such trajectories, however, is complicated, as the mobility of molecules can be affected by the presence of immobile obstacles, and the transient binding of the tracers to these obstacles. We have previously developed a micropatterning approach that allows for immobilizing a plasma membrane protein and probing the diffusional behavior of a putative interaction partner in living cells. Here, we provide guidelines on how this micropatterning approach can be extended to quantify interaction parameters between plasma membrane constituents in their natural environment. We simulated a patterned membrane system and evaluated the effect of different surface densities of patterned immobile obstacles on the relative mobility as well as the surface density of diffusing tracers. In the case of inert obstacles, the size of the obstacle can be assessed from its surface density at the percolation threshold, which in turn can be extracted from the diffusion behavior of the tracer. For sticky obstacles, 2D dissociation constants can be determined from the tracer diffusion or surface density. (paper)

  19. Obstacle Avoidance for Redundant Manipulators Utilizing a Backward Quadratic Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjian Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle avoidance can be achieved as a secondary task by appropriate inverse kinematics (IK resolution of redundant manipulators. Most prior literature requires the time-consuming determination of the closest point to the obstacle for every calculation step. Aiming at the relief of computational burden, this paper develops what is termed a backward quadratic search algorithm (BQSA as another option for solving IK problems in obstacle avoidance. The BQSA detects possible collisions based on the root property of a category of quadratic functions, which are derived from ellipse-enveloped obstacles and the positions of each link's end-points. The algorithm executes a backward search for possible obstacle collisions, from the end-effector to the base, and avoids obstacles by utilizing a hybrid IK scheme, incorporating the damped least-squares method, the weighted least-norm method and the gradient projection method. Some details of the hybrid IK scheme, such as values of the damped factor, weights and the clamping velocity, are discussed, along with a comparison of computational load between previous methods and BQSA. Simulations of a planar seven-link manipulator and a PUMA 560 robot verify the effectiveness of BQSA.

  20. Assessing the ground vibrations produced by a heavy vehicle traversing a traffic obstacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarne, Loïc; Ainalis, Daniel; Kouroussis, Georges

    2018-01-15

    Despite advancements in alternative transport networks, road transport remains the dominant mode in many modern and developing countries. The ground-borne motions produced by the passage of a heavy vehicle over a geometric obstacle (e.g. speed hump, train tracks) pose a fundamental problem in transport annoyance in urban areas. In order to predict the ground vibrations generated by the passage of a heavy vehicle over a geometric obstacle, a two-step numerical model is developed. The first step involves simulating the dynamic loads generated by the heavy vehicle using a multibody approach, which includes the tyre-obstacle-ground interaction. The second step involves the simulation of the ground wave propagation using a three dimensional finite element model. The simulation is able to be decoupled due to the large difference in stiffness between the vehicle's tyres and the road. First, the two-step model is validated using an experimental case study available in the literature. A sensitivity analysis is then presented, examining the influence of various factors on the generated ground vibrations. Factors investigated include obstacle shape, obstacle dimensions, vehicle speed, and tyre stiffness. The developed model can be used as a tool in the early planning stages to predict the ground vibrations generated by the passage of a heavy vehicle over an obstacle in urban areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bi-stability in cooperative transport by ants in the presence of obstacles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Ron

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To cooperatively carry large food items to the nest, individual ants conform their efforts and coordinate their motion. Throughout this expedition, collective motion is driven both by internal interactions between the carrying ants and a response to newly arrived informed ants that orient the cargo towards the nest. During the transport process, the carrying group must overcome obstacles that block their path to the nest. Here, we investigate the dynamics of cooperative transport, when the motion of the ants is frustrated by a linear obstacle that obstructs the motion of the cargo. The obstacle contains a narrow opening that serves as the only available passage to the nest, and through which single ants can pass but not with the cargo. We provide an analytical model for the ant-cargo system in the constrained environment that predicts a bi-stable dynamic behavior between an oscillatory mode of motion along the obstacle and a convergent mode of motion near the opening. Using both experiments and simulations, we show how for small cargo sizes, the system exhibits spontaneous transitions between these two modes of motion due to fluctuations in the applied force on the cargo. The bi-stability provides two possible problem solving strategies for overcoming the obstacle, either by attempting to pass through the opening, or take large excursions to circumvent the obstacle.

  2. A Compact Magnetic Field-Based Obstacle Detection and Avoidance System for Miniature Spherical Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to their efficient locomotion and natural tolerance to hazardous environments, spherical robots have wide applications in security surveillance, exploration of unknown territory and emergency response. Numerous studies have been conducted on the driving mechanism, motion planning and trajectory tracking methods of spherical robots, yet very limited studies have been conducted regarding the obstacle avoidance capability of spherical robots. Most of the existing spherical robots rely on the “hit and run” technique, which has been argued to be a reasonable strategy because spherical robots have an inherent ability to recover from collisions. Without protruding components, they will not become stuck and can simply roll back after running into bstacles. However, for small scale spherical robots that contain sensitive surveillance sensors and cannot afford to utilize heavy protective shells, the absence of obstacle avoidance solutions would leave the robot at the mercy of potentially dangerous obstacles. In this paper, a compact magnetic field-based obstacle detection and avoidance system has been developed for miniature spherical robots. It utilizes a passive magnetic field so that the system is both compact and power efficient. The proposed system can detect not only the presence, but also the approaching direction of a ferromagnetic obstacle, therefore, an intelligent avoidance behavior can be generated by adapting the trajectory tracking method with the detection information. Design optimization is conducted to enhance the obstacle detection performance and detailed avoidance strategies are devised. Experimental results are also presented for validation purposes.

  3. [Obstacles perceived by nurses for evidence-based practice: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Inmaculada; López-Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L

    2013-01-01

    To examine the obstacles perceived by nurses to implement an evidence-based clinical practice. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews conducted in 2010-2011 including 11 nurses purposively selected from public hospitals and community centres in Jaén and Córdoba (Spain). A content analysis was performed, using Miles and Huberman as a reference and comprising the following steps: data reduction, data presentation, and data conclusion/verification. Data saturation was reached in these categories (obstacles). The obstacles perceived by nurses to introduce an evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) were grouped into 3 major categories: obstacles related with professionals (routine-based practice, unwilling and stagnant attitudes, and lack of training in EBCP), obstacles related to the social context (reluctance from other professionals and from patients or families), and obstacles related to the organization (obsolete cultures that do not promote innovation in nursing care). This study highlights the persistence of various factors that hinder the use of research findings in clinical practice. The results underline the need to change the culture of healthcare organizations, to motivate professionals, and to break some of the resistance attitudes that hinder the implementation of evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of spiral waves pinned to obstacles in a simulated excitable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantu, Metinee; Kumchaiseemak, Nakorn; Porjai, Porramain; Sutthiopad, Malee; Müller, Stefan C.; Luengviriya, Chaiya; Luengviriya, Jiraporn

    2017-09-01

    Pinning phenomena emerge in many dynamical systems. They are found to stabilize extreme conditions such as superconductivity and super fluidity. The dynamics of pinned spiral waves, whose tips trace the boundary of obstacles, also play an important role in the human health. In heart, such pinned waves cause longer tachycardia. In this article, we present two methods for generating pinned spiral waves in a simulated excitable system. In method A, an obstacle is set in the system prior to an ignition of a spiral wave. This method may be suitable only for the case of large obstacles since it often fails when used for small obstacles. In method B, a spiral wave is generated before an obstacle is placed at the spiral tip. With this method, a pinned spiral wave is always obtained, regardless the obstacle size. We demonstrate that after a transient interval the dynamics of the pinned spiral waves generated by the methods A and B are identical. The initiation of pinned spiral waves in both two- and three-dimensional systems is illustrated.

  5. An Approach for Indoor Path Computation among Obstacles that Considers User Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available People often transport objects within indoor environments, who need enough space for the motion. In such cases, the accessibility of indoor spaces relies on the dimensions, which includes a person and her/his operated objects. This paper proposes a new approach to avoid obstacles and compute indoor paths with respect to the user dimension. The approach excludes inaccessible spaces for a user in five steps: (1 compute the minimum distance between obstacles and find the inaccessible gaps; (2 group obstacles according to the inaccessible gaps; (3 identify groups of obstacles that influence the path between two locations; (4 compute boundaries for the selected groups; and (5 build a network in the accessible area around the obstacles in the room. Compared to the Minkowski sum method for outlining inaccessible spaces, the proposed approach generates simpler polygons for groups of obstacles that do not contain inner rings. The creation of a navigation network becomes easier based on these simple polygons. By using this approach, we can create user- and task-specific networks in advance. Alternatively, the accessible path can be generated on the fly before the user enters a room.

  6. Characteristics of leading forelimb movements for obstacle avoidance during locomotion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sho; Sato, Yamato; Yanagihara, Dai

    2012-10-01

    Walking smoothly and safely often involves stepping over an obstacle. The purpose of this study was to examine forelimb movements and toe trajectories in stepping over an obstacle during overground locomotion in rats. We performed a kinematic analysis of forelimb movements and measured electromyographic (EMG) activities in the biceps and triceps brachii of the forelimbs. We found that mean toe height just above the obstacle was lower in the leading forelimb than in the trailing forelimb. The toe positions of the leading forelimb at maximal elevation over the obstacle (peak toe position) were closer to the upper edge of the obstacle than those of the trailing forelimb. The linear distance between peak toe position and the upper edge of the obstacle was significantly less in the leading forelimb compared to the trailing forelimb. The peak toe position of the leading forelimb spatially corresponds to the transition point from flexion to extension of the elbow joint. This transition appeared to be controlled mainly by an offset of EMG activity of the elbow flexor, the biceps brachii muscle. In contrast, the trailing forelimb appeared to be controlled by the shoulder and wrist joints. These results suggest that the toe trajectory of the leading forelimb is more accurately regulated than that of the trailing forelimb. In addition, the activities of the elbow flexor may in part contribute to the toe trajectory of the leading forelimb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of a flow obstacle on liquid film flowing concurrently with air in a horizontal rectangular duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukano, Tohru; Tominaga, Akira; Morikawa, Kengo.

    1986-01-01

    The aspect of a liquid film flowing near a flat plate type obstacle was observed, and the liquid film thickness and the entrainment were measured under a wide range of gas and liquid flow rates. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The configurations of film flows near the obstacle are classified according to whether (a) the liquid film climbs over the obstacle or not, (b) the air flows under the obstacle or not, or (c) the liquid film swells or sinks just upstream or downstream of the obstacle. (2) The lower the liquid flow rate, the larger the effect of the obstacle on the film thickness. (3) The generation of entrainment is regulated by the obstacle when the air volumetric flux is high and by the disturbance wave when it is low. (author)

  8. Continental lithospheric subduction and intermediate-depth seismicity: Constraints from S-wave velocity structures in the Pamir and Hindu Kush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Yun; Yuan, Xiaohui; Schurr, Bernd; Mechie, James; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon; Fu, Bihong

    2018-01-01

    The Pamir has experienced more intense deformation and shortening than Tibet, although it has a similar history of terrane accretion. Subduction as a primary way to accommodate lithospheric shortening beneath the Pamir has induced the intermediate-depth seismicity, which is rare in Tibet. Here we construct a 3D S-wave velocity model of the lithosphere beneath the Pamir by surface wave tomography using data of the TIPAGE (Tien Shan-Pamir Geodynamic program) and other seismic networks in the area. We imaged a large-scale low velocity anomaly in the crust at 20-50 km depth in the Pamir overlain by a high velocity anomaly at a depth shallower than 15 km. The high velocity anomalies colocate with exposed gneiss domes, which may imply a similar history of crustal deformation, partial melting and exhumation in the hinterland, as has occurred in the Himalaya/Tibet system. At mantle depths, where the intermediate-depth earthquakes are located, a low velocity zone is clearly observed extending to about 180 km and 150 km depth in the Hindu Kush and eastern Pamir, respectively. Moreover, the geometry of the low-velocity anomaly suggests that lower crustal material has been pulled down into the mantle by the subducting Asian and Indian lithospheric mantle beneath the Pamir and Hindu Kush, respectively. Metamorphic processes in the subducting lower crust may cause the intermediate-depth seismicity down to 150-180 km depth beneath the Pamir and Hindu Kush. We inverted focal mechanisms in the seismic zone for the stress field. Differences in the stress field between the upper and lower parts of the Indian slab imply that subduction and detachment of the Indian lithosphere might cause intense seismicity associated with the thermal shear instability in the deep Hindu Kush.

  9. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics around an urban sinkhole: evidence of enhanced dissolution in a strike-slip fault zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wadas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 2010, a large sinkhole opened up in the urban area of Schmalkalden, Germany. To determine the key factors which benefited the development of this collapse structure and therefore the dissolution, we carried out several shear-wave reflection-seismic profiles around the sinkhole. In the seismic sections we see evidence of the Mesozoic tectonic movement in the form of a NW–SE striking, dextral strike-slip fault, known as the Heßleser Fault, which faulted and fractured the subsurface below the town. The strike-slip faulting created a zone of small blocks ( < 100 m in size, around which steep-dipping normal faults, reverse faults and a dense fracture network serve as fluid pathways for the artesian-confined groundwater. The faults also acted as barriers for horizontal groundwater flow perpendicular to the fault planes. Instead groundwater flows along the faults which serve as conduits and forms cavities in the Permian deposits below ca. 60 m depth. Mass movements and the resulting cavities lead to the formation of sinkholes and dissolution-induced depressions. Since the processes are still ongoing, the occurrence of a new sinkhole cannot be ruled out. This case study demonstrates how S-wave seismics can characterize a sinkhole and, together with geological information, can be used to study the processes that result in sinkhole formation, such as a near-surface fault zone located in soluble rocks. The more complex the fault geometry and interaction between faults, the more prone an area is to sinkhole occurrence.

  10. The S-wave resonance contributions in the B{sup 0}{sub s} decays into ψ(2S,3S) plus pion pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Li, Ya [Nanjing Normal University, Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Wen-Fei [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2017-03-15

    The three-body decays B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S,3S)π{sup +}π{sup -} are studied based on the perturbative QCD approach. With the help of the nonperturbative two-pion distribution amplitudes, the analysis is simplified into the quasi-two-body processes. Besides the traditional factorizable and nonfactorizable diagrams at the leading order, the next-to-leading order vertex corrections are also included to cancel the scale dependence. The f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1500) resonance contributions as well as the nonresonant contributions are taken into account using the presently known ππ time-like scalar form factor for the s anti s component. It is found that the predicted B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -} decay spectra in the pion pair invariant mass shows a similar behavior as the experiment. The calculated S-wave contributions to the branching ratio of B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -} is 6.0 x 10{sup -5}, which is in agreement with the LHCb data B(B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -}) = (7.2±1.2) x 10{sup -5} within errors. The estimate of B(B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(3S)π{sup +}π{sup -}) can reach the order of 10{sup -5}, pending the corresponding measurements. (orig.)

  11. S-wave velocities of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Lesser Antilles from the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O'Leary; Clouard, Valerie; Tait, Stephen; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2018-06-01

    We present an overview of S-wave velocities (Vs) within the crust and upper mantle of the Lesser Antilles as determined with 19 seismic broadband stations. Receiver functions (RF) have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. Local smoothness optimization (LSO) procedure has been applied, combined with an H-K stacking method, the spatial distribution of hypocenters of local earthquakes and of the energy they released, in order to identify an optimum 1D model of Vs below each station. Several features of the Caribbean plate and its interaction with the Atlantic subducting slab are visible in the resulting models: (a) relatively thick oceanic crust below these stations ranges from 21 km to 33 km, being slight thinner in the middle of the island arc; (b) crustal low velocity zones are present below stations SABA, SEUS, SKI, SMRT, CBE, DSD, GCMP and TDBA; (c) lithospheric thickness range from 40 km to 105 km but lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was not straightforward to correlate between stations; (d) the aseismic mantle wedge between the Caribbean seismic lithosphere and the subducted slab varies in thickness as well as Vs values which are, in general, lower below the West of Martinique than below the West of Guadeloupe; (e) the depth of the subducted slab beneath the volcanic arc, appears to be greater to the North, and relatively shallower below some stations (e.g. DLPL, SAM, BIM and FDF) than was estimated in previous studies based on the depth-distribution of seismicity; f) the WBZ is >10-15 km deeper than the top of the slab below the Central Lesser Antilles (Martinique and Dominica) where the presence of partial melt in the mantle wedge seems also to be more evident.

  12. Age-related changes in gait adaptability in response to unpredictable obstacles and stepping targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Maria Joana D; Lord, Stephen R; Schoene, Daniel; Pelicioni, Paulo H S; Sturnieks, Daina L; Menant, Jasmine C

    2016-05-01

    A large proportion of falls in older people occur when walking. Limitations in gait adaptability might contribute to tripping; a frequently reported cause of falls in this group. To evaluate age-related changes in gait adaptability in response to obstacles or stepping targets presented at short notice, i.e.: approximately two steps ahead. Fifty older adults (aged 74±7 years; 34 females) and 21 young adults (aged 26±4 years; 12 females) completed 3 usual gait speed (baseline) trials. They then completed the following randomly presented gait adaptability trials: obstacle avoidance, short stepping target, long stepping target and no target/obstacle (3 trials of each). Compared with the young, the older adults slowed significantly in no target/obstacle trials compared with the baseline trials. They took more steps and spent more time in double support while approaching the obstacle and stepping targets, demonstrated poorer stepping accuracy and made more stepping errors (failed to hit the stepping targets/avoid the obstacle). The older adults also reduced velocity of the two preceding steps and shortened the previous step in the long stepping target condition and in the obstacle avoidance condition. Compared with their younger counterparts, the older adults exhibited a more conservative adaptation strategy characterised by slow, short and multiple steps with longer time in double support. Even so, they demonstrated poorer stepping accuracy and made more stepping errors. This reduced gait adaptability may place older adults at increased risk of falling when negotiating unexpected hazards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Obstacles of Achieving Total Quality in the Faculty of Education in Alexandria University from Staff’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Salah Hanafy Mahmoud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated obstacles that prevent achieving total quality in the faculty of Education in Alexandria University from the point of view of the faculty members in order to provide methods for overcoming such obstacles. The study also aimed to measure the impact of the variables (gender – academic rank – the major on the staff's views in the fields of (teaching, learning – scientific research – community service – university administration – staff's personal aspects. The study was based on the descriptive method and used a questionnaire to a sample of (100 teaching staff members who were randomly selected. The results revealed that the obstacles were as follows: i obstacles of university administration with a mean of (4.5 indicating a very high agreement score, ii obstacles of teaching and learning process with a mean of (4.2 indicating a high agreement score, iii obstacles of the scientific research with a mean of (3.9 indicating a high agreement score, iv obstacles of the community service with a mean of (3.5 indicating a high agreement score and v obstacles related to the staff members’ personal aspects with a mean of (3.4 indicating an average agreement score. The results showed no statistically significant differences between the staff's views regarding about obstacles of applying total quality in the Faculty of Education, Alexandria University attributed to gender, academic rank or major. Keywords: Quality, Faculty of education, Staff members, TQM obstacles.

  14. Effects of soft interactions and bound mobility on diffusion in crowded environments: a model of sticky and slippery obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefferson, Michael W.; Norris, Samantha L.; Vernerey, Franck J.; Betterton, Meredith D.; E Hough, Loren

    2017-08-01

    Crowded environments modify the diffusion of macromolecules, generally slowing their movement and inducing transient anomalous subdiffusion. The presence of obstacles also modifies the kinetics and equilibrium behavior of tracers. While previous theoretical studies of particle diffusion have typically assumed either impenetrable obstacles or binding interactions that immobilize the particle, in many cellular contexts bound particles remain mobile. Examples include membrane proteins or lipids with some entry and diffusion within lipid domains and proteins that can enter into membraneless organelles or compartments such as the nucleolus. Using a lattice model, we studied the diffusive movement of tracer particles which bind to soft obstacles, allowing tracers and obstacles to occupy the same lattice site. For sticky obstacles, bound tracer particles are immobile, while for slippery obstacles, bound tracers can hop without penalty to adjacent obstacles. In both models, binding significantly alters tracer motion. The type and degree of motion while bound is a key determinant of the tracer mobility: slippery obstacles can allow nearly unhindered diffusion, even at high obstacle filling fraction. To mimic compartmentalization in a cell, we examined how obstacle size and a range of bound diffusion coefficients affect tracer dynamics. The behavior of the model is similar in two and three spatial dimensions. Our work has implications for protein movement and interactions within cells.

  15. Dynamics of cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with aerodynamic obstacle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with an array of aerodynamic obstacles are investigated numerically for diverse shock strengths and for different obstacle configurations in air in standard conditions. The considered number of obstacles N is 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24. Obstacles are lenticular airfoils with thickness-to-chord ratios t/c of 0.07, 0.14, and 0.21. The distances of the airfoil leading edge from the shock focus point (r LE )/(r LE ref ) are 1, 2, and 2.5, where r LE ref =7 is the dimensionless reference distance from the origin. Considered impinging shock Mach numbers M s are 2.2, 2.7, and 3.2 at the reference distance from the origin. The reference experimental configuration (N=8,t/c =0.14,r LE =7,M s =2.7) was proposed by Kjellander et al. [“Thermal radiation from a converging shock implosion,” Phys. Fluids 22, 046102 (2010)]. Numerical results compare fairly well to available one-dimensional models for shock propagation and to available experimental results in the reference configuration. Local reflection types are in good agreement with the classical criteria for planar shock waves. The main shock reshaping patterns are identified and their dependence on the shock strength and obstacle configuration is exposed. In particular, different shock patterns are observed after the leading edge reflection, which results in polygonal shock wave with N, 2N, 3N, and 4N sides. The largest temperature peak at the origin is obtained for the 8- and the 16-obstacle configurations and for the smallest thickness to length ratio, 0.07, located at distance from the origin of 2r LE ref . In terms of compression efficiency at the origin, the 16-obstacle configuration is found to perform slightly better than the reference 8-obstacle configuration—with an efficiency increase of about 2%-3%, which is well within the model accuracy—thus confirming the goodness of the obstacle arrangement proposed by Kjellander and collaborators

  16. Dynamics of cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with aerodynamic obstacle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with an array of aerodynamic obstacles are investigated numerically for diverse shock strengths and for different obstacle configurations in air in standard conditions. The considered number of obstacles N is 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24. Obstacles are lenticular airfoils with thickness-to-chord ratios t/c of 0.07, 0.14, and 0.21. The distances of the airfoil leading edge from the shock focus point (r{sub LE})/(r{sub LE}{sup ref}) are 1, 2, and 2.5, where r{sub LE}{sup ref}=7 is the dimensionless reference distance from the origin. Considered impinging shock Mach numbers M{sub s} are 2.2, 2.7, and 3.2 at the reference distance from the origin. The reference experimental configuration (N=8,t/c =0.14,r{sub LE}=7,M{sub s}=2.7) was proposed by Kjellander et al. [“Thermal radiation from a converging shock implosion,” Phys. Fluids 22, 046102 (2010)]. Numerical results compare fairly well to available one-dimensional models for shock propagation and to available experimental results in the reference configuration. Local reflection types are in good agreement with the classical criteria for planar shock waves. The main shock reshaping patterns are identified and their dependence on the shock strength and obstacle configuration is exposed. In particular, different shock patterns are observed after the leading edge reflection, which results in polygonal shock wave with N, 2N, 3N, and 4N sides. The largest temperature peak at the origin is obtained for the 8- and the 16-obstacle configurations and for the smallest thickness to length ratio, 0.07, located at distance from the origin of 2r{sub LE}{sup ref}. In terms of compression efficiency at the origin, the 16-obstacle configuration is found to perform slightly better than the reference 8-obstacle configuration—with an efficiency increase of about 2%-3%, which is well within the model accuracy—thus confirming the goodness of the obstacle arrangement proposed by Kjellander and

  17. Harnessing atomistic simulations to predict the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroukhani, S.; Nguyen, L. D.; Leung, K. W. K.; Singh, C. V.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles is key to understanding the microscopic features that govern the plastic flow of modern alloys. In this spirit, the current manuscript examines the rate at which an edge dislocation overcomes an obstacle in aluminum. Predictions were made using different popular variants of Harmonic Transition State Theory (HTST) and compared to those of direct Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The HTST predictions were found to be grossly inaccurate due to the large entropy barrier associated with the dislocation-obstacle interaction. Considering the importance of finite temperature effects, the utility of the Finite Temperature String (FTS) method was then explored. While this approach was found capable of identifying a prominent reaction tube, it was not capable of computing the free energy profile along the tube. Lastly, the utility of the Transition Interface Sampling (TIS) approach was explored, which does not need a free energy profile and is known to be less reliant on the choice of reaction coordinate. The TIS approach was found capable of accurately predicting the rate, relative to direct MD simulations. This finding was utilized to examine the temperature and load dependence of the dislocation-obstacle interaction in a simple periodic cell configuration. An attractive rate prediction approach combining TST and simple continuum models is identified, and the strain rate sensitivity of individual dislocation obstacle interactions is predicted.

  18. Radial polar histogram: obstacle avoidance and path planning for robotic cognition and motion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Jen; Keyawa, Nicholas R.; Euler, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate motion control and path planning for a mobile robot, an obstacle avoidance algorithm that provided a desired instantaneous turning radius and velocity was generated. This type of obstacle avoidance algorithm, which has been implemented in California State University Northridge's Intelligent Ground Vehicle (IGV), is known as Radial Polar Histogram (RPH). The RPH algorithm utilizes raw data in the form of a polar histogram that is read from a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a camera. A desired open block is determined from the raw data utilizing a navigational heading and an elliptical approximation. The left and right most radii are determined from the calculated edges of the open block and provide the range of possible radial paths the IGV can travel through. In addition, the calculated obstacle edge positions allow the IGV to recognize complex obstacle arrangements and to slow down accordingly. A radial path optimization function calculates the best radial path between the left and right most radii and is sent to motion control for speed determination. Overall, the RPH algorithm allows the IGV to autonomously travel at average speeds of 3mph while avoiding all obstacles, with a processing time of approximately 10ms.

  19. Blindness enhances auditory obstacle circumvention: Assessing echolocation, sensory substitution, and visual-based navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Scarfe, Amy C; Moore, Brian C J; Pardhan, Shahina

    2017-01-01

    Performance for an obstacle circumvention task was assessed under conditions of visual, auditory only (using echolocation) and tactile (using a sensory substitution device, SSD) guidance. A Vicon motion capture system was used to measure human movement kinematics objectively. Ten normally sighted participants, 8 blind non-echolocators, and 1 blind expert echolocator navigated around a 0.6 x 2 m obstacle that was varied in position across trials, at the midline of the participant or 25 cm to the right or left. Although visual guidance was the most effective, participants successfully circumvented the obstacle in the majority of trials under auditory or SSD guidance. Using audition, blind non-echolocators navigated more effectively than blindfolded sighted individuals with fewer collisions, lower movement times, fewer velocity corrections and greater obstacle detection ranges. The blind expert echolocator displayed performance similar to or better than that for the other groups using audition, but was comparable to that for the other groups using the SSD. The generally better performance of blind than of sighted participants is consistent with the perceptual enhancement hypothesis that individuals with severe visual deficits develop improved auditory abilities to compensate for visual loss, here shown by faster, more fluid, and more accurate navigation around obstacles using sound.

  20. Blindness enhances auditory obstacle circumvention: Assessing echolocation, sensory substitution, and visual-based navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Kolarik

    Full Text Available Performance for an obstacle circumvention task was assessed under conditions of visual, auditory only (using echolocation and tactile (using a sensory substitution device, SSD guidance. A Vicon motion capture system was used to measure human movement kinematics objectively. Ten normally sighted participants, 8 blind non-echolocators, and 1 blind expert echolocator navigated around a 0.6 x 2 m obstacle that was varied in position across trials, at the midline of the participant or 25 cm to the right or left. Although visual guidance was the most effective, participants successfully circumvented the obstacle in the majority of trials under auditory or SSD guidance. Using audition, blind non-echolocators navigated more effectively than blindfolded sighted individuals with fewer collisions, lower movement times, fewer velocity corrections and greater obstacle detection ranges. The blind expert echolocator displayed performance similar to or better than that for the other groups using audition, but was comparable to that for the other groups using the SSD. The generally better performance of blind than of sighted participants is consistent with the perceptual enhancement hypothesis that individuals with severe visual deficits develop improved auditory abilities to compensate for visual loss, here shown by faster, more fluid, and more accurate navigation around obstacles using sound.

  1. Obstacles and facilitators of open visiting policy in Intensive Care Units:A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Khaleghparast

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Open visiting policy in intensive care units is proposed as an essential requirement for patients and their families, so this study is aimed to explain open visiting policy obstacles and facilitators from patients, families and health team members’ viewpoint. This qualitative study implemented in intensive care units of a hospital specialized in cardiology in Tehran-Iran. Patients’, families’, nurses’, doctors’ and guards’ viewpoint was determined regarding open visiting policy obstacles and facilitators by semi-structured interviews. Data analysis method was conventional approach of qualitative content analysis with thematic technique. Data analysis was performed using Max QDA10 software. Two main categories of data regarding open visiting obstacles and facilitators were extracted. Factors related to service systems and visitors derived from open visiting obstacles, and factors related to management system and personnel derived from open visiting facilitators. One of the most important obstacles of open visiting policy implementation is shortage of staff and personnel negative attitude. Regarding open visiting policy facilitators, designing visiting cards for close family and observing specific rules, modification of intensive care unit structure and facilities for families are useful. Finally, what is important as an open visiting policy implementation facilitator is presence of nursing profession as a humanitarian and ethical profession.

  2. Construction of Fisheye Lens Inverse Perspective Mapping Model and Its Applications of Obstacle Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Teng Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a vision based obstacle detection system by utilizing our proposed fisheye lens inverse perspective mapping (FLIPM method. The new mapping equations are derived to transform the images captured by the fisheye lens camera into the undistorted remapped ones under practical circumstances. In the obstacle detection, we make use of the features of vertical edges on objects from remapped images to indicate the relative positions of obstacles. The static information of remapped images in the current frame is referred to determining the features of source images in the searching stage from either the profile or temporal IPM difference image. The profile image can be acquired by several processes such as sharpening, edge detection, morphological operation, and modified thinning algorithms on the remapped image. The temporal IPM difference image can be obtained by a spatial shift on the remapped image in the previous frame. Moreover, the polar histogram and its post-processing procedures will be used to indicate the position and length of feature vectors and to remove noises as well. Our obstacle detection can give drivers the warning signals within a limited distance from nearby vehicles while the detected obstacles are even with the quasi-vertical edges.

  3. Obstacles to the Application of Administrative Process Engineering in Gaza Universities from the Faculty Members’ Perspective

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    Mahmoud A.R. Assaf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify the faculty members’ levels of assessment at Palestinian universities of the obstacles to the application of engineering of administrative processes ; and to find out whether there were statistically significant differences at the level of significance (α≤0.05 between the mean scores of assessment attributable to the variables: (college, academic rank, years of service. To achieve this, the researcher followed the descriptive method by using a questionnaire consisting of 36 items distributed into 4 areas: (technical, human, financial, administrative. The sample consisted of (95 faculty members from two universities (Al-Azhar and Islamia. The study revealed that the total degree of the respondents’ assessment of the obstacles to the application of engineering of administrative processes was (73.4%. The order of obstacles was as follows: i financial, ii human, iii administrative and iv technical obstacles. Further, there were no statistically significant differences at the level of significance (α≤0.05 between the mean scores of respondents’ assessment of the obstacles to the application of this method at the Palestinian universities that were attributed to these variables: (college, academic rank, years of service.The study recommended the need for allocating of adequate financial budgets, and the creation of a special unit in each university to be responsible for providing training on the concepts of reengineering administrative processes and linking them to quality and continuous improvement. Keywords: Administrative process engineering, Gaza governorates , Faculty members.

  4. Explosion hazards of LPG-air mixtures in vented enclosure with obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Yaxing; Lian, Zhen

    2017-07-15

    Numerical simulations were performed to study explosion characteristics of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) explosion in enclosure with a vent. Unlike explosion overpressure and dynamic pressure, explosion temperature of the LPG-air mixture at a given concentration in a vented enclosure has very little variation with obstacle numbers for a given blockage ratio. For an enclosure without obstacle, explosion overpressures for the stoichiometric mixtures and the fuel-lean mixtures reach their maximum within the vent and that for fuel-rich mixture reaches its maximum beyond and near the vent. Dynamic pressures produced by an indoor LPG explosion reach their maximum always beyond the vent no matter obstacles are present or not in the enclosure. A LPG explosion in a vented enclosure with built-in obstacles is strong enough to make the brick and mortar wall with a thickness of 370mm damaged. If there is no obstacle in the enclosure, the lower explosion pressure of several kPa can not break the brick and mortar wall with a thickness of 370mm. For a LPG explosion produced in an enclosure with a vent, main hazards, within the vent, are overpressure and high temperature. However main hazards are dynamic pressure, blast wind, and high temperature beyond the vent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Neural Network Approach for Building An Obstacle Detection Model by Fusion of Proximity Sensors Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Emmanuel; Vargas, Héctor; Hermosilla, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Proximity sensors are broadly used in mobile robots for obstacle detection. The traditional calibration process of this kind of sensor could be a time-consuming task because it is usually done by identification in a manual and repetitive way. The resulting obstacles detection models are usually nonlinear functions that can be different for each proximity sensor attached to the robot. In addition, the model is highly dependent on the type of sensor (e.g., ultrasonic or infrared), on changes in light intensity, and on the properties of the obstacle such as shape, colour, and surface texture, among others. That is why in some situations it could be useful to gather all the measurements provided by different kinds of sensor in order to build a unique model that estimates the distances to the obstacles around the robot. This paper presents a novel approach to get an obstacles detection model based on the fusion of sensors data and automatic calibration by using artificial neural networks. PMID:29495338

  6. Multi-Modal Detection and Mapping of Static and Dynamic Obstacles in Agriculture for Process Evaluation

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    Timo Korthals

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, agricultural vehicles are available that can automatically perform tasks such as weed detection and spraying, mowing, and sowing while being steered automatically. However, for such systems to be fully autonomous and self-driven, not only their specific agricultural tasks must be automated. An accurate and robust perception system automatically detecting and avoiding all obstacles must also be realized to ensure safety of humans, animals, and other surroundings. In this paper, we present a multi-modal obstacle and environment detection and recognition approach for process evaluation in agricultural fields. The proposed pipeline detects and maps static and dynamic obstacles globally, while providing process-relevant information along the traversed trajectory. Detection algorithms are introduced for a variety of sensor technologies, including range sensors (lidar and radar and cameras (stereo and thermal. Detection information is mapped globally into semantical occupancy grid maps and fused across all sensors with late fusion, resulting in accurate traversability assessment and semantical mapping of process-relevant categories (e.g., crop, ground, and obstacles. Finally, a decoding step uses a Hidden Markov model to extract relevant process-specific parameters along the trajectory of the vehicle, thus informing a potential control system of unexpected structures in the planned path. The method is evaluated on a public dataset for multi-modal obstacle detection in agricultural fields. Results show that a combination of multiple sensor modalities increases detection performance and that different fusion strategies must be applied between algorithms detecting similar and dissimilar classes.

  7. Analysis of the obstacles related to treatment entry, adherence and drop-out among alcoholic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsi Elbreder, Márcia; Carvalho De Humerez, Dorisdaia; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex syndrome involving social, psychological and individual factors in addition to a series of obstacles regarding treatment entry, adherence, and drop-out. These obstacles contribute negatively to both clinical evolution and prognosis of the patients, affecting their quality of life and raising the social costs. This is a bibliographical study in which we address this theme as well as other experiences observed in our daily practice in the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit (UNIAD) based at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP). The analysis of the obstacles related to treatment entry, attendance, and drop-out among alcoholic patients shows that systemic, social, cultural, and individual factors are all involved, including the structural ones. Women have more obstacles compared to men, and what is thought to be a barrier to one patient may be a factor motivating another patient to search for help. We conclude that several factors at different levels exist that prevent the patient from overcoming these treatment obstacles.

  8. A reciprocity formulation for the EM scattering by an obstacle within a large open cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Prabhakar H.; Burkholder, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A formulation based on a generalized reciprocity theorem is developed for analyzing the external high frequency EM scattering by a complex obstacle inside a relatively arbitrary open-ended waveguide cavity when it is illuminated by an external source. This formulation is also extended to include EM fields whose time dependence may be nonperiodic. A significant advantage of this formulation is that it allows one to break up the analysis into two independent parts; one deals with the waveguide cavity shape alone and the other with the obstacle alone. The external scattered field produced by the obstacle (in the presence of the waveguide cavity structure) is given in terms of a generalized reciprocity integral over a surface S(T) corresponding to the interior waveguide cavity cross section located conveniently but sufficiently close to the obstacle. Furthermore, the fields coupled into the cavity from the source in the exterior region generally need to propagate only one-way via the open front end (which is directly illuminated) to the interior surface S(T) in this approach, and not back, in order to find the external field scattered by the obstacle.

  9. Path planning for first responders in the presence of moving obstacles

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    Zhiyong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Navigation services have gained much importance for all kinds of human activities ranging from tourist navigation to support of rescue teams in disaster management. However, despite the considerable amount of route guidance research that has been performed, many issues that are related to navigation for first responders still need to be addressed. During disasters, emergencies can result in different types of moving obstacles (e.g., fires, plumes, floods, which make some parts of the road network temporarily unavailable. After such incidents occur, responders have to go to different destinations to perform their tasks in the environment affected by the disaster. Therefore they need a path planner that is capable of dealing with such moving obstacles, as well as generating and coordinating their routes quickly and efficiently. During the past decades, more and more hazard simulations, which can modify the models with incorporation of dynamic data from the field, have been developed. These hazard simulations use methods such as data assimilation, stochastic estimation, and adaptive measurement techniques, and are able to generate more reliable results of hazards. This would allow the hazard simulation models to provide valuable information regarding the state of road networks affected by hazards, which supports path planning for first responders among the moving obstacles. The objective of this research is to develop an integrated navigation system for first responders in the presence of moving obstacles. Such system should be able to navigate one or more responders to one or multiple destinations avoiding the moving obstacles, using the predicted information of the moving obstacles generated from by hazard simulations. In this dissertation, the objective we have is expressed as the following research question: How do we safely and efficiently navigate one or more first responders to one or more destinations avoiding moving obstacles? To address

  10. Determination of Focal Mechanisms of Non-Volcanic Tremors Based on S-Wave Polarization Data Corrected for the Effects of Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, K.; Uchide, T.; Takeda, N.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method to determine focal mechanisms of non-volcanic tremors (NVTs) based on S-wave polarization angles. The successful retrieval of polarization angles in low S/N tremor signals owes much to the observation that NVTs propagate slowly and therefore they do not change their location immediately. This feature of NVTs enables us to use a longer window to compute a polarization angle (e.g., one minute or longer), resulting in a stack of particle motions. Following Zhang and Schwartz (1994), we first correct for the splitting effect to recover the source polarization angle (anisotropy-corrected angle). This is a key step, because shear-wave splitting distorts the particle motion excited by a seismic source. We then determine the best double-couple solution using anisotropy-corrected angles of multiple stations. The present method was applied to a tremor sequence at Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan, which occurred at the beginning of April 2013. A standard splitting and polarization analysis were subject to a one-minute-long moving window to determine the splitting parameters as well as anisotropy-corrected angles. A grid search approach was performed at each hour to determine the best double-couple solution satisfying one-hour average polarization angles. Most solutions show NW-dipping low-angle planes consistent with the plate boundary or SE-dipping high-angle planes. Because of 180 degrees ambiguity in polarization angles, the present method alone cannot distinguish compressional quadrant from dilatational one. Together with the observation of very low-frequency earthquakes near the present study area (Ito et al., 2007), it is reasonable to consider that they represent shear slip on low-angle thrust faults. It is also noted that some of solutions contain strike-slip component. Acknowledgements: Seismograph stations used in this study include permanent stations operated by NIED (Hi-net), JMA, Earthquake Research Institute, together with Geological Survey of

  11. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  12. S-wave triggering of tremor beneath the Parkfield, California, section of the San Andreas fault by the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake: observations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Aiken, Chastity

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic stresses that are associated with the energetic seismic waves generated by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan triggered bursts of tectonic tremor beneath the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (SAF) at an epicentral distance of ∼8200  km. The onset of tremor begins midway through the ∼100‐s‐period S‐wave arrival, with a minor burst coinciding with the SHSH arrival, as recorded on the nearby broadband seismic station PKD. A more pronounced burst coincides with the Love arrival, followed by a series of impulsive tremor bursts apparently modulated by the 20‐ to 30‐s‐period Rayleigh wave. The triggered tremor was located at depths between 20 and 30 km beneath the surface trace of the fault, with the burst coincident with the S wave centered beneath the fault 30 km northwest of Parkfield. Most of the subsequent activity, including the tremor coincident with the SHSH arrival, was concentrated beneath a stretch of the fault extending from 10 to 40 km southeast of Parkfield. The seismic waves from the Tohoku epicenter form a horizontal incidence angle of ∼14°, with respect to the local strike of the SAF. Computed peak dynamic Coulomb stresses on the fault at tremor depths are in the 0.7–10 kPa range. The apparent modulation of tremor bursts by the small, strike‐parallel Rayleigh‐wave stresses (∼0.7  kPa) is likely enabled by pore pressure variations driven by the Rayleigh‐wave dilatational stress. These results are consistent with the strike‐parallel dynamic stresses (δτs) associated with the S, SHSH, and surface‐wave phases triggering small increments of dextral slip on the fault with a low friction (μ∼0.2). The vertical dynamic stresses δτd do not trigger tremor with vertical or oblique slip under this simple Coulomb failure model.

  13. StereoBox: A Robust and Efficient Solution for Automotive Short-Range Obstacle Detection

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    Alberto Broggi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robust method for close-range obstacle detection with arbitrarily aligned stereo cameras. System calibration is performed by means of a dense grid to remove perspective and lens distortion after a direct mapping between image pixels and world points. Obstacle detection is based on the differences between left and right images after transformation phase and with a polar histogram, it is possible to detect vertical structures and to reject noise and small objects. Found objects' world coordinates are transmitted via CAN bus; the driver can also be warned through an audio interface. The proposed algorithm can be useful in different automotive applications, requiring real-time segmentation without any assumption on background. Experimental results proved the system to be robust in several envitonmental conditions. In particular, the system has been tested to investigate presence of obstacles in blind spot areas around heavy goods vehicles (HGVs and has been mounted on three different prototypes at different heights.

  14. StereoBox: A Robust and Efficient Solution for Automotive Short-Range Obstacle Detection

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    Broggi Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robust method for close-range obstacle detection with arbitrarily aligned stereo cameras. System calibration is performed by means of a dense grid to remove perspective and lens distortion after a direct mapping between image pixels and world points. Obstacle detection is based on the differences between left and right images after transformation phase and with a polar histogram, it is possible to detect vertical structures and to reject noise and small objects. Found objects' world coordinates are transmitted via CAN bus; the driver can also be warned through an audio interface. The proposed algorithm can be useful in different automotive applications, requiring real-time segmentation without any assumption on background. Experimental results proved the system to be robust in several envitonmental conditions. In particular, the system has been tested to investigate presence of obstacles in blind spot areas around heavy goods vehicles (HGVs and has been mounted on three different prototypes at different heights.

  15. A study on optimal motion for a robot manipulator amid obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Keun

    1997-01-01

    Optimal motion for a robot manipulator is obtained by nonlinear programming. The objective of optimal motion is minimizing energy consumption of manipulator arm with fixed traveling time in the presence of obstacles. The geometric path is not predetermined. The total trajectory is described in terms of cubic B-spline polynomials and the coefficients of them are obtained to minimize a specific performance index. Obstacle avoidance is performed by the method that the square sum of penetration growth distances between every obstacles and robot links is included in the performance index with appropriate weighting coefficient. In all examples tested here, the solutions were converged to unique optimal trajectories from different initial ones. The optimal geometric path obtained in this research can be used in minimum time trajectory planning. (author)

  16. Pigeon interaction mode switch-based UAV distributed flocking control under obstacle environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huaxin; Duan, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flocking control is a serious and challenging problem due to local interactions and changing environments. In this paper, a pigeon flocking model and a pigeon coordinated obstacle-avoiding model are proposed based on a behavior that pigeon flocks will switch between hierarchical and egalitarian interaction mode at different flight phases. Owning to the similarity between bird flocks and UAV swarms in essence, a distributed flocking control algorithm based on the proposed pigeon flocking and coordinated obstacle-avoiding models is designed to coordinate a heterogeneous UAV swarm to fly though obstacle environments with few informed individuals. The comparative simulation results are elaborated to show the feasibility, validity and superiority of our proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. UAV formation control design with obstacle avoidance in dynamic three-dimensional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai; Xia, Yuanqing; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the artificial potential field method combined with rotational vectors for a general problem of multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems tracking a moving target in dynamic three-dimensional environment. An attractive potential field is generated between the leader and the target. It drives the leader to track the target based on the relative position of them. The other UAVs in the formation are controlled to follow the leader by the attractive control force. The repulsive force affects among the UAVs to avoid collisions and distribute the UAVs evenly on the spherical surface whose center is the leader-UAV. Specific orders or positions of the UAVs are not required. The trajectories of avoidance obstacle can be obtained through two kinds of potential field with rotation vectors. Every UAV can choose the optimal trajectory to avoid the obstacle and reconfigure the formation after passing the obstacle. Simulations study on UAV are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  18. Portuguese primary school children's conceptions about digestion: identification of learning obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rui Graça; Lima, Nelson; Coquet, Eduarda; Clément, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    A cross-sectional study of Portuguese primary school pupils' conceptions on digestion and the digestive tract was carried out before and after teaching this topic. Pupils of the prior four school years (5/6 to 9/10 year old) drew what happens to a cookie inside their body. In some cases they also wrote a short text or were interviewed. To identify their level of graphic development, they produced a free-hand drawing. The main conceptual changes in explaining digestion were strongly linked to teaching. Children's previous conceptions were not epistemological obstacles to learning about digestion. The main obstacles were of didactical origin, as images of primary school books do not represent (i) the path of food from the intestine into the blood, (associated to the epistemological obstacle of the permeability of the gut wall); (ii) a clear continuous tract from stomach to anus, which causes a specific confusion at the intestine level.

  19. Robot Navigation Control Based on Monocular Images: An Image Processing Algorithm for Obstacle Avoidance Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Benn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers the use of monocular vision to control autonomous navigation for a robot in a dynamically changing environment. The solution focused on using colour segmentation against a selected floor plane to distinctly separate obstacles from traversable space: this is then supplemented with canny edge detection to separate similarly coloured boundaries to the floor plane. The resulting binary map (where white identifies an obstacle-free area and black identifies an obstacle could then be processed by fuzzy logic or neural networks to control the robot’s next movements. Findings show that the algorithm performed strongly on solid coloured carpets, wooden, and concrete floors but had difficulty in separating colours in multicoloured floor types such as patterned carpets.

  20. Impaired anticipatory control of grasp during obstacle crossing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Tara L; Diermayr, Gudrun; Albert, Frederic

    2012-05-16

    During self-paced walking, people with Parkinson's disease maintain anticipatory control during object grasping. However, common functional tasks often include carrying an object while changing step patterns mid-path and maneuvering over obstacles, increasing task complexity and attentional demands. Thus, the present study investigated the effect of Parkinson's disease on the modulation of grasping force changes as a function of gait-related inertial forces. Subjects with Parkinson's disease maintained the ability to scale and to couple over time their grip and inertial forces while walking at irregular step lengths, but were unable to maintain the temporal coupling of grasping forces compared to controls during obstacle crossing. We suggest that this deterioration in anticipatory control is associated with the increased demands of task complexity and attention during obstacle crossing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.