WorldWideScience

Sample records for nutritionally at-risk children

  1. Children-at-risk for poor nutrition: expanding the approach of future professionals in educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron

    2011-08-01

    To examine how the subject of nutrition is being addressed in the work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions and what the barriers are which may hinder inclusion of this subject. A structured questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of this study and was implemented with 111 students in Israel who are working in their internships in educational institutions with children who are exposed to risk factors of poor nutrition (e.g., parental neglect, lack of knowledge, poverty). Participants attributed a high level of importance to integrating nutrition-related components in their work. However, the findings indicate less emphasis on nutrition-related components than on psycho-social-educational components, as well as a low level of collaboration with specialists in the area of nutrition. In addition, it was found that knowledge-based barriers and institutional-related systemic barriers may hinder future teachers' capabilities to incorporate those components despite their favorable approach towards this subject. The findings illuminate the need to reduce barriers hampering the individual work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions. In the training of future teachers, there is a need to advance a bio-psycho-social educational approach incorporating a knowledge base about assessing situations of poor nutrition, including how to advance an interdisciplinary collaboration with specialists in the area of nutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection with diarrhea and nutritional status among nutritionally-at-risk children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, M.A.; Husaini, Y.K.; Suwardi, S.; Salimar; Widodo, Y.; Kurpad, A.; Miranda-Da-Cruz, B.

    2005-01-01

    A crossectional study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was carried out in 275 children (Age range = 6-36 months) belonging to the low socio-economic strata (SES) in the rural and suburban areas of Bogor (West Java Indonesia). H. Pylori infection was diagnosed by using C-13 urea breath test and nutritional status was analyzed by z- 2 scores. The study revealed a strong (χ 2 = 30.9; df=4; p 2 =7.2; df=3; p<0.05) association was observed between the educational status of mothers and prevalence of H. pylori infection. Although there was a trend, the results did not yield any significant association between diarrhoea and H. pylori infection. A similar trend was also seen between anemia status and H. pylori infection. Of particular interest was the higher rate of H.pylori infection in children who were on breast-feeding as compared to those who had already been weaned (p<0.05). Stunting, a deficit of length-for-age was the only parameter among the three indicators of malnutrition (underweight, wasting, stunting), which was observed to be significantly (P<0.05) associated with H. pylori infection in our study. Although the other two parameters, underweight and wasting, were also manifested, the associations were not statistically significant. The results of this study have demonstrated that H. Pylori infection has an effect on malabsorption leading to a negative impact on the ability of children to thrive. (author)

  3. School breakfast and cognition among nutritionally at-risk children in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, E; Jacoby, E; Cueto, S

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, in Peru, the Institute of Nutritional Research conducted two studies in Huaraz in the Andean region to evaluate the educational and nutritional impact of the government's School Breakfast Program. The school breakfast included a small cake and a glass of Amilac (similar in taste and color to milk), which provided 30% of each child's energy requirements, 60% of recommended dietary allowances for minerals and vitamins, and 100% of dietary iron needs. A case control study examined the effects of breakfast on cognition among 54 elementary schoolchildren 9-11 years old. It found that the school breakfast did not have a significant effect on the children's performance in the Number Discrimination, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Raven Progressive Matrices, or Reaction Time tests. Children nutritionally at risk who received the placebo had significantly slower short-term memory scanning than their counterparts who received the breakfast. The no-risk placebo group exhibited more rapid discrimination between visual stimuli than the no-risk breakfast group. A field evaluation of the program in 10 rural schools, which were randomly assigned to a treatment or control condition, was conducted. In terms of energy, protein, and iron intake, the children in the case and control conditions were not significantly different. The children tended to be either very stunted or overweight. School attendance increased 0.58 points in the experimental group, while it decreased by 2.92 points in the control group (p 0.05). When both groups received the breakfast, attendance rates increased significantly in both groups (p 0.05). Vocabulary was sensitive to the effects of the breakfast. Specifically, the greater the child's weight, the higher his/her vocabulary test scores (p 0.05). These findings suggest that the brain is sensitive to decreases in the short-term availability of nutrients, and that an overnight and morning fast produces a physiological state accompanied by changes in

  4. Development of nutritionally at-risk young children is predicted by malaria, anemia, and stunting in Pemba, Zanzibar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritionally at-risk children suffer delays in physical growth and motor and language development. Infectious diseases such as malaria pose an additional risk. We examined the cross-sectional relationships among malaria infection, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ), motor ...

  5. Interdisciplinary collaboration between social workers and dieticians in nutrition education programs for children-at-risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Bio-psycho-social risk factors may lead to situations of poor nutrition of children. However, despite the multiple risk factors involved in such situations, interdisciplinary collaboration between experts in the psycho-social dimensions and experts in the bio-dimension of poor nutrition has not been a common model of practice. An evaluation was conducted in Israel of the experience of collaboration between social workers and dieticians in leading nutrition-education programs. A qualitative methodology was implemented with 22 participants. The findings illuminate the potential that interdisciplinary collaboration has to enhance the response of each of the professions to the risks for poor nutrition. The barriers affecting collaboration are: (a) role ambiguity about the non-administrative functions of social workers; (b) the dieticians' lack of sufficient familiarity with the life circumstances of low-income families and how to adjust the nutrition-related contents to their circumstances; and (c) difficulties to achieve a balance between the structured methods of knowledge delivery of the dieticians and the less structured methods of intervention of social workers. The findings illuminate the significance of incorporating suitable approaches into the collaboration for reducing these barriers.

  6. Assessment of children's nutritional attitudes before oral food challenges to identify patients at risk of food reintroduction failure: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polloni, L; Ferruzza, E; Ronconi, L; Toniolo, A; Lazzarotto, F; Bonaguro, R; Celegato, N; Muraro, A

    2017-05-01

    Inappropriate dietary eliminations may impair quality of life, affect children's growth and unnecessarily impact on healthcare costs. Previous retrospective studies reported that around 25% of children continue a food-avoidance diet despite a negative oral food challenge (OFC). A definite pattern has not been found yet for patients not reintroducing the food. This study aimed to examine the role of child's nutritional attitudes and maternal anxiety in reintroducing food after a negative OFC. A prospective study was conducted involving 81 mothers of children with IgE-mediated food allergy. They completed a survey on nutritional behaviour and attitudes and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory on the day of OFC and 6 months later. In total, 11.1% of children never or rarely ate the food after a negative OFC. Consumption of the reintroduced food is positively correlated to child's interest in tasting new foods before and after OFC and to changes in child's nutritional habits after OFC. It is negatively correlated to monotony of the diet after OFC. No correlations were found with other participants' characteristics or maternal anxiety. State anxiety significantly decreased after the OFC. A correlation was found between trait and state anxiety and the degree of change in nutritional habits after OFC. Evaluating child's approach towards food before the OFC is a promising approach to identify patients at risk of food reintroduction failure. Furthermore, it underlined the importance of reassessing food consumption in all patients after a negative OFC and supporting patients in the reintroduction of food. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Nutrition and frail elderly at risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière-Arnoux, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Good health for elderly people depends on some extent on their nutritional status. During the completion of a master's degree in nursing sciences, a study highlighted the need to develop measuring tools for screening for undernutrition in the elderly in community nursing practice. A programme for raising awareness of the consequences of undernutrition in elderly people is an area to develop through broader frailty screening in primary care.

  8. Philippines: street children, children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantoco, F G

    1993-01-01

    Almost 2 million of Manila's 2.5 million children younger than 15 years old live on or below the poverty line. 75,000 of these children live on the streets after having run away from home or being abandoned. They beg, steal, scavenge for food, and sell newspapers, cigarettes, and leis. About 20,000 of the street children prostitute themselves. It is these latter children and adolescents who are at particular risk of HIV infection. Studies in the Philippines indicate that 91% of reported HIV infections are among individuals aged 15-44, the male/female infection ratio is one to one, the transmission rate is 45%, and the most common mode of transmission is through heterosexual intercourse. The high incidence of child sexual abuse and child prostitution in the Philippines would suggest that there are a significant number of children and adolescents under age 15 who are infected with HIV. Caritas Manila has developed an information, education, and communication program for HIV/AIDS prevention focusing upon individuals who have direct influence upon and are in direct contact with people: clergy, religious and civic associations, educators, and social and health workers. Caritas has also to a limited extent reached out directly to populations at risk, while collaborating with human rights advocacy groups and networking with other children-oriented agencies in the interest of providing resources to street children. Efforts must be made to protect the rights of children and provide them with an environment conducive to their growth and development. The author notes how off-duty policemen in Manila help real estate developers forcibly eject the poor from their shelters to clear the way for the construction of new infrastructure without concern for the legal processes and requirements in the humane and peaceful relocation of the homeless poor. Many women and children are hurt and killed in the process. It has also been reported that off-duty policemen in Rio de Janeiro

  9. Optimising nutrition to improve growth and reduce neurodisabilities in neonates at risk of neurological impairment, and children with suspected or confirmed cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Morag J; Parr, Jeremy R; Montague-Johnson, Chris; Braddick, Oliver; Laler, Karen; Williams, Nicola; Baker, Bonny; Sullivan, Peter B

    2015-03-17

    Neurological impairment is a common sequelae of perinatal brain injury. Plasticity of the developing brain is due to a rich substrate of developing neurones, synaptic elements and extracellular matrix. Interventions supporting this inherent capacity for plasticity may improve the developmental outcome of infants following brain injury. Nutritional supplementation with combination docosahexaenoic acid, uridine and choline has been shown to increase synaptic elements, dendritic density and neurotransmitter release in rodents, improving performance on cognitive tests. It remains elusive whether such specific 'neurotrophic' supplementation enhances brain plasticity and repair after perinatal brain injury. This is a two year double-blind, randomised placebo controlled study with two cohorts to investigate whether nutritional intervention with a neurotrophic dietary supplement improves growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates at significant risk of neurological impairment (the D1 cohort), and infants with suspected or confirmed cerebral palsy (the D2 cohort). 120 children will be randomised to receive dietetic and nutritional intervention, and either active supplement or placebo. Eligible D1 neonates are those born Toddler Development III at 24 months. Secondary outcomes include visuobehavioural and visual neurophysiological assessments, and growth parameters including weight, height, and head circumference. This is the first study to supplement neonates and infants with perinatal brain injury with the combination of factors required for healthy brain development, throughout the period of maximal brain growth. A further study strength is the comprehensive range of outcome measures employed. If beneficial, supplementation with brain phosphatide precursors could improve the quality of life of thousands of children with perinatal brain injury. Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN39264076 (registration assigned 09/11/2012), ISRCTN15239951 (registration assigned 23/04/2010).

  10. Objective Understanding of Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels among Nutritionally At-Risk Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Pauline; Méjean, Caroline; Julia, Chantal; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Touvier, Mathilde; Fezeu, Léopold K; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2015-08-24

    In the ongoing debate about front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labels, little data exist regarding nutritionally at-risk populations, although they are critical targets of prevention programs. This study aimed to compare the impact of FOP labels on the ability to rank products according to their nutritional quality among French adults potentially at risk of poor dietary quality (N = 14,230). Four labels were evaluated: Guideline Daily Amounts (GDA), Multiple Traffic Lights (MTL), 5-Color Nutrition Label (5-CNL), Green Tick (Tick), along with a reference without label. Mixed models were used to assess how individual characteristics and FOP labels were associated with the ability to rank products. Older participants and those with a lower educational level, income, nutritional knowledge, and likelihood of reading nutrition facts were less skilled at ranking food products according to nutritional quality. Compared with individual characteristics, nutrition labels had an increased impact on food product ranking ability. Overall, 5-CNL corresponded to the highest rate of correct responses, followed by MTL, GDA, and Tick (p < 0.0001). The strongest impact of 5-CNL was observed among individuals with no nutritional knowledge (odds ratio (OR): 20.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 13.19-31.06). Therefore, 5-CNL appeared to be effective at informing consumers, including those who are nutritionally at-risk, about the nutritional quality of food products.

  11. Objective Understanding of Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels among Nutritionally At-Risk Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Ducrot

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the ongoing debate about front-of-package (FOP nutrition labels, little data exist regarding nutritionally at-risk populations, although they are critical targets of prevention programs. This study aimed to compare the impact of FOP labels on the ability to rank products according to their nutritional quality among French adults potentially at risk of poor dietary quality (N = 14,230. Four labels were evaluated: Guideline Daily Amounts (GDA, Multiple Traffic Lights (MTL, 5-Color Nutrition Label (5-CNL, Green Tick (Tick, along with a reference without label. Mixed models were used to assess how individual characteristics and FOP labels were associated with the ability to rank products. Older participants and those with a lower educational level, income, nutritional knowledge, and likelihood of reading nutrition facts were less skilled at ranking food products according to nutritional quality. Compared with individual characteristics, nutrition labels had an increased impact on food product ranking ability. Overall, 5-CNL corresponded to the highest rate of correct responses, followed by MTL, GDA, and Tick (p < 0.0001. The strongest impact of 5-CNL was observed among individuals with no nutritional knowledge (odds ratio (OR: 20.24; 95% confidence interval (CI: 13.19–31.06. Therefore, 5-CNL appeared to be effective at informing consumers, including those who are nutritionally at-risk, about the nutritional quality of food products.

  12. Alternative Certified Teachers and Children at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissington, Laura D.; Grow, Amani

    2007-01-01

    Special education programs that serve at-risk students are facing very real personnel needs that colleges and universities alone cannot meet. Alternative certification programs (ACP) may help meet these needs. Effective university-school district partnership programs that include critical teaching training components may offer an attractive…

  13. Children at Risk: Global Views on Challenges Facing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Members of the World Forum community were invited to respond to the question: "What is the most urgent challenge facing young children in your country?" Here are some of their responses. Jamils Richard Achunji Anguaseh mentions that in Cameroon, young children face lots of insecurity, both from health hazards and poor parenting practices. There…

  14. Children of Alcoholics/Addicts: Children at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, F. Jill

    Children of alcoholics/addicts (COAs) are at a greater risk to develop alcohol and drug dependency, eating disorders, attention deficit disorders, stress-related illness, and suicidal behavior. Children become part of a conspiracy of silence by being told not to talk about the drug problem. The family members assume different roles which…

  15. Nutrition care-related practices and factors affecting nutritional intakes in hospital patients at risk of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S; Chaboyer, W; Desbrow, B

    2015-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in hospitals and is a risk factor for pressure ulcers. Nutrition care practices relating to the identification and treatment of malnutrition have not been assessed in patients at risk of pressure ulcers. The present study describes nutrition care practices and factors affecting nutritional intakes in this patient group. The study was conducted in four wards at two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Adult patients at risk of pressure ulcers as a result of restricted mobility were observed for 24 h to determine their daily oral intake and practices such as nutrition screening, documentation and intervention. Independent samples t-tests and chi-squared tests were used to analyse dietary intake and nutrition care-related data. Predictors of receiving a dietitian referral were identified using logistic regression analyses. Two hundred and forty-one patients participated in the present study. The observed nutritional screening rate was 59% (142 patients). Weight and height were documented in 71% and 34% of cases. Sixty-nine patients (29%) received a dietitian referral. Predictors of receiving a dietitian referral included lower body mass index and longer length of stay. On average, patients consumed 73% and 72% of the energy and protein provided, respectively. Between 22% and 38% of patients consumed meals. Nutrition care practices including malnutrition risk screening and documentation of nutritional parameters appear to be inadequate in patients at risk of pressure ulcers. A significant proportion of these patients eat inadequately at main meals, further increasing their risk of malnutrition and pressure ulcers. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Can statistical data qualify assessments of children at risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjerg, Lene Mosegaard; Villumsen, Anne Marie Anker; Klitbjerg-Nielsen, Christina

    and parents that are already registered in the municipality such as home address and school records. A similar tool is being developed in a social work research project in Denmark. The idea is to include risk and protection factors such as information about health, school absenteeism and family circumstances......Every day municipalities across Europe (and beyond) receive notifications about children at risk. The notifications come from teachers, health professionals, social workers, neighbors, or anyone else who sees a child, which appears not to thrive. The assessment and validation of whether the child...... significantly from case to case. Third, the relative importance of the different risk and protection factors is complex and difficult to assess – especially when the social worker has to assess both immediate danger as well as risk of long term failure-to-thrive. Internationally, different risk assessment tools...

  17. Nutrition knowledge and nutritional status of primary school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... b Research Fellow, CSL, Vaal University of Technology, South Africa ... Keywords: primary school children; nutrition knowledge; nutritional status. Nutrition ... research on basic nutrition education focusing on adolescents has.

  18. Home parenteral nutrition in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalousova, J.; Rouskova, B.; Styblova, J.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition delivered at home presents a major improvement in the quality of life of children dependent on long term parenteral nutrition. Indications, technical conditions, logistics, complications, prognosis of home parenteral nutrition as well as some health-care issues to be addressed by pediatric practitioner are summarized. (author)

  19. The differences of movement between children at risk of developmental coordination disorder and those not at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Agricola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developmental coordination disorder (DCD is a syndrome unexplained by medical condition, which is marked by defects in the development of motor coordination. Children with this impairment are more dependent on visual information to perform movements than their typically developing (TD peers. Objective: The main aim of the research was to create a checklist for the evaluation of the head and limb movement while walking. After that, based on this tool, to find differences in the movement of various body segments in children at risk of DCD (DCDr compared to typically developing children under different visual conditions. Methods: A total of 32 children aged 8.7 ± 1.1 years participated in this study. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children - 2nd edition (MABC-2 was used to make a classification of motor competence level of the participants. PLATO goggles were used to make four different visual conditions. All trials were recorded. Based on the video analysis we completed a qualitative checklist. Results: The analysis between the children from the DCDr group and TD children showed significant differences in the head (p = .023 and the arm (p = .005 movements, in body position (p = .002 and total summary score (p = .001. The main effects of visual conditions showed significant differences in all cases; in the head (p = .015, with the arm (p = .006, trunk (p =  .009, leg (p = .001 movements, in body position (p = .001 and also in the total summary score (p = .001. The interaction between groups and visual conditions was significant in leg movements (p = .007 and body position (p = .002. Conclusions: This study has shown which movements of body segments are most affected by different visual conditions and how children at risk of DCD are dependent on visual perception.

  20. Nutritional Disorders of Children. Prevention, Screening, and Followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Intended for child health care providers, the text contains information on improving preventive efforts in nutrition, particurlarly those focused on prevention of the major health problems which are nutrition related (obesity, atherosclerosis, dental caries, and anemia). Part I focuses on screening of individual children likely to be at risk of…

  1. Nutritional support for children with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lesley

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a rare group of genetically determined skin blistering disorders characterized by extreme fragility of the skin and mucous membranes, with recurrent blister formation. The cornerstones of management are control of infection, wound management, pain relief, promotion of optimal nutritional status and mobility, surgical intervention and provision of the best possible quality of life. There is currently no cure for EB and, throughout life, those with the more severe types are at risk of significant nutritional compromise which impacts negatively on health and overall quality of life. Nutritional support is an important facet of holistic care and the dietetic challenges can be considerable. This paper describes some of the issues involved in optimizing the nutritional status of children with this disorder.

  2. KANSAS KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2000: Kansas Children at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This KIDS COUNT Data Book provides state and county data on the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 22 indicators of well-being: (1) births to single teens; (2) children living in poverty; (3) children receiving free school meals; (4) children in families receiving economic assistance; (5) childhood deaths; (6)…

  3. Identifying Learning Patterns of Children at Risk for Specific Reading Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Baptiste; Krivulskaya, Suzanna; Hein, Sascha; Reich, Jodi; Thuma, Philip E.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Differences in learning patterns of vocabulary acquisition in children at risk (+SRD) and not at risk (-SRD) for Specific Reading Disability (SRD) were examined using a microdevelopmental paradigm applied to the multi-trial Foreign Language Learning Task (FLLT; Baddeley et al., 1995). The FLLT was administered to 905 children from rural…

  4. Orphans and at-risk children in Haiti: vulnerabilities and human rights issues postearthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; George, Erin K; Raymond, Nadia; Lewis-OʼConnor, Annie; Victoria, Stephanie; Lucien, Sergeline; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen; Hickey, Nancy; Corless, Inge B; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Davis, Sheila M; Barry, Donna; Marcelin, Naomie; Valcourt, Roodeline

    2012-01-01

    The vulnerability of children in Haiti has increased dramatically since the earthquake in January 2010. Prior to the earthquake, the prevalence of orphans and at-risk children was high but since the earthquake, more than 1 million people-with more than 380,000 children remaining displaced and living in over 1200 displacement sites. These existing conditions leave orphans and at-risk children vulnerable to exploitation, abuse, and increased risk of HIV/AIDS. This article will focus on the complex issues affecting orphans and at-risk children and the intersection with HIV/AIDS and human rights. Specific recommendations by United Nations Children's Fund are discussed. Nursing in Haiti must address the policy-related and population-specific approaches for the care of children living with or affected by HIV/AIDS.

  5. Supportive interventions for enhancing dietary intake in malnourished or nutritionally at-risk adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Christine; Kimber, Katherine L; Gibbs, Michelle; Weekes, Christine Elizabeth

    2016-12-20

    Supportive interventions such as serving meals in a dining room environment or the use of assistants to feed patients are frequently recommended for the management of nutritionally vulnerable groups. Such interventions are included in many policy and guideline documents and have implications for staff time but may incur additional costs, yet there appears to be a lack of evidence for their efficacy. To assess the effects of supportive interventions for enhancing dietary intake in malnourished or nutritionally at-risk adults. We identified publications from comprehensive searches of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science databases, scrutiny of the reference lists of included trials and related systematic reviews and handsearching the abstracts of relevant meetings. The date of the last search for all databases was 31 March 2013. Additional searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO ICTRP were undertaken to September 2016. The date of the last search for these databases was 14 September 2016. Randomised controlled trials of supportive interventions given with the aim of enhancing dietary intake in nutritionally vulnerable adults compared with usual care. Three review authors and for the final search, the editor, selected trials from titles and abstracts and independently assessed eligibility of selected trials. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias, as well as evaluating overall quality of the evidence utilising the GRADE instrument, and then agreed as they entered data into the review. The likelihood of clinical heterogeneity amongst trials was judged to be high as trials were in populations with widely different clinical backgrounds, conducted in different healthcare settings and despite some grouping of similar interventions, involved interventions that varied considerably. We were only able, therefore, to conduct meta-analyses for the outcome measures

  6. Nutrition in children posttransplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    status and to detect, prevent and treat late-onset complications such as obesity ... potential, prevent further liver injury, promote liver regeneration, minimise risk of infection and .... Campos ACL, Matias JEF and Coelho JCU. Nutritional Aspects ...

  7. Parental Attachment for At-Risk Children's Antisocial Behaviour: A Case of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Siti Hajar; Wahab, Haris Abd.; Rezaul Islam, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: to explore the influential factors of parents' attachment for at-risk children's antisocial behaviour, and to know the types of children's antisocial behaviour caused by being a single-parent family. The sample comprised 1,434 secondary school children from the state of Johore, Malaysia. Results from the…

  8. Identifying Children at Risk for Language Impairment or Dyslexia with Group-Administered Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Scoggins, Joanna; Brazendale, Allison; Babb, Spencer; Petscher, Yaacov

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to determine whether brief, group-administered screening measures can reliably identify second-grade children at risk for language impairment (LI) or dyslexia and to examine the degree to which parents of affected children were aware of their children's difficulties. Method: Participants (N = 381) completed screening tasks…

  9. Nutritional status of children on the National School Nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. School feeding programmes are intended to alleviate short-term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, and provide incomes to families. Objectives. To assess the nutritional status of children receiving meals provided by the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) in Capricorn Municipality, ...

  10. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and Down Syndrome: A Scoping Review

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Safiza Mohamad Nor; Nur Shahida Abdul Aziz; Cheong Siew Man; Rashidah Ambak; Mohd Azahadi Omar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Down Syndrome (DS) and Cerebral Palsy (CP) are the most common disabilities among children. Nutritional status assessment is important as these children are at risk of underweight, overweight or obesity. Therefore, the objectives of this review were to identify evidence on the prevalence of nutritional status of children with DS, CP and ASD, and to determine tools and indicators to measure the nutritional status of these children. Methods: This s...

  11. Nutrition in Children's Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Young athletes need to be aware of the importance of good nutrition to athletic performance. A basic diet plan, worked out with a physician to satisfy energy and weight needs, is essential. The best eating schedule and amount and type of food varies with different sports depending on the intensity and duration of physical activity. Weight control…

  12. Arts Enrichment and Preschool Emotions for Low-Income Children at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eleanor D.; Sax, Kacey L.

    2013-01-01

    No studies to date examine the impact of arts-integrated preschool programming on the emotional functioning of low-income children at risk for school problems. The present study examines observed emotion expression and teacher-rated emotion regulation for low-income children attending Settlement Music School's Kaleidoscope Preschool Arts…

  13. Philanthropic networks for children at risk in nineteenth-century Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    In the first half of nineteenth-century Europe, the founding fathers of the philanthropic network developed a specific network for the care of children at risk. This network eventually resulted in institutionalized solutions for the care of these children. In this article, three topics are looked

  14. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli, S.; Cardinali, S.; Veggiotti, P.; Trentani, C.; Testolin, G.; Tagliabue, A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with ...

  15. Word Decoding Development during Phonics Instruction in Children at Risk for Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaars, Moniek M H; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, we examined the early word decoding development of 73 children at genetic risk of dyslexia and 73 matched controls. We conducted monthly curriculum-embedded word decoding measures during the first 5 months of phonics-based reading instruction followed by standardized word decoding measures halfway and by the end of first grade. In kindergarten, vocabulary, phonological awareness, lexical retrieval, and verbal and visual short-term memory were assessed. The results showed that the children at risk were less skilled in phonemic awareness in kindergarten. During the first 5 months of reading instruction, children at risk were less efficient in word decoding and the discrepancy increased over the months. In subsequent months, the discrepancy prevailed for simple words but increased for more complex words. Phonemic awareness and lexical retrieval predicted the reading development in children at risk and controls to the same extent. It is concluded that children at risk are behind their typical peers in word decoding development starting from the very beginning. Furthermore, it is concluded that the disadvantage increased during phonics instruction and that the same predictors underlie the development of word decoding in the two groups of children. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. [Clinical observation of preoperative administration of enteral nutrition support in gastric cancer patients at risk of malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Ping; Qin, Xian-peng; Li, Ning-ning; He, Dan; Feng, Jin-yan; Yan, Chuan-jing; Wu, Xiao-ting

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate safety and efficacy of preoperative administration of enteral nutrition support in gastric cancer patients at risk of malnutrition. A single center randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 60 gastric cancer patients in West China Hospital from May to October 2012. Thirty patients were given enteral nutrition support(Ensure(R)) manufactured by Abbott Laboratories for ten consecutive days before surgical operation in the treatment group, and 30 patients were given an isocaloric and isonitrogenous homogenized diet in the control group for 10 days as well. The laboratory parameters of nutritional status and hepatorenal function were observed and compared between the two groups on admission, preoperative day 1 and postoperative day 3, respectively. Clinical observations, such as nausea and vomiting, were carried out until patients were discharged. Before the intervention, there were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between the two groups. The levels of serum albumin [(33.9±5.6) g/L vs. (31.0±5.3) g/L, P0.05). Moreover, two patients with nausea and one with vomiting in each group were found. In clinical observation period, no severe treatment-related adverse event were observed. The enteral supplement with Ensure(R) in gastric cancer patients at risk of malnutrition during preoperative period is effective and safe, which is superior to homogenized diet and an appropriate choice for gastric cancer patients with nutritional risk.

  17. Individualised dietary counselling for nutritionally at-risk older patients following discharge from acute hospital to home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, T; Tolstrup, U; Beck, A M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many older patients are undernourished after hospitalisation. Undernutrition impacts negatively on physical function and the ability of older patients to perform activities of daily living at home after discharge from acute hospital. The present study aimed to evaluate the evidence...... for an effect of individualised dietary counselling following discharge from acute hospital to home on physical function, and, second, on readmissions, mortality, nutritional status, nutritional intake and quality of life (QoL), in nutritionally at-risk older patients. Methods: A systematic review of randomised......% CI = 0.08-1.95, P = 0.03). Meta-analyses revealed no significant effect on physical function assessed using hand grip strength, and similarly on mortality. Narrative summation of effects on physical function using other instruments revealed inconsistent effects. Meta-analyses were not conducted on Qo...

  18. Lipid profiles of vegetarian and non-vegetarian children at risk of overweight or obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Purwana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The type, amount, and composition of a diet may affect the levels of cholesterol in blood. Itis believed that children adhering to a vegetarian diet have lower total cholesterol levels and lower body mass indexes compared to children with non-vegetarian (omnivorous diets. We wish to compare cholesterol levels of vegetarian and non-vegetarian Indonesian children who are at risk of overweight or obesity. Objective To compare lipid profiles of vegetarian and no-vegetarian children who are at risk for overweight or obesity. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study in January and February 2010. Subjects for this study came from Denpasar, Bali. Subjects filled questionnaires as well as underwent history-taking, anthropometric measurements, and blood testing. We performed lipid profile analyses on their blood samples. We used the independent t test and Mann-Whitney test for statistical analysis of the data. The level of significance was set at P <0.05. Results Our study included forty-four children at risk for overweight or obesity with a vegetarian or non-vegetarian diet. We found that vegetarian children had lower mean total cholesterol (144 mg/dL than that of non-vegetarian children (171 mg/dL, a statistically significant difference of P=0.014. In addition, vegetarian children had lower mean triglyceride levels (150 mg/dL than those of nonvegetarian children (264 mg/dL, a statistically significant difference of P =0 .025. Conclusion Among Balinese children at risk of overweight or obesity, vegetarians have significantly lower mean total cholesterol and triglyceride levels than non-vegetarians.

  19. Visual and auditory perception in preschool children at risk for dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Rosario; Estévez, Adelina; Muñetón, Mercedes; Domínguez, Carolina

    2014-11-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in perceptive problems of dyslexics. A polemic research issue in this area has been the nature of the perception deficit. Another issue is the causal role of this deficit in dyslexia. Most studies have been carried out in adult and child literates; consequently, the observed deficits may be the result rather than the cause of dyslexia. This study addresses these issues by examining visual and auditory perception in children at risk for dyslexia. We compared children from preschool with and without risk for dyslexia in auditory and visual temporal order judgment tasks and same-different discrimination tasks. Identical visual and auditory, linguistic and nonlinguistic stimuli were presented in both tasks. The results revealed that the visual as well as the auditory perception of children at risk for dyslexia is impaired. The comparison between groups in auditory and visual perception shows that the achievement of children at risk was lower than children without risk for dyslexia in the temporal tasks. There were no differences between groups in auditory discrimination tasks. The difficulties of children at risk in visual and auditory perceptive processing affected both linguistic and nonlinguistic stimuli. Our conclusions are that children at risk for dyslexia show auditory and visual perceptive deficits for linguistic and nonlinguistic stimuli. The auditory impairment may be explained by temporal processing problems and these problems are more serious for processing language than for processing other auditory stimuli. These visual and auditory perceptive deficits are not the consequence of failing to learn to read, thus, these findings support the theory of temporal processing deficit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Children's Nutrition and Learning. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Urbana, IL.

    This digest reviews research on the link between children's nutrition and their ability to learn from the prenatal through school years. It also discusses the importance of nutrition education for children. The need for adequate nutrition during pregnancy and the preschool years is highlighted by research that indicates that low birthweight…

  1. Reading and Language Intervention for Children at Risk of Dyslexia: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Fiona J.; Hulme, Charles; Grainger, Katy; Hardwick, Samantha J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intervention studies for children at risk of dyslexia have typically been delivered preschool, and show short-term effects on letter knowledge and phoneme awareness, with little transfer to literacy. Methods: This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a reading and language intervention for 6-year-old children…

  2. A Formative Evaluation of the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jonathan R.; Smith, Burgess; Hawkey, Kyle R.; Perkins, Daniel F.; Borden, Lynne M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe the results of a formative evaluation of a coaching model designed to support recipients of funding through the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) initiative. Results indicate that CYFAR coaches draw from a variety of types of coaching and that CYFAR principle investigators (PIs) are generally satisfied with…

  3. Designing a Computerized Neuro-Cognitive Program for Early Diagnosing Children at Risk for Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Delavarian

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: This program has an acceptable validity and reliability. It could be useful as an accurate assessment tool in predicting dyslexia before the occurrence of psychological scars and can be used as a quick screening tool for children at risk for dyslexia.

  4. Promoting At-Risk Preschool Children's Comprehension through Research-Based Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin-Parecki, Andrea; Squibb, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Young children living in poor urban neighborhoods are often at risk for reading difficulties, in part because developing listening comprehension strategies and vocabulary knowledge may not be a priority in their prekindergarten classrooms, whose curriculums typically focus heavily on phonological awareness and alphabet knowledge. Prereading…

  5. Sight Word Recognition among Young Children At-Risk: Picture-Supported vs. Word-Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadan, Hedda; Stoner, Julia B.; Parette, Howard P.

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-experimental design was used to investigate the impact of Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) on sight word recognition by young children identified as "at risk" for academic and social-behavior difficulties. Ten pre-primer and 10 primer Dolch words were presented to 23 students in the intervention group and 8 students in the…

  6. A Promise Unfulfilled: Social Skills Training with At-Risk and Antisocial Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael; Walker, Hill M.; Sprague, Jeffrey R.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the social skills training knowledge base and describes social skills training considerations for children who are at-risk and/or display antisocial behavior at three grade levels: preschool and elementary, middle schools, and high school. Characteristics of students, composition of model social skills interventions, and…

  7. How to screen obese children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Marloes P; Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Kromwijk, Lisa A J; de Boer, Anthonius; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; van der Vorst, Marja M J

    BACKGROUND: Recommended screening to identify children at risk for diabetes and its precursors impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance (IR) is fasted plasma glucose (FPG). This study evaluates the added value of fasted plasma insulin (FPI). METHODS: This study analyzed routinely

  8. Early identification and intervention in children at risk for reading difficulties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtvoort, A.G.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    In pre-readers, a familial background of dyslexia and/or delayed emergent literacy should be considered a not-to-ignore risk signalling problems with learning to read. This thesis aims to study early identification and intervention in at-risk children shortly before or after the start of formal

  9. Household factors, family behavior patterns, and adherence to dietary and physical activity guidelines among children at risk for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunin-Batson, Alicia S; Seburg, Elisabeth M; Crain, A Lauren; Jaka, Meghan M; Langer, Shelby L; Levy, Rona L; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    To describe the proportion of children adhering to recommended physical activity and dietary guidelines, and examine demographic and household correlates of guideline adherence. Cross-sectional (pre-randomization) data from a behavioral intervention trial designed to prevent unhealthy weight gain in children. A total of 421 children (aged 5-10 years) at risk for obesity (body mass index percentile, 70-95). Physical activity (accelerometry), screen time (parent survey), and fruit and vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage intake (24-hour dietary recall). Proportions meeting guidelines were calculated. Logistic regression examined associations between demographic and household factors and whether children met recommended guidelines for (1) physical activity (≥ 60 min/d), (2) screen time (≤ 2 h/d), (3) fruit and vegetable intake (≥ 5 servings/d), and (4) sugar-sweetened beverage avoidance. Few children met more than 1 guideline. Only 2% met all 4 recommended guidelines and 19% met none. Each guideline had unique sociodemographic and domain-specific household predictors (ie, availability of certain foods and beverages, media, and active play and exercise equipment). Families equipped to promote healthy child behavior patterns in 1 activity or dietary domain may not be in others. Results have implications for the development of interventions to affect children's weight-related behaviors and growth trajectories. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying children at risk for language impairment: screening of communication at 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, B; Kornfält, R; Radeborg, K; Hansson, K; Nettelbladt, U

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the possibility of identifying children at risk for language impairment based on a new screening instrument to assess communication and language skills at 18 mo of age. At 18 mo, 58 children were assessed with a screening instrument for communication and language consisting of a professional assessment and a parents' questionnaire. Students of speech and language pathology, well trained in child language assessment, carried out the professional assessment, which was based on observations of play behaviour, interaction and expressive and receptive language skills. Of the 58 children, 43 attended a follow-up assessment of language skills at 54 mo of age. Nine children were considered to be at risk for language impairment at 18 mo and 10 children were evaluated as being at risk at 54 mo. A significant positive correlation was found between the professional evaluations at 18 mo and the language tests at 54 mo. Verbal comprehension and pretend play correlated significantly with the results on the language tests. A professional screening of communication and language at 18 mo of age is worthwhile for predicting problems in language development. The results further show that language comprehension and pretend play rather than expressive skills should be emphasized.

  11. FeNO and Exercise Testing in Children at Risk of Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Christiansen, Christina Figgé; Stokholm, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    completed in 224 seven-year-old children from the at-risk Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 birth cohort. The associations between FeNO, exercise test results, and reported respiratory symptoms during exercise were analyzed adjusting for gender, respiratory infections, and inhaled....... OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between FeNO, exercise test results, and a history of respiratory symptoms during exercise in children at risk of asthma. METHODS: FeNO measurement, exercise testing, and interview about respiratory symptoms during exercise were...... corticosteroid treatment. The associations were also analyzed stratified by asthma and atopic status. RESULTS: Of the 224 children, 28 (13%) had an established asthma diagnosis and 58 (26%) had a positive exercise test (≥15% drop in forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] from baseline). FeNO and bronchial...

  12. Identifying Children in Middle Childhood Who Are at Risk for Reading Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, Deborah L; Ritchey, Kristen D; Silverman, Rebecca; Schatschneider, Christopher; Walker, Caroline Y; Andrusik, Katryna N

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and evaluate a universal screening battery for reading that is appropriate for older elementary students in a response to intervention model. Multiple measures of reading and reading correlates were administered to 230 fourth-grade children. Teachers rated children's reading skills, academic competence, and attention. Children were classified as not-at-risk or at-risk readers based on a three-factor model reflecting reading comprehension, word recognition/decoding, and word fluency. Predictors of reading status included group-administered tests of reading comprehension, silent word reading fluency, and teacher ratings of reading problems. Inclusion of individually administered tests and growth estimates did not add substantial variance. The receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis yielded an area under the curve index of 0.90, suggesting this model may both accurately and efficiently screen older elementary students with reading problems.

  13. Morphology and Spelling in French: A Comparison of At-Risk Readers and Typically Developing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Poh Wee; Shakory, Sharry; Chen, Xi; Deacon, S Hélène

    2017-11-01

    We present two studies that examine the role of morphology in French spelling. In Study 1, we examined the concurrent and longitudinal relationships between inflectional awareness and derivational awareness and spelling within a sample of 77 children in a French immersion programme in Canada. Children completed a non-verbal reasoning measure and French measures of phonological awareness, word reading, vocabulary, morphological awareness, and spelling. Results showed that inflectional morphological awareness in Grade 3 was a predictor of spelling in the same grade. Inflectional awareness in Grade 2 predicted Grade 3 spelling, controlling for reading-related skills and spelling at Grade 2. These analyses support the role of inflectional morphological awareness in the development of spelling of children of a range of reading and spelling abilities. In contrast, derivational awareness in Grades 2 and 3 did not predict spelling concurrently in both grades respectively. Study 2 contrasted the morphological errors in the spellings of six children at risk for reading difficulties with those of six chronological age-matched and six reading level-matched children. Analyses showed that at-risk children exhibited more difficulties with spelling roots and suffixes in words as compared with their age-matched peers, although they performed similarly to children matched on reading level. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Quantitative Deficits of Preschool Children at Risk for Mathematical Learning Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia W. Chu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study tested the hypothesis that acuity of the potentially inherent approximate number system (ANS contributes to risk of mathematical learning disability (MLD. Sixty-eight (35 boys preschoolers at risk for school failure were assessed on a battery of quantitative tasks, and on intelligence, executive control, preliteracy skills, and parental education. Mathematics achievement scores at the end of one year of preschool indicated that 34 of these children were at high risk for MLD. Relative to the 34 typically achieving children, the at risk children were less accurate on the ANS task, and a one standard deviation deficit on this task resulted in a 2.4 fold increase in the odds of MLD status. The at risk children also had a poor understanding of ordinal relations, and had slower learning of Arabic numerals, number words, and their cardinal values. Poor performance on these tasks resulted in 3.6 to 4.5 fold increases in the odds of MLD status. The results provide some support for the ANS hypothesis but also suggest these deficits are not the primary source of poor mathematics learning.

  15. Are there nutritional and other benefits associated with family meals among at-risk youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A; Kubik, Martha Y; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie; Arcan, Chrisa

    2009-10-01

    The literature suggests positive associations between family dinner frequency and dietary practices and psychosocial well-being, and inverse associations between family dinner frequency and overweight status among general adolescent populations. The present study aims to examine these associations among a population of adolescents at-risk of academic failure. A racially diverse sample of adolescents (n = 145, 52% male, 61% nonwhite) from six alternative high schools (AHS) completed surveys and had their heights and weights measured by trained research staff. Mixed-model logistic regression analyses assessed associations between family dinner frequency and overweight status, healthy and unhealthy weight management, and food insecurity, whereas mixed linear models assessed associations with breakfast consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, high-fat food intake, fast food intake, substance use, and depressive symptoms. Analyses adjusted for race/ethnicity, age, gender, socioeconomic status, and the random effect of school. Family dinner frequency was positively associated with breakfast consumption and fruit intake (p Adolescents who reported never eating family dinner were significantly more likely to be overweight (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8, confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-6.9) and food insecure (OR = 6.0, CI = 2.2-16.4) than adolescents who reported five to seven family meals per week. In this at-risk sample of youth, some, but not all of the benefits of family meals found in other studies were apparent. Intervention programs to increase the availability and affordability of healthful foods and promote family meals for families of AHS students may be beneficial.

  16. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords 'endothelial', 'children', 'pediatric' and 'infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children.

  17. Children and adolescents with migratory experience at risk in language learning and psychosocial adaptation contexts.

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Sandra; Silva, Carlos Fernandes da; Monteiro, Sara

    2007-01-01

    A compelling body of evidence shows a strong association between psychological, affective and learning variables, related also with the age and gender factors, which are involved in the language learning development process. Children and adolescents with migratory experience (direct/indirect) can develop behaviours at risk in their academic learning and psychosocial adaptation, according to several stressors as anxiety, low motivation, negative attitudes, within a stressed internal l...

  18. Nutritional supportive care in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riha, P.; Smisek, P.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is an important part of comprehensive oncology treatment. The aim is to decrease the incidence of malnutrition. Malnourished patients are in higher risk of infectious and toxic complications, experience worse quality of life. Systematic survey of nutritional status and early nutritional intervention can eventually lead to better results of oncology treatment. We review the definitions, etiology and epidemiology of malnutrition, practical approaches to nutritional support of children with cancer. (author)

  19. Predictors of Social Skills for Preschool Children at Risk for ADHD: The Relationship between Direct and Indirect Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Shapiro, Edward S.; DuPaul, George J.; Lutz, J. Gary; Kern, Lee

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between direct and indirect measurements of social skills and social problem behaviors for preschool children at risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was examined. Participants included 137 preschool children, aged 3 to 5 years, at risk for ADHD, who were participating in a larger study examining the effects of…

  20. Improving Early Identification and Intervention for Children at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotholz, David A; Kinsman, Anne M; Lacy, Kathi K; Charles, Jane

    2017-02-01

    To provide an example of a successful, novel statewide effort to increase early identification of young children at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using a 2-tiered screening process with enhanced quality assessment, interagency policy collaboration and coordination. The South Carolina Act Early Team (SCAET) provided focused collaboration among leaders representing state agencies, universities, health care systems, private organizations, and families to improve quality of life for children with ASD. Specific focus was on implementing policy changes and training to result in earlier identification and home-based behavioral intervention for young children at risk for ASD. Policy changes, training, and modified state agency practices were accomplished. Presumptive eligibility, on the basis of a 2-tiered screening process was implemented by BabyNet (South Carolina's Early Intervention Program) in collaboration with the lead agency for developmental disability services. There was a fivefold increase in children eligible for early intensive behavioral intervention without waiting for a diagnosis of ASD, avoiding long waits for diagnostic evaluations. Only 16 children (2.5%) were later found not to have ASD from a comprehensive evaluation. Improvements in early identification and intervention are feasible through collaborative policy change. The South Carolina Act Early Team and its key stakeholders committed to improving outcomes for this population used existing tools and methods in new ways to improve early identification of children with ASD and to make available evidence-based intervention services. This example should be replicable in other states with key stakeholders working collaboratively for the benefit of young children with ASD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. The Sports Challenge international programme for identified 'at risk' children and adolescents: a Singapore study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, G J; Watkins, G G; Rouse, I

    1999-01-01

    The current world wide phenomena of youth suicide which became a major issue for countries in the early nineties, is still growing exponentially. The Sports Challenge program was initiated in 1992 in Western Australia to identify 'at risk' children and adolescents who display: a low sense of basic trust, a sense of shame and doubt, a sense of inferiority and a sense of identity confusion with common characteristics of low self esteem. The subsequent program is based on a strong statistical paradigm encompassing current and historical information with reliable and objective evaluation measures. To this end, since 1992, Sports Challenge has been recognised as a 'World Best Practice' in redressing the issue of 'at risk' children and adolescents. The program now operates in over 150 schools and communities throughout Australia and 24 schools and Detention Centres in Singapore. This paper will allow a window into the development of the program and the successful transfer of the project into Singapore. The Singapore study which began in 1996 has revealed the success of the Sports Challenge program cross culturally with improvement in self esteem and self concept of 'at risk' groups in the range of 18% to 44%.

  2. Using relative handgrip strength to identify children at risk of sarcopenic obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Steffl

    Full Text Available Identifying children at risk of developing childhood sarcopenic obesity often requires specialized equipment and costly testing procedures, so cheaper and quicker methods would be advantageous, especially in field-based settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between the muscle-to-fat ratio (MFR and relative handgrip strength, and to determine the ability of handgrip strength relative to body mass index (grip-to-BMI to identify children who are at risk of developing sarcopenic obesity. Grip-to-BMI was measured in 730 Czech children (4 to 14 yrs. Bioelectrical impedance was used to estimate body fat mass and skeletal muscle mass, from which the MFR was calculated. The area under the curve (AUC was 0.791 (95% CI 0.692-0.890, p ˂ 0.001 in girls 4-9; 0.789 (95% CI 0.688-0.890, p ˂ 0.001 in girls 10-14 years old; 0.719 (95% CI 0.607-0.831, p = 0.001 in boys 4-9; and 0.896 (95% CI 0.823-0.969, p ˂ 0.001 in boys 10-14 years old. Calculated using the grip-to-BMI ratio, the OR (95% CI for girls to be at risk of sarcopenic obesity identified by MFR was 9.918 (4.243-23.186, p ˂ 0.001 and was 11.515 (4.280-30.982, p ˂ 0.001 for boys. The grip-to-BMI ratio can be used to predict the presence of sarcopenic obesity in children, which can play a role in pediatric health interventions.

  3. Nutritional advice in older patients at risk of malnutrition during treatment for chemotherapy: a two-year randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Blanc-Bisson, Christelle; Doussau, Adélaïde; Germain, Christine; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Dauba, Jérôme; Lahmar, Cyril; Terrebonne, Eric; Lecaille, Cédric; Ceccaldi, Joël; Cany, Laurent; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Houede, Nadine; Chomy, François; Durrieu, Jessica; Soubeyran, Pierre; Senesse, Pierre; Chene, Geneviève; Fonck, Mariane

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effect of dietary advice dedicated to increase intake in older patients at risk for malnutrition during chemotherapy, versus usual care, on one-year mortality. We conducted a multicentre, open-label interventional, stratified (centre), parallel randomised controlled trial, with a 1∶1 ratio, with two-year follow-up. Patients were aged 70 years or older treated with chemotherapy for solid tumour and at risk of malnutrition (MNA, Mini Nutritional Assessment 17-23.5). Intervention consisted of diet counselling with the aim of achieving an energy intake of 30 kCal/kg body weight/d and 1.2 g protein/kg/d, by face-to-face discussion targeting the main nutritional symptoms, compared to usual care. Interviews were performed 6 times during the chemotherapy sessions for 3 to 6 months. The primary endpoint was 1-year mortality and secondary endpoints were 2-year mortality, toxicities and chemotherapy outcomes. Between April 2007 and March 2010 we randomised 341 patients and 336 were analysed: mean (standard deviation) age of 78.0 y (4·9), 51.2% male, mean MNA 20.2 (2.1). Distribution of cancer types was similar in the two groups; the most frequent were colon (22.4%), lymphoma (14.9%), lung (10.4%), and pancreas (17.0%). Both groups increased their dietary intake, but to a larger extent with intervention (pnutritional status changes was found. Response to chemotherapy was also similar between the groups. Early dietary counselling was efficient in increasing intake but had no beneficial effect on mortality or secondary outcomes. Cancer cachexia antianabolism may explain this lack of effect. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00459589.

  4. Chinese approaches to understanding and building resilience in at-risk children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tak-Yan; Shek, Daniel T L; Kwong, Wai-Man

    2007-04-01

    This article discusses the prevailing Chinese belief systems that have bearings on the perception and practices of promoting resilience among children and youth in a major city in China. It briefly describes a huge social intervention program entitled "Understanding the Adolescent Project" to combat the problems among grade 7 students identified as adolescents at risk from 2001 to 2004 in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. A critical review of the problems encountered by social workers in the delivery of the program is presented to support the move to provide the preventive program for grade 4 students with clinical symptoms on a screening tool for identification of at-risk status. Starting in 2005, a large-scale positive youth development program was being developed for all secondary one to three (grades 7 to 9) students. Encouraging results of the evaluation studies demonstrated the effectiveness of this new preventive program, entitled Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs.

  5. Early motor development and later language and reading skills in children at risk of familial dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viholainen, Helena; Ahonen, Timo; Lyytinen, Paula; Cantell, Marja; Tolvanen, Asko; Lyytinen, Heikki

    2006-05-01

    Relationships between early motor development and language and reading skills were studied in 154 children, of whom 75 had familial risk of dyslexia (37 females, 38 males; at-risk group) and 79 constituted a control group (32 females, 47 males). Motor development was assessed by a structured parental questionnaire during the child's first year of life. Vocabulary and inflectional morphology skills were used as early indicators of language skills at 3 years 6 months and 5 years or 5 years 6 months of age, and reading speed was used as a later indicator of reading skills at 7 years of age. The same subgroups as in our earlier study (in which the cluster analysis was described) were used in this study. The three subgroups of the control group were 'fast motor development', 'slow fine motor development', and 'slow gross motor development', and the two subgroups of the at-risk group were 'slow motor development' and 'fast motor development'. A significant difference was found between the development of expressive language skills. Children with familial risk of dyslexia and slow motor development had a smaller vocabulary with poorer inflectional skills than the other children. They were also slower in their reading speed at the end of the first grade at the age of 7 years. Two different associations are discussed, namely the connection between early motor development and language development, and the connection between early motor development and reading speed.

  6. Nutritional advice in older patients at risk of malnutrition during treatment for chemotherapy: a two-year randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bourdel-Marchasson

    Full Text Available We tested the effect of dietary advice dedicated to increase intake in older patients at risk for malnutrition during chemotherapy, versus usual care, on one-year mortality.We conducted a multicentre, open-label interventional, stratified (centre, parallel randomised controlled trial, with a 1∶1 ratio, with two-year follow-up. Patients were aged 70 years or older treated with chemotherapy for solid tumour and at risk of malnutrition (MNA, Mini Nutritional Assessment 17-23.5. Intervention consisted of diet counselling with the aim of achieving an energy intake of 30 kCal/kg body weight/d and 1.2 g protein/kg/d, by face-to-face discussion targeting the main nutritional symptoms, compared to usual care. Interviews were performed 6 times during the chemotherapy sessions for 3 to 6 months. The primary endpoint was 1-year mortality and secondary endpoints were 2-year mortality, toxicities and chemotherapy outcomes.Between April 2007 and March 2010 we randomised 341 patients and 336 were analysed: mean (standard deviation age of 78.0 y (4·9, 51.2% male, mean MNA 20.2 (2.1. Distribution of cancer types was similar in the two groups; the most frequent were colon (22.4%, lymphoma (14.9%, lung (10.4%, and pancreas (17.0%. Both groups increased their dietary intake, but to a larger extent with intervention (p<0.01. At the second visit, the energy target was achieved in 57 (40.4% patients and the protein target in 66 (46.8% with the intervention compared respectively to 13 (13.5% and 20 (20.8% in the controls. Death occurred during the first year in 143 patients (42.56%, without difference according to the intervention (p = 0.79. No difference in nutritional status changes was found. Response to chemotherapy was also similar between the groups.Early dietary counselling was efficient in increasing intake but had no beneficial effect on mortality or secondary outcomes. Cancer cachexia antianabolism may explain this lack of effect.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  7. Nutritional Advice in Older Patients at Risk of Malnutrition during Treatment for Chemotherapy: A Two-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Blanc-Bisson, Christelle; Doussau, Adélaïde; Germain, Christine; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Dauba, Jérôme; Lahmar, Cyril; Terrebonne, Eric; Lecaille, Cédric; Ceccaldi, Joël; Cany, Laurent; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Houede, Nadine; Chomy, François; Durrieu, Jessica; Soubeyran, Pierre; Senesse, Pierre; Chene, Geneviève; Fonck, Mariane

    2014-01-01

    Objective We tested the effect of dietary advice dedicated to increase intake in older patients at risk for malnutrition during chemotherapy, versus usual care, on one-year mortality. Method We conducted a multicentre, open-label interventional, stratified (centre), parallel randomised controlled trial, with a 1∶1 ratio, with two-year follow-up. Patients were aged 70 years or older treated with chemotherapy for solid tumour and at risk of malnutrition (MNA, Mini Nutritional Assessment 17–23.5). Intervention consisted of diet counselling with the aim of achieving an energy intake of 30 kCal/kg body weight/d and 1.2 g protein/kg/d, by face-to-face discussion targeting the main nutritional symptoms, compared to usual care. Interviews were performed 6 times during the chemotherapy sessions for 3 to 6 months. The primary endpoint was 1-year mortality and secondary endpoints were 2-year mortality, toxicities and chemotherapy outcomes. Results Between April 2007 and March 2010 we randomised 341 patients and 336 were analysed: mean (standard deviation) age of 78.0 y (4·9), 51.2% male, mean MNA 20.2 (2.1). Distribution of cancer types was similar in the two groups; the most frequent were colon (22.4%), lymphoma (14.9%), lung (10.4%), and pancreas (17.0%). Both groups increased their dietary intake, but to a larger extent with intervention (p<0.01). At the second visit, the energy target was achieved in 57 (40.4%) patients and the protein target in 66 (46.8%) with the intervention compared respectively to 13 (13.5%) and 20 (20.8%) in the controls. Death occurred during the first year in 143 patients (42.56%), without difference according to the intervention (p = 0.79). No difference in nutritional status changes was found. Response to chemotherapy was also similar between the groups. Conclusion Early dietary counselling was efficient in increasing intake but had no beneficial effect on mortality or secondary outcomes. Cancer cachexia antianabolism may explain this

  8. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testolin G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6 underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting and weight-for-height (wasting were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate. Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA × 100] was Conclusion many children with refractory epilepsy would benefit from individual nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care.

  9. Language profiles of monolingual and bilingual Finnish preschool children at risk for language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Martin; Korkman, Marit; Mickos, Annika; Byring, Roger

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of children are exposed to more than one language, yet research on simultaneous bilingualism has been relatively sparse. Traditionally, there has been concern that bilingualism may aggravate language difficulties of children with language impairment. However, recent studies have not found specific language impairment (SLI) or language-related problems to be increased by bilingualism. The topic of bilingualism and its effects has high actuality in Finland, where increasing numbers of children in the country's 6% Swedish-speaking minority grow up in bilingual families, where one parent's primary language is Swedish and the other's Finnish. The present study aimed at exploring the influence of such bilingualism on the language profiles of children from this population at risk for language impairment (LI). Participants were recruited from a language screening of 339 children from kindergartens with instruction only in Swedish, from the Swedish-speaking parts of Finland. Of these children, 33 (9.7%) were defined as a Risk Group for LI, whereas 48 non-risk children were randomly selected to form a control group. When subdividing the children according to home language, 35 were found to be monolingual, Swedish-speaking, and 46 were Swedish-Finnish bilingual. The children underwent neuropsychological assessment during their preschool year. Assessment methods included subtests from the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scale of Intelligence - Revised and the NEPSY Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment. A repeated-measures multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) showed a significant effect of risk of LI on the NEPSY language scores. The effect of home language was not significant and there was no interaction between home language and risk for LI. Non-verbal IQ was controlled for. Across groups, bilingual children scored lower than monolingual children only on measures of vocabulary and sentence repetition. Although a slight general cost of

  10. Reading and language intervention for children at risk of dyslexia: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Fiona J; Hulme, Charles; Grainger, Katy; Hardwick, Samantha J; Miles, Jeremy N V; Snowling, Margaret J

    2014-11-01

    Intervention studies for children at risk of dyslexia have typically been delivered preschool, and show short-term effects on letter knowledge and phoneme awareness, with little transfer to literacy. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a reading and language intervention for 6-year-old children identified by research criteria as being at risk of dyslexia (n = 56), and their school-identified peers (n = 89). An Experimental group received two 9-week blocks of daily intervention delivered by trained teaching assistants; the Control group received 9 weeks of typical classroom instruction, followed by 9 weeks of intervention. Following mixed effects regression models and path analyses, small-to-moderate effects were shown on letter knowledge, phoneme awareness and taught vocabulary. However, these were fragile and short lived, and there was no reliable effect on the primary outcome of word-level reading. This new intervention was theoretically motivated and based on previous successful interventions, yet failed to show reliable effects on language and literacy measures following a rigorous evaluation. We suggest that the intervention may have been too short to yield improvements in oral language; and that literacy instruction in and beyond the classroom may have weakened training effects. We argue that reporting of null results makes an important contribution in terms of raising standards both of trial reporting and educational practice. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  11. Screening Protocol for Early Identification of Brazilian Children at Risk for Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giseli D. Germano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of students at risk of dyslexia has been an educational challenge in the past years. This research had two main goals. First, we aimed to develop a screening protocol for early identification of Brazilian children at risk for dyslexia; second, we aimed to identify the predictive variables of this protocol using Principal Component Analysis. The major step involved in developing this protocol was the selection of variables, which were chosen based on the literature review and linguistic criteria. The screening protocol was composed of seven cognitive-linguistic skills: Letter naming; Phonological Awareness (which comprises the following subtests: Rhyme production, Rhyme identification, Syllabic segmentation, Production of words from a given phoneme, Phonemic Synthesis, and Phonemic analysis; Phonological Working memory, Rapid naming Speed; Silent reading; Reading of words and non-words; and Auditory Comprehension of sentences from pictures. A total of 149 children, aged from 6 years to 6 and 11, of both genders who were enrolled in the 1st grade of elementary public schools were submitted to the screening protocol. Principal Component Analysis revealed four factors, accounting for 64.45% of the variance of the Protocol variables: first factor (“pre-reading”, second factor (“decoding”, third factor (“Reading”, and fourth factor “Auditory processing.” The factors found corroborate those reported in the National and International literature and have been described as early signs of dyslexia and reading problems.

  12. Nutrition in children posttransplantation | Goddard | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrition support is a vitally important issue in the pretransplantation period. Once a child has been assessed and placed on a list for transplantation the child must see a dietitian to optimise the child's nutritional status as this is vital to improve the outcome at surgery. Children with chronic liver disease who are candidates for ...

  13. ABCs of Oral Health: Nutrition - Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for gum inflammation and cavities. More ABCs of Oral Health A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | All Nutrition - Adults Nutrition - Children Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | ...

  14. Nutrition Status of HIV+ Children in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnyepi, Maria; Bennink, Maurice R.; Jackson-Malete, Jose; Venkatesh, Sumathi; Malete, Leapetswe; Mokgatlhe, Lucky; Lyoka, Philemon; Anabwani, Gabriel M.; Makhanda, Jerry; Weatherspoon, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Identifying and addressing poor nutritional status in school-aged children is often not prioritized relative to HIV/AIDS treatment. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the benefits of integrating nutrition (assessment and culturally acceptable food supplement intervention) in the treatment strategy for this target group.…

  15. Decreased lung function after preschool wheezing rhinovirus illnesses in children at risk to develop asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Singh, Anne Marie; Danov, Zoran; Evans, Michael D; Jackson, Daniel J; Burton, Ryan; Roberg, Kathy A; Anderson, Elizabeth L; Pappas, Tressa E; Gangnon, Ronald; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F

    2011-09-01

    Preschool rhinovirus (RV) wheezing illnesses predict an increased risk of childhood asthma; however, it is not clear how specific viral illnesses in early life relate to lung function later on in childhood. To determine the relationship of virus-specific wheezing illnesses and lung function in a longitudinal cohort of children at risk for asthma. Two hundred thirty-eight children were followed prospectively from birth to 8 years of age. Early life viral wheezing respiratory illnesses were assessed by using standard techniques, and lung function was assessed annually by using spirometry and impulse oscillometry. The relationships of these virus-specific wheezing illnesses and lung function were assessed by using mixed-effect linear regression. Children with RV wheezing illness demonstrated significantly decreased spirometry values, FEV(1) (P = .001), FEV(0.5) (P Children who wheezed with respiratory syncytial virus or other viral illnesses did not have any significant differences in spirometric or impulse oscillometry indices when compared with children who did not. Children diagnosed with asthma at ages 6 or 8 years had significantly decreased FEF(25-75) (P = .05) compared with children without asthma. Among outpatient viral wheezing illnesses in early childhood, those caused by RV infections are the most significant predictors of decreased lung function up to age 8 years in a high-risk birth cohort. Whether low lung function is a cause and/or effect of RV wheezing illnesses is yet to be determined. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Development of a screening scale for children at risk of baby bottle tooth decay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadra-Eid, J; Baudet, D; Fourny, M; Sellier, E; Brun, C; François, P

    2012-03-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay is a severe form of early childhood caries. This study aims to elaborate a screening tool for at risk children in order to facilitate primary prevention. A case-control study was conducted among children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and children with no dental caries. Cases were children aged 5 years or less at diagnosis who experienced at least four caries with one or more affecting maxillary incisors. Controls were children matched for age and sex. Parents were interviewed by phone about their child's exposure to potential risk factors. We included 88 children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and 88 children with no dental caries. In multivariate analysis, low social class (OR 6.39 [95% CI, 1.45-28.11]), prolonged bottle feeding or bedtime feeding (OR 153.2 [95% CI, 11.77-1994.96]), and snacking (OR 5.94 [95% CI, 1.35-26.2]) were significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay. Regular dental visits were a significant protecting factor (OR 0.13 [95% CI, 0.02-0.77]). A score was developed using these significant risk factors and tested on the survey population. The mean score was 13/20 for cases and 4/20 for controls. These results are in accordance with the literature, except for brushing teeth, which was not significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay in our study. A screening scale with a score of 20 points was proposed. Future validation is required. Pediatricians and general practitioners should encourage parents to change their habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutrition Knowledge Assessment of Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Plum, Jane Meacham Jr.

    1997-01-01

    A game with food and nutrition related pictures was developed to provide an opportunity for a classroom teacher to interview preschool children for assessment of nutrition knowledge concepts. Specifically, knowledge of vegetable concepts which included identification of the food, the food group, the source, preparation methods and use by the body was measured. The assessment was administered to five groups of children (ages two and one-half to five years) in preschools and child care center...

  18. Is severity of motor coordination difficulties related to co-morbidity in children at risk for developmental coordination disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marina M.; Lingam, Raghu; Jongmans, Marian J.; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Emond, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate whether 7-9 year old children with severe motor difficulties are more at risk of additional difficulties in activities in daily living, academic skills, attention and social skills than children with moderate motor difficulties. Children (N = 6959) from a

  19. Growth differences between North American and European children at risk for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nucci, Anita M; Becker, Dorothy J; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2012-01-01

    in Northern Europe (6.0%) and in females in Canada (12.8%). However, no statistically significance difference was found by geographic region. In Canada, the obesity rate for female children of mothers with and without T1D differed significantly at 4 and 5 yr (6.0 vs. 0.0% and 21.3 vs. 1.9%, respectively; p......AIM: To evaluate the relationships between early growth and regional variations in type 1 diabetes (T1D) incidence in an international cohort of children with familial and genetic risk for T1D. METHODS: Anthropometric indices between birth to 5 yr of age were compared among regions and T1D proband...... in 2160 children participating in the Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk study. RESULTS: Children in Northern Europe had the highest weight z-score between birth to 12 months of age, while those in Southern Europe and U.S.A. had the lowest weight and length...

  20. Music enrichment programs improve the neural encoding of speech in at-risk children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-09-03

    Musicians are often reported to have enhanced neurophysiological functions, especially in the auditory system. Musical training is thought to improve nervous system function by focusing attention on meaningful acoustic cues, and these improvements in auditory processing cascade to language and cognitive skills. Correlational studies have reported musician enhancements in a variety of populations across the life span. In light of these reports, educators are considering the potential for co-curricular music programs to provide auditory-cognitive enrichment to children during critical developmental years. To date, however, no studies have evaluated biological changes following participation in existing, successful music education programs. We used a randomized control design to investigate whether community music participation induces a tangible change in auditory processing. The community music training was a longstanding and successful program that provides free music instruction to children from underserved backgrounds who stand at high risk for learning and social problems. Children who completed 2 years of music training had a stronger neurophysiological distinction of stop consonants, a neural mechanism linked to reading and language skills. One year of training was insufficient to elicit changes in nervous system function; beyond 1 year, however, greater amounts of instrumental music training were associated with larger gains in neural processing. We therefore provide the first direct evidence that community music programs enhance the neural processing of speech in at-risk children, suggesting that active and repeated engagement with sound changes neural function. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411913-06$15.00/0.

  1. Potential utility of MRI in the evaluation of children at risk of renal scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yuleung; Chan Kamwing; Roebuck, D.J.; Chu, W.C.W.; Metreweli, C.; Yeung Chungkwong; Lee Kimhung

    1999-01-01

    Background. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI has recently been employed in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. Its potential utility in the diagnosis of renal scars in children is unknown. Objective. To evaluate the potential utility of MRI using fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) and post-gadolinium, short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences in detecting renal scarring by comparison with technetium dimercaptosuccinic acid ( 99 m Tc-DMSA) renal scintigraphy in children at risk of renal scarring. Materials and methods. A group of 24 children with spina bifida and neurogenic bladder or anorectal anomaly was studied. No patient had a history of acute pyelonephritis. Documented urinary tract infection (UTI) was present in 10 children (42 %). The remaining 14 (58 %) children had a history of asymptomatic bacteriuria. None had clinical signs or symptoms of acute UTI at the time of the study. 99 m Tc-DMSA and MRI were performed to detect renal scarring. 99 m Tc-DMSA scans were supplemented with pinhole imaging. MRI of the kidneys employed a fat-saturated T1-W sequence and a post-gadolinium STIR sequence employing a short echo time. Results. Of the kidneys studied, 33 % (n = 16) had evidence of a renal parenchymal defect suggestive of scarring on 99 m Tc-DMSA. The concordance in the detection of a scarred kidney by post-gadolinium STIR sequence and 99 m Tc-DMSA is 94 %; that by fat-saturated T1-W sequence and 99 m Tc-DMSA is 82 %; that by both sequences (positive result on either sequence) and 99 m Tc-DMSA is 100 %. Using 99 m Tc-DMSA as the gold standard, MRI had a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 78 % in the diagnosis of a scarred kidney. The concordance in the detection of a scarred zone by post-gadolinium STIR sequence and 99 m Tc-DMSA is 68 %; that by fat-saturated T1-W sequence and DMSA is 44 %; that by both sequences (positive result on either sequence) and 99 m Tc-DMSA is 84 %. MRI had a sensitivity of 84 % and a specificity of 86 % in the diagnosis of a

  2. Early detection of children at risk for antisocial behaviour using data from routine preventive child healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Youth antisocial behaviour is highly prevalent. Young people are usually not willing to disclose such behaviour to professionals and parents. Our aim was to assess whether child health professionals (CHP) working in preventive child healthcare could identify pre-adolescents at risk for antisocial behaviour through using data that they obtain in routine practice. Methods CHPs examined a national sample of 974 pre-adolescents aged 8-12 years (response 79.1%), and interviewed parents and children during routine well-child assessments. We obtained data on family background and current health of the child from the CHP; on developmental concerns from parents, and on social and emotional well-being, injuries, and substance use from the children. Antisocial behaviour concerned the adolescent-reported 15 item International Self-Reported Delinquency study questionnaire, among which are 5 items on violence against people. Results The prevalence of 2+acts of any antisocial behaviour was 21.8%, and 33.9% for 1+acts of violence (10.5% for 2+). Children who were male, had a young mother, no parent employed, recent injuries, poor performance at school or who were bored by school, and who had parental concerns more often reported 2+antisocial acts and 1+violence against people. Detection algorithms on the basis of these variables were moderately able to classify outcomes, with Areas-Under-the-Curves ranging from 0.66 to 0.71. Conclusions Data from routine well-child assessment can help CHPs to detect pre-adolescents at risk for antisocial behaviour, but detection algorithms need to be further improved. This could be done by obtaining additional information on factors that are associated with antisocial behaviour. PMID:22405493

  3. Early detection of children at risk for antisocial behaviour using data from routine preventive child healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijneveld Sijmen A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Youth antisocial behaviour is highly prevalent. Young people are usually not willing to disclose such behaviour to professionals and parents. Our aim was to assess whether child health professionals (CHP working in preventive child healthcare could identify pre-adolescents at risk for antisocial behaviour through using data that they obtain in routine practice. Methods CHPs examined a national sample of 974 pre-adolescents aged 8-12 years (response 79.1%, and interviewed parents and children during routine well-child assessments. We obtained data on family background and current health of the child from the CHP; on developmental concerns from parents, and on social and emotional well-being, injuries, and substance use from the children. Antisocial behaviour concerned the adolescent-reported 15 item International Self-Reported Delinquency study questionnaire, among which are 5 items on violence against people. Results The prevalence of 2+acts of any antisocial behaviour was 21.8%, and 33.9% for 1+acts of violence (10.5% for 2+. Children who were male, had a young mother, no parent employed, recent injuries, poor performance at school or who were bored by school, and who had parental concerns more often reported 2+antisocial acts and 1+violence against people. Detection algorithms on the basis of these variables were moderately able to classify outcomes, with Areas-Under-the-Curves ranging from 0.66 to 0.71. Conclusions Data from routine well-child assessment can help CHPs to detect pre-adolescents at risk for antisocial behaviour, but detection algorithms need to be further improved. This could be done by obtaining additional information on factors that are associated with antisocial behaviour.

  4. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, S; Cardinali, S; Veggiotti, P; Trentani, C; Testolin, G; Tagliabue, A

    2006-04-26

    children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 +/- 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 +/- 3,6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting) and weight-for-height (wasting) were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate). Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA) x 100] was nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care.

  5. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, S; Cardinali, S; Veggiotti, P; Trentani, C; Testolin, G; Tagliabue, A

    2006-01-01

    Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting) and weight-for-height (wasting) were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate). Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA) × 100] was nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care. PMID:16640779

  6. Impact of imposed exercise on energy intake in children at risk for overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnbach, S Nicole; Masterson, Travis D; Schlechter, Haley A; Ross, Amanda J; Rykaczewski, Michael J; Loken, Eric; Downs, Danielle S; Thivel, David; Keller, Kathleen L

    2016-10-21

    Exercise not only has a direct effect on energy balance through energy expenditure (EE), but also has an indirect effect through its impact on energy intake (EI). This study examined the effects of acute exercise on daily ad libitum EI in children at risk for becoming overweight due to family history. Twenty healthy-weight children (ages 9-12 years, 12 male/8 female) with at least one overweight biological parent (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) participated. Children reported to the laboratory for one baseline and two experimental visits (EX = exercise, SED = sedentary) each separated by 1 week in a randomized crossover design. Two hours into the EX day session, children exercised at 70 % estimated VO 2max for 30 min on a cycle ergometer. Objective EI (kcal) was measured at a standard breakfast (~285 kcal) and ad libitum lunch, snack and dinner. Meals were identical on the EX and SED days. Activity-related EE (kcal) was estimated with accelerometers worn on the non-dominant wrist and ankle. Relative EI (kcal) was computed as the difference between Total EI and Activity-related EE for each testing day. Paired t-tests were performed to test differences in Total EI, Activity-related EE and Relative EI between the EX and SED days. Across all meals, Total EI was not statistically different between the EX and SED days (t = 1.8, p = 0.09). Activity-related EE was greater on the EX day compared to the SED day (t = 10.1, p kcal on each day, but had greater Activity-related EE on the EX day, Relative EI was lower (t = -5.15, p kcal) relative to the SED day (1862 ± 426 kcal). Imposed exercise was effective in reducing Relative EI compared to being sedentary. Morning exercise may help children at risk for becoming overweight to better regulate their energy balance within the course of a day.

  7. [Prospective study with auditory evoked potentials of the brain stem in children at risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Rivero, B; González Díaz, E; Marrero Santos, L; Martínez Toledano, I; Murillo Díaz, M J; Valiño Colás, M J

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate methods of hypoacusis screening. The early detection of audition problems is vital for quick rehabilitation. For this reason, resting on the criteria of the Comisión Española para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia (Spanish Commission for the Early Detection of Hypoacusis), we have carried out a prospective study, from January to May 1998, evaluating patients at risk of suffering from hypoacusis. The study included 151 patients with ages between birth and 14 years. Medical records and brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) were carried out. The most common reason for requesting a consultation for the 151 patients included in our study was the suspicion of hypoacusis. Seventy-one (47%) presented pathological BAER, 37 of them were bilateral. In most cases the loss of audition was of cochlear origin, with 11 patients having a serious deafness, 4 with bilateral affection (3 suspicious of hypoacusis and 1 of hyperbilirubinemia) and 7 unilateral deafness. BAER is a good screening method for children at risk. It is an innocuous, objective and specific test that does not require the patient's collaboration. The level of positives is high (47%).

  8. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part

  9. [Videogame addiction: a danger for only at-risk children or for all children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Heuzey, Marie-France; Mouren, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid growth in the number of children and adolescents having access to videogames, there is a risk of addictive behavior, especially among those with underlying mental illnesses. Yet there is no consensual definition of videogame addiction. Depression, anxiety disorders and hostility are all associated with overuse, but attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most significant predictor.

  10. NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT DURING TODDLING AGE IN NORMAL-CHILDREN AND CHILDREN AT RISK OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEMPEL, MS

    Toddling age (1.5-4 years) is a period in which the quality rather than the quantity of motor functions changes. We examined 305 normal and 43 so called 'risk' children with an examination technique which concentrates on observations of motor functions (grasping, sitting, crawling, standing and

  11. [Nutritional management of kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovik, T E; Kutafina, E K; Tsygin, A N; Sergeeva, T V; Baranov, A A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Voznesenskaya, T S; Zakharova, I N; Semenova, N N; Zvonkova, N G; Yatsyk, S P

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of various kidney diseases in children remains high in recent decades. Adequate nutrition management can enhance the effectiveness of drug treatment, slow the frequency of relapses andprevent the progression of the disease. The article is devoted to modern approaches to diet therapy in various kidney diseases in children with the defeat of tubular and glomerular appa ratus. For the first time the therapeutic diets for children with various kidney diseases are presented. Particular attention is paid to diet therapy in nephrotic syndrome (steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory). Dietary approaches with modern formulas for enteral nutrition in cases of steroid therapy complications in children with renal insufficiency (in predialysis stage and on dialysis) are described. Differentiated nutritional approaches for patients with different types of crystalluria are separately presented.

  12. Movements Indicate Threat Response Phases in Children at Risk for Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Ellen W; McGinnis, Ryan S; Muzik, Maria; Hruschak, Jessica; Lopez-Duran, Nestor L; Perkins, Noel C; Fitzgerald, Kate; Rosenblum, Katherine L

    2017-09-01

    Temporal phases of threat response, including potential threat (anxiety), acute threat (startle, fear), and post-threat response modulation, have been identified as the underlying markers of anxiety disorders. Objective measures of response during these phases may help identify children at risk for anxiety; however, the complexity of current assessment techniques prevent their adoption in many research and clinical contexts. We propose an alternative technology, an inertial measurement unit (IMU), that enables noninvasive measurement of the movements associated with threat response, and test its ability to detect threat response phases in young children at a heightened risk for developing anxiety. We quantified the motion of 18 children (3-7 years old) during an anxiety-/fear-provoking behavioral task using an IMU. Specifically, measurements from a single IMU secured to the child's waist were used to extract root-mean-square acceleration and angular velocity in the horizontal and vertical directions, and tilt and yaw range of motion during each threat response phase. IMU measurements detected expected differences in child motion by threat phase. Additionally, potential threat motion was positively correlated to familial anxiety risk, startle range of motion was positively correlated with child internalizing symptoms, and response modulation motion was negatively correlated to familial anxiety risk. Results suggest differential theory-driven threat response phases and support previous literature connecting maternal child risk to anxiety with behavioral measures using more feasible objective methods. This is the first study demonstrating the utility of an IMU for characterizing the motion of young children to mark the phases of threat response modulation. The technique provides a novel and objective measure of threat response for mental health researchers.

  13. Family Chaos and Child Functioning in Relation to Sleep Problems Among Children at Risk for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Richard E; Halbower, Ann C; Daniels, Stephen; Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Whitesell, Nancy; Johnson, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of child and family functioning on child sleep behaviors in low-income minority families who are at risk for obesity. A cross-sectional study was utilized to measure child and family functioning from 2013 to 2014. Participants were recruited from Head Start classrooms while data were collected during home visits. A convenience sample of 72 low-income Hispanic (65%) and African American (32%) families of preschool-aged children were recruited for this study. We assessed the association of child and family functioning with child sleep behaviors using a multivariate multiple linear regression model. Bootstrap mediation analyses examined the effects of family chaos between child functioning and child sleep problems. Poorer child emotional and behavioral functioning related to total sleep behavior problems. Chaos associated with bedtime resistance significantly mediated the relationship between Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (BESS) and Bedtime Resistance. Families at high risk for obesity showed children with poorer emotional and behavioral functioning were at higher risk for problematic sleep behaviors, although we found no link between obesity and child sleep. Family chaos appears to play a significant role in understanding part of these relationships. Future longitudinal studies are necessary to establish causal relationships between child and family functioning and sleep problems to further guide obesity interventions aimed at improving child sleep routines and increasing sleep duration.

  14. Personalized Treatment of Mothers With ADHD and Their Young At-Risk Children: A SMART Pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Wang, Christine H; Strickland, Jennifer; Almirall, Daniel; Stein, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Young children of mothers with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for ADHD by virtue of genetics and environmental factors. Moreover, parent ADHD is associated with maladaptive parenting and poor child behavioral treatment response. Thus, a combined approach consisting of behavioral parent training (BPT) and maternal stimulant medication (MSM) may be needed to effectively treat ADHD within families. However, providing combined BPT+MSM initially to all families may be unnecessarily burdensome because not all families likely need combined treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine how to combine, sequence, and personalize treatment for these multiplex families in order to yield benefits to both the parent and child, thereby impacting the course of child ADHD and disruptive behavior symptoms. This article presents our rationale for, design of, and preliminary experiences (based on 26 participants) with an ongoing pilot Sequential Multiple Assessment Randomized Trial (SMART) designed to answer questions regarding the feasibility and acceptability of study protocols and interventions. This article also describes how the subsequent full-scale SMART might change based on what is learned in the SMART pilot and illustrates how the full-scale SMART could be used to inform clinical decision making about how to combine, sequence, and personalize treatment for complex children and families in which a parent has ADHD.

  15. Efficiency of Visual Information Processing in Children at-Risk for Dyslexia: Habituation of Single-Trial ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtvoort, Anne G. F. M.; van Leeuwen, Theo H.; Stoel, Reinoud D.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2006-01-01

    To investigate underlying learning mechanisms in relation to the development of dyslexia, event-related potentials to visual standards were recorded in five-year-old pre-reading children at-risk for familial dyslexia (n=24) and their controls (n=14). At the end of second grade the children aged 8 years were regrouped into three groups according to…

  16. The Contribution of Parenting Practices and Parent Emotion Factors in Children at Risk for Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Melissa E.; Havighurst, Sophie S.; Holland, Kerry A.; Frankling, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of different parenting characteristics on child disruptive behavior and emotional regulation among a sample of at-risk children. The sample consisted of 373 Australian 5- to 9-year-old children who were screened for serious behavior problems. Seven parenting variables based on self-report were…

  17. Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in Primary Caregivers of Young Children with or at Risk for Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, M.; McDonald, L.; Serbin, L.; Stack, D.; Secco, M. L.; Yu, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Despite extensive research with families raising children with or at risk for developmental delay (DD), it is not clear whether primary caregivers of these children are at increased risk for depressive symptoms. Discrepant findings in the literature may be owing to heterogeneity of child problems. More research is needed on child,…

  18. At-Risk Children and Otitis Media with Effusion: Management Issues for the Early Childhood Special Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, Lynn P.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the implications of otitis media with effusion (OME) for children with disabilities who are already at risk for speech, language, and learning difficulties. The results of a survey of 189 early childhood special educators on management of young children with OME and the role of the early childhood special educator are…

  19. Self-Management Training for Chinese Obese Children at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome: Effectiveness and Implications for School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Anderson, Laura M.; Ji, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a school-based self-management intervention for Chinese obese children at risk for metabolic syndrome. Twenty-eight Chinese obese children (M age?=?10 years) and their parents participated in the study. Metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. The risk factors included Body Mass…

  20. Analysis of Predictors of Behaviour Change among Children at Risk in Juvenile Rehabilitation Centres in Nairobi County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthomi, Rintaugu James; Muthee, Jessina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse predictors of behaviour change among children at risk in juvenile rehabilitation centres within Nairobi County, Kenya. The target population was all the children and managers of Juvenile rehabilitation Centres in Nairobi County. This consisted of 380 boys, 160 girls, 8 managers in Kabete and Getathuru, and 4…

  1. Potential utility of MRI in the evaluation of children at risk of renal scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Yuleung; Chan Kamwing; Roebuck, D.J.; Chu, W.C.W.; Metreweli, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Yeung Chungkwong; Lee Kimhung [Dept. of Surgery, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI has recently been employed in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. Its potential utility in the diagnosis of renal scars in children is unknown. Objective. To evaluate the potential utility of MRI using fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) and post-gadolinium, short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences in detecting renal scarring by comparison with technetium dimercaptosuccinic acid ({sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA) renal scintigraphy in children at risk of renal scarring. Materials and methods. A group of 24 children with spina bifida and neurogenic bladder or anorectal anomaly was studied. No patient had a history of acute pyelonephritis. Documented urinary tract infection (UTI) was present in 10 children (42 %). The remaining 14 (58 %) children had a history of asymptomatic bacteriuria. None had clinical signs or symptoms of acute UTI at the time of the study. {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA and MRI were performed to detect renal scarring. {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA scans were supplemented with pinhole imaging. MRI of the kidneys employed a fat-saturated T1-W sequence and a post-gadolinium STIR sequence employing a short echo time. Results. Of the kidneys studied, 33 % (n = 16) had evidence of a renal parenchymal defect suggestive of scarring on {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA. The concordance in the detection of a scarred kidney by post-gadolinium STIR sequence and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA is 94 %; that by fat-saturated T1-W sequence and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA is 82 %; that by both sequences (positive result on either sequence) and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA is 100 %. Using {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA as the gold standard, MRI had a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 78 % in the diagnosis of a scarred kidney. The concordance in the detection of a scarred zone by post-gadolinium STIR sequence and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-DMSA is 68 %; that by fat-saturated T1-W sequence and DMSA is 44 %; that by both sequences (positive result on either sequence) and {sup 99

  2. Successful applications of montessori methods with children at risk for learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, J S

    1992-12-01

    The critical elements in the Montessori philosophy are respect for the child, individualization of the program to that child, and the fostering of independence. With her research background, Maria Montessori devised a multisensory developmental method and designed materials which isolate each concept the teacher presents to the child.In presenting these materials the teacher observes the concept and skill development level of the child, ascertaining areas of strength and weakness and matching the next presentation to the child's level of development. Using small sequential steps, the teacher works to ameliorate weakness and guide the student to maximize his strengths. These presentations, usually initiated by the child, enhance cognitive growth using a process which integrates his physical, social, and emotional development.The curriculum contains four major content areas: Practical Life; Sensorial; Oral and Written Language; and Mathematics. Geography, History, Science, Art, Music, Literature, and Motor Skills are also included. In all of these the Montessori presentations build from the simple to the complex, from the concrete to the abstract, and from percept to concept. Vocabulary and language usage are integral to each presentation.The procedures introduced through these presentations are designed to enhance attention, increase self-discipline and self-direction, and to promote order, organization, and the development of a work cycle. At-risk children benefit from the structure, the procedures, and the curriculum. Applications of this method require more teacher selection of materials and direct teaching, particularly of language and math symbols and their manipulations.This early childhood intervention provides an individualized program which allows the at-risk child a successful experience at the preschool level. The program includes a strong conceptual preparation for later academic learning and it promotes the development of a healthy self-concept.

  3. Identifying Children at Risk of High Myopia Using Population Centile Curves of Refraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxian Chen

    Full Text Available To construct reference centile curves of refraction based on population-based data as an age-specific severity scale to evaluate their efficacy as a tool for identifying children at risk of developing high myopia in a longitudinal study.Data of 4218 children aged 5-15 years from the Guangzhou Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC study, and 354 first-born twins from the Guangzhou Twin Eye Study (GTES with annual visit were included in the analysis. Reference centile curves for refraction were constructed using a quantile regression model based on the cycloplegic refraction data from the RESC. The risk of developing high myopia (spherical equivalent ≤ -6 diopters [D] was evaluated as a diagnostic test using the twin follow-up data.The centile curves suggested that the 3rd, 5th, and 10th percentile decreased from -0.25 D, 0.00 D and 0.25 D in 5 year-olds to -6.00 D, -5.65D and -4.63 D in 15 year-olds in the population-based data from RESC. In the GTES cohort, the 5th centile showed the most effective diagnostic value with a sensitivity of 92.9%, a specificity of 97.9% and a positive predictive value (PPV of 65.0% in predicting high myopia onset (≤-6.00D before the age of 15 years. The PPV was highest (87.5% in 3rd centile but with only 50.0% sensitivity. The Mathew's correlation coefficient of 5th centile in predicting myopia of -6.0D/-5.0D/-4.0D by age of 15 was 0.77/0.51/0.30 respectively.Reference centile curves provide an age-specific estimation on a severity scale of refractive error in school-aged children. Children located under lower percentiles at young age were more likely to have high myopia at 15 years or probably in adulthood.

  4. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and Down Syndrome: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Safiza Mohamad Nor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, Down Syndrome (DS and Cerebral Palsy (CP are the most common disabilities among children. Nutritional status assessment is important as these children are at risk of underweight, overweight or obesity. Therefore, the objectives of this review were to identify evidence on the prevalence of nutritional status of children with DS, CP and ASD, and to determine tools and indicators to measure the nutritional status of these children. Methods: This scoping review was conducted using a framework suggested by Arksey and O'Maley. A comprehensive search was performed to identify published and unpublished works, reviews, grey literature and reports. Inclusion criteria for the search were articles in English published from 1990 to 2014 and related to children with ASD, DS and CP. Titles, abstract, and keywords for eligibility were examined independently by the researchers. Results: A total of 305,268 titles were extracted from electronic databases and other resources. Based on the inclusion criteria, 21 articles were selected for review. The prevalence of overweight or obese children with DS ranged from 33.5% to 43.5%. The prevalence of underweight children with CP was 22.2% to 78.2%. Children with ASD at a younger age were more likely to be overweight or obese compared with normal developing children. The common nutritional indicators used were z-scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age, body mass index-for-age, and head circumference-for-age. Conclusions: Overall, there is emerging evidence on the nutritional status of children with ASD, DS and CP although this is still very limited in developing countries including Malaysia. The evidence shows that children with CP were at risk of being underweight, while children with DS and ASD were at risk of being overweight or obese.

  5. Children With Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization: Evidence From a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Emery, Clifton R; Ip, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Although research tends to focus on whether children with disability are more at risk of violence victimization, conclusive evidence on the association, especially in non-Western settings, is lacking. Using a large and representative sample of school-aged children in Hong Kong (N = 5,841, aged 9-18 years), this study aims to fill the research gap by providing reliable estimates of the prevalence of disability and the direct and indirect experiences of violence among children with disability. The study also compares the prevalence of child maltreatment, parental intimate partner violence (IPV), and in-law conflict to explore the factors related to the association between disability and violence victimization. The prevalence of disability among children was about 6%. Children with disability were more likely to report victimization than those without disability: 32% to 60% of the former had experienced child maltreatment, and 12% to 46% of them had witnessed IPV between parents or in-law conflict. The results of a logistic regression showed that disability increased the risk of lifetime physical maltreatment by 1.6 times. Furthermore, low levels of parental education and paternal unemployment were risk factors for lifetime child maltreatment. The risk of child maltreatment could have an almost sixfold increase when the child had also witnessed other types of family violence. Possible explanations and implications of the findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Long-term effectiveness of a parenting intervention for children at risk of developing conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Tracey; Hutchings, Judy; Daley, David; Whitaker, Chris; Yeo, Seow Tien; Jones, Karen; Eames, Catrin; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor

    2009-10-01

    The typical pattern for intervention outcome studies for conduct problems has been for effect sizes to dissipate over time with decreasing effects across subsequent follow-ups. To establish whether the short-term positive effects of a parenting programme are sustained longer term. To observe trends, and costs, in health and social service use after intervention. Parents with children aged 36-59 months at risk of developing conduct disorder (n = 104) received intervention between baseline and first follow-up (6 months after baseline n = 86) in 11 Sure Start areas in North Wales. Follow-ups two (n = 82) and three (n = 79) occurred 12 and 18 months after baseline. Child problem behaviour and parenting skills were assessed via parent self-report and direct observation in the home. The significant parent-reported improvements in primary measures of child behaviour, parent behaviour, parental stress and depression gained at follow-up one were maintained to follow-up three, as were improved observed child and parent behaviours. Overall, 63% of children made a minimum significant change (0.3 standard deviations) on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory problem scale between baseline and follow-up (using intention-to-treat data), 54% made a large change (0.8 standard deviations) and 39% made a very large change (1.5 standard deviations). Child contact with health and social services had reduced at follow-up three. Early parent-based intervention reduced child antisocial behaviour and benefits were maintained, with reduced reliance on health and social service provision, over time.

  7. Overweight and obesity among children at risk of intellectual disability in 20 low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, A; Emerson, E

    2016-11-01

    Children with intellectual disability (ID) in high income countries are at significantly greater risk of obesity than their non-disabled peers. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 3 to 4-year-old children who are/are not at risk of ID in low and middle income countries. Secondary analysis of Round 4 and 5 UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) from 20 low and middle income countries that included a total of 83 597 3 to 4-year-old children. Few differences in risk of overweight or obesity were apparent between 3 and 4-year-old children identified as being at risk/not at risk of ID in 20 low and middle income countries. In the two countries where statistically significant differences were observed, prevalence of overweight/obesity was lower among children at risk of ID. These results stand in stark contrast to evidence from high income countries which suggest that children with ID are at significantly increased risk of obesity when compared to their non-intellectually disabled peers. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Improving the nutritional status of malnourished children using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving the nutritional status of malnourished children using soybean ... source of high quality and inexpensive protein and oil, to improvement of nutritional status of ... Soybean products were found to affect weight gain of children (P = 0.04).

  9. [Nutrition recommendations for children who practice sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Valverde Visus, F; Moráis López, A; Ibáñez, J; Dalmau Serra, J

    2014-08-01

    Several health benefits have been attributed to sports practice, and an adequate nutrition status helps to maintain an optimal performance. Children most frequently practice non-competitive and non-endurance activities in a school setting. The dietary intake of children who practice sports should be similar to the general population, properly meeting their energy and nutrient requirements. During the activity performance, correct hydration should be aimed for, with water appearing to be an adequate source in most cases. General calorie and micronutrient supplementation should not be commonly recommended in children. Paediatricians must control nutritional status and dietary habits of children who practice sports, especially in those cases when weight-loss is aimed for, as well as take into account the psychological implications of competitive sports practice. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Intelligence quotient discrepancy indicates levels of motor competence in preschool children at risk for developmental delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu TY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tzu-Ying Yu,1 Kuan-Lin Chen,2,3 Willy Chou,4,5 Shu-Han Yang,4 Sheng-Chun Kung,4 Ya-Chen Lee,2 Li-Chen Tung4,6,7 1Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 2Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, 5Department of Recreation and Health Care Management, Cha Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, 6School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 7School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan Purpose: This study aimed to establish 1 whether a group difference exists in the motor competence of preschool children at risk for developmental delays with intelligence quotient discrepancy (IQD; refers to difference between verbal intelligence quotient [VIQ] and performance intelligence quotient [PIQ] and 2 whether an association exists between IQD and motor competence.Methods: Children’s motor competence and IQD were determined with the motor subtests of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ – Fourth Edition. A total of 291 children were included in three groups: NON-IQD (n=213; IQD within 1 standard deviation [SD], VIQ>PIQ (n=39; VIQ>PIQ greater than 1 SD, and PIQ>VIQ (n=39; PIQ>VIQ greater than 1 SD.Results: The results of one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the subgroups for the “Gross and fine motor” subdomains of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers, especially on the subtests of “body-movement coordination” (F=3.87, P<0.05 and “visual-motor coordination” (F=6.90, P<0.05. Motor competence was significantly

  11. Nutritional rickets in immigrant and refugee children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Pludowski, Pawel; Shaw, Nick J; Mughal, M Zulf; Munns, Craig F; Högler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Immigrant and refugee populations bring public health challenges to host nations. In the current global refugee crisis, children are the most vulnerable subpopulation. Diseases that were considered rare in the host nation may be highly prevalent among immigrant children. The prevalence of nutritional rickets is increasing in high-income countries, largely driven by an influx of immigrant populations. Nutritional rickets is a bone disease in early childhood resulting in bone pain, delayed motor development, and bending of the bones, caused by vitamin D deficiency and/or inadequate dietary calcium intake. The consequences of nutritional rickets include stunted growth, developmental delay, lifelong bone deformities, seizures, cardiomyopathy, and even death. Nutritional rickets is most commonly seen in children from the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia in high-income countries. Dark skin pigmentation, sun avoidance, covering the skin, and prolonged breast feeding without vitamin D supplementation, are important risk factors for vitamin D deficiency, and combined with a lack of dairy products in the diet, these deficiencies can result in insufficient calcium supply for bone mineralization. We recommend screening all immigrant and refugee children under 5 years of age from these ethnic groups for nutritional rickets, based on clinical features, and confirming the diagnosis with radiographs of the wrists and knees. Because nutritional rickets is entirely preventable, public health policies must address the need for universal vitamin D supplementation and adequate dietary calcium to protect children from this scourge. Vitamin D supplementation of all infants and children with 400 IU/d during the first year of life and dietary or supplemental intakes of at least 600 IU/d of vitamin D and 500 mg/d of calcium thereafter, will effectively prevent nutritional rickets. We call on national health authorities of host countries to implement health check lists and prevention

  12. The Effects of Aesthetic Science Activities on Improving At-Risk Families Children's Anxiety About Learning Science and Positive Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of aesthetic science activities on improving elementary school at-risk families' children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and decreasing their anxiety about learning science. Thirty-six 4th-grade children from at-risk families volunteered to participate in a 12-week intervention and formed the experimental group; another 97 typical 4th graders were randomly selected to participant in the assessment and were used as the comparison group. The treatment for experimental group children emphasized scaffolding aesthetic science activities and inquiry strategies. The Elementary School Student Questionnaire was administered to assess all children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and anxiety about learning science. In addition, nine target children from the experimental group with the lowest scores on either positive thinking, or attitudes toward science, or with the highest scores on anxiety about learning science in the pre-test were recruited to be interviewed at the end of the intervention and observed weekly. Confirmatory factor analyses, analyses of covariance, and content theme analysis assessed the similarities and differences between groups. It was found that the at-risk families' children were motivated by the treatment and made significant progress on positive thinking and attitudes toward science, and also decreased their anxiety about learning science. The findings from interviews and classroom observations also revealed that the intervention made differences in children's affective perceptions of learning science. Implication and research recommendation are discussed.

  13. Deficits in visual short-term memory binding in children at risk of non-verbal learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ricardo Basso; Mammarella, Irene C; Pancera, Arianna; Galera, Cesar; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that learning disabled children meet short-term memory (STM) problems especially when they must bind different types of information, however the hypothesis has not been systematically tested. This study assessed visual STM for shapes and colors and the binding of shapes and colors, comparing a group of children (aged between 8 and 10 years) at risk of non-verbal learning disabilities (NLD) with a control group of children matched for general verbal abilities, age, gender, and socioeconomic level. Results revealed that groups did not differ in retention of either shapes or colors, but children at risk of NLD were poorer than controls in memory for shape-color bindings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Use of the Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener for Children at Risk for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Case Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Ashley; Reddy, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener is a multidimensional, computerized screening tool designed to assess attention and global aspects of executive functioning in children at risk for attention disorders. The screener consists of a semi-structured diagnostic interview, brief parent and teacher rating scales, 3 computer-based…

  15. Group Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Parents and Children At-Risk for Physical Abuse: An Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, Melissa K.; Deblinger, Esther; Steer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the relative efficacy of two types of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for treating the traumatized child and at-risk or offending parent in cases of child physical abuse (CPA), 24 parents and their children were treated with Combined Parent-Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT) and 20 parents were treated with Parent-Only CBT.…

  16. Relations among Neighborhood Social Networks, Home Literacy Environments, and Children's Expressive Vocabulary in Suburban At-Risk Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Powell, Douglas R.; Diamond, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing research and policy interest in the neighborhood context of early school success, this study examined relations among neighborhood social networks, home literacy practices/resources, and children's expressive vocabulary in a suburban at-risk sample in the USA at the beginning of the school year. In a Structural Equation…

  17. Educating Urban African American Children Placed at Risk: A Comparison of Two Types of Catholic Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzel, L. Mickey; Domingues, Janine

    2009-01-01

    Although the number of urban Catholic schools has declined in recent years, Nativity model middle schools, first developed by the Jesuits over 35 years ago, have appeared throughout the nation to address the need for effective alternative education for urban children placed at risk. The present study compares the effectiveness of two types of…

  18. Nutritional support for critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Ari; Anton, Natalie; Lequier, Laurance; Vandermeer, Ben; Tjosvold, Lisa; Larsen, Bodil; Hartling, Lisa

    2016-05-27

    Nutritional support in the critically ill child has not been well investigated and is a controversial topic within paediatric intensive care. There are no clear guidelines as to the best form or timing of nutrition in critically ill infants and children. This is an update of a review that was originally published in 2009. . The objective of this review was to assess the impact of enteral and parenteral nutrition given in the first week of illness on clinically important outcomes in critically ill children. There were two primary hypotheses:1. the mortality rate of critically ill children fed enterally or parenterally is different to that of children who are given no nutrition;2. the mortality rate of critically ill children fed enterally is different to that of children fed parenterally.We planned to conduct subgroup analyses, pending available data, to examine whether the treatment effect was altered by:a. age (infants less than one year versus children greater than or equal to one year old);b. type of patient (medical, where purpose of admission to intensive care unit (ICU) is for medical illness (without surgical intervention immediately prior to admission), versus surgical, where purpose of admission to ICU is for postoperative care or care after trauma).We also proposed the following secondary hypotheses (a priori), pending other clinical trials becoming available, to examine nutrition more distinctly:3. the mortality rate is different in children who are given enteral nutrition alone versus enteral and parenteral combined;4. the mortality rate is different in children who are given both enteral feeds and parenteral nutrition versus no nutrition. In this updated review we searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 2); Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to February 2016); Ovid EMBASE (1988 to February 2016); OVID Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews; ISI Web of Science - Science Citation Index Expanded (1965 to February 2016); Web

  19. Nutrition for children with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lesley

    2010-04-01

    Optimization of resistance to infection, growth, sexual maturation, wound healing, and provision of the best possible overall quality of life are important management goals in children with epidermolysis bullosa. However, all these goals rely on the maintenance of optimal nutritional status, and achieving this is extremely challenging in the severe types of the disease. Strategies to improve nutritional status have the best chance of success when the dietitian or nutritionist works as an integral member of the multidisciplinary team and is well informed of patients' situations, family dynamics, and prognoses. Even the best-coordinated dietetic interventions may exert only limited impact. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated...

  1. Nutrition and Physical Activity Knowledge Assessment: Development of Questionnaires and Evaluation of Reliability in African American and Latino Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsay S.; Sharma, Sushma; Hudes, Mark L.; Fleming, Sharon E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: African-American and Latino children living in neighborhoods with a low-socioeconomic index are more at risk of obesity-associated metabolic disease than their higher socioeconomic index and/or white peers. Currently, consistent and reliable questionnaires to evaluate nutrition and physical activity knowledge in these children are…

  2. Children at risk of diabetes type 1. Treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine plus nicotinamide - case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ivana Cristina; Del Carmen Camberos, María; Passicot, Gisel Anabel; Martucci, Lucía Camila; Cresto, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine (50 mg/kg/day) and nicotinamide (25 mg/kg/day) in children at risk of type 1 diabetes. This treatment was effective and harmless in experimental type 1 diabetes in mice. Nine out of seventy healthy participants of the type 1 diabetes risk study were treated. They were typified for diabetes with HLA-DQB1 and positive autoantibodies. Children with a first peak of insulin response ≤48 µU were randomly distributed in control and treated patients. Children evolution was followed with an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Control children were treated when was another risk parameter was added. During their evolution all children were treated. Treatment periods differ (range: 120-16 months) because children began treatment at different times. During the treatment 4 patients recovered their parameters and the medication was suspended; 2 patients continued the treatment with favorable evolution. Two children evolved slowly with normal growth and development. One girl became diabetic because she was treated late. In children at risk, this treatment delays the development or remits the evolution of type 1 diabetes.

  3. Is severity of motor coordination difficulties related to co-morbidity in children at risk for developmental coordination disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoemaker, Marina M; Lingam, Raghu; Jongmans, Marian J; van Heuvelen, Marieke J G; Emond, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate whether 7-9 year old children with severe motor difficulties are more at risk of additional difficulties in activities in daily living, academic skills, attention and social skills than children with moderate motor difficulties. Children (N=6959) from a population based cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were divided into three groups based on their scores on the ALSPAC Coordination Test at age 7: control children (scores above 15th centile; N=5719 [82.1%]); children with moderate (between 5th and 15th centile; N=951 [13.7%]); and children with severe motor difficulties (below 5th centile N=289 [4.2%]). Children with neurological disorders or an IQactivities of daily living (ADL); academic skills (reading, spelling and handwriting); attention; social skills (social cognition and nonverbal skills). Children with severe motor difficulties demonstrated a higher risk of difficulties in ADL, handwriting, attention, reading, and social cognition than children with moderate motor difficulties, who in turn had a higher risk of difficulties than control children in five out of seven domains. Screening and intervention of co-morbid problems is recommended for children with both moderate and severe motor difficulties. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. MRI in children receiving total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaghebeur, G.; Taylor, W.J.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Fell, J.M.E.; Reynolds, A.P.; Milla, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cranial MRI was obtained in 13 of a group of 57 children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition, who were being investigated for hypermanganasaemia. Increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images has been reported in adult patients on long-term parenteral nutrition and with encephalopathy following chronic manganese exposure in arc welding. It has been postulated that these changes are due to deposition of the paramagnetic trace element manganese. In excess manganese is hepato- and neurotoxic and we present the correlation of whole blood manganese levels with imaging findings. The age range of our patients was 6 months to 10 years, and the duration of therapy 3 months to 10 years. In 7 children we found characteristic increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, with no abnormality on T2-weighted images. All patients had elevated whole blood manganese levels, suggesting that the basis for this abnormality is indeed deposition of manganese within the tissues. (orig.). With 3 figs

  5. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  6. Profiles of Emergent Literacy Skills among Preschool Children Who Are at Risk for Academic Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Justice, Laura M.; Konold, Timothy R.; McGinty, Anita S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore patterns of within-group variability in the emergent literacy skills of preschoolers who are at risk for academic difficulties. We used the person-centered approach of cluster analysis to identify profiles of emergent literacy skills, taking into account both oral language and code-related skills.…

  7. Parents Using Explicit Reading Instruction with Their Children At-Risk for Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bethany M.; Kubina, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Kindergarten students at-risk for reading difficulties were selected for participation in a parent implemented reading program. Each parent provided instruction to his or her child using the reading program "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" ("TYCTR"; Engelmann, Haddox, & Bruner, 1983). Parents were expected to…

  8. Identifying Children at Risk of Problematic Development: Latent Clusters Among Childhood Arrestees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, C.A.M.L.; van Domburgh, L.; Doreleijers, T.A.H.; Jansen, L.M.C.; Bouwmeester, S.; Galindo Garre, F.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of clusters characterized by distinct profiles of individual, family and peer characteristics among childhood arrestees was investigated and cluster membership stability after 2 years was determined. Identification of such clusters in this heterogeneous at-risk group can extend insight

  9. Profile of Australian preschool children with speech sound disorders at risk for literacy difficulties

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, S.; Crowe, K.; Masso, S.; Baker, E.; McCormack, J.; Wren, Y.; Roulstone, S.; Howland, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Speech sound disorders are a common communication difficulty in preschool children. Teachers indicate difficulty identifying and supporting these children.\\ud \\ud Aim: To describe speech and language characteristics of children identified by their parents and/or teachers as having possible communication concerns.\\ud \\ud Method: 275 Australian 4- to 5-year-old children from 45 preschools whose parents and teachers were concerned about their talking participated in speech-language p...

  10. Screening for nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tiantian; Mu, Ying; Gong, Xue; Ma, Wenyan; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality from pediatric liver disease. We investigated the prevalence of both malnutrition and high nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease as well as the rate of in-hospital nutritional support. A total of 2,874 hospitalized children and adolescents with liver disease aged 1 to 17 years (inclusive) were enrolled. Malnutrition was screened by anthropometric measures (height-for-age, weight-for-height, weight-for-age, and BMI- for-age z-scores). The Screening Tool for Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids) was used to evaluate nutritional risk status. Nutrition markers in blood, rate of nutritional support, length of hospital stay, and hospital fees were compared among nutritional risk groups. The overall prevalence of malnutrition was 38.6%. About 20.0% of children had high nutritional risk, and prevalence of malnutrition was markedly greater in the high nutritional risk group compared with the moderate risk group (67.9% vs 31.3%). Serum albumin and prealbumin differed significantly between high and moderate risk groups (pnutritional risk and 3.5% with moderate nutritional risk received nutrition support during hospitalization. Children with high nutritional risk had longer hospital stays and greater hospital costs (pnutritional risk is also prevalent at admission. Albumin and prealbumin are sensitive markers for distinguishing nutritional risk groups. High nutritional risk prolongs length of stay and increases hospital costs. The nutritional support rate is still low and requires standardization.

  11. Drugs, Alcohol and Pregnancy: Parents and Children At Risk. Emerging Issues. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Stacie Alexander

    The effects of drug and alcohol use by pregnant women which concern state policymakers are discussed in this booklet. Topics discussed include: (1) the effects of fetal alcohol syndrome on infants and children, as well as the effects on children of drug use by mothers during pregnancy; (2) initiatives aimed at helping these children; (3) women…

  12. Profile of Australian Preschool Children with Speech Sound Disorders at Risk for Literacy Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Crowe, Kathryn; Masso, Sarah; Baker, Elise; McCormack, Jane; Wren, Yvonne; Roulstone, Susan; Howland, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Speech sound disorders are a common communication difficulty in preschool children. Teachers indicate difficulty identifying and supporting these children. The aim of this research was to describe speech and language characteristics of children identified by their parents and/or teachers as having possible communication concerns. 275 Australian 4-…

  13. Cognitive Processes that Account for Mental Addition Fluency Differences between Children Typically Achieving in Arithmetic and Children At-Risk for Failure in Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Derek H.; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether processing speed, short-term memory, and working memory accounted for the differential mental addition fluency between children typically achieving in arithmetic (TA) and children at-risk for failure in arithmetic (AR). Further, we drew attention to fluency differences in simple (e.g., 5 + 3) and complex (e.g., 16 +…

  14. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Graeber, Stefan; Graf, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting γH2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  15. Nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: nutrition, children, pastoral community, Tanzania. Introduction. Nutritional ... adequate diet, availability of education, health services and healthy environment ..... improve growth or hemoglobin status of rural. Tanzanian infants from ...

  16. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect that chronic liver disease has on a child's nutritional status and ... even children with less severe liver disease require nutritional .... Reduced muscle bulk .... pain and fractures, palpation of the spine and assessment of pubertal stage.

  17. Improving Phonological Awareness in Parents of Children at Risk of Literacy Difficulties: A Preliminary Evaluation of the Boost Program

    OpenAIRE

    Boyes, Mark E.; Leitão, Suze; Claessen, Mary; Dzidic, Peta; Boyle, Gemma; Perry, Alison; Nayton, Mandy

    2017-01-01

    Background Phonological awareness is an important skill underpinning the development of early literacy. Given the central role of parents in supporting the development of children’s early literacy skills, and that poor parental phonological awareness is associated with poorer child literacy outcomes, it is possible that improving parent phonological awareness may aid literacy development for at-risk children. This study is a preliminary evaluation of a program aiming to improve phonologica...

  18. Cost-effectiveness of Nutritional Counseling for Obese Patients and Patients at Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jens; Willain, I.; Ladelund, S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Obesity and dyslipidemia are risk factors for ischemic heart disease, and prevention and treatment in primary care can reduce these risks. The objective of this cost-effectiveness analysis was to compare the costs and effects (in terms of life years gained) of providing nutritional...... counseling by a general practitioner (GP) or a dietician. METHODS: A total of 60 GPs, who accepted to participate, were randomized either to give nutritional counseling or to refer patients to a dietician for counseling. The life years gained was estimated using a Cox regression model. Costs were estimated...... proven that the GP group was the most cost-effective-the cost of gaining 1 extra life year was estimated to be 8213 DKK compared with the dietician group, for which the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated to be 59,987 DKK. CONCLUSIONS: The effects were moderate, but other studies of other...

  19. [Nutritional status and risk in hospitalized children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankard, R; Bloch, J; Martin, P; Randrianasolo, H; Bannier, M F; Machinot, S; Cézard, J P

    2001-11-01

    A few studies report malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This one-day cross-sectional survey performed in January 1999 assessed nutritional status and protein-energy intake in a pediatric population hospitalized in medicine or surgery units. Every child older than six months, hospitalized for more than 48 h and free of nutritional support (parenteral, enteral, or special regimens for metabolic diseases) was included. Fifty-eight children among the 183 present the day of the study met the inclusion criteria and were included in the statistical analysis. They were hospitalized in medicine (48%), psychiatry (31%) and surgery (21%). The body mass index (BMI) was below -2 standard deviations (DS) in 21% of them. Excluding patients with anorexia nervosa, BMI was +2 SD, or in between these limits in respectively 12, 14 and 74%. Energy intake measured at the hospital was below 75% of the recommended dietary allowances in two-thirds of the children whether malnourished or not. Fifty percent of the malnourished children had been referred to a dietician the day of the study. Malnutrition is frequent in a population of hospitalized children. Energy intake and referral to a dietician are insufficient.

  20. Nutritional status of children with clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexia J; Hill, Rebecca J; Buntain, Helen; White, Melinda; Brookes, Denise; Davies, Peter S W

    2017-06-01

    Nutritional status is an important consideration in many pediatric clinical conditions. This paper aimed to examine and compare the nutritional status, represented by body cell mass (BCM), of children with cancer, Crohn's disease (CD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Anthropometry was measured and BCM was calculated from whole body potassium-40 counting in 259 children being treated for clinical conditions (n = 66 cancer; n = 59 AN; n = 75 CF; n = 59 CD) and 108 healthy children. BCM was adjusted for height (BCMI) and expressed as a Z-score relative to laboratory reference data. The CD (-0.80 ± 1.61; p = 0.0001) and AN (-1.13 ± 0.99; p = 0.0001) groups had significantly lower BMI Z-score than the healthy control (0.13 ± 0.75), cancer (0.50 ± 1.40) and CF groups (-0.09 ± 0.95). The cancer (-1.16 ± 1.60; p = 0.0001), CD (-1.13 ± 1.36; p = 0.0001) and AN (-0.97 ± 1.18; p = 0.0001) groups had significantly reduced BCM compared to the healthy control (0.07 ± 0.93) and CF group (0.31 ± 1.08). According to BCMI Z-score, 42.4% of patients with cancer, 41.7% of the patients with CD, 27.1% of patients with AN, and 4.0% of patients with CF were considered malnourished. This study demonstrates that children undergoing treatment for clinical conditions may have alterations in BCM, independent of BMI. Children with cancer, CD and AN all had a high prevalence of malnutrition. Assessment of body composition, not just body size, is vital to understand nutritional status in children with clinical conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Barriers and Facilitators to Melanoma Prevention and Control Behaviors Among At-Risk Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Parsons, Bridget G; Mooney, Ryan; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Cloyes, Kristin; Hay, Jennifer L; Kohlmann, Wendy; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy A

    2018-04-06

    Melanoma prevention is essential for children who are at elevated risk for the disease due to family history. However, children who carry a familial risk for the disease do not optimally adhere to recommended melanoma preventive behaviors. The current study sought to identify perceived barriers to and facilitators of children's engagement in melanoma preventive behaviors among children at elevated risk for melanoma due to family history of the disease (i.e., having a parent with a history of melanoma) from both parents' and childrens' perspectives. Qualitative methods were employed and consisted of separate focus group discussions with children (ages 8-17 years, n = 37) and their parents (n = 39). Focus group transcripts were coded using content analysis. Parents and children reported a number of barriers and facilitators, including on the individual (e.g., knowledge and awareness, preferences), social (e.g., peer influences, family modeling and communication), and contextual (e.g., healthcare provider communication) levels. The identified categories of barriers and facilitators both confirm and extend the literature documenting the reasons children who are at elevated risk for melanoma do not engage in melanoma prevention and control behaviors. Programs aiming to decrease melanoma risk among children of melanoma survivors could help families address their barriers to preventive behavior implementation and build on facilitators. Melanoma survivors and their children could benefit from support on their interactions with healthcare providers, schools, peers, and other caregivers about melanoma prevention.

  2. An emergency department intervention to protect an overlooked group of children at risk of significant harm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaye, P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Parental psychiatric disorder, especially depression, personality disorder and deliberate self-harm, is known to put children at greater risk of mental illness, neglect or physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Without a reliable procedure to identify children of parents presenting with these mental health problems, children at high risk of significant harm can be easily overlooked. Although deliberate self-harm constitutes a significant proportion of emergency presentations, there are no guidelines which address the emergency physician\\'s role in identifying and assessing risk to children of these patients. METHODS: A robust system was jointly developed with the local social services child protection team to identify and risk-stratify children of parents with mental illness. This allows us to intervene when we identify children at immediate risk of harm and to ensure that social services are aware of potential risk to all children in this group. The referral process was audited repeatedly to refine the agreed protocol. RESULTS: The proportion of patients asked by the emergency department personnel about dependent children increased and the quality of information received by the social services child protection team improved. CONCLUSIONS: All emergency departments should acknowledge the inadequacy of information available to them regarding patients\\' children and consider a policy of referral to social services for all children of parents with mental health presentations. This process can only be developed through close liaison within the multidisciplinary child protection team.

  3. Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition among school-age children is due to inadequacies in one or more of the three main preconditions for good nutrition: food, care and health. Children stunted at school age are likely to have been exposed to poor nutrition since early childhood. Interventions for school age children can supplement ...

  4. Statewide prevalence of school children at risk of anaphylaxis and rate of adrenaline autoinjector activation in Victorian government schools, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Paxton; Koplin, Jennifer; Beck, Cara; Field, Michael; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Tang, Mimi L K; Allen, Katrina J

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of school students at risk of anaphylaxis in Victoria is unknown and has not been previously studied. Similarly, rates of adrenaline autoinjector usage in the school environment have yet to be determined given increasing prescription rates. We sought to determine time trends in prevalence of school children at risk of anaphylaxis across all year levels and the annual usage rate of adrenaline autoinjectors in the school setting relative to the number of students at risk of anaphylaxis. Statewide surveys from more than 1,500 government schools including more than 550,000 students were used and prevalence rates (%) with 95% CIs were calculated. The overall prevalence of students at risk of anaphylaxis has increased 41% from 0.98% (95% CI, 0.95-1.01) in 2009 to 1.38% (95% CI, 1.35-1.41) in 2014. There was a significant drop in reporting of anaphylaxis risk with transition from the final year of primary school to the first year of secondary school, suggesting a change in parental reporting of anaphylaxis risk among secondary school students. The number of adrenaline autoinjectors activated per 1000 students at risk of anaphylaxis ranged from 6 to 8 per year, with consistently higher activation use in secondary school students than in primary school students. Statewide prevalence of anaphylaxis risk has increased in children attending Victorian government schools. However, adrenaline autoinjector activation has remained fairly stable despite known increase in the rates of prescription. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Can subsyndromal manifestations of major depression be identified in children at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M; Fitzgerald, M; Lin, K; Carrellas, N; Woodworth, H; Biederman, J

    2017-02-01

    Children of parents with major depression are at significantly increased risk for developing major depression themselves; however, not all children at genetic risk will develop major depressive disorder (MDD). We investigated the utility of subsyndromal scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) Anxiety/Depression scale in identifying children at the highest risk for pediatric MDD from among the pool of children of parents with MDD or bipolar disorder. The sample was derived from two previously conducted longitudinal case-control family studies of psychiatrically and pediatrically referred youth and their families. For this study, probands were stratified based on the presence or absence of a parental mood disorder. Subsyndromal scores on the CBCL Anxiety/Depression scale significantly separated the children at high risk for pediatric MDD from those at low risk in a variety of functional areas, including social and academic functioning. Additionally, children at genetic risk without elevated CBCL Anxiety/Depression scale scores were largely indistinguishable from controls. These results suggest that the CBCL Anxiety/Depression scale can help identify children at highest risk for pediatric MDD. If implemented clinically, this scale would cost-effectively screen children and identify those most in need of early intervention resources to impede the progression of depression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Precursors of Language Ability and Academic Performance: An Intergenerational, Longitudinal Study of At-Risk Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Lisa; Serbin, Lisa A.; Stack, Dale M.; Schwartzman, Alex E.; Ledingham, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    The current investigation examined whether inter-generational transfer of risk could be revealed through mothers' and preschool-aged children's expressive language, and whether continuity of risk persisted in these children's academic abilities, 3 years later. Participating families were drawn from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project, a…

  7. Exposure to Aflatoxin and Fumonisin in Children at Risk for Growth Impairment in Rural Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Stunted growth is a major public health issue for children in Tanzania. We examined dietary exposures to aflatoxin and fumonisin and their potential roles in growth impairment in children under 36 months of age in Haydom, Tanzania. Methods. Plasma samples collected at 24 months of age ...

  8. Children at Risk: A Review of Sexual Abuse Incidents and Child Protection Issues in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The right of children to be protected from abuse is grounded in international law. Children should be free to enjoy their childhoods and to engage with their physical environment without fear for their safety. In recent years, girls and women in Jamaica have been targeted by men who rape and/or otherwise sexually assault them. This is without…

  9. Socially anxious children at risk for victimization : The role of personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Saskia F.; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether Big Five personality traits affect the extent to which a socially anxious child will be victimized. A total of 1814 children participated in the study (mean age = 11.99 years). Children completed self-reports and peer reports of victimization, which were aggregated, and

  10. Is Privacy at Risk when Commercial Websites Target Primary School Children? A Case Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sora; Yi, Soon-Hyung

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses privacy risk factors when commercial web sites target primary school children in Korea. Specifically, the authors examined types of personal information required for membership subscriptions and whether privacy policies at commercial sites for children abide by privacy guidelines. A total of 159 commercial sites targeting…

  11. Parental cannabis abuse and accidental intoxications in children: prevention by detecting neglectful situations and at-risk families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Fanny; Claudet, Isabelle; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Cannabis intoxication in toddlers is rare and mostly accidental. Our objectives were to focus on the characteristics and management of children under the age of 6 years who were admitted to our emergency department with cannabis poisoning reported as accidental by parents, and to point out the need to consider accidental cannabis ingestions as an indicator of neglect. The medical records of children hospitalized for cannabis poisoning in a pediatric emergency department from January 2007 to November 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Data collected included age, sex, drug ingested, source of drug, intentional versus accidental ingestion, pediatric intensive care unit or hospital admission, treatment and length of hospital stay, toxicology results, and rate of child protectives services referral. Twelve toddlers (4 boys and 8 girls; mean age, 16.6 months) were included. All had ingested cannabis. Their parents reported the ingestion. Seven children experienced drowsiness or hypotonia. Three children were given activated charcoal. Blood screening for cannabinoids, performed in 2 cases, was negative in both, and urine samples were positive in 7 children (70%). All children had favorable outcomes after being hospitalized from 2 to 48 hours. Nine children were referred to social services for further assessment before discharge. Cannabis intoxication in children should be reported to child protection services with the aim of prevention, to detect situations of neglect and at-risk families. Legal action against the parents may be considered. Accidental intoxication and caring parents should be no exception to this rule.

  12. Cause or consequence? Investigating attention bias and self-regulation skills in children at risk for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Nora; Bergmann, Sarah; Klein, Annette M; Daum, Moritz; von Klitzing, Kai; Horstmann, Annette

    2017-03-01

    Impaired self-regulation, especially in food-specific situations, has been linked to childhood obesity. These deficits may be acquired during the development of obesity rather than being a prerequisite thereof. The current study, hence, focused on an at-risk population versus controls. Normal-weight children of obese and normal-weight parents were tested regarding attentional flexibility, emotion regulation, and inhibitory control. A sample of 50 preschoolers of obese parents (n=25) or normal-weight parents (n=25) participated in this study. Through eye-tracking, attentional bias for food cues was measured during a visual probe task using food and toy images. Emotion regulation was assessed during a distress-evoking task, and inhibitory control was examined through a delay-of-gratification task. Both tasks are standardized and were conducted in non-food contexts. Results showed no significant group differences in overall attentional bias to food images over toy images. However, children of normal-weight parents showed a preference for toy images. Regarding emotion regulation, children in the risk group expressed significantly less overall emotional distress. In addition, less gaze aversion and bodily sadness could be observed in this group. No differences were found for inhibitory control. Findings suggest that general deficits in self-regulation are not yet present in normal-weight children at risk for obesity. Instead, they might develop as a by-product of unhealthy weight gain. Results indicate, however, that children of obese parents are less emotionally expressive compared with children of normal-weight parents. Furthermore, children of normal-weight parents appeared to be more interested in toy images than in food images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Nutritional Education based on Health Belief Model on Self-Esteem and BMI of Overweight and at Risk of Overweight Adolescent Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Rabiei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Due to significant increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescents in developed countries, much attention has been focused on this issue. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of nutritional education based on Health Belief Model (HBM on self-esteem and body mass index (BMI of overweight and at risk of overweight adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: The study subjects consist of 140 female students recruited from two high schools, who were randomly allocated to the intervention (n=70 and control (n=70 groups. The data collection instrument included sections on socio-demographic status, transportation method, physical status, and knowledge and attitudes of the students towards nutrition, which was designed according to HBM. As the intervention, model-based educational program was implemented through six 60-minute sessions, focusing on the overweight and at-risk students. Results were compared in the beginning, and three months after the intervention to find the possible impacts. Results: Average score of model structures and self-esteem of students in both groups had no significant difference at baseline, but immediately after the intervention and 3 months after treatment, the mean component scores were significantly higher in intervention group than controls (P

  14. Feasibility of a patient-centred nutrition intervention to improve oral intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer: a pilot randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; Desbrow, Ben; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition is important for pressure ulcer prevention. This randomised control pilot study assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to test the effectiveness of a patient-centred intervention for improving the dietary intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer in hospital. A 3-day intervention targeting patients at risk of pressure ulcer was developed, based on three main foundations: patient education, patient participation and guided goal setting. The intervention was piloted in three wards in a metropolitan hospital in Queensland, Australia. Participants were randomised into control or intervention groups and had their oral intakes monitored. A subset of intervention patients was interviewed on their perceptions of the intervention. Feasibility was tested against three criteria: ≥75% recruitment; ≥80% retention; and ≥80% intervention fidelity. Secondary outcomes related to effects on energy and protein intakes. Eighty patients participated in the study and 66 were included in final analysis. The recruitment rate was 82%, retention rate was 88%, and 100% of intervention patients received the intervention. Patients viewed the intervention as motivating and met significantly more of their estimated energy and protein requirements over time. This pilot study indicates that the intervention is feasible and acceptable by patients at risk of pressure ulcer. A larger trial is needed to confirm the effectiveness of the intervention in the clinical setting. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Improving nutritional status of children under 6 through nutrition counseling in rural area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaei, Mina; Zarei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Nutrition counseling is one of the nutritional activities for improving child nutrition. It is the best way for decreasing malnutrition in children. Goal: To improve nutritional status of children under 6 through nutrition counseling in rural area with high prevalence of malnutrition. Methods: An international study with a total of 660 children with their mothers and with duration of seven months started in Lali district (in Khozestan province of Iran). Data gathered with using a demographic questionnaire and anthropometric measurements in children. Afterwards, malnourished children determined and referred to nutrition counseling centers. After training mothers, planning a diet and monitoring nutritional status were determined. Results: The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight in studied children at the beginning of the study were 9.6%, 6.2% and 4.8% respectively, which reached 8.7%, 3.3% and 2.4% by the end of the project (P<0.05). The intervention was most efficient in children suffering growth retardation, with a cure rate of 91%; only 48.6% of malnourished children referred to the center health were cured. Conclusion: Results obtained from this study showed that over 90% of children suffering growth retardation were cured. This means establishing nutrition counseling centers to encourage proper nutrition behaviors, evaluate current issues and find possible solutions, persuade mothers to improve child nutrition status making use of practical and specific methods appropriate with the tradition of the region has had an important role in improving the nutrition status of the children in the region. (author)

  16. Self-Regulation Mediates the Relationship between Learner Typology and Achievement in At - Risk Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Keri; Keogh, Deborah; Borkowski, John G.; Whitman, Thomas; Noria, Christine W.

    2010-01-01

    A person-centered approach was used to explore the mediating role of self-regulation between learner typology at age 8 and academic achievement at age 14while controlling for domain-specific achievement in a longitudinal sample of 113 children born to adolescent mothers. Children were classified into one of 5 learner typologies at age 8based on interactive patterns of intellectual, achievement, and adaptive abilities. Typology classification explained significant variance in both reading and mathematics achievement at age 14. A bootstrapping approach confirmed that self-regulation mediated the relationship between typology and reading and mathematical achievement for children from all typologies except those classified as Cognitively and Adaptively Challenged. Implications of person-centered approaches for understanding processes involved with achievement are discussed. PMID:21278904

  17. Are former late-preterm children at risk for child vulnerability and overprotection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Haifa A; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Wey, Howard

    2010-09-01

    Parent perception of child vulnerability (PPCV) and parent overprotection (POP) are believed to have serious implications for age appropriate cognitive and psychosocial development in very low birth weight preterm children. With recent concerns about suboptimal developmental outcomes in late-preterm children, this study was aimed at examining the relationship between history of late-preterm birth (34-36 6/7 weeks gestation), and PPCV, POP, and healthcare utilization (HCU). This was a cross-sectional observational design. Study participants were mothers of 54 healthy singleton children recruited from community centers including Women and Children Clinics (WIC), primary care clinics and daycare centers in the upper Midwest region. Outcome measures included Forsyth Child Vulnerability Scale (CVS), Thomasgard Parent Protection Scale (PPS) scores, and healthcare utilization (HCU). Potential covariates included history of life-threatening illness, child and maternal demographics, and maternal stress and depression using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). HCU (p=0.02) and the PPS subscales of supervision (p=0.003) and separation (p=0.03) were significant predictors of PPCV in mothers of 3-8 years old children with late-preterm history. Age of the child (p=0.008) and CVS scores (p=0.005) were significant predictors of POP. Maternal age (p=0.04), stress (p=0.04), and CVS scores (p=0.003) were significant predictors of HCU. Dependence, a subscale of the PPS, correlated with the child's age and gender even after controlling for age. History of late-preterm did not predict MPCV, MOP, or HCU in healthy children. Future research is needed in larger more diverse samples to better understand causal relationships and develop strategies to lessen risks of MPCV and MOP. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Identifying children at risk for being bullies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetgiri, Rashmi; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with the greatest and lowest prevalence of bullying perpetration among U.S. children. Using the 2001-2002 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, a nationally representative survey of U.S. children in 6th-10th grades, bivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with any (once or twice or more), moderate (two to three times/month or more), and frequent (weekly or more) bullying. Stepwise multivariable analyses identified risk factors associated with bullying. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) identified risk factors which, in combination, identify students with the highest and lowest bullying prevalence. The prevalence of any bullying in the 13,710 students was 37.3%, moderate bullying was 12.6%, and frequent bullying was 6.6%. Characteristics associated with bullying were similar in the multivariable analyses and RPA clusters. In RPA, the highest prevalence of any bullying (67%) accrued in children with a combination of fighting and weapon-carrying. Students who carry weapons, smoke, and drink alcohol more than 5 to 6 days/week were at greatest risk for moderate bullying (61%). Those who carry weapons, smoke, have more than one alcoholic drink per day, have above-average academic performance, moderate/high family affluence, and feel irritable or bad-tempered daily were at greatest risk for frequent bullying (68%). Risk clusters for any, moderate, and frequent bullying differ. Children who fight and carry weapons are at greatest risk of any bullying. Weapon-carrying, smoking, and alcohol use are included in the greatest risk clusters for moderate and frequent bullying. Risk-group categories may be useful to providers in identifying children at the greatest risk for bullying and in targeting interventions. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Objective: To assess the nutrition status and associated risk factors of children in selected public primary schools in ... influence on the future economic development of a ..... growth of school children in urban Bangladesh.

  20. Nutrition status of children in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, M. L.; Jones‐Smith, J.; Lutter, C. K.; Miranda, J. J.; Pedraza, L. S.; Popkin, B. M.; Ramirez‐Zea, M.; Salvo, D.; Stein, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Across the region, children face a dual burden of undernutrition and excess weight. While efforts to address undernutrition have made marked improvements, childhood obesity is on the rise as a result of diets that favour energy‐dense, nutrient‐poor foods and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle. Over the last decade, changes in socioeconomic conditions, urbanization, retail foods and public transportation have all contributed to childhood obesity in the region. Additional research and research capacity are needed to address this growing epidemic, particularly with respect to designing, implementing and evaluating the impact of evidence‐based obesity prevention interventions. PMID:28741907

  1. The Analysis of Nutritional Predictors of Anemia Combined with Obesity in Primary School-Age Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulic Marija R.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The consumption and amounts of a variety of food products used in a diet affect the incidence of anemia and different levels of nutritional status among school-age children. The prevalence of food intake comprised of fats, carbohydrates and sodium (salt is a significant contributing factor to the incidence of excessive weight. Apart from nutrition, a leisure-time physical activity and the time spent in front of the TV or computer may contribute to an increase in anemia and obesity rates. The objective of this paper was to examine nutritional status, dietary habits and anemia among school-age children in the central Serbia region (the city of Kragujevac. It was established that 47.3% of the surveyed children fell into the normal weight group, 24.5% of the children are considered to be at risk of being overweight, 21.4 % of the children are considered as obese, whereas 6.8% of the children fell into the under-weight group. The incidence of anemia was noted in 10.8% of the cases, whereas anemia in obese children was observed in 21.6% of the cases (n=114; during the school year of 2014-2015. The obtained results show a statistically significant correlation between an increase in the consumption of fast food and anemia in children, whereas the amount of time children spend in front of the TV is also associated with the higher percentage of anemia and obesity.

  2. Measuring Appetite with the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire Identifies Hospitalised Older People at Risk of Worse Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, A L; Baylis, D; Jameson, K A; Cooper, C; Sayer, A A; Robinson, S M; Roberts, H C

    2016-01-01

    Poor appetite is commonly reported by older people but is rarely measured. The Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) was validated to predict weight loss in community dwelling older adults but has been little used in hospitals. We evaluated it in older women on admission to hospital and examined associations with healthcare outcomes. Longitudinal observational with follow-up at six months. Female acute Medicine for Older People wards at a University hospital in England. 179 female inpatients. Age, weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), grip strength, SNAQ, Barthel Index Score, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale: Short Form (GDS-SF), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), category of domicile and receipt of care were measured soon after admission and repeated at six month follow-up. The length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital acquired infection, readmissions and deaths by follow-up were recorded. 179 female participants mean age 87 (SD 4.7) years were recruited. 42% of participants had a low SNAQ score (appetite). A low SNAQ score was associated with an increased risk of hospital acquired infection (OR 3.53; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.41; p=0.004) and with risk of death (HR 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.68; p = 0.023) by follow-up. Poor appetite was common among the older hospitalised women studied, and was associated with higher risk of poor healthcare outcomes.

  3. IA-2 autoantibody affinity in children at risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stephanie; Chmiel, Ruth; Bonifacio, Ezio; Scholz, Marlon; Powell, Michael; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Ziegler, Anette-G; Achenbach, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Autoantibodies to insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2A) are associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes. Here we examined IA-2A affinity and epitope specificity to assess heterogeneity in response intensity in relation to pathogenesis and diabetes risk in 50 children who were prospectively followed from birth. At first IA-2A appearance, affinity ranged from 10(7) to 10(11)L/mol and was high (>1.0×10(9)L/mol) in 41 (82%) children. IA-2A affinity was not associated with epitope specificity or HLA class II haplotype. On follow-up, affinity increased or remained high, and IA-2A were commonly against epitopes within the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like IA-2 domain and the homologue protein IA-2β. IA-2A were preceded or accompanied by other islet autoantibodies in 49 (98%) children, of which 34 progressed to diabetes. IA-2A affinity did not stratify diabetes risk. In conclusion, the IA-2A response in children is intense with rapid maturation against immunogenic epitopes and a strong association with diabetes development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Homeless and in Need of Special Education. Exceptional Children at Risk: CEC Mini-Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, L. Juane; Rudy, Kathryn

    This booklet examines the plight of homeless families who have children who need special educational services. It explores the magnitude of homelessness among families, provides empirical descriptions of homeless populations, and identifies factors contributing to the rising incidence of homelessness in the United States. Specific effects of…

  5. Making the Case for Early Identification and Intervention for Young Children at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Marcee M.

    2004-01-01

    The early identification of children with learning disabilities (LD) is difficult but can be accomplished. Observation of key behaviors which are indicators of LD by preschool and kindergarten teachers can assist in this process. This early identification facilitates the use of intervention strategies to provide a positive early experience for…

  6. Hyperactive Children are at Risk of Dental Caries -An Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Jeevika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is well recognized in western countries, but there were no much reports of ADHD from India. Aim: To determine the relationship of ADHD with dental caries. Materials & Method : A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out among 120 children aged around 8-15 years who were randomly selected from normal and special schools located in Chennai city. The children were categorized as ADHD according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV.The questionnaire was given to parents and teachers. It included details of DSM- IV criteria, age, sex, demographic details, past dental history, hours diet chart and any medication taken previously. The oral hygiene status was assessed using Oral Hygiene index simplified (OHI-S and the caries experience was recorded using DMFT index. Categorical data were compared by the Chi-square test. The odds ratio (OR was calculated with logistic regression. A multivariate analysis was carried out to adjust for gender, dental caries status of primary and permanent teeth. Results : Males are more in ADHD group when compared to females. Oral Hygiene Status of ADHD group was significantly better than control group. ADHD children were 3.1 times more odds of getting dental caries than children in the control group.

  7. Family Interactions, Exposure to Violence, and Emotion Regulation: Perceptions of Children and Early Adolescents at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Henry, Carolyn S.; Morris, Amanda Sheffield

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the protective nature of youth reports of family interactions in relation to perceived exposure to violence and anger regulation in 84 children and early adolescents (mean age of 10.5; 7-15 years old) primarily from ethnic minority groups and living in high-risk communities in a large southwestern city. Path analysis and…

  8. "Why Don't They Report?" Hospital Personnel Working with Children at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svärd, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Hospital personnel have been shown to report child maltreatment to social services less frequently than other professionals. This quantitative study shows that one-half of the respondents within the four largest Swedish children's hospitals had never made a report. However, nurses' and nurse assistants' odds of being low reporters were…

  9. Environmental exposure at day care centres: are our children at risk?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the exposure of 5-year old children attending preschool facilities in Pretoria to lead (as an example of an environmental pollutant) in air and surface soil, specifically in relation to their activity patterns....

  10. Characteristics of revisits of children at risk for serious infections in pediatric emergency care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. De Vos-Kerkhof (Evelien); D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); M. Lakhanpaul (Monica); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractIn this study, we aimed to identify characteristics of (unscheduled) revisits and its optimal time frame after Emergency Department (ED) discharge. Children with fever, dyspnea, or vomiting/diarrhea (1 month–16 years) who attended the ED of Erasmus MC-Sophia, Rotterdam (2010–2013), the

  11. Tourette Syndrome: A Case for Establishing the Individual Needs of Children at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeni; Shrimpton, Bradley

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by multiple, involuntary, and repetitive motor and vocal tics. This paper addresses the educational needs of students with TS noting that, without proper intervention and appropriate learning experiences, these children often experience personal distress, reduced self-esteem, social…

  12. Nutritional Status and Cognitive Performance among Children Aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Without adequate nutrition, children cannot develop to their full physical and mental potentials. The nutritional status and the cognitive performance of 500 school children aged 5-12 years from urban and rural areas of Enugu State, Nigeria were evaluated. Anthropometric measurements of heights and weights were ...

  13. Nutritional status of primary school children in Enugu, Nigeria using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition in children can co-exist as under- and over-nutrition in the same population with varying attendant medical risks. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional status of primary school children in Enugu North LGA, using anthropometry. Methodology: This was a cross sectional descriptive study ...

  14. Cognitive person variables in the delay of gratification of older children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M L; Mischel, W; Shoda, Y

    1989-08-01

    The components of self-regulation were analyzed, extending the self-imposed delay of gratification paradigm to older children with social adjustment problems. Delay behavior was related to a network of conceptually relevant cognitive person variables, consisting of attention deployment strategies during delay, knowledge of delay rules, and intelligence. A positive relationship was demonstrated between concurrent indexes of intelligence, attention deployment, and actual delay time. Moreover, attention deployment, measured as an individual differences variable during the delay process, had a direct, positive effect on delay behavior. Specifically, as the duration of delay and the frustration of the situation increased, children who spent a higher proportion of the time distracting themselves from the tempting elements of the delay situation were able to delay longer. The effect of attention deployment on delay behavior was significant even when age, intelligence, and delay rule knowledge were controlled. Likewise, delay rule knowledge significantly predicted delay time, even when age, attention deployment, and intelligence were controlled.

  15. A new motor screening assessment for children at risk for motor disorders: construct validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Matiko Martins Okuda

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To develop a motor screening assessment and provide preliminary evidence of its psychometric properties. Methods: A sample of 365 elementary school students was assessed, with structural equation modeling applied to obtain evidence of the adequacy of the factor structure of the motor screening assessment. As well, differential item functioning was used to evaluate whether various identifiable subgroups of children (i.e., sex and grade perform particular tasks differently. Results: Overall, girls obtained higher scores than boys while, for both sexes, the assessment scores increased with age. Furthermore, differential item function analysis revealed that the precision of the test was highest for those with moderate to low motor performance, suggesting that this tool would be appropriate for identifying individuals with movement difficulties. Conclusion: Although further tests of its psychometric properties are required, the motor screening assessment appears to be a reliable, valid, and quickly-administered tool for screening children's movements.

  16. Atypical Sulcal Pattern in Children with Developmental Dyslexia and At-Risk Kindergarteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kiho; Raschle, Nora Maria; Smith, Sara Ashley; Ellen Grant, P; Gaab, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is highly heritable and previous studies observed reduced cortical volume, white matter integrity, and functional alterations in left posterior brain regions in individuals with DD. The primary sulcal pattern has been hypothesized to relate to optimal organization and connections of cortical functional areas. It is determined during prenatal development and may reflect early, genetically influenced, brain development. We characterize the sulcal pattern using graph-based pattern analysis and investigate whether sulcal patterns in parieto-temporal and occipito-temporal regions are atypical in elementary school-age children with DD and pre-readers/beginning readers (preschoolers/kindergarteners) with a familial risk (elementary school-age children: n [males/females], age range = 17/11, 84-155 months; preschoolers/kindergarteners: 16/15, 59-84 months). The pattern of sulcal basin area in left parieto-temporal and occipito-temporal regions was significantly atypical (more sulcal basins of smaller size) in children with DD and further correlated with reduced reading performance on single- and nonword reading measures. A significantly atypical sulcal area pattern was also confirmed in younger preschoolers/kindergarteners with a familial risk of DD. Our results provide further support for atypical early brain development in DD and suggest that DD may originate from altered organization or connections of cortical areas in the left posterior regions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Precursors of Reading Difficulties in Czech and Slovak Children At-Risk of Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Kristina; Thompson, Paul A; Mikulajova, Marina; Jagercikova, Zuzana; Kucharska, Anna; Franke, Helena; Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J

    2016-05-01

    Children with preschool language difficulties are at high risk of literacy problems; however, the nature of the relationship between delayed language development and dyslexia is not understood. Three hundred eight Slovak and Czech children were recruited into three groups: family risk of dyslexia, speech/language difficulties and controls, and were assessed three times from kindergarten until Grade 1. There was a twofold increase in probability of reading problems in each risk group. Precursors of 'dyslexia' included difficulties in oral language and code-related skills (phoneme awareness, letter-knowledge and rapid automatized naming); poor performance in phonological memory and vocabulary was observed in both affected and unaffected high-risk peers. A two-group latent variable path model shows that early language skills predict code-related skills, which in turn predict literacy skills. Findings suggest that dyslexia in Slavic languages has its origins in early language deficits, and children who succumb to reading problems show impaired code-related skills before the onset of formal reading instruction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Familial and temperamental predictors of resilience in children at risk for conduct disorder and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Katherine E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Brenner, Sharon L.; Neuhaus, Emily; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated predictors of resilience among 8- to 12-year-old children recruited from primarily low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, 117 of whom suffered from clinical levels of conduct problems and/or depression, and 63 of whom suffered from no significant symptoms. Tests of interactions were conducted between (a) paternal antisocial behavior and maternal depression and (b) several physiological indices of child temperament and emotionality in predicting (c) children’s conduct problems and depression. Both internalizing and externalizing outcomes among children were associated specifically with maternal melancholic depression, and not with nonmelancholic depression. In addition, low levels of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) among children conferred significant risk for depression, regardless of maternal melancholia, whereas high RSA offered partial protection. Furthermore, high levels of maternal melancholia conferred significant risk for child depression, regardless of paternal antisocial behavior, whereas low levels of maternal melancholia offered partial protection. Finally, low levels of electrodermal responding (EDR) conferred significant risk for conduct problems, regardless of paternal antisocial behavior, whereas high EDR offered partial protection. None of the identified protective factors offered complete immunity from psychopathology. These findings underscore the complexity of resilience and resilience-related processes, and suggest several potential avenues for future longitudinal research. PMID:17705899

  19. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: Biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eKraus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements in the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1,000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for one year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to an instrumental training class. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. These findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity during trand may inform the development of strategies for auditory

  20. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  1. At-risk children's use of reflection and revision in hands-on experimental activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating opportunities for reflection and revision in hands-on science instruction which emphasized experimentation using model rockets. The participants were low achieving sixth grade summer school students (n = 23) designated as at-risk for school failure by their district. The group was asked a series of interview questions based on work by Schauble et al. (1995) relating to experimentation. The interviews took place over three distinct time points corresponding to a "hands-on only" condition, a "hands-on with reflection and revision" condition and a "hands-on with repeated reflection and revision" condition. A Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks indicate students score low at first with traditional hands-on instruction but improve significantly with opportunities to reflect and revise their experiments. In addition, a sociocultural analysis was conducted during the summer school session to assess the model rocket activity as an apprenticeship, as guided participation and as participatory appropriation using a framework established by Rogoff (1994). Finally, a survey (the Classroom Environment Survey) was administered to the students measuring five constructs consistent with a constructivist classroom: participation, autonomy, relevance, commitment to learning and disruptions to learning. Analysis indicate students in the summer school model rocket intervention experienced a greater sense of constructivist principles during the activity than a similar comparison group utilizing reform minded instruction but not including opportunities for reflection and revision cycles. This research provides important evidence that, like scientists, students in school can learn effectively from extended practice in a varied context. Importantly, the data indicate that hands-on instruction is best utilized when opportunities for reflection and revision are made explicit. Implications are discussed related

  2. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for lifelong neurological decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99 (60%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their life-span.

  3. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for life-long neurological decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T.; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99(73%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their lifespan. PMID:26788781

  4. [Nutrition and nutritional status in infants and children of early years of life in Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutel'ian, V A; Baturin, A K; Kon', I Ia; Safronova, A M; Keshabiants, E E; Starovoĭtov, M L; Gmoshinskaia, M V

    2010-01-01

    The study of the nutrition and the nutritional status children of the first year age and children earliest age were conducted on nationally representative surveys (2500 children, 2-24 months) the Institute of Nutrition, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences with the Institute of Sociology Russian of Academy of Sciences, Gerber Product Company and Nestle Company in 2006. The level the frequency of breast feeding had among children 1 m.--80%, 2-4 m.--70%, 4-6 m.--60%. The lowest body mass Z-scores were registered 0.5-5.0% among of children, the tendency of obesity increase in the age were registered from 1.6 to 13% of children. Calculations of chemical composition and energy value of actual nutrition have show according to the values requirements.

  5. Vaccine induced Hepatitis A and B protection in children at risk for cystic fibrosis associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Esther, Charles R; Leigh, Margaret W; Dellon, Elisabeth P

    2013-01-30

    Hepatitis A (HAV) and Hepatitis B (HBV) infections can cause serious morbidity in patients with liver disease, including cystic fibrosis associated liver disease (CFALD). HAV and HBV vaccinations are recommended in CFALD, and maintenance of detectable antibody levels is also recommended with chronic liver disease. A better understanding of factors predicting low HAV and HBV antibodies may help physicians improve protection from these viruses in CFALD patients. We examined HAV and HBV vaccine protection in children at risk for CFALD. Clinical and vaccine histories were reviewed, and HAV and HBV antibody titers measured. Those with no vaccination history or low HAV or HBV titers received primary or booster vaccinations, and responses were measured. Thirty-four of 308 children were at risk for CFALD per project criteria. Ten had previous HAV vaccination, of which 90% had positive anti-HAV antibodies. Thirty-three of 34 had previously received primary HBV vaccination (most in infancy), but only 12 (35%) had adequate anti-HBs levels (≥10mIU/mL). Children with adequate anti-HBs levels were older at first HBV vaccine (median 2.3 vs. 0.1 years, p<0.01), and at final HBV vaccine (median 4.0 vs. 0.8 years, p=0.01). Fourteen of 19 (74%) responded to HBV boosters. Z-scores for BMI at HBV booster were significantly lower in booster non-responders (p=0.04). Children at increased risk of CFALD have inadequate HAV and HBV antibody levels, and HBV antibody protection can be enhanced through vaccine boosters. HBV antibody titers should be assessed in CFALD patients with a history of vaccination, particularly in those who received HBV vaccines in infancy or who are malnourished. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Executive functioning and motivation in preschool children at risk for learning difficulties in mathematics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentación-Herrero, M Jesús; Mercader-Ruiz, Jessica; Siegenthaler-Hierro, Rebeca; Fernández-Andrés, Inmaculada; Miranda-Casas, Ana

    2015-02-25

    Early identification of the factors involved in the development of learning difficulties in mathematics is essential to be able to understand their origin and implement successful interventions. This study analyses the capacity of executive functioning and of variables from the motivational belief system to differentiate and classify preschool children with and without risk of having difficulties in mathematics. A total of 146 subjects from the third year of preschool education took part in the study, divided into risk/no risk according to the score obtained on the operations subtest of the TEDI-MATH test. Working memory (verbal and visuospatial) and inhibition (with auditory and visual stimuli) neuropsychological tasks were applied. Teachers filled in a questionnaire on the children's motivation with regard to learning. Significant differences were found between the two groups on the working memory and inhibition-auditory factors, as well as on all the motivation variables. The results also show a similar power of classification, with percentages above 80%, for both groups of variables. The implications of these findings for educational practice are discussed.

  7. Instructional climates in preschool children who are at-risk. Part II: perceived physical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E; Rudisill, Mary E; Goodway, Jacqueline D

    2009-09-01

    In Part II of this study, we examined the effect of two 9-week instructional climates (low-autonomy [LA] and mastery motivational climate [MMC]) on perceived physical competence (PPC) in preschoolers (N = 117). Participants were randomly assigned to an LA, MMC, or comparison group. PPC was assessed by a pretest, posttest, and retention test with the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance. A significant Treatment x Time interaction (p < .001) was present, supporting that MMC participants reported significantly higher PPC scores over time, while no positive changes were present in LA and comparison participants. The results show that an MMC leads to psychological benefits related to achievement motivation. These findings should encourage early childhood educators to consider the effect of instructional climates on children's self-perception.

  8. PECULIARITIES OF NUTRITION IN CHILDREN WITH MUCOVISCIDOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Roslavtseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors analyze a problem of digestion disorders in children with cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis. The basis of these disorders is chronic pancreatic insufficiency, developed as malabsorption of fat and steatorrhea, and, to a lesser degree, as disorders of assimilation of protein and starch. A correction of such disorders in infants should be performed with the use of well-balances compound combined with effective pancreatic enzymes, according to the expert’s recommendations. These measures can compensate increased energy consumption in child with cystic fibrosis, provide patient’s normal growth and development, and decrease the rate of infectious complications. Key words: infants, mucoviscidosis, nutrition.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:162-167

  9. Development of Motor-Life-Skills: Variations in Children at Risk for Motor Difficulties from the Toddler Age to Preschool Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Thomas; Reikerås, Elin; Tønnessen, Finn Egil

    2018-01-01

    This article explores variations in development of everyday motor-life-skills in 661 children (329 girls and 332 boys) in Norwegian kindergartens of ages 2:9 (T1) and 4:9 (T2) years:months. The particular focus is on children at risk for problems in motor development (the 10% weakest children in the sample). The methodological approach chosen is…

  10. Systematic review of interventions to promote social-emotional development in young children with or at risk for disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review synthesized the research on interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners to promote social-emotional development in young children (birth-5 yr) with or at risk for disabilities. After a comprehensive search of the research literature, 23 studies were reviewed and then synthesized into five themes: (1) touch-based interventions to enhance calming and parent-infant bonding, (2) relationship-based interventions to promote positive caregiver-child interactions, (3) joint attention interventions, (4) naturalistic preschool interventions to promote peer-to-peer engagement, and (5) instruction-based interventions to teach children appropriate social behaviors. The interventions for infants primarily involved coaching parents in specific strategies to promote positive interactions; interventions for preschool-age children typically involved encouraging peer support, instructing children, and applying naturalistic behavioral techniques to develop higher-level social competence. The studies demonstrated low to moderate positive effects for interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners to improve social-emotional development across ages, diagnoses, and settings. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  11. Improper nutrition and diseases in pre-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Taseva, Lence; Sumanov, Gorgi; Dzidrova, Violeta

    2017-01-01

    For healthy generation it is healthy and orderly development from early childhood. It needs proper nutrition, proper care and personal hygiene. Early childhood is the most vulnerable period in the development stage of man. Improper diet and disease in children from pre-school age are a problem for both children and parents. It is therefore important to undertake measures for proper nutrition and prevention of diseases. Described as improper diet affects children from pre-school...

  12. Nutrition knowledge and nutritional status of primary school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... are a decreased fibre intake and increased intakes of total protein and animal protein ... has implemented various national nutrition and primary health- .... fish, chicken, dried beans, legumes, peas and soy, 4) the dairy group,.

  13. Parental Nutrition Knowledge Rather Than Nutrition Label Use Is Associated With Adiposity in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinami, Lisa; Houle-Johnson, Stephanie; McGrath, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Determine how parental nutrition label use, label literacy, and nutrition knowledge may be associated with cardiovascular health in parents and their children. Cross-sectional analyses of 2006 data from the Healthy Heart Project in Montreal, Canada. Among community recruited families, parents were predominantly mothers (n = 127 [80%]; mean age, 45.0 years) and half of their children were female (44%; mean age, 12.5 years). Blood pressure, lipids, and weight. Nutrition label use, label literacy, and nutrition knowledge among parents were collected using existing scales. Multivariable linear regression models. Among parents, nutrition label use was associated with lower total cholesterol (B[SE] = -.53 [.20]; P = .009), lower low-density lipoprotein (B[SE] = -.57 [.21]; P = .007), and lower total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (B[SE] = -.82 [.30]; P = .008) but was not associated with adiposity. Among children, greater parental nutrition knowledge was associated with lower body mass index percentiles (B[SE] = -3.6 [1.49]; P = .02), lower waist circumference (B[SE] = -1.27 [.55]; P = .02), and lower percent body fat (B[SE] = -1.28 [.47]; P = .008). Parental nutrition label use or nutrition knowledge was not associated with children's lipids. Parents with greater nutrition label use had more favorable lipids, but children's lipids were unaffected. Children of parents with greater nutrition knowledge had lower adiposity. Further research on the correlates of label use and health is needed. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Wouters, Pieter J; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Debaveye, Yves; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Desmet, Lars; Casaer, Michael P; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Hanot, Jan; Joffe, Ari; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2016-03-24

    Recent trials have questioned the benefit of early parenteral nutrition in adults. The effect of early parenteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in critically ill children is unclear. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving 1440 critically ill children to investigate whether withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week (i.e., providing late parenteral nutrition) in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) is clinically superior to providing early parenteral nutrition. Fluid loading was similar in the two groups. The two primary end points were new infection acquired during the ICU stay and the adjusted duration of ICU dependency, as assessed by the number of days in the ICU and as time to discharge alive from ICU. For the 723 patients receiving early parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was initiated within 24 hours after ICU admission, whereas for the 717 patients receiving late parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was not provided until the morning of the 8th day in the ICU. In both groups, enteral nutrition was attempted early and intravenous micronutrients were provided. Although mortality was similar in the two groups, the percentage of patients with a new infection was 10.7% in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 18.5% in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition (adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.66). The mean (±SE) duration of ICU stay was 6.5±0.4 days in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 9.2±0.8 days in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition; there was also a higher likelihood of an earlier live discharge from the ICU at any time in the late-parenteral-nutrition group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.37). Late parenteral nutrition was associated with a shorter duration of mechanical ventilatory support than was early parenteral nutrition (P=0.001), as well as a smaller proportion of patients

  15. Designing and evaluating Brain Powered Games for cognitive training and rehabilitation in at-risk African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, B; Novak, B; Sikorskii, A; Bangirana, P; Nakasujja, N; Winn, B M; Boivin, M J

    2015-01-01

    Valid, reliable, accessible, and cost-effective computer-training approaches can be important components in scaling up educational support across resource-poor settings, such as sub-Saharan Africa. The goal of the current study was to develop a computer-based training platform, the Michigan State University Games for Entertainment and Learning laboratory's Brain Powered Games (BPG) package that would be suitable for use with at-risk children within a rural Ugandan context and then complete an initial field trial of that package. After game development was completed with the use of local stimuli and sounds to match the context of the games as closely as possible to the rural Ugandan setting, an initial field study was completed with 33 children (mean age = 8.55 ± 2.29 years, range 6-12 years of age) with HIV in rural Uganda. The Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), CogState computer battery, and the Non-Verbal Index from the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, 2nd edition (KABC-II) were chosen as the outcome measures for pre- and post-intervention testing. The children received approximately 45 min of BPG training several days per week for 2 months (24 sessions). Although some improvements in test scores were evident prior to BPG training, following training, children demonstrated clinically significant changes (significant repeated-measures outcomes with moderate to large effect sizes) on specific TOVA and CogState measures reflecting processing speed, attention, visual-motor coordination, maze learning, and problem solving. Results provide preliminary support for the acceptability, feasibility, and neurocognitive benefit of BPG and its utility as a model platform for computerized cognitive training in cross-cultural low-resource settings.

  16. Dietary Intakes and Nutritional Issues in Neurologically Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Penagini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurologically impaired (NI children are at increased risk of malnutrition due to several nutritional and non-nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues. Feeding problems are frequently secondary to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which usually correlates with the severity of motor impairment and presents in around 90% of preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP during the first year of life. Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism. Among the non-nutritional factors, the type and severity of neurological impairment, ambulatory status, the degree of cognitive impairment, and use of entiepileptic medication altogether concur to determination of nutritional status. With the present review, the current literature is discussed and a practical approach for nutritional assessment in NI children is proposed. Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

  17. Dietary Intakes and Nutritional Issues in Neurologically Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penagini, Francesca; Mameli, Chiara; Fabiano, Valentina; Brunetti, Domenica; Dilillo, Dario; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2015-11-13

    Neurologically impaired (NI) children are at increased risk of malnutrition due to several nutritional and non-nutritional factors. Among the nutritional factors, insufficient dietary intake as a consequence of feeding difficulties is one of the main issues. Feeding problems are frequently secondary to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which usually correlates with the severity of motor impairment and presents in around 90% of preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) during the first year of life. Other nutritional factors are represented by excessive nutrient losses, often subsequent to gastroesophageal reflux and altered energy metabolism. Among the non-nutritional factors, the type and severity of neurological impairment, ambulatory status, the degree of cognitive impairment, and use of entiepileptic medication altogether concur to determination of nutritional status. With the present review, the current literature is discussed and a practical approach for nutritional assessment in NI children is proposed. Early identification and intervention of nutritional issues of NI children with a multidisciplinary approach is crucial to improve the overall health and quality of life of these complex children.

  18. A longitudinal study on predictors of early calculation development among young children at risk for learning difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Namkung, Jessica M; Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S; Patton, Samuel; Yen, Loulee; Compton, Donald L; Zhang, Wenjuan; Miller, Amanda; Hamlett, Carol

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore domain-general cognitive skills, domain-specific academic skills, and demographic characteristics that are associated with calculation development from first grade to third grade among young children with learning difficulties. Participants were 176 children identified with reading and mathematics difficulties at the beginning of first grade. Data were collected on working memory, language, nonverbal reasoning, processing speed, decoding, numerical competence, incoming calculations, socioeconomic status, and gender at the beginning of first grade and on calculation performance at four time points: the beginning of first grade, the end of first grade, the end of second grade, and the end of third grade. Latent growth modeling analysis showed that numerical competence, incoming calculation, processing speed, and decoding skills significantly explained the variance in calculation performance at the beginning of first grade. Numerical competence and processing speed significantly explained the variance in calculation performance at the end of third grade. However, numerical competence was the only significant predictor of calculation development from the beginning of first grade to the end of third grade. Implications of these findings for early calculation instructions among young at-risk children are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Link between Nutrition and Cognitive Development in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy.

    New findings about child nutrition and cognitive development indicate that undernourished children are typically fatigued and uninterested in their social environments. Such children are less likely to establish relationships or to explore and learn from their surroundings. Undernourished children are also more susceptible to illness and, thus,…

  20. Nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in Simanjiro district in northern Tanzania to determine the nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community. Weight and height measurements were carried out on 250 children and that of mean upper arm circumference (MUAC) on 226 children. The z-scores of weight-for-age, ...

  1. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  2. Nutrition quality analysis in school-age children

    OpenAIRE

    Ковтюк, Наталия Ивановна

    2015-01-01

    School nutrition as a component of quality of life is analyzed. A total of 180 children 10–17 years old are examined. Health indicators studied in conjunction with physiological components of quality of life. The one-sided nutrition principles with predominance of cereals and confectionery products with low consumption of dairy and meat products are determined. The deficit of the fundamental components of nutrition creates a risk factor for health problems and makes preconditions for the deve...

  3. The New York High-Risk Project: social and general intelligence in children at risk for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, S L; Spinelli, S; Rock, D; Roberts, S; Amminger, G P; Erlenmeyer-Kimling, L

    1998-05-04

    Social deficits, as well as low performance on intelligence tests, are known early symptoms of schizophrenia. We studied whether impairment of social intelligence can be detected before the outbreak of the disorder. In the New York High-Risk Project, children at risk for schizophrenia (HRSz) or affective disorder (HRAff) and a normal control group (NC) were studied over the past 26 years. The children are now in mid-adulthood, with known psychiatric outcomes. Developmental and clinical data from childhood can now be related to adulthood diagnoses. We compared mean WISC (or WISC-R) and WAIS (or WAIS-R) scores from childhood and adolescence, and change of IQ, between the risk groups, as well as between the adulthood outcomes. We were specifically interested in the development of social intelligence (the Picture Arrangement and Comprehension subtests). We used logistic regression analyses to generate a model predicting adulthood schizophrenia. IQ at age 9,7 was lower in children with HRSz than with HRAff. Adulthood schizophrenia, compared with major depressive disorder and no psychiatric diagnosis could not be related conclusively to low IQ. This may be a result of the study design, since children with IQ below 70 or behavioral problems were not eligible as study subjects. There was no evidence of lower scores or more decline in social intelligence related to age or group membership (risk or outcome). Subtest-Scatter, a nondirectional measure of the differences between all subtests and Vocabulary, reflecting a lesser difference between crystallized and fluid intelligence, was identified as a significant predictor of adulthood schizophrenia, in the whole group as well as in the HRSz group alone.

  4. Nutrition Beliefs of Disadvantaged Parents of Overweight Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescud, Melanie; Pettigrew, Simone; Henley, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore low socioeconomic parents' beliefs in relation to children's nutrition. Design: A qualitative, longitudinal study over 12 months involving 37 low socioeconomic parents. Setting: Perth, Western Australia. Method: Parents' nutrition-related beliefs were explored via interviews, focus groups and…

  5. Engaging Parents to Promote Children's Nutrition and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Byrd-Williams, Courtney; Ramsay, Samantha; McBride, Brent; Srivastava, Deepa; Murriel, Ashleigh; Arcan, Chrisa; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M

    2017-03-01

    Using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks as a framework, this study examined childcare providers' (Head Start [HS], Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP] funded, and non-CACFP) perspectives regarding communicating with parents about nutrition to promote children's health. Qualitative. State-licensed center-based childcare programs. Full-time childcare providers (n = 18) caring for children 2 to 5 years old from varying childcare contexts (HS, CACFP funded, and non-CACFP), race, education, and years of experience. In-person interviews using semi-structured interview protocol until saturation were achieved. Thematic analysis was conducted. Two overarching themes were barriers and strategies to communicate with parents about children's nutrition. Barriers to communication included-(a) parents are too busy to talk with providers, (b) parents offer unhealthy foods, (c) parents prioritize talking about child food issues over nutrition, (d) providers are unsure of how to communicate about nutrition without offending parents, and (e) providers are concerned if parents are receptive to nutrition education materials. Strategies for communication included-(a) recognize the benefits of communicating with parents about nutrition to support child health, (b) build a partnership with parents through education, (c) leverage policy (federal and state) to communicate positively and avoid conflict, (d) implement center-level practices to reinforce policy, and (e) foster a respectful relationship between providers and parents. Policy and environmental changes were recommended for fostering a respectful relationship and building a bridge between providers and parents to improve communication about children's nutrition and health.

  6. Understanding the health and nutritional status of children in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asenso-Okyere, W.K.; Asante, F.A.; Nube, M.

    1997-01-01

    The data set of the Ghana Living Standards Survey (GLSS, round 1, 1987/1988) was utilized to analyse the principal determinants (publicly and privately) of health and nutrition of children under five in Ghana. While in most health and nutrition studies the emphasis is either on health-related

  7. Burying Nutrition Myths and Activating Choices for our Children's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burying Nutrition Myths and Activating Choices for our Children's Development. Lawrence Haddad. Abstract. (Af. J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development: 2003 3(1): 56-59). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  8. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Inappropriate complementary feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months is major cause of under nutrition. There is scarce information on the relationship between complementary feeding practices and nutritional status. This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary ...

  9. Nutritional Disorders and the Development of Young Children: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Joan Good

    This bibliography on nutritional disorders and child development is directed towards early childhood professionals outside the field of nutrition. The main topic covered pertains to malnutrition and undernutrition as it relates to mental/intellectual/cognitive development of children from the fetal stage through the early childhood years. Included…

  10. Nutritional status and food intake data on children and adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-15

    Feb 15, 2012 ... Department of Food and Nutrition Consumer Sciences, Durban University of Technology. Oldewage-Theron W ... that indicated the nutritional status and food consumption patterns of children in ..... nutrient requirements, and eating behaviour, lifestyle, human ..... Foods and beverages that make significant ...

  11. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional and health status have powerful influences on a child's ... well-being and cognitive development of school children. Students who ... Department of Pediatrics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria. Abstract.

  12. Impact of nutrition messages on children's food choice: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Katie; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2006-03-01

    This pilot study tested the influence of nutrition message framing on snack choice among kindergarteners. Three classrooms were randomly assigned to watch one of the following 60s videos: (a) a gain-framed nutrition message (i.e. the positive benefits of eating apples) (n=14); (b) a loss-framed message (i.e. the negative consequences of not eating apples) (n=18); or (c) a control scene (children playing a game) (n=18). Following this, the children were offered a choice between animal crackers and an apple for their snack. Among the children who saw one of the nutrition message videos, 56% chose apples rather than animal crackers; in the control condition only 33% chose apples. This difference was statistically significant (chi2=7.56, p<0.01). These results suggest that videos containing nutritional messages may have a positive influence on children's short-term food choices.

  13. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed at determining how mother support groups affect the nutrition status of children under 2 years of age ... fants should be fed exclusively on breast milk from birth ... an intervention provides long-term health benefits for.

  14. [Prevention of dyslexia – short-term and intermediate effects of promoting phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence with at-risk preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höse, Anna; Wyschkon, Anne; Moraske, Svenja; Eggeling, Marie; Quandte, Sabine; Kohn, Juliane; Poltz, Nadine; von Aster, Michael; Esser, Günter

    2016-09-01

    This study assesses the short-term and intermediate effects of preschool training stimulating phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence for children at risk of developing dyslexia. Moreover, we examined whether training reduced the frequency of subsequent dyslexic problems. 25 children at risk of developing dyslexia were trained with Hören, Lauschen, Lernen 1 und 2 (Küspert & Schneider, 2008; Plume & Schneider, 2004) by their kindergarten teachers and were compared with 60 untrained at-risk children. The training revealed a significant short-term effect: The phonological awareness of trained at-risk children increased significantly over that of untrained at-risk children. However, there were no differences in phonological awareness, spelling, and reading ability between the first-graders in the training and control group. Furthermore, reading problems were reduced in the training group. In the future, phonological awareness as well as additional predictors should be included when identifying children vulnerable to developing dyslexia. Moreover, in order to prevent dyslexia, additional prerequisite deficits need to be identified, alleviated, and their effects evaluated.

  15. At-risk elementary school children with one year of classroom music instruction are better at keeping a beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jessica; Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Temporal processing underlies both music and language skills. There is increasing evidence that rhythm abilities track with reading performance and that language disorders such as dyslexia are associated with poor rhythm abilities. However, little is known about how basic time-keeping skills can be shaped by musical training, particularly during critical literacy development years. This study was carried out in collaboration with Harmony Project, a non-profit organization providing free music education to children in the gang reduction zones of Los Angeles. Our findings reveal that elementary school children with just one year of classroom music instruction perform more accurately in a basic finger-tapping task than their untrained peers, providing important evidence that fundamental time-keeping skills may be strengthened by short-term music training. This sets the stage for further examination of how music programs may be used to support the development of basic skills underlying learning and literacy, particularly in at-risk populations which may benefit the most.

  16. Important Aspects of Nutrition in Children with Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Jacqueline; Jürgens, Heribert; Frühwald, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Adequate nutrition during cancer plays a decisive role in several clinical outcome measures, such as treatment response, quality of life, and cost of care. However, the importance of nutrition in children and young adults with malignancies is still an underestimated topic within pediatric oncology. The importance of our work is to reinforce and indicate that malnutrition in children with cancer should not be accepted at any stage of the disease or tolerated as an inevitable process. Unique to...

  17. Effect of Body Composition, Physical Activity, and Aerobic Fitness on the Physical Activity and Fitness Knowledge of At-Risk Inner-City Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, Timothy A.; Burns, Ryan D.; Hannon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE America has highlighted the importance of developing physically literate children as part of quality physical education programming. Unfortunately, most children know little about physical activity and health-related fitness. The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity and fitness content knowledge of at-risk inner-city…

  18. [Diagnostic evaluation of the developmental level in children identified at risk of delay through the Child Development Evaluation Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Campos-Maldonado, Martha Carmen; Vélez-Andrade, Víctor Hugo; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Ojeda-Lara, Lucía; Davis-Martínez, Erika Berenice; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Sidonio-Aguayo, Beatriz; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (or CDE Test) was developed in Mexico as a screening tool for child developmental problems. It yields three possible results: normal, slow development or risk of delay. The modified version was elaborated using the information obtained during the validation study but its properties according to the base population are not known. The objective of this work was to establish diagnostic confirmation of developmental delay in children 16- to 59-months of age previously identified as having risk of delay through the CDE Test in primary care facilities. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in one Mexican state. CDE test was administered to 11,455 children 16- to 59-months of age from December/2013 to March/2014. The eligible population represented the 6.2% of the children (n=714) who were identified at risk of delay through the CDE Test. For inclusion in the study, a block randomization stratified by sex and age group was performed. Each participant included in the study had a diagnostic evaluation using the Battelle Development Inventory, 2 nd edition. From the 355 participants included with risk of delay, 65.9% were male and 80.2% were from rural areas; 6.5% were false positives (Total Development Quotient ˃90) and 6.8% did not have any domain with delay (Domain Developmental Quotient <80). The proportion of delay for each domain was as follows: communication 82.5%; cognitive 80.8%; social-personal 33.8%; motor 55.5%; and adaptive 41.7%. There were significant differences in the percentages of delay both by age and by domain/subdomain evaluated. In 93.2% of the participants, developmental delay was corroborated in at least one domain evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional deficiencies and overweight prevalence among children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaya, Yael; Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Leitner, Yael; Reif, Shimon; Gabis, Lidia

    2015-03-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk of developing nutritional deviations. Three to six year old children with ASD were compared to their typically developing siblings and to a typically developing age and gender matched control group, in order to evaluate their intake and body mass index. Nutrient intake was compared to the Dietary Reference Intake using three-day diet diaries completed by the parents. The sum percentage of nutritional deficiencies in the ASD group compared to the typical development group was 342.5% (±122.9%) vs. 275.9% (±106.8%), respectively (P=0.026). A trend toward higher deficiency in the ASD group was observed as compared to the sibling group 363% (±122.9%) vs. 283.2% (±94.7%) (P=0.071). A higher body mass index was found in the ASD group compared to their counterparts, despite their nutritional deficiencies. In conclusion, children with ASD are more likely to suffer from nutritional deficiencies despite higher body mass index. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing children and adolescents on parenteral nutrition: Challenges for the nutritional support team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracey; Sexton, Elaine

    2006-08-01

    Managing infants, children and adolescents, ranging from premature infants to 18-year-old adolescents, on parenteral nutrition (PN) is a challenge. The ability of children to withstand starvation is limited and, unlike adults, children require nutrition for growth. PN in children is often required secondary to a congenital bowel problem rather than because of an acquired condition. Conditions requiring PN include motility disorders, congenital disorders of the intestinal epithelium and short-bowel syndrome (SBS). Intestinal failure may be temporary and children with SBS may be weaned from PN. However, other children require permanent PN. There are no comprehensive guidelines for the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents requiring PN. Practice in individual centres is based on clinical experience rather than clinical trials. Requirements are assessed on an individual basis according to age, nutritional status and clinical condition. These requirements need regular review to ensure that they remain appropriate for the changing age and weight of the child. Assessments of intakes use different methods, e.g. reference tables and predictive equations. Complications of PN include infection, accidental damage to, or removal of, the line and cholestatic liver disease. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is associated with fewer line infections and allows continuation of nutritional support in a more normal environment, encouraging normal development and participation in family activities. However, having a child at home on HPN is associated with physical and psychological stresses. A feeling of depression, loneliness and social isolation is common amongst children and their families. Home-care services are essential to supporting children at home and should be tailored to, and sensitive to, the individual needs of each family.

  1. Medical homes for at-risk children: parental reports of clinician-parent relationships, anticipatory guidance, and behavior changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Catherine S; Higman, Susan M; Sia, Calvin; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Duggan, Anne K

    2005-01-01

    Family-centeredness, compassion, and trust are 3 attributes of the clinician-parent relationship in the medical home. Among adults, these attributes are associated with patients' adherence to clinicians' advice. The objectives were (1) to measure medical home attributes related to the clinician-parent relationship, (2) to measure provision of anticipatory guidance regarding injury and illness prevention, (3) to relate anticipatory guidance to parental behavior changes, and (4) to relate medical home attributes to anticipatory guidance and parental behavior changes. A cross-sectional study of data collected among at-risk families when children were 1 year of age, in a randomized, controlled trial of a home-visiting program to prevent child abuse and neglect, was performed. Modified subscales of the Primary Care Assessment Survey were used to measure parental ratings of clinicians' family-centeredness, compassion, and trust. Parental reports of provision of anticipatory guidance regarding injury and illness prevention topics (smoke alarms, infant walkers, car seats, hot water temperature, stair guards, sunscreen, firearm safety, and bottle propping) and behavior changes were recorded. Of the 564 mothers interviewed when their children were 1 year of age, 402 (71%) had a primary care provider and had complete data for anticipatory guidance items. By definition, poverty, partner violence, poor maternal mental health, and maternal substance abuse were common in the study sample. Maternal ratings of clinicians' family-centeredness, compassion, and trust were fairly high but ranged widely and varied among population subgroups. Families reported anticipatory guidance for a mean of 4.6 +/- 2.2 topics relevant for discussion. Each medical home attribute was positively associated with parental reports of completeness of anticipatory guidance, ie, family-centeredness (beta = .026, SE = .004), compassion (beta = .019, SE = .005), and trust (beta = .016, SE = .005). Parents

  2. How To Teach Nutrition to Kids: An Integrated, Creative Approach to Nutrition Education for Children Ages 6-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Connie Liakos

    This book presents nutrition education activities and strategies that are child-tested and teacher-endorsed. It targets educators, nutrition professionals, parents, and other caregivers, offering the tools to teach children ages 6-10 years about nutrition in a meaningful, integrated way. Divided by subject, this resource integrates nutrition into…

  3. The validation of Implicit Association Test measures for smartphone and Internet addiction in at-risk children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Daeyoung; Bhang, Soo-Young; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kweon, Yong Sil; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Potenza, Marc N

    2018-03-01

    Background Potential concerns are increasing that smartphone and Internet addictions may have deleterious effects on the mental health. Despite the recognition of the important role that implicit associations may have over explicit processes in addiction, such implicit associations have not been comprehensively investigated with respect to Internet addiction. Therefore, we modified the Implicit Association Test (IAT) for smartphone and Internet addictions and investigated its validity in children and adolescents. Methods In this experimental study, 78 at-risk children and adolescents ranging in age from 7 to 17 years completed an IAT modified with pictures captured from the most popular Internet games among youth. Furthermore, measures of Internet and smartphone addictions, mental health and problem behaviors, impulsive tendencies, self-esteem, daily stress, and quality of life were assessed simultaneously. Results Significant correlations were found between IAT D2SD scores and standardized scales for Internet (r = .28, p smartphone (r = .33, p addictions. There were no significant correlations between IAT parameters and other scales measuring the constructs that are less relevant to the features of addiction, such as daily stress levels, impulsivity, and quality of life. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the IAT D2SD was independently and positively associated with smartphone addiction (p = .03) after controlling for other clinical correlates. Conclusions This study demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity of this IAT as a novel measurement relating to Internet and smartphone addictions. Further longitudinal and prospective studies are needed to evaluate its potential utility in clinical and community settings.

  4. The social paediatrics initiative: a RICHER model of primary health care for at risk children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; Lynam, M Judith; Khan, Koushambhi B; Scott, Lorine; Loock, Christine

    2012-10-04

    The Responsive Interdisciplinary Child-Community Health Education and Research (RICHER) initiative is an intersectoral and interdisciplinary community outreach primary health care (PHC) model. It is being undertaken in partnership with community based organizations in order to address identified gaps in the continuum of health services delivery for 'at risk' children and their families. As part of a larger study, this paper reports on whether the RICHER initiative is associated with increased: 1) access to health care for children and families with multiple forms of disadvantage and 2) patient-reported empowerment. This study provides the first examination of a model of delivering PHC, using a Social Paediatrics approach. This was a mixed-methods study, using quantitative and qualitative approaches; it was undertaken in partnership with the community, both organizations and individual providers. Descriptive statistics, including logistic regression of patient survey data (n=86) and thematic analyses of patient interview data (n=7) were analyzed to examine the association between patient experiences with the RICHER initiative and parent-reported empowerment. Respondents found communication with the provider clear, that the provider explained any test results in a way they could understand, and that the provider was compassionate and respectful. Analysis of the survey and in-depth interview data provide evidence that interpersonal communication, particularly the provider's interpersonal style (e.g., being treated as an equal), was very important. Even after controlling for parents' education and ethnicity, the provider's interpersonal style remained positively associated with parent-reported empowerment (p<0.01). This model of PHC delivery is unique in its purposeful and required partnerships between health care providers and community members. This study provides beginning evidence that RICHER can better meet the health and health care needs of people, especially

  5. Improving Phonological Awareness in Parents of Children at Risk of Literacy Difficulties: A Preliminary Evaluation of the Boost Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Boyes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPhonological awareness is an important skill underpinning the development of early literacy. Given the central role of parents in supporting the development of children’s early literacy skills, and that poor parental phonological awareness is associated with poorer child literacy outcomes, it is possible that improving parent phonological awareness may aid literacy development for at-risk children. This study is a preliminary evaluation of a program aiming to improve phonological awareness skills of parents in low socioeconomic status communities, and also provide these parents with strategies to support their child’s literacy development.MethodsAfter completing the program, participants were asked if it had helped them learn about how to assist their child’s reading and spelling, whether they planned on using the resources provided, and if they would be likely to attend a future workshop building on the Boost program. Phonological awareness measures (rhyme, syllable, and phoneme level, and measures of overall confidence in performance on the phonological awareness tasks, were administered both before and after attending the program.ResultsAlmost all parents indicated that the program helped with learning how to assist their child’s reading and spelling, that they would use the resources provided, and would likely attend a future workshop. Significant increases in pre- to post-program phonological awareness scores were obtained at the rhyme and phoneme level.ConclusionThe program and associated resources appear acceptable to parents in communities with high rates of literacy problems and improved parents’ phonological awareness skills. However, findings are preliminary and further evaluation using more rigorous methodologies and testing whether improvements in parents’ phonological awareness translate into better literacy outcomes for children is needed.

  6. Relationship between Nutritional Status and Flat Foot in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Phua Pau Fung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric flatfoot has been reported as the highest clinical complains for foot problems in pediatric department. Nutritional status has showed great influence on the occurrence of flat foot. There are many debates regarding whether underweight or overweight children are more prone to flatfoot. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between nutritional status and flatfoot in children. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted from July to October 2015 in 3 primary schools in Kecamatan Jatinangor. There were 259 children of grade 4 to 5 included in this study. Flatfoot screening was based on measurement of footprint and calculation using Chippaux-smirak index (CSI. The height and weight of children were measured to obtain their Body Mass Index (BMI. Nutritional status was classified based on CDC BMI-for-age growth charts. Analysis was done using chi-square test. Results: There was significant association between nutritional status and flatfoot with p value<0.001.The prevalence of flatfoot in children grade 4to5is40%. When compared to the normal weight children, the overweight children showed prevalence ratio of 1.97(95% CI:1.47 to 2.64 while the underweight children showed prevalence ratio of 1.34 (95% CI:1.78 to 2.25.This stated that the risk of developing flat foot was higher in overweight children. Conclusions: There is significant association between nutritional status with children grade4 to 5. Overweight children are more prone to flat foot.

  7. Are children with chronic illnesses requiring dietary therapy at risk for disordered eating or eating disorders? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conviser, Jenny H; Fisher, Sheehan D; McColley, Susanna A

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric chronic illnesses (CI) can affect a child's mental health. Chronic illnesses with treatment regimens that specify a therapeutic diet may place the child at increased risk for disordered eating and specific eating disorders (ED). The aim of this review is to examine the relation between diet-treated CI and disordered eating and to determine the order of onset to infer directionality. Diet-treated CI is hypothesized to precede and to be associated with disordered eating. A comprehensive search of empirical articles that examine the relation between diet-treated CI (diabetes, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease, gastrointestinal disorders, and inflammatory bowel diseases) and disordered eating was conducted in Medline and PsycINFO using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A table of the sample's characteristics, ED measures, major pertinent findings, and the onset of CI in relation to ED were provided. Diet-treated CI was associated with disordered eating and ED. Diet-treated CI had onset prior to disordered eating in most studies, except for inflammatory bowel diseases. Disordered eating and unhealthy weight management practices put children at risk for poor medical outcomes. Interventions for diet-treated CI require a focus on diet and weight, but may increase the risk for disordered eating. Future research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms that transform standard treatment practices into pathological eating, including characteristics and behaviors of the child, parents/care providers, family, and treatment providers. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Senior Secondary School Children's Understanding of Plant Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosothwane, Modise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's understanding of plant nutrition. The research was done on a sample of secondary school pupils in the age range of 16 to 19 years in two senior secondary schools in Botswana. The sample contained 137 senior secondary pupils all in their final year of study. These children were above average…

  9. Nutritional Screening of Children: A Manual for Screening & Followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Community Health Services (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This manual shows health providers how to perform precisely and expertly each step of several procedures used in screening children for nutritional problems. It is intended for all health providers who are involved in weighing and measuring children, recording and plotting measurements on growth charts, taking blood samples to test for iron…

  10. Changes in the Nutritional Status of School Children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children is increasing worldwide with significant health and social consequences. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the current nutritional status and its changes between 1983 and 2006 among school children and adolescents in a South ...

  11. Determinants Of Under Nutrition Among School Age Children In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a major public health concern affecting a significant number of school age children influencing their health, growth and development, and school academic performance. Objective: To establish the determinants of under nutrition among school age children between 6-12 years in a low-income ...

  12. Nutrition myths - the factor influencing the quality of children's diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slávka Mrosková

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the influence of parents' belief in nutrition myths on the frequency of their serving certain foods to their children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Survey carried out with 297 respondents - parents of children aged 5-18 years. The data collection took place between September 2013 and December 2014. The questionnaire focussed on 14 nutrition myths related to selected foods (milk, dairy products, meat, offal, fruit, vegetables, eggs, fish, legumes, soya, and flour dishes. At the same time, the parents reported the frequency of their serving the monitored foods to their children. In the statistical analysis, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used. Results: For nine nutrition myths we found significant negative coefficients between a certain nutrition myth and the frequency of the serving of the food. The nutrition myths related to the consumption of fish (r = -0.328, eggs (r = -0.203, soya (r = -0.301; -0.290, offal (r = -0.155, meat (r = -0.128, milk (r = -0.272; -0.254, and fruit/vegetables (r = -0.104. Conclusion: The belief in nutrition myths appears to be a determinant modifying parental behaviour and subsequently the quality of children's diets.

  13. Nutritional status (BMI in children suffering from asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćepanović Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research encompassed 708 children of both genders, aged 6 to 15. Three hundred and fifty four of the total number had been diagnosed with Asthma bronchiale, whereas the other half of the children were healthy and served as a control group. Their nutritional condition was determined on the basis of the percentile value of their BMI. Recent studies on the level of nutrition and its connection to asthma have shown contradictory results. This paper was aimed at estimating the nutritional level of sick children in relation to healthy ones. The data were analyzed in relation to group, gender and age by means of descriptive methods, univariate (analysis of variance - ANOVA and multivariate (multivariate analysis of variance - MANOVA, whereas the results were tested by Roy’s test (Pearson contingency coefficient χ, coefficient of multiple correlation R. It was determined that male children more frequently suffer from this disease than female children do. Both healthy and sick children were normally nourished. However, as regards the sick, the number of normally nourished was considerably lower, whereas the number of underweight was considerably higher, as well as those that were overweight. Intergroup differences in the distribution of certain levels of nutrition of male and female children occurred in only two non-sequential age groups, being later in boys than in girls. This uneven distribution is probably a consequence of the joint effects of environment factors, sickness and therapy.

  14. Nutritional status and dietary intake in tribal children of Bihar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R J; Singh, P

    1999-01-01

    To assess the dietary intake and nutritional status in children of the tribal areas of Bihar. Cross sectional survey with two stage probability proportional to size sampling. Study covered 396 villages from 17 tribal districts of Bihar. 1847 preschool children (0-6 Years) were studied. 24 hours recall method was used to assess the nutrition intake and anthropometric measurements included height and weight. Nutritional intake was compared with Indian Council of Medical Research recommended dietary allowances (RDA) and nutritional status assessed by SD classification. The intake of protein was broadly in line with the recommended dietary allowances (RDA) in all age groups among children. However, the average intake of energy and other nutrients was lower in allage groups as compared to RDA. Calorie deficiency was 38% whereas protein deficiency was about 19%. More than half of the children were caloric deficient in Katihar, Bokaro, Godda and Singhbhum (east and west). The overall prevalence of stunting was about 60% and underweight about 55% and was comparable in boys and girls. However, wasting was more frequent in girls (urban - 34.5% vs. 16.3% and rural - 34.9% vs 18%). The level of malnutrition was not very different in rural and urban areas. The nutritional status and dietary intakes of tribal children in Bihar is very poor. Urgent remedial measures are required in this context, particularly on a war footing in especially vulnerable districts identified by this survey.

  15. Assessment of Nutritional Status in Children With Cancer and Effectiveness of Oral Nutritional Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlek Gökçebay, Dilek; Emir, Suna; Bayhan, Turan; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Gunduz, Mehmet; Tunc, Bahattin

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of cancer in children, but the most effective methods of nutrition intervention are under debate. We aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of children diagnosed with cancer, and to investigate the effect of oral nutritional supplements on anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters, and outcome. A randomized clinical study of 45 newly diagnosed cancer patients was performed. Anthropometric and biochemical data and related factors were assessed at 0, 3, and 6 months after diagnosis. On initial anthropometric assessment, prevalence of malnutrition by weight or height was found to be lower as compared with body mass index (BMI), or weight for height (WFH), or arm anthropometry. Twenty-six of the patients (55%) received oral nutritional supplement. During the second 3 months after diagnosis, there was a statistically significant decrease in number of the patients with WFH Nutritional intervention is necessary to promote normal development and increase functional status as a child receives intensive treatment. Protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplements are effective for preventing weight loss in malnourished children.

  16. Epidemiology of nutritional rickets in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlAtawi, M. S.; AlMutair, A. N.; AlAlwan, I. A.; Tamim, H. M.; AlJurayyan, N. A.

    2009-01-01

    In most developing countries, nutritional rickets is a major health problem. The aim of this study was to explore the magnitude of nutritional rickets among Saudi infants, and the various clinical presentations, as well as to address the possible operating risk factors behind the disease. We carried out a retrospective study at King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The records of Saudi infants under the age of 14 months over a 10-year period (between January 1990 and January 2000) were reviewed. Information collected included age, sex, clinical presentations, biochemical, radiological findings, infant nutrition, presence of other nutritional deficiencies and exposure to sunlight. There were 283 infants diagnosed with nutritional rickets due to Vitamin D deficiency (67% males) who were between 6 and 14 months of age. Among the total, 70% were exclusively breast-fed, and 23% were breast-fed until the age of 1 year. The most frequent clinical presentation was hypo-calcemic convulsions (34%) followed by chest infections (33%) and gastroenteritis (25%). In conclusion, nutritional rickets is still prevalent in Saudi Arabia with the primary etiology being vitamin D deficiency. Therefore we recommend that every infant, who is exclusively on breast-feeding, has routine supplement of vitamin D in the range of 200 IU/day (alone or as apart of multivitamin), started soon after birth until the time of weaning. (author)

  17. Important Aspects of Nutrition in Children with Cancer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jacqueline; Jürgens, Heribert; Frühwald, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Adequate nutrition during cancer plays a decisive role in several clinical outcome measures, such as treatment response, quality of life, and cost of care. However, the importance of nutrition in children and young adults with malignancies is still an underestimated topic within pediatric oncology. The importance of our work is to reinforce and indicate that malnutrition in children with cancer should not be accepted at any stage of the disease or tolerated as an inevitable process. Unique to our manuscript is the close collaboration, the exchange of knowledge and expertise between pediatric oncologists and a nutritional specialist, as well as the comprehension of the mechanisms during cancer cachexia and malnutrition. We provide a critical review of the current state of research and new knowledge related to nutritional management in childhood cancer. PMID:22332035

  18. Determinants of Nutritional Status in Children living in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Shafieian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children are one of the most vulnerable groups to sub-optimal nutritional intake in most societies. We have investigated some of the potential determinants of malnutrition in children of 2-5 years of age.   Methods and Materials: A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between nutritional status (weight for age, height for age and weight for height and dietary and socioeconomic factors in 671 children (24-59 months of age from selected health centers in Mashhad city, Iran. Children were assessed for weight and height and the care givers were interviewed and a questionnaire was completed by the interviewers. The data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and the Z-scores were calculated using the WHO anthropometric software package.   Results: The study showed that 24.4% of children were mildly underweight, 4.3% were underweight, 13% were mildly stunted, 23.6% of children were mildly wasted and 3.1% were stunted. Educational attainment, whether the children had been breast feed, average daily consumption of milk, feeding practices and type of first food were found to be the main factors determining nutritional status in our study.   Conclusion: A higher daily consumption of milk, lower age at which first solid food was started; lower age for consumption of meat and good feeding practices may resolve malnutrition in this population. These findings support the need for a family-based prevention program that focus on guiding parents to foster appropriate feeding practices as well as to promote healthy food intake in the children. Future research should determine the cost-effectiveness of both short- and long-term interventions for child malnutrition.   Keywords:Malnutrition Prevention, Nutritional Intake, Nutritional Status, Preschool Children.  

  19. Dietary habits and nutritional status of children in preschool age

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Dzidrova, Violeta; Nikolovska, Lence; Sumanov, Gorgi; Jovevska, Svetlana; Panova, Blagica; Panov, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood is the most important for the overall development of the personality. During this period, each child realizes that it is an independent entity, and it expresses certain requirements, desires, actions, proceedings and behaviour. Our research aims to display nutritional status and degree of obesity among preschool children in the Republic of Macedonia and nutritional quality of their diet. Because of the increasing incidence of obesity in childhood and it...

  20. Gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in neurologically impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Thapar, Nikhil; Staiano, Annamaria; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2016-11-01

    The current increasing survival of children with severe central nervous system damage has created a major challenge for medical care. Gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in neurologically impaired children have been recently recognized as an integral part of their disease, often leading to growth failure and worsened quality of life for both children and caregivers. Nutritional support is essential for the optimal care of these children. Undernourished handicapped children might not respond properly to intercurrent diseases and suffer unnecessarily. On the other hand, restoring a normal nutritional status results in a better quality of life in many. The easiest and least invasive method to increase energy intake is to improve oral intake. However, oral intake can be maintained as long as there is no risk of aspiration, the child is growing well and the time required to feed the child remains within acceptable limits. When oral intake is unsafe, insufficient or too time consuming, enteral nutrition should be initiated. Damage to the developing central nervous system may result in significant dysfunction in the gastrointestinal tract and is reflected in impairment in oral-motor function, rumination, gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER), with or without aspiration, delayed gastric emptying and constipation. These problems can all potentially contribute to feeding difficulty in disabled children, carrying further challenging long-term management issues. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutritional status of children under the age five in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Rjimati, Arbi; El Menchawy, Imane; Baddou, Issâd; El Kari, Khalid; El Haloui, Noureddine; Aguenaou, Hassan; Rabi, Baha

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In Morocco we live nutritional, demographic and epidemiological transition. These transitions affect the nutritional status of the population, especially that of children under five years of age. They also play a guiding role in the development of strategies to be implemented to improve the situation. Aim: To describe the evolution of the nutritional status of children under five years in Morocco over the past ten years. Methods: Two national surveys were conducted in 2004 and 2011. One of the objectives of these surveys is to assess the nutritional status of children aged less than five years compared to WHO standards. Results: The surveys that included 5737 children under 5 years in 2004 and 7271 in 2011 showed according to WHO standards, at the national level , a prevalence of underweight of 3.1 % ( weight / age 2 SD) 2.6 % of which are obese (BMI for age > 3 SD), whereas the proportion of children with overweight and obesity was 10.4 % in 2004. Discussion/conclusions: These studies show that acute malnutrition almost disappeared in Morocco, however prevalence of stunting remains high, overweight and obesity among children less than five years increased in the country. (author)

  2. [Nutritional risk screening and its clinical significance in 706 children hospitalized in the surgical department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lu-Ting; Li, Rong; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yin-Hua; Li, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Meng-Ying; Cao, Jia; Li, Xiao-Nan

    2013-10-01

    To investigate nutritional risk and its relationship with clinical outcome in children hospitalized in the surgical department, and to provide a scientific basis for clinical nutrition management. Nutritional risk screening was performed on 706 children hospitalized in the surgical department using the Screening Tool for Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth. The data on nutritional support during hospitalization, incidence of infectious complications, length of hospital stay, post operative length of hospital stay and total hospital expenses were recorded. Of the 706 cases, 11.5% had high nutritional risk, 46.0% had moderate nutritional risk, and 42.5% had low nutritional risk. Congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, intestinal obstruction and congenital heart disease were the three most common types of high nutritional risk. The incidence of high nutritional risk was significantly higher in infants than in other age groups (Pnutritional risk received parenteral nutrition. Children with high nutritional risk were significantly more likely to have weight loss than children with low nutritional risk (Pnutritional risk had significantly increased incidence of infectious complications, length of hospital stay, post operative length of hospital stay and total hospital expenses compared with those with moderate or low nutritional risk (Pnutritional risk is seen in children hospitalized in the surgical department. Nutritional risk score is correlated with clinical outcome. Nutritional support for these children is not yet properly provided. Nutritional risk screening and standard nutritional support should be widely applied among hospitalized children.

  3. Health & nutritional status of HIV infected children in Hyderabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, G Krishna; Hemalatha, R; Prasad, U V; Murali, Vasudev; Damayanti, K; Bhaskar, V

    2015-01-01

    Information on nutritional status of HIV infected children from India is lacking and is required before taking up nutritional supplementation trials. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the growth and morbidity status of HIV infected children over a period of one year in a city in southern India. This was an observational study carried out between July 2009 and February 2011, at two orphanages in Hyderabad, India. Seventy seven HIV-positive children aged between 1 and half and 15 years, both on and not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were included. Nutritional status was assessed longitudinally for one year by weight gain, linear growth and body composition. Serum samples were analyzed for haemoglobin, micronutrients, CD4 and CD8 counts. Dietary intakes were assessed by institutional diet survey and morbidity data were recorded every day for 12 months. Mean energy intakes were less than recommended dietary allowance (RDA) in all age groups. Iron and folate intakes were less than 50 per cent of RDA; 46 (59.7%) children were stunted, 36 (46.8%) were underweight and 15 (19.5%) had low BMI for age. Anaemia was observed in 35 (45.5%) children. Micronutrient deficiencies such as vitamin D (40/77; 51.9%), vitamin A (11/77; 14.3%), folate (37/77; 48.1%), iron (38/77; 49.3%) were widely prevalent. HIV viral load was higher in children not on ART and those with morbidity. Respiratory (36.6%) and dermatological illnesses (18.8%) were the commonest presentations. Acute, chronic malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies were common in HIV infected children, especially in those not on ART and having morbidity. With severe malnutrition being an alarming consequence of HIV, prophylactic nutritive care should be considered for integration into HIV care strategies besides initiation of ART to improve the nutritional status and quality of life of these children.

  4. E-Books Effectiveness in Promoting Phonological Awareness and Concept about Print: A Comparison between Children at Risk for Learning Disabilities and Typically Developing Kindergarteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Adina; Shlafer, Inessa

    2011-01-01

    Despite the young child's increasing access to electronic books and the evidence indicating it's effectiveness for promoting emergent literacy, research among young children at risk for learning disabilities is only just beginning. Motivated by this challenge, the study reported here compared the effect of an educational e-book on improvements in…

  5. The effects of early prevention programs for families with young children at risk for physical child abuse and neglect : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraert, L; Van den Noortgate, W; Grietens, H; Onghena, P

    In this article, a meta-analysis is presented on 40 evaluation studies of early prevention programs for families with young children at risk for physical child abuse and neglect with mostly nonrandomized designs. The main aim of all programs was to prevent physical child abuse and neglect by

  6. Medical, nutritional, and dental considerations in children with low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Susan; O'Connell, Anne; O'Mullane, Elaine; Hoey, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that 8 to 26 percent of infants are born with low birth weight (LBW) worldwide. These children are at risk for medical problems in childhood and adulthood and often have poor oral health. The influence of fetal growth on birth weight and its relevance to childhood growth and future adult health is controversial. Evidence now indicates that the postnatal period is a critical time when nutrition may predispose the child to lifelong metabolic disturbance and obesity. Given the lack of consensus on optimum infant nutrition for LBW, premature, and small-for-gestational-age infants, many such infants may be suboptimally managed. This may result in rapid postnatal weight gain and ongoing health problems. The purpose of this review was to summarize medical terminology and issues related to fetal growth, morbidity associated with being born low birth weight, premature, or small for gestational age, and the importance of appropriate nutrition in such infants. Pediatric dentists can play an important role in supporting healthy feeding practices and improving long-term health in these children. Early integrated medical and dental care should be encouraged for all children with low birth weight.

  7. Medical, nutritional, and dental considerations in children with low birth weight.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Susan

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that 8 to 26 percent of infants are born with low birth weight (LBW) worldwide. These children are at risk for medical problems in childhood and adulthood and often have poor oral health. The influence of fetal growth on birth weight and its relevance to childhood growth and future adult health is controversial. Evidence now indicates that the postnatal period is a critical time when nutrition may predispose the child to lifelong metabolic disturbance and obesity. Given the lack of consensus on optimum infant nutrition for LBW, premature, and small-for-gestational-age infants, many such infants may be suboptimally managed. This may result in rapid postnatal weight gain and ongoing health problems. The purpose of this review was to summarize medical terminology and issues related to fetal growth, morbidity associated with being born low birth weight, premature, or small for gestational age, and the importance of appropriate nutrition in such infants. Pediatric dentists can play an important role in supporting healthy feeding practices and improving long-term health in these children. Early integrated medical and dental care should be encouraged for all children with low birth weight.

  8. Effect of weaning period on nutritional status children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, S.; Naz, F.; Jamalvi, S.W.; Ali, S.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effect of age of introduction and the type of weaning foods used, on the nutritional status of children under three years of age. Three hundred and fifty-nine children under 3 years were included in the study. Based on the age of commencement of weaning, the children were categorized as children weaned at appropriate and inappropriate age. For the type of weaning foods, the children were grouped into two categories based on the nature of food items. Children for whom weaning was started at the recommended age of 4-6 months were found to be significantly less malnourished on anthropometric measurements as compared to the other set in which weaning was started at an earlier or later age. Significant statistical difference was noted in the children weaned on nutritious home-made items compared to children having commercial foods. (author)

  9. Nutritional challenges for children in societies in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei

    2014-05-01

    This review is to explore the childhood nutrition and health in relation to socioeconomic changes in transitional countries, and to describe the good experiences and policies in these countries to combat childhood nutritional challenges. Double burden of malnutrition - the coexistence of under-nutrition and over-nutrition in the same population - is a prominent public health concern in transitional countries. With rapid industrialization, these countries are facing a growing epidemic of overweight/obesity in children and adolescents. The increasing prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity is a likely consequence of behavioral changes, and accompanied with an increasing incidence of noncommunicable chronic diseases. Although remarkable improvement of childhood nutrition was achieved, the stunting growth and micronutrient deficiency remain to be child health issues in transitional countries. The social transition caused a broad range of nutrition-associated problems. Previous successful experiences indicated that if appropriate action is undertaken, the child nutritional problems accompanied with economic transition could be controlled to some extent. However, greater efforts are needed to improve the status of childhood nutrition in transitional countries.

  10. Diet and nutritional status of children with food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammarion, Sophie; Santos, Clarisse; Guimber, Dominique; Jouannic, Lyne; Thumerelle, Caroline; Gottrand, Frédéric; Deschildre, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the food intakes and nutritional status of children with food allergies following an elimination diet. We conducted a cross sectional study including 96 children (mean age 4.7 ± 2.5 years) with food allergies and 95 paired controls (mean age 4.7 ± 2.7 years) without food allergies. Nutritional status was assessed using measurements of weight and height and Z scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age and weight-for-height. Nutrient intakes assessment was based on a 3-day diet record. Children with food allergies had weight-for-age and height-for-age Z scores lower than controls (0.1 versus 0.6 and 0.2 versus 0.8 respectively). Children with 3 or more food allergies were smaller than those with 2 or less food allergies (p = 0.04). A total of 62 children with food allergies and 52 controls completed usable diet records. Energy, protein and calcium intakes were similar in the two groups. Children with food allergies were smaller for their age than controls even when they received similar nutrient intakes. Nutritional evaluation is essential for the follow up of children with food allergies. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from patients with acute flaccid paralysis, enterovirus infection and children from groups at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Romanenkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from different categories of the investigated children. The percentage of detection of polioviruses from the patients with acute flaccid paralysis was lower than that from the children from groups at risk. Among the patients with the enterovirus infection the polioviruses were rarely revealed. The frequency of isolation of non polio enteroviruses from these patients was significantly higher than that from the other categories of investigated persons. The improvement of poliomyelitis surveillance and the reinforcement of virological surveillance of children from groups at risk and those with enterovirus infection will provide the important data for Global Polio Eradication Initiative and the maintenance of polio free status of the Russian Federation.

  12. Growing children's bodies and minds: maximizing child nutrition and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patrice; Huffman, Sandra L

    2010-06-01

    For their optimal growth, and for greater long-term human capital development, children profit not only from improved nutrition but also from improved learning opportunities in the earliest years of life. This paper describes how actions to enhance optimal infant and young child nutrition can be linked with child development interventions for children under 3 years of age. In countries with high rates of malnutrition, linking these two components will result in synergies of program activities, and will bring about a greater impact at reduced cost than either activity conducted separately. New understanding of social marketing and communication strategies can increase effectiveness of linked interventions. Public-private partnerships to improve both child development and nutrition offer promise for sustainable interventions.

  13. Nutritional Rickets among Children in a Sun Rich Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bener Abdulbari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study describes the magnitude and characteristics of nutritional rickets and associated risk factors among children in Qatar. Subjects. A consecutive sample of 730 healthy subjects who visited the primay health care clinics were approached and 540 (73.9% subjects gave consent. Mehods. Nutritional rickets diagnosis was based on clinical radiologic and biochemical parameters and normalization of alkaline phosphatase level after 6 weeks course of daily vitamin D therapy. Results. The study revealed that 23.9% of the studied children had nutritional rickets. The mean SD age of those with rickets (3.76 years 1.51 was slightly higher than those without rickets (3.57 years 1.45. Family history of vitamin D deficiency (44.2%; P = .001 and diabetes mellitus (53.5%; P = .002 were significantly higher in rachitic children than in nonrachitic children. The children with rickets spent a significantly shorter average duration (26.86 minutes 19.94 under the sun than those without rickets (30.59 minutes 15.72; . A significantly larger proportion of rachitic children was afflicted with vitamin D deficiency (75.2% versus 62.2%; , secondary hypothyroidism (100% versus 7.5%; P = .009 and muscular weakness (56.6% versus 26.3%; . Conclusion. The most important risk factors were low vitamin D and calcium intakes, lack of exposure to sunlight, prolonged breast feeding without supplementation of vitamin D.

  14. NUTRIENTS INTAKE AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF STREET CHILDREN IN BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Patriasih

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The objectives of this research were to analyze food habits and nutrients intake, and health and nutritional status of street children. The research was carried out in the City of Bandung, West Java; Indonesia. A sample of 324 street children was selected randomly. The sample consisted of 232 boys and 92 girls. The data obtained from questionnaires. Means, standard deviation, frequency and proportion were calculated with a combination of software applications:  Microsoft Excel and Statistical Analysis System. The result showed the level of consumption adequacy did not meet the recommended dietary allowances i.e. with the shortage of 10-15%, this is an indication that the street children should be aware of their daily food consumption. The most common diseases suffered by the respondents were acute respiratory infections (ARI (47%. In addition, 22.7 % and 18.4 % of them suffered from diarrhoea and skin diseases, respectively. Blood haemoglobin status of street children shows that the incidence of anemia was 29.3%. Based on the classification of nutritional status, 42.7% and 80.4 % of street children were underweight and stunted, respectively. Key words: nutrients intake, nutritional status, street children

  15. Assessment of nutrition and physical activity education programmes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Milligan, R; Thompson, C

    1995-03-01

    1. Studies in children relating blood lipids to the extent of atherosclerosis at post-mortem suggest a link between risk factors for cardiovascular disease in childhood and adult life. Tracking of blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol from childhood also supports this association. However, prospective studies have not yet established the outcome in children with increased levels of risk factors. 2. In a controlled trial in Perth, Western Australia, involving over 1000 10-12 year old children, fitness was improved by physical activity programmes which were associated with a greater fall in diastolic BP and triceps skinfolds in girls compared with controls. Sugar intake decreased in boys and fat intake fell in girls, mainly affecting participants in home nutrition programmes. 3. In higher risk children, identified by cluster analysis, major benefits were associated with the fitness and home nutrition programmes. Physical activity combined with involvement of the family in nutrition education is likely to be the most successful approach to modifying lifestyle in children, including those with higher levels of risk. 4. Undernutrition by too rigid restriction of fat intake must be avoided in young children who need calorie-dense foods. Undernutrition, in itself, may predispose to cardiovascular disease in later life. Programmes should aim to establish a prudent diet appropriate to the age of the child combined with physical activity. As regular activity and a healthy diet in adult life will reduce risks of cardiovascular disease it is likely that childhood education will establish lifestyle habits of potential long-term benefit.

  16. Dietary practices and nutritional status of 0-24-month-old children from Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, T G; Baraldi, L G; Muniz, P T; Cardoso, M A

    2009-12-01

    To assess the nutritional status and dietary practices of 0-24-month-old children living in Brazilian Amazonia. Cross-sectional study. Information on children's dietary intakes was obtained from diet history data. Weight and length were measured for anthropometric evaluation. Fe status was assessed using fasting venous blood samples; Hb, serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations were measured. The towns of Assis Brasil and Acrelândia in the state of Acre, north-west Brazil. A total of sixty-nine randomly selected 0-24-month-old children. Of these children, 40.3 % were anaemic, 63.1 % were Fe-deficient, 28.1 % had Fe-deficiency anaemia and 11.6 % were stunted. Breast-feeding was initiated by 97.1 % of mothers, followed by early feeding with complementary foods. The dietary pattern reflected a high intake of carbohydrate-rich foods and cow's milk, with irregular intakes of fruit, vegetables and meat. All infants and 92.3 % of toddlers were at risk of inadequate Fe intakes. Fe from animal foods contributed on average 0.5 % and 14.3 % to total dietary Fe intake among infants and toddlers, respectively. Poor nutritional status and inadequate feeding practices in this study population reinforce the importance of exclusive breast-feeding during the first 6 months of life. Greater emphasis is required to improve the bioavailability of dietary Fe during complementary feeding practices.

  17. Approaches to Teaching Plant Nutrition. Children's Learning in Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds Univ. (England). Centre for Studies in Science and Mathematics Education.

    During the period 1984-1986, over 30 teachers from the Yorkshire (England) region have worked in collaboration with the Children's Learning in Science Project (CLIS) developing and testing teaching schemes in the areas of energy, particle theory, and plant nutrition. The project is based upon the constructivist approach to teaching. This document…

  18. Determinants of nutritional status of children in farming households ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic, household and child-related factors on the nutritional status of children (0-5yrs) in farming households of Oyo State, Nigeria. The study was conducted using a multistage sampling technique to select 201 mother-child pairs from 18 farming ...

  19. Metabolic, endocrine and nutritional aspects of critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.F.M. Joosten (Koen)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 provides the aims of the studies (chapter 1) and a general overview and discussion of the current literature of metabolic, endocrine and nutritional aspects in critically ill children (chapter 2). In Part 2 the clinical use of an indirect calorimeter is tested and validated for

  20. Correlation between Nutrition and Symptoms: Nutritional Survey of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Chongqing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Restricted diets and inadequate nutrient intake of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD have been reported. This study examined the nutritional statuses of children with ASD and the relationships between their behaviors and nutritional intake. A total of 154 children with ASD (age = 5.21 ± 1.83 years and 73 typically-developing (TD children (age = 4.83 ± 0.84 years from Chongqing, China, were enrolled. The severity of ASD was evaluated using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS. The serum ferritin, folate, vitamin B12, 25(OH vitamin D, and vitamin A concentrations in the children with ASD were determined. All participants underwent anthropometric examinations, dietary assessments, and questionnaire assessments about their feeding behaviors, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The ZHA, ZWA, and ZBMIA were found to be significantly lower in the children with ASD compared with those without ASD. In addition, the percentages of children exhibiting severe picky eating and severe resistance to new foods, as well as those with a reported general impression of severe eating problems and constipation, were higher among the children with ASD. These children consumed significantly fewer macronutrients compared with the children without ASD. In addition, the children with ASD had the highest rate of vitamin A deficiency, followed by iron deficiency. After adjusting for sex, the vitamin A concentration was found to be negatively correlated with the CARS score (rs = −0.222, p = 0.021. No correlation between the ferritin, folate, vitamin D, or vitamin B12 concentration and the CARS score was found. These results suggest that reduced macronutrient intakes, severe feeding behavior issues, constipation, and vitamin A deficiency are quite common among children with ASD. Further, a low serum vitamin A level may be a risk factor for symptoms of ASD. However, the underlying mechanism should be further studied.

  1. Stress Measured by Allostatic Load in Neurologically Impaired Children: The Importance of Nutritional Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Cena, Hellas; de Silvestri, Annalisa; Albertini, Riccardo; De Amici, Mara; Valenza, Mario; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Allostatic load (AL) is the cumulative physiological wear and tear that results from repeated efforts to adapt to stressors over time. The life stress response is modified by nutritional status. We estimated AL scores among neurologically impaired (NI) children; the association with malnutrition was also evaluated. Forty-one patients with severe disabilities were included. Data based on 15 biomarkers were used to create the AL score. A dichotomous outcome of high AL was defined for those who had ≥6 dysregulated components. Body mass index (BMI)-standard deviation score (SDS) children, high AL was associated with malnutrition. Body composition is a better indicator than BMI of allostatic adjustments. AL estimation should be considered a measure of health risk and be used to promote quality of life in at-risk disabled populations. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Feed the Alien! The Effects of a Nutrition Instruction Game on Children's Nutritional Knowledge and Food Intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Roel C. J.; van den Broek, Nina; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Otten, Roy; Ruiter, Emilie L. M.; Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C.

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Serious games are a promising venue to increase children's nutritional knowledge in an entertaining format. The aim of this study was to test the short-term effectiveness of the Alien Health Game, a videogame designed to teach elementary school children about nutrition and healthy food

  3. Home parenteral nutrition in children: the Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazyk, J; Lyszkowska, M; Kierkus, J; Bogucki, K; Ratyńska, A; Tondys, B; Socha, J

    1999-02-01

    Home parenteral nutrition has become routine for management of intestinal failure in patients. In Poland the main obstacle to widespread use of home parenteral nutrition is the lack of interest of commercial companies in delivering feedings and ancillaries to patients. Twenty-five home parenteral nutrition patients aged from 4 months to more than 13 years were reviewed. The mother or both parents were trained in home parenteral nutrition techniques for 4 to 6 weeks and compounded the nutrients themselves at home. The mean duration of home parenteral nutrition was 10,117 patient days. Hospital stays of patients receiving parenteral feedings were significantly shorter than the duration of administration of home parenteral nutrition (p rate of catheter occlusion decreased within the observation period, and in 1997 not one case of occlusion was observed. In 1997 only three catheters were removed during 7.8 patient years, and the overall incidence of catheter-related complications was 0.38 per patient year. The overall occurrence of septicemia was one case in 516 days and of catheter infection was one in 459 days. In 1997 a catheter was infected on average of once every 1419 days. There was significant improvement in the z score for weight during therapy. The average monthly cost of nutrients and ancillary items was approximately $1200 (4200 Polish zlotys [PLN]). These costs are 1.6 to 3 times lower than those recorded in other studies. Home parenteral nutrition in children with nutrients mixed by caregivers in the home setting is a safe and appropriate method of treatment that can be used in countries where home parenteral nutrition solutions are not manufactured or where commercial home parenteral nutrition is not economically feasible.

  4. Using Activity Schedules to Increase On-Task Behavior in Children at Risk for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirelli, Christe A.; Sidener, Tina M.; Reeve, Kenneth F.; Reeve, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of activity schedules on on-task and on-schedule behavior were assessed with two boys at risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and referred by their public school teachers as having difficulty during independent work time. On-task behavior increased for both participants after two training sessions. Teachers, peers,…

  5. Infant ERPs Separate Children at Risk of Dyslexia Who Become Good Readers from Those Who Become Poor Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuijen, Titia L.; Plakas, Anna; Maassen, Ben A. M.; Maurits, Natasha M.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexia is heritable and associated with phonological processing deficits that can be reflected in the event-related potentials (ERPs). Here, we recorded ERPs from 2-month-old infants at risk of dyslexia and from a control group to investigate whether their auditory system processes /bAk/ and /dAk/ changes differently. The speech sounds were…

  6. Safety and tolerability of cell culture-derived and egg-derived trivalent influenza vaccines in 3 to children and adolescents at risk of influenza-related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Domingo, Javier; de Martino, Maurizio; Lopez, Jose Garcia-Sicilia; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Villani, Alberto; Moreno-Perez, David; Hernández, María Méndez; Aldeán, Javier Álvarez; Mateen, Ahmed Abdul; Enweonye, Igwebuike; de Rooij, Richard; Chandra, Richa

    2016-08-01

    This descriptive, non-comparative, phase III study evaluated the safety and tolerability of cell culture-derived (TIVc) and egg-derived (TIV) seasonal influenza vaccines in children at risk of influenza-related complications. Four hundred and thirty subjects were randomized 2:1 to TIVc or TIV. Subjects aged 3 to vaccinated, n=89) or two doses (if not previously vaccinated, n=124) of the study vaccines; the 9 to vaccination; safety was monitored for 6 months. After any vaccination, the most frequently reported solicited local adverse event (AE) was tenderness/pain (TIVc 44%, 66%, 53% and TIV 56%, 51%, 65% in the age groups 3 to vaccine-related serious AEs were noted. New onset of chronic disease was reported in ≤1% of subjects. TIVc and TIV had acceptable tolerability and similar safety profiles in at-risk children (NCT01998477). Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Personalized Approach to Nutrition of Children Athletes: Practical Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Makarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition is the most important factor of children’s health, affecting not only his/her state of health, but also physical activity indicators. Children athletes, for compensating the energy cost, anabolic processes activation, and operability recovery, need an optimum diet with adequate protein, fats, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins to cover the development and growth needs, as well as to recover from the physical and neuro-psychological stress. There are also certain requirements to food and drinking regime, especially during periods of intense training and competitions. Recommendations for the composition of diets for children athletes are developed and presented in a number of guidelines; however, studies show that the actual nutrition of almost half of the specialized children and youth Olympic reserve schools’ students does not meet the recommended standards. The article presents an overview of modern approaches to young athletes’ nutrition organization, and gives recommendations for personified diet correction and nutritive support depending on sports specialization, nature of physical activity, stage of training process, and individual features of a child.

  8. Nutritional status of children hospitalized for parapneumonic effusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Huysentruyt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Among children hospitalized for pneumonia, those with parapneumonic effusion (PPE are at particular risk for nutritional deterioration. This study aimed to 1 investigate the evolution of the nutritional status during hospitalization and at outpatient follow-up; 2 determine clinical risk factors for weight loss during hospitalization; 3 describe the nutritional interventions for these children. METHODS: Retrospective chart review (January '07 - September '12 of 56 children with pneumonia, complicated by PPE in two Belgian hospitals for data on body weight and height at admission (t0 and discharge (t1, and two weeks (t2 and one month (t3 after discharge. Length of hospitalization (LoS, length of stay in paediatric intensive care (LoSPICU and maximal in-hospital weight loss (tmax were calculated and nutritional interventions were recorded. RESULTS: The median (range age was 3.5 (1.0-14.8 years. Weight or height was lacking in five (8.9% children at t0 and in 28 (50% at t1; 21.4% was weighed only once during hospitalization. At tmax, respectively 17/44 and 5/44 children lost ≥ 5% and ≥ 10% of their weight. Median (range LoS and LoSPICU were 18.0 (10-41 and 4.0 (0-23 days. One-fourth received a nutritional intervention. Weight for height at admission (WFH(t0 significantly predicted maximal weight loss (β (95% CI = -0.34 (-2.0--0.1; p = 0.03. At t2 and t3, 13/32 and 5/22 of the children with available follow-up data did not reach WFH(t0, whilst in 4/35 and 5/26 body weight remained ≥ 5% under the weight(t0. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of children with pneumonia complicated by PPE and monitored for weight and height, lost ≥ 5% of their body weight during hospitalization. One-fourth did not reach initial WFH one month after discharge. Those with a higher WFH at admission were at higher risk of weight loss. More attention for monitoring of weight loss and the nutritional policy during and after hospitalization is warranted.

  9. FEEDING PATTERN TOWARD THE INCREASING OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN CHILDREN AGED 1–3 YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Subarkah; Nursalam Nursalam; Praba Diyan Rachmawati

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of nutritional status problems with underweight in Indonesia at the moments is (19,6%). Data showed that children with less nutritional status aged 1-3 years in Kalijudan, Surabaya are existed. Provide feeding pattern properly is one effort to improve the nutritional status by fulfilling the needs of the child nutrition. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationship of feeding pattern and nutritional status in children aged 1-3 years in the Kalijudan d...

  10. Optimizing and Validating a Brief Assessment for Identifying Children of Service Members at Risk for Psychological Health Problems Following Parent Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Journal of Family Therapy, 21, 313-323. Behar, L.B. (1997). The Preschool Behavior Questionnaire. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology , 5, 265-275... Psychological Health Problems Following Parent Deployment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Julie Wargo Aikins, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wayne State...Validating a Brief Assessment for Identifying Children of Service Members at Risk for Psychological Health Problems Following Parent Deployment 5b. GRANT

  11. Determinants of Nutritional Status in Children living in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Shafieian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children are one of the most vulnerable groups to sub-optimal nutritional intake in most societies. We have investigated some of the potential determinants of malnutrition in children of 2-5 years of age.   Methods and Materials: A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between nutritional status (weight for age, height for age and weight for height and dietary and socioeconomic factors in 671 children (24-59 months of age from selected health centers in Mashhad city, Iran. Children were assessed for weight and height and the care givers were interviewed and a questionnaire was completed by the interviewers. The data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and the Z-scores were calculated using the WHO anthropometric software package.   Results: The study showed that 24.4% of children were mildly underweight, 4.3% were underweight, 13% were mildly stunted, 23.6% of children were mildly wasted and 3.1% were stunted. Educational attainment, whether the children had been breast feed, average daily consumption of milk, feeding practices and type of first food were found to be the main factors determining nutritional status in our study.   Conclusion: A higher daily consumption of milk, lower age at which first solid food was started; lower age for consumption of meat and good feeding practices may resolve malnutrition in this population. These findings support the need for a family-based prevention program that focus on guiding parents to foster appropriate feeding practices as well as to promote healthy food intake in the children. Future research should determine the cost-effectiveness of both short- and long-term interventions for child malnutrition.  

  12. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  13. Vaccination and nutritional status of children in Karawari, East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiak, Louis; Emeto, Theophilus I

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of health care services to rural and remote populations in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is problematic. This is mainly due to difficulties with transportation and communication. Hence, the children in this region of PNG are likely to be at risk of malnutrition compounded by inadequate vaccination that may predispose them to preventable diseases. This study was conducted to determine the vaccination and nutritional status of children less than 5 years old in the remote and rural Karawari area of PNG. 105 children were included in the study, of whom 55% were male and 45% female. The mean age of children included in the study was 32.6 months. Their age, height, and weight by gender was not significantly different. Overall, 85% of children had incomplete vaccination. However, children above the median age of 32 months (34%) were more likely to be fully vaccinated for their age, χ2 (1) = 23.294, p new facilities within the region, with adequately trained and compensated staff.

  14. The development of android - based children's nutritional status monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanto, Agus; Paramita, Octavianti; Pribadi, Feddy Setio

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of BMI (Body Mass Index) is one of the methods to calculate the nutritional status of a person. The BMI calculation has not yet widely understood and known by the public. In addition, people should know the importance of progress in the development of child nutrition each month. Therefore, an application to determine the nutritional status of children based on Android was developed in this study. This study restricted the calculation for children with the age of 0-60 months. The application can run on a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system due to the rapid development of a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system and many people own and use it. The aim of this study was to produce a android app to calculate of nutritional status of children. This study was Research and Development (R & D), with a design approach using experimental studies. The steps in this study included analyzing the formula of the Body Mass Index (BMI) and developing the initial application with the help of a computer that includes the design and manufacture of display using Eclipse software. This study resulted in android application that can be used to calculate the nutritional status of children with the age 0-60 months. The results of MES or the error calculation analysis using body mass index formula was 0. In addition, the results of MAPE percentage was 0%. It shows that there is no error in the calculation of the application based on the BMI formula. The smaller value of MSE and MAPE leads to higher level of accuracy.

  15. Nutrition Recommendations for Foods Marketed to Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this audio podcast, listen to Michigan State University authors Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, PhD, RD, and Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, PhD, talk about the impact food advertising may have on children’s eating behaviors.

  16. Does school mobility place elementary school children at risk for lower math achievement? The mediating role of cognitive dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H; Raver, C Cybele

    2015-12-01

    Children growing up in poverty have a higher likelihood of exposure to multiple forms of adversity that jeopardize their chances of academic success. The current paper identifies school mobility, or changing schools, as 1 such poverty-related risk. Using a sample of low-income, predominantly ethnic-minority children (n = 381) in Chicago, this study tests the hypothesis that repeatedly changing schools during the 5-year period between Head Start (preschool) and third grade is a potent predictor of children's math achievement in fourth grade and that children's cognitive dysregulation serves as a mechanism through which school mobility may negatively affect children's math achievement. Hierarchical linear models controlling for baseline child and family characteristics (including children's early math and dysregulation measured during Head Start) revealed an inverse relation between the number of times low-income children changed schools between preschool and third grade and children's math achievement on state standardized tests in fourth grade. Furthermore, frequently changing schools (3 or 4 school changes over the same time period) was positively associated with teacher-reported cognitive dysregulation in third grade and negatively associated with children's math achievement in fourth grade. Evidence for the role of children's cognitive dysregulation as a partial statistical mediator was found for the relation between frequently changing schools and math achievement, even after accounting for baseline risk. Results are discussed in terms of school policies, practices, and intervention strategies to prevent the disruptive and potentially stressful experiences of school mobility for young, low-income children. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Maternal BMI as a predictor of methylation of obesity-related genes in saliva samples from preschool-age Hispanic children at-risk for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelsner, Kathryn Tully; Guo, Yan; To, Sophie Bao-Chieu; Non, Amy L; Barkin, Shari L

    2017-01-09

    The study of epigenetic processes and mechanisms present a dynamic approach to assess complex individual variation in obesity susceptibility. However, few studies have examined epigenetic patterns in preschool-age children at-risk for obesity despite the relevance of this developmental stage to trajectories of weight gain. We hypothesized that salivary DNA methylation patterns of key obesogenic genes in Hispanic children would 1) correlate with maternal BMI and 2) allow for identification of pathways associated with children at-risk for obesity. Genome-wide DNA methylation was conducted on 92 saliva samples collected from Hispanic preschool children using the Infinium Illumina HumanMethylation 450 K BeadChip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA), which interrogates >484,000 CpG sites associated with ~24,000 genes. The analysis was limited to 936 genes that have been associated with obesity in a prior GWAS Study. Child DNA methylation at 17 CpG sites was found to be significantly associated with maternal BMI, with increased methylation at 12 CpG sites and decreased methylation at 5 CpG sites. Pathway analysis revealed methylation at these sites related to homocysteine and methionine degradation as well as cysteine biosynthesis and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, eight of the 17 CpG sites reside in genes (FSTL1, SORCS2, NRF1, DLC1, PPARGC1B, CHN2, NXPH1) that have prior known associations with obesity, diabetes, and the insulin pathway. Our study confirms that saliva is a practical human tissue to obtain in community settings and in pediatric populations. These salivary findings indicate potential epigenetic differences in Hispanic preschool children at risk for pediatric obesity. Identifying early biomarkers and understanding pathways that are epigenetically regulated during this critical stage of child development may present an opportunity for prevention or early intervention for addressing childhood obesity. The clinical trial protocol is available at Clinical

  18. Nutrition Recommendations for Foods Marketed to Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-25

    In this audio podcast, listen to Michigan State University authors Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, PhD, RD, and Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, PhD, talk about the impact food advertising may have on children’s eating behaviors.  Created: 9/25/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/25/2013.

  19. Punishment and reward in parental discipline for children aged 5 to 6 years : prevalence and groups at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Meinou H. C.; Vogels, Anton G. C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study we examined the use and predictors of different discipline practices by parents of children aged 5 to 6 years. METHODS: We obtained cross-sectional data for a nationally representative Dutch sample of children aged 5 to 6 years within the setting of routine well-child visits

  20. Strengthening School Readiness for Children at Risk: Evaluating Self-Regulation Measures and an Intervention Using Classroom Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, self-regulation has emerged as a foundational skill for academic success and well-being. Unfortunately, many children enter kindergarten without the self-regulation skills necessary to succeed. Children from high-risk backgrounds (e.g., low-income) are particularly vulnerable for difficulties in self-regulation development. Given…

  1. Prevalence of Autism in Children of Somali Origin Living in Stockholm: Brief Report of an At-Risk Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnevik-Olsson, Martina; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    This work was a follow-up study (birth years 1999-2003) of the prevalence of autism in children of Somali background living in the county of Stockholm, Sweden. In a previous study (birth years 1988-98), the prevalence of autism associated with learning disability was found to be three to four times higher among Somali children compared with other…

  2. Systematic meta-analysis of childhood social withdrawal in schizophrenia, and comparison with data from at-risk children aged 9-14 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Sandra L; Vijayan, Hena; Dickson, Hannah; Shepherd, Alana M; Carr, Vaughan J; Laurens, Kristin R

    2013-08-01

    Social withdrawal is a robust childhood risk factor for later schizophrenia. The aims of this paper were to assess the evidence for childhood social withdrawal among adults with schizophrenia and, comparatively, in children aged 9-14 years who are putatively at-risk of developing schizophrenia. We conducted a meta-analysis, including cohort and case-control studies reporting social withdrawal measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in adults with schizophrenia vs. controls. Further, an experimental study compared CBCL withdrawal scores from typically-developing children with scores from two groups of putatively at-risk children: (i) children displaying a triad of replicated antecedents for schizophrenia, and (ii) children with at least one first- or second-degree relative with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Six studies met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis (N = 3828), which demonstrated a large effect of increased childhood social withdrawal in adults with schizophrenia (standardized mean difference [SMD] score = 1.035, 95% CI = 0.304-1.766, p = 0.006), with no indication of publication bias, but considerable heterogeneity (I(2) = 91%). Results from the experimental study also indicated a large effect of increased social withdrawal in children displaying the antecedent triad (SMD = 0.743, p = 0.001), and a weaker effect in children with a family history of schizophrenia (SMD = 0.442, p = 0.051). Childhood social withdrawal may constitute a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia in the presence of other antecedents and/or genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. At-Risk Screened Children with Celiac Disease are Comparable in Disease Severity and Dietary Adherence to Those Found because of Clinical Suspicion: A Large Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Laura; Kaukinen, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Mäki, Markku; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-04-01

    To assess whether children at risk for celiac disease should be screened systematically by comparing their baseline and follow-up characteristics to patients detected because of clinical suspicion. Five hundred four children with celiac disease were divided into screen-detected (n = 145) and clinically detected cohorts (n = 359). The groups were compared for clinical, serologic, and histologic characteristics and laboratory values. Follow-up data regarding adherence and response to gluten-free diet were compared. Subgroup analyses were made between asymptomatic and symptomatic screen-detected patients. Of screen-detected patients, 51.8% had symptoms at diagnosis, although these were milder than in clinically detected children (P celiac disease had symptoms unrecognized at diagnosis. The severity of histologic damage, antibody levels, dietary adherence, and response to treatment in screen-detected cases is comparable with those detected on a clinical basis. The results support active screening for celiac disease among at-risk children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Follow-up Study on BMI-SDS and Insulin Resistance in Overweight and Obese Children at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soulmaz Fazeli Farsani PharmD, MSc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS, insulin sensitivity, and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in children at risk for T2DM approximately 3 years after being diagnosed with overweight/obesity and insulin resistance (measured by Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance [HOMA-IR]. Methods. Out of 86 invited children, 44 (mean age 15.4 ± 3.6 years participated. Medical history, physical examination, and laboratory workup were performed. Results. While the mean BMI-SDS significantly increased from 2.9 to 3.4, the mean HOMA-IR significantly decreased from 5.5 to 4.6 (baseline vs follow-up visit. Change in HOMA-IR was only due to a decrease in mean fasting plasma insulin (24.1 vs 21.1, P = .073. Conclusions. Although increase in BMI-SDS in these children is worrisome, the American Diabetes Association recommended screening interval of 3 years for children at risk for T2DM is not too long based on the fact that none of our study participants developed T2DM.

  5. Nutrition in children with long-term health conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, A

    2015-01-01

    Long-term health conditions (LTHCs) in children may affect nutrition and growth by means of multiple mechanisms. Both undernutrition and overweight/obesity are risk factors. Direct effects of the condition that may cause undernutrition include increased resting energy expenditure, excess losses through malabsorption, difficulty ingesting food, and decreased appetite. Indirect effects of LTHCs may be mediated by learnt or adaptive behaviours, secondary anorexia, inappropriate diets, or conditi...

  6. Influence of care practices on nutritional status of Ghanaian children

    OpenAIRE

    Nti, Christina Antwiwaa; Lartey, Anna

    2008-01-01

    A community-based longitudinal study was conducted in the Manya Krobo District of the Eastern Region of Ghana with the objective of assessing how caregiving practices influence nutritional status of young children in Ghana. The study subjects were one hundred mothers with infants between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Each child was visited at home monthly for a period of six months. On each visit, information was collected on caregiver household and personal hygiene, child's immunization statu...

  7. Nutritional value of milk drinks for young children

    OpenAIRE

    German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2011-01-01

    Milk drinks for young children, i.e. toddlers, available on the market are referred to as toddler milk or children’s milk. The manufacturers of these products often advertise these to be – in contrast to cow milk – adjusted to serve the specific nutritional needs of young children. These products thus often contain less protein than cow milk, allegedly in order to counteract obesity later in life. Instead they contain more vitamins and minerals, which is then said to be necessary for the adeq...

  8. [Investigation on nutritional intakes for hospitalized children with blood disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zi-Liang; Wu, Yun-Tang; Sun, Zhong; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Rui; Li, Hong-Qiang; Qi, Yu-Mei; Song, Ji-Chang; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the diet and nutritional status of hospitalized children with blood disease in order to provide nutritional guidelines. The patients' daily dietary intakes, including breakfast, lunch, dinner and additional meals, were recorded in detail for seven consecutive days. The intake amount of various nutrients was calculated using the dietary database. The majority of children with blood disease showed inadequate intakes of calories [mean 1825.81 kCal/d, 73.62% of the recommended intake (RNI)] and protein (mean 67.68 g/d, 81.34% of RNI). Intakes of vitamin E and riboflavin were adequate, but intakes of vitamin A, thiamine and vitamin C (66.67%, 77.78% and 69.89% of RNI, respectively) were inadequate. Iron and selenium intakes were adequate, but calcium and zinc intakes (41.11% and 56.21% of RNI, respectively) were grossly inadequate. Hospitalized children with blood disease had decreased dietary intakes of calories, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, calcium and zinc. The dietary pattern and nutritional intake need to be improved.

  9. The family drawings of at-risk children: concurrent relations with contact with incarcerated parents, caregiver behavior, and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaire, Danielle H; Ciccone, Anne; Wilson, Laura C

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined children's attachment representations as assessed with their family drawings in relation to contact with an incarcerated or estranged parent, caregiver behavior, and family stress in a high-risk sample of children (N = 44, M (age) = 8.14), 55% of whom had incarcerated parents. Greater phone, mail, and physical contact with an incarcerated parent was associated with more role reversal in children's family drawings. Additional results show that child-reports of more hostile caregiver behavior were associated with greater overall insecurity in their family drawings; child and caregiver reports of stress were associated with increased global pathology and bizarreness/dissociation in children's family drawings. Given the lack of research on concurrent familial-based correlates of ratings made of children's family drawings, these results provide additional insights into children's representations of attachment relationships in early middle childhood. Further, the results regarding contact with incarcerated parents have implications for researchers and clinicians working with families impacted by parental incarceration.

  10. Don't forget the siblings: School-aged siblings of children presenting to mental health services show at-risk patterns of attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Kasia; Elliott, Bronwen

    2017-04-01

    Family therapists understand that children presenting for treatment are often bearers of symptoms signalling relational problems within the family system. Rather than addressing the children's symptoms in isolation, family therapists typically take those relational problems as their starting point in therapy. This study used the School-aged Assessment of Attachment (SAA) to assess the self-protective (attachment) strategies of the siblings of children presenting for psychiatric evaluation and also of the siblings of control children drawn from the normative population. Siblings of children in the clinical group were much more likely than siblings of control children to use at-risk self-protective strategies and to have markers suggestive of unresolved loss or trauma. School-aged siblings were found to use a broad range of strategies, and the pattern of change from first born to later born involved either a reversal of strategy or a shift to a more complex strategy. The study highlights that siblings of children presenting to mental health services are significantly affected by family relational stress. A family systems approach to assessment, one that enquires about the wellbeing of all family members, will ensure that the emotional needs of siblings are also addressed during the therapy process.

  11. Breast-feeding and the nutritional status of nursing children in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, C; Atalah, E; Riumalló, J; Castro, R

    1996-06-01

    The work reported here sought to describe the feeding patterns of Chilean children up to 18 months old and their relation to nutritional status. To this end, a survey was conducted in 1993 of 9330 Chilean children under 18 months old who were receiving care through the National Health Service System-which provides care for 75% of all children under age 6. The children, whose mothers or caretakers were interviewed, constituted 94% of a sample selected at random from 102 of the 320 urban health clinics located throughout the country. The interview served to identify the type of feeding (exclusive breast-feeding, breast-feeding plus bottle-feeding, breast-feeding plus solid food, exclusive bottle-feeding, or bottle-feeding plus solid food) and to determine the nutritional status of the participants in terms of standards used by the United States National Center for Health Statistics and the World Health Organization. Children were deemed at risk of malnutrition if they had z scores on the weight-for-age distribution between 1.0 and 2.0 standard deviations below the US/WHO standard and as actually malnourished if they had z scores of over 2.0 standard deviations below the standard. The survey found exclusive breast-feeding prevalences of 86.5%, 66.7%, and 25.3% among infants 1, 3, and 6 months old. Some 12.1% of the participants were found to have a weight-for-age deficiency, 30.7% exhibited a height-for-age deficiency, and 35.7% were found to be over-weight. The prevalence of weight-for-age and height-for-age deficiencies were found to be considerably higher among bottle-fed children than among breast-fed children. In general, the results demonstrated the benefits of exclusive breast-feeding through the first 6 months of life, the need to complement exclusive breast-feeding with solid food after that time, and the superior nutritional status of breast-fed children within the age groups studied.

  12. Timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Lissette; Mehta, Nilesh M; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    To review the current literature evaluating clinical outcomes of early and delayed parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children. Nutritional management remains an important aspect of care among the critically ill, with enteral nutrition generally preferred. However, inability to advance enteral feeds to caloric goals and contraindications to enteral nutrition often leads to reliance on parenteral nutrition. The timing of parenteral nutrition initiation is varied among critically ill children, and derives from an assessment of nutritional status, energy requirements, and physiologic differences between adults and children, including higher nutrient needs and lower body reserves. A recent randomized control study among critically ill children suggests improved clinical outcomes with avoiding initiation of parenteral nutrition on day 1 of admission to the pediatric ICU. Although there is no consensus on the optimal timing of parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children, recent literature does not support the immediate initiation of parenteral nutrition on pediatric ICU admission. A common theme in the reviewed literature highlights the importance of accurate assessment of nutritional status and energy expenditure in deciding when to initiate parenteral nutrition. As with all medical interventions, the initiation of parenteral nutrition should be considered in light of the known benefits of judiciously provided nutritional support with the known risks of artificial, parenteral feeding.

  13. Non-Uptake of HIV Testing in Children at Risk in Two Urban and Rural Settings in Zambia: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Merten

    Full Text Available This article investigates reasons why children who were considered at risk of HIV were not taken for HIV testing by their caregivers. Qualitative and quantitative data collected in Zambia from 2010-11 revealed that twelve percent of caregivers who stated that they had been suspecting an HIV infection in a child in their custody had not had the child tested. Fears of negative reactions from the family were the most often stated reason for not testing a child. Experience of pre-existing conflicts between the couple or within the family (aOR 1.35, 95% CI 1.00-1.82 and observed stigmatisation of seropositive children in one's own neighbourhood (aOR 1.69, 95% CI1.20-2.39 showed significant associations for not testing a child perceived at risk of HIV. Although services for HIV testing and treatment of children have been made available through national policies and programmes, some women and children were denied access leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment-not on the side of the health system, but on the household level. Social norms, such as assigning the male household head the power to decide over the use of healthcare services by his wife and children, jeopardize women's bargaining power to claim their rights to healthcare, especially in a conflict-affected relationship. Social norms and customary and statutory regulations that disadvantage women and their children must be addressed at every level-including the community and household-in order to effectively decrease barriers to HIV related care.

  14. Non-Uptake of HIV Testing in Children at Risk in Two Urban and Rural Settings in Zambia: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Sonja; Ntalasha, Harriet; Musheke, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates reasons why children who were considered at risk of HIV were not taken for HIV testing by their caregivers. Qualitative and quantitative data collected in Zambia from 2010-11 revealed that twelve percent of caregivers who stated that they had been suspecting an HIV infection in a child in their custody had not had the child tested. Fears of negative reactions from the family were the most often stated reason for not testing a child. Experience of pre-existing conflicts between the couple or within the family (aOR 1.35, 95% CI 1.00-1.82) and observed stigmatisation of seropositive children in one's own neighbourhood (aOR 1.69, 95% CI1.20-2.39) showed significant associations for not testing a child perceived at risk of HIV. Although services for HIV testing and treatment of children have been made available through national policies and programmes, some women and children were denied access leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment-not on the side of the health system, but on the household level. Social norms, such as assigning the male household head the power to decide over the use of healthcare services by his wife and children, jeopardize women's bargaining power to claim their rights to healthcare, especially in a conflict-affected relationship. Social norms and customary and statutory regulations that disadvantage women and their children must be addressed at every level-including the community and household-in order to effectively decrease barriers to HIV related care.

  15. Short- and long-term effects of parent training for preschool children with or at risk of ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimestad, Marie Louise; Lambek, Rikke; Zacher Christiansen, Helene

    2016-01-01

    -ups of 3 to 12 months. Program type, intervention modality, and child diagnostic status did not moderate the effect. CONCLUSION: PT was partially supported as an efficacious intervention for preschool children with ADHD or ADHD symptoms with moderate ESs on parent-rated outcomes, but no significant results......OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to synthesize the evidence of parent training (PT) as an early intervention for preschool children aged 2.5 to 6 years with ADHD or ADHD symptoms. METHOD: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Sixteen studies including 1,003 children were...... analyzed. Parent-rated outcomes revealed moderate effect sizes (ESs; Hedges' g) of 0.51 for ADHD symptoms, 0.40 for conduct problems, and 0.64 for negative parenting. Based on independent assessment, results were only significant for negative parenting. Parent-rated outcomes were sustained at follow...

  16. Children at risk: A comparison of child pedestrian traffic collisions in Santiago, Chile, and Seoul, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazquez, Carola; Lee, Jae Seung; Zegras, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We examine and compare pedestrian-vehicle collisions and injury outcomes involving school-age children between 5 and 18 years of age in the capital cities of Santiago, Chile, and Seoul, South Korea. We conduct descriptive analysis of the child pedestrian-vehicle collision (P-VC) data (904 collisions for Santiago and 3,505 for Seoul) reported by the police between 2010 and 2011. We also statistically analyze factors associated with child P-VCs, by both incident severity and age group, using 3 regression models: negative binomial, probit, and spatial lag models. Descriptive statistics suggest that child pedestrians in Seoul have a higher risk of being involved in traffic crashes than their counterparts in Santiago. However, in Seoul a greater proportion of children are unharmed as a result of these incidents, whereas more child pedestrians are killed in Santiago. Younger children in Seoul suffer more injuries from P-VCs than in Santiago. The majority of P-VCs in both cities tend to occur in the afternoon and evening, at intersections in Santiago and at midblock locations in Seoul. Our model results suggest that the resident population of children is positively associated with P-VCs in both cities, and school concentrations apparently increase P-VC risk among older children in Santiago. Bus stops are associated with higher P-VCs in Seoul, and subway stations relate to higher P-VCs among older children in Santiago. Zone-level land use mix was negatively related to child P-VCs in Seoul but not in Santiago. Arterial roads are associated with fewer P-VCs, especially for younger children in both cities. A share of collector roads is associated with increased P-VCs in Seoul but fewer P-VCs in Santiago. Hilliness is related to fewer P-VCs in both cities. Differences in these model results for Santiago and Seoul warrant additional analysis, as do the differences in results across model type (negative binomial versus spatial lag models). To reduce child P-VCs, this study

  17. Factors affecting nutritional status of Malaysian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, M Z Anuar; Lim, C T; Low, W Y; Harun, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nutritional status of a randomly selected cohort of school children and the factors affecting it. This random survey was conducted in the state of Selangor, involving 1,405 primary students (aged 9-10 years from 54 national primary schools). Physical examination was carried out on all the students. Information on the students was also obtained from the parents. Blood samples were taken by using the finger pricking technique. Body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of physical growth. The students were mainly from urban areas (82.9%). The mean age was 9.71 years and a higher proportion was females (51%). Malays constituted 83.6%, Indians 11.6% and Chinese 4.2% of the study population. The mean weight and height were 32.30 kg and 135.18 cm respectively. The mean BMI was 17.42 kg/m2, with 1.2% of the students underweight, 76.3% normal BMI, 16.3% overweight and 6.3% were obese. Nutritional status was significantly related to blood pressure, history of breast feeding, eating fast food, taking canned/bottled drinks, income and educational level of parents. Significant differences in nutritional status between sexes and locations (rural/urban) were also found. The prevalence of overweight and obese children was of concern. There is thus an urgent need for the School Health Program to periodically monitor the school children's eating habits and physical growth. Appropriate counselling on nutritional intake and physical activities should be given not only to schoolchildren but also to their teachers and parents or caregivers.

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of a Brief Parent- and Teacher-Rated Screen for Children at Risk of Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Melissa E.; Havighurst, Sophie S.; Holland, Kerry A.; Frankling, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Conduct Problems Risk Screen (CPRS), a seven-item screen derived from DSM-IV-TR criteria that can be completed by parents or teachers. The sample consisted of 4,752 Australian five- to nine-year-old primary school children. The results showed the parent and teacher screens had very good…

  19. Handwriting Development in Grade 2 and Grade 3 Primary School Children with Normal, At Risk, or Dysgraphic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvelde, Anneloes; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    The wide variation in prevalence of dysgraphic handwriting (5-33%) is of clinical importance, because poor handwriting has been identified as one of the most common reasons for referring school-age children to occupational therapy or physiotherapy, and is included as an criterion for the diagnosis of Developmental Coordination Disorder. This study…

  20. Low-Income Parents: How Do Working Conditions Affect Their Opportunity To Help School-Age Children at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, S. Jody; Earle, Alison

    2000-01-01

    Examined the working conditions faced by parents who has at least one child in need of help for educational or behavioral problems using data for 1,878 families from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Mother and Child Survey. Data show that low-income parents often lack the paid leave and flexibility they need to help children with…

  1. Joint Contributions of Peer Acceptance and Peer Academic Reputation to Achievement in Academically At-Risk Children: Mediating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.; Liew, Jeffrey; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2010-01-01

    The longitudinal relationships between two dimensions of peer relationships and subsequent academic adjustment were investigated in a sample of 543 relatively low achieving children (M = 6.57 years at Year 1, 1st grade). Latent variable SEM was used to test a four stage model positing indirect effects of peer acceptance and peer academic…

  2. Caries and dental erosion: are Soroti children and adolescents at risk from increased soft-drink availability in Uganda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jordan; Campbell, Karen

    2016-12-01

    An initial field study to investigate dental caries and dental erosion in children and adolescents in the community of Soroti, Uganda. A stratified two-stage cluster sample of 84 children (ages 8-10) and adolescents (ages 16-19) were recruited. A survey was undertaken to assess the state of determinants of oral health, oral hygiene practices, and soft-drink and sweetened-tea consumption. Intra-oral photographs were taken and reviewed to measure Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) and dental erosion. A significant difference was observed in DMFT between children and adolescents (3.7 ± 2.7 versus 2.1 ± 2.4 p=.02). A trend of lower erosion scores was seen in children compared to adolescents. Greater frequency of sweetened-tea consumption over soft-drinks was noted in both groups. This study did not reveal any relationship between different levels of cariogenic beverage consumption and DMFT or dental erosion in this sample group.

  3. The Effects of a Nutritional Intervention on the Nutritional Knowledge of Children and Adolescents with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste-Williams, Lyndsey; Lieberman, Lauren J.; Banerjee, Priya; Boyle, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a nutritional program on the nutritional knowledge of children and adolescents with visual impairments. The results indicated that there was a significant difference between the scores of the experimental and control groups and that age and vision had no effect on the acquisition of…

  4. Metabolic and Psychological Restricts of Nutrition Correction in Overweight Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Chaychenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The publication provides an overview of materials concerning psychological and metabolic regulators of hunger/satiety and their impact at food behavior in overweight children. In the context of the obesity epidemic in the world, the recommended measures aimed at preventing its spread include increased physical activity and proper organization of child nutrition. At the same time, the effectiveness of these non-drug interventions is extremely low, and psychosocial dysfunction is considered to be its cause. Analysis of the mechanisms of excessive food intake occurrence shows that eating disorders in overweight children have metabolic neuroenteroendocrine basis with direct impact on hunger/satiety center. Constant stimulation of hedonic centers with the formation of physical dependence in children with reduced volitional qualities supported by parental attitude is the basis for an extremely low efficiency of nutrition correction in overweight. In order to improve the efficiency of weight control programs in children, in parallel with endocrinological/pediatric advice, the family-oriented educational programs and social and psychological interventions should be widely implemented.

  5. Effect of nutritional intake towards Angular cheilitis of orphanage children

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    Nurdiani Rakhmayanthie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Angular cheilitis is one of the oral manifestations of iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiency. This manifestation frequently seen in people at first and second decade. The purpose of this study was to obtain the prevalence of angular cheilitis and its classifications related to the nutritional intake level in 6-18 years old children. Methods: This research was a descriptive study with 53 children between 6-18 years old from Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung as the samples. The oral cavity was examined clinically and their food consumption in a week was noted in Food Recall 24 hours and Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ in order to measure their nutritional intake level. Results: There are 23 children with angular cheilitis. 13% has iron and folate deficiencies, and 87% has iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Angular cheilitis types that has been found are Type I (39%, Type II (48% and Type III (13%. Conclusion: The prevalence of angular cheilitis in 6-18 years old children in Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung was moderately high, most of them were having iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Type II angular cheilitis was the most frequently seen.

  6. Update on Early Nutrition and Food Allergy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Eun; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-05-01

    With growing evidence of an increase in the prevalence, food allergy has been emerged as a new public health problem. As treatment and management of food allergy remain challenging, more attention has been paid to the importance of prevention of food allergy. Although the exact mechanism of recent epidemic is not fully understood, it is suggested that nutritional exposure in early life may play an important role in food allergy development. The underlying hypothesis is that nutritional status or food exposure in the critical period of fetal development can affect the programming of immune system and modify the risk of immunologic reactions to foods in postnatal life. We review accumulating epidemiological studies to examine an association between nutritional exposure during pregnancy or early infancy and food allergy development in children. We also discuss recent advances in the studies of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of food allergy and evaluate the role of early nutrition in food allergy development to provide a new perspective on the prevention of food allergy.

  7. Executive functioning in a racially diverse sample of children who are overweight and at risk for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B; O'Brien, Setareh; Lavender, Jason M; Pearson, Carolyn M; Le Grange, Daniel; Hunter, Scott J

    2018-05-01

    Difficulties with executive functioning may underlie both overweight and loss of control (LOC) eating behavior across the age spectrum, but there is a relative paucity of research in children with both conditions. This study aimed to characterize general executive functioning among children with overweight and LOC eating as compared to their overweight and normal-weight peers. Participants were 75 racially diverse children (58.7% female; 81.3% African-American), aged 9-12y (M age = 10.5 ± 1.1), of whom 26 were overweight/obese and endorsed LOC eating (OW-LOC), 34 were overweight controls (OW-CON), and 15 were normal-weight controls (NW-CON). All children completed interview-based measures of eating pathology, and behavioral measures of executive functioning. Parents reported on behavioral facets of children's executive functioning. Groups were compared across parent-report measures and behavioral tasks using analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) and multivariate analyses of covariance (MANCOVAs) which adjusted for general intellectual functioning. Significant group differences were revealed on a behavioral measure of planning, the Tower of London task [F (5,65) = 3.52; p = 0.007], and a behavioral measure of working memory, the List Sorting task [F (2,71) = 6.45; p = 0.003]. Post-hoc tests revealed that OW-LOC and OW-CON performed worse than NW-CON on the Tower of London, with relative decrements in accuracy rather than performance time. Further, OW-LOC performed worse than both OW-CON and NW-CON on the List Sorting task. Overweight with or without concomitant LOC eating in children may characterize a unique pattern of executive dysfunction. Interventions for eating- and weight-related problems in youth should address underlying deficits in planning and working memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Nutrition Interventions in Children in Conflict Zones: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Grace J; Lama, Sonam D; Martinez-Brockman, Josefa L; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    Food and nutrition insecurity becomes increasingly worse in areas affected by armed conflict. Children affected by conflict, or in war-torn settings, face a disproportionate burden of malnutrition and poor health outcomes. As noted by humanitarian response reviews, there is a need for a stronger evidence-based response to humanitarian crises. To achieve this, we systematically searched and evaluated existing nutrition interventions carried out in conflict settings that assessed their impact on children's nutrition status. To evaluate the impact of nutrition interventions on children's nutrition and growth status, we identified published literature through EMBASE, PubMed, and Global Health by using a combination of relevant text words and Medical Subject Heading terms. Studies for this review must have included children (aged ≤18 y), been conducted in conflict or postconflict settings, and assessed a nutrition intervention that measured ≥1 outcome for nutrition status (i.e., stunting, wasting, or underweight). Eleven studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for this review. Five different nutrition interventions were identified and showed modest results in decreasing the prevalence of stunting, wasting, underweight, reduction in severe or moderate acute malnutrition or both, mortality, anemia, and diarrhea. Overall, nutrition interventions in conflict settings were associated with improved children's nutrition or growth status. Emergency nutrition programs should continue to follow recent recommendations to expand coverage and access (beyond refugee camps to rural areas) and ensure that aid and nutrition interventions are distributed equitably in all conflict-affected populations. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Nutritional status of preschool children in informal settlement areas near Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, A; Bester, C; Joubert, G; Badenhorst, P; Slabber, M; Badenhorst, A; Du Toit, E; Barnard, H; Botha, P; Nogabe, L

    2000-09-01

    To determine the nutritional status and household resources of preschool children. A cross-sectional survey. : Two informal settlement areas, Joe Slovo (JS) and JB Mafora (JBM) in Mangaung, near Bloemfontein, South Africa. Preschool children (poor household situation of the participants. The generally poor nutritional status and environmental conditions emphasize the urgency of intervention for these children.

  10. Promoting Expressive Language in Young Children with or At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Preschool Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Justin D; Shepley, Collin; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often demonstrate delays in expressive communication, impacting their ability to independently function in typical environments. Individuals with ASD who develop expressive language during early childhood experience better outcomes later in life; therefore, examination of naturalistic language interventions (NLIs) remain an important area of investigation. The current study used a multiple probe design across participants to examine the effects of a classroom-based NLI on various expressive language targets in three preschool-aged children demonstrating characteristics of ASD. Findings suggest the intervention had positive and maintained effects on trial-based use of language targets, as well as concomitant changes in commenting, requesting, and phrase complexity. Implications regarding implementation of NLIs within typical classroom play activities are discussed.

  11. Clinical prediction model to aid emergency doctors managing febrile children at risk of serious bacterial infections: diagnostic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Ruud G; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Thompson, Matthew; van Veen, Mirjam; van Meurs, Alfred H J; van der Lei, Johan; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Moll, Henriette A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To derive, cross validate, and externally validate a clinical prediction model that assesses the risks of different serious bacterial infections in children with fever at the emergency department. Design Prospective observational diagnostic study. Setting Three paediatric emergency care units: two in the Netherlands and one in the United Kingdom. Participants Children with fever, aged 1 month to 15 years, at three paediatric emergency care units: Rotterdam (n=1750) and the Hague (n=967), the Netherlands, and Coventry (n=487), United Kingdom. A prediction model was constructed using multivariable polytomous logistic regression analysis and included the predefined predictor variables age, duration of fever, tachycardia, temperature, tachypnoea, ill appearance, chest wall retractions, prolonged capillary refill time (>3 seconds), oxygen saturation rule out the presence of other SBIs. Discriminative ability (C statistic) to predict pneumonia was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.73 to 0.88); for other SBIs this was even better: 0.86 (0.79 to 0.92). Risk thresholds of 10% or more were useful to identify children with serious bacterial infections; risk thresholds less than 2.5% were useful to rule out the presence of serious bacterial infections. External validation showed good discrimination for the prediction of pneumonia (0.81, 0.69 to 0.93); discriminative ability for the prediction of other SBIs was lower (0.69, 0.53 to 0.86). Conclusion A validated prediction model, including clinical signs, symptoms, and C reactive protein level, was useful for estimating the likelihood of pneumonia and other SBIs in children with fever, such as septicaemia/meningitis and urinary tract infections. PMID:23550046

  12. Does School Mobility Place Elementary School Children at Risk for Lower Math Achievement? The Mediating Role of Cognitive Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Raver, C. Cybele

    2015-01-01

    Children growing up in poverty have a higher likelihood of exposure to multiple forms of adversity that jeopardize their chances of academic success. The current paper identifies school mobility, or changing schools, as 1 such poverty-related risk. Using a sample of low-income, predominantly ethnic-minority children (n = 381) in Chicago, this study tests the hypothesis that repeatedly changing schools during the 5-year period between Head Start (preschool) and third grade is a potent predictor of children’s math achievement in fourth grade and that children’s cognitive dysregulation serves as a mechanism through which school mobility may negatively affect children’s math achievement. Hierarchical linear models controlling for baseline child and family characteristics (including children’s early math and dysregulation measured during Head Start) revealed an inverse relation between the number of times low-income children changed schools between preschool and third grade and children’s math achievement on state standardized tests in fourth grade. Furthermore, frequently changing schools (3 or 4 school changes over the same time period) was positively associated with teacher-reported cognitive dysregulation in third grade and negatively associated with children’s math achievement in fourth grade. Evidence for the role of children’s cognitive dysregulation as a partial statistical mediator was found for the relation between frequently changing schools and math achievement, even after accounting for baseline risk. Results are discussed in terms of school policies, practices, and intervention strategies to prevent the disruptive and potentially stressful experiences of school mobility for young, low-income children. PMID:26436870

  13. Behavioral inhibition in preschool children at risk is a specific predictor of middle childhood social anxiety: a five-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R; Biederman, Joseph; Henin, Aude; Faraone, Stephen V; Davis, Stephanie; Harrington, Kara; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F

    2007-06-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) to the unfamiliar represents the temperamental tendency to exhibit fearfulness, reticence, or restraint when faced with unfamiliar people or situations. It has been hypothesized to be a risk factor for anxiety disorders. In this prospective longitudinal study, we compared the psychiatric outcomes in middle childhood of children evaluated at preschool age for BI. The baseline sample consisted of 284 children ages 21 months to 6 years, including offspring at risk for anxiety (children of parents with panic disorder and/or major depression) and comparison offspring of parents without mood or major anxiety disorders. They had been assessed for BI using age-specific laboratory protocols. We reassessed 215 of the children (76.5%) at 5-year follow-up at a mean age of 9.6 years using structured diagnostic interviews. BI specifically predicted onset of social anxiety. The rate of lifetime social anxiety (DSM-IV social phobia or DSM-III-R avoidant disorder) was 28% versus 14% (odds ratio [OR] = 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10-5.10) in inhibited versus noninhibited children. BI significantly predicted new onset of social phobia among children unaffected at baseline (22.2% vs 8.0% in inhibited versus noninhibited children (OR = 3.15, 95% CI: 1.16-8.57). No other anxiety disorders were associated with BI. BI appears to be a temperamental antecedent to subsequent social anxiety in middle childhood. Children presenting with BI should be monitored for symptoms of social anxiety and may be good candidates for preventive cognitive behavioral strategies.

  14. Poor nutrition on the menu: children's meals at America's top chain restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batada, Ameena; Bruening, Meg; Marchlewicz, Elizabeth H; Story, Mary; Wootan, Margo G

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the nutritional quality of children's meals at chain restaurants, because children obtain about a third of their daily calories from away-from-home foods and studies show that restaurant foods are often higher in calories and lower in nutritional value than foods prepared at home. We assessed the nutritional quality of children's meals at the 50 largest U.S. restaurant chains by visiting each chain's web site or calling the company. Eighteen of the chains did not have children's meals and 10 did not provide adequate nutrition information to be included in the study. The nutritional quality of each meal combination was evaluated against a set of nutrition standards based on key nutrition recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Of the 22 restaurants that had children's menus and available nutrition information, 99% of 1662 children's meal combinations were of poor nutritional quality. Restaurants should support healthier choices for children by reformulating existing menu items and adding new healthier items, posting calories on menus, and setting nutrition standards for marketing to children.

  15. Nutrition education of school children: a non-formal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udipi, S A; Kamath, R; Shah, N

    1993-01-01

    The health education learning can be promoted through children's games. How basic nutrition knowledge was provided to Indian children aged 7-10 years through nutrition games was described. The project involved teaching educational games to 882 students in 4 different primary schools over 8 months in Bombay: 478 from private fee-paying schools and 404 from non-fee-paying municipal schools. Games covered the 4 basic food groups and a balanced diet. The games were food relay, passing the parcel, throw ball, and food chain. An initial introduction to the importance of nutrition, the major nutrients, and their food sources was provided by a trained nutritionist to 30-35 students at a time. Nutrients of importance were identified as protein, energy, fat, vitamins A and C, and minerals such as calcium and iron. There were 2 games for the basic food groups followed by 2 games for the balanced diet; each game was played for 3 turns. Pretests and posttests were conducted. The Relay Game was played with 4 groups (1 group for each food group) of children standing 15 feet away from foods in plastic bags. At the signal, the first one in line ran to the end, grabbed a food appropriate to his or her food group, and returned to the rear of the line, which released the second runner to repeat the process until all the food was gone. The teacher checked the items collected and corrected mistakes. In Pass the Parcel, children sat in a circle and passed a bag filled with scrape of paper with the names of food items written on them, while music played. When the music was stopped, whoever was holding the bag drew out a food name and had to identify the food item, the basic food group, and the major nutrient in the food and its importance. In Throw Ball, 30-35 children stood in a circle with a person in the center with a ball. At each throw of the ball, the student named a food, and the following 5 students named foods that would complete a balanced diet. Then these 5 children moved out

  16. Caregivers' Attitudes towards HIV Testing and Disclosure of HIV Status to At-Risk Children in Rural Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Lorenz

    Full Text Available Caregivers of HIV-positive children were interviewed in the Mbarara and Isingiro districts of Uganda to identify current trends in practices related to HIV testing and the disclosure of HIV status to the child. A total of 28 caregivers of at least one HIV-positive child participated in semi-structured interviews exploring when and why they tested the child for HIV, when the child was informed of their positive status, and what the caregiver did to prepare themselves and the child for status disclosure. For a majority (96% of respondents, the decision to test the child for HIV was due to existing illness in either the child or a relative. Other common themes identified included the existence of stigma in the caregivers' communities and doubt that the children truly understood what was being explained to them when their status was disclosed. Most (65% children were informed of their HIV status between the ages of 5 and 9, with the mean age of disclosure occurring at the age of 7. General provision of HIV information typically began at the same age as disclosure, and as many as two thirds (64% of the caregivers sought advice from an HIV counsellor prior to disclosure. How a caregiver chose to prepare themselves and the child did not affect the caregiver's perception of whether the disclosure experience was beneficial or not. These findings suggest that the HIV disclosure experience in Mbarara and Isingiro districts differs from current guidelines, especially with respect to age of disclosure, how caregivers prepare themselves and the child, and approaching disclosure as an ongoing process. The doubts expressed by caregivers regarding the child's level of HIV understanding following the disclosure experience suggest the children may be insufficiently prepared at the time of the initial disclosure event. The findings also suggest that examining the content of pre-disclosure counselling and HIV education, and how health care professionals are trained

  17. An active video game intervention does not improve physical activity and sedentary time of children at-risk for developmental coordination disorder: a crossover randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, E K; Campbell, A C; Straker, L M

    2016-03-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are highly inactive and sedentary. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a home-based active video game intervention on objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in children at risk for DCD. In a crossover randomized clinical trial, 21 children (mean age 11.0, SD 1.0; n = 11 girls) in Perth, Western Australia participated in two 16-week periods: no active video games (AVGs) control period and AVGs intervention period. Two active input consoles were provided to participants along with a selection of non-violent AVGs for participants to play at home. Participants wore accelerometers at baseline and following each period to determine minutes of sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous times in addition to self-reported types of activities in a diary. Linear mixed models, adjusted for the order of periods, compared physical activity and sedentary time during the last week of each period. There were no significant differences between the intervention and control periods in time spent in sedentary (decrease of -1.0 min/day during the intervention period, 95%CI -12.1, 10.1), light (increase of 2.2 min/day, 95%CI -8.8, 13.2), moderate (decrease of 0.7 min/day, 95%CI -4.6, 3.3) or vigorous (decrease of -0.6 min/day, 95%CI -1.6, 0.4). Among children at risk for DCD, participating in this AVG intervention did not improve objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Oxytocin and Parent-Child Interaction in the Development of Empathy among Children at Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Nicole M.; Baker, Jason K.; Messinger, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated whether variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and early parent-child interactions predicted later empathic behavior in 84 toddlers at high or low familial risk for ASD. Two well-studied OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs53576 and rs2254298, were examined. Parent-child interaction was measured at 15 and 18 months of age during free play sessions. Empathy was measured at 24 and 30 months using a response to parental distress paradigm. While there was no direct association between parent-child interaction quality or OXTR and empathy, rs53576 moderated the relation between interaction quality and empathy. Results suggest that the interplay between OXTR and early parent-child interactions predicts individual differences in empathy in children at varying risk for atypical social development. Findings are consonant with a differential susceptibility model in which an OXTR variant may increase the social salience of interaction processes for specific allele carriers. These results increase our understanding of predictors of empathy development in young children with a wide range of social outcomes. PMID:26998571

  19. Effects of bottom-up and top-down intervention principles in emergent literacy in children at risk of developmental dyslexia: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Turid; Tjus, Tomas; Hovden, Marit; Ofte, Sonja; Heimann, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study focused on the effects of two different principles of intervention in children at risk of developing dyslexia from 5 to 8 years old. The children were selected on the basis of a background questionnaire given to parents and preschool teachers, with cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging results substantiating group differences in neuropsychological processes associated with phonology, orthography, and phoneme-grapheme correspondence (i.e., alphabetic principle). The two principles of intervention were bottom-up (BU), "from sound to meaning", and top-down (TD), "from meaning to sound." Thus, four subgroups were established: risk/BU, risk/TD, control/BU, and control/TD. Computer-based training took place for 2 months every spring, and cognitive assessments were performed each fall of the project period. Measures of preliteracy skills for reading and spelling were phonological awareness, working memory, verbal learning, and letter knowledge. Literacy skills were assessed by word reading and spelling. At project end the control group scored significantly above age norm, whereas the risk group scored within the norm. In the at-risk group, training based on the BU principle had the strongest effects on phonological awareness and working memory scores, whereas training based on the TD principle had the strongest effects on verbal learning, letter knowledge, and literacy scores. It was concluded that appropriate, specific, data-based intervention starting in preschool can mitigate literacy impairment and that interventions should contain BU training for preliteracy skills and TD training for literacy training.

  20. Navy Bean and Rice Bran Intake Alters the Plasma Metabolome of Children at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal cholesterol in childhood predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD risk in adulthood. Navy beans and rice bran have demonstrated efficacy in regulating blood lipids in adults and children; however, their effects on modulating the child plasma metabolome has not been investigated and warrants investigation. A pilot, randomized-controlled, clinical trial was conducted in 38 children (10 ± 0.8 years old with abnormal cholesterol. Participants consumed a snack for 4 weeks containing either: no navy bean or rice bran (control; 17.5 g/day cooked navy bean powder; 15 g/day heat-stabilized rice bran; or 9 g/day navy beans and 8 g/day rice bran. Plasma metabolites were extracted using 80% methanol for global, non-targeted metabolic profiling via ultra-high performance liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Differences in plasma metabolite levels after 4 weeks of dietary intervention compared to control and baseline were analyzed using analysis of variance and Welch’s t-tests (p ≤ 0.05. Navy bean and/or rice bran consumption influenced 71 plasma compounds compared to control (p ≤ 0.05, with lipids representing 46% of the total plasma metabolome. Significant changes were determined for 18 plasma lipids in the navy bean group and 10 plasma lipids for the rice bran group compared to control, and 48 lipids in the navy bean group and 40 in the rice bran group compared to baseline. These results support the hypothesis that consumption of these foods impact blood lipid metabolism with implications for reducing CVD risk in children. Complementary and distinct lipid pathways were affected by the diet groups, including acylcarnitines and lysolipids (navy bean, sphingolipids (rice bran, and phospholipids (navy bean + rice bran. Navy bean consumption decreased free fatty acids associated with metabolic diseases (palmitate and arachidonate and increased the relative abundance of endogenous anti-inflammatory lipids

  1. Nutrition and mental performance in children - The NUTRIMENTHE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The Nutrition And Mental Performance In Children project of the European Union (NUTRIMENTHE) has added to the evidence that maternal diet influences mental performance in childhood. The biological mechanisms have been shown to be complex and to involve genetic variation, as indicated by the work linking genetic variation in the fatty acid desaturase gene cluster to the processing of fatty acids. The role played by a child's diet also needs to be considered and this question is being addressed through the inclusion of post-natal intervention studies in the NUTRIMENTHE project's research plan. This paper summarises progress. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. "Children at risk": development, implementation, and effectiveness of a school-based violence intervention and prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sharon L; Smith, Donald J

    2009-01-01

    Violence impacts the lives of children on a daily basis. In their communities, they witness drive-by shootings, drug deals, and violence in their schools while many endure abuse, neglect, and violent behavior in their homes. Because the traumatizing impact of such exposure disrupts a child's ability to concentrate and learn, the Dallas Independent School District (ISD) sought content expertise to develop a training vehicle for school district professionals. The program aimed to raise the awareness of educators to problems related to domestic violence and the myriad of circumstances at home and in the community that lead to exposure to violence. Approximately 15,000 faculty and staff of Dallas ISD were educated in the identification, intervention, and prevention of exposure to violence. Referrals and inquiries related to abuse have increased (approximately 70%) while the city of Dallas has witnessed a drop in the number of domestic violence and child abuse offenses.

  3. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a brief school-based group programme for parents of children at risk of ADHD: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayal, K; Taylor, J A; Valentine, A; Guo, B; Sampson, C J; Sellman, E; James, M; Hollis, C; Daley, D

    2016-07-01

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines recommend a stepped care approach for the identification and management of children with, or at risk of, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of a group parenting intervention programme (+/- a teacher session) for children at risk of ADHD. In a three-arm cluster randomised controlled trial, 12 primary schools were randomly assigned to control, parent-only and combined (parent + teacher) intervention arms. Eligible children had high levels of parent-rated hyperactivity/inattention (n = 199). At 6 month follow-up, the primary outcome measure was the parent-completed Conners' Rating Scale - Revised (ADHD index). Secondary outcomes included the Conners' sub-scales (hyperactivity, cognitive problems/inattention and oppositional behaviour), the teacher-completed Conners' Rating Scale - Revised, child health-related quality of life, parental burden and parental mental health. The cost-effectiveness analyses reflected a health and personal social services perspective. ISRCTN87634685. Follow-up data were obtained from 76 parents and 169 teachers. There was no effect of the parent-only (mean difference = -1.1, 95% CI -5.1,2.9; p = 0.57) or combined interventions (mean difference = -2.1, 95% CI -6.4,2.1; p = 0.31) on the ADHD index. The combined intervention was associated with reduced parent-reported hyperactivity symptoms (mean difference = -5.3; 95% CI -10.5,-0.01; p = 0.05) and the parent-only intervention with improved parental mental health (mean difference = -1.9; 95% CI -3.2,-0.5; p = 0.009). The incremental costs of the parent-only and the combined interventions were £73 and £123, respectively. Above a willingness-to-pay of £31 per one-point improvement in the ADHD index, the parent-only programme had the highest probability of cost-effectiveness. Participants found the

  4. Effect of a School-based Nutrition Education Program on the Nutritional Status of Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Keshani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Regarding the high prevalence of unhealthy food habits among Iranian children, we aimed to assess the effect of a school-based nutrition education program on nutritional status of primary school students in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: This randomized educational controlled trial was carried out on 221 primary school age children selected by cluster sampling in the elementary schools of Shiraz-Iran. The intervention consisted of 6 nutrition education sessions carried out through one year for children, using active learning methods. Mothers’ education was carried out in person in both lecture and question-answer sessions also via sending text messages and pamphlets. Weight, height and waist circumference (WC of children were measured before and after the intervention. Also a 168-item food frequency questionnaire was completed. Two separate nutrition knowledge questionnaires were filled up by children and their mothers. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: 171 children (83 in the case and 88 in the control group, aged 9.5-10.5 years, completed the study. Anthropometric and nutritional knowledge of the participants in both the intervention and control groups was significantly increased. Weight, height, WC and nutritional knowledge increased significantly more in the intervention group compared to the controls. Consumption of fruits and vegetables decreased in the intervention group while plain sugar and fast foods intake increased among the controls. There were no significant differences between the changes in the intake of any of the food groups in the two groups. Conclusions: In conclusion, the designed nutrition education program could increase students’ nutritional knowledge, and lead to a non-significant change towards reducing the consumption of unhealthy foods such as fast foods, sweets and salty snacks.

  5. The social paediatrics initiative: a RICHER model of primary health care for at risk children and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Sabrina T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Responsive Interdisciplinary Child-Community Health Education and Research (RICHER initiative is an intersectoral and interdisciplinary community outreach primary health care (PHC model. It is being undertaken in partnership with community based organizations in order to address identified gaps in the continuum of health services delivery for ‘at risk’ children and their families. As part of a larger study, this paper reports on whether the RICHER initiative is associated with increased: 1 access to health care for children and families with multiple forms of disadvantage and 2 patient-reported empowerment. This study provides the first examination of a model of delivering PHC, using a Social Paediatrics approach. Methods This was a mixed-methods study, using quantitative and qualitative approaches; it was undertaken in partnership with the community, both organizations and individual providers. Descriptive statistics, including logistic regression of patient survey data (n=86 and thematic analyses of patient interview data (n=7 were analyzed to examine the association between patient experiences with the RICHER initiative and parent-reported empowerment. Results Respondents found communication with the provider clear, that the provider explained any test results in a way they could understand, and that the provider was compassionate and respectful. Analysis of the survey and in-depth interview data provide evidence that interpersonal communication, particularly the provider’s interpersonal style (e.g., being treated as an equal, was very important. Even after controlling for parents’ education and ethnicity, the provider’s interpersonal style remained positively associated with parent-reported empowerment (p Conclusions This model of PHC delivery is unique in its purposeful and required partnerships between health care providers and community members. This study provides beginning evidence that RICHER can

  6. A Retrospective Study of the Incidence of Missed Opportunities in Identifying, Managing and Referring At-Risk of Overweight and Overweight Children and Adolescents in an Outpatient Primary Care Setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quirke, Amy

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive study of the incidence of missed opportunities in identifying, managing and referring children and adolescents at-risk of overweight and overweight were conducted using a retrospective...

  7. Effect of nutritional support in children with spastic quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Ozlem Bekem; Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret; Dizdarer, Gülsen; Ozgonul, Figen Oksel; Conku, Aliye; Ataman, Hamide; Ozturk, Aysel Aydogan

    2008-11-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cerebral palsy. We evaluated the effect of nutritional support on clinical findings in children with spastic quadriplegia. Feeding history, numbers of lower respiratory tract infections, and gastrointestinal and neurologic findings were evaluated via questionnaire. Weight, height, head circumference, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness were measured. Height for age, weight for age, weight for height, body mass index, and weight and height z-scores were calculated. Clinical findings and anthropometric parameters were re-evaluated after nutritional support for 6 months. Forty-five patients were enrolled. No difference was evident between the first and the last height z-scores of 31 patients who completed the follow-up. Weight, height, weight z-scores, weight for age, weight for height, body mass index, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness exhibited improvement. Moreover, a significant decrease in number of infections was evident. Frequency of seizures and Gross Motor Function Classification System status did not change. Constipation decreased significantly. Nutritional therapy revealed improvements in some anthropometric findings and a decrease in number of infections. Although there was no difference regarding motor development or seizure frequency, further studies with a longer follow-up are required.

  8. NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN BLIND CHILDREN: ISFAHAN ABABASIR BOARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M RAJAI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inadequate dietary intake causes malnutrition associated with poor physical and mental development, specially in children. This study evaluated the nutritional status in blind children in Ababasir Boarding Center (a boarding school in Isfahan city. Methods: A 72 hours food regimen survey was measured in 50 subjects (boys and girls by weighting method. The anthropometric data was collected to compare with NCHS normal data. Results: Energy intake was less than 75 percent RDA in all the subjects and the amounts of animal protein intake was also little. Chronic malnutrition was more prevalent. Discussion: Althought the energy intake was lower than RDA, but it did not cause under weight among them probably because of reduced physical activity due to their disability and inadequate high quality protein and other nutrients probably could be the major cause in chronic malnutrition.

  9. Hemodialysis and nutritional status in children: malnutrition and cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Michel; Dheu, Céline; Seuge, Laure; Orfanos, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common state in chronic hemodialyzed children. More than malnutrition, which infers that dietary supplementation would be curative, cachexia, which implies loss of protein stores, are combined factors of impaired linear growth and reduced muscle mass in uremic patients. Adequate diet to prevent malnutrition is of major importance. But to avoid cachexia in children on chronic hemodialysis, the management of acidosis, inflammation, abnormal metabolic rate, and endocrine disturbances should not, be forgotten. Daily hemodialysis regimen using convective flow therapy and ultrapure dialysate, i.e., on line hemodiafiltration together with growth hormone therapy, appears as a hopeful strategy for the chronic dialyzed child to achieve catch-up growth, a parameter of optimal nutrition.

  10. Redox, iron, and nutritional status of children during swimming training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Kalitsis, Konstantinos; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Tsalis, George; Kouretas, Dimitris; Loupos, Dimitris; Mougios, Vassilis

    2009-11-01

    Effects of exercise training on important determinants of children's long-term health, such as redox and iron status, have not been adequately investigated. The aim of the present study was to examine changes in markers of the redox, iron and nutritional status of boy and girl swimmers during a prolonged period of training. 11 boys and 13 girls, aged 10-11 years, were members of a swimming club. They were assessed at the beginning of the training season, at 13 weeks and at 23 weeks through blood sampling and recording of the diet. Reduced glutathione increased at 13 and 23 weeks, whereas oxidised glutathione decreased at 13 weeks, resulting in an increase of the reduced/oxidised glutathione ratio at 13 and 23 weeks. Total antioxidant capacity, catalase, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation and ferritin did not change significantly. Carbohydrate intake was below 50% of energy and fat intake was above 40% of energy. Intakes of saturated fatty acids and cholesterol were excessive. Iron intake was adequate but intakes of folate, vitamin E, calcium and magnesium did not meet the recommended daily allowances. No significant differences were found between sexes in any of the parameters measured. In conclusion, child swimmers improved the redox status of glutathione during training, although the intake of antioxidant nutrients did not change. The iron status was not impaired by training. Suboptimal intake of several nutrients suggests the need for nutritional monitoring and education of children athletes.

  11. Optimization of nutritional correction treatment for neurological disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Tekebaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study project at the Infant Neurology Department, which has shown the urgency of nutritional rehabilitation in children aged 3 months to 5 years with infantile cerebral paralysis. Thirty patients were followed up to study the causes of malnutrition, to assess and correct their nutritional status, and to show the efficiency of the measures implemented. A diet corrected by a nutritionist was combined with nonsurgical interventions, such as positioning, a decision on the transition to nasogastric tube feeding, and maternal work. The complementary foods were FrutoNyanya products as the latter are low-immunogenic, cause no allergic reactions, and may be used both in the feeding of high-risk group children and as ingredients of a therapeutic diet for patients with different diseases. This resulted in 305-g weight gain within 7-10 day of hospital stay in those whose underweight averaged 28%. The emotional status of the patients and their caregivers was improved by 2-3 scores on 5-point rating scale. There were improvements in their emotional tone (in 75%, chewing (in 28%, and swallowing (in 35% and reductions in reflux episodes (in 19% and stress in the caregivers (in 86%.

  12. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutrition guidance for healthy children ages 2 to 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Beth N; Hayes, Dayle

    2014-08-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that children ages 2 to 11 years should achieve optimal physical and cognitive development, maintain healthy weights, enjoy food, and reduce the risk of chronic disease through appropriate eating habits and participation in regular physical activity. Rapid increases in the prevalence of childhood obesity during the 1980s and 1990s focused attention on young children's overconsumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and beverages and lack of physical activity. While recent data suggest a stabilization of obesity rates, several public health concerns remain. These include the most effective ways to promote healthy weights, the number of children living in food insecurity, the under-consumption of key nutrients, and the early development of diet-related risks for chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, obesity, and osteoporosis. This Position Paper reviews what children 2 to 11 years old in the United States are reportedly eating, explores trends in food and nutrient intakes, and examines the impact of federal nutrition programs on child nutrition. Current dietary recommendations and guidelines for physical activity are also discussed. The roles of parents and caregivers in influencing the development of life-long healthy eating behaviors are highlighted. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics works with other allied health and food industry professionals to translate dietary recommendations and guidelines into positive, practical health messages. Specific recommendations and sources of science-based nutrition messages to improve the nutritional well-being of children are provided for food and nutrition practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections at the emergency department: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Evelien de Vos-Kerkhof

    Full Text Available To assess the impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI attending the emergency department (ED.Randomized controlled trial with 439 febrile children, aged 1 month-16 years, attending the pediatric ED of a Dutch university hospital during 2010-2012. Febrile children were randomly assigned to the intervention (clinical decision model; n = 219 or the control group (usual care; n = 220. The clinical decision model included clinical symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein and provided high/low-risks for "pneumonia" and "other SBI". Nurses were guided by the intervention to initiate additional tests for high-risk children. The clinical decision model was evaluated by 1 area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC to indicate discriminative ability and 2 feasibility, to measure nurses' compliance to model recommendations. Primary patient outcome was defined as correct SBI diagnoses. Secondary process outcomes were defined as length of stay; diagnostic tests; antibiotic treatment; hospital admission; revisits and medical costs.The decision model had good discriminative ability for both pneumonia (n = 33; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.75-0.90 and other SBI (n = 22; AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.90. Compliance to model recommendations was high (86%. No differences in correct SBI determination were observed. Application of the clinical decision model resulted in less full-blood-counts (14% vs. 22%, p-value < 0.05 and more urine-dipstick testing (71% vs. 61%, p-value < 0.05.In contrast to our expectations no substantial impact on patient outcome was perceived. The clinical decision model preserved, however, good discriminatory ability to detect SBI, achieved good compliance among nurses and resulted in a more standardized diagnostic approach towards febrile children, with less full blood-counts and more rightfully urine-dipstick testing.Nederlands Trial Register NTR2381.

  14. The Classroom Chefs: A Children's Picture Cookbook for Nutrition Education. Teachers Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Margaret; And Others

    This teacher's manual presents lesson plans and recipes designed for use with preschool children, discusses the need for early nutrition education, and offers suggestions for conducting cooking activities in the classroom. Specific ideas are provided to involve handicapped children in cooking experiences. Nutrition education in the preschool is…

  15. Growth and nutritional status of children with homozygous sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Saqladi, A.-W. M.; Cipolotti, R.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Brabin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Poor growth and under-nutrition are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). This review summarises evidence of nutritional status in children with SCD in relation to anthropometric status, disease severity, body composition, energy metabolism, micronutrient deficiency and

  16. A Review on the Importance of Nursing Approaches in Nutrition of Children with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ş. Çiftcioğlu; E. Efe

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, cancer has been at the top of diseases that cause death in children. Adequate and balanced nutrition plays an important role in the treatment of cancer. Cancer and cancer treatment is affecting food intake, absorption and metabolism, causing nutritional disorders. Appropriate nutrition is very important for the cancerous child to feel well before, during and after the treatment. There are various difficulties in feeding children with cancer. These are the cancer-related facto...

  17. Principles of Proper Nutrition in Children with Celiac Disease

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    H Khajavikia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a hereditary disorder of the immune system which damages the mucosa of the small intestine caused by gluten consumption(even very small amounts. Villous atrophy, leads to malabsorption, which is due to decreased absorption levels. The first bowel symptoms are seen during the first 2 years of life. Currently, the only treatment is to compliance with a gluten-free diet lifelong. The purpose of this study was to introduce the principles of proper nutrition in children with CD to prevent complications of malabsorption.   Results: The patients do not tolerate the proteins of cereals in bread such as wheat, barley, black barley and rye. Substituting wheat flour with rice flour, corn and potatoes and using olive oil, sunflower, corn oil and peanut oil for cooking is recommended. Until the disappearance of symptoms, consumption of milk, fat and high-fiber foods should be avoided. Deficiency of folic acid, iron, vitamin B12 and calcium are common. If necessary, iron, folic acid and multivitamin can be used. These children need proper energy according to their personal needs and should have a diet high in protein. Consumption of potatoes, corn, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy and nuts (non- roasted in any form is allowed. Identifying foods which contain gluten (prepared sauces, sausages, salami, herbal supplements, all canned meat products, crushed barbecue, prepared soups, espresso and coffee , white vinegar, curd, dried milk, pasta, pastries prepared by wheat flour, compote and food supplements is recommended.   Conclusions: The identification of substances containing gluten by parents and children, and removal of harmful substances from the diet causes the intestines to quickly begin to rebuild itself. Keywords: Nutrition, Child, Celiac, Diet.

  18. Acceptability and Potential Efficacy of Single-Sex After-School Activity Programs for Overweight and At-Risk Children: The Wollongong SPORT RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel A; Kelly, Jacque; Cliff, Dylan P; Batterham, Marijka; Okely, Anthony D

    2015-11-01

    Single sex after-school physical activity programs show potential to prevent unhealthy weight gain. The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability and potential efficacy of single-sex after-school physical activity programs for overweight and at-risk children from low-income communities. 7-month, 2-arm parallel-group, RCT, conducted at an elementary school in a disadvantaged area in Wollongong, Australia (March-November 2010). 20 boys and 17 girls were randomized to intervention (PA) or active comparison groups (HL). Primary outcomes included implementation, acceptability, percentage body fat and BMI z-score. The PA programs were acceptable with high implementation and enjoyment rates. At 7 months postintervention girls in the PA group displayed greater changes in percentage body fat (adjust diff. = -1.70, [95% CI -3.25, -0.14]; d = -0.83) and BMI z-score (-0.19 [-0.36, -0.03]; d= -1.00). At 7 months boys in the PA group showed greater changes in waist circumference (-3.87 cm [-7.80, 0.15]; d= -0.90) and waist circumference z-score (-0.33 [-0.64, -0.03]; d= -0.98). For both boys' and girls' PA groups, changes in adiposity were not maintained at 12-month follow-up. Single-sex after-school physical activity programs are acceptable and potentially efficacious in preventing unhealthy weight gain among overweight and at-risk children. However improvements are hard to sustain once programs finish operating.

  19. Oocyte cryopreservation for fertility preservation in postpubertal female children at risk for premature ovarian failure due to accelerated follicle loss in Turner syndrome or cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, K; Bedoschi, G

    2014-12-01

    To preliminarily study the feasibility of oocyte cryopreservation in postpubertal girls aged between 13 and 15 years who were at risk for premature ovarian failure due to the accelerated follicle loss associated with Turner syndrome or cancer treatments. Retrospective cohort and review of literature. Academic fertility preservation unit. Three girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome, 1 girl diagnosed with germ-cell tumor. and 1 girl diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukemia. Assessment of ovarian reserve, ovarian stimulation, oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation, and mature oocyte cryopreservation. Response to ovarian stimulation, number of mature oocytes cryopreserved and complications, if any. Mean anti-müllerian hormone, baseline follical stimulating hormone, estradiol, and antral follicle counts were 1.30 ± 0.39, 6.08 ± 2.63, 41.39 ± 24.68, 8.0 ± 3.2; respectively. In Turner girls the ovarian reserve assessment indicated already diminished ovarian reserve. Ovarian stimulation and oocyte cryopreservation was successfully performed in all female children referred for fertility preservation. A range of 4-11 mature oocytes (mean 8.1 ± 3.4) was cryopreserved without any complications. All girls tolerated the procedure well. Oocyte cryopreservation is a feasible technique in selected female children at risk for premature ovarian failure. Further studies would be beneficial to test the success of oocyte cryopreservation in young girls. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Models of safe nutrition of children and adolescents as a basis for prevention of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weker, Halina; Barańska, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present up-to-date nutrition models for children and adolescents in Poland on the basis of current research on obesity prevention. Up-to-date results of research on the link between nutritional factor and the nutritional status of children and adolescents, nutritional standards and recommendations of expert teams on healthy diet were analysed, based on the review of literature (Medline database) from the years 2005-2010. The main components of the model of safe nutrition for children and adolescents, which according to the current views should be combined with obesity prevention, include the frequency of meals, selection of products in a daily diet and observance of norms concerning energy and nutritional value of the diets. Other factors include family and environmental determinants, including dietary habits and behaviour, knowledge about nutrition and physical activity. The models of safe nutrition for children and adolescents in Poland are compliant with the current nutritional recommendations of the WHO and EU standards. The developed models of safe nutrition for children and adolescents must not only be popularised but also their efficiency needs to be increased by adjusting them to various groups of recipients.

  1. Education in a homeless shelter to improve the nutrition of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousey, Yvonne; Leake, Jacquelyn; Wdowik, Melissa; Janken, Janice K

    2007-01-01

    To improve the nutritional status of homeless children by implementing an educational program for their mothers and the cafeteria staff at a homeless shelter. Program evaluation including before and after measures of mothers' nutritional knowledge and nutritional quality of foods served in the cafeteria. Fifty-six mothers with children aged 18 months to 6 years and 3 cafeteria staff. Four nutrition classes developed by a registered nutritionist were taught to mothers by clinic nurses; 3 nutrition classes were taught to the cafeteria staff by the nutritionist. Mothers scored higher on posttests than on pretests, indicating improved nutritional knowledge. Minimal differences in the nutritional quality of foods served to residents were observed after staff education. This project demonstrates the challenges of altering the nutritional status of children in a homeless shelter. Despite mothers showing better knowledge of nutritional requirements for children, the types of food served in the cafeteria were an obstacle to them in practicing what they had learned. The cafeteria staff's ability to demonstrate their learning was impeded by the constraints of food donations. Educational strategies may need to be augmented by policies to improve the nutritional status of children in homeless shelters.

  2. Nutrition Status Of Children (1-6 Years In Slums Of Ghaziabad City

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    Garg S.K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the nutritional problems of pre- school children in slums? Objectives: (i To assess the nutritional status of the children . (ii To find out the nutritional deficiency disorders in them (iii To study their dietary intake. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting : Slums of Ghaziabad city. Participants :771 children (1-6 years. Study Variables : Age, sex, caste, ICDS beneficiary status, weight, nutritional deficiency disorders, dietary intake and supplementary nutrition. Statistical analysis : Simple proportions and Chi- square test. Results : A majority (58.2 % of children were having under nutrition of varying grades irrespective of their sex and caste but influenced by their age and ICDS beneficiary status. Anaemia, xerophthalmia and goitre were present in 14.7%, 1.6% and 0.6 % children respectively. Average daily dietary intake of energy & nutrients were lower than the recommended daily allowances (RDA. Conclusion: Regular nutritional supplementation along with adequate nutrition education would reduce the nutritional deficiency disorders among children.

  3. Teaching young children a theory of nutrition: conceptual change and the potential for increased vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripshover, Sarah J; Markman, Ellen M

    2013-08-01

    In two experiments, we used a novel approach to educating young children about nutrition. Instead of teaching simple facts, we provided a rich conceptual framework that helped children understand the need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Using the insight that children's knowledge can be organized into coherent belief systems, or intuitive theories, we (a) analyzed the incipient knowledge that guides young children's reasoning about the food-body relationship, (b) identified the prerequisites that children need to conceptualize food as a source of nutrition, and (c) devised a strategy for teaching young children a coherent theory of food as a source of diverse nutrients. In these two experiments, we showed that children can learn and generalize this conceptual framework. Moreover, this learning led children to eat more vegetables at snack time. Our findings demonstrate that young children can benefit from an intervention that capitalizes on their developing intuitive theories about nutrition.

  4. PERSPECTIVES OF PRODUCTS FOR FUNCTIONAL NUTRITION IN CHILDREN

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    I.N. Zakharova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal microflora of gastrointestinal tract provides colonization resistance of intestine, takes part in digestion, synthesis of vitamins and systemic stimulation of immune reactions. Prophylaxis of intestinal microbiocenosis disorders, their timely diagnostics and proper correction are significant for normalization of gastrointestinal function, formation of immune system and harmonious development of a child. There are several approaches to the regulation of intestinal micro biocenosis; the perspective one is diet with functional food containing prebiotic microorganisms. The article analyses data on physiological role of intestinal biocenosis, presents main standards of prebiotic strains. Modern studies show high clinical efficacy of Lactobacillus GG strain. This probiotic can be recommended in production of functional food for infants’ nutrition.Key words: children, intestinal micro flora, probiotics, Lactobacillus GG.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2: 150–154

  5. FAMILY’S ECONOMIC LEVEL AND CULTURE CORRELATE WITH NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS

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    Abdul Muhith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is an important thing for human life. Variety in family’s economic level and culture have effect on family’s eating habit. Family with higher economic status have big opportunity to met under fi ve year’s nutrition. Cultural diversity on each family has an impact on the difference of raw food selection, processing methods, and presentation of food. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between family’s economic level and culture with nutritional status of children under fi ve year. Method: Research design was observational analytic with cross sectional approach. The population were mother and their children under fi ve years at Desa Jatigono Kunir, Kabupaten Lumajang. Sampel were 184 respondents, taken by using cluster sampling. Independent variables were family’s economic level and culture. Dependent variable was nutritional status of children under fi ve years. Data were collected by using questionnaire and observational sheet. Then, data were analyzed by using Spearman Rho Test with α<0.05. Result: The results showed that 140 (76.1% respondents have low economic level, 105 (57.1% respondents have negative culture in children’s nutrition, and 89 (48% respondents have good nutritional status. The result of Spearman-rho test showed that family’s economic level (p=0.000 and culture (0.019 have correlated with nutritional status of children under five years. Discussion: It can be concluded that family’s economic level and culture have correlated with nutritional status of children under fi ve years. Nurses should develop health education and counseling to improve family’s knowledge about nutrition, so children will have good nutritional status. Keywords: economic level, family’s culture, nutritional status, children under five years

  6. Prevention of recurrent rhinopharyngitis in at-risk children in France: a cost-effectiveness model for a nonspecific immunostimulating bacterial extract (OM-85 BV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessey, Jean-Jacques; Mégas, Françoise; Arnould, Benoît; Baron-Papillon, Florence

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the pharmacoeconomic impact for the French Social Security System of preventing recurrent acute rhinopharyngitis (RARP) in at-risk children with OM-85 BV, an immunostimulating agent indicated for the prevention of recurrences. A decision-analysis model. The probability of progression of the infection and of its associated care, the principal direct costs linked to them, and the effectiveness of OM-85 BV were established or calculated by reviewing the available literature (published between 1984 and 2000). Four experts validated the parameters and the model. For the French Social Security System, the mean direct cost for an acute rhinopharyngitis (ARP) infection was 49.39 Euro(2000 values). By using OM-85 BV prevention, 1.52 infections were prevented in 6 months saving 67.83 Euro on the costs of care for the recurrently infected child. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the model and indicated a saving of between 6.28 Euro and 303.64 Euro in direct costs for each individual treated preventively. Threshold analyses showed that OM-85 BV prophylaxis is economically profitable if more than 0.15 infections are prevented and if direct costs of care of an ARP are greater than 4.78 Euro. Non-specific immunotherapy should be considered for the child at risk of RARP and administered in addition to other recommended measures. The economic savings for the community of using a medication for which the clinical effectiveness has been demonstrated should also be taken into account in assessing its usefulness.

  7. Fundamental motor skills, nutritional status, perceived competence, and school performance of Brazilian children in social vulnerability: Gender comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Glauber Carvalho; Valentini, Nadia Cristina; Nobre, Francisco Salviano Sales

    2018-06-01

    Being at risk or in social vulnerability situations can affect important aspects of child development. The aim of this study was to investigate fundamental motor skills (locomotor and object control) and school (writing, arithmetic, reading) performances, the perceived competence and the nutritional status of girls and boys living in social vulnerability in the poorest regions of Brazil. Two hundred eleven (211) children (87 girls, 41%), 7-10-year-old (M = 8.3, SD = 0.9), from public schools in Ceará (Brazil), living in social vulnerability, participated in the study. Children were assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development - 2, the Body Mass Index (BMI), the Self-Perception Profile for Children, and the School Performance Test. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), adjusted for age, did not show any significant effect for locomotion. There was an effect of gender on the object control. Boys showed higher scores in striking, kicking, throwing, and rolling a ball. Quade's nonparametric analysis showed no difference in BMI between the genders. Most children presented healthy weight. The MANCOVA showed no effect of gender on children's scores on perceived competence on the subscales; moderate scores were found for most children. There were no gender effects on school performance; both boys and girls demonstrated inferior performance. Boys and girls in social vulnerability showed inferior performance in most motor skills, moderate perceived competence and inferior school performance. These results reveal that the appropriate development of these children is at risk and that intervention strategies should be implemented to compensate the difficulties presented. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Evaluation of nutritional status of school-age children after implementation of "Nutrition Improvement Program" in rural area in Hunan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhu-Juan; Mao, Guang-Xu; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Li; Chen, Yan

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the nutritional status of school-age children in rural area in Hunan, China from 2012 to 2015 and to evaluate the effectiveness of the "Nutrition Improvement Program for Compulsory Education Students in Rural Area" (hereinafter referred to as "Nutrition Improvement Program"). The nutritional status of school-age children aged 6-14 years was evaluated after the implementation of the "Nutrition Improvement Program" and the changing trend of the children's nutritional status was analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed on the monitoring data of the school-age children aged 6-14 years in rural area in Hunan, China from 2012 to 2015, which came from "The Nutrition and Health Status Monitoring and Evaluation System of Nutrition Improvement Program for Compulsory Education Students in Rural Area". In 2015, female students aged 6-7 years in rural area in Hunan, China had a significantly greater body length than the rural average in China (PNutrition Improvement Program", the prevalence rate of growth retardation decreased (PNutrition Improvement Program" has achieved some success, but the nutritional status of school-age children has not improved significantly. Overweight/obesity and malnutrition are still present. Therefore, to promote the nutritional status of school-age children it is recommended to improve the measures for the "Nutrition Improvement Program".

  9. Nutritional status of children on the National School Nutrition Programme in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Malongane

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. School feeding programmes are intended to alleviate short-term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, andprovide incomes to families.Objectives. To assess the nutritional status of children receiving meals provided by the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP inCapricorn Municipality, Limpopo Province, South Africa.Methods. The setting was 18 randomly selected schools on the NSNP in Capricorn District. The total sample comprised 602 randomlyselected schoolchildren from grades 4 to 7, aged 10 (26.6%, 11 (35.4% and 12 (35.4%. Socioeconomic characteristics, anthropometricmeasurements, dietary patterns and school attendance were determined. Children were interviewed to assess their nutritional status using avalidated questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations (SDs and ranges were used for socioeconomic parametersand dietary patterns, and z-scores for anthropometric data.Results. The results showed that boys (9.5% and girls (7.8% were underweight. The prevalence of stunting in the sample was 11.3% forboys and 7.4% for girls, whereas boys (3.6% and girls (4.2%were wasted, with az-score of –2 SD. School attendance was good.Conclusion. The nutritional status of most subjects in the study was within the acceptable range as indicated by the assessment of growthusing anthropometric measurements.

  10. Improving nutritional status of children with cystic fibrosis at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spuy, Dorothy A; Cader, Shihaam; van der Spuy, Gian D; Westwood, Anthony T

    2011-05-01

    To determine the nutritional status of children attending a cystic fibrosis clinic in a tertiary hospital in South Africa and compare it to previously reported 10-year rates. Weights and heights were measured of 69 (37 male and 32 female) children aged between 1 year and 18 years. Expected weight-for-age, expected height-for-age, expected weight-for-height and body mass index (BMI) were compared with international standards for underweight, stunting, wasting and BMI goal. The nutritional status of the patients has improved over the last 10 years, most significantly for wasting, which decreased from 58.3% in 1996 to 15.9% in 2006 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.315-14.09, P nutritional status, although deficits remain. The normalisation of mean weight-for-age and weight-for-height with far fewer wasted patients is encouraging. Interventions are needed in some areas to ensure that all children show progress. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Half-elemental Nutrition Mixtures for Enteral Nutrition of Children in Critical Conditions: Features of Usage and Economic Efficiency

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    L. N. Berestennikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteral (tube nutrition has demonstrated its superiority in comparison with parenteral nutrition for patients with a preserved function of gastrointestinal tract who are in intensive care units, or ICU, and who cannot eat or are not allowed to eat by medical indications. International guidelines recommend enteral injections of mixtures for patients in critical conditions in need of nutritial support. The first twenty-four hour is considered the optimal period for starting nutritional support. It is known that costs of the enteral nutrition are much lower than costs of intravascular supply for patients who are in the ICU. The usage of special-purpose dietary products — half-elemental mixtures with high energy density — is the most physiological for children in ICU from 1 year and for adults in critical conditions.

  12. [Nutritional status of children in the North Backa Region based on the body mass index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, M

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring nutritional status of children at a population level represents an important index of the nutritional quality and quantity in a certain period of time. The aim of this paper was to determine the body mass index (BMI kg/m2) and evaluate the nutritional status of children in the North Backa Region (Subotica, Backa Topola and Mali Idos). A transversal anthropometric study examining body weight and height during a mass screening of children in Health centers in the North Backa Region, 25.790 children aged 1-18 have been examined in the period 1995-1998. Evidence and statistical evaluation of data have been processed using the software "CHILD" determining the percentile values of BMI and nutritional status according to reference values of the First National Healts and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1). Analyzing the nutritional status of children aged 6-18 in the North Backa Region we found 4.39% boys and 5.41 girls with BMI nutritional status (BMI P15-85) was found in 67.13% boys and 67.25% girls. 12.77% of boys and 11.78% of girls were overweight (BMI P85-95) and obesity (BMI > P95) was registered in 8.46% boys and 8.60% girls. Using the same software and based on results for the whole group of children aged 1-18, reference values were calculated for BMI as a regional reference data which can be used in everyday public health setting. This research is the first examination of the nutritional status of children at a population level in the North Backa Region in regard to BMI. This model of nutritional status monitoring in children using the above mentioned software will be used at a national level. These results show an inadequate nutritional status of children in the North Backa Region which can be associated with unbalanced nutrition and life style. Therefore, permanent monitoring of the nutritional status in children has been established in order to take adequate preventive measures to realize nutrition of children and adolescents.

  13. FEEDING PATTERN TOWARD THE INCREASING OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN CHILDREN AGED 1–3 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Subarkah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of nutritional status problems with underweight in Indonesia at the moments is (19,6%. Data showed that children with less nutritional status aged 1-3 years in Kalijudan, Surabaya are existed. Provide feeding pattern properly is one effort to improve the nutritional status by fulfilling the needs of the child nutrition. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationship of feeding pattern and nutritional status in children aged 1-3 years in the Kalijudan district, Surabaya. Methods: The research design used was cross-sectional study with dietary habit as the independent variable and nutritional status as dependent variable. The sample was taken from 154 mothers and children. Consecutive sampling was deployed. Data collection by questionnaires, and then data analysis using the Spearman’s Rho in level  of significance α≤0.05. Result and Analysis: There was strong relationship between feeding pattern and nutritional status (r=0.640. The result showed that inappropriate feeding patterns with nutritional status is very thin (44.4% a proper feeding patterns with normal nutritional status (89.7%.  Discussion and Conclussion: The efforts to improve nutritional status of children aged 1-3 years related to feeding patterns should be improved in order to achieve a normal nutritional status. Further research may explore on the feeding patterns based on dietary allowances. Keywords: feeding pattern, nutritional status, 1-3 years old children

  14. [Influence of sociohygienic factors on the shaping of the nutritional status in children and teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, E S; Kuzmichev, Yu G; Olushina, E A; Polyashova, A S; Kotova, N V; Badeeva, T V; Ashina, M V; Maksimenko, E O; Kiseleva, A S; Pisareva, A N; Kovalchuk, S N; Shaposhnikova, M V

    There was revealed the structure of deteriorations in the nutritional status of schoolchildren in the city: the most of students has normal nutritional status, but there was noted the high prevalence of excessive body weight and obesity among children and teenagers. Risk factors for development of deteriorations of the nutrition state were detected as follows: irrational food regimen, qualitative compartment offood, factors of educational environment, lifestyle. The main role in system of control of the nutritional status in children is referred to the correction of socio-hygienic factors which prove to be the priority ones in the shaping of the nutritional status in students. As the main condition determining the nutrition state of the up-to-date schoolchildren and the quality of their life in the whole the social cultural level of children and adolescents must be regarded as a result of the hygienic education and training in fundamentals of healthy lifestyle. Priority protective factors of the gain in the part of schoolchildren with normal nutritional status (optimalfood regimen, optimal dietary habits, sufficient level of physical activity) laidfrom the child age in conditions of the family, sufficient level of the physical activity and the implementation of the other element of hygienically expedient day regimen served as the base for the elaboration of the system of the control of nutritional status. Algorithm of the control of the nutritional status in the students of educational institutions includes the creation of healthcare educational environment, optimization of nutrition and physical activity, the shaping of the culture of healthy lifestyle, health-improving measures for children with disorders of nutritional status and their psychological pedagogical supports at the stage of the correction of the nutritional status, improvement of the medical service for the early detection of deviations of nutritional status with the estimation of the efficiency of

  15. Improving children's nutrition environments: A survey of adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downs Shauna M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mandate of recreational facilities is to enhance well-being, many offer foods inconsistent with recommendations for healthy eating. Little is known regarding recreational facility food environments and how they might be improved, as few studies exist. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY are intended to ensure access to healthy food choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities. This study investigated awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY among recreational facilities in Alberta, Canada, one year following their release. Methods A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted from June - December, 2009 (n = 151 with managers of publicly funded recreational facilities that served food. The questionnaire included 10 closed and 7 open ended questions to assess the organizational priority for healthy eating, awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY. Chi-squared tests examined quantitative variables, while qualitative data were analysed using directed content analysis. Greenhalgh's model of diffusion of complex innovations within health service organizations constituted the theoretical framework for the study. Results One half of respondents had heard of the ANGCY, however their knowledge of them was limited. Although 51% of facilities had made changes to improve the nutritional quality of foods offered in the past year, only a small fraction (11% of these changes were motivated by the ANGCY. At the time of the survey, 14% of facilities had adopted the ANGCY and 6% had implemented them. Barriers to adoption and implementation were primarily related to perceived negative attributes of the ANGCY, the inner (organizational context, and negative feedback received during the implementation process. Managers strongly perceived that implementing nutrition guidelines would limit their profit-making ability. Conclusions If fully adopted and implemented, the ANGCY

  16. Giocampus school: a "learning through playing" approach to deliver nutritional education to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Alice; Brighenti, Furio; Finistrella, Viviana; Ingrosso, Lisa; Monti, Giorgia; Vanelli, Maurizio; Vitale, Marco; Volta, Elio; Scazzina, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To improve nutritional knowledge of children, single-group educational interventions with pre/post knowledge assessment were performed in primary schools in Parma, Italy, participating to the Giocampus Program. A total of 8165 children (8-11 years old) of 3rd, 4th and 5th grades of primary school were involved in 3 hours per class nutritional lessons, with specifically designed games and activities for each school grade. To evaluate children learning, a questionnaire was administered before and after three months of educational intervention. A total of 16330 questionnaires were analysed. Children nutritional knowledge significantly increased (peducational figures, tools and games, was successful in improving children's nutritional knowledge. A stable integration of this method in primary school settings could prepare a new generation of citizens, better educated on health-promotion lifestyles.

  17. The link between infant regulatory problems, temperament traits, maternal depressive symptoms and children's psychopathological symptoms at age three: a longitudinal study in a German at-risk sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidor, Anna; Fischer, Cristina; Cierpka, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Difficult conditions during childhood can limit an individual's development in many ways. Factors such as being raised in an at-risk family, child temperamental traits or maternal traits can potentially influence a child's later behaviour. The present study investigated the extent of regulatory problems in 6-month-old infants and their link to temperamental traits and impact on externalizing and internalizing problems at 36 months. Moderating effects of maternal distress and maternal depressive symptoms were tested as well. In a quasi-experimental, longitudinal study, a sample of 185 mother-infant dyads at psychosocial risk was investigated at 6 months with SFS (infants' regulatory problems) and at 3 years with CBCL (children's behavioural problems), EAS (children's temperament), ADS (maternal depressive symptoms) and PSI-SF (maternal stress). A hierarchical regression analysis yielded a significant association between infants' regulatory problems and both externalizing and internalizing behaviour problems at age 3 (accounting for 16% and 14% variance), with both externalizing and internalizing problems being linked to current maternal depressive symptoms (12 and 9% of the variance). Externalizing and internalizing problems were found to be related also to children's temperamental difficulty (18 and 13% of variance) and their negative emotionality. With temperamental traits having been taken into account, only feeding problems at 6 months contributed near-significant to internalizing problems at 3 years. Our results underscore the crucial role of temperament in the path between early regulatory problems and subsequent behavioural difficulties. Children's unfavourable temperamental predispositions such as negative emotionality and generally "difficult temperament" contributed substantially to both externalizing and internalizing behavioural problems in the high-risk sample. The decreased predictive power of regulatory problems following the inclusion of

  18. The nutritional status of school-aged children: why should we care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cora; Neufingerl, Nicole; van Geel, Laura; van den Briel, Tina; Osendarp, Saskia

    2010-09-01

    The nutritional status of school-aged children impacts their health, cognition, and subsequently their educational achievement. The school is an opportune setting to provide health and nutrition services to disadvantaged children. Yet, school-aged children are not commonly included in health and nutrition surveys. An up-to-date overview of their nutritional status across the world is not available. To provide a summary of the recent data on the nutritional status of school-aged children in developing countries and countries in transition and identify issues of public health concern. A review of literature published from 2002 to 2009 on the nutritional status of children aged 6 to 12 years from Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean region was performed. Eligible studies determined the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies or child under- and overnutrition using biochemical markers and internationally accepted growth references. A total of 369 studies from 76 different countries were included. The available data indicate that the nutritional status of school-aged children in the reviewed regions is considerably inadequate. Underweight and thinness were most prominent in populations from South-East Asia and Africa, whereas in Latin America the prevalence of underweight or thinness was generally below 10%. More than half of the studies on anemia reported moderate (> 20%) or severe (> 40%) prevalence of anemia. Prevalences of 20% to 30% were commonly reported for deficiencies of iron, iodine, zinc, and vitamin A. The prevalence of overweight was highest in Latin American countries (20% to 35%). In Africa, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean, the prevalence of overweight was generally below 15%. The available data indicate that malnutrition is a public health issue in school-aged children in developing countries and countries in transition. However, the available data, especially data on micronutrient status, are limited. These findings emphasize

  19. Predicting dietary intake among children classified as overweight or at risk for overweight: Independent and interactive effects of parenting practices and styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Shelby L; Seburg, Elisabeth; JaKa, Meghan M; Sherwood, Nancy E; Levy, Rona L

    2017-03-01

    Using baseline data from a randomized controlled pediatric obesity prevention trial, this study sought to examine general parenting style as a potential moderator of the association between feeding-specific parenting practices and child dietary intake. Four hundred and twenty-one parent-child dyads served as participants (49% girls and 93% mothers). Children were, on average, 6.6 years old and either overweight or at-risk for overweight (mean BMI percentile = 84.9). Data were collected in participants' homes. Study staff measured children's height and weight. Parents completed questionnaires designed to assess general parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian and permissive) and child feeding practices (restriction and monitoring). Child dietary intake was assessed using a 24-h recall system. Outcomes were daily servings of fruits and vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), and unhealthy snacks. Results were as follows: Permissive parenting was inversely associated with fruit and vegetable consumption, and parental monitoring was inversely associated with SSB consumption. There were no other main effects of parenting style or feeding practice on child dietary consumption. Authoritarian parenting moderated the association between restriction and SSB intake (a marginally significant effect after correcting for multiple comparisons). Restriction was inversely associated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was high but unassociated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was low. Findings indicate that the parenting practice of monitoring child dietary intake was associated with more healthful consumption regardless of parenting style; interventions may thus benefit from encouraging parental monitoring. The parenting strategy of restricting child dietary intake, in contrast, was associated with lower SSB intake in the context of higher parental authoritarianism but inconsequential in the context of lower parental authoritarianism. This exploratory

  20. Screening for iron deficiency anemia in at risk children in the pediatric emergency department: a survey of Canadian pediatric emergency department physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Roberta; Matsui, Doreen; Lynch, Tim

    2007-05-01

    To determine the attitudes and reported practices of physicians regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia in at-risk children in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) across Canada. A standardized survey was mailed to 183 PED physicians at 10 tertiary care PED across Canada. The practices and attitudes regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia were collected via a questionnaire consisting of single select closed-ended items and items which required ranking in order of importance. Sixty-one percent (111/183) of physicians responded to the survey. Ninety-six percent of respondents do not routinely screen for iron deficiency anemia. One third of respondents believed that screening for iron deficiency anemia in the PED is possible. The remaining stated lack of time, difficulty with follow-up, it not being an emergent issue and cost as prohibitive factors. One third of participants stated that 21% to 40% of the pediatric patients seen in their PED did not have a primary care physician. The main considerations in deciding on whom to perform venipuncture were based on dietary history and physical examination with a history of consumption of milk greater than 24 ounces per day (94%) and conjunctival or skin pallor (97%, 94%, respectively) selected as the most important items. The results of this study indicate that Canadian PED physicians are not routinely screening for iron deficiency anemia, although they demonstrate knowledge of the risk factors for iron deficiency anemia and recognize the importance of diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term morbidity.

  1. Nutritional status in children with cancer: Before, during and after therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R D

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in children with cancer at diagnosis, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where the great majority of children live. It is associated with an added burden of morbidity and mortality. Answers were sought to the best measure of nutritional status in LMIC, the impact of anti-neoplastic therapy, effective interventions to achieve normal nutritional status and the impact of these on clinical outcomes. Arm anthropometry offers reasonable estimates of fat mass and lean body mass that are both impacted adversely by treatment. Nutritional supplementation, including the use of simple local resources, is beneficial and can improve survival. Long-term survivors may continue to exhibit perturbed nutritional status. The prevalence and severity of malnutrition in children with cancer in LMIC demand attention. Opportunities exist to conduct studies in India to examine the effects of nutritional interventions, including on the overall well-being of survivors.

  2. Children's Needs -- for Universal Food Service and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, George M.

    Good nutrition and adequate nutritious food are not only essential to good health but also represent the difference between life and death. Nutrition is the world's number one problem today, along with war and population control. Good nutrition means providing, with care and love, all 45 essential nutrients in adequate amounts to each child -- one…

  3. Nutrition Knowledge and Food Choices of Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Jay; Jones, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effect of a 3-week school-based nutrition education program on nutrition knowledge and healthy food choices of fifth graders randomly assigned to experimental or control group. Found that the experimental group exhibited a significant increase in nutrition knowledge from pretest to posttest and significant change in compliance in…

  4. Nutritional status of preschool children in semi-urban Area of Benue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of preschool children under-5 years in Benue state Nigeria. in order to establish and provide baseline information on the health and nutritional status of the target group. The study was carried out using anthropometric measurements (weights and heights) which were ...

  5. Relationship Between Nutritional Status of Children Under Five with Parents Who Work

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    Noor Edi Widya Sukoco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia is one of 117 countries which has three crucial nutritional problems in children under fives, such as stunting, wasting and overweight. This study is important because nutritional status of children under fi ve years old was closely related with economic factors. While economic conditions of families depend on the work of both parents.Methods: The study design was cross sectional based on health research “Riskesdas 2007 and 2013”. Type of research was quantitative and qualitative methods. Samples consisted of children under fi ves years old of whom their parents were still alive and have completed the information for the questionnaires. The informants of the qualitative research came from caregivers, district nutrition offi cer, sub-district nutrition offi cer, district labor offi ce, and parliament at district. Quantitative data was processed and analyzed by SPSS version 15 under the licensed of NIHRD MOH RI. While primary data was explored by indepth interview and analyzed using content analyses. Result: There was no relationship between parents who were both working with the nutritional status of children under fi ves based on indicators: weight/age p= 0,77 (2007, p = 0,92 (2013; height/age p = 0,58 (2007, p = 0,71 (2013; weight/height p = 0,77 (2007, p =,33 (2013. These qualitative results were confi rmed by informants’ opinions that the nutritional status of children under fi ves years were not differ between those whose parents are working and not working. Conclusion: The analysis whether quantitative or qualitative found there was no signifi cant relationship between the nutritional status of children under fi ves to those both of the parents working. Recommendation: Nutritional problems should be solved inter-sectoraly, it does not guarantee that only the economic capacity to bring about positive impacts the nutritional status of children under five.

  6. Beneficial Effect of the Nutritional Support in Children Who Underwent Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Nevra; Gündüz, Mehmet; Tavil, Betül; Azik, M Fatih; Coşkun, Zeynep; Yardımcı, Hülya; Uçkan, Duygu; Tunç, Bahattin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status in children who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant compared with a healthy control group. A secondary aim was to utilize mid-upper arm circumference as a measure of nutritional status in these groups of children. Our study group included 40 children (18 girls, 22 boys) with mean age of 9.2 ± 4.6 years (range, 2-17 y) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Our control group consisted of 20 healthy children (9 girls, 11 boys). The children were evaluated at admission to the hospital and followed regularly 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after discharge from the hospital. In the study group, 27 of 40 patients (67.5%) received nutritional support during hematopoietic stem cell transplant, with 15 patients (56%) receiving enteral nutrition, 6 (22%) receiving total parenteral nutrition, and 6 (22%) receiving enteral and total parenteral nutrition. Chronic malnutrition rate in the study group was 47.5% on admission to the hospital, with the control group having a rate of 20%. One year after transplant, the rate decreased to 20% in the study group and 5% in the control group. The mid-upper arm circumference was lower in children in the study group versus the control group at the beginning of the study (P groups at follow-up examinations (P > .05). During follow-up, all anthropometric measurements increased significantly in both groups. Monitoring nutritional status and initiating appropriate nutritional support improved the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplant and provided a more comfortable process during the transplant period. Furthermore, mid-upper arm circumference is a more sensitive, useful, and safer parameter that can be used to measure nutritional status of children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

  7. Bone mineral density and nutritional status in children with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); J. Bouquet (Jan); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Osteoporosis has been reported in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AIMS: To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), nutritional status, and determinants of BMD in children with inflammatory bowel disease. PATIENTS: Fifty five patients

  8. Childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6–36 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research: Childcare practices and nutritional status of children in Tanzania ... prolonged experience has advantages compared to experience ... were exclusively breast-fed for a significantly longer period (50 days) than those in the ...

  9. Oral health and nutrition for children under five years of age: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Paediatric Food-Based Dietary Guidelines for South Africa: Oral health and nutrition for children under five ... obesity, diabetes, coronary heart disease and dental caries. ... research has examined the association between key.

  10. Nutritional adequacy of menus offered to children of 2 - 5 years in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development (ECD) programmes are mainly a strategy for alleviating poverty. ... service provision for poor children was a justified cost, as it not only improves ...... meals and snacks served in four daycare centers in Guatemala City. Nutrition.

  11. Trends in the nutritional status of Salvadorian children: the post-war experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummer-Strawn, L M; Cáceres, J M; Herrera de Jaimes, B P

    1996-01-01

    This article examines trends in the nutritional status of children in EI Salvador between 1988 and 1993 (before and after the signing of a peace accord that ended the civil war.) The data derive from two national surveys, each of which included measurements of the height and weight of children aged 3-59 months. The prevalence of low weight-for-age (nutritional status.

  12. An increase of cereal intake as an approach to weight reduction in children is effective only when accompanied by nutrition education: a randomized controlled trial

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    García Olga P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main emphasis of dietary advice for control of obesity has been on reducing dietary fat. Increasing ready to eat cereal (RTEC consumption could be a strategy to reduce fat intake and increase carbohydrate intake resulting in a diet with lower energy density. Objectives 1. To determine if an increase in RTEC intake is an effective strategy to reduce excess body weight and blood lipids in overweight or at risk of overweight children. 2. To determine if a nutrition education program would make a difference on the response to an increase in cereal intake. 3 To determine if increase in RTEC intake alone or with a nutrition education program has an effect on plasma lipid profile. Experimental design One hundred and forty seven overweight or at risk of overweight children (6–12 y of age were assigned to one of four different treatments: a. One serving of 33 ± 7 g of RTEC for breakfast; b. one serving of 33 ± 7 g of RTEC for breakfast and another one for dinner; c. one serving of 33 ± 7 g of RTEC for breakfast and a nutrition education program. d. Non intervention, control group. Anthropometry, body composition, physical activity and blood lipids were measured at baseline, before treatments, and 12 weeks after treatments. Results After 12 weeks of intervention only the children that received 33 ± 7 g of RTEC and nutrition education had significantly lower body weight [-1.01 (-1.69, -0.34 ], p Conclusion A strategy to increase RTEC consumption, as a source of carbohydrate, to reduce obesity is effective only when accompanied by nutrition education. The need for education could be extrapolated to other strategies intended for treatment of obesity. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clincial Trial Registry. Request no: ACTRN12608000025336

  13. Evaluation of a kindergarten-based nutrition education intervention for pre-school children in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanlai; Ye, Dongqing; Li, Yingchun; Huang, Yongling; Li, Li; Gao, Yongqing; Wang, Sufang

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of nutrition education in kindergartens and to promote healthy dietary habits in children. Prospective cohort study. Four kindergartens with 1252 children were randomized to the intervention group and three with 850 children to the control group. The personal nutritional knowledge, attitudes and dietary behaviours of the parents were also investigated. Each month, children and parents in the intervention group participated in nutrition education activities. The main outcome measures were anthropometrics and diet-related behaviours of the children and the nutritional knowledge and attitudes of the parents at baseline, 6 months (mid-term) and 1 year (post-test). Baseline demographic and socio-economic characteristics were also collected. Seven kindergartens from Hefei, the capital city of Anhui Province, eastern China. Two thousand one hundred and two 4- to 6-year-old pre-schoolers from seven kindergartens participated. The prevalence of children's unhealthy diet-related behaviours decreased significantly and good lifestyle behaviours increased in the group receiving nutrition education compared with controls. Parental eating habits and attitudes to planning their children's diets also changed appreciably in the intervention group compared with the control group (P education improves pre-schoolers' lifestyle behaviours and brings about beneficial changes in parents' attitudes to planning their children's diets and their own personal eating habits.

  14. Effects of exercise intensity and nutrition advice on myocardial function in obese children and adolescents: a multicentre randomised controlled trial study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Katrin A; Coombes, Jeff S; Green, Daniel J; Gomersall, Sjaan R; Keating, Shelley E; Tjonna, Arnt Erik; Hollekim-Strand, Siri Marte; Hosseini, Mansoureh Sadat; Ro, Torstein Baade; Haram, Margrete; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Peter S W; Cain, Peter A; Leong, Gary M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of paediatric obesity is increasing, and with it, lifestyle-related diseases in children and adolescents. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has recently been explored as an alternate to traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in adults with chronic disease and has been shown to induce a rapid reversal of subclinical disease markers in obese children and adolescents. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effects of HIIT with MICT on myocardial function in obese children and adolescents. Methods and analysis Multicentre randomised controlled trial of 100 obese children and adolescents in the cities of Trondheim (Norway) and Brisbane (Australia). The trial will examine the efficacy of HIIT to improve cardiometabolic outcomes in obese children and adolescents. Participants will be randomised to (1) HIIT and nutrition advice, (2) MICT and nutrition advice or (3) nutrition advice. Participants will partake in supervised exercise training and/or nutrition sessions for 3 months. Measurements for study end points will occur at baseline, 3 months (postintervention) and 12 months (follow-up). The primary end point is myocardial function (peak systolic tissue velocity). Secondary end points include vascular function (flow-mediated dilation assessment), quantity of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, myocardial structure and function, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, autonomic function, blood biochemistry, physical activity and nutrition. Lean, healthy children and adolescents will complete measurements for all study end points at one time point for comparative cross-sectional analyses. Ethics and dissemination This randomised controlled trial will generate substantial information regarding the effects of exercise intensity on paediatric obesity, specifically the cardiometabolic health of this at-risk population. It is expected that communication of results will allow for the development of

  15. Effectiveness of nutrition education, iron supplementation or both on iron status in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, D; Sharma, S; Agarwal, K N

    2003-12-01

    A community-based, randomized trial was designed to compare the effect of nutrition education and/or iron supplementation (weekly) on iron status of children in an urban slum in Delhi. Four hundred and fifty one children, 9-36 months of age and their caretakers (mothers), assigned to one of the following groups were included in the cohort. Group 1, nutrition education. Group 2, supplementation (with 20 mg elemental iron). Group 3, nutrition education with supplementation (with 20 mg elemental iron) and Group 4, control given placebo. The intervention program was of four months duration, with a treatment phase of 8 wk followed by 8 wk of no treatment. Post intervention, at 8 wk and at 16 wk, the hemoglobin change in the nutrition education, supplementation, nutrition education with supplementation and control groups was 2.9, 1.9, 3.8 and -5.9%, respectively and 2.1, -1.9, 0 and -9.3%, respectively (as compared to initial values). There was no significant effect of any of the intervention at 8 weeks. At 16 wk, there was significant positive effect of nutrition education group (p less than 0.05). The percent change in serum ferritin value at 16 wk in the nutrition education, supplementation, nutrition education with supplementation and control groups was 5.7, -2.3, -3.4 and -40%, respectively. Serum ferritin values were significantly higher for the nutrition education group (p nutrition education group mothers showed significantly higher nutrition knowledge and the dietary iron intake of children was significantly higher than their control group counterparts (p nutrition education did have a positive effect on the iron status possibly by improving the dietary iron intake.

  16. Implementing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition Education for Children: Child-Care Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Schober, Daniel J; McBride, Brent A; Kok, Car Mun; Ramsay, Samantha

    2017-12-01

    National childhood obesity prevention policies recommend that child-care providers educate young children about nutrition to improve their nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Yet, the provision of nutrition education (NE) to children in child-care settings is limited. Using the 2011 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks for NE in child care as a guiding framework, researchers assessed child-care providers' perspectives regarding delivery of NE through books, posters, mealtime conversations, hands-on learning, and sensory exploration of foods to young children (aged 2 to 5 years). Using a qualitative design (realist method), individual, semistructured interviews were conducted until saturation was reached. The study was conducted during 2012-2013 and used purposive sampling to select providers. Final sample included 18 providers employed full-time in Head Start or state-licensed center-based child-care programs in Central Illinois. Child-care providers' perspectives regarding implementation of NE. Thematic analysis to derive themes using NVivo software. Three overarching themes emerged, including providers' motivators, barriers, and facilitators for delivering NE to children. Motivators for delivering NE included that NE encourages children to try new foods, NE improves children's knowledge of healthy and unhealthy foods, and NE is consistent with children's tendency for exploration. Barriers for delivering NE included that limited funding and resources for hands-on experiences and restrictive policies. Facilitators for delivering NE included providers obtain access to feasible, low-cost resources and community partners, providers work around restrictive policies to accommodate NE, and mealtime conversations are a feasible avenue to deliver NE. Providers integrated mealtime conversations with NE concepts such as food-based sensory exploration and health benefits of foods. Present study findings offer insights regarding providers' perspectives on

  17. Representations by Caregivers, Teachers, and Children on Food, Nutrition, Health, and School Breakfast Contributions for the "ESNUT" Nutritional Stabilization Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Gallegos-Martínez

    Full Text Available Objective.This work sought to determine the social representations conferred by caregivers, teachers, and children to food, health, and nutrition and the school breakfast program for children from three to seven years of age in the city of San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí, Mexico, through identifying a knowledge and practices and b meanings attributed on health and nutrition of children from three to seven years of age and on the school breakfast program. Methods. This was a qualitative health study. The sample included 33 mothers, 3 grandmothers, 1 father, 30 children from 3 to 7 years of age, and 8 teachers who signed an informed consent. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview and treated through content analysis modality thematic analysis. Results. The analysis yielded the categories: knowledge on food, the health-feeding relation, customs and practices of the child's feeding, and meanings of the school breakfast program. Conclusion. On the reflection on the representations of the different players included in the school breakfast program, elements become manifest that would support an educational intervention by nursing, which would have to be based on the family as the central figure to provide good nutrition and teach good habits.

  18. Bone mass in Indian children--relationships to maternal nutritional status and diet during pregnancy: the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganpule, A; Yajnik, C S; Fall, C H D; Rao, S; Fisher, D J; Kanade, A; Cooper, C; Naik, S; Joshi, N; Lubree, H; Deshpande, V; Joglekar, C

    2006-08-01

    Bone mass is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies have highlighted associations between maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and bone mass in the offspring. We hypothesized that maternal calcium intakes and circulating micronutrients during pregnancy are related to bone mass in Indian children. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nutritional status was measured at 18 and 28 wk gestation in 797 pregnant rural Indian women. Measurements included anthropometry, dietary intakes (24-h recall and food frequency questionnaire), physical workload (questionnaire), and circulating micronutrients (red cell folate and plasma ferritin, vitamin B12, and vitamin C). Six years postnatally, total body and total spine bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the children (n = 698 of 762 live births) and both parents. Both parents' DXA measurements were positively correlated with the equivalent measurements in the children (P pregnancy (milk, milk products, pulses, non-vegetarian foods, green leafy vegetables, fruit) had higher total and spine bone mineral content and BMD, and children of mothers with higher folate status at 28 wk gestation had higher total and spine BMD, independent of parental size and DXA measurements. Modifiable maternal nutritional factors may influence bone health in the offspring. Fathers play a role in determining their child's bone mass, possibly through genetic mechanisms or through shared environment.

  19. Predicting Dietary Intake among Children Classified as Overweight or at Risk for Overweight: Independent and Interactive Effects of Parenting Practices and Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Shelby L.; Seburg, Elisabeth; JaKa, Meghan M.; Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.

    2017-01-01

    Using baseline data from a randomized controlled pediatric obesity prevention trial, this study sought to examine general parenting style as a potential moderator of the association between feeding-specific parenting practices and child dietary intake. Four hundred and twenty-one parent-child dyads served as participants (49% girls and 93% mothers). Children were, on average, 6.6 years old and either overweight or at-risk for overweight (mean BMI percentile = 84.9). Data were collected in participants’ homes. Study staff measured children’s height and weight. Parents completed questionnaires designed to assess general parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian and permissive) and child feeding practices (restriction and monitoring). Child dietary intake was assessed using a 24-hour recall system. Outcomes were daily servings of fruits and vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), and unhealthy snacks. Results were as follows: Permissive parenting was inversely associated with fruit and vegetable consumption, and parental monitoring was inversely associated with SSB consumption. There were no other main effects of parenting style or feeding practice on child dietary consumption. Authoritarian parenting moderated the association between restriction and SSB intake (a marginally significant effect after correcting for multiple comparisons). Restriction was inversely associated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was high but unassociated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was low. Findings indicate that the parenting practice of monitoring child dietary intake was associated with more healthful consumption regardless of parenting style; interventions may thus benefit from encouraging parental monitoring. The parenting strategy of restricting child dietary intake, in contrast, was associated with lower SSB intake in the context of higher parental authoritarianism but inconsequential in the context of lower parental authoritarianism. This

  20. IMPACT OF EDUCATION OF PARENTS ON NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Kunwar, Rajesh; Pillai, PB

    2002-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study the nutritional status of 2585 school children, including 1253 boys and 1332 girls, aged between 5 and 15 years was correlated with the levels of literacy of their parents. The study showed a direct relationship between the levels of literacy of parents and the nutritional status of children. When the same was tested separately for mothers and fathers in relation to the sex of the child, it was noted that nutritional status of boys and girls was not different irresp...

  1. Children with nutritional rickets referred to hospitals in Copenhagen during a 10-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Michaelsen, K F; Mølgaard, C

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To describe the prevalence of nutritional rickets among children admitted to three large paediatric departments in the Copenhagen area during a 10 y period. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of cases identified from the diagnosis registers fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for nutritional...... joints. Two children had generalized convulsions. None of the cases had received vitamin D supplementation. CONCLUSION: Nutritional rickets is still present among immigrants in Denmark, and it is likely that the prevalence of mild cases is high. Prevention through vitamin D supplementation is important......, but requires a dedicated health education effort....

  2. Practitioner review: schizophrenia spectrum disorders and the at-risk mental state for psychosis in children and adolescents--evidence-based management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffin, Paul A; Welsh, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders are severe mental illnesses which often result in significant distress and disability. Attempts have been made to prospectively identify and treat young people viewed as at high risk of impending nonaffective psychosis. Once a schizophrenia spectrum disorder has developed, prompt identification and management is required. This article reviews the literature relating to the assessment and management of 'at-risk mental states' (ARMS) and the treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in children and adolescents. A systematic search of the literature was undertaken using EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO databases for the period January 1970-December 2012. Evidence suggests that young people fulfilling the ARMS criteria are at high risk of adverse mental health outcomes but that the majority do not develop nonaffective psychosis over the medium term. Although clinical trial findings have been inconsistent, psychosocial approaches, such as cognitive behaviour therapy, may reduce the risk of transition to psychosis and improve some symptoms, at least over the short term. The effectiveness of psychotropic medication for the ARMS is uncertain although there is accumulating evidence for potential adverse effects of antipsychotic medication, even at low dose, in this population. For the schizophrenias, clinical trial findings suggest that, as in adults, antipsychotics should be selected on the basis of side-effect profile although clozapine may be helpful in treatment refractory illness. There are almost no studies of psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia in young people under 18, and some caution must be exercised when extrapolating the findings of adult studies to younger individuals. A stepped care approach to the ARMS in young people represents a plausible potential management approach for those at high risk of serious mental health problems. However, predictive models currently lack precision and should focus on accurately identifying

  3. „Careers of young delinquents”, i.e. the phenomenon of excluding pre-school children who are at risk of social maladjustment during the early stages of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research on the process of social exclusion from the first stage of the education of children at risk of social maladjustment. The author presents strategies and tactics used by teachers of preschool education to eliminate the exclusion of children who cause educational problems. The author analyzes the data in accordance with the methodology of grounded theory in the context of game theory.

  4. Evaluation of the nutrition counselling component of a fitness programme for children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Bradford, Laura; Haley, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    To describe and evaluate the nutrition counselling component of a fitness programme for children with disabilities. Twenty-eight children with disabilities, ages 6-14 years, participated in a 16-week comprehensive fitness programme consisting of twice weekly exercise sessions, nutrition counselling and physical activity promotion education sessions. Nutrition sessions consisted of three individual and two group sessions. Individual nutrition goals were developed for each child using 3-day food intake diaries and parent interview. Body Mass Index (BMI) and progress towards nutrition goals were documented. No significant BMI changes were recorded for the entire group (n=28) or a sub-group with a goal to decrease BMI (n=8). Most of the children made improvements in individual goals indicating improvements in healthy eating habits. This included eating the daily recommended amount of servings of each food group, trying new foods and limiting foods containing saturated and trans fats, sodium and sugar. Short-term changes were noted in eating habits and behaviours during the 16-week fitness programme, although the effects did not influence overall BMI during the 16-week programme. Children with disabilities are at nutritional risk, and long-term follow-up is needed to determine if initial changes in parent-reported child eating behaviours will impact long-term nutrition, BMI and overall health.

  5. Impact of socioeconomic factors on nutritional status in primary school children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, N.F.; Khan, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Child malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in most of the poor communities leading to high morbidity and mortality. Various studies have highlighted the factors involved. The present study focuses on socioeconomic inequality resulting in malnutrition. Objectives of the Study were to find the Impact of socio-economic factors on nutritional status in primary school children. Methods: It was a cross sectional survey conducted at Lahore from February to August 2005 among primary schools from public and private sectors to assess the nutritional status of primary school going children age 5-11 years belonging to different socio economic classes of the society. Systematic random sampling technique was applied to collect the sample. Body Mass Index in relation to NHANES reference population was used for assessing nutritional status. Results: The nutritional status of children from lower socio economic class was poor as compared to their counter parts in upper socio economic class. Children with BMI <5 percentile were 41% in lower class while in upper class it was 19.28%. Prevalence of malnutrition was 42.3% among children of illiterate mothers as compare to 20% in those of literate mothers. Conclusion: Poverty, low literacy rate, large families, food insecurity, food safety, women's education appears to be the important underlying factors responsible for poor health status of children from low socioeconomic class. It requires economic, political and social changes as well as changes for personal advancement mainly through educational opportunities to improve the nutritional status of the children. (author)

  6. Impact of socioeconomic factors on nutritional status in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Nabeela Fazal; Muzaffar, Rizwana; Khan, Muhammad Athar; Imdad, Seema

    2010-01-01

    Child malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in most of the poor communities leading to high morbidity and mortality. Various studies have highlighted the factors involved. The present study focuses on socioeconomic inequality resulting in malnutrition. Objectives of the Study were to find the Impact of socio-economic factors on nutritional status in primary school children. It was a cross sectional survey conducted at Lahore from February to August 2005 among primary schools from public and private sectors to assess the nutritional status of primary school going children age 5-11 years belonging to different socio economic classes of the society. Systematic random sampling technique was applied to collect the sample. Body Mass Index in relation to NHANES reference population was used for assessing nutritional status. The nutritional status of children from lower socio economic class was poor as compared to their counter parts in upper socio economic class. Children with BMI children of illiterate mothers as compare to 20% in those of literate mothers. Poverty, low literacy rate, large families, food insecurity, food safety, women's education appears to be the important underlying factors responsible for poor health status of children from low socioeconomic class. It requires economic, political and social changes as well as changes for personal advancement mainly through educational opportunities to improve the nutritional status of the children.

  7. Nutritional Status And Its Association With Diabetes Mellitus In School Children, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muninarayana C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor health and nutrition may impair both the growth and intellectual development of school children. Incidence of malnutrition related childhood diabetes mellitus has increased and continues to be on the rise.Objectives: To assess the nutritional status by anthropometry and to screen for diabetes by capillary blood examination of school children. Design: Longitudinal study Setting: The study was carried out at Sri R.L.Jalappa Central School, Kolar from August 2008 to December 2009. Methods: All the school children were interviewed with pre-designed and pre-tested proforma. Height, Weight was measured by standard procedures. The nutritional status was analysed by Body Mass Index (BMI for age. The school children were also screened for diabetes mellitus by Finger stick capillary random plasma glucose testing. The children were followed up for any major medical problems during the study period.Participants: All the students studying in the school during study period.Results: Mean height and weight of children were found comparable to the ICMR pooled data. However, compared to NCHS standards and affluent Indian children the mean height and weight were found to be much inferior at all ages. According to BMI for age as per NCHS most of the children were undernourished (79.2% and 3 children (0.6% were overweight. Out of 495 children screened for diabetes 14 children had hyperglycaemia (>160mg/dl. These 14 children were further tested by oral glucose tolerance test and found to have normal blood sugars levels. During the follow up two undernourished children developed diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: The magnitude of malnutrition among school going children was found to be 79%. During the follow up two undernourished children developed diabetes mellitus, hence under nutrition was associated with diabetes mellitus.

  8. Feeding and Nutrition of Infants and Young Children. Guidelines for the WHO European Region. WHO Regional Office for Europe. 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen; Fleischcer Michælsen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Good feeding practices will prevent malnutrition and early growth retardation, which is still common in some parts of the WHO European Region, especially countries of the former Soviet Union. Despite the importance of nutrition and feeding of infants and young children, limited attention has been...... nutrition recommendations and will be of particular interest to ministries of health, paediatricians, dietitians, nutrition scientists, and public health and other professionals concerned with the nutrition and health of young children....

  9. Nutritional content of food and beverage products in television advertisements seen on children's programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Lisa M; Schermbeck, Rebecca M; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-12-01

    Given the high rates of childhood obesity, assessing the nutritional content of food and beverage products in television (TV) advertisements to which children are exposed is important. TV ratings data for children 2-5 and 6-11 years of age were used to examine the nutritional content of food and beverage products in advertisements seen by children on all programming and children's programming (≥35% child-audience share). Nutritional content was assessed based on the federal Interagency Working Group (IWG) recommended nutrients to limit (NTL), including saturated fat, trans fat, sugar, and sodium. A total of 46.2% of 2- to 5-year-olds' and 43.5% of 6- to 11-year-olds' total exposure to food and beverage TV advertising was for ads seen on children's programming. Among children 2-5 and 6-11 years, respectively, 84.1 and 84.4% of ads seen on all programming and 95.8 and 97.3% seen on children's programming were for products high in NTL, and 97.8 and 98.1% of Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) company-member ads seen on children's programming were for products high in NTL, compared to 80.5 and 89.9% of non-CFBAI product ads. Most food and beverage products in TV ads seen by children do not meet the IWG nutrition recommendations and less than one half of such ads are covered by self-regulation. Products advertised on children's versus general-audience programming and by CFBAI- versus non-CFBAI-member companies are particularly of low nutritional quality, suggesting that self-regulation has not successfully protected children from exposure to advertising for unhealthy foods and that continued monitoring is required.

  10. Nutritional Content of Food and Beverage Products in Television Advertisements Seen on Children's Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermbeck, Rebecca M.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Given the high rates of childhood obesity, assessing the nutritional content of food and beverage products in television (TV) advertisements to which children are exposed is important. Methods: TV ratings data for children 2–5 and 6–11 years of age were used to examine the nutritional content of food and beverage products in advertisements seen by children on all programming and children's programming (≥35% child-audience share). Nutritional content was assessed based on the federal Interagency Working Group (IWG) recommended nutrients to limit (NTL), including saturated fat, trans fat, sugar, and sodium. Results: A total of 46.2% of 2- to 5-year-olds' and 43.5% of 6- to 11-year-olds' total exposure to food and beverage TV advertising was for ads seen on children's programming. Among children 2–5 and 6–11 years, respectively, 84.1 and 84.4% of ads seen on all programming and 95.8 and 97.3% seen on children's programming were for products high in NTL, and 97.8 and 98.1% of Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) company-member ads seen on children's programming were for products high in NTL, compared to 80.5 and 89.9% of non-CFBAI product ads. Conclusions: Most food and beverage products in TV ads seen by children do not meet the IWG nutrition recommendations and less than one half of such ads are covered by self-regulation. Products advertised on children's versus general-audience programming and by CFBAI- versus non-CFBAI-member companies are particularly of low nutritional quality, suggesting that self-regulation has not successfully protected children from exposure to advertising for unhealthy foods and that continued monitoring is required. PMID:24206260

  11. Food intake and nutrition in children 1-4 years of age in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuanalo de la Cerda, Heriberto E; Ochoa Estrada, Ernesto; Tuz Poot, Felipe R; Datta Banik, Sudip

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT in Spanish) reported high rates of under-nutrition in children of Yucatan. Is food intake the main cause of under-nutrition in children of the state of Yucatan, Mexico? Identify the primary causes of under-nutrition in pre-school children in Yucatan. A sample of 111 children (59 girls and 52 boys) aged 1-4 years representing Yucatan was taken from a database of ENSANUT 2006 and another national survey, a federal poverty mitigation programme for the state of Yucatan, Mexico entitled "Oportunidades". A human ecology approach together with life history theory was used to analyse anthropometric indices and food intake data from the ENSANUT 2006 and "Oportunidades". Height and weight were significantly correlated to age and total food intake. No correlations were found between age and anthropometric indices or food intake rates. The children in the sample had adequate protein intake but deficient energy intake. No correlation was identified between nutritional status and food intake rates. Pre-schoolers with higher weight-for-height values achieved greater height-for-age. These relationships can be explained by life history theory in that energy intake was used either for maintenance (combating and recovering from infections) or growth. The poor relationship between food intake rates and nutritional status is probably explained by the interaction between high disease incidence and insufficient energy intake. These conditions are endemic in Yucatan due to widespread poor housing, water and sanitation conditions.

  12. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of States, Districts, and Schools That Required Teaching Nutrition and Dietary Behavior, by School Level 100 80 60 40 20 0 72. ... no comparable variable existed in both survey years. Nutrition Services • 68.6% of schools offered breakfast to students and 63.0% participated ...

  13. Combined intensive nutrition education and micronutrient powder supplementation improved nutritional status of mildly wasted children on Nias Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayati, Dyah A; Scherbaum, Veronika; Purwestri, Ratna C; Wirawan, Nia N; Suryantan, Julia; Hartono, Susan; Bloem, Maurice A; Pangaribuan, Rosnani V; Biesalski, Hans K; Hoffmann, Volker; Bellows, Anne C

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of intensive nutrition education (INE) with or without the provision of micronutrient powder (MNP) on the nutritional status of mildly wasted children in Nias, Indonesia, two groups of mildly wasted (>=-1.5 to children aged >=6 to children who were living at a clear distance from INE and INE+MNP villages were selected to receive a monthly non-intensive nutrition education program (NNE) with or without MNP (n=50 both respectively). WHZ, weight, height, haemoglobin (Hb) level, and morbidity data were assessed at admission, during the study, and at individual discharge. Children's weight gain (g/kg body weight/day) was highest in INE+MNP group (2.2±2.1), followed by INE (1.1±0.9), NNE+MNP (0.3±0.5) and NNE (0.3±0.4) group. In both MNP intervention groups (INE+MNP, NNE+MNP), supplements significantly increased Hb value (g/L) of respective children (10.0±10.0; pchildren who reached discharge criterion was highest among the INE+MNP (70.6%; n=36), followed by INE (64.1%; n=41), NNE+MNP (26.0%; n=13), and NNE (20.0%; n=10) groups (pchildren in the INE+MNP group (29.9 days), followed by INE (40.0 days), NNE+MNP (80.6 days), and NNE (86.2 days) respectively (pnutrition education supported by MNP supplementation produced the best results regarding weight gain and haemoglobin status of mildly wasted children.

  14. Resourceful or At Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen-Sørensen, Anna-Katharina

    Introduction: Social categories are used to determine which individuals are at an increased risk of unfavorable outcomes and they are a vital tool for the development of targeted interventions. This presentation takes a critical look at the Resourceful and At Risk categories, that are often emplo...... employed in research and social work, and investigate the possible consequences of the preconceptions born out of these categories....

  15. The nutritional status of children in Bhutan: results from the 2008 National nutrition survey and trends over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangmo Ugyen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports on the nutritional status of Bhutanese children. The objective of this paper is to summarize results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and to describe progress achieved during the last two decades. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2376 children aged 6 to 59 months was conducted during November-December 2008 to provide national and regional estimates. A multi-stage cluster sampling method was applied and 40 gewogs/thromdes were selected from each region (Western, Central, Eastern. Guidelines on how to measure length/height and weight followed WHO standardized procedures. Data were analysed for consistency and validation using the software WHO Anthro and the WHO SPSS macro. Underweight, stunting, overweight, wasting and thinness were defined based on the WHO Child Growth Standards. Data from 1986-88 and 1999 national surveys were reanalysed using the WHO standards to describe trends in nutritional status. Results Nationally, 34.9% Bhutanese preschool children are stunted and 10.4% are underweight. Wasting is 4.7%, with severe wasting close to 2% in rural areas, while overweight affects 4.4% of preschool children. While underweight rates are similar across regions, wasting is substantially more prevalent in the Western region and stunting in the Eastern region. Stunting shows a steep rise during the first two years of life, as high as 40%, and levels off thereafter, while wasting is greatest among children aged 6-24 months and subsequently decreases. The prevalence of stunting fell from 60.9% in 1986-88 to 34.9% in 2008, and underweight declined from 34.0% to 10.4% during same period. The percentage of wasted children dropped from 5.2% in 1986-88 to 2.5% in 1999 but then increased to 4.7% in 2008. Conclusions There have been major improvements in the nutritional status of Bhutanese children over the past two decades, however, linear growth retardation remains a significant concern. Early

  16. Can children discriminate sugar-sweetened from non-nutritively sweetened beverages and how do they like them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruyter, J.C.; Katan, M.B.; Kas, R.; Olthof, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Replacement of sugar-sweetened by non-nutritively sweetened beverages or water may reduce excess weight gain in children. However, it is unclear whether children like non-nutritively sweetened beverages as much as sugar-sweetened beverages. We examined whether children could taste a

  17. Role of nutrition in preventing insulin resistance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasetti, Annalisa; Franchini, Simone; Comegna, Laura; Prezioso, Giovanni; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Nutrition during prenatal, early postnatal and pubertal period is crucial for the development of insulin resistance and its consequences. During prenatal period fetal environment and nutrition seems to interfere with metabolism programming later in life. The type of dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, protein, fat and micronutrient content in maternal nutrition could influence insulin sensitivity in the newborn. The effects of lactation on metabolism and nutritional behavior later in life have been studied. Dietary habits and quality of diet during puberty could prevent the onset of a pathological insulin resistance through an adequate distribution of macro- and micronutrients, a diet rich in fibers and vegetables and poor in saturated fats, proteins and sugars. We want to overview the latest evidences on the risk of insulin resistance later in life due to both nutritional behaviors and components during the aforementioned periods of life, following a chronological outline from fetal development to adolescence.

  18. Assessment of nutritional status of children attending paediatric outpatient department at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreyash J Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The nutrition status is always neglected issue of public health. The high prevalence of malnutrition in NFHS data gives alarm to work for the children who are assets of our country in future. Objectives To study the nutritional status of children attending pediatric OPD by anthropometric measurements and to know the health status of these children and their relation with nutritional status. Methods The nutritional profile of children of age group 0-5 years attending Paediatric OPD at New Civil Hospital (NCH, Surat was studied. Stratification to get equal representation of both gender by enrolling 50 boys and 50girls of each age group 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 1-2 years, 2-3 years, 3-4 years and 4-5 years was done. Total 600 children of age group of 0-5 years were enrolled. Results As per WHO growth standards, 17.5%, 46% and 39.33% children had wasting, stunting and underweight respectively. Total malnutrition cases were 386 with a prevalence of 64.3 %. Age group wise prevalence of under nutrition was highest in 37-48 months age group (69.2 %. As per assessment of nutritional status of children aged 6-60 months using MUAC, 45.8 % children have mild to moderate malnutrition whereas 1.8 % has severe malnutrition. Conclusion Malnutrition is more in boys compared to girls. Malnutrition was more prevalent in 12-60 months age group children and was found statistically significant. Reduction of malnutrition in 0-5 age group can be ensured by availability of supplementary feed.

  19. NUTRITION AS A FACTOR OF ADAPTATION TODDLERS TO CHILDREN'S EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Альбертовна Дракина

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion. Thus, the rational nutrition of children ensures improvement of local immunity and as a consequence of the increasing resistance of the child's body, as evidenced by the decrease in the number of SARS that facilitates easier period of adaptation to the children's educational institution.

  20. Association between maternal socioeconomic factors and nutritional outcomes in children under 5 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Géa‐Horta

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Maternal level of schooling was associated with short stature in children and maternal employment with overweight, indicating the need to take into account the socioeconomic factors when proposing programs and strategies aimed at health and nutrition improvement of children, considering inter‐sectoral interventions.

  1. Assessment of nutritional status of school children in Oyo West Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the nutritional status of primary school children in Oyo West Local Government Area of Oyo State. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was among 499 primary school children. The study instrument was a pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire.

  2. Adaptation of calcium absorption during treatment of nutritional rickets in Nigerian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional rickets in Nigerian children has been effectively treated with Ca supplementation. High values of Ca absorption efficiency have been observed in untreated children, but whether Ca absorption efficiency changes during treatment with Ca is unknown. Our objective in conducting this study wa...

  3. Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jack L.

    Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

  4. A qualitative study of the quality of life of children receiving intravenous nutrition at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emedo, Marylyn-Jane; Godfrey, Emma I; Hill, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    To discover the views of children with severe intestinal failure treated with intravenous nutrition from early life and who remained heavily dependent on treatment throughout childhood. Seven children ages 7 to 17 years (mean 13 years) were interviewed. The diagnoses were enteropathy in 3, extreme short gut in 1, complex (associated mucosal inflammation and dysmotitlity) in 2, and intestinal pseudo-obstruction in 1. They were treated with intravenous nutrition overnight at home that was administered by trained parents using the simplest possible system. The children were individually questioned about their lifestyle and health. Transcripts were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Children coped well with life with intravenous nutrition (apart from septicaemia in 2 cases), but were troubled when complications of the underlying disease persisted (eg, nocturnal disturbance, stool frequency, abdominal pain). Children were aware that life was restricted (eg, fewer sleepovers with friends, fewer late nights out). There was a high level of family functioning. Older children wished to take care of themselves. The burdens of life with intravenous nutrition appear to be less significant for these children than living with the effects of chronic illness. There was resilience and acceptance in the face of illness-related demands. This study has found that despite the problems they may face, it is possible for children fed intravenously at home to develop a level of resilience, maintain a positive outlook, and cope well with illness-related demands even when they have had virtually lifelong severe intestinal failure. Families can continue to function well.

  5. Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children's health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children's eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch…

  6. Dietary patterns and nutritional status of pre-school children in Nairobi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the dietary patterns and nutritional status of pre-school children in Nairobi, Kenya. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Pre-schools in Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Three hundred and four pre-school children (149 males and 155 females) aged three to five years were assessed. Results: About 96% ...

  7. Dietary Status and Impact of Risperidone on Nutritional Balance in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ronald L.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Aman, Michael G.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Posey, David J.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Pachler, Maryellen; McCracken, James T.; Tierney, Elaine; Bozzolo, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    Background: Risperidone may be effective in improving tantrums, aggression, or self-injurious behaviour in children with autism, but often leads to weight gain. Method: Using a quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), we prospectively examined the nutritional intake of 20 children with autism participating in a randomised…

  8. Children as subjects in nutrition research: a retrospective look at their perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Tamar; Economos, Christina; Folta, Sara; Sacheck, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    To explore children's motivations for and perceived benefits and barriers to nutrition research participation. To explore children's perspectives on how to improve the research experience. Seven focus group sessions were conducted during March 2008 with research participants from a trial that examined the effects of pre-exercise snacks on physical activity and exercise stress in children. The Health Belief Model for Behavior Change served as the framework for understanding perceived benefits and barriers to research participation and cues to action to help children's readiness for future research participation. Indoor sports center in Acton, Massachusetts. Thirty-five children, 15 males and 20 females, aged 7-10 years. Children's participation in nutrition research. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and sorted according to recurring trends and patterns using NVIVO software. Participants were overwhelmingly motivated to participate in research because of financial incentives. The biggest barrier to participation was anxiety over finger pricks. Children suggested demonstrating different aspects of data collection during recruitment to reduce trepidation and using distraction techniques to improve the experience during anxiety-provoking data collection. Themes for benefits and barriers to research participation were identified. Data also provide a guide to promote readiness and to improve the research experience for children in future nutrition trials. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Prevalence of Anemia in Head Start Children. Nutrition Evaluation, 1968-69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelsen, Olaf; And Others

    Concern over the nutritional status of the disadvantaged in America led to this study describing the prevalence of anemia among Head Start children in Pontiac, Michigan. Hemoglobin and hematocrit determinations, along with measurements of height and weight, were performed on 77 children, 4 to 6 years old, enrolled in Head Start classes. These…

  10. Correlation between Calorie Intake and Nutritional Status of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryo Windaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is a severe pervasive developmental disorder with prevalence as high as one in sixty-eight children. Children diagnosed with ASD may have food intake problem and might affect their nutritional status in the future. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between total calorie intake and nutritional status of ASD children. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Indigrow Child Development and Autism Center involving 16 patients from October to November 2015. Total calorie intake was assessed by 24-hour food recall and nutritional status was measured by Z-score. Correlation was analyzed using Spearman’s Rho. Results: Overweight and obesity were found in 10 out of 16 ASD children assessed. Total calorie intake was not significantly correlated with nutritional status of ASD children (r=0.021, p=0.940. Conclusions: There is no significant relevance between total calorie intake and nutritional status in ASD children at Indigrow Child Development and Autism Center.

  11. A novel school-based intervention to improve nutrition knowledge in children: cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Ken K

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving nutrition knowledge among children may help them to make healthier food choices. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of a novel educational intervention to increase nutrition knowledge among primary school children. Methods We developed a card game 'Top Grub' and a 'healthy eating' curriculum for use in primary schools. Thirty-eight state primary schools comprising 2519 children in years 5 and 6 (aged 9-11 years were recruited in a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial. The main outcome measures were change in nutrition knowledge scores, attitudes to healthy eating and acceptability of the intervention by children and teachers. Results Twelve intervention and 13 control schools (comprising 1133 children completed the trial. The main reason for non-completion was time pressure of the school curriculum. Mean total nutrition knowledge score increased by 1.1 in intervention (baseline to follow-up: 28.3 to 29.2 and 0.3 in control schools (27.3 to 27.6. Total nutrition knowledge score at follow-up, adjusted for baseline score, deprivation, and school size, was higher in intervention than in control schools (mean difference = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.05 to 2.16; p = 0.042. At follow-up, more children in the intervention schools said they 'are currently eating a healthy diet' (39.6% or 'would try to eat a healthy diet' (35.7% than in control schools (34.4% and 31.7% respectively; chi-square test p Conclusions The 'Top Grub' card game facilitated the enjoyable delivery of nutrition education in a sample of UK primary school age children. Further studies should determine whether improvements in nutrition knowledge are sustained and lead to changes in dietary behaviour.

  12. [Value of nutritional risk screening in evaluating adverse clinical outcomes in children with severe pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Yan-Feng; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Han, Shu-Zhen; Miao, Jing; Cui, Min

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the nutritional risk in children with severe pneumonia using the Screening Tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition in Paediatrics (STAMP) and the association between nutritional risk and adverse clinical outcomes. According to the STAMP score, 216 children with severe pneumonia were classified into high nutritional risk group (HR group; n=98), moderate nutritional risk group (MR group; n=65), and low nutritional risk group (LR group; n=53). Fasting blood samples were collected to measure the levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), adiponectin, leptin, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), albumin, transferrin, prealbumin, and retinol binding protein (RBP). The adverse clinical outcomes were recorded. Compared with the MR and LR groups, the HR group had significantly lower serum levels of IGF-1, leptin, adiponectin, prealbumin, and RBP, as well as a significantly higher serum level of NEFA (Prisk screening has an important value in evaluating the clinical outcome of children with severe pneumonia, and children at a higher nutritional risk tend to have more adverse clinical outcomes.

  13. ROLE OF MATERNAL EDUCATION & OCCUPATION IN THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF UNDER THREE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaili Vyas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research question: To determine the role of  Maternal  Education & Occupation in the nutritional status of  <3yrs children. Objectives: To assess the role of  maternal education & occupation in the nutritional status of  <3yrs children.  Study design: Cross sectional study. Settings:In the field practice area of Department of Community Medicine, Dehradun. Participants:500 children between 0-3years. Statistical Analysis:Chi Square . Results:  Majority of mothers (41.20% were found to be illiterate & of these majority had undernourished children (73.30%. In our study, most (92.20% of the mothers were housewives or were unemployed ,whereas maximum undernutrition (88.46% was found in children whose mothers were unskilled labourer by occupation, whereas children of housewives were found to be only 59.22%  undernourished.

  14. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in Children during Predialysis, or Treated By Peritoneal Dialysis or Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Dilek; Sönmez, Ferah; Karakaş, Sacide; Yavaşcan, Önder; Aksu, Nejat; Ömürlü, İmran Kurt; Yenisey, Çiğdem

    2016-06-01

    Malnutrition is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of this study was to evaluate nutritional status of children with stage 3-4 CKD and treated by peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis using anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters and bioelectrical impedance analysis. The study included a total of 52 patients and 46 healthy children. In anthropometric evaluation, the children with CKD had lower values for standard deviation score for weight, height, body mass index, skinfold thickness and mid-arm circumference than those of healthy children (p nutritional evaluation in children. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Oral motor dysfunction, feeding problems and nutritional status in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mei; Fu, Ping; Zhao, Jian-hui; Lan, Kun; Zhang, Hong

    2004-10-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the clinical features of oral motor dysfunction and feeding problems as well as the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-nine CP children, 39 boys and 20 girls, mean age 31 months (20 to 72 months), were recruited. Their parents were interviewed for high risk factors and feeding history. Each case was assessed for oral motor and feeding problems based on oral motor and feeding skill score; for nutritional status by measurement of weight, height; neurologically for type of cerebral palsy and for developmental age by Gesell's developmental scale. Equal number of age and sex matched controls were included for comparison of nutritional status, oral motor and feeding skill score. Among 59 patients, 51 cases had oral motor dysfunction and 55 cases had feeding problems including all athtosis, spastic tetraplegia, and 16 had spastic diplegia. The scores of both the mean oral motor function and feeding skill of CP children were significantly lower than those of the controls (P children with cerebral palsy consisted of liquid and semisolid diet. Body weight and height below the 25th percentile were found in 13 cases and 19 cases, respectively. The majority of the children with cerebral palsy had oral motor dysfunction and feeding problems which appeared in early age and disturbed the growth and nutritional status. Thorough assessment for oral motor function, feeding problems and nutritional status of CP children is indicated in order to start timely rehabilitation and nutritional interventions which can significantly improve their nutritional status and quality of life.

  16. Relationship between nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and cognitive development in preschool children in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsito, Oktarina; Khomsan, Ali; Hernawati, Neti; Anwar, Faisal

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyze nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and factors affecting the cognitive development of preschool-age children. This study was conducted in the Village of Babakan, Sub-District of Dramaga, Bogor Regency, West Java. This cross-sectionally designed study was conducted with mothers who had preschool children aged 3-5 years as respondents. Fifty-eight children were included. The distribution of mother's educational level was quite diverse, and the largest percentage (44.8%) had senior high school education. Approximately 78% of the family income per capita was classified into the non-poor category and 22.4% into the poor category. The average mother's nutritional knowledge score was 76.7 ± 2.5 (moderate category). Most of the preschool children (84.4%) had psychosocial stimulation scores in the moderate category (30-45). The nutritional status of children showed that 15.5% were underweight, 5.2% were wasted, 3.4% were severely wasted, and 19% of the children were in the short and very short categories (stunted). The stepwise regression results showed that psychosocial stimulation (P education (P = 0.002) and nutritional status based on the height index for age (P = 0.028) had a positive and significant effect on cognitive development of the preschool children (adjusted R(2), 0.434; P = 0.028).

  17. A Longitudinal Investigation of Nutrition and Dietary Patterns in Children of Mothers with Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Easter, Abigail; Naumann, Ulrike; Northstone, Kate; Schmidt, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet; Micali, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate dietary patterns and nutritional intake in children of mothers with eating disorders. STUDY DESIGN: Mothers (N = 9423) from a longitudinal general population birth cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, completed Food Frequency Questionnaires on their children at 3, 4, 7, and 9 years of age. Macronutrient intake was estimated, and dietary patterns were obtained using principal components analysis. Linear regression and mixed-effects models...

  18. Implementing the global plan of action. IAEA's programme for improving children's health and nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is working to ensure improved health for all, particularly children and women, in partnership with its 132 Member States, other United Nations organizations, and donors. Its programme of technical activities is fully supportive of the recommendations adopted in 1990 by the international community during the World Summit for Children, particularly the statement 'enhancement of children's health and nutrition is a first duty'. (IAEA)

  19. Implementing the global plan of action. IAEA's programme for improving children's health and nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is working to ensure improved health for all, particularly children and women, in partnership with its 132 Member States, other United Nations organizations, and donors. Its programme of technical activities is fully supportive of the recommendations adopted in 1990 by the international community during the World Summit for Children, particularly the statement 'enhancement of children's health and nutrition is a first duty'. (IAEA)

  20. Nutrition and Goiter Status of Primary School Children in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    Sanusi R. A. and Ekerette N. N.. Department of Human Nutrition, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) has continued to be of significant health problem in some communities.

  1. Nutritional status of children under five years and associated factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    ... in society. Identification of core factors influencing nutrition of this population supports plans to alleviate child malnutrition ... particular concern since the early years of life are crucial for ..... be explained by the fact that the family meal is.

  2. Mothers' perceptions about the nutritional status of their overweight children: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caliandra Francescatto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this systematic review aims to explore and describe the studies that have as a primary outcome the identification of mothers' perception of the nutritional status of their children. SOURCES: the PubMed, Embase, LILACS, and SciELO databases were researched, regardless of language or publication date. The terms used for the search, with its variants, were: Nutritional Status, Perception, Mother, Maternal, Parents, Parental. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: after screening of 167 articles, 41 were selected for full text reading, of which 17 were included in the review and involved the evaluation of the perception of mothers on the nutritional status of 57,700 children and adolescents. The methodological quality of the studies ranged from low to excellent. The proportion of mothers who inadequately perceived the nutritional status of their children was high, and was the most common underestimation for children with overweight or obesity. CONCLUSION: despite the increasing prevalence of obesity in pediatric age, mothers have difficulty in properly perceiving the nutritional status of their children, which may compromise referral to treatment programs.

  3. What determines nutritional recovery in malnourished children after correction of congenital heart defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Balu; Radhakrishnan, Reshma; Sarala, Deepa Aravindakshan; Sundaram, Karimassery Ramaiyar; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2009-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), especially in developing countries. To examine the impact of corrective intervention on the nutritional status of children with CHD and identify factors associated with suboptimal recovery. Consecutive patients with CHD in a tertiary center in South India were evaluated for nutritional status before and 2 years after corrective intervention. Anthropometry was performed at presentation and every 6 months for 2 years, and z scores were compared. Malnutrition was defined as a weight-for-age, height-for-age, and weight/height z score nutritional status at presentation, and height of parents and not with type of cardiac lesion, dietary intake, or socioeconomic factors. This study from South India demonstrates severe malnutrition in over half of the patients with CHD and is not always reversed by corrective surgery or intervention. Persistent malnutrition after corrective intervention is predicted by nutritional status at presentation, birth weight, and parental anthropometry.

  4. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients′ scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  5. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Abo Al Fotoh, Mohammad Nagib; Elibehidy, Rabab Mohamed; Ramadan, Shreen Magdy Ahmad; Mohammad, Ehab Mohammady

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD) at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients' scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  6. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Screen time in Mexican children: findings from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ian; Medina, Catalina; Pedroza, Andrea; Barquera, Simón

    2013-01-01

    To provide descriptive information on the screen time levels of Mexican children. 5 660 children aged 10-18 years from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012) were studied. Screen time (watching television, movies, playing video games and using a computer) was self-reported. On average, children engaged in 3 hours/day of screen time, irrespective of gender and age. Screen time was higher in obese children, children from the northern and Federal District regions of the country, children living in urban areas, and children in the highest socioeconomic status and education categories. Approximately 33% of 10-14 year olds and 36% of 15-18 year olds met the screen time guideline of ≤ 2 hours/day. 10-18 year old Mexican children accumulate an average of 3 hours/day of screen time. Two thirds of Mexican children exceed the recommended maximal level of time for this activity.

  8. Nutritional status, dietary intake patterns and nutrition knowledge of children aged 5-6 years attending kindergartens in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, B K; Kathryn Tham, B L; Wong, S N; Winnie Chee, S S; Tee, E S

    2012-08-01

    Early childhood is a period during which many factors influence the development of lifelong eating habits. This study aimed to assess the nutritional status of young children and to determine factors related to eating habits. A total of 992 children aged 5-6 years attending kindergartens that participated in the Bright Start Nutrition programme in the Klang Valley were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements were taken and body mass index (BMI) calculated. A questionnaire to assess the children's nutrition knowledge was administered through interviews, while their mothers self-administered another set of questionnaires regarding knowledge, attitude and practice on nutrition. The mean BMI was 15.7 +/- 2.7 kg/m2 in boys and 15.4 +/- 2.4 kg/m2 in girls. Based on the WHO 2007 growth reference, the prevalence of overweight and obesity were 9.1% and 9.3%, respectively; while the prevalence of thinness and stunting were 5.8% and 3.9%, respectively. Most of the children consumed breakfast (86.4%), lunch (94.1%) and dinner (93.4%) daily. The majority liked fruits (95.1%), snacks (93.8%), Western fast food (93.3%) and milk (90.8%), while less than two-thirds (65.1%) liked vegetables. The mean nutrition knowledge scores for the children and mothers were 73.2 +/- 9.8% and 60.2 +/- 18.8%, respectively. Maternal nutrition knowledge was correlated positively with children's vegetable intake (r=0.111, pobesity than underweight and thinness among the urban young children studied. As mother's nutrition knowledge was found to exert a positive influence on children's eating habits, it is important to provide nutrition education to both mothers and children when conducting intervention programmes.

  9. A longitudinal investigation of nutrition and dietary patterns in children of mothers with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Abigail; Naumann, Ulrike; Northstone, Kate; Schmidt, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet; Micali, Nadia

    2013-07-01

    To investigate dietary patterns and nutritional intake in children of mothers with eating disorders. Mothers (N = 9423) from a longitudinal general population birth cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, completed Food Frequency Questionnaires on their children at 3, 4, 7, and 9 years of age. Macronutrient intake was estimated, and dietary patterns were obtained using principal components analysis. Linear regression and mixed-effects models were used to assess dietary patterns and nutritional intake among children of women with lifetime anorexia nervosa (AN, n = 140), bulimia nervosa (BN, n = 170), or AN+BN (n = 71), compared with children of women without eating disorders (unexposed women, n = 9037). Children in the maternal AN and BN groups had higher scores on the "health conscious/vegetarian" dietary pattern compared with unexposed children. Less adherence to the "traditional" dietary pattern was observed in children of exposed mothers, with more pronounced differences in early childhood. Children of women with AN and BN had higher intake of energy and children of women with BN had higher intake of carbohydrates and starch and lower intake of fat, compared with children in the unexposed group. Maternal eating disorders are associated with altered offspring dietary patterns and macronutrient intake. Longitudinal changes in patterns of diet in children of women with eating disorders may increase the risk of weight gain or disordered eating later in life. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advertisement and Children: is Brand Logo Recognition of Children Effected their Nutritional Habits and Food Preferences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Tokuc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was conducted for determining the eating habits and food knowledge and rate of recognizing brand logos currently featured in promotional campaigns of the food industry of the school children. And to explore the relationship between the ability of recognizing brand logos currently featured in promotional campaigns of the food industry and eating habits, food knowledge and preferences. METHOD: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 primary schools in the provincial center of Edirne. The questionnaire form was composed of three parts. In the first part; the socio-demographic characteristics and nutritional habits, in the second part; food knowledge and preferences of the students and in the third part; ability to recognize brand logos were questioned. RESULTS: 1018 students were participated in the study. The results of the study confirmed the findings of previous studies that the diet of children aged 9-11 was poor. The majority of the children reported eating unhealthy foods such cips, crisps and fast-food and drinking fizzy drinks at least once a day. Children knew healthy foods (med:8 but did not prefer healthy foods (med:5. 84.9 % of the students recognized more than the half of the brand logos. A correlation was found between higher brand logo recognition and poorer eating behaviors and food knowledge. CONCLUSION: Nonetheless this study did not presented strong evidence to suggest a casual link between food advertising and poor diet; it indicated that food promotion may have an influence on children. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(6.000: 459-464

  11. Relationship between food insecurity and nutritional status of Brazilian children under the age of five

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Leonardo Pozza dos; Gigante,Denise Petrucci

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between food insecurity and nutritional status of Brazilian children. METHODS: The National Demographic and Health Survey 2006 database is available on the worldwide web. Thus, the analyzed variables were obtained in this study, including nutritional indices, food insecurity and other socioeconomic and demographic variables. The height-for-age, weight-for-age and weight-for-height indices were evaluated as the Z-score of the...

  12. Gluten-Free Diet in Children: An Approach to a Nutritionally Adequate and Balanced Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Penagini, Francesca; Dilillo, Dario; Meneghin, Fabio; Mameli, Chiara; Fabiano, Valentina; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Gluten-free diet (GFD) is the cornerstone treatment for celiac disease (CD). GFD implies a strict and lifelong elimination from the diet of gluten, the storage protein found in wheat, barley, rye and hybrids of these grains, such as kamut and triticale. The absence of gluten in natural and processed foods, despite being the key aspect of GFD, may lead to nutritional consequences, such as deficits and imbalances. The nutritional adequacy of GFD is particularly important in children, this the a...

  13. Assessment of nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interaction in Central American refugee children

    OpenAIRE

    Laude Monica

    1999-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and December 1992 to assess the nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interactions in a group of 153 Nicaraguan refugee children living in Costa Rica. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric indices. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scale of Mental Development. Mother-child interaction was assessed with the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale and Caldwell's Home Observation and Measurem...

  14. Socioeconomic inequities in the health and nutrition of children in low/middle income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G; Scherpbier, Robert; Gwatkin, Davidson

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of social inequities on the health and nutrition of children in low and middle income countries. METHODS: We reviewed existing data on socioeconomic disparities within-countries relative to the use of services, nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. A conceptual framework including five major hierarchical categories affecting inequities was adopted: socioeconomic context and position, differential exposure, differential vulnerability, differential hea...

  15. Nutritional Awareness of Mothers in Relation to Nutritional Status of the Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Santoshi; Kejriwal, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the developing world, nearly one-third (35%) of under-five children are stunted and rural children are twice likely to be underweight as those in urban areas (United Nations, Children education Fund, UNICEF Global Database (2006-2010). United Nations Development Assistance Framework of Uganda. Retrieved from…

  16. Programs at risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, , R.

    Declaring that “these lists represent the smoke behind which a fire may be raging,” Senator John Glenn (D.-Ohio), chairman of the Senate Government Affairs committee, has released a list prepared by the Office of Management and Budget of 73 government programs “in which hundreds of billions of federal dollars are at risk.”The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Department of Energy are among the 16 federal departments and agencies having programs that Glenn feels could be “our next HUDs.” The secret list is not of programs where losses have occurred, but only where safeguards are thought to be insufficient.

  17. Teachers' Beliefs about the Impact of Games on the Academic and Social Experiences of Diverse and At-Risk Children in Schools: A Deleuzian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores teachers' beliefs about the ways in which the use of digital games in schooling contexts impacted upon students who they believed to be in some way at risk of educational or social alienation or failure. Drawing upon the theoretical resources provided by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, the paper explores opportunities…

  18. Family Functioning Predictors of Self-Concept and Self-Esteem in Children at Risk for Learning Disabilities in Oman: Exclusion of Parent and Gender Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Abu-Serei, Usama Saad

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated whether family functioning can predict the self-concept and self-esteem of normally achieving (NA) and at risk for learning disabilities (LD) students in Oman regardless of parent education level and gender status. A total of 259 elementary school students were selected from schools in the main districts of Muscat, the…

  19. Role of calcium deficiency in development of nutritional rickets in Indian children: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Seth, Anju; Aneja, Satinder; Sharma, Bhawna; Sonkar, Pitamber; Singh, Satveer; Marwaha, Raman K

    2012-10-01

    Nutritional rickets is usually attributed to vitamin D deficiency. Studies from some tropical countries have postulated low dietary intake of calcium as the cause of nutritional rickets. Both vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency are highly prevalent in India. Information on their relative contribution in the development of rickets in Indian children is limited. The aim was to study the role of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in causation of nutritional rickets in young Indian children. In a case-control study, 67 children with nutritional rickets and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were compared for demographic factors, nutritional status, sun exposure (UV score), dietary calcium and phytate intake (for subjects not breast-fed at presentation), and biochemical parameters [serum calcium, inorganic phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and PTH]. Mean intake of calcium (204±129 vs. 453±234 mg/d; Prickets, significant negative correlations were seen between dietary calcium intake and radiological score (r=-0.28; P=0.03) and PTH (r=-0.26; P=0.02). No correlation was found between serum 25OHD level and radiological score or biochemical parameters of rickets. Rickets develops when low dietary calcium intake coexists with a low or borderline vitamin D nutrition status.

  20. Health and nutritional status of children in Ethiopia: do maternal characteristics matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Abdu Kedir

    2013-03-01

    In Ethiopia, despite some recent improvements, the health and nutritional status of children is very poor. A better understanding of the main socioeconomic determinants of child health and nutrition is essential to address the problem and make appropriate interventions. In the present study, an attempt is made to explore the effect of maternal characteristics on the health and nutritional status of under-five children using the 2005 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey. The health and nutritional status of children are measured using the two widely used anthropometric indicators height-for-age (HAZ) and weight-for-height (WHZ). In the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimation, it is observed that maternal characteristics have a significant impact on child health and nutritional status. The magnitudes of the coefficients, however, are found to slightly increase when maternal education is instrumented in the 2SLS estimation. Moreover, in the quantile regression (QR) estimation, the impacts of maternal characteristics are observed to vary between long-term and current child health and nutritional status.

  1. Assessment and comparison of nutritional status of government and private secondary school children of Muzaffarnagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Jain Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition leads to poor cognitive performance and physical growth in children and is a major component of school health services. Imbalanced nutrition in adolescence can put them at high risk of chronic diseases particularly if combined with adverse lifestyle. Aims & Objectives: This study was designed to assess and compare the nutritional status of government and private school children of Muzaffarnagar city. Material and Methods: School based, comparative Cross-sectional study. One private and one government school was selected using unistage stratified random sampling. A total of 1960 (980 each from private school and government school school children of class 6-12 were studied for socio-epidemiological details, dietary habits, and physical activity. Information on education status, occupation, monthly income of their parents was also collected. Required anthropometric measurements were taken. Results: Of 980 children from private school, 90 (9.18% were underweight,138 (14.08% were overweight, and 137 (13.97% were obese. Majority of children from government school were underweight 215 (21.94% except for 24 (2.45% overweight children. Conclusion: This study shows the dual nature of nutritional problem, under-nutrition among the lower socioeconomic class of govt. school at one side and worrisome epidemic of obesity among the affluent of private school

  2. Developing Healthy Food Preferences in Preschool Children Through Taste Exposure, Sensory Learning, and Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekitsing, Chandani; Hetherington, Marion M; Blundell-Birtill, Pam

    2018-03-01

    The present review was undertaken in order to summarize and evaluate recent research investigating taste exposure, sensory learning, and nutrition education interventions for promoting vegetable intake in preschool children. Overall, taste exposure interventions yielded the best outcomes for increasing vegetable intake in early childhood. Evidence from sensory learning strategies such as visual exposure and experiential learning also show some success. While nutrition education remains the most common approach used in preschool settings, additional elements are needed to strengthen the educational program for increasing vegetable intake. There is a substantial gap in the evidence base to promote vegetable intake in food fussy children. The present review reveals the relative importance of different intervention strategies for promoting vegetable intake. To strengthen intervention effects for improving vegetable intake in preschool children, future research could consider integrating taste exposure and sensory learning strategies with nutrition education within the preschool curriculum.

  3. G132 Which cut off should we choose? Is severity of motor coordination difficulties related to co-morbidity in children at risk for DCD?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingam, R; Schoemaker, M; Jongmans, M; van Heuvelena, M; Emond, A

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate whether children aged 7–9 year old with severe motor difficulties had a greater risk of additional difficulties in activities in daily living (ADL), academic skills, attention and social skills than children with moderate motor difficulties. Methods Children

  4. Association between maternal socioeconomic factors and nutritional outcomes in children under 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géa-Horta, Tatiane; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Ortiz, Renzo Joel Flores; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    To estimate the association between maternal socioeconomic factors and the occurrence of nutritional outcomes in children under five years of age in a representative sample of the Brazilian population. This was a cross-sectional study that evaluated data from the latest National Survey of Children and Women's Demographics and Health, carried out in Brazil in 2006-2007. Maternal employment and maternal level of schooling were the main exposures. The following nutritional outcomes in children were considered: height/age 2SD for overweight. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were utilized as the regression method. After adjustments, it was observed that children whose mothers had low level of schooling had a higher chance of having short stature (OR=3.97, 95% CI, 1.23-12.80) and children whose mothers worked outside the home were more likely to have excess weight (OR=1.57, 95% CI, 1.02-2.42). Maternal employment was not associated with short stature in children (OR=1.09, 95% CI, 0.67-1.77). Maternal level of schooling was associated with short stature in children and maternal employment with overweight, indicating the need to take into account the socioeconomic factors when proposing programs and strategies aimed at health and nutrition improvement of children, considering inter-sectoral interventions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. [Nutritional status of street children in the district of Manga (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diongue, M; Ndiaye, P; Yameogo, I; Faye, B F; Dia, A Tal; Diousse, P

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is an important indicator of development, and its consequences in children and adolescents produce a serious socioeconomic burden. Children living on the street are more vulnerable than others. Thus, our objective was to analyze the nutritional status of children living on the streets of Manga, through a cross-sectional and analytical study. The snowball technique was used for sampling. Data came from individual interviews, blood samples and medical examinations. Of the 237 children studied, 84.8% were boys; the overall mean age was 11.5 years, and 72.6% were adolescents (aged 10 to 17 years). Growth retardation (15.9%) predominated among the children aged 4 to 9 years, while a weight deficit (27.9%) was most common among those aged 10 to 17. Half of the children (50.2%) with blood tests (N = 119) had anemia. There was a link between anemia and underweight (p = 0.0145). Children who ate at least three times a day were 2.63 times less likely to be anemic (p<0.001). Factors associated with anemia (p<0.005) included survival activities. We frequently found nutritional deficits and anemia in these children. A targeted nutritional program would be a good entry point for their successful reintegration..

  6. Association between maternal socioeconomic factors and nutritional outcomes in children under 5 years of age,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Géa-Horta

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To estimate the association between maternal socioeconomic factors and the occurrence of nutritional outcomes in children under five years of age in a representative sample of the Brazilian population. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that evaluated data from the latest National Survey of Children and Women's Demographics and Health, carried out in Brazil in 2006-2007. Maternal employment and maternal level of schooling were the main exposures. The following nutritional outcomes in children were considered: height/age 2SD for overweight. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were utilized as the regression method. Results: After adjustments, it was observed that children whose mothers had low level of schooling had a higher chance of having short stature (OR = 3.97, 95% CI, 1.23-12.80 and children whose mothers worked outside the home were more likely to have excess weight (OR = 1.57, 95% CI, 1.02-2.42. Maternal employment was not associated with short stature in children (OR = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.67-1.77. Conclusion: Maternal level of schooling was associated with short stature in children and maternal employment with overweight, indicating the need to take into account the socioeconomic factors when proposing programs and strategies aimed at health and nutrition improvement of children, considering inter-sectoral interventions.

  7. Dignifying families at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie Anker

    for a family of two parents and two children to be assigned ten different professionals from the municipality. In addition, the coordination between these different sectors is weak, leaving the collaboration between the different professionals almost non-exiting. However, in one Danish municipality a new...

  8. Physical growth and nutritional status assessment of school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-02

    Mar 2, 2016 ... Age and gender differences in the mean body weight, height, and BMI were ..... preferences for male children in the Indian society. This .... Garcia V. Children Malnutrition and Horizontal Inequalities in Sub‑Saharan. Africa: A ...

  9. Beliefs about feeding practices and nutrition for children with disabilities among families in Dharavi, Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Aisha K; Pagedar, Sunita; Wirz, Sheila; Filteau, Suzanne

    2003-03-01

    Attitudes arise from specific experiences and emotions driven by cultural beliefs. An understanding of societal constructs regarding disability in a given culture contributes to developing strategies to meet the needs of children with disabilities by providing culturally competent services. In 1999, a series of focus-group discussions were conducted with families in a low-income community in Mumbai, India to collect qualitative information on the knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA) regarding disability, feeding and nutrition to facilitate the development of an intervention to improve the nutritional well-being of children with disabilities. The KSA of this population of poor families has seldom been directly examined. The specific objectives of this study were (i) to describe the experiences of families with young disabled children in the local community; (ii) to identify the nutritional and feeding needs of children with disabilities; and (iii) to identify any service, environmental or attitudinal barriers to acquiring an adequate nutritional status. Content analysis of concepts in the focus groups identified four emerging themes: (i) acceptance of disability; (ii) services and needs; (iii) future; and (iv) food and nutrition. The focus-group findings enabled a broader understanding of attitudes towards disability within this population, which can have an impact on the care of the child. The findings provided insights into the content of the intervention to be helpful for local families incorporating an understanding of the cultural background of the local community that must be included alongside our understanding of the feeding impairment.

  10. Physical growth and nutritional status assessment of school children in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, J N; Oguonu, T; Ojinnaka, N C; Ibe, B C

    2017-01-01

    Physical growth of a child is a reflection of its state of nutrition. In some developing countries such as Nigeria with changing economy and rapidly growing population, the nutritional status of the children is a reflection of the general well-being of the society. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study in which participants were selected using a multistage sampling method. Heights and weights of randomly selected school children aged 6-12 years were measured using standard protocols. Weight-for-age, height-for-age, and body mass index (BMI)-for-age expressed as Z-scores were used to characterize the nutritional status. Descriptive statistics was used to determine the frequency and standard deviations (SDs) of the anthropometric measurements. Age and gender differences in the mean body weight, height, and BMI were evaluated using an independent samples t-test. Significant levels were set at Pschool-feeding programs in all Nigerian schools as well as nutrition education/campaign directed at parents and their children will help forestall the double burden of under- and over-nutrition among our children.

  11. Weight-based nutritional diagnosis of Mexican children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Sanchez, Rodrigo; de la Luz Gomez-Aguilar, Maria; Haua, Karime; Rozada, Guadalupe

    2012-07-04

    Nutrition related problems are increasing worldwide but they have scarcely been evaluated in people with neuromotor disabilities, particularly in developing countries. In this study our aim was to describe the weight-based nutritional diagnoses of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities who attended a private rehabilitation center in Mexico City. Data from the first visit's clinical records of 410 patients who attended the Nutrition department at the Teleton Center for Children Rehabilitation, between 1999 and 2008, were analyzed. Sex, age, weight and height, length or segmental length data were collected and used to obtain the nutritional diagnosis based on international growth charts, as well as disability-specific charts. Weight for height was considered the main indicator. Cerebral palsy was the most frequent diagnosis, followed by spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and Down's syndrome. Children with cerebral palsy showed a higher risk of presenting low weight/undernutrition (LW/UN) than children with other disabilities, which was three times higher in females. In contrast, children with spina bifida, particularly males, were more likely to be overweight/obese (OW/OB), especially after the age of 6 and even more after 11. Patients with muscular dystrophy showed a significantly lower risk of LW/UN than patients with other disabilities. In patients with Down's syndrome neither LW/UN nor OW/OB were different between age and sex. This is the first study that provides evidence of the nutritional situation of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities in Mexico, based on their weight status. Low weight and obesity affect a large number of these patients due to their disability, age and sex. Early nutritional diagnosis must be considered an essential component in the treatment of these patients to prevent obesity and malnutrition, and improve their quality of life.

  12. Differences in nutritional status of preschool children in the context of the maternal social characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocka, Adrianna; Jacukowicz, Aleksandra

    2017-07-14

    It is generally accepted that maternal factors are important in maintaining the adequate nutritional status of young children. This study was aimed at verifying whether mother's socio-demographic (age and relationship status) and socio-economic features (education and professional status) differentiate the child's nutritional status. A cross-sectional study was conducted between April and October 2013. Five hundred thirty mothers of preschool children from 5 different regions of Poland were interviewed. Mothers were interviewed on their socio-demographic and socio-economic status. To assess the child's nutritional status, body mass index (BMI) z-score and the diet indicators were calculated, such as the percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy (%EAR), the percentage of energy coming from carbohydrates (%EC), fat (%ET) and proteins (%EP). Percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy, %EC, %ET and %EP was obtained from 24-h dietary recalls conducted with the mothers. The results showed that mother's education and professional status did not differentiate any of the indices of the child's nutritional status. However, maternal age and her relationship status occurred significant (ANOVA; p Children of younger mothers had higher BMI z-score and higher %EC as compared to children of older mothers. Moreover, %EAR was higher among children of single mothers and it was closer to the recommended nutrition standards as compared to children of mothers with a partner. When a child is diagnosed with any type of malnutrition, it is worth assessing various factors that might influence the nutritional status, such as child's social background (e.g., maternal factors). Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):811-821. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Differences in nutritional status of preschool children in the context of the maternal social characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Potocka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is generally accepted that maternal factors are important in maintaining the adequate nutritional status of young children. This study was aimed at verifying whether mother’s socio-demographic (age and relationship status and socio-economic features (education and professional status differentiate the child’s nutritional status. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between April and October 2013. Five hundred thirty mothers of preschool children from 5 different regions of Poland were interviewed. Mothers were interviewed on their socio-demographic and socio-economic status. To assess the child’s nutritional status, body mass index (BMI z-score and the diet indicators were calculated, such as the percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy (%EAR, the percentage of energy coming from carbohydrates (%EC, fat (%ET and proteins (%EP. Percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy, %EC, %ET and %EP was obtained from 24-h dietary recalls conducted with the mothers. Results: The results showed that mother’s education and professional status did not differentiate any of the indices of the child’s nutritional status. However, maternal age and her relationship status occurred significant (ANOVA; p < 0.05. Children of younger mothers had higher BMI z-score and higher %EC as compared to children of older mothers. Moreover, %EAR was higher among children of single mothers and it was closer to the recommended nutrition standards as compared to children of mothers with a partner. Conclusions: When a child is diagnosed with any type of malnutrition, it is worth assessing various factors that might influence the nutritional status, such as child’s social background (e.g., maternal factors. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5:811–821

  14. The role of agriculture in the nutrition of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackie, Malcolm

    2014-11-01

    Data from across the developing world show consistently that a fundamental cause of poor nutrition is low agricultural productivity and consequent low incomes, especially amongst poor rural households. Conventionally, technical solutions have been sought to contribute to greater household food security, and thus better childhood nutrition. A more holistic approach is required. This paper draws from field examples, mainly in southern and east Africa, to illustrate the implementation and effectiveness of what is termed a 'green evolution' approach which emphasizes the efficient use of available resources of land, labour and inputs, thus allowing food to be sold profitably at low prices. With low food prices, the poor can use their limited funds to invest in better housing, education and health care. This is achieved through building thoughtful, farmer demand-led initiatives, backed by high quality science to deliver widespread improvements in nutrition for the poor.

  15. European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Complications in Children With Neurological Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; van Wynckel, Myriam; Hulst, Jessie; Broekaert, Ilse; Bronsky, Jiri; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Mis, Nataša F; Hojsak, Iva; Orel, Rok; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Schaeppi, Michela; Thapar, Nikhil; Wilschanski, Michael; Sullivan, Peter; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    Feeding difficulties are frequent in children with neurological impairments and can be associated with undernutrition, growth failure, micronutrients deficiencies, osteopenia, and nutritional comorbidities. Gastrointestinal problems including gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, and dysphagia are also frequent in this population and affect quality of life and nutritional status. There is currently a lack of a systematic approach to the care of these patients. With this report, European Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition aims to develop uniform guidelines for the management of the gastroenterological and nutritional problems in children with neurological impairment. Thirty-one clinical questions addressing the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of common gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in neurological impaired children were formulated. Questions aimed to assess the nutritional management including nutritional status, identifying undernutrition, monitoring nutritional status, and defining nutritional requirements; to classify gastrointestinal issues including oropharyngeal dysfunctions, motor and sensory function, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and constipation; to evaluate the indications for nutritional rehabilitation including enteral feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy/jejunostomy; to define indications for surgical interventions (eg, Nissen Fundoplication, esophagogastric disconnection); and finally to consider ethical issues related to digestive and nutritional problems in the severely neurologically impaired children. A systematic literature search was performed from 1980 to October 2015 using MEDLINE. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation was applied to evaluate the outcomes. During 2 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was applied to

  16. Nutrition content of food and beverage products on Web sites popular with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingas, Elena O; Dorfman, Lori; Bukofzer, Eliana

    2009-11-01

    We assessed the nutritional quality of branded food and beverage products advertised on 28 Web sites popular with children. Of the 77 advertised products for which nutritional information was available, 49 met Institute of Medicine criteria for foods to avoid, 23 met criteria for foods to neither avoid nor encourage, and 5 met criteria for foods to encourage. There is a need for further research on the nature and extent of food and beverage advertising online to aid policymakers as they assess the impact of this marketing on children.

  17. Nutritional status of children from low-income countries arriving in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Lopez-Bernus, Amparo; Muñoz Bellido, Juan Luis; Muro, Antonio; Cordero, Miguel; Pardo-Lledias, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Nutritional problems, anaemia and infectious diseases are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents in tropical and subtropical areas. The main objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status in children from low-income countries who migrated to Spain and the value of the usual biochemistry markers of nutrition in these children, as well as to evaluate the nutritional status associated with imported infectious diseases. Moreover, we evaluated the association between anaemia and nutrition problems. We prospectively evaluated immigrants younger than 18 years of age, from tropical or subtropical areas, who were referred on suspicion of or screening for imported diseases. Detailed medical records and physical and oral examinations were obtained. Blood count and biochemical measures of micronutrients and nutritional biomarkers were performed. We included microbiological methods for diagnosing imported infectious diseases according to the region of origin and clinical setting. 373 minors were evaluated, including 250 (67.0%) from sub-Saharan Africa, 67 (18.0%) from North Africa and 56 (15.0%) from Latin America. The mean BMI of the subjects was 19.8±0.2. BMI increased by 0.02 for each month of stay in Spain. Nineteen patients (6.8%) had a nutritional risk of growth problems, and 50 (17.8%) were overweight. The time since arrival was longer in patients who were overweight (pnutritional issue. A low level of ferritin is the most frequently detected nutritional problem and the main cause of anaemia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Children's perceptions of weight, obesity, nutrition, physical activity and related health and socio-behavioural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Christina D; Bakun, Peter J; Herzog, Julia Bloom; Dolan, Peter R; Lynskey, Vanessa M; Markow, Dana; Sharma, Shanti; Nelson, Miriam E

    2014-01-01

    Approximately one-third of children in the USA are either overweight or obese. Understanding the perceptions of children is an important factor in reversing this trend. An online survey was conducted with children to capture their perceptions of weight, overweight, nutrition, physical activity and related socio-behavioural factors. Within the USA. US children (n 1224) aged 8-18 years. Twenty-seven per cent of children reported being overweight; 47·1% of children overestimated the rate of overweight/obesity among US children. A higher percentage of self-classified overweight children (81·9%) worried about weight than did self-classified under/normal weight children (31·1%). Most children (91·1%) felt that it was important to not be overweight, for both health-related and social-related reasons. The majority of children believed that if someone their age is overweight they will likely be overweight in adulthood (93·1%); get an illness such as diabetes or heart disease in adulthood (90·2%); not be able to play sports well (84·5%); and be teased or made fun of in school (87·8%). Children focused more on food/drink than physical activity as reasons for overweight at their age. Self-classified overweight children were more likely to have spoken with someone about their weight over the last year than self-classified under/normal weight children. Children demonstrated good understanding of issues regarding weight, overweight, nutrition, physical activity and related socio-behavioural factors. Their perceptions are important and can be helpful in crafting solutions that will resonate with children.

  19. Impact of parents’ nutritional knowledge on the nutrition and frequency of consumption of selected products in children and adolescents practicing football in a football club in Bydgoszcz, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Anna Ameryk

    2017-02-01

    A correlation between the parents’ nutritional knowledge and the frequency of consumption of selected products by their children was observed. Parents with insufficient knowledge less frequently served dark bread and thick groats than those with good and sufficient knowledge. Parents with good and sufficient knowledge less frequently served instant soups, canned meat, energy and isotonic drinks. No impact of the parents’ knowledge was observed with reference to white cheese, vegetable oils and sweets. Nutritional education of the parents of young athletes is necessary regardless of their nutritional knowledge. Improving eating habits can positively affect children’s development and achievements in sports.   Keywords: Nutrition; Knowledge; Sport; Young Athletes; Eating habits.

  20. A Study on Nutritional Status of Rural School going Children in Kavre District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, D I; Haque, M K; Sharma, K; Mehta, D K; Shakya, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood is a time of active growth in terms of physical size, mental, emotional and psychological development. Normal growth is dependent on adequate nutrition and encompasses major transformations from birth to adulthood. Nutrition is a focal point for health and well being; and has special significance in countries with disadvantages in socioeconomic and hygienic standards. Objective The objective of the present study was to assess the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among rural school going children. Method The present study was cross-sectional study, conducted on 438 rural school going children (169 male and 259 female) with the age group 4-16 years, during the period from April 2014 to July 2014. Age was recorded in year; height and weight were measured in centimeter and kilogram respectively. BMI was calculated by using standard equation. Result The present study concluded that the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were found to be 30.85%, 24.54% and 10.05% respectively among rural school going children of Kavre district. It was revealed that 37.87% was underweight, 29.59% was stunted and 11.25% was thinness among male children whereas in female children, 26.27% was underweight, 21.24% was stunted and 9.27% was thinness. Hence, high prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were observed in male than in female children. Conclusion The present study has successfully documented the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among the rural school going children of Kavre district. The results of the present study will be useful for policy makers in their endeavor to formulate various developmental and health care programs.

  1. Impact of elimination diets on growth and nutritional status in children with multiple food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Melissa J; Adams, Jennifer; Voutilainen, Helena; Feustel, Paul J; Celestin, Jocelyn; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2015-03-01

    Impairment of growth has been reported in food-allergic children. It is not known whether this is related to the extent of food allergies. We sought to compare growth, nutritional status, and nutrient intake in children with food allergy either avoiding cow's milk or avoiding cow's milk and wheat, which are staples of the diet in young children. Infants and young children with challenge-proven allergy were recruited to this prospective study. They were strictly avoiding their allergic food triggers, either cow's milk, or cow's milk and wheat. They were counseled by a dietitian specialized in food allergies on food avoidance diets and nutritionally adequate supplementation at regular intervals. A 3-day food diary was kept. Children's height, weight, and laboratory data for nutritional parameters were monitored at 8-month intervals. A total of 18 patients avoiding milk and 28 patients avoiding milk and wheat were evaluated at an average of 12, 21, and 28 months of age. During the follow-up, the markers of nutritional status, nutrient intake or height for age, and weight for height were comparable between the two groups, although the means for anthropometric measures were below the average for age in both groups. The extent of food elimination diet has no impact on growth or nutritional status of food-allergic children, when diet is adequately supplemented. Close physician and dietitian follow-up are essential for food-allergic children when avoiding one or more foods, which are staples of the diet. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Factors associated with the iron nutritional status of Brazilian children aged 4 to 7 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercílio Paulino ANDRÉ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate factors associated with the iron nutritional status of Brazilian children aged 4 to 7 years in the city of Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 357 children aged 4-7 years who had been followed-up up for during their first six months of life by the Breastfeeding Support Program. Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, feeding practices, nutritional status (height-for-age and body mass index-for-age, and serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis was carried out to evaluate factors independently associated with iron nutritional status (hemoglobin and ferritin, considering α=0.05 as the significance level. Results The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency was (34 9.52% and (11 11.00%, respectively. The factors independently associated with anemia were younger child age, low maternal education, low height-for-age Z-scores, and children of single and separated mothers or widows. Iron deficiency was associated with child younger age and consumption of chocolates and chocolate flavored milk. Conclusion The results obtained allow us to conclude that anemia among children 4-7 years of age is a public health problem in the city of Viçosa, Minas Gerais. Therefore, there is a need for intervention measures targeting children in this age group. These measures can be implemented through food and nutritional education by encouraging the consumption of iron-rich foods.

  3. The Effectiveness of Community-Based Nutrition Education on the Nutrition Status of Under-five Children in Developing Countries. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majamanda, J; Maureen, D; Munkhondia, T M; Carrier, J

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review aimed at examining the best available evidence on the effectiveness of community-based nutrition education in improving the nutrition status of under five children in developing countries. A systematic search of the literature was conducted utilising the following data bases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, Medline, and Web of Knowledge. 9 studies were identified for the critical appraisal process. The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) critical appraisal check-list for experimental studies was utilised and two reviewers conducted the appraisal process independently. 7 studies were included for this review and data was extracted using the JBI data extraction form for experimental studies. The extracted data was heterogeneous as such narrative synthesis was conducted. The nutritional status of children in all studies improved and this was evidenced by increases in weight, height, mid upper arm circumference and reduced morbidity. Key messages about education were age at introduction of complementary foods, nutrition value on different types of feeds found locally and frequency of feeding the children. However, there were varied results regarding the effects of the intervention on the nutrition status of children. This was attributed by differences in implementers' characteristics, different intervention strategy and intensity, difference in age of the children at enrolment, pre-existing children's growth and nutritional status and follow-up periods. In addition to home visiting, conducting group meetings of care givers and community leaders, providing education twice a week and use of cooking demonstrations have shown that they produce highly significant findings. The evidence from the identified studies suggests that community- based nutrition education improves the nutrition status of under-five children in developing countries.

  4. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Koen; van der Velde, Kelly; Joosten, Pieter; Rutten, Hans; Hulst, Jessie; Dulfer, Karolijn

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools. Overall, 642 children, median age 9.8 years (IQR 7.7-11.5), 60 % male, 72 % Caucasian, were included in this prospective study in nine special schools for chronically ill children in the Netherlands. Overall malnutrition was assessed as: acute malnutrition (nutritional risk-screening tool STRONGkids. Subjective health status was assessed with EQ-5D. Overall, 16 % of the children had overall malnutrition: 3 % acute and 13 % chronic malnutrition. Nurses reported 'some/severe problems' on the health status dimensions mobility (15 %), self-care (17 %), usual activities (19 %), pain/discomfort (22 %), and anxiety/depression (22 %) in chronically ill children. Their mean visual analogue scale score (VAS) was 73.0 (SD 11.1). Malnutrition, medication usage, and younger age explained 38 % of the variance of the VAS score. The presence of overall malnutrition in chronically ill children attending special schools was associated with lower subjective health status, especially in younger children and in those with chronic medication usage. Therefore, it is important to develop and use profile-screening tools to identify these children.

  5. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  6. Nutrition and human immunodeficiency virus infection in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To review the relationship between nutrition and paediatric HIV infection, and to discuss treatment options and their applicability to situations with scarce resources. Results. Growth failure and malnutrition are frequent complications of paediatric lllV infection. Intra-uterine growth of infants born to HIV-seropositive ...

  7. Nutrition education and anaemia outcome in inner city black children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seugnet

    die “Special Supplementary Food Program for Wo- ... from the third National Health and Nutrition Ex- amination Survey ... of sickle cell-anaemia or Thalassemia trait, (4) .... iron were whole grain breads, green peas, broc- ... garding risk factors for childhood iron deficiency ... processed by an office-based screening instru-.

  8. Social inequalities, health and nutrition situation among European children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    Need for a more coordinated nutrition approach to maternal & young child services within EU: decrease risk of childhood obesity; improve maternal and child health; & reduce social gradient and disparities in disadvantaged groups. Obesity before pregnancy (monitor pre-pregnancy obesity); excessive...

  9. Burying Nutrition Myths and Activating Choices for our Children's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Nutritional status in mentally disabled children and adolescents: A study from Western Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakime Nogay, Nalan

    2013-04-01

    To assess the nutritional status of mentally disabled children in Turkey on the basis of anthropometric indicators and dietary intake. The sample of the study consisted of 77 mentally disabled children with ages between 10 and 18 years. The body mass index and body fat ratios of the children were calculated by measuring their body weight, height, and the skinfold thickness of their triceps and subscapular. Their three-day nutrition consumption was recorded in order to determine their nutrient intake. When the body weights of the children were evaluated according to their ages, 14.3% of the children were found to be thin. The shortness rate among the participants was 28.6%. The shortness ratio was found to increase with age and girls had a higher inclination for shortness than boys. The ratios of those with ≤5(th) percentile upper middle arm circumference were 32.7% in the 10-13 age group, and 36.0% in the 14-18 age group. The folic acid and calcium intakes of girls in the 10-13 age group, and the calcium intakes of boys in the 10-13 age group were under the suggested values. In the 14-18 age group the vit C and calcium intakes of girls and the calcium intakes of boys were under the recommended values. The prevalence of malnutrition is high among mentally disabled children. In order to raise their quality of life, mentally disabled children must be provided with sufficient nutritional support.

  11. Who Is at Risk for Problematic Video Gaming? Risk Factors in Problematic Video Gaming in Clinically Referred Canadian Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Chloe Lau; Shannon L. Stewart; Catalina Sarmiento; Donald H. Saklofske; Paul F. Tremblay

    2018-01-01

    Both Internet and offline video gaming have become a normal aspect of child development, with estimates of children playing video games ranging from 90% to 97%. Research on problematic video gaming (PVG) has grown substantially in the last decade. Much of that research has focused on community samples, while research on clinically referred children and youth is lacking. The present study includes 5820 clinically referred children and youth across 44 mental health agencies, assessed using the ...

  12. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INFLUENCE ON NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Radulović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of excessive body weight and obesity among children is increasing in many countries, including our country. It is believed that one of the two most important reasons for this increase is insufficient physical activity of children.The aim of this study was to examine the state of the level of nourishment of preschool children in relation to their level of physical activity. The survey was conducted in preschools in Pancevo. The sample consisted of 193 children (88 boys and 105 girls, aged 4 and 5 years. The assessment of the level of nourishment of the children and their parents was done after the standard anthropometric measurements of height, body weight, determining the body mass index and waist circumference and comparing the obtained values with the growth plates given by World Health Organization. Physical activity of the children was evaluated by a questionnaire which parents filled up. Inappropriate level of nourishment had 60 (31.1% children, of which 26 (13.5% with excessive body mass, obese 29 (15.0%, while 5 (2.5% were malnourished. Children are most attracted to sports such as ballet or folk dances, ball games and swimming, but only 22 (15.83% children are members of some sports club. The lack of finances and the lack of sports facilities and terrains are given as reasons by most parents. During the implementation of physical activities, 65.2% of children are never or sometimes exposed to excessive physical effort. The prevalence of insufficient physical activity among preschool children in Pancevo was high, particularly among children with excessive body weight and obese children. Socio-demographic and behavioral factors as well as behavior of parents significantly contributed to physical inactivity.

  13. The impact of intrauterine exposure versus postnatal environment in neurodevelopmental toxicity: long-term neurobehavioral studies in children at risk for developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornoy, A

    2003-04-11

    Various investigators have shown that enriched environment may positively affect the early brain development of experimental animals. Environment was also shown to positively affect the development of young children born to mothers of low socio-economic class (low SES). It is unknown, however, to what extent can an enriched environment improve the developmental outcome of children born with slight brain damage. We studied the development of preschool and early school age children born to heroin dependent parents raised at home or adopted in comparison to children suffering only from environmental deprivation (low parental SES) and to controls. They were examined by several professionals, using standard, age appropriate, neurological and psychological tests. Similar evaluations were performed on a group of early school age children born to mothers with pregestational or with gestational diabetes and on a group of children born prematurely, with a birth weight of less than 1500 g using various developmental tests. Young children born to heroin dependent mothers and fathers raised at home and children of low SES had, in comparison to controls, lower intellectual skills and a higher rate of inattention. This persisted at school age, too. Children born to heroin dependent mothers adopted at a young age and hence being raised in a good environment had normal intellectual function but a high rate of inattention and behavioral problems. We also examined the school age children for possible presence of ADHD and found a high rate of ADHD among all children born to heroin dependent parents including those adopted, as well as in the children with low parental SES. Similar findings regarding the strong positive influence of an enriched environment were observed in children born to diabetic mothers, where the intellectual abilities of the children were directly related with parental education. The cognitive abilities of the children born prematurely were also strongly associated

  14. Nutritional status in children and adolescents with leukemia: An emphasis on clinical outcomes in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald D; Mosby, Terezie T

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to examine the information available on the nutritional status of children with leukemia in low and middle income countries (LMICs), where the great majority of them live and malnutrition is prevalent, in order to identify best practices and remaining deficits in knowledge. Literature relevant to measurement of nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status on important clinical outcomes in this population, and others of relevance, was reviewed. Arm anthropometry provides more accurate information on nutritional status than measures based on body weight in children with cancer. Both over- and under-nutrition are important determinants of tolerance of chemotherapy, compliance with treatment, relapse of disease, and survival. These relationships are subject to change with nutritional intervention. There are valuable roles for educational tools and 'ready-to-use-therapeutic-foods'. Assessment of nutritional status is mandatory in this population and accomplishable at various levels of sophistication according to available resources. Recognition of the fundamental role of nutritional status in affecting outcomes in children with leukemia is expanding, but knowledge gaps remain. An apparently counter-intuitive strategy of caloric restriction may be worthy of exploration. There is a particular need to establish normative data, including measures of body composition, in children in LMICs. Developing adaptive clinical practice guidelines for the measurement of nutritional status and for nutritional interventions, incorporating assessment of health-related quality of life, are evident priorities in the care of children with leukemia in LMICs.

  15. Malaria and nutritional status among children with severe acute malnutrition in Niger: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Catherine E; Guerin, Philippe J; Berthé, Fatou; Grais, Rebecca F; Isanaka, Sheila

    2018-03-07

    The relationship between malaria infection and nutritional status is complex and previous studies suggest malaria may increase the incidence and severity of malnutrition while malnutrition may increase the risk of malaria infection. Here, we report bi-directional associations between malaria and nutritional status among children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The present study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of uncomplicated SAM in Niger. Children between 6-59 months were enrolled and followed for 12 weeks. Malaria infection was assessed using an HRP2 rapid diagnostic test at admission and at any follow-up visit with fever. We assessed the association of 1) nutritional status at admission on malaria incidence using Cox proportional hazards regression, and 2) malaria infection at admission on nutritional recovery, weight and height gain using linear regression. Of 2,399 children included in the analysis, 1,327 (55.3%) were infected with malaria at admission. Malaria incidence was 12.1 cases per 100 person-months among those without malaria infection at admission. Nutritional status at admission was not associated with malaria incidence. Children with malaria infection at admission, subsequently treated with an artemisinin based combination therapy, had increased weight gain (0.38 g/kg/day, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07 to 0.69) and reduced height gain (-0.002 mm/day, 95% CI -0.004 to -0.0008). Malaria infection was common among children treated for uncomplicated SAM. Malaria infection may impair height gain. Proper medical and nutritional management should be assured to prevent adverse effects of malaria infection.

  16. Oral Health, Obesity Status and Nutritional Habits in Turkish Children and Adolescents: An Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kesim

    2016-04-01

    , significant differences between the frequencies of the BMI groups at the age of 16 (boys only and 17 (girls only were seen (p<0.05. Conclusion: Periodontal and dental status appears to correlate with nutritional habits and obesity. Obesity and dental/periodontal diseases are multifactorial diseases that follow similar risk patterns and develop from an interaction between chronic conditions originating early in life. It is important for all health professionals to educate patients at risk about the progression of periodontal and dental diseases and the importance of proper oral hygiene.

  17. [Nutritional status in children with intellectual disabilities based on anthropometric profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Vidal-Espinoza, Rubén; Lagos-Luciano, Juan; Gómez-Campos, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Anthropometric variables such as weight, height and body length in children and adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities should be studied in connection with nutritional status, physical growth and biological maturation. a) to analyze the anthropometric profile based on nutritional status, b) to determine the prevalence of overweight and short stature c) to propose equations for predicting height from anthropometric variables. A total of 49 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and from a special education school were studied (30 boys and 19 girls). Weight, height, trunk-cephalic height, forearm and foot length were evaluated. The calculation of nutritional status resulted in the establishment of nutritional categories: underweight, normal and overweight. The anthropometric profile of males varies significantly when classified according to nutritional categories (P.05). Also, high values of overweight prevalence were observed in both genders (43% of boys and 26% of girls). Variables such as age, weight, length of the forearm in females, and foot length in males are good predictors of height (R(2) = 91-94% males and R(2) = 87% females). A high percentage of overweight cases were observed; therefore, rigorous control and monitoring of nutritional status are suggested. The proposed regression equations could be an option in schools to easily and simply predict height. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. Participation of children in nutrition and sleeping in preeschool

    OpenAIRE

    Krk, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical part consists of participation issues regarding eating and sleeping of children in preschool, based on predisposition, that changing process of childcare through time is related with perspectives of children and childhood in society. Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) is considered as crucial document for understanding participation of children as an important part of learning process in preschool. Further on is written about recognition of a child as competent being, th...

  19. Nutritional status at diagnosis in children with cancer. 2. An assessment by arm anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald; Collins, Laura; Nayiager, Trishana; Doring, Nancy; Kennedy, Charlene; Halton, Jacqueline; Walker, Scott; Sala, Alessandra; Webber, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Assessment of nutritional status in children with cancer is important but measures based on weight can be problematic at diagnosis, especially in those with advanced disease. Likewise, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry may be confounded by other radiological procedures and is not commonly available in low-income countries where most children with cancer live. Arm anthropometry is not subject to these constraints. In a study sample of 99 Canadian patients with cancer at diagnosis, mid-upper arm circumference correlated well with lean body mass as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry but triceps skin fold thickness was a poor predictor of fat mass. Arm anthropometry can be a useful tool for the measurement of nutritional status in children with cancer. However, further studies, particularly in low-income countries and in children with solid tumors at diagnosis, are required to determine the full extent of its utility.

  20. Can children discriminate sugar-sweetened from non-nutritively sweetened beverages and how do they like them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne C de Ruyter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Replacement of sugar-sweetened by non-nutritively sweetened beverages or water may reduce excess weight gain in children. However, it is unclear whether children like non-nutritively sweetened beverages as much as sugar-sweetened beverages. We examined whether children could taste a difference between non-nutritively sweetened beverages and matching sugar-sweetened beverages, and which of the two types of beverage they liked best. METHODS: 89 children aged 5 to 12 tasted seven non-nutritively sweetened beverages and matching sugar-sweetened beverages, for a total of 14 beverages. We used Triangle tests to check their ability to discriminate between the matched versions, and a 5-point scale to measure how much the children liked each individual beverage. RESULTS: Overall, 24% of children appeared to be genuinely capable of distinguishing between non-nutritively sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages. The mean ± SD score for how much the children liked the non-nutritively sweetened beverages was 3.39 ± 0.7 and that for the sugar-sweetened beverages 3.39 ± 0.6 (P = 0.9 on a scale running from 1 (disgusting to 5 (delicious. The children preferred some beverages to others irrespective of whether they were sugar-sweetened or non-nutritively sweetened (P = 0.000. Children who correctly identified which of three drinks contained the same sweetener and which one was different also showed no preference for either type. CONCLUSION: We found that about one in four children were able to discriminate between non-nutritively sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages but children liked both varieties equally. Non-nutritively sweetened beverages may therefore be an acceptable alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages although water remains the healthiest beverage for children.

  1. Nutrition and health claims in products directed at children via television in Spain in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Bosqued-Estefanía, María José; Damián, Javier; López-Jurado, Lázaro; Moya-Geromini, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    To describe the use of nutrition and health claims in products directed at children via television in Spain and to analyse their nutrient profile. A cross-sectional study of television food advertisements over 7 days in five Spanish television channels popular among children. The products were classified as core, non-core or miscellaneous, and as either healthy or less healthy, according to the United Kingdom Nutrient Profile Model. We registered all claims contained on the product (packaging and labelling) and its advertisement. We calculated the frequency distributions of health and nutrition claims. During the 420hours of broadcasting, 169 food products were identified, 28.5% in the dairy group and 60.9% in the non-core category. A total of 53.3% of products contained nutrition claims and 26.6% contained health claims; 62.2% of the products with claims were less healthy. Low-fat dairy products were the food category containing the highest percentage of health and nutrition claims. Over half of all food products marketed to children via television in Spain made some type of nutrition or health claim. Most of these products were less healthy, which could mislead Spanish consumers. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating Physical Activity Using Accelerometry in Children at Risk of Developmental Coordination Disorder in the Presence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerg, Sally; Cairney, John; Hay, John; Rempel, Lynn; Mahlberg, Nadilein; Faught, Brent E.

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is compromised in children and adolescents with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Approximately half of all children with DCD suffer from attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD); a cohort often considered more physically active than typically developing youth. Accelerometry is an effective method of assessing…

  3. Early identification of children at-risk for academic difficulties, using standardized assessment: stability and predictive validity of preschool math and language scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Niek; Post, Wendy J.; Huisman, Mark; Oenema-Mostert, Ineke C.E.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Minnaert, Alexander E.M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the claim by several researchers that variability in performance may complicate the identification of “at-risk” children, variability in the academic performance of young children remains an undervalued area of research. The goal of this study is to examine the predictive validity for future

  4. Eating Habits of Malaysian Children: Findings of the South East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kar Hau; Wu, Suet Kei; Noor Hafizah, Yatiman; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Poh, Bee Koon

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to describe the eating habits of Malaysian children using a nationally representative data set from the South East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS) in Malaysia. A total of 2797 children aged 2 to 12 years were included in this analysis. Eating habits and dietary intakes of children were assessed using questionnaires. Overall, 56.1% of children consumed 3 main meals every day. Approximately 20% of children snacked 3 times per day, whereas 9.7% ate fast food on a weekly basis. Irregular meal patterns were significantly associated with lower micronutrient intakes, and the groups with higher odds for this pattern were older children, Malays, and those living in rural areas. Considering the relatively high rate of irregular meal consumption and its potential influence on dietary nutrient intake, persistent efforts must be continued to promote and inculcate healthy eating habits among children from an early age. © 2016 APJPH.

  5. Nutritional status changes in children with malignant solid tumor before and after chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Januar; Sri S Nasar; Rulina Suradi; Maria Abdulsalam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although aggressive multimodal treatment programs in childhood cancer have significantly increased survival rates, the morbidity caused by protein energy malnutrition related to therapy is still high. Objective To describe nutritional status changes in children with malignant solid tumors after 21 days of chemotherapy. Methods A descriptive prospective study with pre- and post-test design in children with malignant solid tumors was conducted in the Departmen...

  6. Nutritional status and food intake data on children and adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine growth indicators and dietary intake patterns of children aged 4-18 years residing in residential care facilities in Durban. Method: Thirty-three girls and 110 boys, aged 5-18 years, in three different children's homes participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements ...

  7. The State of the World's Children 1998: Focus on Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Carol

    This report on the well-being of the world's children focuses on the issue of malnutrition and its impact on children's lives. Chapter 1: (1) discusses the incidence of malnutrition and the complex interplay of factors that cause malnutrition, including poor health services and discrimination against women; (2) presents several approaches to…

  8. growth and nutrition in south african children with cystic fibrosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population. Thirty-eight children and adolescents attending the CF clinic at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital,. Cape Town. Methods. Standard anthropometry and a 3-day weighed food record. Results. Median percentage expected weight for height. (WFH) was 93 (interquartile range 84 - 101). Sixteen per cent.

  9. Growth and nutrition in South African children with cystic fibrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population. Thirty-eight children and adolescents attending the CF clinic at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. Methods. Standard anthropometry and a 3-day weighed food record. Results. Median percentage expected weight for height (WFH) was 93 (interquartile range 84 - 101). Sixteen per cent of ...

  10. Nutritional anaemia and malaria in children. | Anumudu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A total of 177 children between the ages of 2 and 11 years were included in the study. Children were examined for malaria parasites by microscopy. The World Health Organization (WHO) age-adjusted cut-off for hemoglobin and hematocrit were used to classify anemia. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for ...

  11. Breastfeeding pattern and nutritional status of children under two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 16.6% express breast-milk and the median duration for continued breastfeeding in this study was 18months. Complementary foods given to the children are mostly home prepared cereals, solids and semi-solid foods. About 30.4% of the children were stunted, 25.4% were underweight and 15.3% were wasted.

  12. Validity and reliability of a nutrition knowledge survey for assessment in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Jared R; Moyer-Mileur, Laurie J; Wilkinson, Robert D; Slater, Hillarie; Jordan, Kristine C

    2010-03-01

    Limited surveys are available to assess the nutrition knowledge of children. The goals of this study were to test the validity and reliability of a computer nutrition knowledge survey for elementary school students and to evaluate the impact of the "Fit Kids 'r' Healthy Kids" nutrition intervention via the knowledge survey. During survey development, a sample (n=12) of health educators, elementary school teachers, and registered dietitians assessed the survey. The target population consisted of first- through fourth-grade students from Salt Lake City, UT, metropolitan area schools. Participants were divided into reliability (n=68), intervention (n=74), and control groups (n=59). The reliability group took the survey twice (2 weeks apart); the intervention and control groups also took the survey twice, but at pre- and post-intervention (4 weeks later). Only students from the intervention group participated in four weekly nutrition classes. Reliability was assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficients for knowledge scores. Results demonstrated appropriate content validity, as indicated by expert peer ratings. Test-retest reliability correlations were found to be significant for the overall survey (r=0.54; PNutrition knowledge was assessed upon program completion with paired samples t tests. Students from the intervention group demonstrated improvement in nutrition knowledge (12.2+/-1.9 to 13.5+/-1.6; Pnutrition survey demonstrated content validity and test-retest reliability for first- through fourth-grade elementary school children. Also, the study results imply that the Fit Kids 'r' Healthy Kids intervention promoted gains in nutrition knowledge. Overall, the computer survey shows promise as an appealing medium for assessing nutrition knowledge in children. Copyright 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Incidence of nutritional anaemia among the under five children attending Ahmed Gasim hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Hager Elrasheed Ali

    1998-11-01

    A survey was carried out in Khartoum North Ahmed Gasim specialist Hospital for children to identify aetiological factors that lead to incidence of nutritional anaemia among children under under five years of age. The sample consists of 192 patients taken from the hospital wards (experimental group), and 60 healthy children taken from out patient vaccination department of same hospital. A questionnaire was used as a tool for collection data regarding children and their families with emphasis to general information, socio-economic information, dietary information, anthropometric information, medical history and laboratory investigations including haemoglobin, hematocrit (PCV)%, peripheral blood picture, serum ferritin, serum folate and serum B 12 . Results show no correlation between anaemia and age R(0.1048) p 1 2 deficiency. Some children affected had mixed deficiency anaemia (3.182). Iron deficiency without anaemia was common among healthy children (control) 22.8%. Some recommendations were set for the improvement of the existing situation e.g. health education, nutrition education with emphasis on intake of supplements and weaning diets rich in iron and folate. Follow up and surveillance program to compact nutritional anaemia should be adopted.(Author)

  14. United we stand divided we fall : maternal social participation and children's nutritional status in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Favara,Marta

    2012-01-01

    In previous literature, social capital has been hypothesized as a substitute for other forms of capital, such as physical and human capital. This paper contributes to this literature, studying the association between mothers' access to social capital via participation in community organizations and their children's nutritional status at 1 and 5 years. Using the Peruvian sample of the Young...

  15. Economic incentives and nutritional behaviour of children in the school setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Hartmann, Helene Jeanette; de Mul, Anika

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature on the effectiveness of economic incentives for good nutritional behaviour in schools. Methods: Studies published in English that included baseline and/or outcome data regarding food and beverage intake of school children were eligible for inclusion. A systematic......, it is difficult to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the economic incentive instruments per se for these studies....

  16. Nutritional interventions to reduce symptoms in children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben; Bjerrum, Merete; Larsen, Palle

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this scoping review is to examine and map reported nutritional interventions and their outcomes in relieving symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the daily lives of children and adults. A further objective is to determine...

  17. Childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6-36 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out to compare childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6–36 months in Mwembesongo and Mjimpya wards that had long and short experiences respectively with the Child Survival, Protection and Development (CSPD) programme. The purpose of the study ...

  18. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for

  19. Clinical report--Forgoing medically provided nutrition and hydration in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekema, Douglas S; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2009-08-01

    There is broad consensus that withholding or withdrawing medical interventions is morally permissible when requested by competent patients or, in the case of patients without decision-making capacity, when the interventions no longer confer a benefit to the patient or when the burdens associated with the interventions outweigh the benefits received. The withdrawal or withholding of measures such as attempted resuscitation, ventilators, and critical care medications is common in the terminal care of adults and children. In the case of adults, a consensus has emerged in law and ethics that the medical administration of fluid and nutrition is not fundamentally different from other medical interventions such as use of ventilators; therefore, it can be forgone or withdrawn when a competent adult or legally authorized surrogate requests withdrawal or when the intervention no longer provides a net benefit to the patient. In pediatrics, forgoing or withdrawing medically administered fluids and nutrition has been more controversial because of the inability of children to make autonomous decisions and the emotional power of feeding as a basic element of the care of children. This statement reviews the medical, ethical, and legal issues relevant to the withholding or withdrawing of medically provided fluids and nutrition in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics concludes that the withdrawal of medically administered fluids and nutrition for pediatric patients is ethically acceptable in limited circumstances. Ethics consultation is strongly recommended when particularly difficult or controversial decisions are being considered.

  20. Children with nutritional rickets referred to hospitals in Copenhagen during a 10-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Michaelsen, K F; Mølgaard, C

    2003-01-01

    joints. Two children had generalized convulsions. None of the cases had received vitamin D supplementation. CONCLUSION: Nutritional rickets is still present among immigrants in Denmark, and it is likely that the prevalence of mild cases is high. Prevention through vitamin D supplementation is important...