WorldWideScience

Sample records for observable collider signatures

  1. Signatures of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzi, Elena; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Zwirner, Fabio

    2000-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with a very light gravitino, the effective theory at the weak scale should contain not only the goldstino G-tilde, but also its supersymmetric partners, the sgoldstinos. In the simplest case, the goldstino is a gauge-singlet and its superpartners are two neutral spin-0 particles, S and P. We study possible signals of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders, focusing on those that are most relevant for the Tevatron. We show that inclusive production of sgoldstinos, followed by their decay into two photons, can lead to observable signals or to stringent combined bounds on the gravitino and sgoldstino masses. Sgoldstino decays into two gluon jets may provide a useful complementary signature

  2. Can one really observe signatures of the weak interaction with multi-TeV colliding hadron rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1977-01-01

    We discuss two possible signatures of weak interactions in multi-TeV hadron-hadron collisions: (i) production of the weak boson W/sup plus-or-minus/ and its neutral partner Z; (ii) observation of secondaries with transverse momentum so large that they cannot be electromagnetic or strong in origin. After summarizing theoretical prejudices on the properties of weak bosons and their production mechanism, we calculate their actual experimental signature, i.e., the momentum distributions of their decay lepton, as well as the competing backgrounds. Contrary to popular belief, we conclude that the weak-boson signature is not expected to be pronounced and backgrounds could be severe (especially the production of direct photons). Our calculation reinforces the case for antiproton-proton storage rings

  3. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H"± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  4. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  5. Dictionary of Large Hadron Collider signatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report on a plan to establish a `Dictionary of LHC Signatures', an initiative that started at the WHEPP-X workshop in Chennai, January 2008. This study aims at the strategy of distinguishing 3 classes of dark matter motivated scenarios such as -parity conserved supersymmetry, little Higgs models with -parity ...

  6. Working group report: Dictionary of Large Hadron Collider signatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ... of 14 TeV will shed light on the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking and are expected to provide collider signatures of dark matter (DM), thus directly ... SUSY superpartners have a different spin compared to their partners, while LHT.

  7. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brivio, I.; Gavela, M. B.; Merlo, L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is d...... final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations....

  8. ColliderBit. A GAMBIT module for the calculation of high-energy collider observables and likelihoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Csaba [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); Buckley, Andy [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Dal, Lars A.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Farmer, Ben [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Jackson, Paul; Murnane, Daniel; White, Martin [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Kvellestad, Anders [NORDITA, Stockholm (Sweden); Putze, Antje [Universite de Savoie, LAPTh, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Rogan, Christopher [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Saavedra, Aldo [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); The University of Sydney, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, Centre for Translational Data Science, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Weniger, Christoph [University of Amsterdam, GRAPPA, Institute of Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Scanner Workgroup

    2017-11-15

    We describe ColliderBit, a new code for the calculation of high energy collider observables in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). ColliderBit features a generic interface to BSM models, a unique parallelised Monte Carlo event generation scheme suitable for large-scale supercomputer applications, and a number of LHC analyses, covering a reasonable range of the BSM signatures currently sought by ATLAS and CMS. ColliderBit also calculates likelihoods for Higgs sector observables, and LEP searches for BSM particles. These features are provided by a combination of new code unique toColliderBit, and interfaces to existing state-of-the-art public codes. ColliderBit is both an important part of the GAMBIT framework for BSM inference, and a standalone tool for efficiently applying collider constraints to theories of new physics. (orig.)

  9. Non-abelian dark sectors and their collider signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Cheung, Clifford; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Yavin, Itay

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the recent proliferation of observed astrophysical anomalies, Arkani-Hamed et al. have proposed a model in which dark matter is charged under a non-abelian 'dark' gauge symmetry that is broken at ∼1 GeV. In this paper, we present a survey of concrete models realizing such a scenario, followed by a largely model-independent study of collider phenomenology relevant to the Tevatron and the LHC. We address some model building issues that are easily surmounted to accommodate the astrophysics. While SUSY is not necessary, we argue that it is theoretically well-motivated because the GeV scale is automatically generated. Specifically, we propose a novel mechanism by which mixed D-terms in the dark sector induce either SUSY breaking or a super-Higgs mechanism precisely at a GeV. Furthermore, we elaborate on the original proposal of Arkani-Hamed et al. in which the dark matter acts as a messenger of gauge mediation to the dark sector. In our collider analysis we present cross-sections for dominant production channels and lifetime estimates for primary decay modes. We find that dark gauge bosons can be produced at the Tevatron and the LHC, either through a process analogous to prompt photon production or through a rare Z decay channel. Dark gauge bosons will decay back to the SM via 'lepton jets' which typically contain >2 and as many as 8 leptons, significantly improving their discovery potential. Since SUSY decays from the MSSM will eventually cascade down to these lepton jets, the discovery potential for direct electroweak-ino production may also be improved. Exploiting the unique kinematics, we find that it is possible to reconstruct the mass of the MSSM LSP. We also present several non-SUSY and SUSY decay channels that have displaced vertices and lead to multiple leptons with partially correlated impact parameters.

  10. Freeze-In dark matter with displaced signatures at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co, Raymond T.; D’Eramo, Francesco; Hall, Lawrence J.; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter, X, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature T R ≪ TeV. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle B of the thermal bath, B→X. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any m X in the range keV colliders. This result applies whether the early MD era arises after conventional inflation, when T R is the usual reheat temperature, or is a generic MD era with an alternative origin. In the former case, if m X is sufficiently large to be measured from kinematics, the reheat temperature T R can be extracted. Our result is independent of the particular particle physics implementation of B→X, and can occur via any operator of dimension less than 8 (4) for a post-inflation (general MD) cosmology. An interesting example is provided by DFS axion theories with TeV-scale supersymmetry and axino dark matter of mass GeV to TeV, which is typically overproduced in a conventional RD cosmology. If B is the higgsino, h-tilde, Higgs, W and Z particles appear at the displaced decays, h-tilde→ha-tilde, Za-tilde and h-tilde ± →W ± a-tilde. The scale of axion physics, f, is predicted to be in the range (3×10 8 −10 12 ) GeV and, over much of this range, can be extracted from the decay length

  11. Signatures of massive sgoldstinos at e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzi, Elena; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Zwirner, Fabio

    2000-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with a very light gravitino, the effective theory at the weak scale should contain not only the goldstino G-tilde, but also its supersymmetric partners, the sgoldstinos. In the simplest case, the goldstino is a gauge-singlet and its superpartners are two neutral spin-0 particles, S and P. We study possible signals of massive sgoldstinos at e + e - colliders, focusing on those that are most relevant at LEP energies. We show that the LEP constraints on e + e - →γS (γP), ZS (ZP) or e + e - S (e + e - P), followed by S(P) decaying into two gluon jets, can lead to stringent combined bounds on the gravitino and sgoldstino masses

  12. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jonathan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Grellscheid, David [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University,Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yallup, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-14

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, ‘Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet’, CONTUR, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The CONTUR approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The CONTUR method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  13. Signatures for isoscalar weak vector bosons at pp and panti p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Schwarzer, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    In a wide class of composite models of quarks, leptons and W-bosons the existence of isoscalar weak vector bosons Y or Y L is predicted. They either couple to the weak hypercharge current j μ Y or its left-handed part j Y μL =j μ YL and have a mass in the few hundred GeV range. The signatures of such particles at future hadron-hadron colliders is studied by means of an effective lagrangian incorporating vector dominance. Quantities relevant for detecting and studying isoscalar weak vector bosons turn out to be sensitive to the mixing strength λ Y of the Y- or Y L -boson with the photon. The Y or Y L are expected to be produced abundantly at multi-TeV colliders. The Tevatron collider will be able to see a Y L -boson if its mass is ≤400 GeV. (orig.)

  14. Observable signatures of inflaton decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battefeld, Diana; Battefeld, Thorsten [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Goettingen, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Gottingen (Germany); Giblin, John T. Jr.; Pease, Evan K., E-mail: dbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: tbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: peasee@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022, U.S.A (United States)

    2011-02-01

    We numerically compute features in the power-spectrum that originate from the decay of fields during inflation. Using a simple, phenomenological, multi-field setup, we increase the number of fields from a few to thousands. Whenever a field decays, its associated potential energy is transferred into radiation, causing a jump in the equation of state parameter and mode mixing at the perturbed level. We observe discrete steps in the power-spectrum if the number of fields is low, in agreement with analytic arguments in the literature. These features become increasingly smeared out once many fields decay within a given Hubble time. In this regime we confirm the validity of the analytic approach to staggered inflation, which is based on a coarse-graining procedure. Our numerical approach bridges the aforementioned analytic treatments, and can be used in more complicated scenarios.

  15. Compromise between neutrino masses and collider signatures in the type-II seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Wei; Luo Shu; Xing Zhizhong; Zhou Shun

    2008-01-01

    A natural extension of the standard SU(2) L xU(1) Y gauge model to accommodate massive neutrinos is to introduce one Higgs triplet and three right-handed Majorana neutrinos, leading to a 6x6 neutrino mass matrix which contains three 3x3 submatrices, M L , M D and M R . We show that three light Majorana neutrinos (i.e., the mass eigenstates of ν e , ν μ , and ν τ ) are exactly massless in this model, if and only if M L =M D M R -1 M D T exactly holds. This no-go theorem implies that small but nonvanishing neutrino masses may result from a significant but incomplete cancellation between M L and M D M R -1 M D T terms in the Type-II seesaw formula, provided three right-handed Majorana neutrinos are of O(1) TeV and experimentally detectable at the LHC. We propose three simple Type-II seesaw scenarios with the A 4 xU(1) X flavor symmetry and its explicit breaking to interpret the observed neutrino mass spectrum and neutrino mixing pattern. Such a TeV-scale neutrino model can be tested in two complementary ways: (1) searching for possible collider signatures of lepton number violation induced by the right-handed Majorana neutrinos and doubly-charged Higgs particles; and (2) searching for possible consequences of unitarity violation of the 3x3 neutrino mixing matrix in the future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

  16. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  17. When Worlds Collide: Chandra Observes Titanic Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided the best X-ray image yet of two Milky Way-like galaxies in the midst of a head-on collision. Since all galaxies - including our own - may have undergone mergers, this provides insight into how the universe came to look as it does today. Astronomers believe the mega-merger in the galaxy known as Arp 220 triggered the formation of huge numbers of new stars, sent shock waves rumbling through intergalactic space, and could possibly lead to the formation of a supermassive black hole in the center of the new conglomerate galaxy. The Chandra data also suggest that merger of these two galaxies began only 10 million years ago, a short time in astronomical terms. "The Chandra observations show that things really get messed up when two galaxies run into each other at full speed," said David Clements of the Imperial College, London, one of the team members involved in the study. "The event affects everything from the formation of massive black holes to the dispersal of heavy elements into the universe." Arp 220 is considered to be a prototype for understanding what conditions were like in the early universe, when massive galaxies and supermassive black holes were presumably formed by numerous galaxy collisions. At a relatively nearby distance of about 250 million light years, Arp 220 is the closest example of an "ultra-luminous" galaxy, one that gives off a trillion times as much radiation as our Sun. The Chandra image shows a bright central region at the waist of a glowing, hour-glass-shaped cloud of multimillion-degree gas. Rushing out of the galaxy at hundreds of thousands of miles per hour, the super-heated as forms a "superwind," thought to be due to explosive activity generated by the formation of hundreds of millions of new stars. Farther out, spanning a distance of 75,000 light years, are giant lobes of hot gas that could be galactic remnants flung into intergalactic space by the early impact of the collision. Whether the

  18. Unique heavy lepton signature at e+e- linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.

    2013-03-01

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e + e - →W + W - within E 6 models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e + e - International Linear Collider (ILC) for √(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W ± bosons is considered.

  19. Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

    1996-01-01

    This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb -1 /week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb -1 for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent 'components': procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don't directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components

  20. Unique heavy lepton signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Osland, P. [Univ. Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V. [Technical Univ. Gomel (Belarus). Abdus Salam ICTP Affliated Centre

    2013-03-15

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} within E{sub 6} models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) for {radical}(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W{sup {+-}} bosons is considered.

  1. Successful observation of Schottky signals at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1989-08-01

    We have constructed a Schottky detector for the Tevatron collider in the form of a high-Q (∼5000) cavity which operates at roughly 2 GHz, well above the frequency at which the Tevatron's single-bunch frequency spectrum begins to roll off. Initial spectra obtained from the detector show clearly observable Schottky betatron lines, free of coherent contaminants; also seen are the ''common-mode'' longitudinal signals due to the offset of the beam from the detector center. The latter signals indicate that at 2 GHz, the coherent single-bunch spectrum from the detector is reduced by >80 dB; therefore, in normal collider operation, the Schottky betatron lines are >40 dB greater than their coherent counterparts. We describe how the data we have obtained give information on transverse and longitudinal emittances, synchrotron frequency, and betatron tunes, as well as reveal what may be previously unobserved phenomena. Space limitations restrict us to presenting only as much data as should be necessary to convince even the skeptical reader of the validity of the claim made in the paper's title. 3 refs., 2 figs

  2. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  3. Search for Microscopic Black Hole Signatures at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Ka Vang [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-05-01

    A search for microscopic black hole production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been conducted using Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A total integrated luminosity of 35 pb-1 data sample, taken by CMS Collaboration in year 2010, has been analyzed. A novel background estimation for multi-jet events beyond TeV scale has been developed. A good agreement with standard model backgrounds, dominated by multi-jet production, is observed for various final-state multiplicities. Using semi-classical approximation, upper limits on minimum black hole mass at 95% confidence level are set in the range of 3.5 - 4.5 TeV for values of the Planck scale up to 3 TeV. Model-independent limits are provided to further constrain microscopic black hole models with additional regions of parameter space, as well as new physics models with multiple energetic final states. These are the first limits on microscopic black hole production at a particle accelerator.

  4. Possible signature of multiple parton interactions in collider four-jet events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ametller, L.; Paver, N.; Treleani, D.

    1985-07-01

    We discuss the role of multiple parton scattering in the production of four-jet events of the Ssub(pp-bar)S Collider. Taking into account the experimental conditions, we find that such a mechanism can contribute to the psub(out) distribution appreciably enough to be differentiated from the leading perturbative QCD. (author)

  5. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knapitsch, Arno; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Rohringer, Christine; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Cabrera, Andrés; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Falkiewicz, Anna; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Lomidze, David; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Erdmann, Martin; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Sikler, Ferenc; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Polujanskas, Mindaugas; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; 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Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Gundacker, Stefan; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hegner, Benedikt; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Milenovic, Predrag; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; 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Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; 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Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sfiligoi, Igor; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Eartly, David P; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jensen, Hans; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pivarski, James; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Schwarz, Thomas; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; 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Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Sakumoto, Willis; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Gurrola, Alfredo; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Bernardini, Jacopo; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2012-01-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 inverse femtobarns. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  6. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  7. Collider signatures of a light NMSSM pseudoscalar in neutralino decays in the light of LHC results

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeno, David G; Park, Chan Beom; Peiro, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We investigate signatures induced by a very light pseudoscalar Higgs in neutralino decays in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) and determine their observability at the LHC. We concentrate on scenarios which feature two light scalar Higgs bosons (one of them is SM-like with a mass of 125 GeV and a singlet-like lighter one) with a very light (singlet-like) pseudoscalar Higgs in the mass range 2m_tau X_1 a1, which leads to topologies involving multi-leptons and missing transverse energy. We determine a set of selection cuts that can effectively isolate the signal from backgrounds of the Standard Model or the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We also exemplify the procedure with a set of benchmark points, for which we compute the expected number of events and signal strength for LHC with 8 TeV center of mass energy. We show that this signal can already be probed for some points in the NMSSM parameter space.

  8. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  9. Observation of the non colliding bunch parameters evolution in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Trad, G

    2012-01-01

    On the 6th and the 7th of June 2011, the LHC was filled so to have twelve additional non-colliding bunches per ring. In this note a detailed observation of the bunch parameters (current, emittances and length) is presented, focusing on the differences in the behaviour between colliding and non-colliding bunches. Lifetimes for the residual gas interaction were estimated. Simulations were compared to the experimental data collected in the MD. Some conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future MD are discussed.

  10. Orbital Signatures from Observed Light Curves of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Variability in active galactic nuclei is observed in UV to X-ray emission based light curves. This could be attributed to orbital signatures of the plasma that constitutes the accretion flow on the putative disk or in the developing jet close to the inner region of the central black hole. We discuss some theoretical ...

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking and collider signatures in the next-to-minimal composite Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David M.

    2017-04-01

    We conduct a detailed numerical analysis of the composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Higgs model based on the next-to-minimal coset SO(6)/SO(5) ≅ SU(4)/Sp(4), featuring an additional SM singlet scalar in the spectrum, which we allow to mix with the Higgs boson. We identify regions in parameter space compatible with all current exper-imental constraints, including radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, flavour physics, and direct searches at colliders. We find the additional scalar, with a mass predicted to be below a TeV, to be virtually unconstrained by current LHC data, but potentially in reach of run 2 searches. Promising indirect searches include rare semi-leptonic B decays, CP violation in B s mixing, and the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  12. Electroweak symmetry breaking and collider signatures in the next-to-minimal composite Higgs model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David M. [Excellence Cluster Universe, TUM,Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-20

    We conduct a detailed numerical analysis of the composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Higgs model based on the next-to-minimal coset SO(6)/SO(5)≅SU(4)/Sp(4), featuring an additional SM singlet scalar in the spectrum, which we allow to mix with the Higgs boson. We identify regions in parameter space compatible with all current experimental constraints, including radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, flavour physics, and direct searches at colliders. We find the additional scalar, with a mass predicted to be below a TeV, to be virtually unconstrained by current LHC data, but potentially in reach of run 2 searches. Promising indirect searches include rare semi-leptonic B decays, C P violation in B{sub s} mixing, and the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  13. Observable Signatures of Energy Release in Braided Coronal Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontin, D. I. [University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Janvier, M. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Bât. 121, F-91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Tiwari, S. K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Galsgaard, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, Geological Museum Østervoldgade 5-7, DK-1350, Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2017-03-10

    We examine the turbulent relaxation of solar coronal loops containing non-trivial field line braiding. Such field line tangling in the corona has long been postulated in the context of coronal heating models. We focus on the observational signatures of energy release in such braided magnetic structures using MHD simulations and forward modeling tools. The aim is to answer the following question: if energy release occurs in a coronal loop containing braided magnetic flux, should we expect a clearly observable signature in emissions? We demonstrate that the presence of braided magnetic field lines does not guarantee a braided appearance to the observed intensities. Observed intensities may—but need not necessarily—reveal the underlying braided nature of the magnetic field, depending on the degree and pattern of the field line tangling within the loop. However, in all cases considered, the evolution of the braided loop is accompanied by localized heating regions as the loop relaxes. Factors that may influence the observational signatures are discussed. Recent high-resolution observations from Hi-C have claimed the first direct evidence of braided magnetic fields in the corona. Here we show that both the Hi-C data and some of our simulations give the appearance of braiding at a range of scales.

  14. Future Collider Signatures of the Possible 750 GeV State

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Godbole, Rohini; Quevillon, Jérémie

    2016-03-31

    If the recent indications of a possible state $\\Phi$ with mass $\\sim 750$ GeV decaying into two photons reported by ATLAS and CMS in LHC collisions at 13 TeV were to become confirmed, the prospects for future collider physics at the LHC and beyond would be affected radically, as we explore in this paper. Even minimal scenarios for the $\\Phi$ resonance and its $\\gamma \\gamma$ decays require additional particles with masses $\\gtrsim \\frac12 m_\\Phi$. We consider here two benchmark scenarios that exemplify the range of possibilities: one in which $\\Phi$ is a singlet scalar or pseudoscalar boson whose production and $\\gamma \\gamma$ decays are due to loops of coloured and charged fermions, and another benchmark scenario in which $\\Phi$ is a superposition of (nearly) degenerate CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons in a (possibly supersymmetric) two-Higgs doublet model also with additional fermions to account for the $\\gamma \\gamma$ decay rate. We explore the implications of these benchmark scenarios for the production of...

  15. Observational signature of high spin at the Event Horizon Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Strominger, Andrew

    2018-04-01

    We analytically compute the observational appearance of an isotropically emitting point source on a circular, equatorial orbit near the horizon of a rapidly spinning black hole. The primary image moves on a vertical line segment, in contrast to the primarily horizontal motion of the spinless case. Secondary images, also on the vertical line, display a rich caustic structure. If detected, this unique signature could serve as a `smoking gun' for a high spin black hole in nature.

  16. Observational Signatures Of Agn Feedback Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika

    2017-06-01

    While many compelling models of AGN feedback exist, there is no clear data-driven picture of how winds are launched, how they propagate through the galaxy and what impact they have on the galactic gas. Recent work suggests that AGN luminosity plays an important role. The following described projects focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN of different power. I first describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures in powerful quasars to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history. Feedback signatures seem to be best observable in gas-rich galaxies where the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest, in agreement with recent simulations. But how and where does this quenching happen? Is it accomplished through the mechanical action of jets or through nuclear winds driven by radiation pressure? Finally, I show that AGN signatures and AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of a galaxy hosting a low/intermediate-luminosity AGN. Using data from the new SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, we have developed a new AGN selection algorithm tailored to IFU data and we are uncovering a much more nuanced picture of AGN activity allowing us to discover AGN signatures at large distances from the galaxy center. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and feedback signatures related to them. Outflows and feedback from low- and intermediate-luminosity AGN might have been underestimated in the past but can potentially significantly contribute to the AGN/host-galaxy self-regulation.

  17. A Particle Consistent with the Higgs Boson Observed with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gildemeister, Otto; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmid, Peter; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trilling, George; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Byszewski, Marcin; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga–electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself.

  18. A particle consistent with the Higgs boson observed with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Barber, T.; Bernhard, R.; Boehler, M.; Bruneliere, R.; Christov, A.; Consorti, V.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Hartert, J.; Herten, G.; Horner, S.; Jakobs, K.; Janus, M.; Kononov, A.I.; Kuehn, S.; Lai, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lohwasser, K.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Mahboubi, K.; Mohr, W.; Nilsen, H.; Parzefall, U.; Rammensee, M.; Rave, T.C.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmidt, E.; Schumacher, M.; Siegert, F.; Stoerig, K.; Sundermann, J.E.; Temming, K.K.; Thoma, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Venturi, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Radziewski, H. von; Vu Anh, T.; Warsinsky, M.; Weiser, C.; Werner, M.; Wiik-Fuchs, L.A.M.; Winkelmann, S.; Xie, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Abreu, H.; Bachacou, H.; Bauer, F.; Besson, N.; Blanchard, J.B.; Bolnet, N.M.; Boonekamp, M.; Chevalier, L.; Ernwein, J.; Etienvre, A.I.; Formica, A.; Gauthier, L.; Giraud, P.F.; Guyot, C.; Hassani, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Laporte, J.F.; Legendre, M.; Maiani, C.; Mal, P.; Manjarres Ramos, J.A.; Mansoulie, B.; Meyer, J.P.; Mijovic, L.; Morange, N.; Nguyen Thi Hong, V.; Nicolaidou, R.; Ouraou, A.; Resende, B.; Royon, C.R.; Schoeffel, L.; Schune, Ph.; Schwindling, J.; Simard, O.; Vranjes, N.; Xiao, M.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Andari, N.; Arnault, C.; Auge, E.; Barrillon, P.; Benoit, M.; Binet, S.; Bourdarios, C.; De La Taille, C.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; Duflot, L.; Escalier, M.; Fayard, L.; Fournier, D.; Grivaz, J.F.; Guillemin, T.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hrivnac, J.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Kado, M.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Lounis, A.; Makovec, N.; Matricon, P.; Niedercorn, F.; Poggioli, L.; Puzo, P.; Renaud, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rybkin, G.; Sauvan, J.B.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schaffer, A.C.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tanaka, R.; Teinturier, M.; Veillet, J.J.; Wicek, F.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, Z.; Abajyan, T.; Arutinov, D.; Backhaus, M.; Barbero, M.; Bechtle, P.; Brock, I.; Cristinziani, M.; Davey, W.; Desch, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Glatzer, J.; Gonella, L.; Haefner, P.; Havranek, M.; Hellmich, D.; Hillert, S.; Huegging, F.; Karagounis, M.; Khoriauli, G.; Koevesarki, P.; Kostyukhin, V.V.; Kraus, J.K.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, H.; Lapoire, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Leyko, A.M.; Limbach, C.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Mazur, M.; Moser, N.; Mueller, K.; Nanava, G.; Nattermann, T.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Pohl, D.; Psoroulas, S.; Schaepe, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitz, M.; Schultens, M.J.; Schwindt, T.; Stillings, J.A.; Therhaag, J.; Tsung, J.W.; Uchida, K.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Urquijo, P.; Vogel, A.; Toerne, E. von; Wang, T.; Wermes, N.; Wienemann, P.; Zendler, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Jana, D.K.; Marzin, A.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Norberg, S.; Saleem, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Strauss, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga-electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself. (authors)

  19. On the observability of pseudoscalar toponium at future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, O; Recepoglu, E; Sultansoy, S

    2004-01-01

    Possible existence of extra SM families and/or isosinglet E/sub 6/ quarks may sufficiently decrease ¿V/sub tb/¿ of CKM matrix so that toponia can be formed. Production of pseudoscalar toponium at the LHC and VLHC has been considered. The observability of eta /sub t/ to gamma gamma signal is discussed.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF THE CORONAL KINK INSTABILITY WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botha, G. J. J.; Arber, T. D.; Srivastava, Abhishek K.

    2012-01-01

    It is known from numerical simulations that thermal conduction along magnetic field lines plays an important role in the evolution of the kink instability in coronal loops. This study presents the observational signatures of the kink instability in long coronal loops when parallel thermal conduction is included. The three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to simulate the evolution of a coronal loop that is initially in an unstable equilibrium. The loop has length 80 Mm, width 8 Mm, and an initial maximum twist of Φ = 11.5π, where Φ is a function of the radius. The initial loop parameters are obtained from a highly twisted loop observed in the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 171 Å wave band. Synthetic observables are generated from the data. These observables include spatial and temporal averaging to account for the resolution and exposure times of TRACE images. Parallel thermal conduction reduces the maximum local temperature by up to an order of magnitude. This means that different spectral lines are formed and different internal loop structures are visible with or without the inclusion of thermal conduction. However, the response functions sample a broad range of temperatures. The result is that the inclusion of parallel thermal conductivity does not have as large an impact on observational signatures as the order of magnitude reduction in the maximum temperature would suggest; the net effect is a blurring of internal features of the loop structure.

  1. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  2. Massive Black Hole Binaries: Dynamical Evolution and Observational Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamical evolution of massive black hole pairs in mergers is crucial in the context of a hierarchical galaxy formation scenario. The timescales for the formation and the coalescence of black hole binaries are still poorly constrained, resulting in large uncertainties in the expected rate of massive black hole binaries detectable in the electromagnetic and gravitational wave spectra. Here, we review the current theoretical understanding of the black hole pairing in galaxy mergers, with a particular attention to recent developments and open issues. We conclude with a review of the expected observational signatures of massive binaries and of the candidates discussed in literature to date.

  3. Search for Microscopic Black Hole Signatures at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hartl, Christian; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Benucci, Leonardo; Cerny, Karel; De Wolf, Eddi A.; Janssen, Xavier; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Adler, Volker; Beauceron, Stephanie; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Joris; Maes, Michael; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Favart, Denis; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Carvalho, Wagner; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Ferreira Dias, Marco Andre; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Novaes, Sergio F.; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Dyulendarova, Milena; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Marinova, Evelina; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xu, Ming; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Li, Wenbo; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Cabrera, Andrés; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Lelas, Karlo; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A.; Rykaczewski, Hans; Assran, Yasser; Awad, Adel; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Klem, Jukka; Kortelainen, Matti J.; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Gentit, François-Xavier; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Verrecchia, Patrice; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Besson, Auguste; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Mikami, Yoshinari; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Falkiewicz, Anna; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Xiao, Hong; Roinishvili, Vladimir; Anagnostou, Georgios; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Mohr, Niklas; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Weber, Martin; Wittmer, Bruno; Ata, Metin; Bender, Walter; Erdmann, Martin; Frangenheim, Jens; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hof, Carsten; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Magass, Carsten; Masetti, Gianni; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Bontenackels, Michael; Davids, Martina; Duda, Markus; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Giffels, Manuel; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heydhausen, Dirk; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Thomas, Maarten; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katkov, Igor; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Parenti, Andrea; Raspereza, Alexei; Raval, Amita; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Schwandt, Joern; Srivastava, Ajay Kumar; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Wolf, Roger; Barth, Christian; Bauer, Julia; Buege, Volker; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Piparo, Danilo; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Renz, Manuel; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Zeise, Manuel; Zhukov, Valery; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A.; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Debreczeni, Gergely; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Laszlo, Andras; Sikler, Ferenc; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jas Bir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Gupta, Pooja; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Kumar, Ashok; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Dimitrov, Anton; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Marcellini, Stefano; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Genta, Chiara; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Tancini, Valentina; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cimmino, Anna; De Cosa, Annapaola; De Gruttola, Michele; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Noli, Pasquale; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Conti, Enrico; De Mattia, Marco; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gresele, Ambra; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Volpe, Roberta; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Sarkar, Subir; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Organtini, Giovanni; Palma, Alessandro; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Mila, Giorgia; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trocino, Daniele; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ambroglini, Filippo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dohhee; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Rhee, Han-Bum; Seo, Eunsung; Shin, Seungsu; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz Burelo, Eduard; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A.; Allfrey, Philip; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H.; Doesburg, Robert; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R.; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Sá Martins, Pedro; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Silva, Pedro; Varela, Joao; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr., Michael; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Bondar, Nikolai; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V.; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitsky, Sergey; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cepeda, Maria; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M.; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bell, Alan James; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Breuker, Horst; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cano, Eric; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Gennai, Simone; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Harvey, John; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hegner, Benedikt; Henderson, Conor; Hesketh, Gavin; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karavakis, Edward; Lecoq, Paul; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lourenco, Carlos; Macpherson, Alick; Maki, Tuula; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stöckli, Fabian; Stoye, Markus; Tropea, Paola; Tsirou, Andromachi; Tsyganov, Andrey; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Voutilainen, Mikko; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Starodumov, Andrei; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Caminada, Lea; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hervé, Alain; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Stieger, Benjamin; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguiló, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Wilke, Lotte; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Wan-Ting; Dutta, Suchandra; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Ming-Hsiung; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Han; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Demir, Zahide; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Nart, Alisah; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demir, Durmus; Gülmez, Erhan; Halu, Arda; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bell, Peter; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Hansen, Maria; Hartley, Dominic; Heath, Greg P.; Heath, Helen F.; Huckvale, Benedickt; Jackson, James; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M.; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J.; Ward, Simon; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W.; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M.; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David J.A.; Coughlan, John A.; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Kennedy, Bruce W.; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R.; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R.; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Clough, Andrew; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St. John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Avetisyan, Aram; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Chou, John Paul; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Breedon, Richard; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Cebra, Daniel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Friis, Evan; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Salur, Sevil; Schwarz, Thomas; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Veelken, Christian; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Deisher, Amanda; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Feng; Liu, Hongliang; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Shen, Benjamin C.; Stringer, Robert; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G.; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Gataullin, Marat; Kcira, Dorian; Litvine, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B.; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Terentyev, Nikolay; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T.; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Das, Souvik; Eggert, Nicholas; Fields, Laura Johanna; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Riley, Daniel; Ryd, Anders; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar A.T.; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; Bloch, Ingo; Borcherding, Frederick; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Demarteau, Marcel; Eartly, David P.; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gunthoti, Kranti; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M.; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; James, Eric; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Limon, Peter; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; McCauley, Thomas; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Popescu, Sorina; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Saoulidou, Niki; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J.; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D.; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Goldberg, Sean; Kim, Bockjoo; Klimenko, Sergey; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Prescott, Craig; Remington, Ronald; Schmitt, Michael Houston; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Ceron, Cristobal; Gaultney, Vanessa; Kramer, Laird; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bandurin, Dmitry; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F.; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M.; Dorney, Brian; Guragain, Samir; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; O'Brien, Christine; Silvestre, Catherine; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Cankocak, Kerem; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Wan, Zongru; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G.; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C.; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Everaerts, Pieter; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Loizides, Constantinos; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Wenger, Edward Allen; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cole, Perrie; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Franzoni, Giovanni; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kelly, Tony; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Lundstedt, Carl; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R.; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Boeriu, Oana; Chasco, Matthew; Kaadze, Ketino; Reucroft, Steve; Swain, John; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Gu, Jianhui; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Jones, John; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E.; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; Everett, Adam; Garfinkel, Arthur F.; Gecse, Zoltan; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Laasanen, Alvin T.; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Jindal, Pratima; Parashar, Neeti; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank J.M.; Liu, Jinghua H.; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Yan, Ming; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Duggan, Daniel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Asaadi, Jonathan; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Nguyen, Chi Nhan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pivarski, James; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Weinberger, Michael; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Buehler, Marc; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Lomidze, David; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Reeder, Don; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H.; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2013-07-16

    A search for microscopic black hole production and decay in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been conducted by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns. Events with large total transverse energy are analyzed for the presence of multiple high-energy jets, leptons, and photons, typical of a signal expected from a microscopic black hole. Good agreement with the expected standard model backgrounds, dominated by QCD multijet production, is observed for various final-state multiplicities. Limits on the minimum black hole mass are set, in the range 3.5 -- 4.5 TeV, for a variety of parameters in a model with large extra dimensions, along with model-independent limits on new physics in these final states. These are the first direct limits on black hole production at a particle accelerator.

  4. The ionospheric signature of Pi 2 pulsations observed by STARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, P.R.; Nielsen, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study extends the work of Sutcliffe and Nielsen (1990) in which a classical Pi 2 pulsation was first isolated in Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) data. A high-pass-filtering technique is used to remove the background electric field in the STARE data and so reveal the spatial and temporal ionospheric signatures of the Pi 2 pulsation electric fields. A number of events are identified and examples presented in which pulsation electric fields up to 50 mV/m are observed. Magnetic field oscillations computed from the filtered STARE data using the Biot-Savart law correlate well with pulsation magnetometer data. A 180 degree phase difference is observed between high- and low-altitude X component pulsations. The ionospheric signature of a Pi 2 is located slightly poleward of the core of the auroral breakup region where the southward, westward, and northward directed background electric fields coverage; the strongest pulsation fields occur in the region of equatorward directed electric fields. The ionospheric electric field patterns of the Pi 2 pulsations determined from the STARE data correlate well with those modeled for a transverse Alfven wave incident on an east-west aligned high-conductivity strip in the ionosphere

  5. Observational Signatures of Parametric Instability at 1AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T. A.; Bale, S. D.; Badman, S.

    2017-12-01

    Observations and simulations of inertial compressive turbulence in the solar wind are characterized by density structures anti-correlated with magnetic fluctuations parallel to the mean field. This signature has been interpreted as observational evidence for non-propagating pressure balanced structures (PBS), kinetic ion acoustic waves, as well as the MHD slow mode. Recent work, specifically Verscharen et al. (2017), has highlighted the unexpected fluid like nature of the solar wind. Given the high damping rates of parallel propagating compressive fluctuations, their ubiquity in satellite observations is surprising and suggests the presence of a driving process. One possible candidate for the generation of compressive fluctuations in the solar wind is the parametric instability, in which large amplitude Alfvenic fluctuations decay into parallel propagating compressive waves. This work employs 10 years of WIND observations in order to test the parametric decay process as a source of compressive waves in the solar wind through comparing collisionless damping rates of compressive fluctuations with growth rates of the parametric instability. Preliminary results suggest that generation of compressive waves through parametric decay is overdamped at 1 AU. However, the higher parametric decay rates expected in the inner heliosphere likely allow for growth of the slow mode-the remnants of which could explain density fluctuations observed at 1AU.

  6. A YOUNG GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMED AT THE INTERFACE OF TWO COLLIDING SUPERSHELLS: OBSERVATIONS MEET SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Ntormousi, E. [Service d' Astrophysique, CEA/DSM/IRFU Orme des Merisiers, Bat 709 Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Fierlinger, K., E-mail: joanne.dawson@mq.edu.au [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany)

    2015-01-20

    Dense, star-forming gas is believed to form at the stagnation points of large-scale interstellar medium flows, but observational examples of this process in action are rare. We here present a giant molecular cloud (GMC) sandwiched between two colliding Milky Way supershells, which we argue shows strong evidence of having formed from material accumulated at the collision zone. Combining {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) data with new high-resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of colliding supershells, we discuss the origin and nature of the GMC (G288.5+1.5), favoring a scenario in which the cloud was partially seeded by pre-existing denser material, but assembled into its current form by the action of the shells. This assembly includes the production of some new molecular gas. The GMC is well interpreted as non-self-gravitating, despite its high mass (M{sub H{sub 2}}∼1.7×10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}), and is likely pressure confined by the colliding flows, implying that self-gravity was not a necessary ingredient for its formation. Much of the molecular gas is relatively diffuse, and the cloud as a whole shows little evidence of star formation activity, supporting a scenario in which it is young and recently formed. Drip-like formations along its lower edge may be explained by fluid dynamical instabilities in the cooled gas.

  7. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    OpenAIRE

    CDF Collaboration; Aaltonen, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pbar-p interactions, pbar + p --> pbar + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb-1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy ET >= 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum ET(jet). The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of exp...

  8. Observation of exclusive dijet production at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pp interactions, pp→p+dijet+p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √(s)=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet ≥10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z =0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √(s)=14 TeV are discussed.

  9. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in (bar p)p interactions, (bar p)p → (bar p) + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet (ge) 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √s = 14 TeV are discussed

  10. Observations and numerical studies of gamma-ray emission in colliding-wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitberger, K.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy gamma rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide, thereby producing accelerated particles which subsequently emit gamma rays.This scenario is supported by observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope presented in this thesis. To address the underlying emission mechanisms in a quantitative way, numerical simulations that incorporate hydrodynamics, the acceleration of charged particles as well as the subsequent gamma-ray emission were found to be needed.This thesis presents the analysis of a high-energy gamma-ray source and its identification with the particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. In order to go beyond the present understanding of such objects, this work provides detailed description of a new 3D-hydrodynamical model, which incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma, as well as the diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles in the wind collision region. In a subsequent step we simulate and study the resulting gamma-ray emission via relativistic bremsstrahlung, anisotropic inverse Compton radiation and neutral pion decay. (author) [de

  11. CP odd observables for the t t-bar system produced at p p-bar and pp colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Ma, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Some CP odd observables are proposed to test CP invariance in the t t-bar system proceeded at p p-bar and pp colliders. As CP violation can appear both in the production and in the decays of the top quarks, it is important to separate the effects from each other by using different observables. These will be discussed and some comments on using the observables for pp colliders are also made. Numerical results for these observables are given together with their sensitivity to the new CP violating interactions. 17 refs, 1 fig

  12. Observation of a 27-day solar signature in noctilucent cloud altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnke, Merlin C.; von Savigny, Christian; Robert, Charles E.

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have identified solar 27-day signatures in several parameters in the Mesosphere/Lower thermosphere region, including temperature and Noctilucent cloud (NLC) occurrence frequency. In this study we report on a solar 27-day signature in NLC altitude with peak-to-peak variations of about 400 m. We use SCIAMACHY limb-scatter observations from 2002 to 2012 to detect NLCs. The superposed epoch analysis method is applied to extract solar 27-day signatures. A 27-day signature in NLC altitude can be identified in both hemispheres in the SCIAMACHY dataset, but the signature is more pronounced in the northern hemisphere. The solar signature in NLC altitude is found to be in phase with solar activity and temperature for latitudes ≳ 70 ° N. We provide a qualitative explanation for the positive correlation between solar activity and NLC altitude based on published model simulations.

  13. Exploring the top-Higgs FCNC couplings at polarized linear colliders with top spin observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa [Institut Ruđer Bošković, Theoretical Physics Division,Bijenička 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2017-01-11

    We study the nature of flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the tt̄ production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that the top couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t→qH in tt̄ production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the couplings at the 3σ level at √s = 500 GeV and L = 500 fb{sup −1} is also studied, resulting in predicted BR(t→qH)<1.19×10{sup −3}. This limit is further improved to BR(t→qH)<8.84×10{sup −4} with the inclusion of initial beam polarization of left handed electrons and right handed positrons.

  14. Soft functions for generic jet algorithms and observables at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics; Kolodrubetz, Daniel; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Duff, Neill [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Pietrulewicz, Piotr; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Waalewijn, Wouter J. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Theory Group; Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics Amsterdam and Delta Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2017-07-15

    We introduce a method to compute one-loop soft functions for exclusive N-jet processes at hadron colliders, allowing for different definitions of the algorithm that determines the jet regions and of the measurements in those regions. In particular, we generalize the N-jettiness hemisphere decomposition of T. T. Joutennus et al. (2011) in a manner that separates the dependence on the jet boundary from the observables measured inside the jet and beam regions. Results are given for several factorizable jet definitions, including anti-k{sub T}, XCone, and other geometric partitionings. We calculate explicitly the soft functions for angularity measurements, including jet mass and jet broadening, in pp→L+1 jet and explore the differences for various jet vetoes and algorithms. This includes a consistent treatment of rapidity divergences when applicable. We also compute analytic results for these soft functions in an expansion for a small jet radius R. We find that the small-R results, including corrections up to O(R{sup 2}), accurately capture the full behavior over a large range of R.

  15. Anomalous self potential (sp) log signatures observed in a water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geophysical logging was done after drilling had been completed in a water well at Okwudor, South Eastern Nigeria. Three electric logs were run viz: Self Potential (SP), Resistivity N16″ and N64″ logs. An anomaly was observed in the SP log. The SP results from this well show some deviation from the standard norm.

  16. Signature of transient boundary layer processes observed with Viking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woch, J.; Lundin, R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient penetration of plasma with magnetosheath origin is frequently observed with the hot plasma experiment on board the Viking satellite at auroral latitudes in the dayside magnetosphere. The injected magnetosheath ions exhibit a characteristic pitch angle/energy dispersion pattern earlier reported for solar wind ions accessing the magnetosphere in the cusp regions. In contrast to the continuous plasma entry in the cusp, the events discussed here show temporal features which suggest a connection to transient processes at or in the vicinity of the magnetospheric boundary. A single event study confirms previously published observations that the injected ions flow essentially tailward with a velocity comparable to the magnetosheath flow and that the energy spectra inferred for the source population resemble magnetosheath spectra. Based on a statistical study, it is found that these events are predominantly observed around 0800 and 1600 MLT, in a region populated by both rung current/plasma sheet particles and by particles whose source is the magnetosheath plasma. Magnetic field line tracing based on the Tsyganenko magnetic field model yields a scatter of the source locations around the mid-latitude region of the magnetospheric boundary. The probability for these events to occur is highest when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is confined to the ecliptic plane. The connection of the events to transient impulsive solar wind/magnetosphere interaction processes, such as transient reconnection (FTE), impulsive plasma transfer, Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, and solar wind pressure pulses, is discussed. A relation with transient reconnection can be excluded

  17. Asymmetric Explosion of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Observational Signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    The nature of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions has not yet been clarified, despite their importance in astrophysics and cosmology. Recent theoretical investigations suggest that asymmetric distribution of initial thermonuclear sparks may be a key in the SN Ia explosion mechanism. In this paper, the first observational evidence of the asymmetry in SN Ia explosions is presented: We have found that late-time nebular spectra of various SNe Ia show a diversity in wavelengths of emission lines. This feature is inconsistent with any spherically symmetric explosion models, and indicates that the innermost region, a likely product of the deflagration wave propagation, shows an off-set with respect to the explosion center. The diversity in the emission-line wavelengths could naturally be explained by a combination of different viewing angles.

  18. Observational signatures of spherically-symmetric black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Younsi, Ziri; Porth, Oliver; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fromm, Christian; Rezzolla, Luciano; Olivares, Hector

    2017-12-01

    A binary system composed of a supermassive black hole and a pulsar orbiting around it is studied. The motivation for this study arises from the fact that pulsar timing observations have proven to be a powerful tool in identifying physical features of the orbiting companion. In this study, taking into account a general spherically-symmetric metric, we present analytic calculations of the geodesic motion, and the possible deviations with respect to the standard Schwarzschild case of General Relativity. In particular, the advance at periastron is studied with the aim of identifying corrections to General Relativity. A discussion of the motion of a pulsar very close the supermassive central black hole in our Galaxy (Sgr A*) is reported.

  19. Observation of Discrete-Time-Crystal Signatures in an Ordered Dipolar Many-Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovny, Jared; Blum, Robert L.; Barrett, Sean E.

    2018-05-01

    A discrete time crystal (DTC) is a robust phase of driven systems that breaks the discrete time translation symmetry of the driving Hamiltonian. Recent experiments have observed DTC signatures in two distinct systems. Here we show nuclear magnetic resonance observations of DTC signatures in a third, strikingly different system: an ordered spatial crystal. We use a novel DTC echo experiment to probe the coherence of the driven system. Finally, we show that interactions during the pulse of the DTC sequence contribute to the decay of the signal, complicating attempts to measure the intrinsic lifetime of the DTC.

  20. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  1. ''Electron Conic'' Signatures observed in the nightside auroral zone and over the polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menietti, J.D.; Burch, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary search of the Dynamics Explorer 1 high-altitude plasma instrument data base has yielded examples of ''electron conic'' signatures. The three example passes show an association with regions of downward electron acceleration and upward ion beams, but this is not true of all the electron conic events. The electron conic signatures are clearly discernible on energy-flux-versus-time color spectrograms as pairs of discrete vertical bands which are symmetric about a pitch angle of approximately 180 0 . One of the examples is a polar cap pass with electron conic signatures observed at invariant latitudes from 84 0 to 75 0 . The other two cases are nightside auroral zone passes in which the regions of detectable electron conics are spatially more confined, covering only about 1 0 in invariant latitude. The conic signatures have been found at energies that range from 50 eV 0 is larger than expected for a loss cone feature. If the electrons conserve the first adiabatic invariant in a dipole magnetic field, and in some cases a parallel electric field, the mirroring altitude varies between about 500 km and 8000 km, which is above the atmospheric loss region. For this reason, and in analogy with the formation of ion conics, we suggest that the conic signatures are produced by heating of the electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field

  2. Propagation of Dipolarization Signatures Observed by the Van Allen Probes in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S.; Motoba, T.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kletzing, C.

    2017-12-01

    Dipolarization, the change of the local magnetic field from a stretched to a more dipolar configuration, is one of the most fundamental processes of magnetospheric physics. It is especially critical for the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere. The associated electric field accelerates ions and electrons and transports them closer to Earth. Such injected ions intensify the ring current, and electrons constitute the seed population of the radiation belt. Those ions and electrons may also excite various waves that play important roles in the enhancement and loss of the radiation belt electrons. Despite such critical consequences, the general characteristics of dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere still remain to be understood. The Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two probes that orbit through the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere, provides an ideal opportunity to examine dipolarization signatures in the core of the ring current. In the present study we investigate the spatial expansion of the dipolarization region by examining the correlation and time delay of dipolarization signatures observed by the two probes. Whereas in general it requires three-point measurements to deduce the propagation of a signal on a certain plane, we statically examined the observed time delays and found that dipolarization signatures tend to propagate radially inward as well as away from midnight. In this paper we address the propagation of dipolarization signatures quantitatively and compare with the propagation velocities reported previously based on observations made farther away from Earth. We also discuss how often and under what conditions the dipolarization region expands.

  3. IAR signatures in the ionosphere: Modeling and observations at the Chibis-M microsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, V.; Dudkin, D.; Fedorov, E.; Korepanov, V.; Klimov, S.

    2017-02-01

    A peculiar feature of geomagnetic variations at middle/low latitudes in the ULF band, just below the fundamental tone of the Schumann resonance, is the occurrence of a multi-band spectral resonant structure, observed by high-sensitivity induction magnetometers during nighttime. The occurrence of such spectral structure was commonly attributed to the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR) in the upper ionosphere. Rather surprisingly, while ground observations of the IAR are ubiquitous, there are practically no reports on the IAR signatures from space missions. According to the new paradigm, the multi-band spectral structure excited by a lightning discharge is in fact produced by a regular sequence of an original pulse from a stroke and echo-pulses reflected from the IAR upper boundary. Upon the interaction of initial lightning-generated pulse with the anisotropic lower ionosphere, it partially penetrates into the ionosphere, travels up the ionosphere as an Alfvén pulse, and reflects back from the upper IAR boundary. The superposition of the initial pulse and echo-pulses produces spectra with multiple spectral peaks. Our modeling of Alfvénic pulse propagation in a system with the altitude profile of Alfven velocity modeling the realistic ionosphere has shown that IAR spectral signatures are to be evident only on the ground and above the IAR. Inside the IAR, the superposition of upward and downward propagating pulses produces a more complicated spectral pattern and the IAR spectral signatures deteriorate. We have used electric field data from the low-orbit Chibis-M microsatellite to search for IAR signatures in the ionosphere. We found evidence that the multi-band structure revealed by spectral analysis in the frequency range of interest is indeed the result of a sequence of lightning-produced pulses. According to the proposed conception it seems possible to comprehend why the IAR signatures are less evident in the ionosphere than on the ground.

  4. Observation of very large transverse momentum jets at the CERN pp collider

    CERN Document Server

    Banner, M; Bonaudi, Franco; Borer, K; Borghini, M; Chollet, J C; Clark, A G; Conta, C; Darriulat, Pierre; Di Lella, L; Dines-Hansen, J; Dorsaz, P A; Fayard, L; Fraternali, M; Froidevaux, D; Gaillard, J M; Gildemeister, O; Goggi, V G; Grote, H; Hahn, B; Hänni, H; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P; Himel, T; Hungerbühler, V; Jenni, Peter; Kofoed-Hansen, Otto Møgens; Livan, M; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Madsen, B; Mansoulié, B; Mantovani, G C; Mapelli, L; Merkel, B; Mermikides, Michael E; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B; Onions, Christopher J; Parrour, G; Pastore, F; Plothow-Besch, H; Repellin, J P; Ringel, J; Rothenberg, A F; Roussarie, A; Sauvage, G; Schacher, J; Siegrist, J L; Stocker, F; Teiger, J; Vercesi, V; Williams, H H; Zaccone, Henri; Zeller, W

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of total transverse energy Sigma E/sub T/ over the pseudorapidity interval -1( eta (1 and an azimuthal range Delta phi =300 degrees has been measured in the UA2 experiment at the CERN pp collider ( \\sqrt{s}=540 GeV) using a highly segmented total absorption calorimeter. In the events with the very large Sigma E/sub T/ ( Sigma E/sub T/>or approximately=60 GeV) most of the transverse energy is found to be contained in small angular regions as expected for high transverse momentum hadron jets. The authors discuss the properties of a sample of two-jet events with invariant two-jet masses up to 140 GeV/c/sup 2/ and measure the cross section for inclusive jet production in the range of jet transverse momenta between 15 and 60 Ge V/c.

  5. X-ray observations of the colliding wind binary WR 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bharti; Pandey, Jeewan Chandra

    2018-04-01

    Using the archival data obtained from Chandra and Suzaku spanning over '8 years, we present an analysis of a WN6h+O4f Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. The X-ray light curves folded over a period of '208 d in the 0.3 - 10.0 keV energy band showed phase-locked variability where the count rates were found to be maximum near the periastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were well explained by a two-temperature plasma model with temperatures of 0.64 ± 0.01 and 2.96 ± 0.05 keV and are consistent with previous results. The orbital phase dependent local hydrogen column density was found to be maximum just after the periastron passage, when the WN type star is in front of the O star. The hard (2.0 - 10.0 keV) X-ray luminosity was linearly dependent on the inverse of binary separation which confirms that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary.

  6. On the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A.; Jiménez, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made to identify the seismic signatures of flares and magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. In this work, we have analysed the disc-integrated velocity and intensity observations of the Sun obtained from the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) and Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations/Sun photometers (VIRGO/SPM) instruments, respectively, on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory space mission covering several successive flare events, for the period from 2011 February 11 to 2011 February 17, of which 2011 February 11 remained a relatively quiet day and served as a `null test' for the investigation. Application of the spectral analysis to these disc-integrated Sun-as-a-star velocity and intensity signals indicates that there is enhanced power of the global modes of oscillations in the Sun during the flares, as compared to the quiet day. The GOLF instrument obtains velocity observations using the Na I D lines which are formed in the upper solar photosphere, while the intensity data used in our analysis are obtained by VIRGO/SPM instrument at 862 nm, which is formed within the solar photosphere. Despite the fact that the two instruments sample different layers of the solar atmosphere using two different parameters (velocity versus intensity), we have found that both these observations show the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun. These results could suffice in identifying the asteroseismic signatures of stellar flares and magnetic activity in the Sun-like stars.

  7. Observational Signatures of Transverse Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Associated Dynamic Instabilities in Coronal Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, P.; Moortel, I. De [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: patrick.antolin@st-andrews.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-02-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves permeate the solar atmosphere and constitute potential coronal heating agents. Yet, the waves detected so far may be but a small subset of the true existing wave power. Detection is limited by instrumental constraints but also by wave processes that localize the wave power in undetectable spatial scales. In this study, we conduct 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling of standing transverse MHD waves in coronal loops with uniform and non-uniform temperature variation in the perpendicular cross-section. The observed signatures are largely dominated by the combination of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI), resonant absorption, and phase mixing. In the presence of a cross-loop temperature gradient, we find that emission lines sensitive to the loop core catch different signatures compared to those that are more sensitive to the loop boundary and the surrounding corona, leading to an out-of-phase intensity and Doppler velocity modulation produced by KHI mixing. In all of the considered models, common signatures include an intensity and loop width modulation at half the kink period, a fine strand-like structure, a characteristic arrow-shaped structure in the Doppler maps, and overall line broadening in time but particularly at the loop edges. For our model, most of these features can be captured with a spatial resolution of 0.″33 and a spectral resolution of 25 km s{sup −1}, although we do obtain severe over-estimation of the line width. Resonant absorption leads to a significant decrease of the observed kinetic energy from Doppler motions over time, which is not recovered by a corresponding increase in the line width from phase mixing and KHI motions. We estimate this hidden wave energy to be a factor of 5–10 of the observed value.

  8. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN: Signatures, physical observables and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions have become available with the recent experiments at CERN utilizing 200 GeV/n oxygen and sulfur beams. Physics motivations for these experiments are presented: a description of predicted signatures for possible formation of a quark-gluon plasma and physical observables that are expected to provide important information for understanding the dynamics of these collisions. A presentation will be made of some of the first experimental results to emerge from this new field. 28 refs., 9 figs

  9. The lightest Higgs boson of mSUGRA, mGMSB and mAMSB at present and future colliders: observability and precision analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedes, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; Su, S.; Weiglein, G.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the physics of the lightest CP-even MSSM Higgs boson at the Tevatron, the LHC, a linear e + e - collider, a γγ collider and a μ + μ - collider. The analysis is performed in the three most prominent soft SUSY-breaking scenarios, mSUGRA, mGMSB and mAMSB. For all colliders the observability and parameter regions with suppressed production cross sections (compared to a SM Higgs boson with the same mass) are investigated. For the lepton and photon colliders the potential is analyzed of precision measurements of the branching ratios of the light CP-even Higgs boson for obtaining indirect bounds on the mass of the CP-odd Higgs boson and the high-energy parameters of the soft SUSY-breaking scenarios. In regions of the parameter space where the LHC can detect the heavy Higgs bosons, precision measurements of the properties of the light Higgs boson at the linear collider can provide valuable information for distinguishing between the mSUGRA, mGMSB and mAMSB scenarios

  10. NO TRACE LEFT BEHIND: STEREO OBSERVATION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION WITHOUT LOW CORONAL SIGNATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbrecht, Eva; Patsourakos, Spiros; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    The availability of high-quality synoptic observations of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and visible corona during the SOHO mission has advanced our understanding of the low corona manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The EUV imager/white light coronagraph connection has been proven so powerful, it is routinely assumed that if no EUV signatures are present when a CME is observed by a coronagraph, then the event must originate behind the visible limb. This assumption carries strong implications for space weather forecasting but has not been put to the test. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of a frontside, large-scale CME that has no obvious counterparts in the low corona as observed in EUV and Hα wavelengths. The event was observed by the SECCHI instruments onboard the STEREO mission. The COR2A coronagraph observed a slow flux-rope-type CME, while an extremely faint partial halo was observed in COR2B. The event evolved very slowly and is typical of the streamer-blowout CME class. EUVI A 171 A images show a concave feature above the east limb, relatively stable for about two days before the eruption, when it rises into the coronagraphic fields and develops into the core of the CME. None of the typical low corona signatures of a CME (flaring, EUV dimming, filament eruption, waves) were observed in the EUVI B images, which we attribute to the unusually large height from which the flux rope lifted off. This interpretation is supported by the CME mass measurements and estimates of the expected EUV dimming intensity. Only thanks to the availability of the two viewpoints we were able to identify the likely source region. The event originated along a neutral line over the quiet-Sun. No active regions were present anywhere on the visible (from STEREO B) face of the disk. Leaving no trace behind on the solar disk, this observation shows unambiguously that a CME eruption does not need to have clear on-disk signatures. Also it sheds light on the

  11. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  12. Chasing the observational signatures of seed black holes at z > 7: candidate observability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Zappacosta, Luca; Graziani, Luca; Pezzulli, Edwige; Volonteri, Marta

    2018-05-01

    Observing the light emitted by the first accreting black holes (BHs) would dramatically improve our understanding of the formation of quasars at z > 6, possibly unveiling the nature of their supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds. In previous works, we explored the relative role of the two main competing BH seed formation channels, Population III remnants (low-mass seeds) and direct collapse BHs (high-mass seeds), investigating the properties of their host galaxies in a cosmological context. Building on this analysis, we predict here the spectral energy distribution and observational features of low- and high-mass BH seeds selected among the progenitors of a z ˜ 6 SMBH. We derive the processed emission from both accreting BHs and stars by using the photoionization code CLOUDY, accounting for the evolution of metallicity and dust-to-gas mass ratio in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies, as predicted by the cosmological data-constrained model GAMETE/QSODUST. We show how future missions like James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (ATHENA) will be able to detect the light coming from SMBH progenitors already at z ˜ 16. We build upon previous complementary studies and propose a method based on the combined analysis of near-infrared colours, IR excess (IRX), and UV continuum slopes (i.e. colour-colour and IRX-β diagrams) to distinguish growing seed BH host galaxies from starburst-dominated systems in JWST surveys. Sources selected through this criterion would be the best target for follow-up X-ray observations.

  13. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  14. When Models and Observations Collide: Journeying towards an Integrated Snow Depth Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, M.; Petty, A.; Boisvert, L.; Markus, T.; Kurtz, N. T.; Kwok, R.; Perovich, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of snow depth is essential for assessing changes in sea ice mass balance due to snow's insulating and reflective properties. In remote sensing applications, the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrievals from altimetry crucially depends on snow depth. Despite the need for snow depth data, we currently lack continuous observations that capture the basin-scale snow depth distribution and its seasonal evolution. Recent in situ and remote sensing observations are sparse in space and time, and contain uncertainties, caveats, and/or biases that often require careful interpretation. Likewise, using model output for remote sensing applications is limited due to uncertainties in atmospheric forcing and different treatments of snow processes. Here, we summarize our efforts in bringing observational and model data together to develop an approach for an integrated snow depth product. We start with a snow budget model and incrementally incorporate snow processes to determine the effects on snow depth and to assess model sensitivity. We discuss lessons learned in model-observation integration and ideas for potential improvements to the treatment of snow in models.

  15. Tidal signatures of the thermospheric mass density and zonal wind at midlatitude: CHAMP and GRACE observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xiong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available By using the accelerometer measurements from CHAMP and GRACE satellites, the tidal signatures of the thermospheric mass density and zonal wind at midlatitudes have been analyzed in this study. The results show that the mass density and zonal wind at southern midlatitudes are dominated by a longitudinal wave-1 pattern. The most prominent tidal components in mass density and zonal wind are the diurnal tides D0 and DW2 and the semidiurnal tides SW1 and SW3. This is consistent with the tidal signatures in the F region electron density at midlatitudes as reported by Xiong and Lühr (2014. These same tidal components are observed both in the thermospheric and ionospheric quantities, supporting a mechanism that the non-migrating tides in the upper atmosphere are excited in situ by ion–neutral interactions at midlatitudes, consistent with the modeling results of Jones Jr. et al. (2013. We regard the thermospheric dynamics as the main driver for the electron density tidal structures. An example is the in-phase variation of D0 between electron density and mass density in both hemispheres. Further research including coupled atmospheric models is probably needed for explaining the similarities and differences between thermospheric and ionospheric tidal signals at midlatitudes.

  16. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  17. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  18. Minimal anomalous U(1) theories and collider phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Andreas; Enberg, Rikard; Ingelman, Gunnar; Löfgren, Johan; Mandal, Tanumoy

    2018-02-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of a neutral gauge boson Z ' arising in minimal but anomalous U(1) extensions of the Standard Model (SM). To retain gauge invariance of physical observables, we consider cancellation of gauge anomalies through the Green-Schwarz mechanism. We categorize a wide class of U(1) extensions in terms of the new U(1) charges of the left-handed quarks and leptons and the Higgs doublet. We derive constraints on some benchmark models using electroweak precision constraints and the latest 13 TeV LHC dilepton and dijet resonance search data. We calculate the decay rates of the exotic and rare one-loop Z ' decays to ZZ and Z-photon modes, which are the unique signatures of our framework. If observed, these decays could hint at anomaly cancellation through the Green-Schwarz mechanism. We also discuss the possible observation of such signatures at the LHC and at future ILC colliders.

  19. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro + micro - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  20. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  1. Observation of correlated atom pairs in spontaneous four wave mixing of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, A.

    2007-11-01

    In this thesis, we report on the observation of pairs of correlated atoms produced in the collision of two Bose-Einstein condensates of metastable helium. Three laser beams perform a Raman transfer which extracts the condensate from the magnetic trap and separates it into two parts with opposite mean momenta. While the condensates propagate, elastic scattering of pairs of atoms occurs, whose momenta satisfy energy and momentum conservation laws. Metastable helium atoms large internal energy allows the use of a position-sensitive, single-atom detector which permits a three-dimensional reconstruction of the scattered atoms'momenta. The statistics of these momenta show correlations for atoms with opposite momenta. The measured correlation volume can be understood from the uncertainty-limited momentum spread of the colliding condensates. This interpretation is confirmed by the observation of the momentum correlation function for two atoms scattered in the same direction. This latter effect is a manifestation of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for indistinguishable bosons. Such a correlated-atom-pair source is a first step towards experiments in which one would like to confirm the pairs'entanglement. (author)

  2. Improving predictions for collider observables by consistently combining fixed order calculations with resummed results in perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenherr, Marek

    2011-01-01

    With the constantly increasing precision of experimental data acquired at the current collider experiments Tevatron and LHC the theoretical uncertainty on the prediction of multiparticle final states has to decrease accordingly in order to have meaningful tests of the underlying theories such as the Standard Model. A pure leading order calculation, defined in the perturbative expansion of said theory in the interaction constant, represents the classical limit to such a quantum field theory and was already found to be insufficient at past collider experiments, e.g. LEP or HERA. Such a leading order calculation can be systematically improved in various limits. If the typical scales of a process are large and the respective coupling constants are small, the inclusion of fixed-order higher-order corrections then yields quickly converging predictions with much reduced uncertainties. In certain regions of the phase space, still well within the perturbative regime of the underlying theory, a clear hierarchy of the inherent scales, however, leads to large logarithms occurring at every order in perturbation theory. In many cases these logarithms are universal and can be resummed to all orders leading to precise predictions in these limits. Multiparticle final states now exhibit both small and large scales, necessitating a description using both resummed and fixed-order results. This thesis presents the consistent combination of two such resummation schemes with fixed-order results. The main objective therefor is to identify and properly treat terms that are present in both formulations in a process and observable independent manner. In the first part the resummation scheme introduced by Yennie, Frautschi and Suura (YFS), resumming large logarithms associated with the emission of soft photons in massive QED, is combined with fixed-order next-to-leading matrix elements. The implementation of a universal algorithm is detailed and results are studied for various precision

  3. Search for the Higgs Boson and Rare Standard Model Processes in the ET+B-Jets Signature at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potamianos, Karolos Jozef [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-12-01

    We study rare processes of the standard model of particle physics (SM) in events with missing transverse energy ET, no leptons, and two or three jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a $b$-quark (ET+b-jets signature). We present a search for the SM Higgs boson produced in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson when the Higgs decays into \\bbbar. We consider the scenario where $Z \\to \

  4. Do In Situ Observations Contain Signatures of Intermittent Fast Solar Wind Acceleration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Stansby, D.

    2017-12-01

    Disentangling local plasma properties and Solar origin structures in in situ data is a crucial aspect for the understanding of solar wind acceleration and evolution. This is particularly challenging at 1 AU and beyond, where structures of various origin have had time to interact and merge, smoothing out their main characteristics. Observations of more pristine plasma closer to the Sun are therefore needed. In preparation of the forthcoming Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe missions, Helios observations as close as to 0.3 AU - although old, not yet fully exploited - can be used to test our expectations and make new predictions. Recent observations (Matteini et al. 2014, 2015) have outlined the presence of intense (up to 1000km/s) and short-living velocity peaks that ubiquitously characterize the typical profile of the fast solar wind at 0.3 AU, suggesting that these features could be remnants of processes occurring in the Solar atmosphere and a signature of intermittent solar wind acceleration from coronal holes. We discuss results about statistics of these events, characterizing their physical properties and trying to link them with typical Solar temporal and spatial scales. Finally we also discuss how these velocity peaks will likely affect the future in situ exploration of the inner heliosphere by Solar Orbiter and the Parker Solar Probe.

  5. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  6. Colliding druthers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Johnson, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are made to maximize the usefulness of the colliding beam facility of the Main Ring and Energy Doubler at the Fermilab accelerator. The advantages of the transposed crossing geometry over the kissing geometry are pointed out

  7. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  8. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  9. Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, D.

    1999-01-01

    These lectures are intended as a pedagogical introduction to physics at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders. A selection of processes is used to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of the different machines. The discussion includes $W$ pair production and chargino searches at $e^+e^-$ colliders, Drell-Yan events and the top quark search at the Tevatron, and Higgs searches at the LHC.

  10. The observable signature of late heating of the Universe during cosmic reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Barkana, Rennan; Visbal, Eli

    2014-02-13

    Models and simulations of the epoch of reionization predict that spectra of the 21-centimetre transition of atomic hydrogen will show a clear fluctuation peak, at a redshift and scale, respectively, that mark the central stage of reionization and the characteristic size of ionized bubbles. This is based on the assumption that the cosmic gas was heated by stellar remnants-particularly X-ray binaries-to temperatures well above the cosmic microwave background at that time (about 30 kelvin). Here we show instead that the hard spectra (that is, spectra with more high-energy photons than low-energy photons) of X-ray binaries make such heating ineffective, resulting in a delayed and spatially uniform heating that modifies the 21-centimetre signature of reionization. Rather than looking for a simple rise and fall of the large-scale fluctuations (peaking at several millikelvin), we must expect a more complex signal also featuring a distinct minimum (at less than a millikelvin) that marks the rise of the cosmic mean gas temperature above the microwave background. Observing this signal, possibly with radio telescopes in operation today, will demonstrate the presence of a cosmic background of hard X-rays at that early time.

  11. Three-dimensional disc-satellite interaction: torques, migration, and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasskiy, Lev; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.

    2018-04-01

    The interaction of a satellite with a gaseous disc results in the excitation of spiral density waves, which remove angular momentum from the orbit. In addition, if the orbit is not coplanar with the disc, three-dimensional effects will excite bending and eccentricity waves. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study nonlinear disc-satellite interaction in inviscid protoplanetary discs for a variety of orbital inclinations from 0° to 180°. It is well known that three-dimensional effects are important even for zero inclination. In this work, we (1) show that for planets with small inclinations (as in the Solar system), effects such as the total torque and migration rate strongly depend on the inclination and are significantly different (about 2.5 times smaller) from the two-dimensional case, (2) give formulae for the migration rate, inclination damping, and precession rate of planets with different inclination angles in disc with different scale heights, and (3) present the observational signatures of a planet on an inclined orbit with respect to the protoplanetary disc. For misaligned planets, we find good agreement with linear theory in the limit of small inclinations, and with dynamical friction estimates for intermediate inclinations. We find that in the latter case, the dynamical friction force is not parallel to the relative planetary velocity. Overall, the derived formulae will be important for studying exoplanets with obliquity.

  12. Observed mixed standing-wave signatures in Cochin Estuary on the southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Srinivas, K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Thottam, T.J.

    Study of the characteristics of currents and water-level variations in the Cochin estuary reveals, for the first time, unique signatures of mixed standing-waves in the southern region. Analysis of the simultaneous water-level data generated...

  13. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  14. A particle consistent with the Higgs Boson observed with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Havránek, Miroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Vrba, Václav; Valenta, J.; Zeman, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 338, č. 6114 (2012), s. 1576-1582 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs particle * mass * ATLAS * CERN LHC Coll * interpretation of experiments Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 31.027, year: 2012

  15. The GRB-SLSN connection: misaligned magnetars, weak jet emergence, and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ben; Metzger, Brian D.; Thompson, Todd A.; Nicholl, Matt; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2018-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support a connection between hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Both classes of events require a powerful central energy source, usually attributed to a millisecond magnetar or an accreting black hole. The GRB-SLSN link raises several theoretical questions: What distinguishes the engines responsible for these different phenomena? Can a single engine power both a GRB and a luminous SN in the same event? We propose a unifying model for magnetar thermalization and jet formation: misalignment between the rotation (Ω) and magnetic dipole (μ) axes dissipates a fraction of the spin-down power by reconnection in the striped equatorial wind, providing a guaranteed source of `thermal' emission to power the supernova. The remaining unthermalized power energizes a relativistic jet. We show that even weak relativistic jets of luminosity ˜1046 erg s-1 can escape the expanding SN ejecta implying that escaping relativistic jets may accompany many SLSNe. We calculate the observational signature of these jets. We show that they may produce transient ultraviolet (UV) cocoon emission lasting a few hours when the jet breaks out of the ejecta surface. A longer lived optical/UV signal may originate from a mildly relativistic wind driven from the interface between the jet and the ejecta walls, which could explain the secondary early-time maximum observed in some SLSNe light curves, such as LSQ14bdq. Our scenario predicts a population of GRB from on-axis jets with extremely long durations, potentially similar to the population of `jetted-tidal disruption events', in coincidence with a small subset of SLSNe.

  16. SIGNATURES OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: PREDICTIONS FOR ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Jacob B. [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith; Flaherty, Kevin M. [Astronomy Department, Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Dr., Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Bai, Xue-Ning [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Armitage, Philip J., E-mail: jbsimon.astro@gmail.com [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved observations of molecular line emission have the potential to yield unique constraints on the nature of turbulence within protoplanetary disks. Using a combination of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and radiative transfer calculations, tailored to properties of the disk around HD 163296, we assess the ability of ALMA to detect turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our local simulations show that the MRI produces small-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations that increase in strength with height above the mid-plane. For a set of simulations at different disk radii, we fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution to the turbulent velocity and construct a turbulent broadening parameter as a function of radius and height. We input this broadening into radiative transfer calculations to quantify observational signatures of MRI-driven disk turbulence. We find that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center is a robust diagnostic of turbulence that is only mildly degenerate with systematic uncertainties in disk temperature. For the CO(3–2) line, which we expect to probe the most magnetically active slice of the disk column, variations in the predicted peak-to-trough ratio between our most and least turbulent models span a range of approximately 15%. Additional independent constraints can be derived from the morphology of spatially resolved line profiles, and we estimate the resolution required to detect turbulence on different spatial scales. We discuss the role of lower optical depth molecular tracers, which trace regions closer to the disk mid-plane where velocities in MRI-driven models are systematically lower.

  17. Particle signatures of magnetic topology at the magnetopause: AMPTE/CCE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Onsager, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    magnetosheath plasma has converted directly across the magnetopause. These observations are consistent with quasi-steady, high-latitude reconnection and indicate that the signatures of this reconnection geometry are commonly present in the subpolar region.

  18. MMS observations of guide field reconnection at the interface between colliding reconnection jets inside flux rope-like structures at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T.; Haggerty, C. C.; Shay, M.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R.; Mozer, F.; Oka, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Wang, S.; Chen, L. J.; Swisdak, M.; Pollock, C. J.; Dorelli, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Lavraud, B.; Kacem, I.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Saito, Y.; Avanov, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Schwartz, S. J.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Malakit, K.

    2017-12-01

    The formation and evolution of magnetic flux ropes is of critical importance for a number of collisionless plasma phenomena. At the dayside magnetopause flux rope-like structures can form between two X-lines. The two X-lines produce converging plasma jets. At the interface between the colliding jets a compressed current sheet can form, which in turn can undergo reconnection. We present MMS observations of the exhaust and diffusion region of such reconnection.

  19. Observational signatures of past mass-exchange episodes in massive binaries: the case of LSS 3074

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucq, F.; Gosset, E.; Rauw, G.; Manfroid, J.; Mahy, L.; Mennekens, N.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The role of mass and momentum exchanges in close massive binaries is very important in the subsequent evolution of the components. Such exchanges produce several observational signatures such as asynchronous rotation and altered chemical compositions, that remain after the stars detach again. Aims: We investigated these effects for the close O-star binary LSS 3074 (O4 f + O6-7:(f):), which is a good candidate for a past Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) episode because of its very short orbital period, P = 2.185 days, and the luminosity classes of both components. Methods: We determined a new orbital solution for the system. We studied the photometric light curves to determine the inclination of the orbit and Roche lobe filling factors of both stars. Using phase-resolved spectroscopy, we performed the disentangling of the optical spectra of the two stars. We then analysed the reconstructed primary and secondary spectra with the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to determine stellar parameters, such as the effective temperatures and surface gravities, and to constrain the chemical composition of the components. Results: We confirm the apparent low stellar masses and radii reported in previous studies. We also find a strong overabundance in nitrogen and a strong carbon and oxygen depletion in both primary and secondary atmospheres, together with a strong enrichment in helium of the primary star. Conclusions: We propose several possible evolutionary pathways through a RLOF process to explain the current parameters of the system. We confirm that the system is apparently in overcontact configuration and has lost a significant portion of its mass to its surroundings. We suggest that some of the discrepancies between the spectroscopic and photometric properties of LSS 3074 could stem from the impact of a strong radiation pressure of the primary. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and the Cerro Tololo Inter

  20. Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  1. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  2. Future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, pp), of lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders are considered. Technical arguments for increased energy in each type of machine are presented. Their relative size, and the implications of size on cost are discussed

  3. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  4. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Francois [IN2P3/CNRS et Universite Paris-Sud 11 Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann [Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, Z or Z'. In the case of Z-boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of Z' mediator. These scenarios can be tested at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders through ISR events, e{sup +}e{sup -} → XX + γ. A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state A in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is e{sup +}e{sup -} → HA, H → hh, A → XX. (orig.)

  5. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Francois; Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future e + e - colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, Z or Z'. In the case of Z-boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of Z' mediator. These scenarios can be tested at e + e - colliders through ISR events, e + e - → XX + γ. A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state A in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is e + e - → HA, H → hh, A → XX. (orig.)

  6. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On SporadicCarbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.C.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey,S.; Baltay, C.; Baron, E.; Bauer, A.; Buton, C.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Parrent, J.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Runge, K.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.

    2006-10-12

    We present four spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN Ia 2006Dextending from -7 to +13 days with respect to B-band maximum. The spectrainclude the strongest signature of unburned material at photosphericvelocities observed in a SN Ia to date. The earliest spectrum exhibits CII absorption features below 14,000 km/s, including a distinctive C IIlambda 6580 absorption feature. The carbon signatures dissipate as the SNapproaches peak brightness. In addition to discussing implications ofphotospheric-velocity carbon for white dwarf explosion models, we outlinesome factors that may influence the frequency of its detection before andaround peak brightness. Two effects are explored in this regard,including depopulation of the C II optical levels by non-LTE effects, andline-of-sight effects resulting from a clumpy distribution of unburnedmaterial with low volume-filling factor.

  7. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  8. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  9. Simultaneous in-situ observations of the signatures of dayside reconnection at the high- and low-latitude magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present magnetic field and particle data recorded by the Cluster and Geotail satellites in the vicinity of the high- and low-latitude dayside magnetopause, respectively, on 17 February 2003. A favourable conjunction of these spacecraft culminated in the observation of a series of flux transfer events (FTEs, characterised by bipolar perturbations in the component of the magnetic field normal to the magnetopause, an enhancement in the overall magnetic field strength, and field tilting effects in the plane of the magnetopause whilst the satellites were located on the magnetosheath side of the boundary. Whilst a subset of the FTE signatures observed could be identified as being either normal or reverse polarity, the rapid succession of events observed made it difficult to classify some of the signatures unambiguously. Nevertheless, by considering the source region and motion of flux tubes opened by magnetic reconnection at low latitudes (i.e. between Cluster and Geotail, we demonstrate that the observations are consistent with the motion of northward (southward and tailward moving flux tubes anchored in the Northern (Southern Hemisphere passing in close proximity to the Cluster (Geotail satellites. We are able to demonstrate that a multi-spacecraft approach, coupled with a realistic model of flux tube motion in the magnetosheath, enables us to infer the approximate position of the reconnection site, which in this case was located at near-equatorial latitudes.

  10. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV

  11. Physics possibilities of lepton and hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    After a brief introduction to lepton and hadron colliders presently being planned, I give some examples of the nice standard physics which is expected to be seen in them. The bulk of the discussion, however, is centered on signals for new physics. Higgs searches at the new colliders are discussed, as well as signatures and prospects for detecting effects of supersymmetry, compositeness and dynamical symmetry breakdown. (orig.)

  12. Mesospheric signatures observed during 2010 minor stratospheric warming at King Sejong Station (62°S, 59°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaraiah, S.; Kim, Yong Ha; Hong, Junseok; Kim, Jeong-Han; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Chandran, A.; Rao, S. V. B.; Riggin, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    A minor stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event was noticed in the southern hemisphere (SH) during September (day 259) 2010 along with two episodic warmings in early August (day 212) and late October (day 300) 2010. Among the three warming events, the signature of mesosphere response was detected only for the September event in the mesospheric wind dataset from both meteor radar and MF radar located at King Sejong Station (62°S, 59°W) and Rothera (68°S, 68°W), Antarctica, respectively. The zonal winds in the mesosphere reversed approximately a week before the September SSW event, as has been observed in the 2002 major SSW. Signatures of mesospheric cooling (MC) in association with stratospheric warmings are found in temperatures measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Simulations of specified dynamics version of Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) are able to reproduce these observed features. The mesospheric wind field was found to differ significantly from that of normal years probably due to enhanced planetary wave (PW) activity before the SSW. From the wavelet analysis of wind data of both stations, we find that strong 14-16 day PWs prevailed prior to the SSW and disappeared suddenly after the SSW in the mesosphere. Our study provides evidence that minor SSWs in SH can result in significant effects on the mesospheric dynamics as in the northern hemisphere.

  13. Hadroproduction of heavy flavors at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1979-11-01

    The possibility of detecting the top quark in hadron interactions at collider energies is investigated. The production of bound and naked t-quarks for m/sub t/ = 15 - 100 GeV, and the experimental signatures from their leptonic and semileptonic decay modes are studied. The background to any leptonic signature is expected to be severe, suggesting the requirement of simultaneous detection of hadrons

  14. Theoretical perspective on RHIC [relativistic heavy ion collider] physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the status of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven, and assess some key experiments which propose to detect the signatures of a transient quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in such collisions. 24 refs

  15. MMS observations of magnetic reconnection signatures of dissipating ion inertial-scale flux ropes associated with dipolarization events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Lu, S.; Le, G.; Cassak, P.; Eastwood, J. P.; Ozturk, D. S.; Zou, S.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Moore, T. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of flux ropes is thought to be an integral part of the process that may have important consequences for the onset and subsequent rate of reconnection in the tail. Earthward flows, i.e. bursty bulk flows (BBFs), generate dipolarization fronts (DFs) as they interact with the closed magnetic flux in their path. Global hybrid simulations and THEMIS observations have shown that earthward-moving flux ropes can undergo magnetic reconnection with the near-Earth dipole field in the downtail region between the Near Earth Neutral Line and the near-Earth dipole field to create DFs-like signatures. In this study, we analyzed sequential "chains" of earthward-moving, ion-scale flux ropes embedded within DFs observed during MMS first tail season. MMS high-resolution plasma measurements indicate that these earthward flux ropes embedded in DFs have a mean bulk flow velocity and diameter of 250 km/s and 1000 km ( 2‒3 ion inertial length λi), respectively. Magnetic reconnection signatures preceding the flux rope/DF encounter were also observed. As the southward-pointing magnetic field in the leading edge of the flux rope reconnects with the northward-pointing geomagnetic field, the characteristic quadrupolar Hall magnetic field in the ion diffusion region and electron outflow jets in the north-south direction are observed. Our results strongly suggest that the earthward moving flux ropes brake and gradually dissipate due to magnetic reconnection with the near Earth magnetic field. We have also examined the occurrence rate of these dissipating flux ropes/DF events as a function of downtail distances.

  16. Observation of the human body thermoregulation and extraction of its vein signature using NIR and MWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzida, Nabila; Bendada, Abdelhakim; Maldague, Xavier P.

    2009-05-01

    The article aims first to present a new study on the thermal regulatory response of the human skin surface while exposed to a cold environment. Our work has shown that when a cold stress is applied to the left hand, thermal infrared imaging (MWIR spectral band: 3-5 μm) allows a clear observation of a temperature rise on the right hand. Moreover, a frequency analysis was also carried out upon selected vein pixels of the images monitored during the same cold stress experiment. The objective was to identify the specific frequencies that could be linked to some physiological mechanisms of the human body. This kind of study could be very useful for the characterization of possible thermo-physiological pathologies. Besides thermoregulation, we also present in this article some results on the extraction of the hand vein pattern. Firstly, we show some vein extraction results obtained after image processing of the thermal images recorded in the thermal band (MWIR), then we compare this vein pattern to the signature obtained with a camera operating in the NIR spectral band (0.85-1.7 μm). This method could be used as a complementary means for finger print signatures in biometrics.

  17. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Marshall, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, VLF observations during EuroSprite-2003 are analyzed in connection with many sprites observed above thunderstorms in central France. The sprites were detected with a sensitive camera from the Observatoire du Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees overlooking storms monitored by the French nat...

  18. Signature of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter in observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Elcio; Abramo, L. Raul; Souza, Jose C. C. de

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of an interaction between dark energy and dark matter upon the dynamics of galaxy clusters. This effect is computed through the Layser-Irvine equation, which describes how an astrophysical system reaches virial equilibrium and was modified to include the dark interactions. Using observational data from almost 100 purportedly relaxed galaxy clusters we put constraints on the strength of the couplings in the dark sector. We compare our results with those from other observations and find that a positive (in the sense of energy flow from dark energy to dark matter) nonvanishing interaction is consistent with the data within several standard deviations.

  19. Production Of The ADD Type Kaluza-Klein Excitations At Future e+e-, ep And pp Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billur, A. A.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Inan, S. C.; Sultansoy, S.

    2007-01-01

    Possible production of ADD type Kaluza-Klein excitations are investigated at future high energy e+e-, ep and pp colliders. Discovery limits and signatures of such excitations are discussed at above colliders comparatively

  20. Production of the Randall-Sundrum Type Kaluza-Klein Excitations at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billur, A. A.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Inan, S. C.; Sultansoy, S.

    2007-01-01

    Possible production of Randall-Sundrum type Kaluza-Klein excitations are investigated at future high energy e+e-, ep and pp colliders. Discovery limits and signatures of such excitations are discussed at above colliders comparatively

  1. Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Quarks at Future e+e-, ep, and pp Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Sultansoy, S.; Yildiz, H. Duran

    2007-01-01

    Possible single productions of fourth SM family u4 and d4 quarks via anomalous interactions at the e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are investigated. Signatures of such anomalous processes are discussed at above colliders comparatively

  2. Search for squarks and gluinos in p bar p collisions at the D0 detector with the jets and missing energy signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    A search for squarks and gluinos has been performed using the D null detector at √s = 1.8 TeV Tevatron p anti p collider. Data from the 1992-1993 collider run corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 13.5 pb -1 were examined via the missing E T plus jets signature with two separate analyses. No events above the Standard Model backgrounds were observed

  3. Possible signature of the magnetic fields related to quasi-periodic oscillations observed in microquasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kološ, Martin; Tursunov, Arman; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2017-12-01

    The study of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) of X-ray flux observed in the stellar-mass black hole binaries can provide a powerful tool for testing of the phenomena occurring in the strong gravity regime. Magnetized versions of the standard geodesic models of QPOs can explain the observationally fixed data from the three microquasars. We perform a successful fitting of the HF QPOs observed for three microquasars, GRS 1915+105, XTE 1550-564 and GRO 1655-40, containing black holes, for magnetized versions of both epicyclic resonance and relativistic precession models and discuss the corresponding constraints of parameters of the model, which are the mass and spin of the black hole and the parameter related to the external magnetic field. The estimated magnetic field intensity strongly depends on the type of objects giving the observed HF QPOs. It can be as small as 10^{-5} G if electron oscillatory motion is relevant, but it can be by many orders higher for protons or ions (0.02-1 G), or even higher for charged dust or such exotic objects as lighting balls, etc. On the other hand, if we know by any means the magnetic field intensity, our model implies strong limit on the character of the oscillating matter, namely its specific charge.

  4. Possible signature of the magnetic fields related to quasi-periodic oscillations observed in microquasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolos, Martin; Tursunov, Arman; Stuchlik, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Opava (Czech Republic)

    2017-12-15

    The study of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) of X-ray flux observed in the stellar-mass black hole binaries can provide a powerful tool for testing of the phenomena occurring in the strong gravity regime. Magnetized versions of the standard geodesic models of QPOs can explain the observationally fixed data from the three microquasars. We perform a successful fitting of the HF QPOs observed for three microquasars, GRS 1915+105, XTE 1550-564 and GRO 1655-40, containing black holes, for magnetized versions of both epicyclic resonance and relativistic precession models and discuss the corresponding constraints of parameters of the model, which are the mass and spin of the black hole and the parameter related to the external magnetic field. The estimated magnetic field intensity strongly depends on the type of objects giving the observed HF QPOs. It can be as small as 10{sup -5} G if electron oscillatory motion is relevant, but it can be by many orders higher for protons or ions (0.02-1 G), or even higher for charged dust or such exotic objects as lighting balls, etc. On the other hand, if we know by any means the magnetic field intensity, our model implies strong limit on the character of the oscillating matter, namely its specific charge. (orig.)

  5. Tomb of Nefertari signature in microgravity observations in the Valley of the Queens, Luxor, Egypt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Issawy, E. S. A.; Mrlina, Jan; Radwan, A. H.; Hassan, G. S.; Sakr, K. O.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2002), s. 23-32 ISSN 1687-0999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/1470 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : archaeological prospecting * Luxor * microgravity observations Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  6. TRANSITION REGION AND CHROMOSPHERIC SIGNATURES OF IMPULSIVE HEATING EVENTS. I. OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Reep, Jeffrey W. [National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Crump, Nicholas A. [Naval Center for Space Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Simões, Paulo J. A. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-20

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during a small flare. Simultaneous observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provide constraints on the energetic electrons precipitating into the flare footpoints, while observations of the X-Ray Telescope , Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) allow us to measure the temperatures and emission measures from the resulting flare loops. We find clear evidence for heating over an extended period on the spatial scale of a single IRIS pixel. During the impulsive phase of this event, the intensities in each pixel for the Si iv 1402.770 Å, C ii 1334.535 Å, Mg ii 2796.354 Å, and O i 1355.598 Å emission lines are characterized by numerous small-scale bursts typically lasting 60 s or less. Redshifts are observed in Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii during the impulsive phase. Mg ii shows redshifts during the bursts and stationary emission at other times. The Si iv and C ii profiles, in contrast, are observed to be redshifted at all times during the impulsive phase. These persistent redshifts are a challenge for one-dimensional hydrodynamic models, which predict only short-duration downflows in response to impulsive heating. We conjecture that energy is being released on many small-scale filaments with a power-law distribution of heating rates.

  7. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CORONAL LOOP HEATING AND COOLING DRIVEN BY FOOTPOINT SHUFFLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Taylor, B. D. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Einaudi, G. [Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, I. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rappazzo, A. F. [Advanced Heliophysics, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Velli, M., E-mail: rdahlbur@lcp.nrl.navy.mil [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  8. Prospects for Future Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-10-20

    One item on the agenda of future colliders is certain to be the Higgs boson. What is it trying to tell us? The primary objective of any future collider must surely be to identify physics beyond the Standard Model, and supersymmetry is one of the most studied options. it Is supersymmetry waiting for us and, if so, can LHC Run 2 find it? The big surprise from the initial 13-TeV LHC data has been the appearance of a possible signal for a new boson X with a mass ~750 GeV. What are the prospects for future colliders if the X(750) exists? One of the most intriguing possibilities in electroweak physics would be the discovery of non-perturbative phenomena. What are the prospects for observing sphalerons at the LHC or a future collider?

  9. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Abdalla, E; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavón, D

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  10. A general relativistic signature in the galaxy bispectrum: the local effects of observing on the lightcone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeh, Obinna; Jolicoeur, Sheean; Maartens, Roy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Clarkson, Chris, E-mail: umeobinna@gmail.com, E-mail: beautifulheart369@gmail.com, E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com, E-mail: chris.clarkson@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    Next-generation galaxy surveys will increasingly rely on the galaxy bispectrum to improve cosmological constraints, especially on primordial non-Gaussianity. A key theoretical requirement that remains to be developed is the analysis of general relativistic effects on the bispectrum, which arise from observing galaxies on the past lightcone, as well as from relativistic corrections to the dynamics. As an initial step towards a fully relativistic analysis of the galaxy bispectrum, we compute for the first time the local relativistic lightcone effects on the bispectrum, which come from Doppler and gravitational potential contributions. For the galaxy bispectrum, the problem is much more complex than for the power spectrum, since we need the lightcone corrections at second order. Mode-coupling contributions at second order mean that relativistic corrections can be non-negligible at smaller scales than in the case of the power spectrum. In a primordial Gaussian universe, we show that the local lightcone projection effects for squeezed shapes at z ∼ 1 mean that the bispectrum can differ from the Newtonian prediction by ∼> 10% when the short modes are k ∼< (50 Mpc){sup −1}. These relativistic projection effects, if ignored in the analysis of observations, could be mistaken for primordial non-Gaussianity. For upcoming surveys which probe equality scales and beyond, all relativistic lightcone effects and relativistic dynamical corrections should be included for an accurate measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity.

  11. A New Boson with a Mass of 125 GeV Observed with the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Majerotto, Walter; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Szoncsó, Fritz; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Emeliantchik, Igor; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Solin, Alexander; Stefanovitch, Roman; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Fedorov, Andrey; Korzhik, Mikhail; Missevitch, Oleg; Zuyeuski, Raman; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Beaumont, Willem; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Druzhkin, Dmitry; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Goorens, Robert; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Dewulf, Jean-Paul; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Rugovac, Shkelzen; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Iope, Rogerio Luiz; Lagana, Caio; Lietti, Sergio M; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Vutova, Mariana; Roumenin, Chavdar; Uzunova, Daniela; Zahariev, Roman; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; He, Kang-Lin; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Li, Wei-Guo; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Han-Sheng; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenxia; Zhao, Wei-Ren; Zhu, Zian; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Cai, Jianxin; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Ye, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Aly, Ayman; Assran, Yasser; Awad, Adel; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Strumia, Alessandro; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Anttila, Erkki; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Katajisto, Harri Mikael; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kotamäki, Miikka; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Vanhala, Tommi Pekka; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Anfreville, Marc; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Gentit, François-Xavier; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kircher, François; Lemaire, Marie-Claude; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Nayak, Aruna; Pansart, Jean-Pierre; Rander, John; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Verrecchia, Patrice; Badier, Jean; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Becheva, Emilia; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Cerutti, Muriel; Chamont, David; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Geerebaert, Yannick; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hennion, Pascale; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Romanteau, Thierry; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sartirana, Andrea; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Besson, Auguste; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Gross, Laurent; Huss, Daniel; Juillot, Pierre; Kieffer, Eric; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Pansanel, Jérôme; Patois, Yannick; Van Hove, Pierre; Boutigny, Dominique; Mercier, Damien; Baulieu, Guillaume; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Combaret, Christophe; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Giraud, Noël; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Haroutunian, Roger; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lumb, Nicholas; Mathez, Hervé; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Roinishvili, Vladimir; Rurua, Lali; Amaglobeli, Nodar; Bagaturia, Iuri; Chiladze, Badri; Kvatadze, Ramazi; Lomidze, David; Shanidze, Revaz; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Adolphi, Roman; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Brauer, Richard; Braunschweig, Wolfgang; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Lübelsmeyer, Klaus; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schmitz, Detlef; Schultz von Dratzig, Arndt; Siedling, Rolf; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Biallass, Philipp; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hilgers, Guenter; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hof, Carsten; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Philipps, Barthel; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sowa, Michael; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Goettlicher, Peter; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lewendel, Birgit; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Muhl, Carsten; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Olzem, Jan; Parenti, Andrea; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosemann, Christoph; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Youngman, Christopher; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Bauer, Julia; Berger, Joram; Blüm, Peter; Böser, Christian; Buege, Volker; Chen, Zheng-Yu; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Chwalek, Thorsten; Daeuwel, Daniel; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Fahrer, Manuel; Feindt, Michael; Felzmann, Ulrich; Frey, Martin; Furgeri, Alexander; Gebauer, Iris; Gessler, Andreas; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauler, Florian; Hauth, Thomas; Heier, Stefan; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Heinrich, Michael; Heiss, Andreas; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Imhof, Markus; Jung, Christopher; Junghans, Sascha; Katkov, Igor; Kerzel, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Dieter; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kräber, Michael; Kuhr, Thomas; Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Menchikov, Alexandre; Mol, Xavier; Mörmann, Dirk; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Neuberger, Dirk; Neuland, Maike Brigitte; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ortega Gomez, Tino; Ott, Jochen; Piasecki, Christian; Poschlad, Angela; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Roederer, Frank; Sabellek, Andreas; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Dennis; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Schwerdtfeger, Wolfgang; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Skiba, Alexander; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Theel, Andreas; Thümmel, Wolf Hagen; Troendle, Daniel; Trunov, Artem; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Markus; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Zvada, Marian; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zalan, Peter; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Fenyvesi, Andras; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Zilizi, Gyula; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chatterji, Sudeep; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gupta, Pooja; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Ghodgaonkar, Manohar; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Ganguli, Som N; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Raghavan, R; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bheesette, Satyanarayana; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Lakkireddi, Venkatesam Reddy; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Panyam, Nagaraj; Verma, Piyush; Ardalan, Farhad; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; De Robertis, Giuseppe; Donvito, Giacinto; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Natali, Sergio; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Ranieri, Antonio; Romano, Francesco; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Spinoso, Vincenzo; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Noto, Francesco; Potenza, Renato; Saizu, Mirela Angela; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Genta, Chiara; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Parrini, Giuliano; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Farinon, Stefania; Greco, Michela; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Carbone, Luca; D'Angelo, Pasqualino; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dini, Paolo; Farina, Fabio Mario; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Negri, Pietro; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pullia, Antonino; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benettoni, Massimo; Biasotto, Massimo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Gulmini, Michele; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Loreti, Maurizio; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Berzano, Umberto; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Passeri, Daniele; Placidi, Pisana; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Angelini, Franco; Arezzini, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Basti, Andrea; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Bosi, Filippo; Brez, Alessandro; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Calzolari, Federico; Carboni, Andrea; Castaldi, Rino; Cerri, Claudio; Ciampa, Alberto; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Giusti, Simone; Kraan, Aafke; Latronico, Luca; Ligabue, Franco; Linari, Stefano; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Massa, Maurizio; Massai, Marco Maria; Mazzoni, Enrico; Messineo, Alberto; Moggi, Andrea; Palla, Fabrizio; Raffaelli, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Sanguinetti, Giulio; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Baccaro, Stefania; Barone, Luciano; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cavallari, Francesca; Dafinei, Ioan; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Talamo, Ivano Giuseppe; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Peroni, Cristiana; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Ambroglini, Filippo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Kavka, Carlos; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Ham, Seung Woo; Han, Daehee; Kang, Juheon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Man Woo; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dohhee; Son, Dong-Chul; Suh, Jun Suhk; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Jo, Youngkwon; Kang, Minho; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Hahn, Garam; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Naujikas, Rolandas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Allfrey, Philip; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Bernardino Rodrigues, Nuno; Butler, Anthony Philip Howard; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Williams, Jennifer C; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Goscilo, Lukasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Kudla, Ignacy Maciek; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Czyrkowski, Henryk; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Oklinski, Wojciech; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Zabolotny, Wojciech; Zych, Pawel; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Alemany-Fernandez, Reyes; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Rasteiro Da Silva, Jose; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Ershov, Yuri; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gorbunov, Ilya; Gramenitski, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Kurenkov, Alexander; Lanev, Alexander; Makankin, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Melnitchenko, Igor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Oleynik, Danila; Orlov, Alexandre; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Petrosyan, Artem; Savina, Maria; Semenov, Roman; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skachkova, Anna; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smetannikov, Vladimir; Smirnov, Vitaly; Smolin, Dmitry; Tikhonenko, Elena; Vasilyev, Sergey; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zhiltsov, Victor; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Anisimov, Alexander; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Pivovarov, Grigory; Postoev, Vladimir E; Rubakov, Valery; Shirinyants, Valery; Solovey, Anatoly; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kiselevich, Ivan; Kolosov, Victor; Konoplyannikov, Anatoly; Kossov, Mikhail; Kozlov, Yury; Krokhotin, Andrey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Oulianov, Alexei; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Shreyber, Irina; Stepanov, Nikita; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zaytsev, Valentin; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Demiyanov, Andrey; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Ilyin, Viacheslav; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Kryukov, Alexander; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Proskuryakov, Alexander; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Levine, Andrey; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryabov, Alexander; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Talov, Vladimir; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Smiljkovic, Nebojsa; Zupan, Marko; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Aspell, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baechler, Joachim; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Campi, Domenico; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cano, Eric; Cerminara, Gianluca; Charkiewicz, Andrzej; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daguin, Jerome; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eppard, Michael; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Gastal, Martin; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Goudard, Raphael; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Gutleber, Johannes; Hammarstrom, Robert; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Loos, Robert; Lourenco, Carlos; Macpherson, Alick; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marchioro, Alessandro; Marques Pinho Noite, João; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moneta, Lorenzo; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Onnela, Antti; Orsini, Luciano; Osborne, John Andrew; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petagna, Paolo; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucci, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Postema, Hans; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Ricci, Daniel; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Ryjov, Vladimir; Sakulin, Hannes; Samyn, Dirk; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sciaba, Andrea; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Taylor, Bruce G; Teller, Olivier; Tropea, Paola; Troska, Jan; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vasey, François; Veillet, Lucien; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wertelaers, Piet; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Feichtinger, Derek; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Beat; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sakhelashvili, Tariel; Bäni, Lukas; Behner, Frank; Betev, Botjo; Blau, Bertrand; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Da Silva Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Dambach, Sarah; Davatz, Giovanna; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eggel, Christina; Eugster, Jürg; Faber, Gérard; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hintz, Wieland; Hits, Dmitry; Hofer, Hans; Holme, Oliver; Horvath, Istvan; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Punz, Thomas; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Röser, Ulf; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Schinzel, Dietrich; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Suter, Henry; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Trüb, Peter; Udriot, Stève; Urscheler, Christina; Viertel, Gert; von Gunten, Hans Peter; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Wan-Ting; Ferro, Cristina; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Ming-Hsiung; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Wu, Jing-Han; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Gao, Zhengwei; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liau, Jiun-jie; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Ueno, Koji; Velikzhanin, Yury; Wan, Xia; Wang, Chin-chi; Wang, Minzu; Wei, Jui-Te; Yeh, Ping; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Lukyanenko, Sergiy; Soroka, Dmytro; Sorokin, Pavel; Ahmad, Mian Khawar Hasham; Branson, Andrew; McClatchey, Richard; Odeh, Mohammed; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran; Barrass, Timothy; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lacesso, Winnie; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bateman, Eddie; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David JA; Connolly, John F; Coughlan, John A; Denton, Len G; Flower, Paul S; French, Marcus; Greenhalgh, Justin; Halsall, Robert; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Hill, John; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Lintern, Laurence Albert; Lodge, Anthony B; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Pearson, Matthew; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Smith, Brian; Sproston, Martin; Stephenson, Richard; Tomalin, Ian R; Torbet, Martin; Williams, Julian; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Bauer, Daniela; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Jones, John; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Leaver, James; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Miller, Derek George; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Noy, Matthew; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Rand, Duncan; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Timlin, Claire; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Wingham, Matthew; Zorba, Osman; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Fantasia, Cory; Hazen, Eric; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Wu, Shouxiang; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Hooper, Ryan; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Unalan, Zeynep; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Case, Michael; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Grim, Gary; Gunion, Jack; Holbrook, Britt; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Miceli, Tia; Murray, Patrick; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rowe, Jeff; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Yohay, Rachel; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Kubic, Jonathan; Otwinowski, Stanislaw; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Yangheng; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Layter, John G; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Shen, Benjamin C; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cinquilli, Mattia; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Martin, Terrence; Mrak-Tadel, Alja; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sfiligoi, Igor; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Golf, Frank; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Kyre, Susanne; Lowette, Steven; Magazzu, Guido; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; White, Dean; Adamczyk, David; Apresyan, Artur; Barczyk, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Denis, Gregory; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Galvez, Philippe; Gataullin, Marat; Kcira, Dorian; Lebeau, Michel; Legrand, Iosif; Litvine, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Maxa, Zdenek; Mott, Alexander; Mughal, Azher; Nae, Dan; Newman, Harvey B; Ravot, Sylvain; Rogan, Christopher; Rozsa, Sandor Gyula; Shevchenko, Sergey; Shin, Kyoungha; Spiropulu, Maria; Steenberg, Conrad; Thomas, Michael; Timciuc, Vladlen; van Lingen, Frank; Veverka, Jan; Voicu, Bucoveanu-Ramiro; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Terentyev, Nikolay; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Johnson, Douglas; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Riley, Daniel; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Stroiney, Steven; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albert, Merina; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Badgett, William; Bailleux, David; Bakken, Jon Alan; Baldin, Boris; Banicz, Karoly; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Binkley, Morris; Borcherding, Frederick; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Dagenhart, William; Derylo, Greg; Dumitrescu, Catalin; Dykstra, David; Eartly, David P; Elias, John E; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Eulisse, Giulio; Evans, David; Fagan, David; Fisk, Ian; Foulkes, Stephen; Freeman, Jim; Gaines, Irwin; Gao, Yanyan; Gartung, Patrick; Giacchetti, Lisa; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Guo, Yuyi; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Holzman, Burt; Hooberman, Benjamin; Howell, Joseph; Huang, Chih-hao; Hufnagel, Dirk; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Jones, Christopher Duncan; Joshi, Umesh; Juska, Evaldas; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Larson, Krista; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lopez Perez, Juan Antonio; Los, Serguei; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; McCauley, Thomas; Mishra, Kalanand; Moccia, Stefano; Mommsen, Remigius K; Mrenna, Stephen; Murray, Steven John; Musienko, Yuri; Muzaffar, Shahzad; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Osborne, Ianna; Pivarski, James; Popescu, Sorina; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rapsevicius, Valdas; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Rossman, Paul; Ryu, Seangchan; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Shaw, Theresa; Smith, Richard P; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tanenbaum, William; Taylor, Lucas; Thompson, Rich; Tiradani, Anthony; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Tuura, Lassi; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yarba, Julia; Yun, Jae Chul; Zimmerman, Thomas; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Barashko, Victor; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Dolinsky, Sergei; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Gorn, Lisa; Holmes, Daniel; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Madorsky, Alexander; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Park, Myeonghun; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Scurlock, Bobby; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Stasko, John; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bertoldi, Maurizio; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Dharmaratna, Welathantri GD; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Tentindo, Silvia; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chung, Man-Ho; Evdokimov, Olga; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Hollis, Richard; Iordanova, Aneta; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Debbins, Paul; Duru, Firdevs; Ingram, F Duane; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael Jan; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Schmidt, Ianos; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Coppage, Don; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Grassi, Tullio; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Toole, Terrence; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Egeland, Ricky; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Inyakin, Alexandre; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Attebury, Garhan; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bockelman, Brian; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Lundstedt, Carl; Malik, Sudhir; Snihur, Robert; Snow, Gregory R; Swanson, David; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Moromisato, Jorge; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Swain, John; Trocino, Daniele; Von Goeler, Eberhard; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Gobbi, Bruno; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Lusito, Letizia; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Baumbaugh, Barry; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Rush, Chuck J; Sehgal, Veejay; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Koay, Sue Ann; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Wildish, Tony; Xie, Zhen; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Bonnett Del Alamo, Miguel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Arndt, Kirk; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bujak, Adam; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Lee, Jik; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Miyamoto, Jun; Neumeister, Norbert; Rott, Carsten; Roy, Amitava; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Lee, Sang Joon; Li, Wei; Liu, Jinghua H; Matveev, Mikhail; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Tumanov, Alexander; Yepes, Pablo; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Ginther, George; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Sakumoto, Willis; Slattery, Paul; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Ragghianti, Gerald; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Nguyen, Chi Nhan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Andelin, Daniel; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Phillips II, David; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Borrello, Laura; Bradley, Daniel; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Crotty, Ian; Dasu, Sridhara; Feyzi, Farshid; Friis, Evan; Gorski, Thomas; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lackey, Joe; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Loveless, Richard; Lusin, Sergei; Magrans de Abril, Marc; Maier, Will; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Reeder, Don; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua; Wenman, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force—the W+, W–, and Z0 bosons—as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 106. The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 giga–electron volts. Although its measured properties are, withi...

  12. Observational signatures of the parametric amplification of gravitational waves during reheating after inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Lin, Chunshan; Sasaki, Misao; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2018-01-01

    We study the evolution of gravitational waves (GWs) during and after inflation as well as the resulting observational consequences in a Lorentz-violating massive gravity theory with one scalar (inflaton) and two tensor degrees of freedom. We consider two explicit examples of the tensor mass mg that depends either on the inflaton field ϕ or on its time derivative ϕ ˙, both of which lead to parametric excitations of GWs during reheating after inflation. The first example is Starobinsky's R2 inflation model with a ϕ -dependent mg, and the second is a low energy-scale inflation model with a ϕ ˙-dependent mg. We compute the energy density spectrum ΩGW(k ) today of the GW background. In the Starobinsky's model, we show that the GWs can be amplified up to the detectable ranges of both cosmic microwave background and DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory, but the bound from the big bang nucleosynthesis is quite tight to limit the growth. In low-scale inflation with a fast transition to the reheating stage driven by the potential V (ϕ )=M2ϕ2/2 around ϕ ≈Mpl (where Mpl is the reduced Planck mass), we find that the peak position of ΩGW(k ) induced by the parametric resonance can reach the sensitivity region of advanced LIGO for the Hubble parameter of order 1 GeV at the end of inflation. Thus, our massive gravity scenario offers exciting possibilities for probing the physics of primordial GWs at various different frequencies.

  13. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  14. MMS Observations of Large Guide Field Symmetric Reconnection Between Colliding Reconnection Jets at the Center of a Magnetic Flux Rope at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Haggerty, C.; Shay, M. A.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report evidence for reconnection between colliding reconnection jets in a compressed current sheet at the center of a magnetic flux rope at Earth's magnetopause. The reconnection involved nearly symmetric Inflow boundary conditions with a strong guide field of two. The thin (2.5 ion-skin depth (d(sub i) width) current sheet (at approximately 12 d(sub i) downstream of the X line) was well resolved by MMS, which revealed large asymmetries in plasma and field structures in the exhaust. Ion perpendicular heating, electron parallel heating, and density compression occurred on one side of the exhaust, while ion parallel heating and density depression were shifted to the other side. The normal electric field and double out-of-plane (bifurcated) currents spanned almost the entire exhaust. These observations are in good agreement with a kinetic simulation for similar boundary conditions, demonstrating in new detail that the structure of large guide field symmetric reconnection is distinctly different from antiparallel reconnection.

  15. Identifying the subtle signatures of feedback from distant AGN using ALMA observations and the EAGLE hydrodynamical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, J.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, C. M.; Rosario, D. J.; McAlpine, S.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stanley, F.; Simpson, J.; Theuns, T.; Bower, R. G.; Hickox, R. C.; Santini, P.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    We present sensitive 870 μm continuum measurements from our ALMA programmes of 114 X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra Deep Field-South and Cosmic Evolution Survey fields. We use these observations in combination with data from Spitzer and Herschel to construct a sample of 86 X-ray selected AGN, 63 with ALMA constraints at z = 1.5-3.2 with stellar mass >2 × 1010 M⊙. We constructed broad-band spectral energy distributions in the infrared band (8-1000 μm) and constrain star-formation rates (SFRs) uncontaminated by the AGN. Using a hierarchical Bayesian method that takes into account the information from upper limits, we fit SFR and specific SFR (sSFR) distributions. We explore these distributions as a function of both X-ray luminosity and stellar mass. We compare our measurements to two versions of the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) hydrodynamical simulations: the reference model with AGN feedback and the model without AGN. We find good agreement between the observations and that predicted by the EAGLE reference model for the modes and widths of the sSFR distributions as a function of both X-ray luminosity and stellar mass; however, we found that the EAGLE model without AGN feedback predicts a significantly narrower width when compared to the data. Overall, from the combination of the observations with the model predictions, we conclude that (1) even with AGN feedback, we expect no strong relationship between the sSFR distribution parameters and instantaneous AGN luminosity and (2) a signature of AGN feedback is a broad distribution of sSFRs for all galaxies (not just those hosting an AGN) with stellar masses above ≈1010 M⊙.

  16. Searching for signatures of dark matter-dark radiation interaction in observations of large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhen; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Knox, Lloyd

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we conduct a search in the latest large-scale structure measurements for signatures of the dark matter-dark radiation interaction proposed by Buen-Abad et al. (2015). We show that prior claims of an inference of this interaction at ˜3 σ significance rely on a use of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster mass function that ignores uncertainty in the mass-observable relationship. Including this uncertainty we find that the inferred level of interaction remains consistent with the data, but so does zero interaction; i.e., there is no longer a preference for nonzero interaction. We also point out that inference of the shape and amplitude of the matter power spectrum from Ly α forest measurements is highly inconsistent with the predictions of the Λ CDM model conditioned on Planck cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization, and lensing power spectra, and that the dark matter-dark radiation model can restore that consistency. We also phenomenologically generalize the model of Buen-Abad et al. (2015) to allow for interaction rates with different scalings with temperature, and find that the original scaling is preferred by the data.

  17. Physics at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    After a brief review of the Big Issues in particle physics, we discuss the contributions to resolving that could be made by various planned and proposed future colliders. These include future runs of LEP and the Fermilab Tevatron collider, B factories, RHIC, the LHC, a linear electron-positron collider, an electron-proton collider in the LEP/LHC tunnel, a muon collider and a future larger hadron collider (FLHC). The Higgs boson and supersymmetry are used as benchmarks for assessing their capabilities. The LHC has great capacities for precision measurements as well as exploration, but also shortcomings where the complementary strengths of a linear electron-positron collider would be invaluable. It is not too soon to study seriously possible subsequent colliders.

  18. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-06-01

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  19. Linear colliders - prospects 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1985-06-01

    We discuss the scaling laws of linear colliders and their consequences for accelerator design. We then report on the SLAC Linear Collider project and comment on experience gained on that project and its application to future colliders. 9 refs., 2 figs

  20. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  1. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of. CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider ...

  2. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating ...

  3. Flash propagation and inferred charge structure relative to radar-observed ice alignment signatures in a small Florida mesoscale convective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Michael I.; Zounes, Zackery; Addison Alford, A.; Carrie, Gordon D.; Pilkey, John T.; Uman, Martin A.; Jordan, Douglas M.

    2017-08-01

    A series of vertical cross sections taken through a small mesoscale convective system observed over Florida by the dual-polarimetric SMART radar were combined with VHF radiation source locations from a lightning mapping array (LMA) to examine the lightning channel propagation paths relative to the radar-observed ice alignment signatures associated with regions of negative specific differential phase (KDP). Additionally, charge layers inferred from analysis of LMA sources were related to the ice alignment signature. It was found that intracloud flashes initiated near the upper zero-KDP boundary surrounding the negative KDP region. The zero-KDP boundary also delineated the propagation path of the lightning channel with the negative leaders following the upper boundary and positive leaders following the lower boundary. Very few LMA sources were found in the negative KDP region. We conclude that rapid dual-polarimetric radar observations can diagnose strong electric fields and may help identify surrounding regions of charge.

  4. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number. The right-handed triplet Higgs boson Δ, responsible for such breaking, can be copiously produced at the LHC through the Higgs portal in the gluon fusion and less so in gauge mediated channels. At Δ masses below the opening of the V V decay channel, the two observable modes are pair-production of heavy neutrinos via the triplet gluon fusion gg → Δ → NN and pair production of triplets from the Higgs h → ΔΔ → 4 N decay. The latter features tri- and quad same-sign lepton final states that break lepton number by four units and have no significant background. In both cases up to four displaced vertices may be present and their displacement may serve as a discriminating variable. The backgrounds at the LHC, including the jet fake rate, are estimated and the resulting sensitivity to the Left-Right breaking scale extends well beyond 10 TeV. In addition, sub-dominant radiative modes are surveyed: the γγ, Zγ and lepton flavour violating ones. Finally, prospects for Δ signals at future e + e - colliders are presented.

  5. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  6. Detecting particle dark matter signatures by cross-correlating γ-ray anisotropies with weak lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2016-05-01

    The underlying nature of dark matter still represents one of the fundamental questions in contemporary cosmology. Although observations well agree with its description in terms of a new fundamental particle, neither direct nor indirect signatures of its particle nature have been detected so far, despite a strong experimental effort. Similarly, particle accelerators have hitherto failed at producing dark matter particles in collider physics experiments. Here, we illustrate how the cross-correlation between anisotropies in the diffuse γ-ray background and weak gravitational lensing effects represents a novel promising way in the quest of detecting particle dark matter signatures.

  7. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Q; Jirasek, A; Lum, J J; Brolo, A G

    2011-01-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF 2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF 2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the

  8. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios

  9. Observation of correlated atom pairs in spontaneous four wave mixing of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates; Observation de paires d'atomes correles au travers de la collision de deux condensats de Bose-Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, A

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis, we report on the observation of pairs of correlated atoms produced in the collision of two Bose-Einstein condensates of metastable helium. Three laser beams perform a Raman transfer which extracts the condensate from the magnetic trap and separates it into two parts with opposite mean momenta. While the condensates propagate, elastic scattering of pairs of atoms occurs, whose momenta satisfy energy and momentum conservation laws. Metastable helium atoms large internal energy allows the use of a position-sensitive, single-atom detector which permits a three-dimensional reconstruction of the scattered atoms'momenta. The statistics of these momenta show correlations for atoms with opposite momenta. The measured correlation volume can be understood from the uncertainty-limited momentum spread of the colliding condensates. This interpretation is confirmed by the observation of the momentum correlation function for two atoms scattered in the same direction. This latter effect is a manifestation of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for indistinguishable bosons. Such a correlated-atom-pair source is a first step towards experiments in which one would like to confirm the pairs'entanglement. (author)

  10. Observation of correlated atom pairs in spontaneous four wave mixing of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates; Observation de paires d'atomes correles au travers de la collision de deux condensats de Bose-Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, A

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis, we report on the observation of pairs of correlated atoms produced in the collision of two Bose-Einstein condensates of metastable helium. Three laser beams perform a Raman transfer which extracts the condensate from the magnetic trap and separates it into two parts with opposite mean momenta. While the condensates propagate, elastic scattering of pairs of atoms occurs, whose momenta satisfy energy and momentum conservation laws. Metastable helium atoms large internal energy allows the use of a position-sensitive, single-atom detector which permits a three-dimensional reconstruction of the scattered atoms'momenta. The statistics of these momenta show correlations for atoms with opposite momenta. The measured correlation volume can be understood from the uncertainty-limited momentum spread of the colliding condensates. This interpretation is confirmed by the observation of the momentum correlation function for two atoms scattered in the same direction. This latter effect is a manifestation of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for indistinguishable bosons. Such a correlated-atom-pair source is a first step towards experiments in which one would like to confirm the pairs'entanglement. (author)

  11. Production and decay of supersymmetric particles at future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.; Majerotto, W.; Moesslacher, B.

    1991-01-01

    We describe how supersymmetric particles could be detected at the new colliders HERA, LEP 200, LHC, SSC, and at the possible future linear e + e - collider. We shall present theoretical predictions for production cross sections and decay probabilities, as well as for the important signatures. Our calculations will be based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) which is the simplest supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. (authors)

  12. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50's and the 60's colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible

  13. New particles and their experimental signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Gelmini, G.; Kowalski, H.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes work done by our theoretical working group on exotic particles before, during and since the Lausanne meeting. We discuss the motivations, rates and experimental signatures for new physics and new particles in the 1 TeV mass range. Section 2 reviews some of the motivations for expecting new physics in this range. Of particular interest is the physics of gauge symmetry breaking. In section 3 we discuss the rates and experimental signatures of new particles predicted by theoretical models of gauge symmetry breaking, notably the Higgs boson supersymmetry and technicolour. Among the signatures we discuss are multiple Wsup(+-) and/or Z 0 events (for the Higgs), missing transverse energy (for supersymmetry) and multiple anti tt events (for the Higgs and technicolour). We provide many examples of final state differential distributions in rapidity and Psub(T), particularly for Higgses and for supersymmetry. We also analyse some physics backgrounds to the new particle production processes which interest us. Examples include W + W - , Z 0 Z 0 , W(anti tt) and (anti tt) production as backgrounds to Higgs production. However, we do not consider in detail non-physics backgrounds such as the jet fluctuation background to missing energy signals for supersymmetry production. Section 4 summarizes our preliminary conclusions on the observability at a high energy hadron collider of the new particles studied in this report. (orig./HSI)

  14. Flavorful leptoquarks at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Gudrun; Loose, Dennis; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    B -physics data and flavor symmetries suggest that leptoquarks can have masses as low as a few O (TeV ) , predominantly decay to third generation quarks, and highlight p p →b μ μ signatures from single production and p p →b b μ μ from pair production. Abandoning flavor symmetries could allow for inverted quark hierarchies and cause sizable p p →j μ μ and j j μ μ cross sections, induced by second generation couplings. Final states with leptons other than muons including lepton flavor violation (LFV) ones can also arise. The corresponding couplings can also be probed by precision studies of the B →(Xs,K*,ϕ )e e distribution and LFV searches in B -decays. We demonstrate sensitivity in single leptoquark production for the large hadron collider (LHC) and extrapolate to the high luminosity LHC. Exploration of the bulk of the parameter space requires a hadron collider beyond the reach of the LHC, with b -identification capabilities.

  15. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  17. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  18. Signals for Non-Cummutative Interactions at Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have demonstrated that non-commutative geometries naturally appear within the context of string/M-theory. One consequence of this possibility is that QED takes on a non-abelian nature due to the introduction of 3- and 4-point functions. In addition, each QED vertex acquires a momentum dependent phase factor. We parameterize the effects of non-commutative space-time co-ordinates and show that they lead to observable signatures in several 2 → 2 QED processes in e + e - collisions. In particular, we examine pair annihilation, Moller and Bhabha scattering, as well as γγ → γγ scattering and show that non-commutative scales of order a TeV can be probed at high energy linear colliders

  19. Signals for Non-Cummutative Interactions at Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-07-23

    Recent theoretical results have demonstrated that non-commutative geometries naturally appear within the context of string/M-theory. One consequence of this possibility is that QED takes on a non-abelian nature due to the introduction of 3- and 4-point functions. In addition, each QED vertex acquires a momentum dependent phase factor. We parameterize the effects of non-commutative space-time co-ordinates and show that they lead to observable signatures in several 2 {yields} 2 QED processes in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. In particular, we examine pair annihilation, Moller and Bhabha scattering, as well as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} scattering and show that non-commutative scales of order a TeV can be probed at high energy linear colliders.

  20. Exotic events at the pp-bar collider: an excited quark or an excited colored boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.; Jickia, G.V.; Pirogov, Y.F.

    1984-01-01

    We show that the exotic events with large missing transverse momentum (up to 80--90 GeV/c) observed at the pp-bar collider at CERN require by their signature and effective cross section the existence of an object with a mass of about 180 GeV/c 2 , which is produced like a resonance from the constituents of the hardronic beams and is capable of decaying into a W-jet and a Z-jet. An excited quark q*, produced like a resonance in qg collisions and decaying into Wq and Zq, is the best candidate for such a object. However, colored W* and Z* bosons, produced in qq-bar collisions and decaying into Wg and Zg, cannot be excluded. We discuss possible experiments at pp-bar, pp, and ep colliders for verifying the hypothesis of the excited quark and for investigating its properties

  1. Majorana Dark Matter with a Coloured Mediator: Collider vs Direct and Indirect Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Garny, Mathias; Rydbeck, Sara; Vogl, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the signatures at the Large Hadron Collider of a minimal model where the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion that couples to the Standard Model via one or several coloured mediators. We emphasize the importance of the production channel of coloured scalars through the exchange of a dark matter particle in the t-channel, and perform a dedicated analysis of searches for jets and missing energy for this model. We find that the collider constraints are highly competitive compared to direct detection, and can even be considerably stronger over a wide range of parameters. We also discuss the complementarity with searches for spectral features at gamma-ray telescopes and comment on the possibility of several coloured mediators, which is further constrained by flavour observables.

  2. Majorana dark matter with a coloured mediator. Collider vs direct and indirect searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the signatures at the Large Hadron Collider of a minimal model where the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion that couples to the Standard Model via one or several coloured mediators. We emphasize the importance of the production channel of coloured scalars through the exchange of a dark matter particle in the t-channel, and perform a dedicated analysis of searches for jets and missing energy for this model. We find that the collider constraints are highly competitive compared to direct detection, and can even be considerably stronger over a wide range of parameters. We also discuss the complementarity with searches for spectral features at gamma-ray telescopes and comment on the possibility of several coloured mediators, which is further constrained by flavour observables.

  3. WIMP search in the mono-photon channel at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a planned electron-positron collider with √(s) tunable from 250 to 500 GeV, with a possible upgrade to 1 TeV. Besides precision measurements of the Higgs boson its physics goals comprise searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, e.g. searches for Dark Matter. This collider search assumes the production of WIMPs in pairs. They are not visible in the detector but the energy carried away can be observed via an additional (''tag'') particle. Photon emission from the initial state leads to the almost model independent signature: e{sup +}e{sup -} → χχγ. As this analysis tests couplings between WIMPs and leptons it is complementary to analogues searches at the LHC. A precise study is facilitated by the clean environment of lepton colliders with small systematics of electroweak backgrounds. While the conceptual feasibility and the sensitivity reach of the ILC have been shown in the past, this talk focusses on the consequences for the detector design. The requirements for the central detector as well as for the instrumentation of the forward region are discussed in the context of the ILD detector concept.

  4. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  5. On the signatures of magnetic islands and multiple X-lines in the solar wind as observed by ARTEMIS and WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Newman, D. L.; Lapenta, G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-06-01

    We report the first observation consistent with a magnetic reconnection generated magnetic island at a solar wind current sheet that was observed on 10 June 2012 by the two ARTEMIS satellites and the upstream WIND satellite. The evidence consists of a core magnetic field within the island which is formed by enhanced Hall magnetic fields across a solar wind reconnection exhaust. The core field at ARTEMIS displays a local dip coincident with a peak plasma density enhancement and a locally slower exhaust speed which differentiates it from a regular solar wind exhaust crossing. Further indirect evidence of magnetic island formation is presented in the form of a tripolar Hall magnetic field, which is supported by an observed electron velocity shear, and plasma density depletion regions which are in general agreement with multiple reconnection X-line signatures at the same current sheet on the basis of predicted signatures of magnetic islands as generated by a kinetic reconnection simulation for solar wind-like conditions. The combined ARTEMIS and WIND observations of tripolar Hall magnetic fields across the same exhaust and Grad-Shrafranov reconstructions of the magnetic field suggest that an elongated magnetic island was encountered which displayed a 4RE normal width and a 43RE extent along the exhaust between two neighboring X-lines.

  6. On the signatures of magnetic islands and multiple X-lines in the solar wind as observed by ARTEMIS and WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, S; Newman, D L; Lapenta, G; Angelopoulos, V

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation consistent with a magnetic reconnection generated magnetic island at a solar wind current sheet that was observed on 10 June 2012 by the two ARTEMIS satellites and the upstream WIND satellite. The evidence consists of a core magnetic field within the island which is formed by enhanced Hall magnetic fields across a solar wind reconnection exhaust. The core field at ARTEMIS displays a local dip coincident with a peak plasma density enhancement and a locally slower exhaust speed which differentiates it from a regular solar wind exhaust crossing. Further indirect evidence of magnetic island formation is presented in the form of a tripolar Hall magnetic field, which is supported by an observed electron velocity shear, and plasma density depletion regions which are in general agreement with multiple reconnection X-line signatures at the same current sheet on the basis of predicted signatures of magnetic islands as generated by a kinetic reconnection simulation for solar wind-like conditions. The combined ARTEMIS and WIND observations of tripolar Hall magnetic fields across the same exhaust and Grad–Shrafranov reconstructions of the magnetic field suggest that an elongated magnetic island was encountered which displayed a 4R E normal width and a 43R E extent along the exhaust between two neighboring X-lines. (paper)

  7. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  8. Mono-everything: Combined limits on dark matter production at colliders from multiple final states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, N.; Berge, D.; Whiteson, D.

    2013-01-01

    Searches for dark matter production at particle colliders are complementary to direct-detection and indirect-detection experiments and especially powerful for small masses, mχ<100  GeV. An important collider dark matter signature is due to the production of a pair of these invisible particles with

  9. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds

  10. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi, E-mail: matsu@hosei.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  11. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  12. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  13. FERMILAB: Preparing to collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Against the background of stringent Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) regulations mandated by the US Department of Energy for all national Labs, Fermilab prepared to mount the next major Tevatron proton-antiproton collider run

  14. Linear collider: a preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

  15. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  16. Superconducting linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) for particle accelerators have been demonstrated by successful operation of systems in the TRISTAN and LEP electron-positron collider rings respectively at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and at CERN. If performance continues to improve and costs can be lowered, this would open an attractive option for a high luminosity TeV (1000 GeV) linear collider

  17. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  18. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  19. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  20. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The int...

  1. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The in...

  2. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  3. Photon collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon colliders (γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e + e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3)L e + e - . Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e + e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e + e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ''an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems

  4. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  5. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  6. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  7. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  8. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  9. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  10. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  11. Superphysics at UNK collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kereselidze, A.R.; Liparteliani, A.G.; Sokolov, A.A.; Volkov, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical incompleteness of standard model and the way of going beyond frames on the basis of supersymmetry are considered. The most important directions of experimental researches at the colliders of a new generation are given. Theoretical estimates of masses of supersymmetrical particles in the framework of N=1 supergravity obtained from compactification of the popular E 8 xE 8 superstring theories are presented. The experimental search for supersymmetrical particles at the UNK pp-collider (√s=6 TeV) is performed

  12. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  13. Detection of hail through the three-body scattering signatures and its effects on radar algorithms observed in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    CARBUNARU, DANIEL VICTOR; SASU, MONICA; BURCEA, SORIN; BELL, AURORA

    2014-01-01

    The Romanian National Meteorological Administration (NMA) radar network consists of five S-band and four C-band radars. Observation of convection in Romania through the Doppler radar network offered a new perspective in understanding the climatologic risk of certain regions and mesoscale environments. Highly organized convective systems, such as supercells, are better observed and their subsequent threat can be better anticipated during the nowcasting process using Doppler velocity fields and...

  14. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  15. QCD and collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, William James

    1991-12-01

    1. Some basic theory. 2. Two important applications: - e+ e- annihilation (LEPSLS) ; deep inelastic scattering (HERA). 3. Other applications..., large Pt jets, W and Z, heavy quark production..., (pp- colliders). In this lecture: some basic theory. 1. QCD as a non abelian gauge field theory. 2. Asymptotic freedom. 3. Beyond leading order - renormalisation schemes. 4. MS.

  16. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  18. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  19. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  20. Review of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seishi

    1992-01-01

    The status of R and D of future e + e - linear colliders proposed by the institutions throughout the world is described including the JLC, NLC, VLEPP, CLIC, DESY/THD and TESLA projects. The parameters and RF sources are discussed. (G.P.) 36 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  2. High energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  3. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  4. B factory with hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunities to study B physics in a hadron collider are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the technological developments necessary for these experiments. The R and D program of the Bottom Collider Detector group is reviewed. (author)

  5. The Polarization Signature of Photospheric Magnetic Fields in 3D MHD Simulations and Observations at Disk Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Fabbian, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensytemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rezaei, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea S/N, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Puschmann, K. G., E-mail: cbeck@nso.edu [Alzenau (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    Before using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the solar photosphere in the determination of elemental abundances, one has to ensure that the correct amount of magnetic flux is present in the simulations. The presence of magnetic flux modifies the thermal structure of the solar photosphere, which affects abundance determinations and the solar spectral irradiance. The amount of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere also constrains any possible heating in the outer solar atmosphere through magnetic reconnection. We compare the polarization signals in disk-center observations of the solar photosphere in quiet-Sun regions with those in Stokes spectra computed on the basis of 3D MHD simulations having average magnetic flux densities of about 20, 56, 112, and 224 G. This approach allows us to find the simulation run that best matches the observations. The observations were taken with the Hinode SpectroPolarimeter (SP), the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP), the Polarimetric Littrow Spectrograph (POLIS), and the GREGOR Fabry–Pèrot Interferometer (GFPI), respectively. We determine characteristic quantities of full Stokes profiles in a few photospheric spectral lines in the visible (630 nm) and near-infrared (1083 and 1565 nm). We find that the appearance of abnormal granulation in intensity maps of degraded simulations can be traced back to an initially regular granulation pattern with numerous bright points in the intergranular lanes before the spatial degradation. The linear polarization signals in the simulations are almost exclusively related to canopies of strong magnetic flux concentrations and not to transient events of magnetic flux emergence. We find that the average vertical magnetic flux density in the simulation should be less than 50 G to reproduce the observed polarization signals in the quiet-Sun internetwork. A value of about 35 G gives the best match across the SP, TIP, POLIS, and GFPI observations.

  6. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cecile Noels

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  7. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cecile Noels

    2009-01-01

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  8. CLIC e+e- Linear Collider Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, Dominik; Linssen, Lucie; Schulte, Daniel; Simon, Frank; Stapnes, Steinar; Toge, Nobukazu; Weerts, Harry; Wells, James

    2012-01-01

    This document provides input from the CLIC e+e- linear collider studies to the update process of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. It is submitted on behalf of the CLIC/CTF3 collaboration and the CLIC physics and detector study. It describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale e+e- linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technique. A high-luminosity high-energy e+e- collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a \\sim125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear e+e- collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up t...

  9. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10 -9 s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼10 0 s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  10. FIRST OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE OF ROTATIONAL DECELERATION IN A MASSIVE, INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTER IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaohan [School of Physics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Deng, Licai, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-07-20

    While the extended main-sequence turnoffs (eMSTOs) found in almost all 1–2 Gyr old star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds are often explained by postulating extended star formation histories (SFHs), the tight subgiant branches (SGBs) seen in some clusters challenge this popular scenario. Puzzlingly, the SGB of the eMSTO cluster NGC 419 is significantly broader at bluer than at redder colors. We carefully assess and confirm the reality of this observational trend. If we would assume that the widths of the features in color–magnitude space were entirely owing to a range in stellar ages, the SFHs of the eMSTO stars and the blue SGB region would be significantly more prolonged than that of the red part of the SGB. This cannot be explained by assuming an internal age spread. We show that rotational deceleration of a population of rapidly rotating stars, a currently hotly debated alternative scenario, naturally explains the observed trend along the SGB. Our analysis shows that a “converging” SGB could be produced if the cluster is mostly composed of rapidly rotating stars that slow down over time owing to the conservation of angular momentum during their evolutionary expansion from main-sequence turnoff stars to red giants.

  11. Coordinated Cluster/Double Star and ground-based observations of dayside reconnection signatures on 11 February 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.-H. Zhang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of flux transfer events (FTEs were observed between 09:00 and 12:00 UT on 11 February 2004, during southward and dawnward IMF, while the Cluster spacecraft array moved outbound through the northern, high-altitude cusp and dayside high-latitude boundary layer, and the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft was crossing the dayside low-latitude magnetopause into the magnetosheath south of the ecliptic plane. The Cluster array grazed the equatorial cusp boundary, observing reconnection-like mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma populations. In an adjacent interval, TC-1 sampled a series of sometimes none standard FTEs, but also with mixed magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma populations, near the magnetopause crossing and later showed additional (possibly turbulent activity not characteristic of FTEs when it was situated deeper in the magnetosheath. The motion of these FTEs are analyzed in some detail to compare to simultaneous, poleward-moving plasma concentration enhancements recorded by EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and "poleward-moving radar auroral forms" (PMRAFs on the CUTLASS Finland and Kerguelen Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN radar measurements. Conjugate SuperDARN observations show a predominantly two-cell convection pattern in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The results are consistent with the expected motion of reconnected magnetic flux tubes, arising from a predominantly sub-solar reconnection site. Here, we are able to track north and south in closely adjacent intervals as well as to map to the corresponding ionospheric footprints of the implied flux tubes and demonstrate these are temporally correlated with clear ionospheric velocity enhancements, having northward (southward and eastward (westward convected flow components in the Northern (Southern Hemisphere. The durations of these enhancements might imply that the evolution time of the FTEs is about 18–22 min from their origin on magnetopause (at

  12. A comparison of field-aligned current signatures simultaneously observed by the MAGSAT and TIROS/NOAA spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Evans, D.S.; Cain, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the relative locations of auroral particle fluxes and field-aligned currents and to identify the main charge carriers of the field-aligned currents at auroral latitudes, nearly simultaneous data from the vector magnetometers on MAGSAT and of precipitating electrons with energies between 300 eV and 20 keV observed by TIROS-N and NOAA-6 are compared. For more than fifty cases, MAGSAT and TIROS and/or NOAA orbits occurred within two minutes (mostly within one minute) of each other in the dawn/dusk sectors, during the time the IMS meridian chains of ground magnetometers were operating from November, 1979 through January, 1980. The latitudinal boundaries of precipitating electrons are found to line up within 1 0 with those of the field-aligned current region. Major portions of the upward field-aligned currents in the poleward half of the evening-sector auroral oval and in the equatorward half of the morining-sector auroral oval appear to be carried by the precipitating keV electrons. (author)

  13. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  14. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  15. The International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Benno

    2014-04-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed e+e- linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200-500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  16. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  17. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  18. Linear Colliders TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the TESLA (TeV Superconducting Linear Accelerator) collaboration (at present 19 institutions from seven countries) is to establish the technology for a high energy electron-positron linear collider using superconducting radiofrequency cavities to accelerate its beams. Another basic goal is to demonstrate that such a collider can meet its performance goals in a cost effective manner. For this the TESLA collaboration is preparing a 500 MeV superconducting linear test accelerator at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg. This TTF (TESLA Test Facility) consists of four cryomodules, each approximately 12 m long and containing eight 9-cell solid niobium cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz

  19. Transition-Region/Coronal Signatures of Penumbral Microjets: Hi-C, SDO/AIA and Hinode (SOT/FG) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alpert, Shane E.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Penumbral microjets are bright, transient features seen in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae. Katsuaka et al. (2007) noted their ubiquity and characterized them using the Ca II H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The jets are 1000{4000 km in length, 300{400 km in width, and last less than one minute. It was proposed that these penumbral microjets could contribute to the transition-region and coronal heating above sunspots. We examine whether these microjets appear in the transition-region (TR) and/or corona or are related{ temporally and spatially{ to similar brightenings in the TR and/or corona. First, we identify penumbral microjets with the SOT's Ca II H-line filter. The chosen sunspot is observed on July 11, 2012 from 18:50:00 UT to 20:00:00 UT at approx. 14 inches, -30 inches. We then examine the sunspot in the same field of view and at the same time in other wavelengths. We use the High Resolution Coronal Imager Telescope (Hi-C) at 193A and the 1600A, 304A, 171A, 193A, and 94A passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We include examples of these jets and where they should appear in the other passbands, but find no signifcant association, except for a few jets with longer lifetimes and bigger sizes seen at locations in the penumbra with repeated stronger brightenings. We conclude that the normal microjets are not heated to transition-region/coronal temperatures, but the larger jets are.

  20. Status of the SLAC Linear Collider Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.

    1983-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider Project has two principal goals. The first is to serve as a prototype for a future very high energy linear electron-positron collider. The second is to quickly, at low cost, achieve sufficient luminosity at 100 GeV center-of-mass energy to explore the physics of the Z 0 . The first goal is important to the future of electron-positron physics because the rapid increase of synchrotron radiation with energy causes the cost of circular storage ring colliders to whereas the cost of linear colliders increases only in proportion to the center-of-mass energy. The second is important because the existance at SLAC of a linear accelerator which can be converted at low cost to collider operation makes possible a unique opportunity to quickly achieve 100 GeV center-of-mass collisions. At the design luminosity of 6.0 x 10 30 many thousands of Z 0 decays should be observed in each day of operation

  1. Cell short circuit, preshort signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, C.

    1980-01-01

    Short-circuit events observed in ground test simulations of DSCS-3 battery in-orbit operations are analyzed. Voltage signatures appearing in the data preceding the short-circuit event are evaluated. The ground test simulation is briefly described along with performance during reconditioning discharges. Results suggest that a characteristic signature develops prior to a shorting event.

  2. Ship Signature Management System : Functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arciszewski, H.F.R.; Lier, L. van; Meijer, Y.G.S.; Noordkamp, H.W.; Wassenaar, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    A signature of a platform is the manner in which the platform manifests itself to a certain type of sensor and how observable it is when such a sensor is used to detect the platform. Because many military platforms use sensors in different media, it is the total of its different signatures that

  3. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  4. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  5. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  6. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  7. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  8. Observable Signatures of Wind-driven Chemistry with a Fully Consistent Three-dimensional Radiative Hydrodynamics Model of HD 209458b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, B.; Mayne, N. J.; Manners, J.; Carter, A. L.; Boutle, I. A.; Baraffe, I.; Hébrard, É.; Tremblin, P.; Sing, D. K.; Amundsen, D. S.; Acreman, D.

    2018-03-01

    We present a study of the effect of wind-driven advection on the chemical composition of hot-Jupiter atmospheres using a fully consistent 3D hydrodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer code, the Met Office Unified Model (UM). Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres has primarily been restricted to 1D models that cannot account for 3D dynamical processes. In this work, we couple a chemical relaxation scheme to the UM to account for the chemical interconversion of methane and carbon monoxide. This is done consistently with the radiative transfer meaning that departures from chemical equilibrium are included in the heating rates (and emission) and hence complete the feedback between the dynamics, thermal structure, and chemical composition. In this Letter, we simulate the well studied atmosphere of HD 209458b. We find that the combined effect of horizontal and vertical advection leads to an increase in the methane abundance by several orders of magnitude, which is directly opposite to the trend found in previous works. Our results demonstrate the need to include 3D effects when considering the chemistry of hot-Jupiter atmospheres. We calculate transmission and emission spectra, as well as the emission phase curve, from our simulations. We conclude that gas-phase nonequilibrium chemistry is unlikely to explain the model–observation discrepancy in the 4.5 μm Spitzer/IRAC channel. However, we highlight other spectral regions, observable with the James Webb Space Telescope, where signatures of wind-driven chemistry are more prominant.

  9. New Physics Signatures in Dijets at Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Gounaris, G. J.; Papadamou, D. T.; Renard, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We show how to detect and disentangle at the upgraded Tevatron and at LHC, the effects of the three purely gluonic $dim=6$ $SU(3)\\times SU(2) \\times U(1)$ CP-conserving and CP-violating gauge invariant operators $\\ol{\\O}_{DG}$, $\\O_G$ and $\\wtil{\\O}_{G}$. These operators are inevitably generated by New Physics (NP), if the heavy particles responsible for it are coloured. We establish the relations between their coupling constants and the corresponding NP scales defined through the unitarity r...

  10. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e + e - linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR

  11. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  12. Present searches for Higgs signatures at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groer, L.

    1997-08-01

    We present results for various searches for signatures of standard and non-standard model Higgs boson decays conducted at the collider detectors CDF and D0 using ∼100 pb -1 of integrated luminosity each from the Tevatron collider Run 1 (1992-96) at √s=1.8 TeV. No evidence for a Higgs boson decay is found and various limits are set

  13. Effective models of new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llodra-Perez, J.

    2011-07-01

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider runs, in 2010, particle physicists will be soon able to have a better understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking. They might also answer to many experimental and theoretical open questions raised by the Standard Model. Surfing on this really favorable situation, we will first present in this thesis a highly model-independent parametrization in order to characterize the new physics effects on mechanisms of production and decay of the Higgs boson. This original tool will be easily and directly usable in data analysis of CMS and ATLAS, the huge generalist experiments of LHC. It will help indeed to exclude or validate significantly some new theories beyond the Standard Model. In another approach, based on model-building, we considered a scenario of new physics, where the Standard Model fields can propagate in a flat six-dimensional space. The new spatial extra-dimensions will be compactified on a Real Projective Plane. This orbifold is the unique six-dimensional geometry which possesses chiral fermions and a natural Dark Matter candidate. The scalar photon, which is the lightest particle of the first Kaluza-Klein tier, is stabilized by a symmetry relic of the six dimension Lorentz invariance. Using the current constraints from cosmological observations and our first analytical calculation, we derived a characteristic mass range around few hundred GeV for the Kaluza-Klein scalar photon. Therefore the new states of our Universal Extra-Dimension model are light enough to be produced through clear signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. So we used a more sophisticated analysis of particle mass spectrum and couplings, including radiative corrections at one-loop, in order to establish our first predictions and constraints on the expected LHC phenomenology. (author)

  14. Strong dynamics at the muon collider: Working group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.C.; Eichten, E.

    1998-03-01

    New strong dynamics at the energy scale ∼ 1 TeV is an attractive and elegant theoretical ansatz for the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. We review here, the theoretical models for strong dynamics, particularly, technicolor theories and their low energy signatures. We emphasize that the fantastic beam energy resolution (σ E /E ∼ 10 -4 ) expected at the first muon collider (√s=100-500 GeV) allows the possibility of resolving some extraordinarily narrow technihadron resonances and, Higgs-like techniscalars produced in the s-channel. Investigating indirect probes for strong dynamics such as search for muon compositeness, we find that the muon colliders provide unparalleled reaches. A big muon collider (√s=3-4 TeV) would be a remarkable facility to study heavy technicolor particles such as the topcolor Z', to probe the dynamics underlying fermion masses and mixings and to fully explore the strongly interacting electroweak sector

  15. The observation of the beauty baryon Λb in the decay channel Λb→J/ψΛ at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, A.

    1992-01-01

    The recently published observation of a∼5σ signal for the beauty baryon is summarized. To search for the beauty baryon Λ b , the decay mode Λ b →JψΛ has been chosen. The main features and results of the analysis is presented, and the measured p t -spectrum of the Λ b candidates is presented. (R.P.) 7 refs.; 3 figs

  16. Detection of organic compound signatures in infra-red, limb emission spectra observed by the MIPAS-B2 balloon instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Remedios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds play a central role in troposphere chemistry and increasingly are a viable target for remote sensing observations. In this paper, infra-red spectral features of three organic compounds are investigated in thermal emission spectra recorded on a flight on 8 May 1998 near Aire sur l'Adour by a balloon-borne instrument, MIPAS-B2, operating at high spectral resolution. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that PAN and acetone can be detected in infra-red remote sensing spectra of the upper troposphere; detection results are presented at tangent altitudes of 10.4 km and 7.5 km (not acetone. In addition, the results provide the first observation of spectral features of formic acid in thermal emission, as opposed to solar occultation, and confirm that concentrations of this gas are measurable in the mid-latitude upper troposphere, given accurate spectroscopic data. For PAN, two bands are observed centred at 794 cm−1 and 1163 cm−1. For acetone and formic acid, one band has been detected for each so far with band centres at 1218 cm−1 and 1105 cm−1 respectively. Mixing ratios inferred at 10.4 km tangent altitude are 180 pptv and 530 pptv for PAN and acetone respectively, and 200 pptv for formic acid with HITRAN 2000 spectroscopy. Accuracies are on the order of 15 to 40%. The detection technique applied here is verified by examining weak but known signatures of CFC-12 and HCFC-22 in the same spectral regions as those of the organic compounds, with results confirming the quality of both the instrument and the radiative transfer model. The results suggest the possibility of global sensing of the organic compounds studied here which would be a major step forward in verifying and interpreting global tropospheric model calculations.

  17. Observation of energy-time dispersed ion structures in the magnetosheath by CLUSTER: possible signatures of transient acceleration processes at shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Louarn

    Full Text Available We analyse energy-time dispersed ion signatures that have been observed by CLUSTER in the dayside magnetosheath. These events are characterized by sudden increases in the ion flux at energies larger than 10 keV. The high energy ions (30 keV are first detected, with the transition to the low energy ions (5 keV lasting about 100 s. These injections are often associated with transient plasma structures of a few minutes in duration, characterized by a hotter, less dense plasma and a diverted flow velocity, thus presenting similarities with "hot flow anomalies". They also involve modifications of the magnetic field direction, suggesting that the shock interacts with a solar wind discontinuity at the time of the event. The injections can originate from the magnetosphere or the shock region. Studying in detail a particular event, we discuss this last hypothesis. We show that the observed energy/time dispersion can be explained by combining a time-of-flight effect with a drift of the source of energetic particles along the shock. We propose that the acceleration results from a Fermi process linked to the interaction of the discontinuity with a quasi-perpendicular shock. This model explains the observed pitch-angle selection of the accelerated particles. The Fermi process acting on the beam of ions reflected from the shock appears to be sufficiently efficient to accelerate over short time scales (less than 30 s particles at energies above 30 keV.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar-wind-magnetosphere interaction; magnetosheath – Space plasma physics (shock waves

  18. On Shocks Driven by High-mass Planets in Radiatively Inefficient Disks. III. Observational Signatures in Thermal Emission and Scattered Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Blake; Lyra, Wladimir; Flock, Mario; Turner, Neal J.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2017-11-01

    Recent observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Be star HD 100546 show two bright features in infrared (H and {L}{\\prime } bands) at about 50 au,with one so far unexplained. We explore the observational signatures of a high-mass planet causing shock heating in order to determine if it could be the source of the unexplained infrared feature in HD 100546. More fundamentally, we identify and characterize planetary shocks as an extra, hitherto ignored, source of luminosity in transition disks. The RADMC-3D code is used to perform dust radiative transfer calculations on the hydrodynamical disk models, including volumetric heating. A stronger shock heating rate by a factor of 20 would be necessary to qualitatively reproduce the morphology of the second infrared source. Instead, we find that the outer edge of the gap carved by the planet heats up by about 50% relative to the initial reference temperature, which leads to an increase in the scale height. The bulge is illuminated by the central star, producing a lopsided feature in scattered light, as the outer gap edge shows an asymmetry in density and temperature attributable to a secondary spiral arm launched not from the Lindblad resonances but from the 2:1 resonance. We conclude that high-mass planets lead to shocks in disks that may be directly observed, particularly at wavelengths of 10 μm or longer, but that they are more likely to reveal their presence in scattered light by puffing up their outer gap edges and exciting multiple spiral arms.

  19. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  20. Azimuthal decorrelation between leptons in the Drell-Yan process as a probe of infrared QCD Phenomenology, predictions and measurement of a novel collider observable using perturbative resummation techniques

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00337682; Dasgupta, Mrinal

    This thesis presents phenomenological studies of a state-of-the-art NNLL+NLO theoretical calculation of a novel collider observable known as 'phi star'. In these studies the 'phi star' observable, a measure of azimuthal decorrelation, is applied directly to the leptons in the production of massive lepton pairs in hadron collisions (the Drell-Yan process). This provides an alternate measure of the recoil of the massive vector boson (Z/gamma) against initial state QCD radiation, but with distinct experimental advantages over the traditional boson transverse momentum. Attention is focused on the small-'phi star' regime (the quasi-back-to-back regime) where the infrared dynamics of soft/collinear gluon emissions become important. These phenomenological studies are followed up with the presentation of a measurement of 'phi star' in 'Z to mu mu' events using 20.3 fb^-1 of collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2012. Finally, studies directly related to the ATLAS absolute luminosity calibration by the v...

  1. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  2. The super collider revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors suggest a revised version of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) that employs the planned SSC first stage machine as an injector of 0.5 TeV protons into a power laser accelerator. The recently developed Non-linear Amplification of Inverse Bremsstrahlung Acceleration (NAIBA) concept dictates the scenario of the next stage of acceleration. Post Star Wars lasers, available at several laboratories, can be used for the purpose. The 40 TeV CM energy, a target of the SSC, can be obtained with a new machine which can be 20 times smaller than the planned SSC

  3. Heavy leptons at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnemus, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The recent advent of high energy hadron colliders capable of producing weak bosons has opened new vistas for particle physics research, including the search for a possible fourth generation heavy charged lepton, which is the primary topic of the thesis. Signals for identifying a new heavy lepton have been calculated and compared to Standard Model backgrounds. Results are presented for signals at the CERN collider, the Fermilab collider, and the proposed Superconducting Supercollider

  4. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  5. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  6. Analyzing the 2010-2011 La Niña signature in the tropical Pacific sea surface salinity using in situ data, SMOS observations, and a numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Audrey; Delcroix, Thierry; Boutin, Jacqueline; Dussin, Raphael; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2014-06-01

    The tropical Pacific Ocean remained in a La Niña phase from mid-2010 to mid-2012. In this study, the 2010-2011 near-surface salinity signature of ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) is described and analyzed using a combination of numerical model output, in situ data, and SMOS satellite salinity products. Comparisons of all salinity products show a good agreement between them, with a RMS error of 0.2-0.3 between the thermosalinograph (TSG) and SMOS data and between the TSG and model data. The last 6 months of 2010 are characterized by an unusually strong tripolar anomaly captured by the three salinity products in the western half of the tropical Pacific. A positive SSS anomaly sits north of 10°S (>0.5), a negative tilted anomaly lies between 10°S and 20°S and a positive one south of 20°S. In 2011, anomalies shift south and amplify up to 0.8, except for the one south of 20°S. Equatorial SSS changes are mainly the result of anomalous zonal advection, resulting in negative anomalies during El Niño (early 2010), and positive ones thereafter during La Niña. The mean seasonal and interannual poleward drift exports those anomalies toward the south in the southern hemisphere, resulting in the aforementioned tripolar anomaly. The vertical salinity flux at the bottom of the mixed layer tends to resist the surface salinity changes. The observed basin-scale La Niña SSS signal is then compared with the historical 1998-1999 La Niña event using both observations and modeling.

  7. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  8. Five Guidelines for Selecting Hydrological Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, H. K.; Westerberg, I.; Branger, F.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological signatures are index values derived from observed or modeled series of hydrological data such as rainfall, flow or soil moisture. They are designed to extract relevant information about hydrological behavior, such as to identify dominant processes, and to determine the strength, speed and spatiotemporal variability of the rainfall-runoff response. Hydrological signatures play an important role in model evaluation. They allow us to test whether particular model structures or parameter sets accurately reproduce the runoff generation processes within the watershed of interest. Most modeling studies use a selection of different signatures to capture different aspects of the catchment response, for example evaluating overall flow distribution as well as high and low flow extremes and flow timing. Such studies often choose their own set of signatures, or may borrow subsets of signatures used in multiple other works. The link between signature values and hydrological processes is not always straightforward, leading to uncertainty and variability in hydrologists' signature choices. In this presentation, we aim to encourage a more rigorous approach to hydrological signature selection, which considers the ability of signatures to represent hydrological behavior and underlying processes for the catchment and application in question. To this end, we propose a set of guidelines for selecting hydrological signatures. We describe five criteria that any hydrological signature should conform to: Identifiability, Robustness, Consistency, Representativeness, and Discriminatory Power. We describe an example of the design process for a signature, assessing possible signature designs against the guidelines above. Due to their ubiquity, we chose a signature related to the Flow Duration Curve, selecting the FDC mid-section slope as a proposed signature to quantify catchment overall behavior and flashiness. We demonstrate how assessment against each guideline could be used to

  9. How to Find a Hidden World at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D.

    2008-01-01

    I discuss how the Large Hadron Collider era should broaden our view of particle physics research, and apply this thinking to the case of Hidden Worlds. I focus on one of the simplest representative cases of a Hidden World, and detail the rich implications it has for LHC physics, including universal suppression of Higgs boson production, trans-TeV heavy Higgs boson signatures, heavy-to-light Higgs boson decays, weakly coupled exotic gauge bosons, and Higgs boson decays to four fermions via light exotic gauge bosons. Some signatures may be accessible in the very early stages of collider operation, whereas others motivate a later high-lumonosity upgrade.

  10. Production of spinning black holes at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. C.; Song, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    When the Planck scale is as low as TeV, there will be chances to produce Black holes at future colliders. Generally, black holes produced via particle collisions can have non-zero angular momenta. We estimate the production cross-section of rotating Black holes in the context of low energy gravitation theories by taking the effects of rotation into account. The production cross section is shown to be enhanced by a factor of 2 - 3 over the naive estimate σ = π ∼ R S 2 , where R S denotes the Schwarzschild radius of black hole for a given energy. We also point out that the decay spectrum may have a distinguishable angular dependence through the grey-body factor of a rotating black hole. The angular dependence of decaying particles may give a clear signature for the effect of rotating black holes.

  11. Performance of the SLAC Linear Collider klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Fowkes, W.R.; Koontz, R.F.; Schwarz, H.D.; Seeman, J.T.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    There are now 200 new, high power 5045 klystrons installed on the two-mile Stanford Linear Accelerator. Peak power per klystron averages over 63 MW. Average energy contribution is above 240 MeV per station. Electron beam energy has been measured as high as 53 GeV. Energy instability due to kylstron malfunction is less than 0.2%. The installed klystrons have logged over one million operating hours with close to 20,00 klystron hours cumulative operating time between failures. Data is being accumulated on klystron operation and failure modes with failure signatures starting to become apparent. To date, no wholesale failure modes have surfaced that would impair the SLAC linear Collider (SLC) program

  12. Extra Higgs boson and Z ' as portals to signatures of heavy neutrinos at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomando, Elena; Rose, Luigi Delle; Moretti, Stefano; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the potential of observing heavy neutrino ( ν h ) signatures of a U(1) B- L enlarged Standard Model (SM) encompassing three heavy Majorana neutrinos alongside the known light neutrino states at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We exploit the theoretical decay via a heavy (non-SM-like) Higgs boson and Z ' production followed by ν h → l ± W ∓(∗) and ν h → ν l Z (∗) decays, ultimately yielding a 3 l + 2 j + E T miss signature and, depending upon how boosted the final state objects are, we define different possible selections aimed at improving the signal to background ratio in LHC Run 2 data for a wide range of heavy neutrino masses.

  13. Dijet physics with CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Hadron Collider, at a proton–proton collision energy of. √ ... generator predicts less azimuthal decorrelation than observed in data [8]. ... The dijet mass spectrum predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) falls smoothly.

  14. Tumor signatures of PTHLH overexpression, high serum calcium, and poor prognosis were observed exclusively in clear cell but not non clear cell renal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Shioi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuhiko; Ito, Hiroki; Kondo, Keiichi; Hasumi, Hisashi; Sano, Futoshi; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kishida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yamanaka, Shoji; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    High serum calcium (Ca) due to aberrant secretion of tumor parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) is a well-known paraneoplastic sign and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the status of serum Ca and tumor PTHLH expression have not been verified using the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) renal tumor classification. We retrospectively reviewed corrected serum Ca levels at initial onset (n = 683) and/or as of recurrence (n = 71) in patients with RCC. We also examined a total of 623 renal parenchymal tumor samples for PTHLH mRNA expressions by quantitative real-time PCR. High serum Ca concomitant with PTHLH overexpression in tumors was observed exclusively in clear cell RCC but not in other non clear cell subtype tumors, including papillary, chromophobe, collecting-duct, unclassified, and other rare subtype RCCs or in benign oncocytomas and angiomyolipomas. In clear cell RCC, PTHLH expression was significantly high in male patients, and was associated with a symptomatic presentation, higher grade, and higher stage cases, whereas it was not associated with VHL gene status. Univariate analyses demonstrated that high PTHLH expression was strongly associated with poor outcome both in overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for patients who underwent standard nephrectomy. Further multivariate Cox analyses revealed that the PTHLH expressions remained as independent prognostic parameters for OS but not for DFS. These data suggest that the previously characterized tumor signatures of high serum Ca due to high PTHLH expression and poor prognosis are clear cell RCC-specific features, whereas these characteristics are rare in non clear cell RCCs

  15. Vanilla Technicolor at Linear Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Jarvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the reach of Linear Colliders (LC)s for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that LCs can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, till the maximum energy in the center-of-mass of the colliding leptons. In ...

  16. Future prospects for electron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Toge, N

    2001-01-01

    An overview on the future prospects for electron colliders is presented. In the first part of this paper we will walk through the status of current development of next-generation electron linear colliders of sub-TeV to TeV energy range. Then we will visit recent results from technological developments which aim at longer term future for higher energy accelerators.

  17. Linear colliders for photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The enthusiasm of the first international workshop on photonphoton colliders and associated physics, held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 28 March - 1 April, could have set a ball rolling. According to proponents of this physics, the particle physics one can study with a high energy linear collider is special and complements that of a hadron supercollider

  18. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  19. Overview of colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the colliding beam facilities in existence today. The major high energy physics facilities around the world are described, and a view is presented of the beam collisions in which the instruments used to make the beams collide and those used to detect the products of particle interactions in the beam overlap region are described

  20. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  1. Towards the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    The broad physics potential of e+e- linear colliders was recognized by the high energy physics community right after the end of LEP in 2000. In 2007, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) now under construction at CERN will obtain its first collisions. The LHC, colliding protons with protons at 14 TeV, will discover a standard model Higgs boson over the full potential mass range, and should be sensitive to new physics into the several TeV range. The program for the Linear Collider (LC) will be set in the context of the discoveries made at the LHC. All the proposals for a Linear Collider will extend the discoveries and provide a wealth of measurements that are essential for giving deeper understanding of their meaning, and pointing the way to further evolution of particle physics in the future. For the mexican groups is the right time to join such an effort

  2. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  3. Search for excited electrons using the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Shilpi

    2013-01-01

    The start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) opened a new window to the energy scale far beyond 1 TeV. There are different theories that predict new physics, and hence it is not clear what signature to expect in the data and which of the theory will describe it properly. However new physics could as well manifest itself in ways no one has yet thought of. Thus we have implemented a Model Unspecific Search in CMS (MUSiC). This approach has been applied to the CMS data and we have obtained the preliminary results. I will talk about this details of the analysis techniques, its implementation in analysing CMS data, results obtained and the discussion on the discrepancy observed

  4. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The μ + μ - collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged

  5. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B s meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with 'forward' vs 'central' rapidity coverage

  6. Machine availability at the Large Hardron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pojer, M; Wagner, S

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for a particle accelerator is its uptime, the period of time when it is functioning and available for use. In its second year of operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has experienced high machine availability, which is one of the ingredients of its brilliant performance. Some of the reasons for the observed MTBF are presented. The approach of periodic maintenance stops is also discussed. Some considerations on the ideal length of a physics fill are drawn.

  7. Machine availability at the Large Hardron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Pojer, M; Schmidt, R; Wagner, S

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for a particle accelerator is its uptime, the period of time when it is functioning and available for use. In its second year of operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has experienced high machine availability, which is one of the ingredients of its brilliant performance. Some of the reasons for the observed MTBF are presented. The approach of periodic maintenance stops is also discussed. Some considerations on the ideal length of a physics fill are dr...

  8. Prospects for cosmological collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto (Canada); Münchmeyer, Moritz [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR7095, Paris (France); Muñoz, Julian B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chen, Xingang, E-mail: meerburg@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: mmunchmeyer@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: julianmunoz@jhu.edu, E-mail: xingang.chen@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    It is generally expected that heavy fields are present during inflation, which can leave their imprint in late-time cosmological observables. The main signature of these fields is a small amount of distinctly shaped non-Gaussianity, which if detected, would provide a wealth of information about the particle spectrum of the inflationary Universe. Here we investigate to what extent these signatures can be detected or constrained using futuristic 21-cm surveys. We construct model-independent templates that extract the squeezed-limit behavior of the bispectrum, and examine their overlap with standard inflationary shapes and secondary non-Gaussianities. We then use these templates to forecast detection thresholds for different masses and couplings using a 3D reconstruction of modes during the dark ages ( z ∼ 30–100). We consider interactions of several broad classes of models and quantify their detectability as a function of the baseline of a dark ages interferometer. Our analysis shows that there exists the tantalizing possibility of discovering new particles with different masses and interactions with future 21-cm surveys.

  9. Hadron collider physics 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.; Clark, A.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadron Collider Physics Symposia (HCP) are a new series of conferences that follow the merger of the Hadron Collider Conferences with the LHC Symposia series, with the goal of maximizing the shared experience of the Tevatron and LHC communities. This book gathers the proceedings of the first symposium, HCP2005, and reviews the state of the art in the key physics directions of experimental hadron collider research: - QCD physics - precision electroweak physics - c-, b-, and t-quark physics - physics beyond the Standard Model - heavy ion physics The present volume will serve as a reference for everyone working in the field of accelerator-based high-energy physics. (orig.)

  10. The standard model and colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated

  11. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  12. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  13. Fourth standard model family neutrino at future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Sultansoy, S.

    2005-01-01

    It is known that flavor democracy favors the existence of the fourth standard model (SM) family. In order to give nonzero masses for the first three-family fermions flavor democracy has to be slightly broken. A parametrization for democracy breaking, which gives the correct values for fundamental fermion masses and, at the same time, predicts quark and lepton Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrices in a good agreement with the experimental data, is proposed. The pair productions of the fourth SM family Dirac (ν 4 ) and Majorana (N 1 ) neutrinos at future linear colliders with √(s)=500 GeV, 1 TeV, and 3 TeV are considered. The cross section for the process e + e - →ν 4 ν 4 (N 1 N 1 ) and the branching ratios for possible decay modes of the both neutrinos are determined. The decays of the fourth family neutrinos into muon channels (ν 4 (N 1 )→μ ± W ± ) provide cleanest signature at e + e - colliders. Meanwhile, in our parametrization this channel is dominant. W bosons produced in decays of the fourth family neutrinos will be seen in detector as either di-jets or isolated leptons. As an example, we consider the production of 200 GeV mass fourth family neutrinos at √(s)=500 GeV linear colliders by taking into account di-muon plus four jet events as signatures

  14. Testing the Nature of Kaluza-Klein Excitations at Future Lepton Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1999-01-01

    With one extra dimension, current high precision electroweak data constrain the masses of the first Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model gauge fields to lie above ≅ 4 TeV. States with masses not much larger than this should be observable at the LHC. However, even for first excitation masses close to this lower bound, the second set of excitations will be too heavy to be produced thus eliminating the possibility of realizing the cleanest signature for KK scenarios. Previous studies of heavy $Z'$ and $W'$ production in this mass range at the LHC have demonstrated that very little information can be obtained about their couplings to the conventional fermions given the limited available statistics and imply that the LHC cannot distinguish an ordinary $Z'$ from the degenerate pair of the first KK excitations of the γ and Z. In this paper we discuss the capability of lepton colliders with center of mass energies significantly below the excitation mass to resolve this ambiguity. In addition, we examine how direct measurements obtained on and near the top of the first excitation peak at lepton colliders can confirm these results. For more than one extra dimension we demonstrate that it is likely that the first KK excitation is too massive to be produced at the LHC

  15. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  16. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  17. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  18. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  19. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  20. Vector-like fermion and standard Higgs production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguila, F. del; Ametller, L.; Kane, G.L.; Vidal, J.; Centro Mixto Valencia Univ./CSIC, Valencia

    1990-01-01

    Vector-like fermions are characterized by large neutral current decay rates, in particular into Higgs bosons. If they exist, their clear signals at hadron colliders open a window to Higgs detection, especially to the intermediate Higgs mass region. We discuss in some detail rates and signatures for simple cases. (orig.)

  1. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%

  2. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  3. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e + e - linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider

  4. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  5. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design

  6. The large hadron collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiani, L.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter has greatly advanced, over the last decades. The standard theory of fundamental interactions presents us with a theoretically sound picture, which describes with great accuracy known physical phenomena on most diverse energy and distance scales. These range from 10 -16 cm, inside the nucleons, up to large-scale astrophysical bodies, including the early Universe at some nanosecond after the Big-Bang and temperatures of the order of 10 2 GeV. The picture is not yet completed, however, as we lack the observation of the Higgs boson, predicted in the 100-500 GeV range - a particle associated with the generation of particle masses and with the quantum fluctuations in the primordial Universe. In addition, the standard theory is expected to undergo a change of regime in the 10 3 GeV region, with the appearance of new families of particles, most likely associated with the onset of a new symmetry (supersymmetry). In 1994, the CERN Council approved the construction of the large hadron collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider of a new design to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel, with an energy of 7 TeV per beam and extremely large luminosity, of ∝10 34 cm -2 s -1 . Construction was started in 1996, with the additional support of the US, Japan, Russia, Canada and other European countries, making the LHC a really global project, the first one in particle physics. After a short review of the physics scenario, I report on the present status of the LHC construction. Special attention is given to technological problems such as the realization of the super-conducting dipoles, following an extensive R and D program with European industries. The construction of the large LHC detectors has required a vast R and D program by a large international community, to overcome the problems posed by the complexity of the collisions and by the large luminosity of the machine. (orig.)

  7. Collider detection of dark matter electromagnetic anapole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandre; Santos, A. C. O.; Sinha, Kuver

    2018-03-01

    Dark matter that interacts with the Standard Model by exchanging photons through higher multipole interactions occurs in a wide range of both strongly and weakly coupled hidden sector models. We study the collider detection prospects of these candidates, with a focus on Majorana dark matter that couples through the anapole moment. The study is conducted at the effective field theory level with the mono-Z signature incorporating varying levels of systematic uncertainties at the high-luminosity LHC. The projected collider reach on the anapole moment is then compared to the reach coming from direct detection experiments like LZ. Finally, the analysis is applied to a weakly coupled completion with leptophilic dark matter.

  8. TRANSITION-REGION/CORONAL SIGNATURES AND MAGNETIC SETTING OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL JETS: HINODE (SOT/FG), Hi-C, AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Alpert, Shane E.

    2016-01-01

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al. using the Ca ii H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbrae (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on the internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from Hinode/SOT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except for a few of them showing up in the 1600 Å images. However, we discovered exceptionally stronger jets with similar lifetimes but bigger sizes (up to 600 km wide) occurring repeatedly in a few locations in the penumbra, where evidence of patches of opposite-polarity fields in the tails of some penumbral filaments is seen in Stokes-V images. These tail PJs do display signatures in the TR. Whether they have any coronal-temperature plasma is unclear. We infer that none of the PJs, including the tail PJs, directly heat the corona in active regions significantly, but any penumbral jet might drive some coronal heating indirectly via the generation of Alfvén waves and/or braiding of the coronal field

  9. Search for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron p(bar p) Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolli, Simona

    2011-01-01

    We report on selected recent results from the CDF and D0 experiments on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using data from the Tevatron collider running p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1960 GeV. Over the past decades the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics has been surprisingly successful. Although the precision of experimental tests improved by orders of magnitude no significant deviation from the SM predictions has been observed so far. Still, there are many questions that the Standard Model does not answer and problems it can not solve. Among the most important ones are the origin of the electro-weak symmetry breaking, hierarchy of scales, unification of fundamental forces and the nature of gravity. Recent cosmological observations indicates that the SM particles only account for 4% of the matter of the Universe. Many extensions of the SM (Beyond the Standard Model, BSM) have been proposed to make the theory more complete and solve some of the above puzzles. Some of these extension includes SuperSymmetry (SUSY), Grand Unification Theory (GUT) and Extra Dimensions. At CDF and D0 we search for evidence of such processes in proton-antiproton collisions at √(s) = 1960 GeV. The phenomenology of these models is very rich, although the cross sections for most of these exotic processes is often very small compared to those of SM processes at hadron colliders. It is then necessary to devise analysis strategies that would allow to disentangle the small interesting signals, often buried under heavy instrumental and/or physics background. Two main approaches to search for physics beyond the Standard Model are used in a complementary fashion: model-based analyses and signature based studies. In the more traditional model-driven approach, one picks a favorite theoretical model and/or a process, and the best signature is chosen. The selection cuts are optimized based on acceptance studies performed using simulated signal events. The expected background is

  10. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica]. E-mail: dieter@phenom.physics.wisc.edu

    1996-07-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  11. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    1996-01-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  12. Signature-based User Authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Hámorník, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    This work aims on missing handwritten signature authentication in Windows. Result of this work is standalone software that allow users to log into Windows by writing signature. We focus on security of signature authentification and best overall user experience. We implemented signature authentification service that accept signature and return user access token if signature is genuine. Signature authentification is done by comparing given signature to signature patterns by their similarity. Si...

  13. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Kao

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar (A 0 ) and the heavier CP-even scalar (H 0 ) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino (χ 0 ) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric U(1)(prime) model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment a μ = (g μ -2)/2 in a supersymmetric U(1)(prime) model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of a μ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b(bar b) to hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS

  14. Electroweak and flavor dynamics at hadron colliders - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elchtent, E.; Lane, K.

    1998-02-01

    This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at anti pp and pp colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling α TC , and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies √s approx-lt 1 TeV. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96)

  15. Siting the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Rooney, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering established the Super Collider Site Evaluation Committee to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites for the Superconducting Super Collider. Thirty-six proposals were examined by the committee. Using the set of criteria announced by DOE in its Invitation for Site Proposals, the committee identified eight sites that merited inclusion on a ''best qualified list.'' The list represents the best collective judgment of 21 individuals, carefully chosen for their expertise and impartiality, after a detailed assessment of the proposals using 19 technical subcriteria and DOE's life cycle cost estimates. The sites, in alphabetical order, are: Arizona/Maricopa; Colorado; Illinois; Michigan/Stockbridge; New York/Rochester; North Carolina; Tennessee; and Texas/Dallas-Fort Worth. The evaluation of these sites and the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this book

  16. Muon collider interaction region design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Alexahin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR presents a number of challenges arising from low β^{*}<1  cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV center-of-mass muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10^{34}  cm^{-2} s^{-1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  17. Recent results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Dark spectroscopy at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Rich and complex dark sectors are abundant in particle physics theories. Here, we propose performing spectroscopy of the mass structure of dark sectors via mono-photon searches at lepton colliders. The energy of the mono-photon tracks the invariant mass of the invisible system it recoils against, which enables studying the resonance structure of the dark sector. We demonstrate this idea with several well-motivated models of dark sectors. Such spectroscopy measurements could potentially be performed at Belle II, BES-III and future low-energy lepton colliders.

  19. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  20. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  1. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Before completing a realistic design of a next-generation linear collider, the authors must first learn the lessons taught by the first generation, the SLC. Given that, they must make designs fault tolerant by including correction and compensation in the basic design. They must also try to eliminate these faults by improved alignment and stability of components. When these two efforts cross, they have a realistic design. The techniques of generation and control of emittance reviewed here provide a foundation for a design which can obtain the necessary luminosity in a next-generation linear collider

  2. Electronic Signature Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishes the United States Environmental Protection Agency's approach to adopting electronic signature technology and best practices to ensure electronic signatures applied to official Agency documents are legally valid and enforceable

  3. Lesson 6: Signature Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checklist items 13 through 17 are grouped under the Signature Validation Process, and represent CROMERR requirements that the system must satisfy as part of ensuring that electronic signatures it receives are valid.

  4. Exotic signatures from supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.J.

    1989-08-01

    Minor changes to the standard supersymmetric model, such as soft flavor violation and R parity violation, cause large changes in the signatures. The origin of these changes and the resulting signatures are discussed. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Discriminating Z' from anomalous trilinear gauge coupling signatures in e+e- → W+W- at ILC with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.V.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.

    2012-05-01

    New heavy neutral gauge bosons Z' are predicted by many models of physics beyond the Standard Model. It is quite possible that Z's are heavy enough to lie beyond the discovery reach of the CERN Large Hadron Collider LHC, in which case only indirect signatures of Z' exchanges may emerge at future colliders, through deviations of the measured cross sections from the Standard Model predictions. We discuss in this context the foreseeable sensitivity to Z's of W ± -pair production cross sections at the e + e - International Linear Collider (ILC), especially as regards the potential of distinguishing observable effects of the Z' from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to the same or similar new physics experimental signatures at the ILC. The sensitivity of the ILC for probing the Z-Z' mixing and its capability to distinguish these two new physics scenarios is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the initial beams and the produced W ± bosons are considered. A model independent analysis of the Z' effects in the process e + e - → W + W - allows to differentiate the full class of vector Z' models from those with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings, with one notable exception: the sequential SM (SSM)-like models can in this process not be distinguished from anomalous gauge couplings. Results of model dependent analysis of a specific Z' are expressed in terms of discovery and identification reaches on the Z-Z' mixing angle and the Z' mass.

  6. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  7. Blinding for unanticipated signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chaum (David)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractPreviously known blind signature systems require an amount of computation at least proportional to the number of signature types, and also that the number of such types be fixed in advance. These requirements are not practical in some applications. Here, a new blind signature technique

  8. Fair quantum blind signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian-Yin, Wang; Qiao-Yan, Wen

    2010-01-01

    We present a new fair blind signature scheme based on the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyse the security of this scheme, and show that it is not possible to forge valid blind signatures. Moreover, comparisons between this scheme and public key blind signature schemes are also discussed. (general)

  9. Strong WW scattering at photon linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of observing strong interactions of longitudinally polarized weak vector bosons in the process γγ → ZZ at a photon linear collider. We make use of polarization of the photon beams and cuts on the decay products of the Z bosons to enhance the signal relative to the background of transversely polarized ZZ pairs. We find that the background overwhelms the signal unless there are strong resonant effects, as for instance from a technicolor analogue of the hadronic f 2 (1270) meson

  10. Leptoquark toolbox for precision collider studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doršner, Ilja; Greljo, Admir

    2018-05-01

    We implement scalar and vector leptoquark (LQ) models in the universal FeynRules output (UFO) format assuming the Standard Model fermion content and conservation of baryon and lepton numbers. Scalar LQ implementations include next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. We report the NLO QCD inclusive cross sections in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, 14 TeV, and 27 TeV for all on-shell LQ production processes. These comprise (i) LQ pair production ( pp → ΦΦ) and (ii) single LQ + lepton production ( pp → Φ ℓ) for all initial quark flavours ( u, d, s, c, and b). Vector LQ implementation includes adjustable non-minimal QCD coupling. We discuss several aspects of LQ searches at a hadron collider, emphasising the implications of SU(2) gauge invariance, electroweak and flavour constraints, on the possible signatures. Finally, we outline the high- p T search strategy for LQs recently proposed in the literature to resolve experimental anomalies in B-meson decays. In this context, we stress the importance of complementarity of the three LQ related processes, namely, pp → ΦΦ, pp → Φ ℓ, and pp → ℓℓ.

  11. Quark-Gluon Plasma Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Ramona

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of quark-gluon plasma signatures that can be measured by CMS are discussed. First the initial conditions of the system from minijet production are introduced, including shadowing effects. Color screening of the Upsilon family is then presented, followed by energy loss effects on charm and bottom hadrons, high Pt jets and global observables.

  12. Galaxy interactions : The HI signature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, R; Barnes, JE; Sanders, DB

    1999-01-01

    HI observations are an excellent tool for investigating tidal interactions. Ongoing major and minor interactions which can lead to traumatic mergers or to accretion and the triggering of star formation, show distinct HI signatures. Interactions and mergers in the recent past can also be recognized

  13. Collider Scaling and Cost Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with collider cost and scaling. The main points of the discussion are the following ones: 1) scaling laws and cost estimation: accelerating gradient requirements, total stored RF energy considerations, peak power consideration, average power consumption; 2) cost optimization; 3) Bremsstrahlung considerations; 4) Focusing optics: conventional, laser focusing or super disruption. 13 refs

  14. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11KEK, Tsukuba, Japan. 12Cornell University ... This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth ... In view of the requirements of the hour and the available skills and interests, it was decided to .... The actual computation, which is long and somewhat tedious, is currently under way and is ...

  15. Collider physics: A theorist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Recent experimental results from the CERN anti p p Collider are reviewed from a theorist's perspective. The conclusion is that the standard model is impressively verified and nothing else seems to be present. Some other relevant phenomenological and theoretical issues are also reviewed

  16. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies

  17. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  18. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-01

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W ± /Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  19. The SPS panti p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareyte, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to give a general idea of how the collider works. The fact that one of the beams is composed of scarce precious antiprotons imposes strong constraints on the operation of such a machine. Solutions to these specific problems will be described. (orig./HSI)

  20. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  1. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  2. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. Properties of the W ± and Z 0 gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. The emphasis is placed on the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings

  3. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  4. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  5. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  6. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B

  7. Linear collider systems and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the systems and sub-systems involved in so-called ''conventional'' e + e - linear colliders and to study how their design affects the overall cost of these machines. There are presently a total of at least six 500 GeV c. of m. linear collider projects under study in the world. Aside from TESLA (superconducting linac at 1.3 GHz) and CLIC (two-beam accelerator with main linac at 30GHz), the other four proposed e + e - linear colliders can be considered ''conventional'' in that their main linacs use the proven technique of driving room temperature accelerator sections with pulsed klystrons and modulators. The centrally distinguishing feature between these projects is their main linac rf frequency: 3 GHz for the DESY machine, 11.424 GHz for the SLAC and JLC machines, and 14 GHz for the VLEPP machine. The other systems, namely the electron and positron sources, preaccelerators, compressors, damping rings and final foci, are fairly similar from project to project. Probably more than 80% of the cost of these linear colliders will be incurred in the two main linacs facing each other and it is therefore in their design and construction that major savings or extra costs may be found

  8. Signatures of topological superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yang

    2017-07-19

    The prediction and experimental discovery of topological insulators brought the importance of topology in condensed matter physics into the limelight. Topology hence acts as a new dimension along which more and more new states of matter start to emerge. One of these topological states of matter, namely topological superconductors, comes into the focus because of their gapless excitations. These gapless excitations, especially in one dimensional topological superconductors, are Majorana zero modes localized at the ends of the superconductor and exhibit exotic nonabelian statistics, which can be potentially applied to fault-tolerant quantum computation. Given their highly interesting physical properties and potential applications to quantum computation, both theorists and experimentalists spend great efforts to realize topological supercondoctors and to detect Majoranas. In two projects within this thesis, we investigate the properties of Majorana zero modes in realistic materials which are absent in simple theoretical models. We find that the superconducting proximity effect, an essential ingredient in all existing platforms for topological superconductors, plays a significant role in determining the localization property of the Majoranas. Strong proximity coupling between the normal system and the superconducting substrate can lead to strongly localized Majoranas, which can explain the observation in a recent experiment. Motivated by experiments in Molenkamp's group, we also look at realistic quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions, in which charge puddles acting as magnetic impurities are coupled to the helical edge states. We find that with this setup, the junction generically realizes an exotic 8π periodic Josephson effect, which is absent in a pristine Josephson junction. In another two projects, we propose more pronounced signatures of Majoranas that are accessible with current experimental techniques. The first one is a transport measurement, which uses

  9. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  10. Summary of the Linear Collider Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the Linear Collider Working Group was on a next generation linear collider. Topics discussed are: parameters; damping rings; bunch compression and pre-acceleration; linac; final focus; and multibunch effects. 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Lasers and future high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    Future high energy colliders, directions for particle physics and relationship to new technology such as lasers are discussed. Experimental approaches to explore New Physics with emphasis on the utility of high energy colliders are also discussed

  12. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs

  13. Strings and superstrings. Electron linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrini, V.; Bambade, P.; Binetruy, P.; Kounnas, C.; Le Duff, J.; Schwimmer, A.

    1989-01-01

    Basic string theory; strings in interaction; construction of strings and superstrings in arbitrary space-time dimensions; compactification and phenomenology; linear e+e- colliders; and the Stanford linear collider were discussed [fr

  14. Tau physics at p bar p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments

  15. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  16. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  17. Mapping the isotopic signature of methane in South-Eastern Spain: complementing biogeochemical long-term research with short term observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Àgueda, Alba; Morguí, Josep Anton; Vazquez Garcia, Eusebi; Curcoll, Roger; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2016-04-01

    As a greenhouse gas, methane has a global warming potential of 25 in a 100 year scale. In order to establish mitigation plans it is important to assess its sources and sinks which can be both of geological and biological origin. South-Eastern Spain is a region with many different possible methane sources: i) by seismic activity of many geological faults both inland and in the neighbouring marine region (i.e. the Carboneras fault crossing the Alborán Sea along Málaga coastline); ii) by seepage of methane from hydrates present in the marine regions close to the Gibraltar Strait and the Gulf of Cádiz; iii) by emissions from fossil fuels caused by high traffic of merchant ships and the presence of large harbours (Algeciras, Tetuan and Cádiz), and the Africa - Europe Gas Transport Network in the Gibraltar Strait region; iv) by organic matter decomposition in both highly productive marshlands and eutrophic reservoirs; v) by burning of agricultural debris for energy supply, mainly from olive residues. In this study, a methane mapping survey has been conducted in the area around three atmospheric stations of the ClimaDat Atmospheric Network for Continuous Measurements of Greenhouse Gases (www.climadat.es) located in South-Eastern Spain (Sierra de Grazalema (SGC3), Tarifa (EEC3) and Sierra de Segura (SSC3). A cavity ring down spectrometer (CRDS) (G2301m, Picarro®) installed on a car has been used to measure methane concentrations. Additionally, in selected points, air samples have been collected in Tedlar bags for isotopic signature analysis by CF-GC-IRMS (Continuous Flow Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). In order to obtain a map facilitating the identification of the different methane sources in the background air at regional scale, the mapping of isotopic signature of methane together with its concentration is a useful tool to obtain fast and direct information that will contribute to the knowledge of methane transport at the regional scale and

  18. Ntuples for NLO Events at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z.; Febres Cordero, F.; Höche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present an event-file format for the dissemination of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for QCD processes at hadron colliders. The files contain all information required to compute generic jet-based infrared-safe observables at fixed order (without showering or hadronization), and to recompute observables with different factorization and renormalization scales. The files also make it possible to evaluate cross sections and distributions with different parton distribution functions. This in turn makes it possible to estimate uncertainties in NLO predictions of a wide variety of observables without recomputing the short-distance matrix elements. The event files allow a user to choose among a wide range of commonly-used jet algorithms and jet-size parameters. We provide event files for a $W$ or $Z$ boson accompanied by up to four jets, and for pure-jet events with up to four jets. The files are for the Large Hadron Collider with a center of mass energy of 7 or 8 TeV. A C++ library along with a Python in...

  19. Experiments at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes signatures and backgrounds for processes in high-energy hadronic collisions, particularly at the SSC. It includes both signatures for new particles -- t quarks, Higgs bosons, new Ζ' bosons, supersymmetric particles, and technicolor particles -- and other experiments which might be done. It is based on the 1990 Snowmass Workshop and on work contained in the Expressions of Interest submitted to the SSC. 46 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  20. Multi-TeV muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that muons may be used in a future generation of high-energy high-luminosity μ + μ - and μ - p colliders is presented. The problem of collecting and cooling high-intensity muon bunches is discussed and ionization cooling is described. High-energy collider scenarios are outlined; muon colliders may become superior to electron colliders in the multi-TeV energy range

  1. Phenomenology of new physics beyond the Standard Model: signals of Supersymmetry with displaced vertices and an extended Higgs sector at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334334

    2017-08-02

    Our current understanding of matter and its interactions is summarised in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Many experiments have tested the predictions of the SM with great success, but others have brought our ignorance into focus by showing us there are new phenomena that we can not describe within the framework of the SM. These include the experimental observations of neutrino masses and dark matter, which confirms there must be new physics. What this new physics may look like at colliders motivates the original work in this thesis, which comprises three studies: the prospects of future electron-positron colliders in testing a model with an extended Higgs sector with a scalar triplet, doublet and singlet; the discovery potential at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a non-minimal Supersymmetric model via conventional sparticle searches and via searches for displaced vertices; and the experimental search for long-lived massive particles via a displaced vertex signature using data of proton-proton...

  2. Real Traceable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sherman S. M.

    Traceable signature scheme extends a group signature scheme with an enhanced anonymity management mechanism. The group manager can compute a tracing trapdoor which enables anyone to test if a signature is signed by a given misbehaving user, while the only way to do so for group signatures requires revealing the signer of all signatures. Nevertheless, it is not tracing in a strict sense. For all existing schemes, T tracing agents need to recollect all N' signatures ever produced and perform RN' “checks” for R revoked users. This involves a high volume of transfer and computations. Increasing T increases the degree of parallelism for tracing but also the probability of “missing” some signatures in case some of the agents are dishonest.

  3. The CLIC stability study on the feasibility of colliding high energy nanobeams

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Guignard, Gilbert; Leros, Nicolas; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Wilson, Ian H; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study at CERN proposes a linear collider with nanometer-size colliding beams at an energy of 3 TeV c.m. ("colliding high energy nanobeams"). The transport, demagnification and collision of these nanobeams imposes magnet vibration tolerances that range from 0.2 nm to a few nanometers. This is well below the floor vibration usually observed. A test stand for magnet stability was set-up at CERN in the immediate neighborhood of roads, operating accelerators, workshops, and regular office space. It was equipped with modern stabilization equipment. The experimental setup and first preliminary results are presented. (10 refs).

  4. Graviton collider effects in one and more large extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; Plehn, Tilman; Strumia, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    Astrophysical bounds severely limit the possibility of observing collider signals of gravity with less than 3 flat extra dimensions. However, small distortions of the compactified space can lift the masses of the lightest graviton excitations, evading astrophysical bounds without affecting collider signals of quantum gravity. Following this procedure we reconsider theories with one large extra dimension. A slight space warping gives a model which is safe in the infrared against astrophysical and observational bounds, and which has the ultraviolet properties of gravity with a single flat extra dimension. We extend collider studies to the case of one extra dimension, pointing out its peculiarities. Finally, for a generic number of extra dimensions, we compare different channels in LHC searches for quantum gravity, introducing an ultraviolet cutoff as an additional parameter besides the Planck mass

  5. Probing electroweak symmetry breaking at multi-TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Low energy theorems are derived for scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z's, providing the basis for an estimate of the observable signal if electroweak symmetry breaking is due to new physics at the TeV scale. A pp collider with L, √s = 40 TeV, 10 33 cm. -2 s -1 is just sufficient to observe the signal while pp colliders with 40, 10 32 or 20, 10 33 are not. A collider that is sensitive to the TeV-scale signal provides valuable information about symmetry breaking whether the masses of the associated new particles are below, within, or above the 1-2 TeV region. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Search for supersymmetry in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV Using the trilepton signature for chargino-neutralino production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glatzer, J; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sood, A; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-12-19

    We use the three lepton and missing energy trilepton signature to search for chargino-neutralino production with 2.0 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron pp[over ] collider. We expect an excess of approximately 11 supersymmetric events for a choice of parameters of the mSUGRA model, but our observation of 7 events is consistent with the standard model expectation of 6.4 events. We constrain the mSUGRA model of supersymmetry and rule out chargino masses up to 145 GeV/c;{2} for a specific choice of parameters.

  7. Searches for Electroweak Signatures of Supersymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Khoo, Teng Jian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Searches for strongly-produced superparticles at the Large Hadron Collider have excluded gluinos and squarks of all generations up to the TeV scale. While limited by statistics, electroweak signatures remain less thoroughly explored, and in particular the Higgsino sector has proven challenging. Conventional searches for leptons associated with missing transverse momentum do not fully cover the phase space, requiring new approaches to extend experimental sensitivity. Dedicated reconstruction techniques address the challenge posed by mass-degenerate spectra. By looking beyond the assumption of leptonic signatures, searches for gauge-mediated supersymmetry have broken new ground.

  8. Electron Cloud Effect in the Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M

    2004-01-01

    Beam induced multipacting, driven by the electric field of successive positively charged bunches, may arise from a resonant motion of electrons, generated by secondary emission, bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been observed or is expected at many storage rings [1]. In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud is produced initially by ionization of the residual gas and photoelectrons from the synchrotron radiation. The cloud is then sustained by secondary electron emission. This electron cloud can reach equilibrium after the passage of only a few bunches. The electron-cloud effect may be responsible for collective effects as fast coupled-bunch and single-bunch instability, emittance blow-up or incoherent tune shift when the bunch current exceeds a certain threshold, accompanied by a large number of electrons in the vacuum chamber. The ECE was identified as one of the most important R and D topics in the International Linear Collider Report [2]. Systematic studies on the possible electron-cloud effect have been initiated at SLAC for the GLC/NLC and TESLA linear colliders, with particular attention to the effect in the positron main damping ring (MDR) and the positron Low Emittance Transport which includes the bunch compressor system (BCS), the main linac, and the beam delivery system (BDS). We present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud generation in both machine designs. Thus, single and coupled-bunch instability thresholds are estimated for the GLC/NLC design

  9. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primulando, Reinard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin [Department of Physics, University of California Davis,Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M{sub T2} variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  10. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primulando, Reinard; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-01-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M T2 variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  11. Colliding Pulse Mode-Locked Laser Diode using Multimode Interference Reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon Gallegos, Carlos; Guzmán, R.C.; Jimenez, A.; Leijtens, X.J.M.; Carpintero, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel fully monolithic Colliding Pulse Mode-Locked Laser Diode (CPML) using Multimode Interference Reflectors (MMIRs) to create the laser resonator. We demonstrate experimentally for the first time to our knowledge the Colliding Pulse mode-locking of a laser using MMIRs by observation

  12. Extra dimension searches at hadron colliders to next-to-leading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quantitative impact of NLO-QCD corrections for searches of large and warped extra dimensions at hadron colliders are investigated for the Drell-Yan process. The K-factor for various observables at hadron colliders are presented. Factorisation, renormalisation scale dependence and uncertainties due to various parton ...

  13. Report from LHC MD 1391: First tests of the variation of amplitude detuning with crossing angle as an observable for high-order errors in low-β∗ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear errors in experimental insertions can pose a significant challenge to the operability of low-β∗ colliders. When crossing schemes are applied high-order errors, such as decapole and dodecapole multipole components in triplets and separation dipoles, can feed-down to give a normal octupole perturbation. Such fields may contribute to distortion of the assumed tune footprint, influencing lifetime and the Landau damping of instabilities. Conversely, comparison of amplitude detuning coefficients with and without crossing schemes applied should allow for the beam-based study of such high-order errors. In this note first measurements of amplitude detuning with crossing bumps in the experimental insertions are reported.

  14. Conventional power sources for colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 μsec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 μsec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 μsec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths

  15. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  16. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  17. Perspectives on large linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-11-01

    Three main items in the design of large linear colliders are presented. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder who must design a machine to meet the needs of experimentl high energy physics rather than designing a machine for its own sake. An introduction is also given for linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder. The author also gives his impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade. The paper concludes with a brief recommendation for how we can all get on with the work faster, and hope to realize these machines sooner by working together. 10 refs., 9 figs

  18. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook.

  19. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    1996-02-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (i.e. photons). Often, they are brought into interaction with each other (e.g. in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (e.g. in fixed target physics, synchrotron radiation sciences, neutron scattering experiments, laser chemistry and physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams—always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades—nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and radio frequency cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider paradigms, to name a few. We will illustrate this progress via a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use—the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We will close with an outline of future opportunities and outlook.

  20. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook

  1. Smoking-gun signatures for little Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tao

    2004-01-01

    The little Higgs idea is a new way to solve the 'little hierarchy' problem by protecting the Higgs mass from quadratically divergent one-loop corrections. After a general introduction, I first describe the Littlest Higgs model to illustrate the little Higgs idea. I then present certain phenomenological signatures of two classes of little Higgs theories for future colliders. I emphasize to test the cancellation mechanism and how to distinguish different little Higgs models. (author)

  2. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  3. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch

  4. New collider scheme at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1984-07-01

    This paper presents current ideas from Berkeley concerning a possible new facility for studying the phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter. The physics ideas have evolved over a period of more than five years, the VENUS concept for a 25 GeV/nucleon colliding beam facility having been presented in 1979. The concept for the Minicollider has been, like that of VENUS, the work of Hermann Grunder and Christoph Leemann

  5. Perspectives on large Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-01-01

    The accelerator community now generally agrees that the Linear Collider is the most cost-effective technology for reaching much higher energies in the center-of-mass than can be attained in the largest of the e + e - storage rings, LEP. Indeed, even as the first linear collider, the SLC at SLAC, is getting ready to begin operations groups, at SLAC, Novosibirsk, CERN and KEK are doing R and D and conceptual design studies on a next generation machine in the 1 TeV energy region. In this perspectives talk I do not want to restrict my comments to any particular design, and so I will talk about a high-energy machine as the NLC, which is shorthand for the Next Linear Collider, and taken to mean a machine with a center-of-mass energy someplace in the 0.5 to 2 TeV energy range with sufficient luminosity to carry out a meaningful experimental program. I want to discuss three main items with you. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder. Next, I will give an introduction to linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder.Then, I want to give my impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade

  6. Stanford Linear Collider magnet positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, B.T.

    1991-08-01

    For the installation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) the positioning and alignment of the beam line components was performed in several individual steps. In the following the general procedures for each step are outlined. The calculation of ideal coordinates for the magnets in the entire SLC will be discussed in detail. Special emphasis was given to the mathematical algorithms and geometry used in the programs to calculate these ideal positions. 35 refs., 21 figs

  7. Physics goals of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    These lectures describe some of the physics goals that future colliders are designed to achieve. Emphasis is on the SSC, but its capabilities are compared to those of other machines, and set in a context of what will be measured before the SSC is ready. Physics associated with the Higgs sector is examined most thoroughly, with a survey of the opportunities to find evidence of extended gauge theories

  8. FUTURE CIRCULAR COLLIDER LOGISTICS STUDY

    CERN Document Server

    Beißert, Ulrike; Kuhlmann, Gerd; Nettsträter, Andreas; Prasse, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva is the largest and most powerful collider in the world. CERN and its research and experimental infrastructure is not only a focus for the science community but is also very much in the public eye. With the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study, CERN has begun to examine the feasibility of a new underground accelerator ring with a length of approximately 100 kilometres. Logistics is of great importance for the construction, assembly and operation of the FCC. During the planning, construction and assembly of the LHC, logistics proved to be one of the key factors. As the FCC is even larger than the LHC, logistics will also become more and more significant. This report therefore shows new concepts, methods and analytics for logistics, supply chain and transport concepts as part of the FCC study. This report deals with three different logistics aspects for the planning and construction phase of FCC: 1. A discussion of d...

  9. Particle production at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geich-Gimbel, C.

    1987-11-01

    Key features of the SPS panti p Collider and the detectors of the UA-experiments involved are dealt with in chapter 2, which includes and accord to the ramping mode of the Collider, which allowed to raise the c.m. energy to 900 GeV in the UA5/2 experiment. The following chapters concentrate on physics results. Starting with a discussion of cross sections and diffraction dissociation in chapter 3 we then continue with a presentation of basic features of particle production such as rapidity and multiplicity distributions in chapter 4. There one of the unexpected findings at Collider energies, the breakdown of the so-called KNO-scaling, and new regularities potentially governing multiplicity distributions, are discussed. The findings about correlations among the final state particles, which may tell about the underlying dynamics of multi-particle production and be relevant to models thereof, are described in due detail in chapter 5. Transverse spectra and their trends with energy are shown in chapter 6. Results on identified particles are collected in a separate chapter in order to stress that this piece of information was an important outcome of the UA5 experiment. (orig./HSI)

  10. Experimental overview on small colliding systems at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankus, Paul

    2016-12-15

    Beginning with the observation of ridge/flow-like features in pair correlations measurements in p+Pb, d+Au and high-density p+p events at RHIC and LHC, the last few years have seen a great surge of interest in the question of whether anything like a hot, locally-equilibrated QCD medium is formed in the small systems at collider energies. Many intriguing and suggestive results have been presented, but conclusions about medium formation must be approached with care. This presentation will attempt to summarize the experimental results from small colliding systems measured at RHIC, as part of a careful and objective evaluation of this question.

  11. Supersymmetric Higgs pair discovery prospects at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, A; Éboli, Oscar J P; Mizukoshi, J K; Novaes, S F

    2000-01-01

    We study the potential of hadron colliders in the search for the pair production of neutral Higgs bosons in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Using analytical expressions for the relevant amplitudes, we perform a detailed signal and background analysis, working out efficient kinematical cuts for the extraction of the signal. The important role of squark loop contributions to the signal is emphasised. If the signal is sufficiently enhanced by these contributions, it could even be observable at the next run of the upgraded Tevatron collider in the near future. At the LHC the pair production of light and heavy Higgs bosons might be detectable simultaneously.

  12. Massive stars in colliding wind systems: the GLAST perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems arc considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory.The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems

  13. Searching for color sextet quarks at high energy hardon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantar, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the resonance and pair production of color sextet quarks and their decay modes at very high energy hadron colliders such as VHLC (Very Large Hadron Collider) with the energy of 28 TeV and SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) for two options with energies of 40 TeV and 100 TeV, respectively. The total cross sections of color sextet quark for three different machines are calculated and plotted versus its mass. The distributions of transverse momentum T p and invariant mass jj m of two final state jets are plotted for signals and backgrounds and analyzed the discovery limits of this resonance particle. The observation condition of color sextet quarks are performed by the number of signal events to the number of background events

  14. Hadron Collider Physics with Real Time Trajectory Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annovi, Alberto [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    During last century experiments with accelerators have been extensively used to improve our understanding of matter. They are now the most common tool used to search for new phenomena in high energy physics. In the process of probing smaller distances and searching for new particles the center of mass energy has been steadily increased. The need for higher center of mass energy made hadron colliders the natural tool for discovery physics. Hadron colliders have a major drawback with respect to electron-positron colliders. As shown in fig. 1 the total cross section is several orders of magnitude larger than the cross section of interesting processes such as top or Higgs production. This means that, in order to observe interesting processes, it’s necessary to have collisions at very high rates and it becomes necessary to reject on-line most of the “non-interesting” events. In this thesis I have described the wide range of SVT applications within CDF.

  15. The magnet system of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, A.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a colliding ring accelerator to be completed in 1999. Through collisions of heavy ions it is hoped to observe the creation of matter at extremely high temperatures and densities, similar to what may have occurred in the original ''Big Bang.'' The collider rings will consist of 1740 superconducting magnet elements. Some of elements are being manufactured by industrial partners (Northrop Grumman and Everson Electric). Others are being constructed or assembled at BNL. A description is given of the magnet designs, the plan for manufacturing and test results. In the manufacturing of the magnets, emphasis has been placed on uniformity of their performance and on quality. Results so far indicate that this emphasis has been very successful

  16. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  17. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  18. Partial lifetime test of an SSC Collider dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.; Anerella, M.; Ganetis, G.

    1993-01-01

    Over a period of ten months, a 15 m-long, 50 mm-aperture superconducting SSC Collider dipole was taken through a series of thermal and power cycles to check for changes in performance. One quench below operating current was experienced during this period. Small changes in the coil preload and certain harmonics were observed

  19. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol.1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol.2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol.3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  20. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentaiton and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  1. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LCH workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  2. Distinguishing spins in decay chains with photons at the large hardron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Freitas, A.; Landwehr, A.; Wyler, D.

    2009-04-01

    Several models for physics beyond the Standard Model predict new particles with a decay signature including hard photons and missing energy. Two well-motivated examples are supersymmetry with gauge-mediated breaking (GMSB) and the standard model with two universal extra dimensions. Both models lead to decay chains with similar collider signatures, including hard photon emission. The main discriminating feature are the spins of the new particles. In this paper we discuss how information about the spins of the particles can be extracted from lepton-photon or quark-photon invariant mass distributions at the Large Hadron Collider. The characteristic shapes of the distributions are derived analytically and then studied in a realistic Monte-Carlo simulation. We find that for a typical GMSB mass spectrum with particle masses below 1 TeV, already 10 fb -1 integrated luminosity at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy are sufficient to discriminate the two models with high significance. (orig.)

  3. Collider constraints and prospects of a scalar singlet extension to Higgs portal dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, Grace

    2016-01-01

    This work considers an extension of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs sector by a real, scalar singlet field, including applicability to a dark matter (DM) model with the addition of a Yukawa coupling to a fermionic dark matter candidate. The collider signatures and constraints on the mixed two-Higgs scenario are determined, including limits from Higgs production signals and exclusion searches, as well as constraints arising from the Higgs total and invisible widths. As there is overwhelming Higgs data which is consistent with a SM scenario, the case in which an additional scalar has evaded detection is further explored in the context of Higgs precision measurement. The discovery reach and prospective signatures of the model at a proposed linear collider are investigated, with particular focus on the Higgs triple coupling, and di-Higgs production processes.

  4. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (A new frontier in nuclear physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven is in its second year of construction with a target date for completion in late 1997. In this report, I will describe the status of the project, the designated milestones and the capabilities of this collider that set it apart as the premier facility to probe the new frontier of nuclear matter under extreme temperatures and densities. Two large detectors and a pair of smaller detectors, which are in various stages of approval, form the experimental program at this point. They provide a complementary set of probes to study quark gluon plasma formation through different signatures. The two ring design of this collider allows for collisions between different ion species ranging from protons to gold

  5. Signals of doubly-charged Higgsinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Durmus A.; Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail; Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Several supersymmetric models with extended gauge structures, motivated by either grand unification or by neutrino mass generation, predict light doubly-charged Higgsinos. In this work we study productions and decays of doubly-charged Higgsinos present in left-right supersymmetric models, and show that they invariably lead to novel collider signals not found in the minimal supersymmetric model or in any of its extensions motivated by the μ problem or even in extra dimensional theories. We investigate their distinctive signatures at the Large Hadron Collider in both pair- and single-production modes, and show that they are powerful tools in determining the underlying model via the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider experiments.

  6. Les Houches 2011: Physics at TeV Colliders New Physics Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooijmans, G.; et al.

    2012-03-01

    We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.

  7. Discriminating Z' from anomalous trilinear gauge coupling signatures in e+e-→W+W- at ILC with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.V.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.; Paver, N.

    2012-01-01

    New heavy neutral gauge bosons Z' are predicted by many models of physics beyond the Standard Model. It is quite possible that Z's are heavy enough to lie beyond the discovery reach of the CERN Large Hadron Collider LHC, in which case only indirect signatures of Z' exchanges may emerge at future colliders, through deviations of the measured cross sections from the Standard Model predictions. We discuss in this context the foreseeable sensitivity to Z's of W ± -pair production cross sections at the e + e - International Linear Collider (ILC), especially as regards the potential of distinguishing observable effects of the Z' from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to the same or similar new physics experimental signatures at the ILC. The sensitivity of the ILC for probing the Z-Z' mixing and its capability to distinguish these two new physics scenarios is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the initial beams and the produced W ± bosons are considered. A model-independent analysis of the Z' effects in the process e + e - →W + W - allows to differentiate the full class of vector Z' models from those with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings, with one notable exception: the sequential SM (SSM)-like models can in this process not be distinguished from anomalous gauge couplings. Results of model-dependent analysis of a specific Z' are expressed in terms of discovery and identification reaches on the Z-Z' mixing angle and the Z' mass. (orig.)

  8. Busca por dimensões extras no detector CMS do large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R

    We present the results of a search for experimental evidence of extra space dimensions in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, furnished by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator. We analyzed the data taken by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment during 2011, which total an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb−1. The Randall-Sundrum warped extra dimensions model was used as a standard benchmark for the experimental signatures which could be observed in the data, in the presence of extra dimensions. The studied reaction is pp → G∗→ ZZ→ qqνν, where G∗ is the first Randall-Sundrum graviton resonance. The observations agree witht he Standard Model predictions. In the absence of experimental signals of extra dimensions, we put limits on the parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model. Upper limits, with 95% confidence, for the cross-section of processes which would raise the event yield in the channel considered are in the [0.047 – 0.021] pb range, for resonance masses in the [1000...

  9. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies

  10. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  11. Beam dynamics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss some basic beam dynamics issues related to obtaining and preserving the luminosity of a next generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. 27 refs., 1 fig

  12. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  13. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  14. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  15. The γ-rays that accompanied GW170817 and the observational signature of a magnetic jet breaking out of NS merger ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, O.; Tchekhovskoy, A.; Gottlieb, O.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2018-04-01

    We present the first relativistic magnetohydrodynamics numerical simulation of a magnetic jet that propagates through and emerges from the dynamical ejecta of a binary neutron star merger. Generated by the magnetized rotation of the merger remnant, the jet propagates through the ejecta and produces an energetic cocoon that expands at mildly relativistic velocities and breaks out of the ejecta. We show that if the ejecta has a low-mass (˜10-7 M⊙) high-velocity (v ˜ 0.85c) tail, the cocoon shock breakout will generate γ-ray emission that is comparable to the observed short GRB170817A that accompanied the recent gravitational wave event GW170817. Thus, we propose that this gamma-ray burst (GRB), which is quite different from all other short GRBs observed before, was produced by a different mechanism. We expect, however, that such events are numerous and many will be detected in coming LIGO-Virgo runs.

  16. Kinematics and resolution at future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Klein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Limitations due to resolution and kinematics are discussed of the (Q 2 , x) range accessible with electron-proton colliders after HERA. For the time after HERA one may think of two electron-proton colliders: an asymmetric energy machine and a rather symmetric one. Both colliders are compared here in order to study the influence of the different E l /E p ratios on the accessible kinematic range which is restricted due to angular coverage, finite detector resolution and calibration uncertainties

  17. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  18. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex

  19. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  20. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds

  1. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described

  2. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system

  3. Optimal, real-time control--colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1991-05-01

    With reasonable definitions, optimal control is possible for both classical and quantal systems with new approaches called PISC(Parallel) and NISC(Neural) from analogy with RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing). If control equals interaction, observation and comparison to some figure of merit with interaction via external fields, then optimization comes from varying these fields to give design or operating goals. Structural stability can then give us tolerance and design constraints. But simulations use simplified models, are not in real-time and assume fixed or stationary conditions, so optimal control goes far beyond convergence rates of algorithms. It is inseparable from design and this has many implications for colliders. 12 refs., 3 figs

  4. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  5. Preearthquake anomalous ionospheric signatures observed at low-mid latitude Indian station, Delhi, during the year 2015 to early 2016: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumedha; Upadhayaya, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    We have analyzed five major earthquake events measuring greater than 6 on Richter scale (M > 6) that occurred during the year 2015 to early 2016, affecting Indian region ionosphere, using F2 layer critical parameters (foF2, hmF2) obtained using Digisonde from a low-mid latitude Indian station, Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E, 19.2°N geomagnetic latitude, 42.4°N dip). Normal day-to-day variability occurring in ionosphere is segregated by calculating F2 layer critical frequency and peak height variations (ΔfoF2, ΔhmF2) from the normal quiet time behavior apart from computing interquartile range. We find that the ionospheric F2 region across Delhi by and large shows some significant perturbations 3-4 days prior to these earthquake events, resulting in a large peak electron density variation of 200%. These observed perturbations indicate towards a possibility of seismo-ionospheric coupling as the solar and geomagnetic indices were normally quiet and stable during the period of these events. It was also observed that the precursory effect of earthquake was predominantly seen even outside the earthquake preparation zone, as given by Dobrovolsky et al. (1979). The thermosphere neutral composition (O/N2) as observed by Global Ultraviolet Imager, across Delhi, during these earthquake events does not show any marked variation. Further, the effect of earthquake events on ionospheric peak electron density is compared to the lower atmosphere meteorological phenomenon of 2015 sudden stratospheric warming event.

  6. Comparison of in situ observations of air traffic emission signatures in the North Atlantic flight corridor with simulations using a Gaussian plume model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopka, P; Schlager, H; Schulte, P; Schumann, U; Ziereis, H [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Hagen, D; Whitefield, P [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Lab. for Cloud and Aerosol Science

    1998-12-31

    Focussed aircraft measurements including NO, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and aerosols (CN) have been carried out over the Eastern North Atlantic as part of the POLINAT (Pollution from Aircraft Emissions in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor) project to search for small and large scale signals of air traffic emissions in the corridor region. Here, the experimental data measured at cruising altitudes on November, 6, 1994 close to peak traffic hours are considered. Observed peak concentrations in small scale NO{sub x} spikes exceed background level of about 50 pptv by up to two orders of magnitude. The measured NO{sub x} concentration field is compared with simulations obtained with a plume dispersion model using collected air traffic data and wind measurements. Additionally, the measured and calculated NO/NO{sub x} ratios are considered. The comparison with the model shows that the observed (multiple-)peaks can be understood as a superposition of several aircraft plumes with ages up to 3 hours. (author) 12 refs.

  7. Comparison of in situ observations of air traffic emission signatures in the North Atlantic flight corridor with simulations using a Gaussian plume model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopka, P.; Schlager, H.; Schulte, P.; Schumann, U.; Ziereis, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Hagen, D.; Whitefield, P. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Lab. for Cloud and Aerosol Science

    1997-12-31

    Focussed aircraft measurements including NO, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and aerosols (CN) have been carried out over the Eastern North Atlantic as part of the POLINAT (Pollution from Aircraft Emissions in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor) project to search for small and large scale signals of air traffic emissions in the corridor region. Here, the experimental data measured at cruising altitudes on November, 6, 1994 close to peak traffic hours are considered. Observed peak concentrations in small scale NO{sub x} spikes exceed background level of about 50 pptv by up to two orders of magnitude. The measured NO{sub x} concentration field is compared with simulations obtained with a plume dispersion model using collected air traffic data and wind measurements. Additionally, the measured and calculated NO/NO{sub x} ratios are considered. The comparison with the model shows that the observed (multiple-)peaks can be understood as a superposition of several aircraft plumes with ages up to 3 hours. (author) 12 refs.

  8. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  9. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10 30 cm -2 s -1 as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to ∼10 3 for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW

  10. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance

    2006-01-01

    In the coming decade, the search for the Higgs boson, and for new particles representing physics beyond the Standard Model, will be carried out by colliding protons at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. A collision of two protons, each of which is made out of quarks and gluons, is inherently messy. Feynman likened it to smashing two Swiss watches together to figure out how they work. In recent decades, we have learned better how the Swiss watches work, using the theory of quark-gluon interactions, quantum chromodynamics. Armed with this knowledge, we can better predict the results of collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC, to see whether the Standard Model holds up or fails, or whether new particles are in the data. But a major bottleneck is simply in adding up Feynman diagrams, for which the rules are well known, yet there can be thousands of extremely complicated diagrams. In fact, the sum of all diagrams is often much simpler than the typical one, suggesting hidden symmetries and better ways to compute. In the past two years, spinoffs from a new theory, 'twistor string theory', have led to very efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams for making such predictions, as I will explain.

  11. The muon collider (Sandro's snake)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 x 10 28 cm -2 s -1 . We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance

  12. The Collider dipole magnet program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Bailey, R.; Bever, D.; Bogart, L.; Gigg, G.; Packer, M.; Page, L.; Stranberg, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider will consist of more large superconducting magnets than have been built to date. Over 12,000 superconducting magnets are required and more than 8,000 will be Collider dipoles. The dipole magnet program is on the critical path of the project and requires the optimized utilization of the Nation's resources - National Laboratories, Universities and Industry. General Dynamics and Westinghouse Electric Corporation have been chosen as the Leader and Follower companies for the design of producible magnets and the manufacturing of the SSC dipoles. Industry has the necessary experience, skills and facilities required to produce reliable and cost effective dipole magnets. At peak production, 10 CDMs per day, very large quantities (nearly 130 metric tonnes/day) of materials will have to be procured from companies nationwide and fabricated into defect-free magnets. A key element of the SSCL's strategy to produce the most efficient CDM program is to employ the Leader-Follower approach, with the Leader transferring technology from the laboratories to the Leader's facility, fully integrating the Follower in the producibility and tooling/factory design efforts, and assisting the Follower in magnet qualification tests. General Dynamics is ready to help build America's most powerful research tool. Management is in place, the facilities are ready for activation and resources are available for immediate assignment

  13. Di-Higgs signatures from R-parity violating supersymmetry as the origin of neutrino mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Sanjoy; Chun, Eung Jin [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Heogiro 85, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Sharma, Pankaj [ARC Center of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, Department of Physics,University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005 South (Australia)

    2016-12-14

    Motivated by the naturalness and neutrino mass generation, we study a bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario with a light Higgsino-like lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). We observe that the LSP can have substantial decay branching ratio to νh in a large part of the parameter space, and thus study the pair production of electroweakinos followed by the decays χ̃{sub 1}{sup ±}→χ̃{sub 1}{sup 0}W{sup ±(∗)} and χ̃{sub 1}{sup 0}→νh. This leads to an interesting signature of Higgs boson pair production associated with significantly large missing transverse energy which is grossly distinct from the di-Higgs production in the Standard Model. We investigate the perspective of probing such signatures by performing a detector level simulation using a toy calorimeter of both the signal and corresponding backgrounds for the high-luminosity high energy phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We also advocate some observables based on kinematical features to provide an excellent handle to suppress the backgrounds.

  14. MULTI-VIEWPOINT OBSERVATIONS OF A WIDELY DISTRIBUTED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT: THE ROLE OF EUV WAVES AND WHITE-LIGHT SHOCK SIGNATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouloumvakos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A. [Section of Astrogeophysics, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vourlidas, A. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Penteli (Greece); Hillaris, A. [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15783 Athens (Greece)

    2016-04-10

    On 2012 March 7, two large eruptive events occurred in the same active region within 1 hr from each other. Each consisted of an X-class flare, a coronal mass ejection (CME), an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave, and a shock wave. The eruptions gave rise to a major solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed at widely separated (∼120°) points in the heliosphere. From multi-viewpoint energetic proton recordings we determine the proton release times at STEREO B and A (STB, STA) and the first Lagrange point (L1) of the Sun–Earth system. Using EUV and white-light data, we determine the evolution of the EUV waves in the low corona and reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of the first CME’s shock, respectively. We compare the energetic proton release time at each spacecraft with the EUV waves’ arrival times at the magnetically connected regions and the timing and location of the CME shock. We find that the first flare/CME is responsible for the SEP event at all three locations. The proton release at STB is consistent with arrival of the EUV wave and CME shock at the STB footpoint. The proton release time at L1 was significantly delayed compared to STB. Three-dimensional modeling of the CME shock shows that the particle release at L1 is consistent with the timing and location of the shock’s western flank. This indicates that at L1 the proton release did not occur in low corona but farther away from the Sun. However, the extent of the CME shock fails to explain the SEP event observed at STA. A transport process or a significantly distorted interplanetary magnetic field may be responsible.

  15. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  16. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  17. Coordinated NuSTAR and Swift observations of SU Lyncis: a hard X-ray bright symbiotic star with weak optical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo; Mukai, Koji; Luna, Gerardo Juan Manuel; Sokoloski, Jennifer; Nelson, Thomas; Lucy, Adrian B.

    2018-01-01

    The variable M giant SU Lyncis was recently identified as the optical counterpart of a hard, thermal X-ray source. Also considering the fact that the star displays weak high-excitation emission, it was classified as a symbiotic system purely powered by accretion without accompanying nuclear fusion. This discovery revealed the existence of a subclass of symbiotics which is "invisible" to optical surveys and thus underestimated since these surveys favour the identification of systems with more intense emission lines that arise when shell-burning is present. At the same time, this discovery opens up a new window to investigate accretion and evolution of symbiotic systems. Here we report on the X-ray and UV properties of SU Lyncis derived from simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observations. The investigation is focused on the strong photometric variability in UV and on the X-ray spectral characterization, which is associated with a hot thermal plasma with sub-solar abundance and suffering the effects of a relatively dense local absorber. The results are discussed in the context of the accretion geometry and mass of the white dwarf, and the imposed limits to the reflection fraction.

  18. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  19. THE ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voiculescu Madalina Irena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Article refers to significance and the digital signature in electronic commerce. Internet and electronic commerce open up many new opportunities for the consumer, yet, the security (or perceived lack of security of exchanging personal and financial data

  20. Digital signature feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of using digital signatures to assist the Arizona Department of Transportation in conducting business. The Department is evaluating the potential of performing more electronic t...

  1. The higgsino-singlino world at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soo [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Ray, Tirtha Sankar [University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2015-02-01

    We consider light higgsinos and singlinos in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model at the large hadron collider. We assume that the singlino is the lightest supersymmetric particle and that the higgsino is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle with the remaining supersymmetric particles in the multi-TeV range. This scenario, which is motivated by the flavor and CP issues, provides a phenomenologically viable dark matter candidate and improved electroweak fit consistent with the measured Higgs mass. Here, the higgsinos decay into on (off)-shell gauge boson and the singlino. We consider the leptonic decay modes and the resulting signature is three isolated leptons and missing transverse energy which is known as the trilepton signal. We simulate the signal and the Standard Model backgrounds and present the exclusion region in the higgsino-singlino mass plane at the large hadron collider at √(s) = 14 TeV for an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}. (orig.)

  2. Probing the $WW \\gamma$ vertex at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Papavassiliou, J

    1999-01-01

    We present a new, model independent method for extracting bounds for the anomalous $\\gamma WW$ couplings from hadron collider experiments. At the partonic level we introduce a set of three observables which are constructed from the unpolarized differential cross-section for the process $d\\bar{u}\\to W^{-}\\gamma$ by appropriate convolution with a set of simple polynomials depending only on the center-of-mass angle. One of these observables allows for the direct determination of the anomalous coupling usually denoted by presence of a radiation zero. The other two observables impose two sum rules on the remaining three anomalous couplings. The inclusion of the structure functions is discussed in detail for both $p\\bar{p}$ and $pp$ colliders. We show that, whilst for $p\\bar{p}$ experiments this can be accomplished straightforwardly, in the $pp$ case one has to resort to somewhat more elaborate techniques, such as the binning of events according to their longitudinal momenta.

  3. Multiplicity fluctuations and collective flow in small colliding systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Murase, Koichi; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2017-11-01

    Recent observation of collective-flow-like behaviours in small colliding systems attracts significant theoretical and experimental interests. In large colliding systems, large collective flow has been interpreted as manifestation of almost-perfect fluidity of the quark gluon plasma (QGP). So it is quite intriguing to explore how small the QGP can be as a fluid. Multiplicity fluctuations play a crucial role in centrality definition of the events in small colliding systems since the fluctuations are, in general, more important as the system size is getting smaller. To consider the correct multiplicity fluctuations, we employ PYTHIA which naturally describes multiplicity distribution in p+p collisions. We superpose p+p collisions by taking into account the number of participants and that of binary collisions from Monte-Carlo version of Glauber model and evaluate initial entropy density distributions which contain not only multiplicity fluctuations but also fluctuations of longitudinal profiles. Solving hydrodynamic equations followed by the hadronic afterburner, we calculate transverse momentum spectra, elliptic and triangular flow parameters in p+Au, d+Au and 3He+Au collisions at the RHIC energy and p+Pb collisions at the LHC energy. Although a large fraction of final anisotropic flow parameters comes from the fluid-dynamical stage, the effects of hadronic rescatterings turn out to be also important as well in understanding of the flow data in small colliding systems.

  4. Physics Signatures at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2001-01-01

    A set of signatures for physics processes of potential interests for the CLIC programme at = 1 - 5 TeV are discussed. These signatures, that may correspond to the manifestation of different scenarios of new physics as well as to Standard Model precision tests, are proposed as benchmarks for the optimisation of the CLIC accelerator parameters and for a first definition of the required detector response.

  5. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-01-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC)

  6. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in supersymmetric theories. I will also discuss how the search and study of sparticles other than the Higgs can be used to give information about the parameters ...

  7. Physicist pins hopes on particle collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Physicist pins hopes on particle collider By Deseret Morning News Published: Monday, Dec. 31, 27 12:4 a.m. MST FONT Scott Thomas, a 187 State University graduate, is working at the frontiers of science. The theoretical physicist is crafting ways to extract fundamental secrets that seem certain to be uncovered by the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Technical challenge of future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.

    1986-05-01

    The next generation of high energy e + e - colliders is likely to be built with colliding linear accelerators. A lot of research and development is needed before such a machine can be practically built. Some of the problems and recent progress made toward their solution are described here. Quantum corrections to beamstrahlung, the production of low emittance beams and strong focusing techniques are covered

  9. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)

  10. Possible limits of plasma linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma linear colliders have been proposed as next or next-next generation energy-frontier machines for high-energy physics. I investigate possible fundamental limits on energy and luminosity of such type of colliders, considering acceleration, multiple scattering off plasma ions, intrabeam scattering, bremsstrahlung, and betatron radiation. The question of energy efficiency is also addressed.

  11. Summary of exotic collider concepts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1995-01-01

    We present a summary of the discussions in the Exotic Collider Concepts Group. Most of the discussions were centered around the status and open problems for muon-muon and gamma-gamma colliders. In addition the group discussed some general problems and new results of accelerator physics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Reggeon calculus at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, C.; Varias, A.; Yepes, P.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenology of the perturbative reggeon calculus at collider energies is studied. It is found that the graphs which were neglected at ISR energies are still negligeable at √s=540 GeV. The perturbative series for the total cross section still converges reasonably fast. The values of the different parameters which describe rightly the data up to ISR energies give rise to a total cross section of around 60 mb at √s=540 GeV. For these values, the corresponding low mass and high mass eikonal series converges much more slowly. The non perturbative reggeon calculus gives rise to a total cross section less than 60 mb. (orig.)

  13. Experimental Approaches at Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, John A

    2002-01-01

    Precision measurements have played a vital role in our understanding of elementary particle physics. Experiments performed using e + e - collisions have contributed an essential part. Recently, the precision measurements at LEP and SLC have probed the standard model at the quantum level and severely constrained the mass of the Higgs boson [1]. Coupled with the limits on the Higgs mass from direct searches [2], this enables the mass to be constrained to be in the range 115-205 GeV. Developments in accelerator R and D have matured to the point where one could contemplate construction of a linear collider with initial energy in the 500 GeV range and a credible upgrade path to ∼ 1 TeV. Now is therefore the correct time to critically evaluate the case for such a facility

  14. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  15. Dark matter wants Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Asano, M.; Fujii, K.; Takubo, Y.; Honda, T.; Saito, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Humdi, R.S.; Ito, H.; Kanemura, S; Nabeshima, T.; Okada, N.; Suehara, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main purposes of physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) is to study the property of dark matter such as its mass, spin, quantum numbers, and interactions with particles of the standard model. We discuss how the property can or cannot be investigated at the ILC using two typical cases of dark matter scenario: 1) most of new particles predicted in physics beyond the standard model are heavy and only dark matter is accessible at the ILC, and 2) not only dark matter but also other new particles are accessible at the ILC. We find that, as can be easily imagined, dark matter can be detected without any difficulties in the latter case. In the former case, it is still possible to detect dark matter when the mass of dark matter is less than a half mass of the Higgs boson.

  16. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  17. Multibunch operation in the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Finley, D.A.; Bharadwaj, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab is the world's highest energy hadron collider, colliding protons with antiprotons at a center of mass energy of 1800 GeV. At present six proton bunches collide with six antiproton bunches to generate luminosities of up to 9 x 10 30 cm -2 s -1 . It is estimated that to reach luminosities significantly greater than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 while minimizing the number of interactions per crossing, the number of bunches will have to be increased. Thirty-six bunch operation looks like the most promising plan. This paper looks at the strategies for increasing the number of particle bunches, the new hardware that needs to be designed and changes to the operating mode in filling the Tevatron. An interactive program which simulates the filling of the Tevatron collider is also presented. The time scale for multibunch operation and progress towards running greater than six bunches is given in this paper

  18. Superconducting magnets for a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The existence of a muon collider will be dependent on the use of superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets for the μ - μ + collider will be found in the following locations: the π - π + capture system, the muon phase rotation system, the muon cooling system, the recirculating acceleration system, the collider ring, and the collider detector system. This report describes superconducting magnets for each of these sections except the detector. In addition to superconducting magnets, superconducting RF cavities will be found in the recirculating accelerator sections and the collider ring. The use of superconducting magnets is dictated by the need for high magnetic fields in order to reduce the length of various machine components. The performance of all of the superconducting magnets will be affected the energy deposited from muon decay products. (orig.)

  19. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  20. Final Focus Systems in Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor

    1998-01-01

    In colliding beam facilities, the ''final focus system'' must demagnify the beams to attain the very small spot sizes required at the interaction points. The first final focus system with local chromatic correction was developed for the Stanford Linear Collider where very large demagnifications were desired. This same conceptual design has been adopted by all the future linear collider designs as well as the SuperConducting Supercollider, the Stanford and KEK B-Factories, and the proposed Muon Collider. In this paper, the over-all layout, physics constraints, and optimization techniques relevant to the design of final focus systems for high-energy electron-positron linear colliders are reviewed. Finally, advanced concepts to avoid some of the limitations of these systems are discussed

  1. Technibaryon production at pp colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobado, A.; Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Terron, J.

    1992-01-01

    If the symmetry breaking sector of the Standard Model is strongly interacting, the low-energy dynamics of the longitudinal components of the weak bosons can be described by a non-linear sigma model with two free parameters. For a large range of these parameters the model supports finite energy solitons called weak Skyrmions or technibaryons. Technibaryons could be produced at the SSC giving rise to exotic experimental signatures since they are stable, heavy and, in some cases, fractional-charged particles. PACS:14.80.-j, 12.50Lr. (orig.)

  2. Nonlinear analysis of dynamic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, S.; Fallah, A.; Towhidkhah, F.

    2013-12-01

    Signature is a long trained motor skill resulting in well combination of segments like strokes and loops. It is a physical manifestation of complex motor processes. The problem, generally stated, is that how relative simplicity in behavior emerges from considerable complexity of perception-action system that produces behavior within an infinitely variable biomechanical and environmental context. To solve this problem, we present evidences which indicate that motor control dynamic in signing process is a chaotic process. This chaotic dynamic may explain a richer array of time series behavior in motor skill of signature. Nonlinear analysis is a powerful approach and suitable tool which seeks for characterizing dynamical systems through concepts such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponent. As a result, they can be analyzed in both horizontal and vertical for time series of position and velocity. We observed from the results that noninteger values for the correlation dimension indicates low dimensional deterministic dynamics. This result could be confirmed by using surrogate data tests. We have also used time series to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and obtain a positive value. These results constitute significant evidence that signature data are outcome of chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system of motor control.

  3. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  4. Doppler Velocity Signatures of Idealized Elliptical Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar observations have revealed a class of atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes, dust devils that possess elliptical radar reflectivity signatures. One famous example is Typhoon Herb (1996 that maintained its elliptical reflectivity structure over a 40-hour period. Theoretical work and dual-Doppler analyses of observed tropical cyclones have suggested two physical mechanisms that can explain the formation of two types of elliptical vortices observed in nature, namely, the combination of a circular vortex with either a wavenumber two vortex Rossby wave or a deformation field. The characteristics of these two types of elliptical vortices and their corresponding Doppler velocity signatures have not been previously examined.

  5. Higgs Boson and the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Sunanda

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been extremely successful in explaining all the precision data collected during the past few decades. The model, however, was incomplete with one of the key particles still not experimentally observed till 2012. This particle is predicted by the theory in the context of providing mass to the fundamental constituents as well as the exchange particles W and Z bosons. In the recent past, two experiments, ATLAS and CMS operating at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN have observed the evidence of a new state. Search signal of this object has been motivated by the Higgs boson within the Standard Model. These results have been consolidated with newer data and some attempt has gone to determine some of the properties of this newly observed state. Some of the most important recent results in this context are presented in this lecture. Several groups from India have participated in the LHC program and contributed to various aspects like the machine, computing grid and the experiments. In particular, 3 institutes and 2 University groups have been a member of the CMS collaboration and took part in the discovery of the new state. The participation of the Indian groups are also highlighted. (author)

  6. Charged Hadron Multiplicity Distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews facts and problems concerning charge hadron production in high energy collisions. Main emphasis is laid on the qualitative and quantitative description of general characteristics and properties observed for charged hadrons produced in such high energy collisions. Various features of available experimental data, for example, the variations of charged hadron multiplicity and pseudorapidity density with the mass number of colliding nuclei, center-of-mass energies, and the collision centrality obtained from heavy-ion collider experiments, are interpreted in the context of various theoretical concepts and their implications. Finally, several important scaling features observed in the measurements mainly at RHIC and LHC experiments are highlighted in the view of these models to draw some insight regarding the particle production mechanism in heavy-ion collisions.

  7. Double elementary Goldstone Higgs boson production in future linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yue, Chong-Xing; Liu, Zhi-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    The Elementary Goldstone Higgs (EGH) model is a perturbative extension of the Standard Model (SM), which identifies the EGH boson as the observed Higgs boson. In this paper, we study pair production of the EGH boson in future linear electron positron colliders. The cross-sections in the TeV region can be changed to about ‑27%, 163% and ‑34% for the e+e‑→ Zhh, e+e‑→ νν¯hh and e+e‑→ tt¯hh processes with respect to the SM predictions, respectively. According to the expected measurement precisions, such correction effects might be observed in future linear colliders. In addition, we compare the cross-sections of double SM-like Higgs boson production with the predictions in other new physics models.

  8. Implication of collider experiments for detecting cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    Investigation of Minimal Supersymmetry Standard Model shows, that any discovery with high-energy colliders at least one supersymmetric particle would strongly enhance importance of very accurate experiments. which search for lightest supersymmetric neutralinos as cold dark matter particles. Form other side, non-observations of any signal of cold dark matter in such experiments would force us to change strategy of searching for, for instance, light charged Higgs bosons at high energies [ru

  9. High-Resolution Imaging of Colliding and Merging Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Brad

    1991-07-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution images, using the WF/PC, of two colliding and merging galaxies (i.e., NGC 4038/4039 = "The Antennae" and NGC 7252 ="Atoms-for-Peace Galaxy". Our goal is to use HST to make critical observations of each object in order to gain a better understanding of the various phases of the merger process. Our primary objective is to determine whether globular clusters are formed during mergers\\?

  10. Opportunities with top quarks at future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We describe various studies relevant for top physics at future circular collider projects currently under discussion. We show how highly-massive top-antitop systems produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV could be observed and employed for constraining top dipole moments, investigate the reach of future proton-proton and electron-positron machines to top flavor-changing neutral interactions, and discuss top parton densities.

  11. Chirp of monolithic colliding pulse mode-locked diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, M.; Bischoff, S.; Franck, Thorkild

    1997-01-01

    Spectrally resolved streak camera measurements of picosecond pulses emitted by hybridly colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) laser diodes are presented in this letter. Depending on the modulation frequency both blue-chirped (upchirped) and red-chirped (downchirped) pulses can be observed. The two...... different regimes and the transition between them are characterized experimentally and the behavior is explained on the basis of our model for the CPM laser dynamics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  12. NLO corrections to production of heavy particles at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we study specific aspects of the production of heavy particles at hadron colliders, with emphasis on precision predictions including next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections from the strong and electroweak interactions. In the first part of the thesis we consider the top quark charge asymmetry. In particular, we discuss in detail the calculation of the electroweak contributions from the asymmetric part of the top quark pair production cross section at O(α 2 s α) and O(α 2 ) and their numerical impact on predictions for the asymmetry measurements at the Tevatron. These electroweak contributions provide a non-negligible addition to the QCD-induced asymmetry with the same overall sign and, in general, enlarge the Standard Model predictions by a factor around 1.2, diminishing the deviations from experimental measurements. In the second part of the thesis we consider the production of squarks, the supersymmetric partners of quarks, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss the calculation of the contribution of factorizable NLO QCD corrections to the production of squark-squark pairs combined at fully differential level with squark decays. Combining the production process with two different configurations for the squark decays, our calculation is used to provide precise phenomenological predictions for two different experimental signatures that are important for the search of supersymmetry at the LHC. We focus, for one signature, on the impact of our results on important physical differential distributions and on cut-and-count searches performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Considering the other signature, we analyze the effects from NLO QCD corrections and from the combination of production and decays on distributions relevant for parameter determination. In general, factorizable NLO QCD corrections have to be taken into account to obtain precise phenomenological predictions for the analyzed distributions and inclusive quantities. Moreover

  13. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  14. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  15. The principles and construction of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-09-01

    The problems posed to the designers and builders of high-energy linear colliders are discussed. Scaling laws of linear colliders are considered. The problem of attainment of small interaction areas is addressed. The physics of damping rings, which are designed to condense beam bunches in phase space, is discussed. The effect of wake fields on a particle bunch in a linac, particularly the conventional disk-loaded microwave linac structures, are discussed, as well as ways of dealing with those effects. Finally, the SLAC Linear Collider is described. 18 refs., 17 figs

  16. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  17. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  18. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of a collider capable of accelerating and colliding heavy ions and to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 2 x 10 26 cm -2 sec -1 at an energy per nucleon of 100 GeV in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Standard model Higgs physics at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we briefly review the experimental status and prospects to verify the Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The focus is on the most relevant aspects of the phenomenology of the Standard Model Higgs boson at current (Tevatron) and future (Large Hadron Collider, LHC and International Linear Collider, ILC) particle colliders. We review the Standard Model searches: searches at the Tevatron, the program planned at the LHC and prospects at the ILC. Emphasis is put on what follows after a candidate discovery at the LHC: the various measurements which are necessary to precisely determine what the properties of this Higgs candidate are. (author)

  20. Practical quantum digital signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  1. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  2. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the generation and control of the emittance in a next-generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. The proposed vertical beam sizes at the interaction point are the order of a few nanometers while the horizontal sizes are about a factor of 100 larger. This cross-sectional area is about a factor of 10 4 smaller than the SLC. However, the main question is: what are the tolerances to achieve such a small size, and how do they compare to present techniques for alignment and stability? These tolerances are very design dependent. Alignment tolerances in the linac can vary from 1 μm to 100 μm depending upon the basic approach. In this paper we discuss techniques of emittance generation and control which move alignment tolerances to the 100 μm range

  3. Test accelerator for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Akai, K.; Akemoto, M.; Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Hugo, T.; Ishihara, N.; Kawamoto, T.; Kimura, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Kubo, T.; Kurokawa, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Mizuno, H.; Odagiri, J.; Otake, Y.; Sakai, H.; Shidara, T.; Shintake, T.; Suetake, M.; Takashima, T.; Takata, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Urakawa, J.; Yamamoto, N.; Yokoya, K.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshioka, M.; Yamaoka, Y.

    1989-01-01

    KEK has proposed to build Test Accelerator Facility (TAF) capable of producing a 2.5 GeV electron beam for the purpose of stimulating R ampersand D for linear collider in TeV region. The TAF consists of a 1.5 GeV S-band linear accelerator, 1.5 GeV damping ring and 1.0 GeV X-band linear accelerator. The TAF project will be carried forward in three phases. Through Phase-I and Phase-II, the S-band and X-band linacs will be constructed, and in Phase-III, the damping ring will be completed. The construction of TAF Phase-I has started, and the 0.2 GeV S-band injector linac has been almost completed. The Phase-I linac is composed of a 240 keV electron gun, subharmonic bunchers, prebunchers and traveling buncher followed by high-gradient accelerating structures. The SLAC 5045 klystrons are driven at 450 kV in order to obtain the rf-power of 100 MW in a 1 μs pulse duration. The rf-power from a pair of klystrons are combined into an accelerating structure. The accelerating gradient up to 100 MeV/m will be obtained in a 0.6 m long structure. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Mono-jet signatures of gluphilic scalar dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini M. Godbole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A gluphilic scalar dark matter (GSDM model has recently been proposed as an interesting vision for WIMP dark matter communicating dominantly with the Standard Model via gluons. We discuss the collider signature of a hard jet recoiling against missing momentum (“mono-jet” in such a construction, whose leading contribution is at one-loop. We compare the full one-loop computation with an effective field theory (EFT treatment, and find (as expected that EFT does not accurately describe regions of parameter space where mass of the colored mediator particles are comparable to the experimental cuts on the missing energy. We determine bounds (for several choices of SU(3 representation of the mediator from the s=8 TeV data, and show the expected reach of the s=13 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV pp collider to constrain or discover GSDM models.

  5. Extra dimension searches at hadron colliders to next-to-leading order-QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.

    2007-11-01

    The quantitative impact of NLO-QCD corrections for searches of large and warped extra dimensions at hadron colliders are investigated for the Drell-Yan process. The K-factor for various observables at hadron colliders are presented. Factorisation, renormalisation scale dependence and uncertainties due to various parton distribution functions are studied. Uncertainties arising from the error on experimental data are estimated using the MRST parton distribution functions.

  6. A Collider Search for Dark Matter Produced in Association with a Higgs Boson with the CMS Detector at the 13 TeV LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00387705; Erbacher, Robin; De Roeck, Albert

    The study presented in this dissertation is a search for dark matter produced in 13 TeV proton- proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using 35.9 fb −1 of data collected in 2016 with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Dark matter escapes the detector without interacting, resulting in a large imbalance of transverse momentum, which can be observed when a Higgs boson is tagged in the opposite direction. A variety of models which motivate a dark matter and Higgs interaction are discussed. The experimental signature of these models is called mono-Higgs. In this search, the Higgs is produced primarily from gluon fusion and decays to four leptons via two Z bosons (H → ZZ → 4l). In addition to observing the Higgs in the four-lepton final state, an extensive study of missing transverse energy (MET) is required to search for the mono-Higgs signature. A background model is developed for the Standard Model processes that result in the same final state as the signal, then a counting experiment ...

  7. Signatures of particles; Signatures de particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depasse, P

    2004-11-15

    This document reports the work made by the author in the field of the improvement of gamma detection. The first part is dedicated to experiments and testing performed at the nuclear physics institute in Lyon. It deals with photo-sensors, avalanche photo-diodes and drift chambers. The second part presents the implementation of active lead rings (ALR) to the L3 detector. Although ALR cover only a hundredth of the total solid angle, they are useful for detecting events in which one or several particles bring away a large part of the momentum in a strongly forward direction (between 4 and 9 degrees). The third part is dedicated to the design of the electromagnetic calorimeter barrel that will equip the CMS (compact muon solenoid) that is due to operate on the large hadron collider (LHC). The work made for the selection of scintillating materials (cerium fluoride, lead tungstate), of photo-sensors and for the design of front electronic equipment is particularly detailed. The last part is dedicated to how the knowledge cumulated about photon detection could be beneficial for medical imaging, particularly for the detection of 511 keV photon released in positron collisions. (A.C.)

  8. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs

  9. WHIZARD 2.2 for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.

    2014-03-01

    We review the current status of the WHIZARD event generator. We discuss, in particular, recent improvements and features that are relevant for simulating the physics program at a future Linear Collider.

  10. Parameters of the SLAC Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.; Adolphsen, C.; Burke, D.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the parameters and layout of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC is the SLAC design of a future linear collider using X-band RF technology in the main linacs. The collider would have an initial center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV which would be upgraded to 1 TeV and then 1.5 TeV in two stages. The design luminosity is > 5 x 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 at 0.5 TeV and > 10 34 cm -2 sec -1 at 1.0 and 1.5 TeV. They briefly describe the components of the collider and the proposed energy upgrade scenario

  11. New Stanford collider starts at Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    On 11 April the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider created its first Z particle, inaugurating high energy physics research at this novel machine based on the two-mile linac at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre, SLAC. (orig./HSI).

  12. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.T.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed

  13. The future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    At present, the highest energy e + e - colliders are the SLC and LEP. In this paper their future improvement programs for increasing luminosity and/or energy, and the use of longitudinally polarized beams at the interaction point (IP) are discussed. An e + e - collider in the SSC tunnel does not seem to be an attractive option, on both technical and economical grounds, and with LEP, circular colliders have reached the sensible limit of size and cost. Linear colliders which have, in principle, no high energy limit, must overcome a new set of technical problems having to do with beam power limitations, emittance control, superstrong focusing at the IP, strong bunch-bunch interactions at the IP and related backgrounds

  14. Magnet R and D for future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbi, Gian Luca

    2001-01-01

    High-energy colliders complementing and expanding the physics reach of LHC are presently under study in the United States, Europe and Japan. The magnet system is a major cost driver for hadron colliders at the energy frontier, and critical to the successful operation of muon colliders. Under most scenarios, magnet design as well as vacuum and cryogenic systems are complicated by high radiation loads. Magnet R and D programs are underway worldwide to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve higher efficiency and simplify fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress in magnet technology for future colliders is presented, with emphasis on the most innovative design concepts and fabrication techniques

  15. Timeline for Particle Collider in doubt

    CERN Multimedia

    Klapper, Bradley S

    2007-01-01

    "Officials at CERN said the possible delays in getting the particle collider back online are the result of the magnet failure and cooling processes that have been slower than expected for the 17-mile tunnel." (1,5 page)

  16. The collider calamity, publ. by Scientific American

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "For decades, the big guns of American science have been the U.S. Department of Energy's particle collider, which investigate the nature of matter by accelerating subatomic particles and smashing them together." (1 page)

  17. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  18. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s

  19. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  20. Linear accelerators for TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1985-05-01

    This paper summarizes four tutorial lectures on linear electron accelerators: Electron Linacs for TeV Colliders, Emittance and Damping Rings, Wake Fields: Basic Concepts, and Wake Field Effects in Linacs

  1. RHIC spin: The first polarized proton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    The very successful program of QCD and electroweak tests at the high energy hadron colliders have shown that the perturbative QCD has progressed towards becoming a ''precision'' theory. At the same time, it has been shown that with the help of Siberian Snakes it is feasible to accelerate polarized protons to high enough energies where the proven methods of collider physics can be used to probe the spin content of the proton but also where fundamental tests of the spin effects in the standard model are possible. With Siberian Snakes the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be the first collider to allow for 250 GeV on 250 GeV polarized proton collisions

  2. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  3. Il Collisore LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    In 2007, in a new Collider in the tunnel of 27km, collisions will be made between very powerful beams of protons and ions. The energies will be very high to try to catch the most tiny particle (1 page)

  4. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C.T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)][Chicago Univ., IL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed.

  5. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The activities of the working group including some of the seminars are summarized. The written ... The search for supersymmetry at future colliders also received a lot of attention. It is believed that ..... Then the kinematic regions can be divided.

  6. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  7. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  8. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  9. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  10. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  11. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  12. Transverse equilibria in linear collider beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Chen, Pisin

    1991-01-01

    It has been observed in simulations of the beam-beam interaction in linear colliders that a near equilibrium pinched state of the colliding beams develops when the disruption parameter is large (D much-gt 1). In this state the beam transverse density distributions are peaked at center, with long tails. The authors present here an analytical model of the equilibrium approached by the beams, that of a generalized Bennett pinch which develops through collisionless damping due to the strong nonlinearity of the beam-beam interaction. In order to calculate the equilibrium pinched beam size, an estimation of the rms emittance growth is made which takes into account the partial adiabaticity of the collision. This pinched beam size is used to derive the luminosity enhancement factors whose scaling is in agreement with the simulation results for both D and thermal factor A = σ z /β * large, and explains the previously noted cubic relationship between round and flat beam enhancement factors

  13. R&D for Collider Beauty Physics at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose an R&D program for the development of a Beauty trigger and innovative elements of the associated spectrometer. The program builds on the success of the recent S$\\bar{p}$pS collider run of the P238 Collaboration, in which clean signals from beam-beam interactions were observed in a large silicon strip microvertex detector running 1.5~mm from the circulating beams. A continuing successful R&D program of the type proposed could ultimately lead to a collider experiment at the LHC to study CP-violation and rare B decays. \\\\ \\\\ We request a fixed target run during late 1992 in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of a heavy flavour trigger which uses real time digital calculations on silicon strip data, implemented with a data driven processor.

  14. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  15. The promise of the large collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In 2007, the most powerful particle accelerator ever built, CERN's new Large hadron Collider, will probe the secrets of matter in the energy states prevailing in the moments after the Big Bang. By colliding particles together when they are moving at close to the speed of ight, physicists hope to find out about matter in its earliest forms, using the energy produced by the collisions." (2 pages)

  16. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  17. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Marciano, W.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gunion, J. F. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)] [and others; NLC ZDR Design Group; NLC Physics Working Group

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, S.; Marciano, W.J.; Gunion, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs

  19. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the