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Sample records for nutritional care differed

  1. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal symptoms and their influence on nutritional state and performance status in patients with different primary tumors receiving palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovio, Giacomo; Fonte, Maria Luisa; Baiardi, Paola

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional balance, and performance status in patients receiving palliative care for advanced cancers originating in different sites. We studied a total of 105 patients. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status score (ECOG-PS), dietary intakes, anthropometric measures, and some serum proteins were determined. Unintentional weight loss, alterations in anthropometric measures, and highest number of symptoms were greater in patients with lung and stomach cancer. No differences were found in ECOG-PS according to cancer site. Patients with gastric or lung cancer have most evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition and a higher prevalence of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The performance status is not affected by tumor site. Early nutritional support should be planned for all patients with cancer, especially for patients with gastric or lung cancer.

  2. Ability of different screening tools to predict positive effect on nutritional intervention among the elderly in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Beermann, Tina; Kjær, Stine;

    2013-01-01

    Routine identification of nutritional risk screening is paramount as the first stage in nutritional treatment of the elderly. The major focus of former validation studies of screening tools has been on the ability to predict undernutrition. The aim of this study was to validate Mini Nutritional...... Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002), Body Mass Index (BMI)...

  3. Nutritional considerations for the palliative care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Clare; Eldridge, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Many palliative care patients experience nutritional problems as their conditions progress. This includes those with progressive neurological conditions, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as well as advanced cancer. Nutritional issues not only impact patients physically but also psychologically and can also have an effect on those caring for them. It is important that patients are screened appropriately and that one identifies what symptoms are potentially affecting their intake. Decisions should always be patient-centred. Nutritional interventions range from food modification and nutritional supplements, to more intense methods such as enteral or parenteral nutrition, and these may have ethical and legal considerations. This article explores the nutritional issues faced by palliative patients, the ethical issues supporting decision-making and the methods of nutritional support available.

  4. Transitioning to new child-care nutrition policies: nutrient content of preschool menus differs by presence of vegetarian main entrée.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Hales, Sarah B; Baum, Angela C

    2014-01-01

    Children who attend child care outside the home may be at increased risk for developing obesity. In 2012, the South Carolina ABC Child Care program issued new standards for food and nutrition. The goal of our study (conducted June to December 2012) was to examine changes that occurred at a large, Columbia, SC, preschool during the implementation of the South Carolina ABC Child Care program standards using an observational design, including a survey of parents and nutrient analysis of menus. The nutrition content of menu items before (n=15 days; six of which were vegetarian) and after (n=15 days; six of which were vegetarian) implementation of the new standards was compared. In addition, parents (N=75) were surveyed to examine opinions and support for the changes. Independent samples t tests were used to compare nutrient values before and after menu changes and analysis of variance was used to compare pre- and post-change vegetarian menus and pre- and post-change nonvegetarian menus. There were no significant differences between before and after menus with the exception of a 0.3 cup/day increase in vegetables (PVegetarian menus after the revisions were significantly higher in fiber (13 ± 3 g) than postrevision nonvegetarian menus (11 ± 3 g; Pvegetarian menu items has the potential to improve the nutrient content of menus while keeping energy intake, saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol levels at a more optimum level.

  5. Nutrition in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support has become a routine part of the care of the critically ill patient. It is an adjunctive therapy, the main goal of which is to attenuate the development of malnutrition, yet the effectiveness of nutritional support is often thwarted by an underlying hostile metabolic milieu. This requires that these metabolic changes be taken into consideration when designing nutritional regimens for such patients. There is also a need to conduct large, multi-center studies to acquire more...

  6. Nutrition Standards for Child Care Programs: Meeting Children's Nutrition and Education Needs. Nutrition, Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Margaret E.; Grey, Cynthia R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on standards for American child care and early education programs participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Topics discussed include meal plans, nutritional requirements, food preparation and food service, cultural diversity, food safety and sanitation, nutrition education, and emotional climate at mealtimes. (KB)

  7. Enteral Nutrition and Care of Risky Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Making appropriate and effective enteral feeding is decreasing the morbidity and mortality rates of risky newborns. Most important problems during enteral feeding in risky newborns are realizing the enteral feeding needs late, not following enteral feeding protocols and errors in medical practices (misconnections etc.. The aim of this review article is to describe the gastrointestinal development, nutrition requirements, enteral nutrition, feeding intolerance and care of risky newborns. Increasing the awareness of health care professionals about this topic is promoted the quality of care in risky newborns. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 227-233

  8. [Esthetic nutrition: body and beauty enhancement through nutritional care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Juliana da Silveira Gonçalves Zanini; Schnider, Aline Petter

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing quest for beauty and the models proposed by fashion goods and service segments, to achieve the perfect body. The standard of beauty corresponds to a thin body, without considering health aspects. The number of women who go on diets to control weight is increasing; and taking this into consideration the objective of this study is to conduct a bibliographical review and extract data on esthetics and body image to support the practice of nutritional care. Socio-cultural aspects, which motivate the quest for the perfect body, as well as body, beauty, esthetics, nutritional counseling and cognitive behavior therapy were examined in this survey. On the basis of this work, it is possible to conclude that the continuing obsession with the body may lead the person to go on diets and other drastic methods to control weight, such as surgical procedures. In this respect, nutritional care is far more than merely recommending a standard diet or giving information, as it represents providing an effective model for nutritional reeducation, prioritizing improvement in the style and quality of life. This article provides data about enhancing esthetics and beauty by means of appropriate nutrition.

  9. [Quality of artificial nutritional support in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Cabrera, L; O'Shanahan-Navarro, G; García-Martul, M; Ramírez Rodríguez, A; Sánchez-Palacios, M; Hernández-Medina, E

    2006-01-01

    To assess what are the reasons for discrepancies between the amount of nutrients delivered, prescribed and theoretical requirements, in an intensive care unit. Prospective cohort study over a 5 months period. Intensive Care Unit of the Insular University Hospital in Gran Canaria. Adult patients who were prescribed enteral and or parenteral nutrition for > or = 2 days and we followed them for the first 14 days of nutrition delivery. The prescribed and the delivered calories were calculated every day, whereas the theoretical requeriments were calculated after the ICU stay, by using the Harris-Benedict formula adjusted with a stress factor. Also the reason for cessation of enteral tube feeding > 1 hour in the days of artificial nutrition were analyzed. Fifty-nine consecutive patients, receiving nutritional support either enterally or intravenously, and 465 nutrition days analyzed. Nutrition was initiated within 48 hours after ICU admission. Enteral nutrition was the preferential route used. Seventy-nine percent of the mean caloric amount required was prescribed, and 66% was effectively delivered; also 88% of the amount prescribed was delivered. The low ratio of delivered-prescribed calories concerned principally enteral nutrition and was caused by gastrointestinal intolerance. We observe a wide variation in practice patterns among physicians to start, increase, reduce or stop enteral nutrition when symptoms of intolerance appear. In our ICU exists an important difference between the caloric theoretical requests and the quantity really delivered; this deficit is more clear in the enteral nutrition. The knowledge of this situation allows to take measures directed to optimizing the nutritional support of our patients. Possibly the motivation in the medical and nursery personnel in carrying out nutritional protocols it might be the most effective measurement, which it would be necessary to confirm in later studies.

  10. Nutritional status and mealtime experiences in elderly care recipients

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Elderly people receiving municipal services and care are at risk for malnutrition due to frailty and chronic diseases. In this work, the nutritional status of elderly patients (>65 y) was evaluated in three different populations. One population lived in various care settings, i.e. service flats (SF), old peoples home (OPH), group living for demented (GLD) and nursing homes (NH) (Study I). The other two populations were free-living elderly receiving home nursing care (HNC) ...

  11. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  12. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  13. Nutrition and dementia care: developing an evidence-based model for nutritional care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane L; Holmes, Joanne; Brooks, Cindy

    2017-02-14

    There is a growing volume of research to offer improvements in nutritional care for people with dementia living in nursing homes. Whilst a number of interventions have been identified to support food and drink intake, there has been no systematic research to understand the factors for improving nutritional care from the perspectives of all those delivering care in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to develop a research informed model for understanding the complex nutritional problems associated with eating and drinking for people with dementia. We conducted nine focus groups and five semi-structured interviews with those involved or who have a level of responsibility for providing food and drink and nutritional care in nursing homes (nurses, care workers, catering assistants, dietitians, speech and language therapists) and family carers. The resulting conceptual model was developed by eliciting care-related processes, thus supporting credibility from the perspective of the end-users. The seven identified domain areas were person-centred nutritional care (the overarching theme); availability of food and drink; tools, resources and environment; relationship to others when eating and drinking; participation in activities; consistency of care and provision of information. This collaboratively developed, person-centred model can support the design of new education and training tools and be readily translated into existing programmes. Further research is needed to evaluate whether these evidence-informed approaches have been implemented successfully and adopted into practice and policy contexts and can demonstrate effectiveness for people living with dementia.

  14. Nutrition in the neurocritical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Tripathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of intensive care is to support the physiology of the body till the treatment or the reparative process of the body kicks in to the rescue. Maintaining an adequate nutrition during this period is of vital importance to counteract the catabolic effect of the critical disease process. The guidelines for nutritional care in the neuro intensive care unit (ICU are sparse. This article collates the current evidence and best practice recommendations as applicable to the critically ill patient in the neuro ICU. The use of screening tests to identify patients at a risk of malnutrition and related complications is presently recommended for all patients with an emphasis on early initiation of caloric support. Over-aggressive feeding in an attempt to revert the catabolic effects of critical illness have not proven beneficial, just as the attempts to improve patient outcomes by altering the routes of nutrition administration. Special patient population such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage or spinal cord injury may have varying nutritional requirements; individualised approach in the neurocritical ICU with the help of the intensivist, nutritionist and pharmacology team may be of benefit.

  15. Nutrition services in managed care: new paradigms for dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramee, S H

    1996-04-01

    Managed care systems are transforming the health care system in the United States. Dietitians will need to review practice opportunities in new and different settings, and develop additional skills to make a successful transition to the transformed health care environment. The shift in health care financing from a fee-for-service model to a capitated system will have the most dramatic impact on the profession. Not all the answers are available, but the focus for the future is clear--customer satisfaction, outcomes research, and cost-effective nutrition services.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fletcher, Antoinette

    2012-02-01

    The nutritional care of patients is one of the primary responsibilities of all registered nurses (Persenius et al, 2008). A poor nutritional status can lead to malnutrition, which can have serious consequences for an individual\\'s quality of life (Field and Smith, 2008). This paper commences with an introduction to the concept of nutrition, provides an overview of nutritional guidelines and nutritional screening tools which identify those at risk of malnutrition. It reviews the literature on nurses\\' knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care and debates challenges and opportunities encountered to help nurses ensure adequate patient nutrition.

  17. Determinants of nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians (PCPs), their nutritional attitudes and knowledge and their interest in the role of nutrition in health and disease. A second objective was to identify the determinants of nutrition

  18. Implementing nutrition diagnosis at a multisite health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heukelom, Holly; Fraser, Valli; Koh, Jiak-Chin; McQueen, Kay; Vogt, Kara; Johnson, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The American Dietetic Association Nutrition Care Process (NCP) is designed to improve patient care and interdisciplinary communication through the consistent use of standardized nutrition language. Supported by Dietitians of Canada, the NCP has been gaining prominence across Canada. In spring 2009, registered dietitians at Providence Health Care, an academic, multisite health care organization in Vancouver, British Columbia, began using the NCP with a focus on nutrition diagnosis. The success of nutrition diagnosis at Providence Health Care has depended on support from the Clinical Nutrition Department leadership, commitment from the NCP champions, regularly scheduled lunch-and-learn sessions, revised nutrition assessment forms with a section for nutrition diagnosis statements, and the Pocket Guide for International Dietetics & Nutrition Terminology (IDNT) Reference Manual. Audit results from June through August 2010 showed a 92% nutrition diagnosis completion rate for acute-care and long-term care sites within Providence Health Care. Ongoing audits will be used to evaluate the accuracy and quality of nutrition diagnosis statements. This evaluation will allow Providence Health Care dietitians to move forward with nutrition intervention.

  19. Nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, A

    2011-06-01

    Full-day-care pre-schools contribute significantly to the nutritional intake and acquisition of dietary habits of the pre-school child. The present study investigated nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools in Dublin, Ireland, aiming to determine the nutritional support that pre-school managers deem necessary, thereby facilitating the amelioration of existing pre-school nutritional training and practices.

  20. Nutritional care of cancer patients: a survey on patients' needs and medical care in reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, J; Kruk, U; Kastrati, K; Kleeberg, J; Buchholz, D; Erickson, N; Huebner, J

    2017-02-01

    Cancer patients represent a patient group with a wide-range of nutrition related problems which are often under-recognized and undertreated. In order to assess the status quo of nutritional care in Germany, we conducted a survey among patients with different types of cancer. A standardized questionnaire was distributed online by two national umbrella organizations for self-help groups. 1335 participants completed the questionnaire. 69 % of the participants reported having received information on nutrition and/or specific nutrition-related symptoms. Most often this information was derived from print media (68.5 %) or from within self-help groups (58.7 %). 57.0 % of participants reported having had questions concerning nutrition and/or problems with food intake. most frequently named topics of interest were "healthy diet" (35.0 %) weakness/fatigue (24.3 %), dietary supplements (21.3 %) and taste changes (19.8 %). Nutrition information was most often provided by dietitians (38.7 %) followed by physicians (9.8 %). Women reported receiving nutrition counseling in the hospital nearly twice as often as men (12.5 % versus 5.7 %; p nutrition information more often reported using supplements (p Nutrition is an essential element in cancer care and patients report a high interest and need: Yet, many patients do not have access to high quality nutrition therapy during and after cancer therapy. With respect to survival and quality of life, increasing the availability and resources for provision of evidence based nutrition information seems mandatory.

  1. [Supplemental parenteral nutrition for intensive care patients: a logical combination with enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Thibault, Ronan; Berger, Mette M; Pichard, Claude

    2009-12-09

    Undernutrition is a widespread problem in the intensive care and is associated with a worse clinical outcome. Enteral nutrition is the recommended nutritional support in ICU patients. However, enteral nutrition is frequently insufficient to cover protein-energy needs. The initiation of supplemental parenteral nutrition, when enteral nutrition is insufficient, could optimize the nutritional therapy. Such a combination could allow reducing morbidity, length of stay and recovery, as well as improving quality of life and health care costs. Prospective studies are currently underway to test this hypothesis.

  2. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  3. Canadian perspectives on the nutrition care process and international dietetics and nutrition terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Marlis; Basualdo-Hammond, Carlota; Hotson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline benefits of adoption of the Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and International Dietetics and Nutrition Terminology (IDNT) by Canadian dietitians, discuss implementation considerations for broad-based action and change, and determine future directions. The NCP and IDNT are recommended by the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations for international adoption as a framework for dietetic practice. The NCP uses a client-centred framework to clarify the role of registered dietitians (RDs), nutrition practice elements and skills, and the environments in which RDs practice. It also incorporates an evaluation framework, including identification of specific goals and monitoring of clinical and behavioural outcomes, to improve the quality and effectiveness of nutrition care. The process helps RDs to identify interventions that are more likely to improve nutrition outcomes by providing a systematic approach that encourages critical thinking and problem-solving. IDNT provides a standard set of core nutrition care terms and definitions for the four steps of the nutrition care process: assessment, nutrition diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation. Use of IDNT promotes uniform documentation of nutrition care, enables differentiation of the type and amount of nutrition care provided, and provides a basis for linking nutrition care activities with actual or predicted outcomes. To continue to advance the dietetic profession in the Canadian health system, RDs must demonstrate their value by highlighting population, group, and individual health outcomes that are most influenced by the RD. The NCP and IDNT will help dietitians achieve these goals.

  4. The nutrition care profile: an aid to delivery of quality nutrition care in a small community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P W; Littleton, E M

    1984-12-01

    In an effort to improve nutrition care in a small community hospital with one registered dietitian (R.D.), a system using a nutrition care profile (NCP) and a certified dietetic assistant (C.D.A.) was developed. The NCP includes criteria recognized in the literature or through clinical experience to be indicators of nutrition care needs. The profile is completed by the C.D.A. and reviewed by the R.D., who determines priorities for the patient's nutrition care needs. The NCP has proved to be an effective and efficient tool for prioritizing and systematizing follow-up of nutrition care needs. Indeed, because the NCP form is itself so effective as a follow-up tool for dietary records, the R.D. has found she must make a conscious effort to document nutrition care in the medical record.

  5. Nutrition in the pediatric population in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition is an essential component of patient management in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Poor nutrition status accompanies many childhood chronic illnesses. A thorough assessment of the critically ill child is required to inform the plan for nutrition support. Accurate and clinically relevant nutritional assessment, including growth measurements, provides important guidance. Indirect calorimetry provides the most accurate measurement of resting energy expenditure, but is too often unavailable in the PICU. To prevent inappropriate caloric intake, reassessment of the child's nutrition status is imperative. Enteral nutrition is the recommended route of intake. Human milk is preferred for infants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Audit of artificial nutrition in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa Malpica, A L; Salaverría Garzón, I; Prado López, L M; Simón García, M J; Reta Pérez, O; Ramos Polo, J

    2001-01-01

    To study compliance with an artificial nutrition protocol at an Intensive Care Unit. During a second stage and after introducing the modifications considered appropriate in the protocol, to verify its implementation and compare both series. REFERENCE POPULATION: All patients with artificial nutrition support were included. Artificial nutrition (AN) was deemed to be the dispensation of commercial preparations for enteral nutrition, formulas with amino acids and glucose and the parenteral provision of fat, including propofol in this case, even where it was the only source of energy. The provision of crystalloid solutions was not considered to be AN. The period of observation was two months in both cases. The provision of AN to all such patients was systematically recorded on a daily basis. After analysis of the first series, the members at the unit agreed to increase the nitrogen provision. A second series was recorded, with the data being collected for patients with AN during a similar period. The study of the first series revealed the provisions of energy and nitrogen were below theoretical levels (both in the corrected Harris-Benedict test and at the fixed prescription of 25 kcal/kg). In the second series, there was greater agreement between the theoretical values and the amounts actually received. The deviation in energy and nitrogen was significantly less in the second series. And although the total nitrogen load per patient did not reveal any differences, there were discrepancies in the daily provision per patient. On most days, the diet provided covered over 75% of the energy requirements. With parenteral nutrition on its own or in combination with enteral nutrition, the requirements of energy and nitrogen were exceeded. There were no differences between the two series. The type of provision was enteral on 55% of the days and parenteral on 18%. There was no difference in the type of provision between the two series, although there was a difference in the type

  7. Parenteral nutrition in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed N

    2012-11-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are unable to nourish themselves orally. In addition, critical illness increases nutrient requirements as well as alters metabolism. Typically, ICU patients rapidly become malnourished unless they are provided with involuntary feeding either through a tube inserted into the GI tract, called enteral nutrition (EN), or directly into the bloodstream, called parenteral nutrition (PN). Between the 1960s and the 1980s, PN was the modality of choice and the premise was that if some is good, more is better, which led to overfeeding regimens called hyperalimentation. Later, the dangers of overfeeding, hyperglycemia, fatty liver, and increased sepsis associated with PN became recognized. In contrast, EN was not associated with these risks and it gradually became the modality of choice in the ICU. However, ICU patients in whom the gastrointestinal tract was nonfunctional (i.e., gut failure) required PN to avoid malnutrition. In addition, EN was shown, on average, to not meet nutrient requirements, and underfeeding was recognized to increase complications because of malnutrition. Hence, the balanced perspective has been reached of using EN when possible but avoiding underfeeding by supplementing with PN when required. This new role for PN is currently being debated and studied. In addition, the relative merits and needs for protein, carbohydrates, lipids, and micronutrients are areas of study.

  8. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  9. Nutrition Knowledge of Nurses in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neva L.; Shultz, Jill A.; Massey, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    The average score of 44 nursing-home nurses on a nutrition knowledge questionnaire was 65%. Scores of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses were significantly different. Nutritional assessment activity correlated with nutritional knowledge. The need for further training regarding nutritional concerns of nursing-home residents was…

  10. The nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome. Its defining feature is involuntary weight loss, which arises, in part, because of muscle atrophy and is accompanied by functional decline. International expert consensus recommends that nutritional support and counselling is a component of multimodal therapy for cancer cachexia, as poor nutritional intake can contribute to progression of the syndrome. The present paper focuses on what is presently known about the nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia. There is potential for nurses to play an important role. However, obstacles to this include lack of a robust evidence base to support their nutritional care practices and unmet need for education about nutrition in cancer. The nursing role's boundaries and the outcomes of nurse-delivered nutritional care in cancer cachexia are both uncertain and should be investigated.

  11. Nutritional care in motor neurone disease/ amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cleide dos Santos Salvioni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS often present changes in nutritional status. Based on weight loss and on difficulty in nutritional management, this study aims to review the different possibilities and to present guidelines concerning nutritional treatment to such patients. Diet characteristics, types of treatment and nutritional therapy indicating administration routes and discussing the details of the disease are described herein. Nutritional therapy has been a substantial therapeutic resource for ALS development.

  12. Precision nutrition - review of methods for point-of-care assessment of nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Lee, Seoho; Erickson, David; Mehta, Saurabh

    2017-04-01

    Precision nutrition encompasses prevention and treatment strategies for optimizing health that consider individual variability in diet, lifestyle, environment and genes by accurately determining an individual's nutritional status. This is particularly important as malnutrition now affects a third of the global population, with most of those affected or their care providers having limited means of determining their nutritional status. Similarly, program implementers often have no way of determining the impact or success of their interventions, thus hindering their scale-up. Exciting new developments in the area of point-of-care diagnostics promise to provide improved access to nutritional status assessment, as a first step towards enabling precision nutrition and tailored interventions at both the individual and community levels. In this review, we focus on the current advances in developing portable diagnostics for assessment of nutritional status at point-of-care, along with the numerous design challenges in this process and potential solutions.

  13. Implementing clinical guidelines for nutrition in a neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette, Hansson; Wenström, Yvonne

    2005-12-01

    Patients in neurosurgical intensive care have individual needs concerning nutrition because of their conditions. An important therapeutic goal is to prevent the development of malnutrition as it contributes to an increase in mortality and enhances the risk of complications in these patients. The health-care team has a mutual responsibility for this, although it is a complex task and a correct assessment of patients' nutritional needs is vital. Multidisciplinary clinical guidelines focused on nutrition might help the health-care staff in decision-making and allowing individualized treatment for patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation and use of such a guideline. The results show that the guideline is used in varying degrees by the health-care team. Areas that focused on more practical aspects of nutritional support seemed to have a unified approach, whereas areas on nutritional assessment and routine nutrition orders demonstrated both a lack of knowledge and unclear role responsibilities. The results reveal how different professional groups in health care perceive the implementation of a clinical guideline. Some areas need further clarification, there needs to be continuing development of nutritional guidelines, and education of staff is needed in order to enhance the nutritional care of patients.

  14. Which nutritional regimen for the comorbid complex intensive care unit patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Pierre; Weinberger, Hadas; Tadmor, Boaz

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care patient nutritional therapy has been standardized by guidelines for decades. However, the same nutritional regimen to such a heterogeneous population seems a difficult task. These patients have various genotypes, numerous comorbidities, different severities and lengths of acute illness, and multiple interventions. Therefore, a new way of approaching the complexity of these patients is required, progressing from the whole body to compartments, organs, pericellular space, and cellular metabolism. We propose to untangle the complexity of intensive care unit patients by analyzing the complexity and deciding on the appropriate measures. These activities should aim towards personalized identification and prediction of adequate recovery measures, considering the generalization of guidelines based on the accumulated experience. Defining the specific nutrition supplement to affect various body niches could produce a significant contribution to the monitoring of nutritional complications, better understanding of the published nutritional interventions, and wise use of the nutritional tool in the complex patient.

  15. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    attenuates the hypermetabolic state , improves wound healing, decreases catabolism, and increases the chance of survival. 7,8,25,26 Since nutrition plays...severely injured patient. Contemporary Surgery. 1978;13:15-20. 2. Lee JO, Herndon DN. Modulation of the post-burn hypermetabolic state . Nestle Nutrition ...in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven E. Wolf, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: REPORT DATE

  16. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  17. Promoting a healthy diet in antenatal care: Qualitative studies of barriers to nutrition communication among women of different ethnic backgrounds in the Oslo Area

    OpenAIRE

    Garnweidner, Lisa Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background: The nutritional and weight status of the mother influences not only her own health and foetal growth, but also the offspring’s future risk of diet-related chronic diseases. Given the rise in the proportion of pregnant women globally with overweight and diet-related chronic diseases, efforts to promote a healthy diet and weight management in pregnancy are urgently needed. Pregnant women may be motivated to eat healthily and be more receptive for nutrition-related information. Howev...

  18. FEATURES OF INTENSIVE NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT OF PREMATURE INFANTS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the modern approaches to preterm infants feeding, principles of parenteral and enteral nutrition. The importance of adequate control of deficit status in preterm infants at different periods of developmental care is marked. Arguments for using the enriched milk or specialized formulas for prematurity during the in-clinic and out-clinic periods of care are provided.Key words: premature infants, enteral nutrition, formulas for premature infants, breast milk, breast milk enriches.

  19. Nutritional support among cancer patients enrolled in palliative home care services

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional problems are common in palliative cancer care. Little is known about nutritional problems and nutritional support in home care. AIMS: The primary aim of this thesis was to investigate experiences of nutritional problems and home nutritional support, with a special focus on home parenteral nutrition (HPN), from the perspectives of cancer patients and their family members. Further aims were to investigate the prevalence of nutritional risk and use of nutritional su...

  20. [Nutritional status and nutritional rehabilitation of elderly people living in long-term care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelovics, Zsuzsanna

    2009-11-01

    We review our studies on the most important factors related to feeding and nutrition in long-term care institutions, as well as we present the nutritional status of elderly people living in social homes, and, based on our results, we make recommendations concerning nutritional rehabilitation. We aimed to assess the following: nutritional status of people older than sixty years (elderly) living in long-term care institutions; changes in the body mass index of elderly living in long-term care institutions; changes in the nutritional status of elderly living in long-term care institutions during the last half decade; relations and correlations between acute and chronic diseases and nutritional status; the sip feed provision for elderly living in long-term care institutions; relationship between the discovered potential influencing factors and nutritional status screened by Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST). We screened the nutritional status of altogether 4774 (men: 28.9-30.9%, women: 69.1-71.19%; mean age: 77.8+/-8.9 years) elderly long-term care residents who volunteered to participate. In 2004 and 2006 the MUST and our questionnaire, in 2008 the nutritionDay questionnaire was used. Risk of malnutrition is high (26.8-77.0%) in elderly residents of social homes. Assessment of nutritional status is done four times a year or even more rarely in 29.5% of the residents. Nutritional status is multifactorial; it is influenced by immobility, fever, etc. Loss of appetite and swallowing difficulties are 2.5-fold, limited mobility, dementia and missing teeth are almost two-fold (1.6-1.7) more frequent in the group of high risk elderly than in the elderly living in social homes. Neurological diseases are in a significant correlation with nutritional status. Incidence of neurological diseases increased significantly in the last years. Nutritional rehabilitation does not end with screening the nutritional status, moreover, it begins with that. Individual diet has to

  1. Parkinson's disease: implications for nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Meredith L; Traviss, Karol A; Calne, Susan M

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disease. People with PD are particularly susceptible to weight loss and malnutrition. Involuntary movements associated with PD result in increased energy expenditure, while both disease symptoms and medication side-effects can limit food intake. In addition, patients with the disease may choose to follow unconventional nutritional therapies that exacerbate malnutrition. Dietitians play a key role in helping patients with PD to optimize their nutritional status and manage various nutrition-related symptoms and medication side-effects. To assume this role, dietitians need to have current knowledge about PD and its nutritional consequences, as well as strategies for managing a variety of nutrition-related symptoms.

  2. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters...... means of EuroQol-5D-3L), physical performance (30-seconds chair stand), nutritional status (weight and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (participants from home-care), and mortality. Results Respectively, 55 (46 from 2 home.......3] versus 1.3 [0.5], P = 0.021) was observed. There was a almost significant difference in mortality (2% versus 13%, P = 0.079). Conclusions Multidisciplinary nutritional support in older adults in nursing home and home-care could have a positive effect on quality of life, muscle strength, and oral care....

  3. Need for Intensive Nutrition Care After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Disse, Emmanuel; Chambrier, Cécile; Barnoud, Didier; Gelas, Patrick; Baubet, Sandrine; Laville, Martine; Pelascini, Elise; Robert, Maud

    2017-02-01

    Severe nutrition complications after bariatric surgery remain poorly described. The aim of this case series was to identify specific factors associated with nutrition complications after bariatric surgery and to characterize their nutrition disorders. We retrospectively reviewed all people referred to the clinical nutrition intensive care unit of our university hospital after bariatric surgery from January 2013 to June 2015. Twelve persons who required artificial nutrition supplies (ie, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) were identified. Seven persons underwent a "one-anastomosis gastric bypass" (OAGB) or "mini gastric bypass," 2 underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 2 had a sleeve gastrectomy, and 1 had an adjustable gastric band. This case series suggests that OAGB could overexpose subjects to severe nutrition complications requiring intensive nutrition care and therefore cannot be considered a "mini" bariatric surgery. Even if OAGB is often considered a simplified surgical technique, it obviously requires as the other standard bariatric procedures a close follow-up by experimented teams aware of its specific complications.

  4. [Nutritional care for patients with liver cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Martins, Magaly

    2014-02-01

    The liver is an important organ with specific functions that influence directly on the nutritional and physiological status of every person. At the presence of any illness or injury in this organ, liver cirrhosis is always its final phase. In this pathology, patients present carbohydrate utilization and storage diminishment, as well as protein and fat catabolism increase. This situation, plus a low ingest and a bad nutrient absorption, results in a high prevalence of malnutrition. Many studies prove the importance of an opportune nutritional treatment in these patients, bringing general benefits and improving their quality of life. It's important to considerate the possible nutritional risks and deficiencies that could appear in the course of the cirrhosis to take opportune actions. The nutritional assessment and treatment is transcendental both in compensated phase (without complications) and in decompensated phase (with complications) of the illness.

  5. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  6. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  7. Differences in quality standards when prescribing nutritional support: Differences between specialist and non-specialist physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán López, Jesús Manuel; Piedra León, María; Enciso Izquierdo, Fidel Jesús; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Amado Señaris, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Adequate nutritional support includes many different aspects, but poor understanding of clinical nutrition by health care professionales often results in an inadequate prescription. A study was conducted to compare enteral and parenteral nutritional support plans prescribed by specialist and non-specialist physicians. Non-specialist physicians recorded anthropometric data from only 13.3% of patients, and none of them performed nutritional assessments. Protein amounts provided by non-specialist physicians were lower than estimated based on ESPEN (10.29g of nitrogen vs 14.62; P<.001). Differences were not statistically significant in the specialist group (14.88g of nitrogen; P=.072). Calorie and glutamine provision and laboratory controls prescribed by specialists were significantly closer to those recommended by clinical guidelines. Nutritional support prescribed by specialists in endocrinology and nutrition at San Pedro de Alcántara Hospital was closer to clinical practice guideline standards and of higher quality as compared to that prescribed by non-specialists. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrition rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet, Pablo Lucas; Petit, Laurent; Louart, Benjamin; Corne, Philippe; Richard, Celine; Preiser, Jean Charles

    2015-05-01

    The maintenance of homeostasis after severe injury requires the restoration of the physiological regulation of food intake. A wide array of functional alterations can hinder the intake of adequate amounts of nutrients to support the recovery from critical illness. These alterations encompass changes in the preprandial phase, reflected by a loss of appetite; changes in the prandial phase, yielding swallowing disorders; and changes in the postprandial phase, including impairments of gastric emptying, gut motility, and satiety. This tutorial aims to review these often overlooked features and to suggest recommendations for the nutrition rehabilitation of the critically ill. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. The clinical content of preconception care: nutrition and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paula M; Nelson, Lauren; Shellhaas, Cynthia S; Dunlop, Anne L; Long, Richard; Andrist, Sara; Jack, Brian W

    2008-12-01

    Women of child-bearing age should achieve and maintain good nutritional status prior to conception to help minimize health risks to both mothers and infants. Many women may not be aware of the importance of preconception nutrition and supplementation or have access to nutrition information. Health care providers should be knowledgeable about preconception/pregnancy-related nutrition and take the initiative to discuss this information during preconception counseling. Women of reproductive age should be counseled to consume a well-balanced diet including fruits and vegetables, iron and calcium-rich foods, and protein-containing foods as well as 400 microg of folic acid daily. More research is critically needed on the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements and the role of obesity in birth outcomes. Preconception counseling is the perfect opportunity for the health care provider to discuss a healthy eating guideline, dietary supplement intake, and maintaining a healthy weight status.

  10. Rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia with disability: a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Sakuma, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition and sarcopenia often occur in rehabilitation settings. The prevalence of malnutrition and sarcopenia in older patients undergoing rehabilitation is 49–67 % and 40–46.5 %, respectively. Malnutrition and sarcopenia are associated with poorer rehabilitation outcome and physical function. Therefore, a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management may improve outcome in disabled elderly with malnutrition and sarcopenia. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a c...

  11. The Critical Care Obesity Paradox and Implications for Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayshil J; Rosenthal, Martin D; Miller, Keith R; Codner, Panna; Kiraly, Laszlo; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has been increasing and is associated with an increased risk for other co-morbidities. In the critical care setting, nearly one third of patients are obese. Obese critically ill patients pose significant physical and on-physical challenges to providers, including optimization of nutrition therapy. Intuitively, obese patients would have worse critical care-related outcome. On the contrary, emerging data suggests that critically ill obese patients have improved outcomes, and this phenomenon has been coined "the obesity paradox." The purposes of this review will be to outline the historical views and pathophysiology of obesity and epidemiology of obesity, describe the challenges associated with obesity in the intensive care unit setting, review critical care outcomes in the obese, define the obesity-critical care paradox, and identify the challenges and role of nutrition support in the critically ill obese patient.

  12. Enteral nutritional therapy in septic patients in the intensive care unit: compliance with nutritional guidelines for critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Castro, Kamila; Moraes,Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the compliance of septic patients' nutritional management with enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients. Methods Prospective cohort study with 92 septic patients, age ≥18 years, hospitalized in an intensive care unit, under enteral nutrition, evaluated according to enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients, compliance with caloric and protein goals, and reasons for not starting enteral nutrition early or for discontinuing it. Prognostic scores...

  13. Qualifying instrument for evaluation of food and nutritional care in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    R. W. Díez García; A. A.; de Souza; R. P. C. Proença

    2012-01-01

    Establishing criteria for hospital nutrition care ensures that quality care is delivered to patients. The responsibility of the Hospital Food and Nutrition Service (HFNS) is not always well defined, despite efforts to establish guidelines for patient clinical nutrition practice. This study describes the elaboration of an Instrument for Evaluation of Food and Nutritional Care (IEFNC) aimed at directing the actions of the Hospital Food and Nutrition Service. This instrument was qualified by mea...

  14. [Antibiotics and artificial nutrition in the cardiac intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaudio, Raffaele; Selmi, Valentina; Chelazzi, Cosimo

    2010-04-01

    Patients admitted to cardiac intensive care units are at high risk for infections, particularly nosocomial pneumonia, pacemaker's pocket and sternotomic wound infections. These complications delay recovery, prolong hospitalization, time on mechanical ventilation, and increase mortality. Both behavioral and pharmacological measures are needed to prevent and control infections in these patients, as well as specific antibiotic treatment and nutritional support. In infected critically ill patients, pathophysiological alterations modify distribution and clearance of antibiotics, and hypercatabolic state leads to malnutrition and immune paralysis, which both contribute to increased infectious risk and worsened outcome. A deep understanding of antibacterial agents pharmacology in the critically ill is essential in order to treat severe infections; moreover, it is necessary to know routes of administration and composition of artificial nutrition solutions. The aim of this review is to define main and specific aspects of antibiotic therapy and nutritional support in cardiac critical care patients in light of recent literature data.

  15. Nutrition guidance by primary care physicians: models and circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woerkum, C M

    1999-05-01

    The perception of primary care physicians of the ability to influence the lifestyle and eating habits of patients is an important factor in nutrition guidance practices. This perception is based on assumptions about the kind of influencing process that is effective or not and on the capacity of primary care physicians to play an effective role in these processes. The first elements is dealt with in this article. Three models are distinguished. The first model is the prescription model, based on a medical optimum and on information transfer as a metaphor. The second model is the persuasion model, based on a medical optimum, but presupposing blockades that have to be cornered by persuasive communication. The third is the interaction model. It is not based upon a medical but on an efficacy optimum, and on sharing of information and continuous involvement of the client in the interaction. Behind these three models we can perceive different views on communication and knowledge. Moreover, these three models are more or less appropriate with regard to different circumstances. The current stress on the psychological, social and cultural meaning of food and the new information context in which clients live, asks for more attention to the interaction model.

  16. Nutritional counseling and nutritional supplements: a cornerstone of multidisciplinary cancer care for cachectic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenring, Elizabeth A; Teleni, Laisa

    2013-12-01

    The challenge with cancer cachexia is that it is not fully reversed by nutrition support. The purpose of this review is to provide an opinion on the nutritional management of cancer cachexia based on the most recent available evidence. There continues to be a paucity of nutrition intervention studies in patients with cancer cachexia. In patients with cancer undergoing radiotherapy, there is strong evidence that nutrition counseling increases dietary intake, body weight, nutritional status and quality of life with some suggestion that dietary counseling may improve nutrition impact symptoms, treatment response and survival. In patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, the evidence is less clear. The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have some positive effects in patients with cancer; however, clinical judgment and care need to be taken in its application. Preliminary results of studies in the use of L-carnitine in improving fatigue are promising; however, the largest trial in 'healthy' cancer patients showed no benefit. Further research into the most appropriate methods for identifying and treating cancer cachexia is required. Regardless of whether patients are experiencing reduced dietary intake resulting in malnutrition or due to cachexia, nutrition remains a cornerstone of multimodal treatment.

  17. Nurturing and nourishing: the nurses' role in nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Diana; Johnson, Maree; Ravens, Jennifer

    2011-02-01

    Researchers collaborated with clinicians, consumers and dietitians to develop a policy defining how nurses could support their patients' nutritional care. A high prevalence of hospital malnutrition has been reported in Australia, Europe and the UK. A patient's nutritional status can deteriorate during admission. Malnutrition can increase complications, length of stay, mortality rates and health care costs. As the nursing role has become increasingly complex, traditional nurturing activities such as serving the patients' meals have devolved to other categories of staff leaving the role of nurses in their patients' nutritional care ill-defined. The research team systematically reviewed relevant research literature using the principles of qualitative metasynthesis to identify appropriate nursing strategies that would assist in reducing the prevalence of hospital malnutrition. The policy was developed using a systematic review approach: devising a clinical question, searching the literature, appraising research evidence, analysing existing policy documents, synthesising evidence into dominant themes and once the policy was drafted, initiating a wide ranging consultation and ratification process. A literature search located 147 articles. Forty articles were identified as being within the scope of the clinical question. Most were reports of audits or observation studies. The dominant themes were developed into standards that assisted nurses in supporting the oral nutrition of their patients. These included the following: a focussed mealtime, management of mealtime environments, management of staff mealtimes and a designated nutrition support nurse in each clinical area to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the policy. There is a distinct role for nurses that will assist in reducing the prevalence of hospital malnutrition but successful implementation can only occur with the support of the multidisciplinary team. This policy provides a framework to define and

  18. A clinical approach to the nutritional care process in protein-energy wasting hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Ruperto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition/wasting/cachexia are complex-disease conditions that frequently remain undiagnosed and/or untreated in up to 75% of prevalent hemodialysis (HD patients. The nutrition care process (NCP based on assessment, diagnosis, intervention and monitoring of nutritional status is a systematic method that nutrition professionals use to make decisions in clinical practice. Objective: This review examines from a clinical-nutritional practice point of view: a nutritional status as a mortality causative factor; b phenotypic characteristics of malnutri-tion/wasting/cachexia, and c current trends of NCP with special emphasis on nutritional support and novel nutrient and pharmacologic adjunctive therapies in HD patients. Method: A literature review was conducted using the Pubmed, Science Direct, Scielo, Scopus, and Medline electronic scientific basis. Studies which assessing nutritional status and nutritional support published from 1990 to 2013 in HD patients were included and discussed. Results: From all the epidemiological data analyzed, NCP was the suggested method for identifying malnut rition/ wasting or cachexia in clinical practice. Nutrition support as an unimodal therapy was not completely able to reverse wasting in HD patients. Novel experimental therapeutic strategies including the use of appetite stimulants, ghrelin agonist, MC4-R antagonists, anabolic steroids, anti-inflammatory drugs, cholecalciferol, and other components are still under clinical evaluation. Conclusion: Nutritional status is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in HD patients. The terms called malnutrition, wasting and cachexia have different nutritional therapeutics implications. The NCP is a necessary tool for assessing and monitoring nutritional status in the current clinical practice. Novel pharmacological therapies or specific nutrient supplementation interventions studies are required.

  19. Maintaining nutrition in aged care residents with a train-the-trainer intervention and Nutrition Coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, D; Isenring, E A; Black, L J; Hassall, S; Bauer, J D

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a train-the-trainer program on the nutritional status of older people in residential care. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Eight nursing homes in Southeast Queensland, Australia. A total of 352 residents participated - 245 were female (69.6%). The mean age was 84.2 years and the majority (79.4%) were classified as high dependency. Residents from four nursing homes were randomly selected for a nutrition education program coordinated by Nutrition Coordinators. Residents from the other four nursing homes (control) received usual care. The Subjective Global Assessment was used to determine prevalence of malnutrition at baseline and six months post intervention. The Resident Classification Scale measured functional dependency. Prescribed diet, fluids, oral hygiene status and allied health referrals were obtained by chart audit. Approximately half the residents were well nourished with 49.4% moderately or severely malnourished. Residents in the intervention group were more likely to maintain or improve their nutritional status compared with the control group who were more likely to experience a deterioration (P=0.027). The odds of the control group being malnourished post test was 1.6 times more likely compared with the intervention group but this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.1). The results of the study encourage the implementation of a Nutrition Coordinator program to maintain nutritional status of aged care residents. Nevertheless, malnutrition rates continue to be unacceptably high. In a rapidly aging society, the aged care sector needs to confront malnutrition and provide better resources for staff to take measures against this problem.

  20. [The nutritional status of children in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglitskikh, A K; Kon', I Ia; Ostreĭkov, I F; Shilina, N M; Smirnov, V F

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the nutritional status of infants in intensive care units (ICU). It shows nutritional trends in 269 children aged 1 month to 15 years, treated in the ICU of a Tushino children's city hospital, Moscow, for brain injury, abdominal surgical diseases, and severe pneumonia. The paper evaluates the physical development of children in the ICU, shows the trends in weight-height, somatometric, laboratory parameters, and balance study data. The values of protein losses and nitrogen balance in children in the postaggression period and their relationship to age and feeding mode (enteral, parenteral-enteral) are shown.

  1. Nutritional care of premature infants: microminerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Microminerals, including iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, iodine, chromium and molybdenum, are essential for a remarkable array of critical functions and need to be supplied in adequate amounts to preterm infants. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants carry a very high risk of developing iron deficiency which can adversely affect neurodevelopment. However, a too high iron supply in iron-replete VLBW infants may induce adverse effects such as increased infection risks and impaired growth. Iron needs are influenced by birth weight, growth rates, blood losses (phlebotomy) and blood transfusions. An enteral iron intake of 2 mg/kg/day for infants with a birth weight of 1,500-2,500 g and 2-3 mg/kg/day for VLBW infants is recommended. Higher doses up to 6 mg/kg/day are needed in infants receiving erythropoietin treatment. Regular monitoring of serum ferritin during the hospital stay is advisable. Routine provision of iron with parenteral nutrition for VLBW infants is not recommended. Less certainty exists for the advisable intakes of other microminerals. It appears prudent to provide enterally fed VLBW infants with daily amounts per kilogram body weight of 1.4-2.5 mg zinc, 100-230 μg copper, 5-10 μg selenium, 1-15 μg manganese, 10-55 μg iodine, 0.03-2.25 μg chromium, and 0.3-5 μg molybdenum. Future scientific findings may justify deviations from these suggested ranges.

  2. 'High-tech' home care: overview of professional care in patients on home parenteral nutrition and implications for nursing care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman-de Waal, G.J.; Achterberg, T. van; Jansen, J.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to describe the quality, quantity and content of care given to home parenteral nutrition-dependent patients by various professionals in the Netherlands and to detect potential shortcomings. BACKGROUND: Home parenteral nutrition is a lifesaving treatment for patients who

  3. Review of the Effectiveness of the Nutrition Care Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimasa, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This author (A.I.) has witnessed the introduction of the Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and its subsequent adjustment over 10 y of her career in an acute and critical setting. A.I. observed that the NCP went through several revisions to better suit the actual clinical practices and the NCP was gradually incorporated into everyday work and accepted in a clinical setting. The NCP helped ensure that all practicing registered dietitians (RDs, RDNs) have up-to-date skill sets. The NCP is a systematic problem-solving tool with four distinct and interrelated steps that help RDs to improve critical thinking and address practice-related problems so that RDs can more effectively intervene and evaluate. In summary, RDs using the NCP are producing consistent and easy-to-read documentation of clinical practices that benefit other healthcare members. The intention to provide diagnosis-oriented assessment and to treat nutrition problems with intervention plans opens up opportunities for communication within healthcare teams and clients. The best practice requires interactive and ongoing communication with healthcare teams and clients. The NCP has resulted in improved productivity as the RDs are writing diagnosis- focused documentation with specific plans for intervention. In addition, analysis of common problems and nutrition diagnoses resolution rates appear to be in process in some facilities and may further promote RD roles in practice settings. In conclusion, the NCP is an effective tool to provide improved nutrition care.

  4. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlene Johnson Stoklossa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  5. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care.

  6. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  7. Nutritional intervention using nutrition care process in a malnourished patient with chemotherapy side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Ok; Lee, Jung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, the process of nutritional diagnosis and intervention conducted at a hospital on a malnourished patient who underwent treatment for a chronic illness (chemotherapy for cancer treatment) was recorded. The patient received his first round of chemotherapy for colorectal cancer, and then a second round after the cancer metastasized to the liver. The patient was malnourished and had experienced weight loss (17% loss in the most recent 3 months) due to side effects of chemotherapy including stomatitis, nausea, and vomiting. Nutritional diagnosis and intervention via the nutrition care process were implemented through two screening rounds, and the quantity of oral intake increased from 28% to 62% of the recommended daily intake. The patient required continuous monitoring and outpatient care after hospital discharge. It is speculated that if a more active patient education and dietary regimen with respect to chemotherapy side effects had been offered after the patient's first chemotherapy cycle, it might have been possible to treat ingestion problems due to stomatitis during the second cycle of chemotherapy and prevent the weight loss. Henceforth, patients receiving chemotherapy should be educated about nutrition management methods and monitored continuously to prevent malnutrition.

  8. Personal Trainer Perceptions of Providing Nutrition Care to Clients: A Qualitative Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Katelyn; Ball, Lauren; Desbrow, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Personal trainers are well placed to provide basic nutrition care in line with national dietary guidelines. However, many personal trainers provide nutrition care beyond their scope of practice and this has been identified as a major industry risk due to a perceived lack of competence in nutrition. This paper explores the context in which personal trainers provide nutrition care, by understanding personal trainers' perceptions of nutrition care in relation to their role and scope of practice. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 15 personal trainers working within Australia. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes. All personal trainers reported to provide nutrition care and reported that nutrition care was an important component of their role. Despite this, many were unaware or uncertain of the scope of practice for personal trainers. Some personal trainers reported a gap between the nutrition knowledge they received in their formal education, and the knowledge they needed to optimally support their clients to adopt healthy dietary behaviors. Overall, the personal training context is likely to be conducive to providing nutrition care. Despite concerns about competence personal trainers have not modified their nutrition care practices. To ensure personal trainers provide nutrition care in a safe and effective manner, greater enforcement of the scope of practice is required as well as clear nutrition competencies or standards to be developed during training.

  9. Validation of the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale in Italian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Loris; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Aleo, Giuseppe; Sasso, Loredana

    2013-09-01

    To validate the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale in Italian, a tool created in Sweden to measure nurses' attitudes towards nutritional care in older people. Malnutrition in institutionalized older people is a serious problem having negative impact on patient outcomes. It is reported in the literature that nurses have negative attitudes towards nutritional care. Forward and back-translation were carried out to build the Italian version of the tool. Content and face validity were then examined by pilot study. Test-retest reliability with Spearman's rho (rs) correlation, intraclass correlation (ICC) and internal consistency reliability with Cronbach's α were assessed. Differences between test-rest were assessed by t-test. Linguistic and semantic adaptation of the tool into Italian was successful. Thirty-three nurses skilled in caring for older patients did pilot testing and 46 test-retesting. SANN-G GITA-scale achieved good content and face validity, good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.85) and acceptable stability [rs = 0.75, P = 0.001; ICC = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.86; P = 0.001]. The t-test showed no significant difference between test and retest results, confirming stability of the tool (t(64) = -0.98; P = 0.33). The process of adaptation of the scale from Swedish to Italian language was successful. Thus, the SANN-GITA scale can be useful to assess attitudes of nursing staff to nutritional care in the Italian context. This tool will allow the identification of areas where Italian nurses have negative attitudes and where to implement strategies to improve overall nutritional care. © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  10. Nutrition in care homes and home care: How to implement adequate strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvanitakis, M.; Beck, Anne Marie; Coppens, P.;

    2008-01-01

    are various: medical, social, environmental, organizational and financial. Lack of alertness of individuals, their relatives and health-care professionals play an important role. Undernutrition enhances the risk of infection, hospitalization, mortality and alter the quality of life. Moreover, undernutrition...... related-disease is an economic burden in most countries. Nutritional assessment should be part of routine global management. Nutritional support combined with physical training and an improved ambiance during meats is mandatory. Awareness, information and collaboration with all the stakeholders should...

  11. Nature, nurture or nutrition? Impact of maternal nutrition on maternal care, offspring development and reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, K L; Vickers, M H; Beltrand, J; Meaney, M J; Sloboda, D M

    2012-05-01

    We have previously reported that offspring of mothers fed a high fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and lactation enter puberty early and are hyperleptinaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and obese as adults. Poor maternal care and bonding can also impact offspring development and disease risk.We therefore hypothesized that prenatal nutrition would affect maternal care and that an interaction may exist between a maternal HF diet and maternal care, subsequently impacting on offspring phenotype.Wistar rats were mated and randomized to control dams fed a control diet (CON) or dams fed a HF diet from conception until the end of lactation (HF). Maternal care was assessed by observing maternal licking and grooming of pups between postnatal day (P)3 and P8. Postweaning (P22), offspring were fed a control (–con) or HF (–hf) diet. From P27, pubertal onset was assessed. At ∼P105 oestrous cyclicity was investigated. Maternal HF diet reduced maternal care; HF-fed mothers licked and groomed pups less than CON dams.Maternal fat:lean ratio was higher in HF dams at weaning and was associated with higher maternal plasma leptin and insulin concentrations, but there was no effect of maternal care on fat:lean ratio or maternal hormone levels. Both female and male offspring of HF dams were lighter from birth to P11 than offspring of CON dams, but by P19, HF offspring were heavier than controls. Prepubertal retroperitoneal fat mass was greater in pups from HF-fed dams compared to CON and was associated with elevated circulating leptin concentrations in females only, but there was neither an effect of maternal care, nor an interaction between maternal diet and care on prepubertal fat mass. Pups from HF-fed dams went into puberty early and this effect was exacerbated by a postweaning HF diet.Maternal and postweaning HF diets independently altered oestrous cyclicity in females: female offspring of HF-fed mothers were more likely to have prolonged or persistent oestrus, whilst female offspring fed

  12. The role of care in nutrition -- a neglected essential ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, R; Tomkins, A

    1995-01-01

    The causes of poor child nutrition are undergoing a substantial re-assessment. Care consists of the actions necessary to promote survival, growth and development, involving household food security and health promoting behavior. Resources for improving care exist at the household level: income, food, time, attitudes, relationships, and knowledge. Care in terms of affection, emotional support, and effective allocation of resources with stability has a direct influence on child survival, growth, and development. The need for care of the young child is often greatest with cases of severe protein-energy malnutrition. Promoting breast feeding involves facilitation of breast feeding in the workplace and agreement by the food industry to ensure responsible advertising of infant and child feeding commodities. Care of school age children who are not coping in schools because of malnutrition requires an appropriate response, particularly for children who do not receive breakfast or are micronutrient deficient. In both developed and developing countries about 7% of children have some form of disability. However, on average only 2-3% of children are considered disabled by the community. Nutrition can do much to prevent disabilities and ensure that the disabled child is not at a disadvantage. Urban children from the age of 6 upwards will be vulnerable to shocks from lack of supervision and discipline/nurture, prostitution, drugs and poisoning. Care has to be provided in some form through other community institutions. Refugees and people in emergencies also require care because over the last 10 years the number of internally displaced people and refugees has grown in Africa and in the former Yugoslavia and Soviet Union. In Africa refugees and the displaced now number 20 million.

  13. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care : data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wayenburg, CAM; van de Laar, FA; de Waal, MWM; Okkes, IM; van den Akker, M; van der Veen, WJ; Schellevis, FG; van Staveren, WA; van Binsbergen, JJ; van Weel, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care (

  14. 77 FR 45717 - Proposed Information Collection (Food Service and Nutritional Care Analysis) Activity; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... to determine patients' satisfaction with the quality of food and nutrition services. DATES: Written... level of patient satisfaction and quality of service resulting from advanced food preparation and... Information Collection (Food Service and Nutritional Care Analysis) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY:...

  15. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0074 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven E...University of Texas Health Science Center – Houston, the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and at the United States Army Institute of...Surgical Research, and then we completed collection of 100 subjects at UT-Southwestern, 42 at the University of Texas Health Science Center – Houston, and

  16. Dysphagia, nutrition, and hydration in ischemic stroke patients at admission and discharge from acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Humphrey, Jamie L; Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Sambandam, Raam; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Dysphagia may predispose stroke patients toward undernutrition and hydration. These comorbidities increase patient risks for reduced functional outcome and short-term mortality. Despite this impact, available information on relationships among dysphagia, nutrition, and hydration status in acute stroke is limited and conflicted. This study evaluated nutrition and hydration status in ischemic stroke patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia at admission and at discharge from acute care. Sixty-seven patients admitted to the stroke unit in a tertiary-care hospital provided data for this study. On the day of hospital admission and upon discharge or at 7 days post admission, serum biochemical measures were obtained for nutrition (prealbumin) and hydration status (BUN/Cr). Clinical evaluation for dysphagia, nutrition status, and stroke severity were completed an average of 1.4 days following hospital admission. Dysphagia was identified in 37 % of the cohort. At admission 32 % of patients demonstrated malnutrition based on prealbumin levels and 53 % demonstrated evidence of dehydration based on BUN/Cr levels. No differences in nutrition status were attributed to dysphagia. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly higher BUN/Cr levels (greater dehydration) than patients without dysphagia at admission and at discharge. Dehydration at both admission and discharge was associated with dysphagia, clinical nutrition status, and stroke severity. Results of this study support prior results indicating that dysphagia is not associated with poor nutrition status during the first week post stroke. Dehydration status is associated with dysphagia during this period. The results have implications for future confirmatory research and for clinical management of dysphagia in the acute stroke period.

  17. Nutrition Care Process Implementation: Experiences in Various Dietetics Environments in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövestam, Elin; Boström, Anne-Marie; Orrevall, Ylva

    2017-05-02

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) are currently being implemented by nutrition and dietetics practitioners all over the world. Several advantages have been related to this implementation, such as consistency and clarity of dietetics-related health care records and the possibility to collect and research patient outcomes. However, little is known about dietitians' experiences of the implementation process. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Swedish dietitians' experiences of the NCP implementation process in different dietetics environments. Thirty-seven Swedish dietitians from 13 different dietetics workplaces participated in seven focus group discussions that were audiotaped and carefully transcribed. A thematic secondary analysis was performed, after which all the discussions were re-read, following the implementation narrative from each workplace. In the analysis, The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services implementation model was used as a framework. Main categories identified in the thematic analysis were leadership and implementation strategy, the group and colleagues, the electronic health record, and evaluation. Three typical cases are described to illustrate the diversity of these aspects in dietetics settings: Case A represents a small hospital with an inclusive leadership style and discussion-friendly culture where dietitians had embraced the NCP/NCPT implementation. Case B represents a larger hospital with a more hierarchical structure where dietitians were more ambivalent toward NCP/NCPT implementation. Case C represents the only dietitian working at a small multiprofessional primary care center who received no dietetics-related support from management or colleagues. She had not started NCP/NCPT implementation. The diversity of dietetics settings and their different prerequisites should be considered in the development of NCP/NCPT implementation strategies. Tailored

  18. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  19. Early enteral nutrition therapy and mortality in a pediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of early introduction of enteral nutrition therapy in reducing morbidity and mortality in pediatric intensive care unit.Methods: Search in the literature of the last 10 years, in English and the target population of individuals aged 1 month to 18 years admitted to pediatric intensive care units in the databases PubMed, Lilacs and Embase using the keywords: Critical Care, Nutritional Support and Nutrition Disorders or Malnutrition.Results: Despite advances in th...

  20. Nutritional self-care in two older Norwegian males - A case study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: How to support nutritional self-care among older vulnerable individuals living in their own homes can be considered important knowledge for health care professionals. Aim: The aim of this case study was to evaluate the effects of a nutritional intervention by comparing self-reported perceived health, sense of coherence, self-care ability and nutritional risk in two older home-dwelling individuals before, during and after the intervention and also to describe experiences of nutri...

  1. Health economics evidence for medical nutrition: are these interventions value for money in integrated care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walzer S

    2014-05-01

    value for money of medical nutrition interventions. The evaluations were conducted by analyzing different medical nutrition according to their indications, the economic methodology or perspective adopted, the cost source and utility measures, selected efficiency measures, as well as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Results: A total of 225 abstracts were identified for the detailed review, and the data were entered into a data extraction sheet. For the abstracts that finally met the predefined inclusion criteria (n=53, full-text publications were obtained via PubMed, subito, or directly via each journal's Webpage for further assessment. After a detailed review of the full text articles, 34 publications have been qualified for a thorough data extraction procedure. When differentiating the resulting articles in terms of their settings, 20 studies covered inpatients, whereas 14 articles covered outpatients, including patients in community centers. When reviewing the value-for-money evaluations, the indications showed that the different results were mostly impacted by the different perspectives adopted and the comparisons that were made. In order to draw comprehensive conclusions, the results were split according to the main indications and diseases. Discussion: The systematic literature search has shown that there is not only an interest in health economics and its application in medical nutrition, but that there is a lot of ongoing research in this area. Based on the underlying systematic analysis, it has been shown that medical nutrition interventions offer value for money in the different health care settings, particularly for the specific disease areas that have been pointed out. Conclusion: Based on the systematic literature search that was performed, it was shown that medical nutrition interventions offer value for money in the different health care settings. Although medical nutrition has been the topic of some health economic analyses, the usual willingness

  2. A standardized nutrition care process and language are essential components of a conceptual model to guide and document nutrition care and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakel-Smith, Nancy; Lewis, Nancy M

    2004-12-01

    Documentation of clinical services within health care systems has become increasingly significant because greater amounts of information are now required by accrediting agencies, third-party payers, researchers, and others in their evaluation of patient care and because of the increasing emphasis on patient outcomes. Given the multiple users who depend on health care information in the patient record, it is imperative that clinical nutrition practitioners implement a standardized nutrition care process and language to document comprehensively and communicate meaningful information concerning their role in improving patient outcomes. A body of work has led to the development and adoption of a standardized nutrition care process for the dietetics profession. A standardized nutrition care process consistent with the scientific method and a standardized language are two essential components required to articulate a conceptual model for clinical nutrition practice and documentation and distinguish clinical dietetics' unique body of knowledge. The conceptual model serves as an organizing framework to standardize and guide nutrition practitioners' clinical judgments or critical thinking processes and document information linking nutrition care to patient outcomes.

  3. Care of central venous catheters for total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E; Lawson, L; Lau, M T; Barder, L; Weaver, F; Bayer, D; Schulz, M; Byrne, R; Hauser, M; Neubia, A; Dries, D

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes data obtained via a mailed questionnaire from 129 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals regarding current practices in the care of central venous catheters (CVCs) used for total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The size of VA hospitals' acute medical-surgical beds ranged from 14 to 1320 (median 168) beds. Over 6000 patients annually received CVCs for TPN. Hospitals reported using triple-lumen catheters most frequently as their CVC for TPN (80.3%). A povidone-iodine scrub was used to prepare the skin for CVC insertion by 72.6% of reporting hospitals. Sixty percent of hospitals used transparent polyurethane dressings. Care of CVCs varied among hospitals. Catheter-related infection and sepsis rates were within the national average, although < 50% of responding hospitals provided data on these outcomes. The results of this survey point to the need for a national standardized database relative to patients receiving TPN via a CVC.

  4. Nutritional status of cancer patients given different treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, K; Roy, R K; Vijayalakshmi; Prakash, Jamuna

    2004-08-01

    The nutritional status of 91 cancer patients was assessed at the time of diagnosis and follow-up assessments were carried out at the third and sixth week after initiating different treatment modalities to study the effect of type and duration of treatment on nutritional status. Parameters assessed were anthropometry, biochemical status and clinical signs and symptoms of nutritional deficiencies. Treatment modalities studied were radiotherapy, chemotherapy, chemotherapy+radiotherapy, and combined treatment modality (surgery+radiotherapy+chemotherapy). The nutritional status of male patients was affected most by chemotherapy+radiotherapy while females were affected most with radiotherapy. Biochemical parameters showed a marginal decline in total serum protein and serum albumin concentrations. Haemoglobin concentrations declined substantially with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The lymphocyte count decreased substantially irrespective of the treatment modality. Clinical examination revealed increased incidences of deficiency signs and symptoms in all patients during follow-up irrespective of treatment modality.

  5. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  6. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  7. [Seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management in patients with Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2010-12-01

    Community coordination is necessary in nutrition care management and dysphagia rehabilitation, because they are not completed in one hospital or facility. For seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management in patients with dysphagia, it is useful to define why, who, when, where, what, and how. Common communication materials of nutrition support team and dysphagia rehabilitation made by Kanagawa society of dysphagia rehabilitation is effective in promoting community coordination. In qualitative research for participants in community nutrition support team at Yokohama south area, two issues were emerged: strengthening collaboration of the community nutrition support team including visiting medical staffs and offering opportunity to learn clinical nutrition and dysphagia rehabilitation. Concept of rehabilitation nutrition is also useful for community coordination. Rehabilitation nutrition is to assess with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health including nutrition status and to practice rehabilitation nutrition care plan under adequate prognosis prediction. It is not enough for patients with dysphagia to coordinate only clinical nutrition or rehabilitation. Seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management is important for patients with dysphagia to improve their activities of daily living and quality of life.

  8. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  9. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU, the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores, rate of usege of parenteral and enteral products, and the change in expenses per patient within the first year of activity of the nutrition team in comparison to the previous year was presented. Material and Method: In this study a 6-bed GICU was used. The patients who was admitted through retrospective file scanning between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012 and between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2013 were compared. Results: The number of the patients admitted to the GICU was 341 in 2012 and 369 in 2013. The number of the patients who died in 2012 was 86 (25.2%, while it was 106 in 2013 (28.7%. In 2012, 122 patients (35.7% had decubitus ulcers, while this number was 92 (24.7% in 2013. Human albumin usage was reduced by 23% for the 100 mL (225 in 2012, 175 in 2013 and by 33% for the 50 mL doses (122 in 2012, 82 in 2013. Duration of stay in the hospital was 6.3±0.9 vs. 5.8±0.9 (days (p=0.06. The mean APACHE II scores were observed to be 24.7±6.9 vs. 30.5±11.4 (p=0.03. When the distribution of product types were analyzed, it was observed that the ratio of parenteral products: enteral products was 2:1 in 2012, however the ratio of enteral products to parenteral products was 2:1 in 2013. The daily expense of a patient decreased from 100 TL to 55 TL. Conclusion: The nutrition team directly influences the clinical process outcomes of patients under treatment in the ICU. It was thought that using appropriate nutritional

  10. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes.

  11. Nutrition and health in hotel staff on different shift patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, R; Süße, T; Spitzer, S; Hunger, B; Rudolf, M

    2015-08-01

    Limited research is available that examines the nutritional behaviour and health of hotel staff working alternating and regular shifts. To analyse the nutritional behaviour and health of employees working in alternating and regular shifts. The study used an ex post facto cross-sectional analysis to compare the nutritional behaviour and health parameters of workers with alternating shifts and regular shift workers. Nutritional behaviour was assessed with the Food Frequency Questionnaire. Body dimensions (body mass index, waist hip ratio, fat mass and active cell mass), metabolic values (glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol and low- and high-density lipoprotein), diseases and health complaints were included as health parameters. Participants worked in alternating (n = 53) and regular shifts (n = 97). The average age of subjects was 35 ± 10 years. There was no significant difference in nutritional behaviour, most surveyed body dimensions or metabolic values between the two groups. However, alternating shift workers had significantly lower fat mass and higher active cell mass but nevertheless reported more pronounced health complaints. Sex and age were also confirmed as influencing the surveyed parameters. Shift-dependent nutritional problems were not conspicuously apparent in this sample of hotel industry workers. Health parameters did not show significantly negative attributes for alternating shift workers. Conceivably, both groups could have the same level of knowledge on the health effects of nutrition and comparable opportunities to apply this. Further studies on nutritional and health behaviour in the hotel industry are necessary in order to create validated screening programmes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck cancer in Michoacán, Mexico, ranks as the third most common cancer and accounts for 12% of deaths. The increase in malnutrition in a patient with this disease has been associated with increased mortality. We studied prospectively 30 patients of both sexes, aged 18 years with head and neck cancer in the Cancer Care Center of Michoacan. In the evaluation period since August 2010 to August 2011. Formats were used VGS-Oncology (Subjective Global Assessment), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) and Guss (Gugging Swallowing Screen), through which nutritional risk was determined, and established the swallowing capacity of the study population. In our study, 53.3% of the population had moderate malnutrition according to the VGS Oncology, 33% weight loss record. The NRS 2002 show that 43.3% is at risk of malnutrition. The degree of dysphagia is shown more often in older patients, cancer type and stage of illness. Nutritional risk scales relate directly proportional to tumor location and stage, as well, there are other different oncological factors involved in the patient's nutritional deterioration. Therefore it is of vital importance to have a nutritionist as part of the multidisciplinary team, to detect the nutritional risk and to be able to handle it in an opportune way. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Rhazes’ concepts and manuscripts on nutrition in treatment and health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaein, Farzad; Zargaran, Arman; Mehdizadeh, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    The use of nutrition in medical practice has a long history dating back to 6000 years. The great Persian chemist, physician, and philosopher, Rhazes (865-925 AD), wrote over 200 books in different branches of science. Some of his work drew attention to the notion that nutrition is an important part of treating diseases and health care procedures. Rhazes formulated highly developed concepts of nutrition and wrote several special books about food and diet such as manfe’ al aghzie va mazareha (Benefits of Food and its Harmfulness), teb al moluki (Medicine for Kings), and Ata’me al marza (Food for Patients). His writing included detailed guidance about eating fruit ma iaghdam men al favakeh va al aghzieh va ma yoakhar (Fruit Before or After Meal), and other food types keifiat al eghteza (Temperament and Quality of Foods) and al aghziat al mokhtasareh (Brief Facts about Food). Considering the time that these books were written, they have had a great influence on approaches to nutrition in the history of medicine, so Rhazes can be considered as a pioneer in the scientific field of nutrition. PMID:23661862

  14. Rhazes' concepts and manuscripts on nutrition in treatment and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaein, Farzad; Zargaran, Arman; Mehdizadeh, Alireza

    2012-04-01

    The use of nutrition in medical practice has a long history dating back to 6000 years. The great Persian chemist, physician, and philosopher, Rhazes (865-925 AD), wrote over 200 books in different branches of science. Some of his work drew attention to the notion that nutrition is an important part of treating diseases and health care procedures. Rhazes formulated highly developed concepts of nutrition and wrote several special books about food and diet such as manfe' al aghzie va mazareha (Benefits of Food and its Harmfulness), teb al moluki (Medicine for Kings), and Ata'me al marza (Food for Patients). His writing included detailed guidance about eating fruit ma iaghdam men al favakeh va al aghzieh va ma yoakhar (Fruit Before or After Meal), and other food types keifiat al eghteza (Temperament and Quality of Foods) and al aghziat al mokhtasareh (Brief Facts about Food). Considering the time that these books were written, they have had a great influence on approaches to nutrition in the history of medicine, so Rhazes can be considered as a pioneer in the scientific field of nutrition.

  15. [Nutrition and malnutrition in the intensive coronary care unit. Fundamentals for the clinical cardiologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Daria; Espinosa, Emma; Lilli, Alessio; Bovenzi, Francesco Maria; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Patients admitted to coronary care units (CCU) have largely changed in the last decades. As observed in national and international registries, they are older, with different degrees of disability and several comorbidities. Moreover, they often undergo complex procedures. In this scenario, the cardiologist of the CCU has to deal with multidisciplinarity that should involve physiology and pathophysiology of nutrition. Despite the lack of specific data about our CCUs, hospital malnutrition is indeed a common entity that can reach a prevalence of 50% in elderly patients aged more than 75 years old. Malnutrition has several consequences in CCU patients since it involves respiratory drive, immune system and, clinically, patients have longer CCU stay and more complications. Briefly, malnutrition has a significant impact on their final outcome. In the clinical arena, the main issues for CCU physicians are the nutritional screening tools to promote an early recognition of patients with malnutrition, the pathophysiological knowledge of nutrition for a correct interaction with nutritionists, and the way of administration with its major complications. The changes in the population within CCUs are relatively recent and, although specific data in the cardiology setting are still scarce, nutrition science has reached a high level of knowledge to understand and plan tailored nutritional schemes based on the clinical and demographic features of our sick patients.

  16. Nurse practitioners’ attitudes to nutritional challenges dealing with the patients’ nutritional needs and ability to care for themselves in a fast track program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nutrition plays an important role to the success of fast track programs, but under nutrition are still reported. Nutritional care seems to be a low priority among nurses even though it is well-known that insufficient nutrition has severe consequences for the patients. The aim...... is to report to what extent a training program has made Nutritional Nurse Practitioners aware of the nutritional care for short-term hospitalized patients, and how they deal with patients’ nutritional needs and ability to provide self-care in the context of a fast track program. Methods: Deductive content...... analysis was used to analyse data from four focus group interviews. Sixteen Nutritional Nurse Practitioners from either medical or surgery wards participated. The Nutritional Nurse Practitioners were interviewed twice. The interviews were recorded and verbally transcribed. Results: In the Nutritional Nurse...

  17. Nutritional status among older residents with dementia in open versus special care units in municipal nursing homes: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Undernutrition is widespread among institutionalised elderly, and people suffering from dementia are at particularly high risk. Many elderly with dementia live in open units or in special care units in nursing homes. It is not known whether special care units have an effect on the nutritional status of the residents. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the nutritional status of residents with dementia in both open units and in special care units. Methods Among Oslo’s 29 municipal nursing homes, 21 participated with 358 residents with dementia or cognitive impairment, of which 46% lived in special care units. Nutritional status was assessed using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool and anthropometry. Results We found no differences (p > 0.05) in risk of undernutrition, body mass index, mid-upper arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold thickness between residents in open units and those in special care units. Residents in special care units were significantly younger and stronger when measured with a hand-grip test. Conclusions We found no difference in nutritional status between nursing home residents with dementia/cognitive impairment in open units versus in special care units. PMID:23496975

  18. Students entering internship show readiness in the nutrition care process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S D; Cotugna, N

    2013-10-01

    The British Dietetic Association and the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations are developing an international model for dietetics practice as an aid in providing evidence-based practice. In the USA, undergraduate programmes are mandated by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) to incorporate the nutrition care process (NCP) into the curriculum so that students can use the process during their dietetic internship and later practice. The present study aimed to assess interns' readiness in the NCP prior to beginning a dietetic internship. Before starting the internship, the 40 interns in the 2009-2010 class of a university-based internship were sent an e-mail requesting they complete an online survey. Questions inquired about their NCP background with respect to: academic preparation, work or volunteer experiences, knowledge and confidence in ability to apply the NCP. Survey results were analysed with SPSS statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The 39 interns completing the survey indicated they had prior exposure to the NCP. All but one reported that their academic coursework covered the NCP. Approximately half of the interns worked or volunteered in settings that used the NCP. Overall, students correctly answered most of the questions assessing their basic knowledge in the NCP. Thirty-seven of the 39 interns had some confidence or felt confident in their ability to apply the NCP during internship rotations. This distance internship attracts students from all over the USA, and so the findings of the present study shed light on current undergraduate preparation in the NCP. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Insulin resistance in early vs late nutrition and complications of sirs in neurosurgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilika, Kliti; Roshi, Enver

    2015-02-01

    Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is a common complication in neurosurgical diseases in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Because of associated insulin resistance (IR) the ICU is in dilemma in which stage to start the nutrition to patients and what is the amount of Insulin Unit to control the hyperglycemia. to define the IR and to compare IR and amount of insulin among ICU patients in "Mother Theresa" University Hospital Center (MTUHC) in Tirana Albania. 154 patients with neurosurgical disease and SIRS complications were randomized in two groups: early nutrition 73 patients (47%) and late nutrition 81 (53%) and compared for a number of variables. There was no statistical age and gender difference between the two groups (P>0.05). The amount of insulin units to control the level of glycemia (80-110 mg/dc) was 12.8±7 unit per day in early nutrition and 23.8 ±12.9 units in late nutrition group (p<0.01). No patient in early nutrition group but six (7.4%) patients in late nutrition group developed insulin resistance (p=0.03). the IR due to the infection complications is higher among late than early nutrition group. Therefore, we suggest that in neurosurgical ICU it would be better to start the nutrition within 72 hours.

  20. Health care costs matter: a review of nutrition economics – is there a role for nutritional support to reduce the cost of medical health care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naberhuis JK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jane K Naberhuis,1 Vivienne N Hunt,2 Jvawnna D Bell,3 Jamie S Partridge,3 Scott Goates,3 Mark JC Nuijten4 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; 2Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Singapore; 3Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Columbus, OH, USA; 4A2M (Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Background and aims: As policy-makers assess the value of money spent on health care, research in the field of health economics is expanding rapidly. This review covers a period of 10 years and seeks to characterize the publication of papers at the intersection of health economics and nutrition. Methods: Relevant publications on nutrition care were identified in the medical literature databases using predetermined search criteria. These included nutritional interventions linked to health economic terms with inclusion criteria requiring original research that included clinical outcomes and cost analyses, subjects’ ages ≥18 years, and publications in English between January 2004 and October 2014. Results: Of the 5,646 publications identified in first-round searches, 274 met the specified inclusion criteria. The number of publications linking nutrition to economic outcomes has increased markedly over the 10-year period, with a growing number of studies in both developed and developing countries. Most studies were undertaken in Europe (39% and the USA and Canada (28%. The most common study setting was hospital (62% followed by community/noninstitutional care (30%. Of all the studies, 12% involved the use of oral nutritional supplements, and 13% involved parenteral nutrition. The economic outcomes consistently measured were medical care costs (53% of the studies, hospital length of stay (48%, hospital readmission rates (9%, and mortality (25%. Conclusion: The number of publications focused on the economics of nutrition interventions has increased dramatically in recent years

  1. Effects of different nutritional plans on broiler performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Buteri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out at the Department of Animal Science of the Federal University of Viçosa, Brazil, to evaluate the effects of different nutritional plans on the performance of male and female Ross broilers. A completely randomized experimental design with a 6x2 factorial arrangement (six nutritional plans x two sexes with six replicates of 20 birds per experimental unit was applied. The nutritional plans adopted for males and females included 3, 5, or 28 feeds, and the other 3 plans included 28 feeds containing 92.5, 100, and 107.5% of digestible lysine requirements established according to a mathematical model developed exclusively for Ross broilers. The results showed that the tested 28-feed feeding programs are equivalent, and allow similar performance as compared to 3- and 5-feed feeding programs. Based on the lysine levels included in the different nutritional plans, it was possible to fit the equations: Y = -0.0079x + 1.2435 (R² = 0.981 for males and Y = -0.0084x + 1.1925 (R² = 0.978 for females, where "Y" is digestible lysine level (% and "x" is average age in days. These equations are specific for multiple-phase feeding programs. The performance of male and female broilers fed the lysine levels established by the mathematical models was similar as to that of birds fed the other nutritional plans. This demonstrates that it is possible to determine broiler lysine.

  2. Are Nutritional Care Adequate for Elderly Hospitalized Patients? A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Kjøllesdal Eide

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses nutritional care in identifying and treating nutritional risk in elderly hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a large Norwegian University hospital in the period 2011 to 2013. Data on nutritional risk and care for elderly patients (≥70 years without dementia were collected at 20 wards by 173 second-year nursing students in acute-care clinical studies. A stratified sampling technique was utilized to improve the representativeness of the sample. In total, 508 patients (48.8% women with a mean age of 79.6 years participated. The internationally and nationally recommended nutritional care was not implemented at the hospital, suggesting that nutritional care for elderly hospitalized patients was not adequate. This implies that the majority of the elderly patients nutritionally at risk are neither identified nor treated according to their needs. The article highlights the importance of having systematic nutritional care practices to make it possible for the hospital ward staff to routinely identify nutritional risk and initiate appropriate nutritional treatment measures.

  3. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks for nutrition in child care 2011: are child-care providers across contexts meeting recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; McBride, Brent A

    2013-10-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) recommends feeding practices for child-care providers to establish nutrition habits in early childhood to prevent obesity. With >12 million US children in child care, little is known about child-care providers' feeding practices. The purpose of this study was to examine child-care providers' feeding practices to assess whether providers met the Academy's benchmarks and whether attainment of benchmarks varied across child-care contexts (Head Start, Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP], and non-CACFP). Cross-sectional data was collected in 2011 and 2012 from 118 child-care providers who completed self-administered surveys regarding their feeding practices for 2- to 5-year-old children. χ(2) tests and analysis of variance were used to determine variation across contexts. Head Start providers sat more frequently with children during meals (P=0.01), ate the same foods as children (P=0.001), and served meals family style (Pnutrition-education opportunities compared with CACFP and non-CACFP. Head Start providers encouraged more balance and variety of foods (Pnutrition (PAcademy's benchmarks compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Possible reasons for this compliance might be attributed to Head Start nutrition performance standards and increased nutrition-training opportunities for Head Start staff. Head Start programs can serve as a model in implementing the Academy's benchmarks. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritional care; do process and structure indicators influence malnutrition prevalence over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Tan, Frans; Schols, Jos M G A; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-06-01

    To date, no information is available about the effect of structural and process factors of nutritional care on the prevalence of malnutrition over time in the long-term care sector. This study analyzes the trend of malnutrition prevalence rates between 2007 and 2011 in the long-term care sector, and the related effects of(1) process indicators such as nutritional screening and treatment and 2) structural indicators (guideline, protocol or nutritional screening policy). From 2007 to 2011, the Dutch National Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems (LPZ) was performed in Dutch long-term care organizations using a standardized questionnaire involving measurements at institutional, ward and resident level. The data were analyzed by mixed-linear regression for longitudinal data. Presence of malnutrition was assessed by BMI, undesired weight loss and nutritional intake. Seventy-four care homes were included (26,101 residents). The malnutrition prevalence trend significantly decreased (P effects analysis only the interacted process indicators nutritional screening and oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) were significant in influencing malnutrition prevalence rates over time. Structural indicators had no impact on the malnutrition prevalence over time. In conclusion, over time a lower prevalence of malnutrition is associated with a higher degree of nutritional screening. As might be expected, a higher prevalence of malnutrition is associated with higher use of ONS. Structural nutritional screening is an important intervention to tackle the problem of malnutrition in the long term care sector.

  5. Integrating patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the application of patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice, illustrate the process in a case study, and promote change in the current healthcare clinical ethics model. Nutrition support clinicians have an opportunity to add another dimension to their practice with the incorporation of patient-centered care and clinical ethics. This represents a culture change for healthcare professionals, including nutrition support clinicians, patients and their family. All of these individuals are stakeholders in the process and have the ability to modify the current healthcare system to improve communication and facilitate a change by humanizing nutrition support practice. Nutrition support is a medical, life-sustaining treatment, and the use of this therapy requires knowledge by the nutrition support clinician of patient-centered care concepts, preventive clinical ethics, religion/spirituality and cultural diversity, palliative care team role, and advance care planning. Integrating these into the practice of nutrition support is an innovative approach and results in new knowledge that requires a change in the culture of care and engagement and empowerment of the patient and their family in the process. This is more than a healthcare issue; it involves a social/family conversation movement that will be enhanced by the nutrition support clinician's participation.

  6. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach program on nutrition that helped child care center teachers gain increased nutrition literacy. The teachers indicated that they gained increased personal understanding of formerly confusing nutrition issues (e.g., how to read a nutrition label and what defines a whole grain). Teachers were also able to identify aspects of web sites linked from MedlinePlus that indicated the sites served as reliable sources of health information.

  7. Nutrition and its importance to intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verity, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose in this paper is to consider the importance of early nutrition for critically ill patients, briefly reviewing the effects of malnutrition, and the metabolic response to starvation and sepsis. Discussion includes assessment of nutritional status and nutritional requirements, with a suggested enteral feeding regime; and also the combined effect of enteral nutrition and glutamine on gut integrity and its relevance to nosocomial pneumonia, and the ability of the gut to accept food during critical illness.

  8. Nutritional status and health care costs for the elderly living in municipal residential homes--an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorefält, B; Andersson, A; Wirehn, A B; Wilhelmsson, S

    2011-02-01

    The aim was to study the effect of individualised meals on nutritional status among older people living in municipal residential homes and to compare the results with a control group. An additional aim was to estimate direct health care costs for both groups. Six different municipal residential homes in the south-east of Sweden. Older people living in three residential homes constituted the intervention group n=42 and the rest constituted the control group n=67. A multifaceted intervention design was used. Based on an interview with staff a tailored education programme about nutritional care, including both theoretical and practical issues, was carried through to staff in the intervention group. Nutritional status among the elderly was measured by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), individualised meals were offered to the residents based on the results of the MNA. Staff in the control group only received education on how to measure MNA and the residents followed the usual meal routines. Nutritional status was measured by MNA at baseline and after 3 months. Cost data on health care visits during 2007 were collected from the Cost Per Patient database. Nutritional status improved and body weight increased after 3 months in the intervention group. Thus, primary health care costs constituted about 80% of the total median cost in the intervention group and about 55% in the control group. With improved knowledge the staff could offer the elderly more individualised meals. One of their future challenges is to recognise and assess nutritional status among this group. If malnutrition could be prevented health care costs should be reduced.

  9. Stuck in tradition - A qualitative study on barriers for implementation of evidence-based nutritional care perceived by nursing staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connell, Malene Barfod; Jensen, Pia Søe; Andersen, Signe Lindgård

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To explore the barriers for nutritional care as perceived by nursing staff at an acute orthopedic ward, aiming to implement evidence-based nutritional care. BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicate that nurses recognize nutritional care as important, but interventions are often lacking....... These studies show that a range of barriers influence the attempt to optimize nutritional care. Before the implementation of evidence-based nutritional care, we examined barriers for nutritional care among the nursing staff. DESIGN: Qualitative study. METHODS: Four focus groups with thirteen members...... treatment and Struggling with existing resources. The nursing staff was lacking both knowledge and common practice regarding nutritional care. They felt they protected patient autonomy by accepting patient's reluctance to eat or getting a feeding tube. The lack of nutritional focus from doctors decreased...

  10. Intensive care physicians' attitudes and perceptions on nutrition therapy: a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Haroldo Falcão Ramos da; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira; França, Maria de Fátima

    2010-03-01

    Nutritional therapy is an important element in critical ill patient care. Although recognized as specialty, multidisciplinary teams in nutrition support are scarce in our country. Possibly, nutrition support therapy is applied by intensive care physicians and this may vary. The aim of the study is describe these specialists perceptions about theirs attitudes in enteral nutrition support. A questionnaire was elaborated in an on-line platform. After pre-validation, it was sent by electronic mail to intensivists. In 30 days answers were collected, considering only the full-filled questionnaires. One hundred an fourteen forms were returned, 112 were analyzed. The responders were localized at majority in southeastern region. About beggining of nutritional support, the majority of answers reflect perceptions in accord to specialists societies recommendations. The responders' perception the frequent utilization of assistentials protocols in nutrition care. After support beginning, the responders perceptions about theirs participation in changes in therapeutic plan seems to be lower. The self-knowledge about the theme among the responders was 6.0 (arithmetic media) in a 1 to 10 scale. More studies are necessary to evaluate nutritional support practices among intensive care physicians. Alternatives to on-line platform should be considered. Possibly, intensive care physicians do better in the initial phases of enteral support than in continuity of care. Intensive care physicians knowledge about the issue is suboptimal.

  11. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-03-09

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  12. Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Joan M; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin W

    2014-10-01

    Food security and nutrition play an important role in HIV and TB care and treatment, including for improving treatment outcomes, adherence and uptake of HIV and TB care. This AIDS and behaviour supplement on "Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition" provides an overview of the current evidence and knowledge about the barriers to uptake and retention in HIV and TB treatment and care and on whether and how food and nutrition assistance can help overcome these barriers. It contains nine papers on three topic areas discussing: (a) adherence and food and nutrition security in context of HIV and TB, their definitions, measurement tools and the current situation; (b) food and nutrition insecurity as barriers to uptake and retention; and (c) food and nutrition assistance to increase uptake and retention in care and treatment. Future interventions in the areas of food security, nutrition and social protection for increasing access and adherence should be from an HIV sensitive lens, linking the continuum of care with health systems, food systems and the community, complementing existing platforms through partnerships and integrated services.

  13. Australian practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Sarah; Ball, Lauren; Leveritt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the management of chronic disease, and practice nurses in the Australian primary care setting are increasingly providing nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease in Australia. Twenty practice nurses currently employed in general practice participated in an individual semi-structured telephone interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Practice nurses perceived themselves to be in a prime position to provide opportunistic nutrition care to patients. Participants perceived that the ideal role of a practice nurse is to advocate for nutrition and provide a basic level of nutrition care to patients; however, the interpretation of the term 'basic' varied between participants. Participants perceived that practice nurses are highly trusted and approachable, which they valued as important characteristics for the provision of nutrition care. Barriers to providing nutrition care included time constraints, lack of nutrition knowledge and lack of confidence. Participants were concerned about the availability and accessibility of nutrition education opportunities for practice nurses. The present study has demonstrated that practice nurses perceive themselves as having a significant role in the provision of nutrition care to patients with chronic disease in the Australian primary care setting. Further investigation of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of nutrition care provision by practice nurses is warranted.

  14. Current state of knowledge about nutritional care of pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barretto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy involves a significant anabolic activity that leads to increased nutritional needs relative to the preconception period. This paper aims to review the current understanding of the energy needs of macro and micronutrients during pregnancy as well as guidelines to address common gastrointestinal disorders during pregnancy, the issue of pica and anthropometric assessment to ensure an optimum weight gain. With the exception of iron, most of the nutrients needed by the pregnancy can be provided by a complete and balanced diet. Currently the scientific evidence shows that routine supplementation with iron and folic acid during pregnancy is a practice that prevents iron deficiency anemia, neural tube disorders and preterm births. Intermittent iron supplementation can also be an appropriated intervention. If the diet does not guarantee and adequate support, iodine, vitamin B12 and vitamin D supplements should also be necessaries. The anthropometric assessment by the pattern of weight gain should be present at each prenatal care visit to prevent maternal and fetal complications. In situations where the mother’s weight cannot be assessed, arm muscle circumference is possible to make an overall assessment as it correlates with maternal weight gain alternative. Measurements of biceps, triceps and subscapular skinfolds are another alternative that is useful to evaluate the fatty deposits and their location, in a complementary way to gain weight.

  15. Nutritional counselling in primary health care: a randomized comparison of an intervention by general practitioner or dietician

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen; Jørgensen, Torben;

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To compare health effects and risk reduction in two different strategies of nutritional counselling in primary health care for patients at high risk of ischaemic heart disease. METHODS: In a cluster-randomized trial 60 general practitioners (GPs) in the Copenhagen County were randomized...... to give nutritional counselling or to refer patients to a dietician. Patients were included after opportunistically screening (n=503 patients), and received nutritional counselling by GP or dietician over 12 months. Health effects were measured by changes in weight, waist circumference and blood lipids...... of cardiovascular disease and addressed these when counselling. The guidance from a GP was of significant importance for risk reduction in relation to IHD. However, a long-term lifestyle intervention by GP was difficult to implement. In the case of obesity it was effective to refer to long-term nutritional...

  16. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition of intensive care patients: current thinking and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calder, P.C.; Jensen, G.L.; Koletzko, B.V.; Singer, P.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Energy deficit is a common and serious problem in intensive care units and is associated with increased rates of complications, length of stay, and mortality. Parenteral nutrition (PN), either alone or in combination with enteral nutrition, can improve nutrient delivery to critically ill

  17. National nutrition month: promoting the diversified role of dietitians as health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danga-Storm, D; Gallagher, L; Nixon, D

    1986-02-01

    In summary, the planning and directing of NNM activities for a large metropolitan hospital required extensive public relations efforts to assure the success of each event. NNM provided a unique opportunity for health care professionals to interact with the business community, therefore promoting a positive image of dietitians as professionals. The events, successful in promoting nutrition education, identified dietitians as nutrition experts.

  18. To what extent do structural quality indicators of (nutritional) care influence malnutrition prevalence in nursing homes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nie-Visser, Noemi C.; Meijers, Judith M.; Schols, J.M.G.A.; Lohrmann, Christa; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Halfens, Ruud J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Many residents in European healthcare institutions are malnourished, with reported malnutrition prevalence rates of up to 60%. Due to the negative effects of malnutrition it is important to optimize the quality of nutritional care. If structural quality indicators of nutritional

  19. The evolution of nutrition in critical care: how much, how soon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Critical care is a very recent advance in the history of human evolution. Prior to the existence of ICU care, when the saber-tooth tiger attacked you had but a few critical hours to recover or you died. Mother Nature, and her survival of the fittest mentality, would never have favored the survival of the modern ICU patient. We now support ICU patients for weeks, or even months. During this period, patients appear to undergo phases of critical illness. A simplification of this concept would include an acute phase, a chronic phase, and a recovery phase. Given this, our nutrition care should probably be different in each phase, and targeted to address the evolution of the metabolic response to injury. For example, as insulin resistance is maximal in the acute phase of critical illness, perhaps we have evolved to benefit from a more hypocaloric, high-protein intervention to minimize muscle catabolism. In the chronic phase, and especially in the recovery phase, more aggressive calorie delivery and perhaps proanabolic therapy may be needed. As the body has evolved limited stores of some key nutrients, adequate nutrition may hinge on more than just how many calories we provide. The provision of adequate protein and other key nutrients at the right time may also be vital. This review will attempt to utilize the fundamentals of our evolution as humans and the rapidly growing body of new clinical research to answer questions about how to administer the right nutrients, in the right amounts, at the right time.

  20. Quantification of EUGR as a Measure of the Quality of Nutritional Care of Premature Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlang Lin

    Full Text Available To develop an index of the quality of nutritional care of premature infants based on the change in weight Z score from birth to discharge and to illustrate the use of this index in comparing the performance of different NICUs.Retrospective data analysis was performed to compare the growth of premature infants born in three perinatal centers. Infants with gestational age ≤ 32 weeks who survived to discharge from 2006 to 2010 were included. Weight Z scores at birth and discharge were calculated by the method of Fenton. Using data from one NICU as the reference, a multivariable linear regression model of change in weight Z score from birth to discharge was developed. Employing this model, a benchmark value of change in weight Z score was calculated for each baby. The difference between this calculated benchmark value and the baby's observed change in weight Z score was defined as the performance gap for that infant. The average value of the performance gaps in a NICU serves as its quality care index.1,714 infants were included for analysis. Change in weight Z score is influenced by birth weight Z score and completed weeks of gestation; thus the model for calculating the benchmark change in weight Z score was adjusted for these two variables. We found statistically significant differences in the average performance gaps for the three units.A quality care index was developed based on change in weight Z score from birth to discharge adjusted for two initial risk factors. This objective, easily calculated index may be used as a measurement of the quality of nutritional care to rank the performance of different NICUs.

  1. Comparative secretome analysis of rat stomach under different nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia L. Senin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fact that gastric surgery is at the moment the most effective treatment to fight against obesity highlights the relevance of gastric derived proteins as potential targets to treat this pathology. Taking advantage of a previously established gastric explant model for endocrine studies, the proteomic analysis of gastric secretome was performed. To validate this gastric explant system for proteomic analysis, the identification of ghrelin, a classical gastric derived peptide, was performed by MS. In addition, the differential analysis of gastric secretomes under differential nutritional status (control feeding vs fasting vs re-feeding was performed. The MS identified proteins are showed in the present manuscript. The data supplied in this article is related to the research article entitled “Comparative secretome analysis of rat stomach under different nutritional status” [1].

  2. Nutritional Differences between Two Orangutan Habitats: Implications for Population Density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R Vogel

    Full Text Available Bottom-up regulatory factors have been proposed to exert a strong influence on mammalian population density. Studies relating habitat quality to population density have typically made comparisons among distant species or communities without considering variation in food quality among localities. We compared dietary nutritional quality of two Bornean orangutan populations with differing population densities in peatland habitats, Tuanan and Sabangau, separated by 63 km. We hypothesized that because Tuanan is alluvial, the plant species included in the orangutan diet would be of higher nutritional quality compared to Sabangau, resulting in higher daily caloric intake in Tuanan. We also predicted that forest productivity would be greater in Tuanan compared to Sabangau. In support of these hypotheses, the overall quality of the diet and the quality of matched dietary items were higher in Tuanan, resulting in higher daily caloric intake compared to Sabangau. These differences in dietary nutritional quality may provide insights into why orangutan population density is almost two times greater in Tuanan compared to Sabangau, in agreement with a potentially important influence of diet quality on primate population density.

  3. Comparison of Effects of Soy Oil, Olive Oil, Mct-Lct Based Nutrition Solutions in Parenterally Fed Intensive Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurşen Gürsoy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare the changes in biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition by using parenteral nutrition solutions with different lipid content in critically ill patients. Material and Method: Fourty-five intensive care patients were randomized into three groups to receive either soy bean based (Group 1 or olive oil based (Group 2 or MCT/LCT based (Group 3 nutrition solutions. The calorie requirement was calculated using Schofield equation day. The levels of albumin, total protein, AST, ALT, LDH, GGT, ALP, glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR, CRP, transferin and prealbumin were measured on days 1, 7 and 14. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups according to glucose, liver function tests, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR levels. CRP and prealbumin were similar within-group and between-group comparisons. In groups II and III, CRP levels decreased while prealbumin levels were increasing. Conclusion: As a conclusion, no difference was found comparing the biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition, in ICU patients fed with soy oil, olive oil or MCT/LCT based parenteral nutrition solutions. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 52-8

  4. Insulin kinetics and the Neonatal Intensive Care Insulin-Nutrition-Glucose (NICING) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J L; Pretty, C G; Alsweiler, J; Lynn, A; Chase, J G

    2017-02-01

    Models of human glucose-insulin physiology have been developed for a range of uses, with similarly different levels of complexity and accuracy. STAR (Stochastic Targeted) is a model-based approach to glycaemic control. Elevated blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycaemia) are a common complication of stress and prematurity in very premature infants, and have been associated with worsened outcomes and higher mortality. This research identifies and validates the model parameters for model-based glycaemic control in neonatal intensive care. C-peptide, plasma insulin, and BG from a cohort of 41 extremely pre-term (median age 27.2 [26.2-28.7] weeks) and very low birth weight infants (median birth weight 839 [735-1000] g) are used alongside C-peptide kinetic models to identify model parameters associated with insulin kinetics in the NICING (Neonatal Intensive Care Insulin-Nutrition-Glucose) model. A literature analysis is used to determine models of kidney clearance and body fluid compartment volumes. The full, final NICING model is validated by fitting the model to a cohort of 160 glucose, insulin, and nutrition data records from extremely premature infants from two different NICUs (neonatal intensive care units). Six model parameters related to insulin kinetics were identified. The resulting NICING model is more physiologically descriptive than prior model iterations, including clearance pathways of insulin via the liver and kidney, rather than a lumped parameter. In addition, insulin diffusion between plasma and interstitial spaces is evaluated, with differences in distribution volume taken into consideration for each of these spaces. The NICING model was shown to fit clinical data well, with a low model fit error similar to that of previous model iterations. Insulin kinetic parameters have been identified, and the NICING model is presented for glycaemic control neonatal intensive care. The resulting NICING model is more complex and physiologically relevant, with no

  5. Nutrient Content of Foods, Nutritional Supplements, and Food Fallacies. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Stein, Joan Z.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  6. Attitudes of nursing staff working with older people towards nutritional nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta; Jensen, Sara; Lundin, Rickard; Christensson, Lennart

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine attitudes of the nursing staff in geriatric care towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care. Studies show that nutritional risk assessment is seldom performed on older patients as routine and very few patients have a nutritional care plan. Patients in long-term care who are easy to feed are also found to be looked upon more positively than those with high feeding needs. A total of 252 registered nurses and nurse aids working at geriatric rehabilitation and medical care clinics and resident homes participated in the study. Attitudes were examined using the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale. The scale includes 18 items and was designed as a one to five-point Lickert-type scale. It gives a total score and five subscales representing the dimensions 'Norms', 'Habits', 'Assessment', 'Intervention' and 'Individualization'. A higher score indicates a more positive attitude. Of all nursing staff, 53% displayed a positive attitude towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care and the rest displayed a neutral or negative attitude. The 'Intervention' dimension, dealing with nutritional problems and how to manage them, reflected the highest level of positive attitudes, which represents 71% of the nursing staff. The 'Norms' dimension had the lowest relative frequency of positive attitudes, 27%. The registered nurses held significantly more positive attitudes than the nurse aids did. Nutritional issues comprise an important and time-consuming responsibility in geriatric care; however, nursing staff do not show an unequivocal positive attitude regarding this responsibility. The consequences this entails for the older patient need to be examined further. Relevance to clinical practice. Nursing staff play an important role in caring for patients who are malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Positive attitudes might hinder the development of undernourishment or the further worsening of an

  7. Nutritional Status Among Elderly in Ambulatory Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nurizky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional status is a final outcome from a balance between food intake and body’s needs of the nutrients. Elderly is people whose age more than 60 years old. In Indonesia, elderly population has increased. Its phenomena is also known as population aging. Population aging is related to malnutrition in elderly. Malnutrition is defined as the insufficient, excessive or imbalanced consumption of nutrients.The objective of this study was to describe the nutritional status among elderly outpatients in geriatrics clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study that used primary data in geriatrics clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from September 2013 to October 2013. The sampling method was convenience sampling. This study was done with  43 elderly ( women, n=27 and men, n=16 outpatients.The nutritional status was classified by the questionnaire of Mini Nutritional Assessment into malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. After collecting the data, it was analyzed by Microsoft Excel in presenting the proportion of the elderly nutritional status. Results: Among all the respondents, 27 (63% respondents had adequate nutrition and 16 (37% respondents had risk of malnutrition. There was no respondent who had malnutrition (undernutrition. Conclusions: Majority of elderly outpatients in geriatrics clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital had adequate nutrition.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1087

  8. Implementing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition Education for Children: Child-Care Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Schober, Daniel J; McBride, Brent A; Kok, Car Mun; Ramsay, Samantha

    2017-08-24

    National childhood obesity prevention policies recommend that child-care providers educate young children about nutrition to improve their nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Yet, the provision of nutrition education (NE) to children in child-care settings is limited. Using the 2011 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks for NE in child care as a guiding framework, researchers assessed child-care providers' perspectives regarding delivery of NE through books, posters, mealtime conversations, hands-on learning, and sensory exploration of foods to young children (aged 2 to 5 years). Using a qualitative design (realist method), individual, semistructured interviews were conducted until saturation was reached. The study was conducted during 2012-2013 and used purposive sampling to select providers. Final sample included 18 providers employed full-time in Head Start or state-licensed center-based child-care programs in Central Illinois. Child-care providers' perspectives regarding implementation of NE. Thematic analysis to derive themes using NVivo software. Three overarching themes emerged, including providers' motivators, barriers, and facilitators for delivering NE to children. Motivators for delivering NE included that NE encourages children to try new foods, NE improves children's knowledge of healthy and unhealthy foods, and NE is consistent with children's tendency for exploration. Barriers for delivering NE included that limited funding and resources for hands-on experiences and restrictive policies. Facilitators for delivering NE included providers obtain access to feasible, low-cost resources and community partners, providers work around restrictive policies to accommodate NE, and mealtime conversations are a feasible avenue to deliver NE. Providers integrated mealtime conversations with NE concepts such as food-based sensory exploration and health benefits of foods. Present study findings offer insights regarding providers' perspectives on

  9. Child and youth care workers: Profile, nutrition knowledge and food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-06

    Aug 6, 2014 ... The World Health Report of 2002 confirmed that iodine, iron, vitamin A and zinc ... most serious health risk factors worldwide (WHO 2002). Manary and ... indicators of poor nutrition and, combined with deficiencies in vitamin A ...

  10. New Zealand Medical Students Have Positive Attitudes and Moderate Confidence in Providing Nutrition Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Crowley; Lauren Ball; Dug Yeo Han; Bruce Arroll; Michael Leveritt; Clare Wall

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, medical students and doctors report inadequate nutrition education and subsequently lack of knowledge, attitude, and skills to include nutrition in patient care. This study described New Zealand’s students’ attitudes to and self-perceived skills in providing nutrition care in practice as well as perceived quantity and quality of nutrition education received in training. 183 medical students from New Zealand’s largest medical school (response rate 52%) completed a 65-item...

  11. Current indicators of nutritional care in children with type 1 diabetes in India: Do we need a national nutritional guideline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutrition is an important pillar of management in children with type 1 diabetes. Indian food is heavily influenced by region, religion, traditions, seasons, and cultural choices. This survey was done to assess current practices and the need for India specific nutritional guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Two 12-item questionnaires were administered to forty health-care professionals across India. The first questionnaire evaluated current clinical practice indicators for nutrition in these children and second assessed practices for counseling a child on dietary habits. Results: There is great heterogeneity across the country with regard to dietary advice offered to children with type 1 diabetes. 97.5% of the respondents feel there is a need for an Indian dietary guideline for children with type 1 diabetes. Conclusion: There is need of India specific nutritional guidelines that should be made considering key variants such as age, region, cultural preference, economic burden and psychosocial beliefs, to offer guidance to diabetes care professionals.

  12. Prevalence of outsourcing and perception of clinical nutrition managers on performance of health care dietetics services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Junehee; Yoon, Barbara J H

    2003-08-01

    A nationwide survey of clinical dietitians and clinical nutrition managers was conducted to assess the prevalence of outsourcing in health care dietetics services and to evaluate perceived performance of dietetics services. A questionnaire was developed, validated by an expert panel, and pilot tested prior to data collection. Members of the Clinical Nutrition Management Dietetic Practice Group (N=1,668) were selected as the study sample. Of 431 respondents, 152 (35.3%) indicated that management of both patient and cafeteria foodservices was outsourced. When mean scores of perceived performance ratings were compared using t test, respondents from self-operated facilities rated several items related to patient and cafeteria food quality and material and human resource utilization higher than respondents at contract-managed facilities. No significant differences were found in performance related to decision-making process, buying power, or training programs. Results suggest that careful weighing of advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing is needed before making decisions regarding outsourcing dietetics services.

  13. Anesthesiologists’ Choice of Nutritional Therapy of Intensive Care Patients: A Survey Study

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    Ahmet Şen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Providing adequate nutrition to critical patients as early as possible following internalization is important. Hospitalized patients are among the highest risk groups for malnutrition. Material and Method: A questionnaire including 21 questions about clinician’s demographics and nutritional therapies in intensive care units was e-mailed to anesthesiologists only. Partially answered questionnaires were not included in the analysis. Results: A total of 121 questionnaires were analyzed. Every three out of four clinician reported application of nutritional therapy in intensive care unit, and according to the guidelines. While 75% of the clinicians following the guidelines were routinely evaluating nutritional status of their patients, this ratio was only 19% in clinicians not following the guidelines (p=0.0003. Enteral nutrition was the first choice of all clinicians, and majority of the clinicians (90, 74.4% preferred central venous catheter for parenteral nutrition. The most important criteria for the choice of parenteral nutritional solution were reported as calories per volume and presence of the solution at the hospital by all clinicians. Among the clinicians following the guidelines, 70% were administering fish oil, 95% were administering glutamin to their patients. Among the clinicians not following the guidelines, these ratios were 44% and 80%, respectively (p=0.01 and 0.02. Conclusion: We are in opinion that following the guidelines instead of the clinician’s individual forecasts may improve the nutritional therapy.

  14. Nutritional status and quality of life in different populations of older people in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, J; Borowiak, E; Kostka, T

    2014-11-01

    To estimate the potential association of three distinct nutritional status measures (body mass index (BMI), calf circumference (CC) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA)) with health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessed with Euroqol 5D questionnaire in different populations of elderly people in Poland. The study group was comprised of 1003 community-dwelling subjects from the urban environment, 890 subjects from the rural environment and 879 subjects from an institutional environment (nursing homes). Bivariate and multivariate associations were identified between nutritional status measures and HRQL adjusted for demographic and social variables, health status, physical function and mental status. Nutrition status indices (BMI, CC and MNA) were generally higher in the urban than in the rural environment and clearly worse in institutionalised elderly. In both community-dwelling groups, BMI and CC were negatively related to several Euroqol scores. In institutional residents, of opposite relationships were observed: higher values of these variables were connected with less frequent reporting of problems in Euroqol. In all the three groups, associations between HRQL scores and MNA were very similar: higher values of MNA were significantly connected with less frequent reporting of problems in Euroqol. BMI and CC, as overweight/obesity measures, are independent predictors of lower HRQL in urban and rural community-dwelling seniors and higher HRQL in institutionalised elderly. Poor nutritional state as measured by MNA is a similar determinant of well-being in all the three environments. This different relationship of popular overweight/obesity measures to HRQL should be taken into account while designing care for older people.

  15. Nutritional care in hospitalized patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Dep K; Selvanderan, Shane P; Harley, Hugh A J; Holloway, Richard H; Nguyen, Nam Q

    2015-12-07

    To evaluate the practice of nutritional assessment and management of hospitalised patients with cirrhosis and the impact of malnutrition on their clinical outcome. This was a retrospective cohort study on patients with liver cirrhosis consecutively admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Royal Adelaide Hospital over 24 mo. Details were gathered related to the patients' demographics, disease severity, nutritional status and assessment, biochemistry and clinical outcomes. Nutritional status was assessed by a dietician and determined by subjective global assessment. Estimated energy and protein requirements were calculated by Simple Ratio Method. Intake was estimated from dietary history and/or food charts, and represented as a percentage of estimated daily requirements. Median duration of follow up was 14.9 (0-41.4) mo. Of the 231 cirrhotic patients (167 male, age: 56.3 ± 0.9 years, 9% Child-Pugh A, 42% Child-Pugh B and 49% Child-Pugh C), 131 (57%) had formal nutritional assessment during their admission and 74 (56%) were judged to have malnutrition. In-hospital caloric (15.6 ± 1.2 kcal/kg vs 23.7 ± 2.3 kcal/kg, P = 0.0003) and protein intake (0.65 ± 0.06 g/kg vs 1.01 ± 0.07 g/kg, P = 0.0003) was significantly reduced in patients with malnutrition. Of the malnourished cohort, 12 (16%) received enteral nutrition during hospitalisation and only 6 (8%) received ongoing dietetic review and assessment following discharge from hospital. The overall mortality was 51%, and was higher in patients with malnutrition compared to those without (HR = 5.29, 95%CI: 2.31-12.1; P nutritional assessment, however, is inadequate. This highlights the need for meticulous nutritional evaluation and management in these patients.

  16. Nutritional status in cognitively intact older people receiving home care services--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, H; Routasalo, P; Lagstrom, H

    2005-01-01

    Older adults are a potentially vulnerable group for malnutrition. This cross-sectional pilot study aims to assess the nutritional status of elderly patients living at home and receiving home health care services. The data were collected from patient care plans, the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and a questionnaire on eating problems. In addition, serum nutritional status indicators were measured, and an oral examination including quantitative saliva measurement was carried out. Out of 71 eligible patients 51 (72%) patients aged 76-93 years participated. MNA results showed that 47% were at risk of malnutrition. Care plans for 26 patients made reference to questions of nutrition but provided no detailed forward planning. The mean serum albumin value was 39.1 +/- 3.8 g/l, seven patients had a value lower than 35 g/l. MNA scores were significantly lower for female patients with haemoglobin values lower than 120 g/l (p = 0.027). The dentist's estimation of dry mouth and subjective problems in energy intake were significantly associated with lower MNA scores (p = 0.049 and p = 0.015). Subjects with functioning natural dentition had higher body mass index (BMI) scores than others (p = 0.0485). The results point at the importance of using screening tools such as the MNA for purposes of nutritional assessment, the estimation of oral problems such as dry mouth, chewing and swallowing problems, and advance planning in nutritional issues within the field of home care.

  17. The Effectiveness of Nutritional Screening in Hospital and Primary Care Settings: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rashidian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes in improving quality of care and patient outcomes compared with usual care. Methods: Searches were performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, the Cochrane database, and Current Controlled Trials. Due to the assumed scarcity of high quality evidence, interventional studies in hospital or primary care settings with adequate reporting and comparisons were considered as eligible. Team members met after reviewing the papers. Decisions on inclusion or exclusion of papers were made when all agreed. Two reviewers independently extracted data from included studies. Results: 705 abstracts were considered and thirty full-text papers were ordered and reviewed. Following further review of the extracted data two papers met the inclusion criteria. One was a clustered randomized study of 26 general practices to evaluate the effectiveness of screening for elderly ailments including malnutrition. It concluded nutritional screening did not improve referral to dieticians, detection of nutritional problems, or patients’ quality of life. This study was underpowered for evaluating the effectiveness of nutritional screening. A non-randomized controlled before-after study of four hospital wards concluded that intervention improved weight recording, but not referral to dieticians or care at the mealtime of at risk patients. Discussion: Very few studies assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening with relevant outcomes and acceptable quality. The available evidence does not support systematic application of screening tools to hospital, or general practice patients. Given the current level of interest and political support for nutritional screening, further studies are urgently required.

  18. Effect of changed organisation of nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyholm Ruth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients are undernourished during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study is 1 to implement a new organisation with a focus on improving the quality of the nutritional care of medical inpatients at risk of undernutrition, and 2 to investigate the effect of the intervention. Methods Social and healthcare assistants are educated to the higher level of nutritional and healthcare assistants to provide nutritional care in daily practice to undernourished medical inpatients. The effect of the intervention is investigated before and five months after the employment of the nutritional and healthcare assistants. Data are obtained from structured interviews with patients and staff, and the amount of ordered and wasted food is recorded. Results Patients regard the work of the nutritional and healthcare assistant as very important for their recovery and weight gain: the assistant takes care of the individual patient's nutritional requirements and wishes, and she imparts knowledge to the patient about optimum nutrition. Staff members benefit from the knowledge and dedication of the nutritional and healthcare assistant and from her work; the staff is often too busy with other nursing tasks to make it a priority to ensure that patients who are nibblers get sufficient nutrition. The choices of food from the production kitchen are utilised to a higher degree, and more of the food is eaten by the patients. Before the intervention, a 20% increase in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found. During the intervention a 20% decrease in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found, and food wastage decreases from 55% to 18% owing to the intervention. Conclusion The job function of the nutritional and healthcare assistants on the medical wards is of great value to patients, nursing staff members and the

  19. Empowering Esrd Patients For Assisted Self Nutritional Care: A Simple But Effective Intervention For Improving Nutritional Status Of Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Sengupta

    2012-06-01

    nutrition care is proved to be an effective intervention for improving nutritional status in hemodialysis patients.

  20. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that includes a registered dietitian in a neonatal intensive care unit improved nutrition outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Jennifer; Kattelmann, Kendra; Ren, Cuirong; Stevens, Dennis C

    This study determined whether nutrition outcomes of neonates who were receiving neonatal intensive care were improved with the implementation of a fully functioning multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian. A medical record review was conducted of neonates with birth weights of 1500 g or less who were cared for in Sanford Children's Hospital neonatal intensive care unit from January 1 to December 31, 2001 (prior to functioning multidisciplinary team establishment) and January 1 to December 31, 2004 (subsequent to establishment of a multidisciplinary team). Data from charts in the 2 time periods were examined for differences in nutrition outcomes. Outcome variables included length of stay, birth weight, discharge weight, weight gained for specified time periods, weight at full feeds, weight gain per day, length, head circumference, and number of days to start enteral feeding. Analysis of covariance, controlling for the effect of birth weight, was used to determine differences and was considered significant at P multidisciplinary team (1099 g, 95% CI: 955-1165 vs 1164 g, 95% CI: 1067-1211, respectively). Weight at discharge, total weight gained, total daily weight gained, daily weight gain from birth to the initiation of enteral feeds, daily weight gain from birth to full feeds, and head circumference growth were significantly greater for neonates in the postgroup than in the pre-multidisciplinary team group. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian improved the nutrition outcomes of low birth weight infants in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  1. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  2. A qualitative analysis of the nutritional requirements of palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, C I; Linklater, G T

    2011-10-01

    The National Health Servive (NHS) Quality Improvement Scotland developed nutritional Clinical Standards to address the problem of malnutrition in hospitals. NHS palliative care units are obliged to incorporate these standards into nutritional aspects of care. The nutritional needs of this patient population are under-researched. The present study aimed to explore patients' views of nutrition, to begin to understand their concerns and to determine whether such standards meet the needs of patients in the palliative care setting. A qualitative study was conducted in 2009 in an NHS Palliative Care Unit. Six inpatients were involved in one-to-one interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were subject to qualitative data analysis in accordance with a previous framework. A recurring theme that emerged was that of change and uncertainty. Four main areas subject to change were: disease state, symptoms, oral dietary intake and weight. Each change could exert control over, or be controlled by, the patient. When patients were eventually unable to exert control, they accepted the change, either willingly or enforced, thereby unintentionally setting their own targets. The present study enables a deeper understanding of the concerns that palliative care patients have regarding their oral dietary intake and weight. Their 'malnutrition' not only refers to physical malnutrition alone, but also incorporates psychological and social 'malnutrition'. When applying standards or protocols regarding nutritional care, these wider issues must be taken into account to meet patients' nutritional needs. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ...

  4. Methane emission by Nellore cattle subjected to different nutritional plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Olinta Leone; de Figueiredo, Darcilene Maria; Branco, Renata Helena; Magnani, Elaine; do Nascimento, Cleisy Ferreira; de Oliveira, Luiza Freitas; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate the emission of enteric methane by Nellore cattle subjected to different nutritional plans, as well as the intake and digestibility of nutrients from the diets supplied. Forty-seven animals in a confinement system (feedlot) were fed a corn silage-based diet for 35 days. Afterwards, these animals were evaluated in a grazing system during the rainy periods, in Urochloa brizantha cv Marandu paddocks, for 44 days. Chromic oxide was used as external marker to estimate the fecal production of animals. Samples of feces, ingredients, and pasture were collected and sampled for subsequent chemical analyses. The SF6 tracer gas technique was adopted to quantify the methane gas emitted by the animals. The experimental design was completely randomized, using procedure GLM of software SAS (9.2), including the fixed effects of sex and nutritional plan and the linear effect of the co-variable weights. Means were analyzed by Tukey's test at 5 % probability. The intakes of total dry matter and organic matter were greater for the animals subjected to the feedlot diet (P Emission of CH4/day (104.01 g) by the animals fed the feedlot diet (P methane production (CH4/CEB) and methane emission per dry matter consumed were lower in relation to the grazing treatment (3.75 vs 4.23 % and 11.67 vs 15.71 g/kg). The better quality of the diet in the feedlot promoted lower energy losses as methane.

  5. Continuity of care: differing conceptions and values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Kerr, Jonathan; Schultz, Karen

    2011-08-01

    To understand how the conception of continuity of care can influence family physician trainees by exploring the perspectives of established family physicians, physicians working in episodic care who had been trained in family medicine, and family medicine trainees. Qualitative analysis of focus group data. Southeastern Ontario. Seven focus groups consisting of members from 3 groups: established family physicians, physicians working in episodic care who had been trained in family medicine, or family medicine trainees. Semistructured focus group interviews were taped and transcribed. Using constant comparison, the transcripts were analyzed for themes related to continuity of care and how these were valued among the 3 groups of physicians. The 3 groups differed on how they valued continuity of the relationship, how they valued informational continuity, and how these concepts affected their perceptions of difficult clinician-patient relationships. Experienced family physicians described long-term relationships as a core value in their practices. In contrast, episodic care physicians valued informational continuity. Family medicine trainees learned about continuity of care through role models and theoretical teaching. They valued the efficiency gained by knowing patients and the reward of being recognized by patients. Family medicine trainees expressed greater distress with difficult clinician-patient interactions than experienced family physicians expressed. It was unclear whether the challenges of difficult relationships were offset by the trainees' appreciation of continuity of care. Different perceptions, settings, and skills can influence how continuity of care is valued, which might affect career and practice decisions among trainees.

  6. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach...

  7. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs. Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials and Methods: Sixty questionnaires were distributed and the results analyzed. A database was prepared and the audit was done. Results: Forty-two (70% questionnaires were filled and returned. A majority (38 of staff nurses expressed awareness of nutrition guidelines. A large number (32 of staff nurses knew about nutrition protocols of the ICU. Almost all (40 opined enteral nutrition to be the preferred route of nutrition unless contraindicated. All staff nurses were of opinion that enteral nutrition is to be started at the earliest (within 24-48 h of the ICU stay. Everyone opined that the absence of bowel sounds is an absolute contraindication to initiate enteral feeding. Passage of flatus was considered mandatory before starting enteral nutrition by 86% of the respondents. Everyone knew that the method of Ryle′s tube feeding in their ICU is intermittent boluses. Only 4 staff nurses were unaware of any method to confirm Ryle′s tube position. The backrest elevation rate was 100%. Gastric residual volumes were always checked, but the amount of the gastric residual volume for the next feed to be withheld varied. The majority said that the unused Ryle′s tube feed is to be discarded after 6 h. The most preferred (48% method to upgrade their knowledge of enteral nutrition was from the ICU protocol manual. Conclusion: Information generated from this study can be helpful in identifying nutrition practices that are lacking and may be used to review and revise enteral feeding

  8. Protein calorie malnutrition, nutritional intervention and personalized cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Anju; Choi, Sung Eun; Hassan, Ahmed; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Durante, Gina; Balwani, Sakshi; Kim, Young Hee; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K. Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients often experience weight loss caused by protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) during the course of the disease or treatment. PCM is expressed as severe if the patient has two or more of the following characteristics: obvious significant muscle wasting, loss of subcutaneous fat; nutritional intake of 2% in 1 week, 5% in 1 month, or 7.5% in 3 months. Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is a multifactorial condition of advanced PCM associated with underlying illness (in this case cancer) and is characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. Cachexia is defined as weight loss of more than 5% of body weight in 12 months or less in the presence of chronic disease. Hence with a chronic illness on board even a small amount of weight loss can open the door to cachexia. These nutritional challenges can lead to severe morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. In the clinic, the application of personalized medicine and the ability to withstand the toxic effects of anti-cancer therapies can be optimized when the patient is in nutritional homeostasis and is free of anorexia and cachexia. Routine assessment of nutritional status and appropriate intervention are essential components of the effort to alleviate effects of malnutrition on quality of life and survival of patients. PMID:28177923

  9. Implementation of the Nutrition Care Process and International Dietetics and Nutrition Terminology in a single-center hemodialysis unit: comparing paper vs electronic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Megan; Campbell, Katrina Louise; Ferguson, Maree

    2014-01-01

    There is little doubt surrounding the benefits of the Nutrition Care Process and International Dietetics and Nutrition Terminology (IDNT) to dietetics practice; however, evidence to support the most efficient method of incorporating these into practice is lacking. The main objective of our study was to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of an electronic and a manual paper-based system for capturing the Nutrition Care Process and IDNT in a single in-center hemodialysis unit. A cohort of 56 adult patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis were followed for 12 months. During the first 6 months, patients received the usual standard care, with documentation via a manual paper-based system. During the following 6-month period (Months 7 to 12), nutrition care was documented by an electronic system. Workload efficiency, number of IDNT codes used related to nutrition-related diagnoses, interventions, monitoring and evaluation using IDNT, nutritional status using the scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment Tool of Quality of Life were the main outcome measures. Compared with paper-based documentation of nutrition care, our study demonstrated that an electronic system improved the efficiency of total time spent by the dietitian by 13 minutes per consultation. There were also a greater number of nutrition-related diagnoses resolved using the electronic system compared with the paper-based documentation (PDietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glutamine Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Türkay Aydoğmuş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN. We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU. Material and Methods: With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20, and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20 while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20. C-reactive protein (CRP, sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. Results: No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622. Conclusion: Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  11. Nutritional self-care in two older Norwegian males: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomstad ST

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Solveig T Tomstad,1,2 Ulrika Söderhamn,2 Geir Arild Espnes,1,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 2Centre for Caring Research-Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Knowledge about how to support nutritional self-care in the vulnerable elderly living in their own homes is an important area for health care professionals. The aim of this case study was to evaluate the effects of nutritional intervention by comparing perceived health, sense of coherence, self-care ability, and nutritional risk in two older home-dwelling individuals before, during, and after intervention and to describe their experiences of nutritional self-care before and after intervention.Methods: A study circle was established to support nutritional self-care in two older home-dwelling individuals (≥65 years of age, who participated in three meetings arranged by health professionals over a period of six months. The effects of this study circle were evaluated using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly, the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly (SASE, the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC scale, and responses to a number of health-related questions. Qualitative interviews were performed before and after intervention to interpret the changes that occurred during intervention.Results: A reduced risk of undernutrition was found for both participants. A higher total score on the SASE was obtained for one participant, along with a slightly stronger preference for self-care to maintain sufficient food intake, was evident. For the other

  12. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Individually Tailored Dietary Counseling among Old Home Care Clients - Effects on Nutritional Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölönen, S; Tiihonen, M; Hartikainen, S; Nykänen, I

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of individually tailored dietary counseling on nutritional status among home care clients aged 75 years or older. Non-randomised controlled study. The study sample consisted of 224 home care clients (≥ 75 years) (intervention group, n = 127; control group, n = 100) who were at protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) or risk of PEM (MNA score Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Body Mass Index (BMI) and plasma albumin were used to determine nutritional status at the baseline and after the six-month intervention. The mean age of the home care clients was 84.3 (SD 5.5) in the intervention group and 84.4 (SD 5.3) in the control group, and 70 percent were women in both groups. After the six-month nutritional intervention, the MNA score increased 2.3 points and plasma albumin 1.6 g/L in the intervention group, against MNA score decreased -0.2 points and plasma albumin -0.1 g/L in the control group. Individually tailored dietary counseling may improve nutritional status among older home care clients.

  14. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann Paquette-Warren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design: Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants: The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method: Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings: Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion: Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting.

  15. Nutritional counselling in primary health care: a randomized comparison of an intervention by general practitioner or dietician

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen; Jørgensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To compare health effects and risk reduction in two different strategies of nutritional counselling in primary health care for patients at high risk of ischaemic heart disease. METHODS: In a cluster-randomized trial 60 general practitioners (GPs) in the Copenhagen County were randomized...... of cardiovascular disease and addressed these when counselling. The guidance from a GP was of significant importance for risk reduction in relation to IHD. However, a long-term lifestyle intervention by GP was difficult to implement. In the case of obesity it was effective to refer to long-term nutritional....... Risk of cardiovascular disease was calculated by The Copenhagen Risk Score. Data on use of medicine and primary health care was obtained from central registers. RESULTS: Altogether 339 (67%) patients completed the intervention. Weight loss was larger in the dietician group (mean 4.5 kg vs. 2.4 kg...

  16. The effects of an intensive behavior and nutrition intervention compared to standard of care on weight outcomes in CF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lori J; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Quittner, Alexandra L; Bean, Judy; Powers, Scott W

    2011-01-01

    Inadequate intake and suboptimal growth are common problems for patients with CF and a critical target for intervention. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth outcomes of children with CF who participated in a randomized clinical trial to improve energy intake and weight to children with CF receiving standard of care during the same time period. Our primary outcome was change in body mass index z-score (BMI z-score) over 2 years. An exploratory outcome was forced expiratory volume at 1-sec (FEV(1) ) over 2 years. Participants were children ages 4-12 with CF, who participated in a randomized clinical trial of behavior plus nutrition intervention versus nutrition education alone, and a matched Comparison Sample receiving standard of care drawn from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) Registry. Children in the Clinical Trial Group (N=67) participated in a 9-week, nutrition intervention and were followed at regular intervals (3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months) for 2 years post-treatment to obtain anthropometric and pulmonary function data. For each child in the Comparison Sample (N=346), these measures were obtained from the CFF Registry at matching intervals for the 27-month period corresponding to the clinical trial. Over 27 months, children in the Clinical Trial Group (the combined sample of the behavior plus nutrition and the nutrition alone) demonstrated significantly less decline in BMI z-score, -0.05 (SD=0.68, CI= -0.23 to 0.13), as compared to children in the Comparison Sample, -0.21 (SD=0.67, CI= -0.31 to -0.11). No statistically significant differences were found for decline in FEV(1) between children in the Clinical Trial Group and the Comparison Sample. The key implication of these findings is that intensive behavioral and nutritional intervention is effective and needs to be adapted so that it can be broadly disseminated into clinical practice.

  17. Quality Nutrition Care: Measuring Hospital Staff’s Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Laur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP of hospital staff is needed to improve care activities that support the detection/prevention/treatment of malnutrition, yet quality measures are lacking. The purpose was to develop (study 1 and assess the administration and discriminative potential (study 2 of using such a KAP measure in acute care. In study 1, a 27-question KAP questionnaire was developed, face validated (n = 5, and tested for reliability (n = 35. Kappa and Intraclass Correlation (ICC were determined. In study 2, the questionnaire was sent to staff at five diverse hospitals (n = 189. Administration challenges were noted and analyses completed to determine differences across sites, professions, and years of practice. Study 1 results demonstrate that the knowledge/attitude (KA and the practice (P subscales are reliable (KA: ICC = 0.69 95% CI 0.45–0.84, F = 5.54, p < 0.0001; P: ICC = 0.84 95% CI 0.68−0.92, F = 11.12, p < 0.0001. Completion rate of individual questions in study 2 was high and suggestions to improve administration were identified. The KAP mean score was 93.6/128 (range 51–124 with higher scores indicating more knowledge, better attitudes and positive practices. Profession and years of practice were associated with KAP scores. The KAP questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure that can be used in needs assessments to inform improvements to nutrition care in hospital.

  18. Maternal employment, child care, and nutritional status of 12-18-month-old children in Managua, Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, J F; Engle, P L; Zeitlin, M F

    1998-02-01

    Relationships among women's employment, child care strategies, and nutritional status of children 12-18 months of age were examined in 80 Nicaraguan households sampled by randomized block design in 10 low income urban communities. Multiple regression analyses showed that children of employed mothers (56%) fared better in weight/height than those whose mothers were not employed, with and without controlling for socioeconomic status and maternal education, paternal financial support, child care adequacy, and sex and age of the child. Children with inadequate alternate child care (care by a preteen or care at the work place) had lower height for age, even controlling for the same variables and for maternal employment. Differences in 10 caregiving behaviors between families as a function of work status of the mother and adequacy of child care were examined. In families with working mothers, caregivers were less likely to be observed washing their hands, suggesting that the positive associations of work for earnings might be due to income rather than improved care. Inadequate care was associated with less food variety, less use of health care, and marginally less hand-washing. Inadequate child care, which tends to be associated with informal work, nuclear families and poverty, should be a concern for child welfare.

  19. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sanz-Paris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001, days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001 and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001. Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001 during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026. In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  20. Canadian health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Mark; Morin, Karine; Ries, Nola; Castle, David

    2010-10-01

    Nutritional genomics has reached the public through applications of the Human Genome Project offered direct to consumers (DTC). The ability to pursue nutrigenetic testing without the involvement of a health care professional has received considerable attention from academic and policy commentators. To better understand the knowledge and attitudes of Canadian health care professionals regarding nutritional genomics and nutrigenetic testing, qualitative research in the form of focus group discussions was undertaken. Four key themes emerged: (1) concerns over DTC testing; (2) lack of health care professional competency; (3) genetic scepticism and inevitability; (4) expectation of regulation. Together, they indicate that health care professionals have little knowledge about nutritional genomics and hold contradictory attitudes towards genomics in general, and to nutritional genomics in particular. Respondents argue in favour of a delivery model where health care professionals act as intermediaries. They are also aware of their lack of competency to provide such services. To ensure greater public protection, respondents cite the importance of more stringent regulatory oversight of DTC genetic testing. Whether such an approach is necessary to address the various ethical and social issues raised by nutrigenetic testing remains an open debate.

  1. Improving nutrition in home child care: are food costs a barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Pablo; Johnson, Donna B

    2012-02-01

    Child-care providers have a key role to play in promoting child nutrition, but the higher cost of nutritious foods may pose a barrier. The present study tested the hypothesis that higher nutritional quality of foods served was associated with higher food expenditures in child care homes participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). In this cross-sectional study, nutritional quality of foods served to children and food expenditures were analysed based on 5 d menus and food shopping receipts. Nutritional quality was based on servings of whole grains, fresh whole fruits and vegetables, energy density (kJ/g) and mean nutrient adequacy (mean percentage of dietary reference intake) for seven nutrients of concern for child health. Food expenditures were calculated by linking receipt and menu data. Associations between food expenditures and menu quality were examined using bivariate statistics and multiple linear regression models. USA in 2008-2009. Sixty child-care providers participating in CACFP in King County, Washington State. In bivariate analyses, higher daily food expenditures were associated with higher total food energy and higher nutritional quality of menus. Controlling for energy and other covariates, higher food expenditures were strongly and positively associated with number of portions of whole grains and fresh produce served (P = 0·001 and 0·005, respectively), with lower energy density and with higher mean nutrient adequacy of menus overall (P = 0·003 and 0·032, respectively). The results indicate that improving the nutritional quality of foods in child care may require higher food spending.

  2. Nutrition and oral health considerations in children with special health care needs: implications for oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moursi, Amr M; Fernandez, Jill B; Daronch, Marcia; Zee, Lena; Jones, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are at increased risk for oral diseases. The purpose of this article was to discuss: nutritional and oral health factors routinely observed in most chronic childhood disorders; dietary modifications associated with select systemic disorders and how they may impact oral health in children; and the following factors common to chronic disorders associated with diet modifications-decreased appetite and increased nutritional risk; frequency of food intake; parental overindulgence; long-term use of cariogenic medications; and xerostomia. Characteristics of childhood disorders that require dietary modifications (congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, AIDS/HIV, diabetes mellitus, and phenylketonuria) are summarized. In addition, healthy dietary modifications and oral health recommendations are suggested. Implementation of these recommendations can assist the dentist and dental team as they join physicians and nutritionists in delivering the best possible care to children with special health care needs.

  3. A survey on the status of nutrition care process implementation in korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Mi; Baek, Hee Joon

    2013-07-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP), developed by the American Dietetic Association, is a significant issue to dietetic professionals in many countries and there are rising needs for NCP implementation in Korea. We surveyed clinical nutrition managers of Korean general hospitals regarding the perception of NCP, the status of NCP implementation, and the opinions on NCP. The questionnaire was collected from 35 hospitals. Most clinical nutrition managers perceived NCP, but NCP implementation in hospital was at early stage. NCP was implemented in a fourth of the surveyed hospitals and many clinical nutrition managers responded that the lack of knowledge and the concern on increasing working time were major barriers to implementing NCP. To successfully implement NCP in Korean hospital, ongoing education and training programs should be developed to provide adequate knowledge and help dietitians to cope with the barriers.

  4. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  5. Implementation of nutrition care service development plan at Banning Memorial Hospital: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Oumlil, A; Rao, C P

    1992-01-01

    Health care service markets in general and hospital care service markets in particular are characterized by many competitive developments. Hence, hospital marketing managers are forced to respond to these emerging competitive pressures. However, in formulating appropriate marketing management strategies, hospital managers need to have detailed knowledge about consumers and their behaviors in the marketplace. This paper focuses on the Nutrition Care division of the Department of Nutrition Service at a hospital and its venture into new service development. This case study is intended to emphasize the significance of acquiring adequate knowledge of customers in the health care services industry. It particularly emphasizes the critical role that this type of information concerning customer behavior plays in the development and implementation of an appropriate business expansion strategy. Furthermore, the aim of this case study is to help the reader to relate the acquired marketing information to the problem at hand, and make the appropriate marketing management decision.

  6. Nutrition policy, food and drinks at school and after school care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, I; Poùlsen, J

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the paper is to describe food and drinks available in food stands or cantina at Danish schools and food and drinks provided at after school care institutions in Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The survey was performed in 1999 and self-administered postal questionnaires we....... CONCLUSION: The paper highlights the important aspects of the institutional level as one of six important levels as regards the prevention of obesity and an important level at which to act to increase nutrition habits in school children....... sent to all private and public schools and all after school care institutions in Denmark. The participation rate was 70 at schools and 66 at after school care institutions. RESULTS: In total, 3% of schools and 4% of after school care institutions have a written policy on nutrition. All Danish children...

  7. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  8. Traditional open-bay versus single-family room neonatal intensive care unit: a comparison of selected nutrition outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Erickson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina Erickson1, Kendra Kattelmann1, Jessica Remington1, Cuirong Ren2, Carol C Helseth3, Dennis C Stevens31Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2Department of Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA; 3Sanford Children's Hospital, Sioux Falls, SD, USABackground: In contrast to the traditional open-bay–type design of the neonatal intensive care unit (tNICU, infants in developmentally appropriate NICU (dNICU are housed in individual rooms with greater control of light and noise. Previous reports have documented positive influence of the dNICU in cardiorespiratory status, physiologic stability, and weight gain of the infants. The objective of this study was to explore selected nutrition outcomes of infants in the dNICU versus tNICU.Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted on infants with birth weight of 1500 g or less cared for in dNICU (n = 42 or tNICU (n = 31. Differences between days to reach full parenteral nutrition, full enteral nutrition, or full bottling were determined using analysis of covariance controlling for gestational age, birth weight, and clinical risk index for babies (CRIB acuity score.Results: There were no differences between the two groups in days to reach full parenteral and bottle feeding. The infants in the dNICU took fewer days to reach full enteral nutrition (20.8 days, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 17, 24.6 (dNICU vs 23.3 days, 95% CI: 17.1, 29.6 (tNICU, P = 0.04 than those in the tNICU.Conclusions: Although the two groups of infants only differed in the days to reach full enteral feeding, it is important to remember that the lack of difference may be clinically significant. Clinically, the infants in the dNICU were younger (gestational age and sicker (CRIB acuity score than the infants in the tNICU. Consequently, the results of this study support the change to dNICU, as the private room model provides a supportive environment for growth as evidenced by similar

  9. Mineral essential elements for nutrition in different chocolate products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquanta, Luciano; Di Cesare, Cinzia; Manoni, Remo; Piano, Angela; Roberti, Piero; Salvatori, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the essential mineral nutritional elements in cocoa beans, in chocolates at different cocoa percentage (60,70,80 and 90%) and in milk chocolate are evaluated. Dark chocolates are confirmed as an excellent source of magnesium (252.2 mg/100 g) and iron (10.9 mg/100 g): in chocolate containing 90% cocoa, their content corresponds to, respectively, 67.0% and 80.3 of Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) in the European Union. The chocolate containing 90% cocoa is also a good source of zinc (3.5 mg/100 g), which is important for the immune system, and selenium (0.1 mg/100 g). Three main components suitable to explain the mineral concentrations are analyzed by factor analysis. The component 1 can be interpreted as the contribution from the cocoa beans, owing to the mineral characteristics of the soil in which they have grown; the component 2 is mainly due to the manipulation and transformation of the cocoa in chocolate, while the component 3 represents the milk powder.

  10. Nutritional values of different strains of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Bąkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional values and chemical composition of different strains of the mushroom (Agaricus bisporus were studied. The study covered four strains cultivated in Poland: OCNOS-1, Somycel-11 , Somycel-92, and Somycel-653. The samples were analyzed for dry matter, vitamin C, nitrates, nitrites, total nitrogen and crude protein (N × 4.38, amino acid composition, soluble carbohydrates composition, and minerals content. Besides, whiteness values were determined by Hunter's method. All determinations were made on two of fruit-bodies of two sizes: 25-40 mm in pileus diameter (small and 40-50 mm in pileus diameter (large. A significantly higher dry matter content was found in strain 1 in comparison with strain 92. The lowest value of total nitrogen was detected for strain 92 and the highest for strain 653. From among the four analyzed strains, strain 92 contained the highest amount of essential amino acids. Trehalose content was significantly lower in strain 11 in comparison with other strains both in small and large fruit-body.

  11. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of Australian practice nurses in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Louise; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Ball, Lauren E

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important for the management of chronic diseases. While practice nurses have numerous roles in primary care, the expectations on practice nurses to provide nutrition care for chronic disease management are increasing...

  12. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  13. Incorporating Palliative Care Concepts Into Nutrition Practice: Across the Age Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Olfson, Kristina; Goldman, Babak; Barrocas, Albert; Wesley, John R

    2016-06-01

    A practice gap exists between published guidelines and recommendations and actual clinical practice with life-sustaining treatments not always being based on the patient's wishes, including the provision of nutrition support therapies. Closing this gap requires an interdisciplinary approach that can be enhanced by incorporating basic palliative care concepts into nutrition support practice. In the fast-paced process of providing timely and effective medical treatments, communication often suffers and decision making is not always reflective of the patient's quality-of-life goals. The current healthcare clinical ethics model does not yet include optimum use of advance directives and early communication between patients and family members and their healthcare providers about treatment choices, including nutrition support. A collaborative, proactive, integrated process in all healthcare facilities and across levels of care and age groups, together with measurable sustained outcomes, shared best practices, and preventive ethics, will be needed to change the culture of care. Implementation of a better process, including basic palliative care concepts, requires improved communication skills by healthcare professionals. Formalized palliative care consults are warranted early in complex cases. An education technique, as presented in this article, of how clinicians can engage in critical and crucial conversations early with patients and family members, by incorporating the patient's values and cultural and religious diversity in easily understood language, is identified as an innovative tool.

  14. Comparison of multi-modal early oral nutrition for the tolerance of oral nutrition with conventional care after major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, single-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Da-Li; Li, Wei-Ming; Li, Shu-Min; Cen, Yun-Yun; Xu, Qing-Wen; Li, Yi-Jun; Sun, Yan-Bo; Qi, Yu-Xing; Lin, Yue-Ying; Yang, Ting; Lu, Qi-Ping; Xu, Peng-Yuan

    2017-02-10

    Early oral nutrition (EON) has been shown to improve recovery of gastrointestinal function, length of stay and mortality after abdominal surgery; however, early oral nutrition often fails during the first week after surgery. Here, a multi-modal early oral nutrition program is introduced to promote recovery of gastrointestinal function and tolerance of oral nutrition. Consecutive patients scheduled for abdominal surgery were randomized to the multimodal EON group or a group receiving conventional care. The primary endpoint was the time of first defecation. The secondary endpoints were outcomes and the cost-effectiveness ratio in treating infectious complications. The rate of infectious-free patients was regarded as the index of effectiveness. One hundred seven patients were randomly assigned to groups. Baseline characteristics were similar for both groups. In intention-to-treat analysis, the success rate of oral nutrition during the first week after surgery in the multimodal EON group was 44 (83.0%) versus 31 (57.4%) in the conventional care group (P = 0.004). Time to first defecation, time to flatus, recovery time of bowel sounds, and prolonged postoperative ileus were all less in the multimodal EON group (P multi-modal early oral nutrition group (P multi-modal early oral nutrition program was an effective way to improve tolerance of oral nutrition during the first week after surgery, decrease the length of stay and improve cost-effectiveness after abdominal surgery. Registration number: ChiCTR-TRC-14004395 . Registered 15 March 2014.

  15. Nursing's role in the nutritional care of the terminally ill: weathering the storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baack, C M

    1993-01-01

    The role of the nurse in nutritional care of the terminally ill is first, to come to terms with personal, psychological, and moral and ethical issues surrounding nutrition and hydration on an individual level; and second, to enter into a partnership with the patient and family and guide them through the storm of emotions and questions using a framework based on principles of ethics, crisis intervention, and effective communication. The nurse's ability to be present with the patient and family during this time is his/her primary tool as the nurse helps them maintain wellness and equilibrium.

  16. Blind parents and nutrition of children: experiences and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariane Gomes Cezario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the experiences of blind parents in care related to breastfeeding and complementary feeding of children. Methods: qualitative research with the participation of four blind mothers and five blind fathers. Home interviews were carried out to address the experience of feeding children in the context of blindness, categorized by the technique of thematic analysis. Results: three categories emerged: Breastfeeding and complementary feeding offered by blind mothers; Blind fathers and the feeding of children; and Care of the children and blindness: coping strategies, in which difficulties and alternatives developed to feed the children were highlighted. Conclusion: blind parents have difficulties similar to those seer parents but with specific demands associated with the handling of utensils in safe and satisfactory supply of food.

  17. Is the presence of a validated malnutrition screening tool associated with better nutritional care in hospitalized patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglseer, Doris; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between the use of clinical guidelines and the use of validated screening tools, evaluate the nutritional screening policy in hospitals, and examine the association between the use of validated screening tools and the prevalence of malnutrition and nutritional interventions in hospitalized patients. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. Data were collected using a standardized questionnaire on three levels: institution (presence of a guideline for malnutrition), department (use of a validated screening tool), and patient (e.g., malnutrition prevalence). In all, 53 hospitals with 5255 patients participated. About 45% of the hospitals indicated that they have guidelines for malnutrition. Of the departments surveyed, 38.6% used validated screening tools as part of a standard procedure. The nutritional status of 74.5% of the patients was screened during admission, mostly on the basis of clinical observation and patient weight. A validated screening tool was used for 21.2% of the patients. Significant differences between wards with and without validated screening tools were found with regard to malnutrition prevalence (P = 0.002) and the following interventions: referral to a dietitian (P malnutrition screening tools is associated with better nutritional care and lower malnutrition prevalence rates in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutrition services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptomey, Lauren T; Wittenbrook, Wendy

    2015-04-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that nutrition services provided by registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) and nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered (NDTRs), who work under RDN supervision, are essential components of comprehensive care for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). Nutrition services should be provided throughout life in a manner that is interdisciplinary, family-centered, community based, and culturally competent. Individuals with IDD and CYSHCN have many risk factors requiring nutrition interventions, including growth alterations (eg, failure to thrive, obesity, or growth retardation), metabolic disorders, poor feeding skills, drug-nutrient interactions, and sometimes partial or total dependence on enteral or parenteral nutrition. Furthermore, these individuals are also more likely to develop comorbid conditions, such as obesity or endocrine disorders that require nutrition interventions. Poor nutrition-related health habits, limited access to services, and long-term use of multiple medications are considered health risk factors. Timely and cost-effective nutrition interventions can promote health maintenance and reduce risk and cost of comorbidities and complications. Public policy for individuals with IDD and CYSHCN has evolved, resulting in a transition from institutional facilities and programs to community and independent living. The expansion of public access to technology and health information on the Internet challenges RDNs and NDTRs to provide accurate scientific information to this rapidly growing and evolving population. RDNs and NDTRs with expertise in this area are best prepared to provide appropriate nutrition information to promote wellness and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutrition and hydration in dying patients: the perceptions of acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Isabel; van der Riet, Pamela; Sneesby, Ludmilla; Good, Phillip

    2014-09-01

    To explore the perceptions of nurses regarding the provision and nonprovision of medical nutrition and hydration during the end stage of life when death is imminent in the acute care setting. When people are dying, they often experience a loss of appetite and desire for drinking which are natural processes at this time. The cessation of eating and drinking challenges both family members and clinical staff. This article builds on previous studies that describe the perceptions of medical doctors and palliative care nurses regarding medical nutrition and hydration during the end stage of life when death is imminent. Qualitative descriptive design. This study included three focus group meetings with ten nurses in an acute care setting in medical, oncology and haematology units. An interview schedule was used to guide the discussions. The main theme to emerge from this study was 'finding a comfort space/ambiguous spaces of unrest' that included four subthemes: (1) limited involvement in decision-making, (2) comfort vs. discomfort, (3) uncertainty and (4) the comfort of withdrawing treatment. Finding a comfort space captures the challenges nurses faced when speaking about the concerns of patients and family. In this space, there were ambiguities that created unease and unrest: a reluctance to talk about death; a reluctance to engage with the patient and the family. Acute care nurses need to be more cognisant of the palliative approach to care and become more engaged with decision-making during the end stage of life when death is imminent. Nurses in acute care settings need to be involved in decision-making and advocate for patients and family during the dying phase. Nurses in acute care need better understanding about the palliative approach to care and nutrition and hydration for people who are dying. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Implementation and practical application of the nutrition care process in the dialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmer, Debra

    2013-01-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP) was introduced in 2003 (Lacey and Pritchett, J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103:1061-1071). Since then, dietitians have been encouraged to incorporate the NCP into their daily practice, yet it has not been totally adopted in all dialysis units (Dent and McDuffie, J Ren Nutr. 2011;1:205-207). The renal dietitian has the benefit of being able to follow-up with the dialysis patient on a monthly basis. During these monthly visits, as information unfolds, a unique relationship culminates with the dialysis patient. The NCP allows the dietitian to make precise nutrition diagnoses, which reflect the complexity of the renal dietitian's involvement with the dialysis patient. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief description of the NCP as it relates to dialysis, offer a framework on how to begin using the NCP in the dialysis unit, and provide an example of a monthly nutrition note.

  1. Antioxidants, phenolic compounds, and nutritional quality of different strawberry genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulipani, S.; Mezzetti, B.; Capocasa, F.; Bompadre, S.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Vos, de C.H.; Capanoglu, E.; Bovy, A.G.; Battino, M.

    2008-01-01

    Strawberry contains high levels of micronutrients and phytochemical compounds. These exhibit functional roles in plant growth and metabolism and are also essential for the nutritional and organoleptic qualities of the fruit. The aim of the present work was to better characterize the phytochemical an

  2. Protocols on prenatal care for pregnant women with Zika infection and children with microcephaly: nutritional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel de Sá Barreto Luna Callou Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract This summary aimed to synthesize the protocol guidelines of Pernambuco, the Ministry of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which deal with health care related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy and the preliminary procedures for surveillance on microcephaly cases including nutritional care. With the increase of number of cases on this event since August, 2015, it was necessary to reorganize the prenatal care which is offered to pregnant women, including the protocols in order to reduce the chances of a possible contamination of the virus, to detect previously suspected cases as well as perform follow up on confirmed cases. The gaps in the knowledge of this morbidity, it should be noted that the information and recommendations are subject to revision due to possible incorporation of new knowledge and other evidence, as well as the need for adequacy of surveillance actions in new epidemiological scenarios. It is known that cases of nutritional deficiencies are capable of producing malformation of the Central Nervous System, including microcephaly. In the analysis of the protocols, there were no changes as to the nutritional recommendations already established for the low-risk pregnant women. The authors presented a hypothesis and conceptually, as a prevention measurement, the inclusion of prenatal care to prevent and control isolated or multiple deficiencies associated to microcephaly, such as protein, vitamin A, iodine, folate, B12, vitamin D, biotin, zinc and selenium.

  3. Improving Nutritional Status of Older Persons with Dementia Using a National Preventive Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L; Wijk, H; Christensson, L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the outcome of change in body weight associated with use of a structured preventive care process among persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. The preventive care process is a pedagogical model used in the Senior Alert (SA) quality register, where nutrition is one of the prioritized areas and includes four steps: assessment, analysis of underlying causes, actions performed and outcome. An analysis of data from SA with a pre-post design was performed. The participants were living in ordinary housing or special housing in Sweden. 1912 persons, 65 years and older, registered in both SA and the dementia quality register Svedem were included. A national preventive care program including individualized actions. The Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form was used to assess nutritional status at baseline. Body weight was measured during baseline and follow-up (7-106 days after baseline). 74.3% persons were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Those at risk of malnutrition or malnourished who were registered in all four steps of the preventive care process, increased in body weight from baseline (Md 60.0 kg) to follow-up (Md 62.0 kg) (p=0.013). In those with incomplete registration no increase in body weight was found. Using all steps in the structured preventive care process seems to improve nutritional status of persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. This study contributes to the development of evidence-based practice regarding malnutrition and persons with dementia.

  4. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs. Objective: This study was designed to explore pharmacists’ role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Methods: Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists’ demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists’ education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists

  5. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  6. Nutritional Status of Low Birth Weight Newborns with Different Gestational Age in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit%新生儿重症监护病房中不同胎龄低出生体质量儿营养状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邝文英; 廖艳; 汪伟山; 李丽; 黄辉文

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察NICU中不同胎龄低出生体质量儿血生化指标,探讨临床早期评估低出生体质量儿营养状况的敏感指标.方法采用前瞻性研究方法观察不同胎龄低出生体质量儿[胎龄28~ 31周(G 28-31)组、胎龄32-36周(G 32-36)组和胎龄37~42周(G 37-42)组]在新生儿期第1天和肠内营养达到推荐摄入标准(RDIs)后第1天血清清蛋白(ALB)、血糖(Glu)、总胆固醇(TC)、三酰甘油(TG)、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL-C)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)、载脂蛋白A(ApoA)、载脂蛋白B(ApoB)水平变化.结果 在新生儿期第1天,胎龄越小,血ALB水平越低,3组ALB水平比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).G 37-42组在新生儿期第1天TC、LDL-C、ApoB明显低于G28-31组和G32-36组,而在肠内营养达到RDIs后第1天,其TG、LDL-C、ApoB上升趋势明显高于G28-31组和G32-36组,差异均有统计学意义.结论 血ALB是临床早期评估不同胎龄低出生体质量儿营养状况的敏感指标之一,定期监测血脂中LDL-C、ApoB水平变化,可为新生儿早期营养干预提供合理指导,避免在追赶式生长过程中不适当地补充营养,导致代谢紊乱,产生远期不良后果.%To investigate the early assessment index of nutrition of low birth weight newborns with different gestational age in neonatal intensive care unit. Methods Prospective study was carried in low birth weight newboms divided by different gestational age[gestational age 28 - 31 weeks (G28 -31) group, gestational age 32 - 36 weeks (G32 - 36) group and gestational age 37 - 42 weeks (G37 - 42 ) group]. Serum index including serum albumin (ALB) , glucose (Glu) , total cholesterol (TC) , triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ,low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) , apolipoprotein A (ApoA) , apolipoprotein B (ApoB) were tested at the first day and enteral nutrition reached to recommended diet intakes( RDIs). Results Serum ALB increased obviously

  7. Nutritional composition of rice bran submitted to different stabilization procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Aparecida dos Santos Conceição Faria

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to inactivate enzymatic deterioration, whole rice bran samples were subjected to two stabilization methods. Changes in nutritional value in terms of, concerning chemical composition, minerals and fatty acid content, were evaluated to supplement existing data and promote the utilization of rice bran in the human diet. The following homemade heat treatments were applied: roasting on a conventional stove or heating in a microwave oven. Based on the results, the different heating methods affected sample composition, since the levels of some nutrients of treated samples showed significant changes (pA fim de inativar a deterioração enzimática, as amostras de farelo de arroz foram submetidas a dois métodos de estabilização. As mudanças do valor nutricional, no que se refere a composição química, os minerais e o conteúdo de ácidos graxos, foram avaliadas para adicionar mais informações aos dados existentes e promover a utilização de farelo de arroz na dieta humana. Os seguintes tratamentos caseiros por calor foram aplicados: torra em forno convencional ou de aquecimento em forno de micro-ondas. Com base nos resultados, os diferentes métodos de aquecimento afetaram a composição das amostras, já que os níveis de alguns nutrientes mostraram alterações significativas (p <0,05, comparado com as amostras cruas correspondentes. O farelo de arroz tratado em fogão convencional forneceu produtos com menos umidade (5,14 ± 0,10 g/100 g e nutrientes, tais como: de sódio 11,8%; ácido palmítico 9,9% e ácido esteárico 8,1%. O procedimento de forno de micro-ondas resultou em melhor preservação dos nutrientes, com teor de umidade um pouco maior (6,28 ± 0,10 g/100 g, o que parece ser uma ferramenta prática e rápida no tratamento térmico caseiro para o farelo de arroz.

  8. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Dietetic Technicians, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    DTRs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All DTRs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the DTR, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide a DTR's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the DTR are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All DTRs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the DTR. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  9. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  10. In vivo gluconeogenesis under different nutritional regimens during murine schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S N

    1987-09-01

    The effect of schistosome infection on in vivo gluconeogenesis was studied in mice. Mice infected for 6 weeks displayed no nutritional pathology, regardless of nutritional treatment. All mice with patent infections (9 weeks) displayed decreased rates of growth and food consumption as well as significantly reduced gross conversion efficiencies. The glucogenic capacity, % pyruvate incorporated/g liver, was markedly reduced in infected fasted mice when compared with fasted controls. Total glucogenesis, % pyruvate incorporated/100 g body water, was the same in infected and control groups and the compensatory response in infected individuals was correlated with increased liver mass. The level of hepatic glycogen was significantly greater in infected fasted mice than in their unparasitized counterparts.

  11. Delivery of enteral nutrition after the introduction of practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in pediatric critical care clinical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Emma; Mara, Jackie; Diamantidi, Krystalia; Alfheeaid, Hani A; Spenceley, Neil; Davidson, Mark; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2014-12-01

    Provision of optimal nutrition is often difficult to achieve in the critically ill child, but can improve with better nutritional support practices. This study evaluated the joint impact of the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds on enteral nutrition (EN) intake and practices in children in intensive care. Nutritional intake and EN practices were audited before (period A) and after (period B) the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds in a pediatric intensive care unit. Information was collected on a daily basis and nutritional intake was compared with predefined targets and the United Kingdom dietary reference values. There were 65 patients and 477 nutritional support days in period A and 65 patients and 410 nutritional support days in period B. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) energy requirements were achieved in a larger proportion of nutritional support days in period B (BMR achieved [% nutritional support days]; period A: 27% vs period B: 48.9%; Pnutritional intake in some patients in critical care, but can have limited benefit for children admitted for corrective heart surgery.

  12. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This “gaps methodology” can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists. PMID:24646823

  13. Nutritional counselling in primary health care: a randomized comparison of an intervention by general practitioner or dietician

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen; Jørgensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To compare health effects and risk reduction in two different strategies of nutritional counselling in primary health care for patients at high risk of ischaemic heart disease. METHODS: In a cluster-randomized trial 60 general practitioners (GPs) in the Copenhagen County were randomized....... Risk of cardiovascular disease was calculated by The Copenhagen Risk Score. Data on use of medicine and primary health care was obtained from central registers. RESULTS: Altogether 339 (67%) patients completed the intervention. Weight loss was larger in the dietician group (mean 4.5 kg vs. 2.4 kg......), and increase of HDL-cholesterol was larger in the GP group (mean 0.13 mmol/l vs. 0.03 mmol/l). The reduction of the cardiovascular risk score was significantly larger in the GP group (P=0.0005). Other health outcomes were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: GPs were aware of substantial risk factors...

  14. [Management of parenteral nutrition in intensive care units in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquerizo Alonso, Clara; Mesejo, Alfonso; Acosta Escribano, José; Ruiz Santana, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    y en glucosa, el 42% con SMOF (Soja, MCT, Oliva, Pescado) y el 33% con EBAO (Emulsiones Basadas en Aceite de Oliva) como emulsión lipídica. El 92% adiciona glutamina. Un 60% considera que la nueva fórmula puede estar indicada en sepsis, trauma, quemados y FMO (Fracaso Multiorgánico) y un 30% la utilizaría de rutina al ingreso. Un 40% considera que disminuye las necesidades de insulina, 50% un mejor manejo del volumen y un 60% destaca la relación proteínas/volumen. Evolutivamente, los pacientes con fórmula específica tienen menor afectación hepática, mayor aporte proteico y menor aporte de volumen, sin diferencias significativas, y precisaron menos dosis de insulina (p = 0,07). Conclusiones: En las doce UCIs seleccionadas, los patrones de práctica clínica en el manejo de la nutrición parenteral se adaptan a las recomendaciones de sociedades científicas como la Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC), Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral (SENPE) y European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Las nuevas fórmulas diseñadas para el paciente grave pueden tener indicaciones en estas patologías.

  15. [Pre-pregnancy nutritional status, maternal weight gain, prenatal care, and adverse perinatal outcomes among adolescent mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marta Maria Antonieta de Souza; Baião, Mirian Ribeiro; de Barros, Denise Cavalcante; Pinto, Alessandra de Almeida; Pedrosa, Priscila La Marca; Saunders, Claudia

    2012-03-01

    To identify the association between pre-gestational nutritional status, maternal weight gain, and prenatal care with low birth weight (LBW) and prematurity outcomes in infants of adolescent mothers. Cross-sectional study with 542 pairs of adolescent mothers and their children attending a public maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Data were collected from medical records. To determine the association between independent variables and the outcomes studied, odds ratio (OR) and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated With respect to pre-pregnancy nutritional status of adolescents, 87% had normal weight, 1% were underweight, 10% were overweight, and 2% obese. Inadequate total gestational weight gain (72%) exceeded adequacy (28%). Birth weight was favored with greater gestational weight gain, and reduced with late onset of prenatal care. The comparison between the low birth weight and normal birth weight groups revealed significant differences between variable means: interval between the past pregnancy and current pregnancy (p = 0.022), pre-gestational weight (p = 0.018); pre-gestational body mass index (p prenatal visits. Birth weight was associated with inter-gestational interval, pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index before pregnancy. The minimum frequency of six prenatal care visits was a protective factor against LBW and prematurity.

  16. Primary Care Residents' Knowledge, Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Professional Norms Regarding Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Counseling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Samantha; Seeholzer, Eileen L; Gullett, Heidi; Jackson, Brigid; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Krejci, Susan A; Flocke, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    .... To assess the degree to which residents training in adult primary care programs are prepared to provide obesity, nutrition, and physical activity (ONPA) counseling. Senior residents (postgraduate year [PGY]-3 and PGY-4...

  17. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hanc, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality.At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed.A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality.The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group.

  18. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  19. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicia...

  20. Nutritional care and support among adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafese, Zelalem; Birhan, Yifru; Abebe, Hiwot

    2013-11-01

    Background Improving nutritional care and support for people living with HIV (PLHIV) is an integral part of comprehensive HIV treatment according to the National Nutritional Strategy of Ethiopia. However, there is no adequate published study that assesses the nutritional care and support services for adult people living with HIV/ AIDS (PLHIV) in this setting. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the existing nutritional care and support services and determine the challenges facing adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital in southern Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative study was carried out using focus group discussions (FGDs), in-depth interviews and participant observation. Four FDGs were held and five in-depth interviews were conducted. A two-week participant observation was also conducted by trained nurses. All interviews and FDGs were tape-recorded and transcribed; those conducted in Amharic were translated back to English. Finally thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. Results Most of the FDG participants were unsatisfied with their nutritional care and support services and expressed difficulty with disclosing their HIV status for fear of stigma and discrimination. The in-depth interviews and participant observation showed results similar to those of the FDG. Some key informants expressed a fear that such poor nutritional care and support may threaten the quality of life of people living with HIV and suggested that all stakeholders work on improving the services. Conclusion Current nutritional care and support services for people living with HIV are not well coordinated. They focus mainly on monthly supplementation of antiretroviral drugs and occasional handouts of food. The need to provide health education on antiretroviral drugs and nutrition, and to emphasise strategies aimed at improving the nutritional status of peoples living with HIV is critical. Furthermore, the study recommended strengthening the initiatives of some

  1. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

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    Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci Morishita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs in Embu das Artes (SP, from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6% and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409. After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study.

  2. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  3. Nutritional issues and self-care measures adopted by cancer patients attending a university hospital in Turkey

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    Sevgisun Kapucu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the nutritional status of cancer patients and the self-care measures they adopted as a response to nutritional problems. Methods: This descriptive study included seventy cancer patients staying in the oncology and internal disease clinics of a university hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using a questionnaire with 29 questions. Results: The mean age of participants was 40.2 ΁ 1.82 years. Approximately, 62.9% of the patients ate only half of the meals offered to them, 65.7% experienced weight loss, and 45.7% had difficulty eating their meals on their own. Moreover, 47.1% of the patients received nutritional support and nutritional problems were observed in 71.4% of the patients; 80% were unable to eat hospital food, 54.3% had an eating disorder related to a special diet, 30% suffered from loss of appetite, 27% had nausea, and 14.3% had difficulty swallowing. Furthermore, 48.5% of patients responded that they ate home-cooked food or ordered food from outside when questioned about the self-care measures taken to avoid the aforementioned nutritional problems. Conclusions: Most of the cancer patients had serious nutritional problems and ate home-cooked food and used nutritional supplements to overcome these problems. Oncology nurses are responsible for evaluating the nutritional status of cancer patients and eliminating nutritional problems.

  4. Nutritional food content of seed and effects of five different growing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional food content of seed and effects of five different growing media on the seed germination and seedling growth of Afzelia ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Thirteen chemical food nutrients were detected in the species seed.

  5. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Yoonna

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals.

  6. The energy intake through regular nontherapeutic meals provision in long-term care: impact on nutritional status and related Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtzel, Baerbel; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Ohrenberger, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how the energy intake of institutionalized long-term-care patients through the regular nontherapeutic meals provision is associated with the nutritional status and the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI). A 9 month longitudinal, observational study. Long-term-care Hospital. 66 long-term-care patients with multiple medical conditions and solely oral food-intake. 47 (71 %) patients, predominantly women (n = 39/47), with a mean age of 83.04 (±9.58) years completed study time and 19 (29 %) deceased. At week 1 and week 36 of observation time energy intake was measured by means of three-days-weighing-records. Body composition was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Serum albumin, body weight and body height were taken from the medical report. Albumin content, body weight and height were used to calculate the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index: GNRI = [1.489 × albumin (g/L)] + [41.7 × (weight/ideal body weight)]. Energy intake was significantly below 24 kcal/kg body weight per day. The GNRI of the deceased patients was significantly (p = 0.002) lower than the GNRI of the completers. During observation time energy-intake p nutritional status and likewise the GNRI. The malnourishment and the nutrition related clinical risk of the geriatric patients aggrevated during observation time.

  7. Effects of Different Storage Conditions on the Nutritional Qualities of Barley and Maize

    OpenAIRE

    POLAT, Havva Eylem

    2015-01-01

    The effects of different types of storage on nutritional quality values of barley and maize are examined. For this purpose, 3 different storage types, including horizontal-reinforced concrete storage, vertical-reinforced concrete silo and verticalsteel silo were taken into consideration. Nutritional quality values (dry matter, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, crude ash, and metabolizable energy) of samples were analyzed in the laboratory in four replicates. Total of 438 samples were col...

  8. [The Nutritional Care Experience of a Post-Operative Periampullary Cancer Patient With Cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yan-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Cachexia is one of the most widely overlooked of the syndromes that are experienced by cancer patients. This syndrome is especially prevalent among patients with gastroenterology tract cancer. Although the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) issued palliative-care practice guidelines for cachexia in 2015, guidelines have yet to be issued for the clinical setting. The authors reviewed the literature and applied their clinical experience to create an approach for identifying the degree of cachexia in a post-operative patient with periampullary cancer. This approach assesses the nutritional status, physical status, laboratory results, and gastrointestinal system functions of the patient using the Cachexia Assessment Scale (CAS) and NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cachexia. The patient improved under nursing care with an increase in nutritional intake and physical activity facilitating their process of post-surgical physical recovery. The authors hope that this experience using the combined CAS-NCCN Practice Guidelines will help clinical caregivers better understand how to apply the relevant guidelines in clinical settings. The developed approach may help nurses assess the comprehensive nutrition status of patients and related factors in order to provide interventions that will decrease the progression of cachexia effectively and promote quality of life.

  9. Effectiveness of nutritional intervention in overweight women in Primary Health Care

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    Nathália Luíza Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effectiveness of nutritional intervention in overweight women undergoing Primary Health Care.Methods: An intervention study was conducted with overweight adult and elderly women aged 20 years or older (body mass index ≥25.0 kg/m² and ≥27.0 kg/m², respectively who were subjected to 12 months of individual nutritional monitoring. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed by dietary, health, and anthropometric indicators.Results: Most of the 71 individuals were adults with a low income and poor level of education. After the intervention, there was an increase in number of meals and in the frequency of breakfasting. Moreover, there were more fruits and vegetables consumed, in addition to a decrease in household availability of salt, sugar, oil, and fried foods consumption. An improvement in health and weight self-perception was observed, as well as a decrease in body mass and abdominal adiposity, in particular among those participating in several consultations (n >9.Conclusion: The proposed nutritional intervention was effective and viable for improving the care of overweight individuals and those suffering from destabilized comorbidities, and may be extended to other contexts.

  10. Early palliative home care: Evaluation of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners about nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Erika; Ödlund Olin, Ann; Orrevall, Ylva; Strang, Peter; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Törnkvist, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is important in early palliative home care, and interprofessional education is required to achieve teamwork. It is thus crucial to ensure that interprofessional education works well for the members of all participating professions because levels of knowledge and educational needs may vary. To evaluate, by profession, the effectiveness of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners on three areas of nutritional care for patients in a palliative phase. A quasi-experimental study that used a computer-based, study-specific questionnaire to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The continuing education in primary health care (ConPrim(®)) model was used to create the intervention. ConPrim includes a web-based program, a practical exercise and a case seminar, all with interprofessional training. Primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. Intervention group (n = 87; 48 district nurses, 39 general practitioners); control group (n = 53; 36 district nurses, 17 general practitioners). The total intervention effect was significant in all three areas, p = 0.000-0.004. The intervention effects were similar and significant for both professions in areas 1 and 2. In area 3, the intervention effects were significant for general practitioners but not for district nurses. The intervention seems promising, as it may create better prerequisites for teamwork and caring for patients living at home. However, it needs to be optimized to better increase district nurses' level of knowledge (area 3).

  11. 'Because we see them naked' - nurses' experiences in caring for hospitalized patients with dementia: considering artificial nutrition or hydration (ANH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryon, Els; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Gastmans, Chris

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe how Flemish nurses experience their involvement in the care of hospitalized patients with dementia, particularly in relation to artificial nutrition or hydration (ANH). We interviewed 21 hospital nurses who were carefully selected from nine hospitals in different regions of Flanders. 'Being touched by the vulnerability of the demented patient' was the central experience of the nurses, having great impact on them professionally as well as personally. This feeling can be described as encompassing the various stages of the care process: the nurses' initial meeting with the vulnerable patient; the intense decision-making process, during which the nurses experienced several intense emotions influenced by supporting or hindering contextual factors; and the final coping process, a time when nurses came to terms with this challenging experience. From our examination of this care process, it is obvious that nurses' involvement in ANH decision-making processes that concern patients with dementia is a difficult and ethically sensitive experience. On the one hand, the feeling of 'being touched' can imply strength, as it demonstrates that nurses are willing to provide good care. On the other hand, the feeling of 'being touched' can also imply weakness, as it makes nurses vulnerable to moral distress stemming from contextual influences. Therefore, nurses have to be supported as they carry out this ethically sensitive assignment. Practical implications are given. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Portuguese traditional sausages: different types, nutritional composition, and novel trends

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    Cláudia Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional sausages—smoked, fermented or dried—are meat products that are part of the traditional daily diet in rural Portugal, and also highly valued in major cities with an increasing demand. These ethnic meat products are manufactured mainly by small-scale industries or artisanal producers according to and/or inspired by traditional processes. They are present in a wide variety of types, many recognized for their quality (38 certified products. Presently, cure technologies used are important for the potential they represent in transformation and diversification. Additionally, they add flavors and colors to meat that are much appreciated, surpassing meat preservation proposes. A review on the types and manufacturing technological aspects associated to Portuguese traditional sausages (PTS is provided in this article. Additionally, nutritional composition of the products is presented. Future developments foreseen in the field, in the light of current knowledge and market trends, are finally addressed.

  13. Do study circles and a nutritional care policy improve nutritional care in a short- and long-term perspective in special accommodations?

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    Albert Westergren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease-related malnutrition is a major health problem in the elderly population and management issues are under-explored. Objectives: What is the prevalence of undernutrition-risk (UN-risk, underweight, and overweight in special accommodations (SAs? Do study circles and a nutritional care policy (NCP improve the precision in nutritional care (NC and decrease the prevalence of under- and overweight in a short- and/or long-term perspective?Design: Quasi-experimental pre- and post-intervention design with three experimental groups and one control group (CG. Setting: SAs. Participants: In 2005 (Time 1 – T1, 1726 (90.4% residents agreed to participate; in 2007 (Time 2 – T2, 1,526 (81.8%; and in 2009 (Time 3 – T3, 1,459 (81.3% residents participated. Interventions: Experimental groups: between T1 and T2 the first period of study circles was conducted in one municipality; between T2 and T3 a second period of study circles in another municipality was conducted; after T1 a NCP was implemented in one municipality. CG: residents in three municipalities. Measurements: Under- and overweight were defined based on BMI. Risk of undernutrition was defined as involving any of: involuntary weight loss, low BMI, and/or eating difficulties. The ‘precision in NC’ describes the relationship between nutritional treatment (protein- and energy-enriched food (PE-food and/or oral supplements and UN-risk. Results: The prevalence of UN-risk varied between 64 and 66%, underweight between 25 and 30%, and overweight between 30 and 33% in T1–T3. At T2 the prevalence of underweight was significantly lower in the first period study circle municipality, and at T3 in the second period study circle municipality compared to in the CG. The precision in NC was higher in a short-term perspective in the study circle municipalities and both in a short- and long-term perspective in the NCP municipality. At T3 between 54 and 70% of residents at UN-risk did not

  14. Nursing intervention bundle for enteral nutrition in intensive care: a collective construction

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    Aline Daiane Colaço

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The collective construction of a nursing intervention bundle for patients in critical care in the hospital receiving enteral nutrition therapy, supported by evidence-based practice. Method A qualitative convergent-care study with 24 nursing professionals in an intensive care unit of a public hospital in Santa Catarina. Data collection was performed from May to August 2013, with semi-structured interviews and discussion groups. Results Four interventions emerged that constituted the bundle: bedside pH monitoring to confirm the position of the tube; stabilization of the tube; enteric position of the tube; and maintaining the head of the bed elevated at 30° to 45°.
 Conclusion The interventions chosen neither required additional professional workload nor extra charges to the institution, which are identified as improving the adoption of the bundle by nursing professionals at the ICU.

  15. Aging and longevity: why knowing the difference is important to nutrition research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Roger B; Ruhe, Rodney C

    2011-03-01

    Life expectancies after the age of 70 and the number of individuals living with age-related chronic conditions that affect daily activities continue to increase. Age-specific nutritional recommendations may help to decrease the incidence or severity of age-related debilitating chronic disorders. However, research in this area has seen limited success in identifying nutrition-related mechanisms that underlie the functional loss and chronic conditions that occur as a function of time. We believe that the limited success in establishing age-specific nutrition recommendations for the older population reflects, at least in part, research designs that fail to consider the evolutionary and biological bases of aging and longevity. Longevity has evolved as a by-product of genes selected for their contribution in helping the organism survive to the age of reproduction. As such, the principle of genetic determinism provides an appropriate underlying theory for research designs evaluating nutritional factors involved with life span. Aging is not a product of evolution and reflects stochastic and/or random events that most likely begin during the early, reproductively-active years. The genetic determinism model by which young (normal, control) are compared to old (abnormal, experimental) groups will not be effective in identifying underlying mechanisms and nutritional factors that impact aging. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly discuss the difference between aging and longevity and why knowing the difference is important to nutrition research and to establishing the most precise nutritional recommendations possible for the older population.

  16. Practice paper of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: principles of productivity in food and nutrition services: applications in the 21st century health care reform era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Mary B; Theis, Monica L

    2015-07-01

    Food and nutrition services, along with the health care organizations they serve, are becoming increasingly complex. These complexities are driven by sometimes conflicting (if not polarizing) human, department, organization, and environment factors and will require that managers shift how they think about and approach productivity in the context of the greater good of the organization and, perhaps, even society. Traditional, single-factor approaches to productivity measurements, while still valuable in the context of departmental trend analysis, are of limited value when assessing departmental performance in the context of an organization's goals and values. As health care continues to change and new models of care are introduced, food and nutrition services managers will need to consider innovative approaches to improve productivity that are consistent with their individual health care organization's vision and mission. Use of process improvement tools such as Lean and Six Sigma as strategies for evaluating and improving food and nutrition services efficiency should be considered. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girls Eating healthy at restaurants Special food issues Vegetarian eating Eating for strong bones Quiz: Food Facts ... issues What to do if you are a vegetarian How to take care of your bones Lots ...

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Nutrition Intervention in Long-Term Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Kuertz, Brittany; Silver, Heidi J; Schnelle, John F

    2015-11-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of two nutrition interventions on food, beverage, and supplement intake and body weight. Randomized, controlled trial. Five skilled nursing home facilities. Long-stay residents with orders for nutrition supplementation (N = 154). Participants were randomized into a usual care control group, an oral liquid nutrition supplement (ONS) intervention group, or a snack intervention group. Research staff provided ONS, according to orders or a variety of snack foods and beverages twice per day between meals, 5 days per week for 24 weeks and assistance to promote consumption. Research staff independently weighed residents at baseline and monthly during the 24-week intervention. Resident food, beverage and supplement intake and the amount of staff time spent providing assistance were assessed for 2 days at baseline and 2 days per month during the intervention using standardized observation and weighed intake procedures. The ONS intervention group took in an average of 265 calories more per day and the snack intervention group an average of 303 calories more per day than the control group. Staff time required to provide each intervention averaged 11 and 14 minutes per person per offer for ONS and snacks, respectively, and 3 minutes for usual care. Both interventions were cost-effective in increasing caloric intake, but neither intervention had a significant effect on body weight, despite positive trends. Oral liquid nutrition supplements and snack offers were efficacious in promoting caloric intake when coupled with assistance to promote consumption and a variety of options, but neither intervention resulted in significant weight gain. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital. Methods: During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  20. Critical care 24 × 7: But, why is critical nutrition interrupted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Adequate nutritional support is crucial in prevention and treatment of malnutrition in critically ill-patients. Despite the intention to provide appropriate enteral nutrition (EN, meeting the full nutritional requirements can be a challenge due to interruptions. This study was undertaken to determine the cause and duration of interruptions in EN. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a multidisciplinary critical care unit (CCU of a tertiary care hospital from September 2010 to January 2011 and who received EN for a period >24 h were included in this observational, prospective study. A total of 327 patients were included, for a total of 857 patient-days. Reasons and duration of EN interruptions were recorded and categorized under four groups-procedures inside CCU, procedures outside CCU, gastrointestinal (GI symptoms and others. Results: Procedure inside CCU accounted for 55.9% of the interruptions while GI symptoms for 24.2%. Although it is commonly perceived that procedures outside CCU are the most common reason for interruption, this contributed only to 18.4% individually; ventilation-related procedures were the most frequent cause (40.25%, followed by nasogastric tube aspirations (15.28%. Although GI bleed is often considered a reason to hold enteral feed, it was one of the least common reasons (1% in our study. Interruption of 2-6 h was more frequent (43% and most of this (67.1% was related to "procedures inside CCU". Conclusion: Awareness of reasons for EN interruptions will aid to modify protocol and minimize interruptions during procedures in CCU to reach nutrition goals.

  1. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital.Methods:During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  2. Does the Valuation of Nutritional Claims Differ among Consumers? Insights from Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Francesc; Gracia, Azucena

    2017-01-01

    The presence in the market of food products with nutritional claims is increasing. The objective of this paper is to assess consumers’ valuation of some nutritional claims (‘high in fiber’ and ‘reduced saturated fat’) in a European country and to test for differences among consumers. An artefactual non-hypothetical experiment was carried out in a realistic setting (mock/real brick-and-mortar supermarket) with a sample of 121 Spanish consumers stratified by gender, age, and body mass index. A latent class model was specified and estimated with the data from the experiment. Results indicate that consumers positively valued both nutritional claims, but the valuation was heterogeneous, and three consumer segments were detected. Two of them positively valued both nutritional claims (named ‘nutritional claim seekers’), while the third segment’s valuation was negative (named ‘nutritional claim avoiders’). This last segment is characterized by being younger males with university studies who give the least importance to health, natural ingredients, and the calorie/sugar/fat content when shopping. They pay less attention to nutritional information, and they stated that they use this information to a lesser extent. These consumers showed the least interest in healthy eating, and they reported that they do not have health problems related to their diet. PMID:28208811

  3. Does the Valuation of Nutritional Claims Differ among Consumers? Insights from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Francesc; Gracia, Azucena

    2017-02-13

    The presence in the market of food products with nutritional claims is increasing. The objective of this paper is to assess consumers' valuation of some nutritional claims ('high in fiber' and 'reduced saturated fat') in a European country and to test for differences among consumers. An artefactual non-hypothetical experiment was carried out in a realistic setting (mock/real brick-and-mortar supermarket) with a sample of 121 Spanish consumers stratified by gender, age, and body mass index. A latent class model was specified and estimated with the data from the experiment. Results indicate that consumers positively valued both nutritional claims, but the valuation was heterogeneous, and three consumer segments were detected. Two of them positively valued both nutritional claims (named 'nutritional claim seekers'), while the third segment's valuation was negative (named 'nutritional claim avoiders'). This last segment is characterized by being younger males with university studies who give the least importance to health, natural ingredients, and the calorie/sugar/fat content when shopping. They pay less attention to nutritional information, and they stated that they use this information to a lesser extent. These consumers showed the least interest in healthy eating, and they reported that they do not have health problems related to their diet.

  4. Does the Valuation of Nutritional Claims Differ among Consumers? Insights from Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Jurado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence in the market of food products with nutritional claims is increasing. The objective of this paper is to assess consumers’ valuation of some nutritional claims (‘high in fiber’ and ‘reduced saturated fat’ in a European country and to test for differences among consumers. An artefactual non-hypothetical experiment was carried out in a realistic setting (mock/real brick-and-mortar supermarket with a sample of 121 Spanish consumers stratified by gender, age, and body mass index. A latent class model was specified and estimated with the data from the experiment. Results indicate that consumers positively valued both nutritional claims, but the valuation was heterogeneous, and three consumer segments were detected. Two of them positively valued both nutritional claims (named ‘nutritional claim seekers’, while the third segment’s valuation was negative (named ‘nutritional claim avoiders’. This last segment is characterized by being younger males with university studies who give the least importance to health, natural ingredients, and the calorie/sugar/fat content when shopping. They pay less attention to nutritional information, and they stated that they use this information to a lesser extent. These consumers showed the least interest in healthy eating, and they reported that they do not have health problems related to their diet.

  5. [Standards, options and recommendations: nutritional support in palliative or terminal care of adult patients with progressive cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, P; Marti-Massoud, C; Blanc-Vincent, M P; Desport, J C; Colomb, V; Dieu, L; Kere, D; Melchior, J C; Nitenberg, G; Raynard, B; Roux-Bournay, P; Schneider, S; Senesse, P

    2001-10-01

    The "Standards, Options and Recommendations" (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the 20 French Cancer Centers and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and outcome for cancer patients. The methodology is based on literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. To develop clinical practice guidelines according to the definitions of the Standards, Options and Recommendations project for nutritional support in adult patients with advanced or terminal cancer. Data were identified by searching Medline, web sites and using the personal reference lists of members of the expert groups. Once the guidelines were defined, the document was submitted for review to 95 independent reviewers. The main recommendations for nutritional support in adult patients with advanced or terminal cancer are: 1) Palliative care has been defined in a consensual way and is governed by the law (standard). Nutritional support is a palliative care which aim is to maintain and restore the "well-being" of the patient (standard). 2) Digestive symptoms and nutritional troubles are frequently noted in patients with advanced or terminal cancer (standard, level of evidence B2). Karnofsky index (KPS) and performance status (PS) are functional scores with a prognostic value and have to be used (standard, level of evidence B2). 3) Anorexia has a bad predictive value in patients with advanced or terminal cancer (standard, level of evidence B2). 4) In France, patients with advanced or terminal cancer are referred to medical institutions, palliative care units or remained at home (standard). Patients need a multidisciplinary follow-up (standard). An active participation of patients and

  6. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  7. Technological and nutritional aspect of different hemp types addition: Comparison of flour and wholemeal effect

    OpenAIRE

    Švec, I.; Hrušková, Marie; Jurinová, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Addition of non-traditional raw-materials and flours into wheat flour follows contemporary trend of manufacturing nutritionally healthier fermented bakery products. Aim of the study follows this tendency, evaluating nutritional improvement of composite flour and baking potential of prepared wheat-hemp flour composites. Hemp products addition significantly increased both protein and dietary fibre contents. Between five types of hemp flour, differences were observed according to incorporated am...

  8. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    RDs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All RDs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for RDs, and the applicable focus area SOP and SOPP for RDs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide an RD's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the RD are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning, and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All RDs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians; applicable focus area SOP and SOPP; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  9. Becoming Food Aware in Hospital: A Narrative Review to Advance the Culture of Nutrition Care in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Laur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (2010–2013 study identified the prevalence of malnutrition on admission to medical and surgical wards as 45%. Nutrition practices in the eighteen hospitals, including diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of malnourished patients, were ad hoc. This lack of a systematic approach has demonstrated the need for the development of improved processes and knowledge translation of practices aimed to advance the culture of nutrition care in hospitals. A narrative review was conducted to identify literature that focused on improved care processes and strategies to promote the nutrition care culture. The key finding was that a multi-level approach is needed to address this complex issue. The organization, staff, patients and their families need to be part of the solution to hospital malnutrition. A variety of strategies to promote the change in nutrition culture have been proposed in the literature, and these are summarized as examples for others to consider. Examples of strategies at the organizational level include developing policies to support change, use of a screening tool, protecting mealtimes, investing in food and additional personnel (healthcare aides, practical nurses and/or diet technicians to assist patients at mealtimes. Training for hospital staff raises awareness of the issue, but also helps them to identify their role and how it can be modified to improve nutrition care. Patients and families need to be aware of the importance of food to their recovery and how they can advocate for their needs while in hospital, as well as post-hospitalization. It is anticipated that a multi-level approach that promotes being “food aware” for all involved will help hospitals to achieve patient-centred care with respect to nutrition.

  10. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of Australian practice nurses in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Louise; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Ball, Lauren E

    2014-04-01

    Nutrition is important for the management of chronic diseases. While practice nurses have numerous roles in primary care, the expectations on practice nurses to provide nutrition care for chronic disease management are increasing. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of practice nurses in providing nutrition care has not been widely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of Australian practice nurses on the provision of nutrition care for chronic disease management, including specific nutrition-related activities. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 181 Australian practice nurses in 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on each survey item. The survey sample was tested for representation of the Australian practice nurse workforce, and associations between respondents' demographic characteristics and responses to survey items were explored. Almost all practice nurses (89%) felt it was important to address diet whenever they cared for a patient. Over half of practice nurses (61%) were unsure if their practices were effective in increasing patients' compliance with nutritional recommendations. Nearly all practice nurses (98%) perceived further education on nutrition would assist them in their role. Practice nurses perceive they have an important role and favourable attitudes towards providing nutrition care; however, further training and education to enhance their self-perceived effectiveness is warranted. Future research should clarify whether an increase in nutrition-focused training results in improved effectiveness of nutrition care provided by practice nurses in terms of patient health outcomes.

  11. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  12. Access to food outlets and children's nutritional intake in urban China: a difference-in-difference analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Rui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years supermarkets and fast food restaurants have been replacing those “wet markets” of independent vendors as the major food sources in urban China. Yet how these food outlets relate to children’s nutritional intake remains largely unexplored. Method Using a longitudinal survey of households and communities in China, this study examines the effect of the urban built food environment (density of wet markets, density of supermarkets, and density of fast food restaurants on children’s nutritional intake (daily caloric intake, daily carbohydrate intake, daily protein intake, and daily fat intake. Children aged 6–18 (n = 185 living in cities were followed from 2004 to 2006, and difference-in-difference models are used to address the potential issue of omitted variable bias. Results Results suggest that the density of wet markets, rather than that of supermarkets, positively predicts children’s four dimensions of nutritional intake. In the caloric intake model and the fat intake model, the positive effect of neighborhood wet market density on children’s nutritional intake is stronger with children from households of lower income. Conclusion With their cheaper prices and/or fresher food supply, wet markets are likely to contribute a substantial amount of nutritional intake for children living nearby, especially those in households with lower socioeconomic status. For health officials and urban planners, this study signals a sign of warning as wet markets are disappearing from urban China’s food environment.

  13. Physical Activity, Energy Expenditure, Nutritional Habits, Quality of Sleep and Stress Levels in Shift-Working Health Care Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Lena Johanna; Gärtner, Simone; Hannich, Hans Joachim; Steveling, Antje; Lerch, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Among health care personnel working regular hours or rotating shifts can affect parameters of general health and nutrition. We have investigated physical activity, sleep quality, metabolic activity and stress levels in health care workers from both groups. Methods We prospectively recruited 46 volunteer participants from the workforce of a University Medical Department of which 23 worked in rotating shifts (all nursing) and 21 non-shift regular hours (10 nursing, 13 clerical staff). All were investigated over 7 days by multisensory accelerometer (SenseWear Bodymedia® armband) and kept a detailed food diary. Physical activity and resting energy expenditure (REE) were measured in metabolic equivalents of task (METs). Quality of sleep was assessed as Pittsburgh Sleeping Quality Index and stress load using the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress questionnaire (TICS). Results No significant differences were found for overall physical activity, steps per minute, time of exceeding the 3 METs level or sleep quality. A significant difference for physical activity during working hours was found between shift-workers vs. non-shift-workers (ppersonnel (median = 1.5 METs SE = 0.07, p<0.05). Non-shift-working nurses had a significantly lower REE than the other groups (p<0.05). The proportion of fat in the diet was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the office worker group (median = 42% SE = 1.2) whereas shift-working nurses consumed significantly more carbohydrates (median = 46% SE = 1.4) than clerical staff (median = 41% SE = 1.7). Stress assessment by TICS confirmed a significantly higher level of social overload in the shift working group (p<0.05). Conclusion In this prospective cohort study shift-working had no influence on overall physical activity. Lower physical activity during working hours appears to be compensated for during off-hours. Differences in nutritional habits and stress load warrant larger scale trials to determine the effect on implicit health

  14. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): nutritional assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Santana, S; Arboleda Sánchez, J A; Abilés, J

    2011-11-01

    Current parameters to assess nutritional status in critically-ill patients are useful to evaluate nutritional status prior to admission to the intensive care unit. However, these parameters are of little utility once the patient's nutritional status has been altered by the acute process and its treatment. Changes in water distribution affect anthropometric variables and biochemical biomarkers, which in turn are affected by synthesis and degradation processes. Increased plasma levels of prealbumin and retinol -proteins with a short half-life- can indicate adequate response to nutritional support, while reduced levels of these proteins indicate further metabolic stress. The parameters used in functional assessment, such as those employed to assess muscular or immune function, are often altered by drugs or the presence of infection or polyneuropathy. However, some parameters can be used to monitor metabolic response and refeeding or can aid prognostic evaluation.

  15. Assessing Nutritional Parameters of Brown Bear Diets among Ecosystems Gives Insight into Differences among Populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Alfaro, Claudia; Coogan, Sean C P; Robbins, Charles T; Fortin, Jennifer K; Nielsen, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    ... or nutritional composition of the complete diet. Here, we developed a dynamic model integrating food habits and nutritional information to assess nutritional parameters of brown bear (Ursus arctos...

  16. Assessing Nutritional Differences in Household Level Production and Consumption in African Villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, K.; Palm, C.; Wood, S.

    2015-12-01

    Studies of agriculture often focus on yields and calories, but overlook the production of diverse nutrients needed for human health. Nutritional production is particularly important in low-income countries, where foods produced correspond largely to those consumed. Through an analysis of crops, livestock, and animal products, this study aims to quantify the nutritional differences between household-level production and consumption in the Millennium Village at Bonsaaso, Ghana. By converting food items into their nutritional components it became clear that certain nutritional disparities existed between the two categories. In Bonsasso, 64-78% of households exhibited deficiencies in the consumption of Calcium, Fat, and/or Vitamin A despite less than 30% of households showing deficiencies on the production side. To better understand these differences, k-means clustering analysis was performed, placing households into groups characterized by nutritional means. By comparing the households in these groupings, it was clear that clusters formed around certain nutritional deficiencies. The socioeconomic characteristics of these groupings were then studied for correlations, concentrating on number of people at the household, sex and age of household head, and dependency ratio. It was found that clusters with high dependency ratios (the number of working persons in the household to non-working persons) exhibited a large variety of, and often drastic, nutritional deficiencies. In fact, the cluster with the highest average dependency ratio exhibited deficiencies in every nutrient. In light of these findings, regional policies may look to target households with a large number of dependents, and package nutrients for household distribution based on the characteristics of these clusters.

  17. Aging and Longevity: Why Knowing the Difference Is Important to Nutrition Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B. McDonald

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancies after the age of 70 and the number of individuals living with age-related chronic conditions that affect daily activities continue to increase. Age-specific nutritional recommendations may help to decrease the incidence or severity of age-related debilitating chronic disorders. However, research in this area has seen limited success in identifying nutrition-related mechanisms that underlie the functional loss and chronic conditions that occur as a function of time. We believe that the limited success in establishing age-specific nutrition recommendations for the older population reflects, at least in part, research designs that fail to consider the evolutionary and biological bases of aging and longevity. Longevity has evolved as a by-product of genes selected for their contribution in helping the organism survive to the age of reproduction. As such, the principle of genetic determinism provides an appropriate underlying theory for research designs evaluating nutritional factors involved with life span. Aging is not a product of evolution and reflects stochastic and/or random events that most likely begin during the early, reproductively-active years. The genetic determinism model by which young (normal, control are compared to old (abnormal, experimental groups will not be effective in identifying underlying mechanisms and nutritional factors that impact aging. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly discuss the difference between aging and longevity and why knowing the difference is important to nutrition research and to establishing the most precise nutritional recommendations possible for the older population.

  18. Nutritional quality of foods and beverages on child-care centre menus in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W.; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional quality of foods and beverages listed on menus serving children in government-sponsored child-care centres throughout Mexico. Design For this cross-sectional menu assessment, we compared (i) food groups and portion sizes of foods and beverages on the menus with MyPlate recommendations and (ii) macronutrients, sugar and fibre with Daily Reference Intake standards. Setting Menus reflected foods and beverages served to children attending one of 142 government-sponsored child-care centres throughout Mexico. Subjects There were fifty-four distinct menus for children aged 4–6 months, 7–9 months, 10–12 months, 13–23 months, 24–47 months and 48–72 months. Results Menus included a variety of foods meeting minimum MyPlate recommendations for each food category except whole grains for children aged 48–72 months. Menus listed excessive amounts of high-energy beverages, including full-fat milk, fruit juice and sugar-sweetened beverages for children of all ages. The mean daily energy content of menu items yielded an average of 2·76 MJ for infants, 4·77 MJ for children aged 13–23 months, 5·36 MJ for children aged 24–47 months and 5·87 MJ for children aged 48–72 months. Foods and beverages on menus provided sufficient grams of carbohydrate and fat, but excessive protein. Conclusions Menus provided a variety of foods but excessive energy. Whole grains were limited, and high-energy beverages were prevalent. Both may be appropriate targets for nutrition intervention. Future studies should move beyond menus and assess what children actually consume in child care. PMID:23036360

  19. Analysis on Nutritional and Functional Components of Different Pueraria lobata Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinping; WU; Fengling; GUO; Xianqiang; SHAO; Yan; HU; Jianjun; ZHAO; Zhengming; QIU

    2015-01-01

    This paper made analysis and evaluation of nutritional components and functional components of different Pueraria lobata roots. Nutritional components mainly include water,ash content,fat,reducing sugar,starch and cellulose; functional components mainly include flavone and polyphenol. Pueraria lobata root No. 1 has highest ash content,flavone,and polyphenol but lowest fat,so it is suitable for using as medical Pueraria lobata root resource. Pueraria lobata root No. 5 has starch content as high as 64. 43%,and is recommended using as vegetable and processing into Pueraria lobata powder. Pueraria lobata root No. 5 has cellulose content as high as 17. 79% and is recommended processing into Pueraria lobata tablets. Through comparison of nutritional and functional components of different Pueraria lobata roots,it is intended to provide reference for variety selection,breeding,production and processing of Pueraria lobata roots.

  20. Does an Antenatal Care make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antenatal Care utilization and its effects among booked and unbooked women were studied retrospectively in Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department, Punjab Institute of Medical Sciences, Jalandhar (India during April- June, 2012. Demographic variables, obstetric history and event outcomes were explored. Unbooked (58% status was seen with primiparity, low socioeconomic status (p<0.01 and younger age (p<0.001; 20-25 yrs. 37.21% of unbooked mothers had Anemia (p<0.01 while fetuses of 24.14% mothers developed Fetal Distress. Incidence of Oligohydraminos, Pregnancy Induced Hypertension, Intrauterine Growth Retardation, Preterm Premature Rupture Of Membrane and Preterm Labour were higher among unbooked mothers. Unbooked status had higher Preterm (22.42% and Low Birth Weight babies (51.73%. Majority of mothers of moderate age (40.48%; 26-30yrs, high socioeconomic status (26.20% and multiparity (54.77% booked themselves. The lack of required antenatal care might have led to higher obstetric complications among unbooked mothers. Improving socioeconomic status and women literacy rate may increase the number of booked mothers which may provide them the needed antenatal care.

  1. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale, Ulrika SöderhamnCentre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayBackground: Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explore how a small group of older people in Southern Norway perceived their nutritional self-care.Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach, combined with a simple self-report questionnaire, was used. Five persons living in rural areas in Southern Norway, who in a former study were screened and found to be at risk for undernutrition, participated. Qualitative data assessed by means of individual self-care talks in the persons' own homes were analyzed using directed content analysis. A simple self-report questionnaire containing demographic variables, two health-related questions, and the Nutritional Form For the Elderly (NUFFE-NO instrument was filled out at baseline and 6 months after the self-care talks.Results: The qualitative data showed that the participants had adequate knowledge about healthy and nutritious diets. They were aware of and motivated to adapt their diet to their current state of health and to perform the necessary actions to maintain an optimal nutritional status and nutritional self-care.Conclusion: Older people living at home are a diverse group. However, this study showed that they may have sufficient knowledge, willingness, and ability to perform nutritional self-care, even if they live alone and have several chronic illnesses and impaired health.Keywords: adapting, decision-making, knowledge, self-care talks

  2. [Nutrition and liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauth, M

    2013-06-01

    In the critically ill liver patient, nutrition support is not very different from that given for other illnesses. In hyperacute liver failure, nutrition support is of less importance than in the other subtypes of acute liver failure that take a more protracted course. Nasoenteral tube feeding using a polymeric standard formula should be the first-line approach, while parenteral nutrition giving glucose, fat, amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements is initiated when enteral nutrition is insufficient or impracticable. In chronic liver disease, notably cirrhosis, there is frequently protein malnutrition indicating a poor prognosis and requiring immediate initiation of nutrition support. Enteral nutrition ensuring an adequate provision of energy and protein should be preferred. Particular care should be taken to avoid refeeding syndrome and to treat vitamin and trace element deficiency.

  3. Swallowing rehabilitation with nutrition therapy improves clinical outcome in patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masako; Higashibeppu, Naoki; Arioka, Yasutaka; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of nutrition therapy for the patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital. We also tried to clarify the factors which improve swallowing function in these patients. Seventy patients with dysphagia were included in the present study. Multidisciplinary nutrition support team evaluated swallowing function and nutrition status. Most patients were fed by parenteral or enteral nutrition at the time of the first round. Of these 70 patients, 36 became able to eat orally. The improvement of swallowing function was associated with higher BMI in both genders and higher AMC in men. Mortality was high in the patients with lower BMI and %AMC, suggesting importance of maintaining muscle mass. Thirteen (38.2%) of 34 patients who did not show any improvement in swallowing function died, but no patients who showed improvement died (pnutrition intake aboutdysphagia and poor outcome, compared to those with about>22 kcal/kg/day. These results suggest that it is important to maintain nutritional status to promote rehabilitation in patients with dysphagia even in an acute care hospital.

  4. Nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients: Effect on dietary intake and the occupational groups' perspectives of intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lillian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients do not eat and drink sufficiently during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this under nutrition include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study was 1 to introduce intervention targeting nutritional care for medical inpatients, 2 to investigate the effect of this intervention, and 3 to investigate the occupational groups' attitudes towards nutritional intervention and nutritional care in general. Methods The design was to determinate the extent to which the protein and energy requirements of medical inpatients were met before and after intervention. Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed by 72-hour weighed food records. A total number of 108 medical patients at four bed sections and occupational groups in the two intervention bed sections, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark participated. The intervention included introduction and implementation of nursing procedures targeting nutritional care during a five-month investigation period using standard food produced at the hospital. The effect of intervention for independent groups of patients were tested by one-way analysis of variance. After the intervention occupational groups were interviewed in focus groups. Results Before the intervention hospital food on average met 72% of the patients' protein requirement and 85% of their energy requirement. After intervention hospital food satisfied 85% of the protein and 103% of the energy requirements of 14 patients in one intervention section and 56% of the protein and 76% of the energy requirement of 17 patients in the other intervention section. Hospital food satisfied 61% of the protein and 75% of the energy requirement in a total of 29 controls. From the occupational groups' point of view lack of time, lack of access to food, and lack of knowledge of nutritional care for patients were identified as barriers to better integration of

  5. Nutritional Status of Households of Rural Field Practice Area of a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Sharma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the world as a whole there appears to be a shift from under-nourishment towards over-nourishment making more and more children, adolescents, adults and even elderly to be overweight and obese. Objectives: Study aimed to find out the age and sex wise commonness of over-weight & obesity amongst the families of an overtly different socio-economic environment and its trend in the members of one type of families. Materials & Methods: The undergraduate medical students are supposed to maintain record of individual health (including height & weight of their own family as well as that of the allotted family. The data collected (record maintained by students was utilized to calculate Body Mass Index (BMI. Results: Out of total 291 subjects (males 168; females 123 in students own family 28.9% (28.0%; 30.1% were overweight and 5.9% (6.0%; 5.7% were obese. The similar figures for 262 subjects (males 143 & females 119 in the allotted families were 20.2% (18.5%; 20.2% and 6.5% (4.2%; 8.4% respectively. The respective percentages of under nourished individuals were 18.6 (17.9; 19.5 and 35.5 (37.8; 32.8. Thus over-nutrition was more common amongst the members of students own families (34.8% vs. 26.7% and under-nutrition was more common amongst the members of allotted families (35.5% vs. 18.6% For the years 2000-2003, BMI amongst individuals of students own families the under-nutrition in the age group of 15-24 years amongst males increased from 15.9% to 32.9% and over-nutrition from 13.6% to 20.5%. There was no case of overweight and obesity up to the age of 34 years in the previous analysis which was 2.6% in the present analysis Previous results demonstrated overweight to be more common in males (32.4% Vs. 24.4% in females and obesity being more common females ( 6.3% Vs. 2.6% in females. Conclusion: Males are increasingly becoming prey of malnutrition (adolescents for under-nutrition and adults & elderly for over-nutrition. More studies

  6. Ageing and COPD affect different domains of nutritional status: the ECCE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, S; Spatafora, M; Paglino, G; Pedone, C; Corsonello, A; Scichilone, N; Antonelli-Incalzi, R; Bellia, V

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ageing may contribute to malnutrition. We aimed to explore whether COPD and ageing determine malnutrition in different manners. 460 stable COPD outpatients (376 males and 84 females) from the Extrapulmonary Consequences of COPD in the Elderly (ECCE) study database were investigated (age 75.0±5.9 yrs; forced expiratory volume in 1 s 54.7±18.3% predicted). Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment® (MNA) questionnaire. From the MNA, three scores exploring the domains of the nutritional status were calculated: body composition, energy intake and body functionality scores. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages were negatively correlated with five MNA items exploring mobility, patient's perception of own nutrition and health status, and arm and calf circumferences (lowest Spearman's rho (rs)=-0.011; highest p=0.039). GOLD stages were independently correlated with body composition and body functionality scores (model r2=0.073). Age was negatively correlated with four MNA items exploring loss of appetite, fluid intake, mobility and autonomy in daily life (lowest rs=-0.013; highest p=0.030). Age was independently correlated with body functionality score (model r2=0.037). Severe COPD and ageing are independent and probably concurrent conditions leading to malnutrition. The MNA questionnaire allows a valuable insight into the complexity of components of nutritional status and may provide useful clues for treatment strategies.

  7. The targeting of nutritionally at-risk children attending a primary health care facility in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, S E; Hendricks, M K; Hattingh, S P; Benadé, A J S; Laubscher, J A; Dhansay, M A

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the practices of primary health care (PHC) nurses in targeting nutritionally at-risk infants and children for intervention at a PHC facility in a peri-urban area of the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Nutritional risk status of infants and children nutrition case management guidelines developed for PHC facilities in the province. Children were identified as being nutritionally at-risk if their weight was below the 3rd centile, their birth weight was less than 2500 g, and their growth curve showed flattening or dropping off for at least two consecutive monthly visits. The study assessed the practices of nurses in identifying children who were nutritionally at-risk and the entry of these children into the food supplementation programme (formerly the Protein-Energy Malnutrition Scheme) of the health facility. Structured interviews were conducted with nurses to determine their knowledge of the case management guidelines; interviews were also conducted with caregivers to determine their sociodemographic status. One hundred and thirty-four children were enrolled in the study. The mean age of their caregivers was 29.5 (standard deviation 7.5) years and only 47 (38%) were married. Of the caregivers, 77% were unemployed, 46% had poor household food security and 40% were financially dependent on non-family members. Significantly more children were nutritionally at-risk if the caregiver was unemployed (54%) compared with employed (32%) (P=0.04) and when there was household food insecurity (63%) compared with household food security (37%) (Pnutritionally at-risk if the caregiver was financially self-supporting or supported by their partners (61%) compared with those who were financially dependent on non-family members (35%) (P=0.003). The weight results of the nurses and the researcher differed significantly (Pnurses' (Pinfants and children as being nutritionally at-risk compared with 14 (10%) by the nurses. The nurses' poor

  8. Food and nutritional care in hospitals: how to prevent undernutrition-report and guidelines from the Council of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Balknas, U. N.; Furst, P.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999 the Council of Europe decided to collect information regarding Nutrition programmes in hospitals and for this purpose a network consisting of national experts from eight of the Partial Agreement member states was established. The aim was to review the current practice in Europe regarding...... hospital food provision, to highlight deficiencies and to issue guidelines to improve the nutritional care and support of hospitalized patients. Five major problems seemed to be common in this context: 1) lack of clearly defined responsibilities; 2) lack of sufficient education; 3) lack of influence...... of the patients; 4) lack of co-operation among all staff groups; and 5) lack of involvement from the hospital management. To solve the problems highlighted, a combined 'team-effort' is needed from national authorities and ail staff involved in the nutritional care and support, including hospital managers. (C...

  9. Nurses’ Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Different Health Care Settings in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Leeuwen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows similarities and differences in perceptions and competences regarding spirituality and spiritual care of nurses in different health care settings. Research on this specific topic is limited and can contribute towards a nuanced implementation of spiritual care in different nursing care settings. Four hundred forty nine nurses in different health care settings completed a questionnaire concerning spirituality and spiritual care, spiritual care competence, and personal spirituality. Respondents reported a generic (instead of more specific view of spirituality and spiritual care, and they perceived themselves to be competent in providing spiritual care. Compared to nurses in hospital settings, nurses in mental health care and home care have a more generic view of spirituality and spiritual care and report a higher level of competence. Next to this, they perceive themselves more as spiritual persons. Future research is needed to develop further understanding in setting specific factors and their influence on nurses’ views and competence regarding spiritual care. Nursing education and management should consider an emphasis on spiritual competence development related to working settings of nurses.

  10. The success of medical nutrition therapy in both genders and in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralević Slađana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available More than half of the adult population of the Republic of Serbia is overweight or obese. Obesity carries various risks and general health complications, which can significantly impair one's functioning and well-being. On the other hand, beneficial effects of body mass reduction are clearly confirmed. The therapeutic approach to obesity involves the use of various measures Treatment may include: medical nutrition therapy, programmed physical activity, medicaments and surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to examine if the effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy depends on the sex and age structure. This investigation was conducted as a retrospective study for the period from January 2008. until July 2009. During this time, 990 people came to the Counceling center. Only patients who came regularly to the controls and had BMI higher than 25 kg/m2 were included in this study. The average BMI in men was 31.55 kg/m2 and 32.66 kg/m2 in women. Compared to the first examination, majority of females (n = 35, 24.56% and males (n = 23, 25.27% reduced their BMI from 0 to 0.5 kg/m2 after medical nutrition therapy. Based on the results of X2 test, we concluded that there were statistically significant differences between men and women in effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy, while differences in the effectiveness of treatment in different age groups do not exist, neither in men nor in women.

  11. Nutritional status in acute stroke: undernutrition versus overnutrition in different stroke subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi-Kwon, S; Yang, Y H; Kim, E K; Jeon, M Y; Kim, J S

    1998-09-01

    Nutritional status in the acute stage of stroke has not been properly evaluated in different stroke subtypes. The objective of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of different subtypes of stroke patients. We studied 88 female patients with first-ever strokes. Strokes were divided into cerebral infarction (CI, n=67) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, n=21). We measured the nutritional status of the patients in the acute stage of stroke with the use of 8 parameters including 3 biochemical and 5 anthropometric ones. These variables were assessed in stroke patients and 120 age-matched controls, and were compared with each other. In the acute stage of stroke, undernourishment was significantly (P=0.000) more prevalent in the ICH group (62%) than in the CI group (25%) or controls (13%). On the other hand obesity was present in 10%, 24% and 17% in patients with ICH, those with CI, and controls, respectively, which was not significantly different (P=0.461). Only abdominal skinfold thickness was significantly greater in patients with CI than in those with ICH or controls. Conclusions - Our results illustrate that undernourishment is prevalent in acute stroke patients, significantly more so in patients with ICH than in those with CI. Stroke patients, especially those with ICH, should receive special nutritional intervention starting immediately after admission.

  12. Challenges in the management of nutritional disorders and communicable diseases in child day care centers: a quantitative and qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantyner, Tulio; Konstantyner, Thais Cláudia Roma de Oliveira; Toloni, Maysa Helena Aguiar; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2017-03-01

    In Brazil, although many children from low income families attend day care centers with appropriate hygiene practices and food programs, they have nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. This quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study identified staff challenges in child day care centers and suggested alternative activity management to prevent nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. The study included 71 nursery teachers and 270 children from public and philanthropic day care centers (teacher to child ratios of 1:2.57 and 1:6.40, respectively). Interviews and focus groups were conducted with teachers and parents, and anthropometry and blood samples were drawn from the children by digital puncture. Children in philanthropic child day care centers were more likely to be hospitalized due to communicable diseases. Teachers from philanthropic child day care centers had lower age, income and education and higher work responsibilities based on the number of children and working time. The focus groups characterized institutions with organized routines, standard food practices, difficulties with caretaking, and lack of training to provide healthcare to children. Strategies to improve children's health in day care settings should focus on training of teachers about healthcare and nutrition.

  13. [When enteral nutrition is not possible in intensive care patients: whether to wait or use parenteral nutrition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habes, Q.L.M.; Pickkers, P.

    2016-01-01

    - Overfeeding of critically ill patients is associated with a higher incidence of infections and an increased length of ventilation. However, trophic nutrition or permissive underfeeding appears to have no negative effect on the patient and may even provide a survival benefit.- Initiation of enteral

  14. PENGARUH PEMULIHAN GIZI BURUK RAWAT JALAN SECARA KOMPREHENSIF TERHADAP KENAIKAN BERAT BADAN, PANJANG BADAN, DAN STATUS GIZI ANAK BATITA (EFECTS OF COMPREHENSIVE OUTPATIENT CARE ON WEIGHT AND HEIGHT INCREAMENT, AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS AMONG SEVERELY MALNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnelia Arnelia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Outpatient care is a new approach for severely acute malnourished children while the other is inpatient care. To increase and optimalize outpatient care at Nutrition Clinic in Center for R&D in Nutrition and Food (CRDNF Bogor, the comprehensively treatment was performed including health, nutrition and caring practices. Objectives: To analyse weight and height increament and the nutritional status of under-three years children during outpatient care of severely malnourished children. Methods: An intervention study was implemented to severely malnourished children who participating in a 6 months outpatient care at Nutrition Clinic in CRDNF, Bogor. The comprehensive treatments were: curing the illness, nutrition and health counseling, gradually dietary treatment, caring guidance. The control groups were treated as the regular treatment of the clinic, including curing the illness, nutrition and health counseling and skim milk ration. Results: The average weight increament among comprehensive group significantly higher than those of reguler group, that was 1.39 ± 0.66 kg and 0.80 ± 0.40 after 3 months  (p=0.001 and at the end of out patient care was increased 2.02 ± 0.85 kg and 1.39 ± 0.52 consecutively (p=0.008. No different was found on the increament of childs length/height after 6 months out patient care, that was 4.0 ± 2.0 cm dan 4.1 ± 1.3 cm (p=0.806. After 3 months, 58.3% of comprehensive group and 22.7% of reguler group increased their weight by >15%, and to 73.9% and 50% after 4 months intervention. Based on W/H category, 79.2% of the comprehensive groups were severe wasting while in reguler group 59.1% and the rest were wasting at the beginning of the study. After 3 months intervention, 50% of the comprehensive group and 27.3% of the reguler group were normal and by the end increased to 73.9% and 33.3%. Conclusion: The increament of weight and the nutritional status improvement was much better among comprehensive

  15. Gender and communication style in general practice: differences between women's health care and regular health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: differences were investigated between general practitioners providing women's health care (4 women) and general practitioners providing regular health care (8 women and 8 men). Expectations were formulated on the basis of the principles of women's health care and literature about gender

  16. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  17. Differences in aerobic capacity among students with regard to their level of nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Kunješić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to contemporary lifestyle, nutritional status of students is poorer and therefore it negatively affects the aerobic capacity. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in aerobic capacity among female students of Faculty of Teacher Education with regard to their level of nutritional status. The study included 281 female students of the Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb. The sample of variables consisted of anthropometric measures: body height, body weight, sub-scapular and triceps skinfolds. Aerobic capacity was measured by 20 meter shuttle run test and nutritional status was determined by the body mass index (BMI. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their nutritional status: underweight, normal body weight, overweight and obese. Mean values of the BMI place the students into normal weight group, however, mean values of aerobic capacity show that students achieved poor results. Kruskal Wallis test and its post-hoc test (multiple comparisons for all groups with Bonferroni adjustment for determining the difference between subsamples according to the level of nutritional status among students show that the subsamples differ in four of the five variables that describe the morphological characteristics (body weight, BMI, sub-scapular skinfold, triceps skinfold as well as in aerobic capacity. The results obtained in this study show that the increased body mass have extremely high impact on the aerobic capacity results. It can be concluded that the tested students' aerobic capacity is poor and students with normal body weight have better aerobic capacity than overweight or obese students.

  18. Impact of nutritional status on the quality of life of advanced cancer patients in hospice home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Negar; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Peng, Loh Su

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience malnutrition and this is an important factor in impaired quality of life. This cross-sectional study examined the association between global quality of life and its various subscales with nutritional status among 61 (33 females and 28 males) advanced cancer patients cared for by selected hospices in peninsular Malaysia. The Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the Hospice Quality of Life Index (HQLI) were used to assess nutritional status and quality of life, respectively. Nine (14.7%) patients were well-nourished, 32 (52.5%) were moderately or suspected of being malnourished while 20 (32.8%) of them were severely malnourished. The total HQLI mean score for these patients was 189.9-/+51.7, with possible scores ranging from 0 to 280. The most problem areas in these patients were in the domain of functional well-being and the least problems were found in the social/spiritual domain. PG-SGA scores significantly correlated with total quality of life scores (r2= 0.38, pnutritional status exhibited a lower quality of life. Advanced cancer patients with poor nutritional status have a diminished quality of life. These findings suggest that there is a need for a comprehensive nutritional intervention for improving nutritional status and quality of life in terminally ill cancer patients under hospice care.

  19. An outbreak of Pantoea spp. in a neonatal intensive care unit secondary to contaminated parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habsah, H; Zeehaida, M; Van Rostenberghe, H; Noraida, R; Wan Pauzi, W I; Fatimah, I; Rosliza, A R; Nik Sharimah, N Y; Maimunah, H

    2005-11-01

    Contaminated parenteral nutrition (PN) is an important source of infection in neonates. Many organisms have been reported to cause contamination that results in outbreaks in intensive care units. The objective of this study was to investigate an outbreak caused by Pantoea spp., which contaminates PN, in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This was a descriptive study of an outbreak of sepsis in an NICU of a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Pantoea spp. infection was detected in eight patients over a three-day period from 24 to 27 January 2004 following the administration of PN. Seven of the eight patients died due to the infection. Extensive environmental samplings for culture were performed. PN solution from the NICU and the pharmacy were also cultured during the outbreak period. Pantoea spp. was isolated from blood cultures of all infected patients, and the unused PN from the pharmacy and the NICU. All the strains of Pantoea spp. had a similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern and biochemical reaction. From the results, we concluded that PN was the source of the outbreak and the contamination may have occurred during its preparation in the pharmacy. A thorough investigation has been carried out and, where possible, corrective measures have been taken to avoid similar outbreaks in the future.

  20. Differences between health care systems and the single European health care market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Došenovič Bonča

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper analyses the possibilities of forming a single European health care market. This aim is achieved by studying the impact of the differing organisational features of individual European health care systems on the efficiency of health care provision, by examining the relationship between the inputs used to produce health care services and the population’s health status in the analysedcountries and by exploring the link between the quantity of health care services and the health status. The authors hypothesise that the efficiency and organisation of health care systems determine the possibilities of forming an efficient single European health care market. The empirical methodology employed in this paper isdata envelopment analysis (DEA. The results show that differences between health care systems and in the ownership types of health care providers are not so large as to prevent the formation of a single European health care market. However, the formation of a single European health care market would reveal the characteristicsof health care systems in such a way that citizens would be in favour of the public sector in health care and the national health service model.

  1. Sex and gender differences in diabetes care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, many research has been performed to investigate differences between men and women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) (the most common type of diabetes). These studies showed that the negative impact of T2D on health is higher among women compared to men. However, whether this phenomenon holds tru

  2. The need to advance nutrition education in the training of health care professionals and recommended research to evaluate implementation and effectiveness1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Bales, Connie W; Bistrian, Bruce; Braun, Lynne; Edwards, Marilyn S; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Palmer, Carole A; Pratt, Charlotte A; Ray, Sumantra; Rock, Cheryl L; Saltzman, Edward; Seidner, Douglas L; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is a recognized determinant in 3 (ie, diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases) of the top 4 leading causes of death in the United States. However, many health care providers are not adequately trained to address lifestyle recommendations that include nutrition and physical activity behaviors in a manner that could mitigate disease development or progression. This contributes to a compelling need to markedly improve nutrition education for health care professionals and to establish curricular standards and requisite nutrition and physical activity competencies in the education, training, and continuing education for health care professionals. This article reports the present status of nutrition and physical activity education for health care professionals, evaluates the current pedagogic models, and underscores the urgent need to realign and synergize these models to reflect evidence-based and outcomes-focused education. PMID:24717343

  3. The need to advance nutrition education in the training of health care professionals and recommended research to evaluate implementation and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Bales, Connie W; Bistrian, Bruce; Braun, Lynne; Edwards, Marilyn S; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Palmer, Carole A; Pratt, Charlotte A; Ray, Sumantra; Rock, Cheryl L; Saltzman, Edward; Seidner, Douglas L; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-05-01

    Nutrition is a recognized determinant in 3 (ie, diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases) of the top 4 leading causes of death in the United States. However, many health care providers are not adequately trained to address lifestyle recommendations that include nutrition and physical activity behaviors in a manner that could mitigate disease development or progression. This contributes to a compelling need to markedly improve nutrition education for health care professionals and to establish curricular standards and requisite nutrition and physical activity competencies in the education, training, and continuing education for health care professionals. This article reports the present status of nutrition and physical activity education for health care professionals, evaluates the current pedagogic models, and underscores the urgent need to realign and synergize these models to reflect evidence-based and outcomes-focused education.

  4. The Clinical Nutrition Research Agenda in Indonesia and beyond: ecological strategy for food in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, Widjaja; Wibowo, Lindawati; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2017-06-01

    Despite progress with the food-associated health agenda in the public health and clinical domains, much remains to be done in Indonesia. There are reasons to be optimistic which include economic development, increasing literacy, progress towards universal health coverage and community organizational arrangements across the archipelago which focus on health through some 10,000 puskesmas. These community health centres are variably staffed with voluntary cadres from the community, bidans (nurses) and general medical practitioners. For more effective prevention and management of nutritionally-related health problems, innovative community and clinical nutrition research and expertise is required. With rapid urbanisation, the growth of the digital economy, increasing socio-economic inequity and climate change, there are imperatives for ecologically sustainable, nonemployment dependent livelihoods which provide energy, food, water, education and health care security. A relevant health care workforce will include those who research and practice clinical nutrition. Here we gather together an account of an extensive body of published and emerging literature which makes a case collectively for a more ecological approach to nutrition and health and how it might revitalise the Indonesian and other health care systems.

  5. Symposium 6: Young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care. The nutritional challenges of the young adult with cystic fibrosis: transition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morton, Alison M

    2012-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. Intestinal malabsorption occurs in approximately 90% of patients. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. For many young adults requirements will be 120-150% of the age-related estimated average requirement. To meet these energy needs patients are encouraged to eat a high-fat high-energy diet with appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplements. Many patients are unable to achieve an adequate intake as a result of a variety of factors including chronic poor appetite, infection-related anorexia, gastro-oesophageal reflux and abdominal pain. Oral energy supplements and enteral tube feeding are widely used. Nutritional support has been shown to improve nutritional status and stabilise or slow the rate of decline in lung function. With such emphasis on nutritional intake and nutritional status throughout life, poor adherence to therapies and issues relating to body image are emerging. The median survival of patients with CF is increasing. CF is now considered a life-limiting disease of adulthood rather than a terminal childhood illness. With increased longevity new challenges are emerging that include the transition of young adults with CF to adult services, CF-related diabetes, disordered eating, osteoporosis, liver disease and transplantation.

  6. [Menus offered in long-term care homes: quality of meal service and nutritional analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Rejón, Ana Isabel; Ruiz López, María Dolores; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Puerta, Antonio; Zuñiga, Antonia; Artacho, Reyes

    2017-06-05

    Institutionalization is a risk factor for malnutrition. Low energy intake and/or nutrient deficiencies are considered to be the main causes. To evaluate the quality of meals and meal service as well as the nutritional value of the main menus (regular menu, menu for diabetics, and pureed menu) offered in three long-term care (LTC) homes located in the metropolitan area of Granada (Spain). Cross-sectional study. A validated "quality of meals and meal service" set of indicators was applied. The menus were assessed by weighed food records on 14 consecutive days. The results were compared with the dietary reference intakes (DRIs) and the recommended number of servings. Important deficiencies in the quality of meals and meal service have been reported. Average energy varies from 1,788 to 2,124 kcal/day in the regular menus, from 1,687 to 1,924 kcal/day in the menus for diabetics, and from 1,518 to 1,639 kcal/day in the pureed menus. Average protein varied from 71.4 to 75.4 g/day, from 72.6 to 76.1 g/day, and from 50.5 to 54.7 g/day, respectively. None of the menus complied with the recommendations for fiber, potassium, magnesium, iodine, vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, nor for vegetables, fruit, milk products, olive oil, legumes, or nuts. It is necessary to ensure the implementation of regular routines for controlling the quality of meals and meal service as well as the nutritional value of the menus offered in LTC homes.

  7. A systematic assessment of the current capacity to act in nutrition in West Africa: cross-country similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sodjinou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although it is widely accepted that lack of capacity is one of the barriers to scaling up nutrition in West Africa, there is a paucity of information about what capacities exist and the capacities that need to be developed to accelerate progress toward improved nutrition outcomes in the region. Objective: To systematically assess the current capacity to act in nutrition in the West Africa region and explore cross-country similarities and differences. Design: Data were collected from 13 West African countries through interviews with government officials, key development partners, tertiary-level training institutions, and health professional schools. The assessment was based on a conceptual framework of four interdependent levels (tools; skills; staff and infrastructure; and structures, systems and roles. In each of the surveyed countries, we assessed capacity assets and gaps at individual, organizational, and systemic levels. Results: Important similarities and differences in capacity assets and gaps emerged across all the surveyed countries. There was strong momentum to improve nutrition in nearly all the surveyed countries. Most of the countries had a set of policies on nutrition in place and had set up multisectoral, multi-stakeholder platforms to coordinate nutrition activities, although much remained to be done to improve the effectiveness of these platforms. Many initiatives aimed to reduce undernutrition were ongoing in the region, but there did not seem to be clear coordination between them. Insufficient financial resources to implement nutrition activities were a major problem in all countries. The bulk of financial allocations for nutrition was provided by development partners, even though some countries, such as Niger, Nigeria, and Senegal, had a national budget line for nutrition. Sporadic stock-outs of nutrition supplies were reported in most of the countries as a result of a weak logistic and supply chain system. They

  8. [Changes in nutritional status of patients with different diseases during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H Y; Zhu, M W; Wei, J M; Chen, W; Yang, X; Zhu, S N

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in nutritional status of hospitalized patients with different diseases by subjective global assessment (SGA) and nutritional risk screening (NRS-2002). Methods: A prospective and parallel research done by multi-center collaboration from 34 hospitals in China from June to September 2014. Hospitalized patients with the following diseases were investigated: malignant tumor (2 487 cases), benign disease of the digestive system (1 358 cases), benign disease of the nervous system (1 043 cases), benign bone disease (451 cases), benign disease of the respiratory system(395 cases), cardiovascular disease (227 cases), benign thyroid and breast disease (179 cases), and endocrine disease (149 cases). Patients above the age of 18 and hospitalization time between 7-30 days were included. Physical indexes were measured, the NRS-2002 and SGA scores were recorded, the nutritional support were recorded during hospitalization and 24 hours after discharge from hospital. Measurement data between groups were analyzed using t test or Wilcoxon rank sum test, enumeration data and ranked data between groups were analyzed using chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results: There were 6 638 cases of hospitalized patients, 3 861 cases were males and 2 777 were females, the male/female ratio was 1.4∶1.0; the median age was 60 years; the median height was 1.66 m; the median weight was 62 kg; the median body mass index (BMI)was 22.89 kg/m(2). At discharge, compared with that of admission, the body weight, BMI, grip strength, upper arm and calf circumferences of patients with malignant tumor were significantly decreased (t=20.15-259.67, all Pnutritional risk incidence rate (from NRS-2002) of patients with malignant tumor was significantly higher(χ(2)=21.275, P=0.000); moderate malnutrition (from SGA) incidence rate was significantly higher(χ(2)=62.318, P=0.000; χ(2)=11.312, Pnutritional deficiency(except those with digestive benign diseases )received

  9. Effect of different chemical treatments on nutritional and antinutritional properties of coffee pulp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulloa Rojas, J.B.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Weerd, van J.H.; Huisman, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Different chemical treatments were tested to improve the nutritional value of coffee pulp (CoP): (1) alkali, NaOH solutions of 5 and 10% for 24 and 48 h; (2) a combination of acid and alkali, with first a treatment with HCl (1.5 and 3 M for 24 and 48 h), followed by a NaOH solution of 5% for 48 h;

  10. Effect of different chemical treatments on nutritional and antinutritional properties of coffee pulp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulloa Rojas, J.B.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Weerd, van J.H.; Huisman, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Different chemical treatments were tested to improve the nutritional value of coffee pulp (CoP): (1) alkali, NaOH solutions of 5 and 10% for 24 and 48 h; (2) a combination of acid and alkali, with first a treatment with HCl (1.5 and 3 M for 24 and 48 h), followed by a NaOH solution of 5% for 48 h; (

  11. [Specific care plan in different stages of Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christophe; Villars, Hélène; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2011-09-01

    The management and follow-up of patients with Alzheimers disease have stage-specific characteristics. In the mild stage, the key challenges are above all to improve the early diagnosis and the communication of the diagnosis. With the patient's agreement, a follow-up should be scheduled to assess, at each stage of the disease, cognitive and functional decline, and detect psycho-behavioral, nutritional or mobility complications. In the moderate or severe stages, prevention and treatment of caregiver burnout should be included in the follow-up. Finally, in the very severe stage, end of life and ethical issues should be considered. The followup and the intervention plan should be adapted to each patient, and require coordination between health care professionals and social workers. However, the practical aspects of the follow-up and the ways in which those can be improved are yet to be defined.

  12. Nutritional status and nosocomial infections among adult elective surgery patients in a Mexican tertiary care hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Rodríguez-García

    Full Text Available Controversy exists as to whether obesity constitutes a risk-factor or a protective-factor for the development of nosocomial Infection (NI. According to the obesity-paradox, there is evidence that moderate obesity is a protective-factor. In Mexico few studies have focused on the nutritional status (NS distribution in the hospital setting.The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of NS and the prevalence of nosocomial infection NI among adult elective surgery (ES patients and to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics and length of stays (LOS between obese and non-obese patients and between patients with and without NI.We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 82 adult ES patients (21-59 years old who were recruited from a tertiary-care hospital. The prevalences of each NS category and NI were estimated, the assessments were compared between groups (Mann-Whitney, Chi-squared or the Fisher's-exact-test, and the association between preoperative risk-factors and NI was evaluated using odds ratios.The distribution of subjects by NS category was: underweight (3.66%, normal-weight (28.05%, overweight (35.36%, and obese (32.93%. The prevalence of NI was 14.63%. The LOS was longer (p<0.001 for the patients who developed NI. The percentages of NI were: 33.3% in underweight, 18.52% in obese, 17.39% in normal-weight, and 6.90% in overweight patients.The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adult ES patients is high. The highest prevalence of NI occurred in the underweight and obese patients. The presence of NI considerably increased the LOS, resulting in higher medical care costs.

  13. Social Network and Nutritional Value of Congregate Meal Programs: Differences by Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kristen; Keary, Sara; VanWagenen, Aimee; Bradford, Judith

    2016-09-01

    This study explored the associations between sexual orientation and the perceived social network and nutritional value of congregate meal programs (CMPs) in Massachusetts (N = 289). Descriptives, t tests, and chi-square tests analyzed sexual orientation differences. Linear regression tested the effects of sexual orientation on the value of CMPs. Sexual minorities (SMs) were more likely to have non-kin-based social networks and reported higher levels of loneliness compared with heterosexuals. Heterosexuals, fewer of whom have non-kin-based networks, place a stronger value on access to a social network via CMPs. Nutritional value is important for people of all sexual orientations. SMs traveled seven times the distance to attend CMPs, highlighting the need for greater access to such sites. Results of this study support the specification of SMs as a population of "greatest social need" under the Older Americans Act and the expansion of services that are tailored for their social support needs.

  14. Nutritional differences between a gluten-free diet and a diet containing equivalent products with gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J; Lasa, A; Bustamante, M A; Churruca, I; Simon, E

    2014-06-01

    The gluten-free (GF) products market represents one of the most prosperous markets in the field of food and beverages in the immediate future. Historically, counselling for celiac disease has focused on the absence of gluten in foods, however the nutritional quality of GF foodstuffs is an important aspect to consider. The aim of the present work was to compare the nutritional composition of the 206 GF rendered products most consumed in Spain, against the composition of 289 equivalent foods with gluten, and to make a comparison between the diet including GF products and the same diet with equivalent products with gluten in a 58 adult celiac population. The results of the present collaborative study pointed out differences in calorie, macronutrient, fiber, sodium, salt and cholesterol content between GF rendered and gluten-containing foodstuffs. Thus, calorie and nutrient intake in a GF diet is different when compared to its equivalent diet with gluten. Following a diet based on GF products could suppose a nutritional imbalance for celiac patients as well as for non-celiacs who follow a diet that includes many GF rendered foodstuffs.

  15. [Effects of different intakes of protein on nutritional status in severe stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Zebin; Luo, Bin; Li, Zengning; Lei Min; Jing, Yongmin

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effects of different intake of protein on nutritional indicators in severe stroke patients. 89 patients with severe stroke and NRS-2002 scores not less than 3 were enrolled. The patients were divided into group A, group B and group C by random, and 28 cases were in group A with protein intake at 0.9 g/kg, 30 cases were in group B with protein intake at 1.2 g/kg and 31 cases were in group C with protein intake at 1.6 g/kg, all patients were given the same calories support (25 kcal/kg). On the day of pre-intervention, the 7th and 14th day of post-intervention, fasting blood samples were collected from every subjects. The total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), hemoglobin (Hb), creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), midarm circumference (MAC) and calf circumference (CC) were recorded. (1) The MAC and CC of health side body decreased on the 14th day post-intervention in group A and group B, the differences were significant compared with pre-intervention and on the 7th day post-intervention (P nutritional effect of protein intake at 1.6 g/kg is better than 0.9 g/kg and 1.2 g/kg on improving the nutritional status in severe stroke patients.

  16. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (SC). A prospective study, conducted between 2005 and 2007, compared individual dietary counselling (IDC, optimal energy and protein requirement) to SC by an oncology nurse (standard nutritional coun...

  17. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (SC). A prospective study, conducted between 2005 and 2007, compared individual dietary counselling (IDC, optimal energy and protein requirement) to SC by an oncology nurse (standard nutritional coun...

  18. Battlefield conditions: different environment but the same duty of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    2010-09-01

    Using an interpretative research approach to ethical and legal literature, it is argued that nursing in the battlefield is distinctly different to civilian nursing, even in an emergency, and that the environment is so different that a duty of care owed by military nurses to wounded soldiers should not apply. Such distinct differences in wartime can override normal peacetime professional ethics to the extent that the duty of care owed by military nurses to their patients on the battlefield should not exist. It is also argued that as military nurses have legal and professional obligations to care for wounded soldiers on the battlefield, this obligation conflicts with following military orders, causing a dual loyalty conflict. This is because soldiers are part of the 'fighting force' and must be fit to fight and win the battle. This makes them more of a commodity rather than individual persons with distinct health care needs.

  19. Why Do Families Differ? Children's Care for an Unmarried Mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henretta, John C.; Soldo, Beth J.; Van Voorhis, Matthew F.

    2011-01-01

    An adult child's provision of care to an unmarried elderly mother varies both within and between families. Within-family differences address the variation in different children's behavior within in a family. Between-family differences refer to the propensities that members of a family--the children of one mother--share and that differentiate them…

  20. Documentation and communication of nutritional care for elderly hospitalized patients: perspectives of nurses and undergraduate nurses in hospitals and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kristin; Eide, Helene Kjøllesdal; Sortland, Kjersti; Almendingen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional care is a basic human right for all people. Nevertheless, undernourishment is known to be a frequent and serious health care problem among elderly hospitalized patients in Western Europe. Nutritional documentation contributes to ensuring proper nutritional treatment and care. Only a few studies have explored how nurses document nutritional care in hospitals, and between hospitals and nursing homes. Available research suggests that documentation practices are unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses document nutritional treatment and care for elderly patients in hospitals and how nurses and undergraduate nurses communicate information about patients' nutritional status when elderly patients are transferred between hospital and nursing homes. A qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Data was collected in focus group interviews with 16 nurses in one large university hospital, and 11 nurses and 16 undergraduate nurses in five nursing homes associated with the university hospital. Participants from the university hospital represented a total of seven surgical and medical wards, all of which transferred patients to the associated nursing homes. The catchment area of the hospital and the nursing homes represented approximately 10% of the Norwegian population in heterogenic urban and rural municipalities. Data were coded and analysed thematically within the three contexts: self-understanding, critical common sense, and theoretical understanding. The results were summarized under three main themes 1) inadequate documentation of nutritional status on hospital admission, 2) inadequate and unsystematic documentation of nutritional information during hospital stay, 3) limited communication of nutritional information between hospital and nursing homes. The three main themes included seven sub-themes, which reflected the lack of nutritional screening and unsystematic documentation on admission and during

  1. Assessing Nutritional Parameters of Brown Bear Diets among Ecosystems Gives Insight into Differences among Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia López-Alfaro

    Full Text Available Food habit studies are among the first steps used to understand wildlife-habitat relationships. However, these studies are in themselves insufficient to understand differences in population productivity and life histories, because they do not provide a direct measure of the energetic value or nutritional composition of the complete diet. Here, we developed a dynamic model integrating food habits and nutritional information to assess nutritional parameters of brown bear (Ursus arctos diets among three interior ecosystems of North America. Specifically, we estimate the average amount of digestible energy and protein (per kilogram fresh diet content in the diet and across the active season by bears living in western Alberta, the Flathead River (FR drainage of southeast British Columbia, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE. As well, we estimate the proportion of energy and protein in the diet contributed by different food items, thereby highlighting important food resources in each ecosystem. Bear diets in Alberta had the lowest levels of digestible protein and energy through all seasons, which might help explain the low reproductive rates of this population. The FR diet had protein levels similar to the recent male diet in the GYE during spring, but energy levels were lower during late summer and fall. Historic and recent diets in GYE had the most energy and protein, which is consistent with their larger body sizes and higher population productivity. However, a recent decrease in consumption of trout (Oncorhynchus clarki, whitebark pine nuts (Pinus albicaulis, and ungulates, particularly elk (Cervus elaphus, in GYE bears has decreased the energy and protein content of their diet. The patterns observed suggest that bear body size and population densities are influenced by seasonal availability of protein an energy, likely due in part to nutritional influences on mass gain and reproductive success.

  2. Assessing Nutritional Parameters of Brown Bear Diets among Ecosystems Gives Insight into Differences among Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alfaro, Claudia; Coogan, Sean C P; Robbins, Charles T; Fortin, Jennifer K; Nielsen, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Food habit studies are among the first steps used to understand wildlife-habitat relationships. However, these studies are in themselves insufficient to understand differences in population productivity and life histories, because they do not provide a direct measure of the energetic value or nutritional composition of the complete diet. Here, we developed a dynamic model integrating food habits and nutritional information to assess nutritional parameters of brown bear (Ursus arctos) diets among three interior ecosystems of North America. Specifically, we estimate the average amount of digestible energy and protein (per kilogram fresh diet) content in the diet and across the active season by bears living in western Alberta, the Flathead River (FR) drainage of southeast British Columbia, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). As well, we estimate the proportion of energy and protein in the diet contributed by different food items, thereby highlighting important food resources in each ecosystem. Bear diets in Alberta had the lowest levels of digestible protein and energy through all seasons, which might help explain the low reproductive rates of this population. The FR diet had protein levels similar to the recent male diet in the GYE during spring, but energy levels were lower during late summer and fall. Historic and recent diets in GYE had the most energy and protein, which is consistent with their larger body sizes and higher population productivity. However, a recent decrease in consumption of trout (Oncorhynchus clarki), whitebark pine nuts (Pinus albicaulis), and ungulates, particularly elk (Cervus elaphus), in GYE bears has decreased the energy and protein content of their diet. The patterns observed suggest that bear body size and population densities are influenced by seasonal availability of protein an energy, likely due in part to nutritional influences on mass gain and reproductive success.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of the nutrition care process for persons with diabetes among inpatient and outpatient dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G R; Gates, G E

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the problem-solving skills used by dietitians when planning care for inpatient and outpatient persons with type II diabetes. Telephone interviews were conducted with 44 inpatient dietitians and 45 outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians used more information from the medical record to make clinical judgments than outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians reported condensing their assessment more frequently due to time pressure than outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians were more likely to identify nutrition-related problems via information from the medical record while outpatient dietitians reported using diet history information. Outpatient dietitians more frequently identified specific behavioral goals whereas inpatient dietitians recommended general goals. The increased availability of objective, detailed information necessary for a thorough nutritional assessment is an advantage of inpatient care planning. However, outpatient diabetes education may be a preferred setting because of more time available for education and better learning effectiveness.

  4. Implementing nutrition guidelines for older people in residential care homes: a qualitative study using Normalization Process Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamford Claire

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimizing the dietary intake of older people can prevent nutritional deficiencies and diet-related diseases, thereby improving quality of life. However, there is evidence that the nutritional intake of older people living in care homes is suboptimal, with high levels of saturated fat, salt, and added sugars. The UK Food Standards Agency therefore developed nutrient- and food-based guidance for residential care homes. The acceptability of these guidelines and their feasibility in practice is unknown. This study used the Normalization Process Theory (NPT to understand the barriers and facilitators to implementing the guidelines and inform future implementation. Methods We conducted a process evaluation in five care homes in the north of England using qualitative methods (observation and interviews to explore the views of managers, care staff, catering staff, and domestic staff. Data were analyzed thematically and discussed in data workshops; emerging themes were then mapped to the constructs of NPT. Results Many staff perceived the guidelines as unnecessarily restrictive and irrelevant to older people. In terms of NPT, the guidelines simply did not make sense (coherence, and as a result, relatively few staff invested in the guidelines (cognitive participation. Even where staff supported the guidelines, implementation was hampered by a lack of nutritional knowledge and institutional support (collective action. Finally, the absence of observable benefits to clients confirmed the negative preconceptions of many staff, with limited evidence of reappraisal following implementation (reflexive monitoring. Conclusions The successful implementation of the nutrition guidelines requires that the fundamental issues relating to their perceived value and fit with other priorities and goals be addressed. Specialist support is needed to equip staff with the technical knowledge and skills required for menu analysis and development and to

  5. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pnutritional status through physical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pnutritional status on activities of daily living was observed (b=0.058, P=0.258). The present study identified the complex pathway from nutritional status to the activities of daily living through physical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.G.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.L.; Wei, K.H.; Lintz-Luidens, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (S

  7. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.G. van den; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.L.; Wei, K.H.; Lintz-Luidens, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (S

  8. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.G. van den; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.L.; Wei, K.H.; Lintz-Luidens, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (S

  9. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.G.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.L.; Wei, K.H.; Lintz-Luidens, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care (S

  10. Prevention of Alzheimer disease: The roles of nutrition and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Tabitha J; Cole, Connie

    2015-05-15

    Risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. Due to lack of effective treatments for Alzheimer disease, nutrition and primary prevention becomes important.

  11. Differences in fatty acid composition between aquatic and terrestrial insects used as food in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaneto, Diego; Tommaseo-Ponzetta, Mila; Galli, Claudio; Risé, Patrizia; Glew, Robert H; Paoletti, Maurizio G

    2011-01-01

    Edible insects may be a source of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). The aim of this article is to test for differences in aquatic and terrestrial insects used in human nutrition. We implemented linear models and discovered that differences in the proportion of LC-PUFA between aquatic and terrestrial insects do exist, with terrestrial insects being significantly richer in particular omega-6 fatty acids. In conclusion, any kind of insect may provide valuable sources of LC-PUFA. Because terrestrial insects are more abundant and easier to collect, they can be considered a better source of LC-PUFA than aquatic ones.

  12. What Effect Does International Migration Have on the Nutritional Status and Child Care Practices of Children Left Behind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Renuka; Wickramage, Kolitha

    2016-02-15

    Despite an increasing trend in labour migration and economic dependence on foreign migrant workers in Sri Lanka, very little is known about the child care and nutritional status of "children left behind". The aim of this study was to examine the factors influencing the nutritional status and care practices of children left behind. A sample of 321 children, 6-59 months old of international migrant workers from a cross-sectional nationally represented study were included. Care practices were assessed using ten caregiving behaviours on personal hygiene, feeding, and use of health services. Results revealed the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight to be 11.6, 18.2 and 24.0 percent, respectively. Father being a migrant worker has a positive effect on childcare practices and birthweight of the child. This study indicates that undernutrition remains a major concern, particularly in the poorest households where the mother is a migrant worker, also each additional 100 g increase in the birthweight of a child in a migrant household, decreases the probability of being wasted, stunted and underweight by 6%, 8% and 23% respectively. In depth study is needed to understand how labour migration affects household level outcomes related to child nutrition and childcare in order to build skills and capacities of migrant families.

  13. What Effect Does International Migration Have on the Nutritional Status and Child Care Practices of Children Left Behind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Jayatissa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing trend in labour migration and economic dependence on foreign migrant workers in Sri Lanka, very little is known about the child care and nutritional status of “children left behind”. The aim of this study was to examine the factors influencing the nutritional status and care practices of children left behind. A sample of 321 children, 6–59 months old of international migrant workers from a cross-sectional nationally represented study were included. Care practices were assessed using ten caregiving behaviours on personal hygiene, feeding, and use of health services. Results revealed the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight to be 11.6, 18.2 and 24.0 percent, respectively. Father being a migrant worker has a positive effect on childcare practices and birthweight of the child. This study indicates that undernutrition remains a major concern, particularly in the poorest households where the mother is a migrant worker, also each additional 100 g increase in the birthweight of a child in a migrant household, decreases the probability of being wasted, stunted and underweight by 6%, 8% and 23% respectively. In depth study is needed to understand how labour migration affects household level outcomes related to child nutrition and childcare in order to build skills and capacities of migrant families.

  14. Effects of Different Nitrogen Application Strategies on Yield and ForageNutritive Quality of Zea mexicana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYong-jun; WANGKong-jun; YUANCui-ping; XUHong

    2004-01-01

    A pool experiment was carried out to study the effects of different nitrogen application strategies (rates and stages of nitrogen application) on yield and forage nutritive quality of Zea mexicana cultivated in summer, 2002. In the whole growing stage, its stem was clipped three times at the height of 25 cm when it was II0 cm high (H1, H2 and H3 stand for the first, second and third harvest stage, respectively). Six indexes including crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), nitrogen free extract (NFE), acid detergent fiber (ADF), crude ash (CA), and general energy (GE) were employed to evaluate the forage nutritive value. The results showed that the content of CP and EE increased but the content of CA and ADF decreased under the two nitrogen rates (High-rate N, 600 kg ha-1;Mid-rate N, 300 kg ha-1). The fresh and dry harvest biomass of the whole plants on H1 and those of the leaves on H2 were also improved. But the stalks on H2 and the whole plants on H3 were affected mainly by dressing nitrogen fertilizer. The yield of CP and EE, CA,NFE, and GE was mainly affected by nitrogen rates. The ADF yield increased was due to the increment of the fresh and dry harvest biomass. Nitrogen applied as base fertilizer for summer Zea mexicana can be harvested a higher biomass and improve the forage nutritive quality.

  15. Nutritional composition, bioactive compounds and volatile profile of cocoa beans from different regions of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Fiorini, Dennis; Maggi, Filippo; Nicoletti, Marcello; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Toniolo, Chiara; Prosper, Biapa; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of the complex composition of cocoa beans provides fundamental information for evaluating the quality and nutritional aspects of cocoa-based food products, nutraceuticals and supplements. Cameroon, the world's fourth largest producer of cocoa, has been defined as "Africa in miniature" because of the variety it habitats. In order to evaluate the nutritional characteristics of cocoa beans from five different regions of Cameroon, we studied their polyphenolic content, volatile compounds and fatty acids composition. The High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis showed that the Mbalmayo sample had the highest content of theobromine (11.6 mg/g) and caffeic acid (2.1 mg/g), while the Sanchou sample had the highest level of (-)-epicatechin (142.9 mg/g). Concerning fatty acids, the lowest level of stearic acid was found in the Mbalmayo sample while the Bertoua sample showed the highest content of oleic acid. Thus, we confirmed that geographical origin influences the quality and nutritional characteristics of cocoa from these regions of Cameroon.

  16. Effects of Different Nitrogen Application Strategies on Yield and Forage Nutritive Quality of Zea mexicana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-jun; WANG Kong-jun; YUAN Cui-ping; XU Hong

    2004-01-01

    A pool experiment was carried out to study the effects of different nitrogen application strategies (rates and stages of nitrogen application) on yield and forage nutritive quality of Zea mexicana cultivated in summer, 2002. In the whole growing stage, its stem was clipped three times at the height of 25 cm when it was 110 cm high (H1, H2 and H3 stand for the first, second and third harvest stage, respectively). Six indexes including crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), nitrogen free extract (NFE), acid detergent fiber (ADF), crude ash (CA), and general energy (GE) were employed to evaluate the forage nutritive value. The results showed that the content of CP and EE increased but the content of CA and ADF decreased under the two nitrogen rates (High-rate N, 600 kg ha-1;Mid-rate N, 300 kg ha-1). The fresh and dry harvest biomass of the whole plants on H1 and those of the leaves on H2 were also improved. But the stalks on H2 and the whole plants on H3 were affected mainly by dressing nitrogen fertilizer. The yield of CP and EE, CA,NFE, and GE was mainly affected by nitrogen rates. The ADF yield increased was due to the increment of the fresh and dry harvest biomass. Nitrogen applied as base fertilizer for summer Zea mexicana can be harvested a higher biomass and improve the forage nutritive quality.

  17. Effects of different parenteral nutrition infusions in a patient with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chia-Chee; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, we demonstrate the effects of different lipid emulsions on liver function in a 52-year-old woman with short bowel syndrome who was totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Over a 13-month period after small bowel resection and jejunostomy, we followed the patient's plasma triglycerides and liver enzyme levels as well as body weight and discomfort levels. During the first 3 months when parenteral nutrition including a lipid emulsion containing 50% soybean oil/50% medium-chain triglyerides was administered daily, the patient reported feeling unwell (experiencing dizziness and palpitations) and her triglycerides and liver enzyme levels rose to 366 mg/dL and 145 U/L (alanine aminotransferase [ALT]), respectively; these levels recovered when this emulsion was discontinued. For the following 9 months, an emulsion containing 80% olive oil and 20% soybean oil was administered, and the patient's triglycerides (182 mg/dL) did not increase to abnormal levels and liver enzyme levels were only mildly elevated (109 U/L). The patient felt well and her body weight increased from 51 kg to 55 kg during this period. These results suggest that parenteral nutrition with a reduced soybean oil content may better preserve liver function in patients with short bowel syndrome.

  18. Nutritional quality of dietary patterns of children: are there differences inside and outside school?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diva Aliete dos Santos Vieira

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objectives: To describe the dietary patterns of children inside and outside school and investigate their associations with sociodemographic factors and nutritional status. Methods: This was a multicenter cross-sectional study in which children of both sexes, aged 1-6 years, attending private and public daycare centers and preschools in Brazil, were evaluated (n = 2979. Demographic, socioeconomic and dietary data (weighed food records and estimated food records were collected. Dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis from 36 food groups. Results: Four dietary patterns were identified inside school, and three outside. Inside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated to low income and presented high nutritional quality. The "dual" pattern was associated with low income and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "snack" pattern was associated with children enrolled at private schools and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of added sugar and trans fat. Outside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated with high intake of saturated fat, trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of trans fats and glycemic load, whereas the "snack" pattern was associated with overweight, private schools, high income, and high intake of trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. Conclusion: There are differences in the nutritional quality of dietary patterns inside and outside school, and heterogeneity in adherence to these patterns were observed across regions and socioeconomic classes.

  19. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2014-01-01

    to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary support.Furthermore, interviews with nursing home and home-care management, nursing staff and nutrition coordinators......-care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive.......The primary outcome parameter will be change in quality of life (by means of Euroquol-5D-3L). Secondary outcomes will be: physical performance (chair stand), nutritional status (weight, Body Mass Index and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving...

  20. [The "wine bar", or a different way of caring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Virginie; Raynaud, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The "wine bar" in the palliative care unit of Clermont-Ferrand general hospital is an example of a different way of providing care. It defends the right of patients at the end of life to treat themselves and others. Acknowledging that life is present right up until the end, patients are invited to drink wine at mealtimes and caregivers are encouraged to learn the basics of oenology.

  1. Child nutrition: a primary health care approach towards health for all by 2000 AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, U

    1989-05-01

    Children 14 years old (40% of the population; 21% 6 years old) comprise the most neglected population group in India in terms of nutritional status. Poor nutritional status, infections, and large fertility rates, all of which are interrelated, contribute greatly to the excess mortality of infants 5 years old. Presence or lack of health facilities and literacy of mothers and fathers are strong determinants of nutritional status. The Indian National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau's diet and nutrition surveys reveal that prevalence of nutritional deficiencies is higher among children living in slums and those of industrial laborers than professionals, paraprofessionals, office workers, and drivers. Further, other studies show that the larger the family the higher the prevalence of nutritional deficiencies. For example, 70% of all malnutrition cases are at least a birth order of 4. The leading nutritional problems include kwashiorkor, anemia, deficiency of B complex, and hypovitaminosis A. Indian rural preschool children's heights and weights stand between 15-20% and 40-50% below US standards respectively. On average, mothers wean their infants between 9-12 months. The older women in the community dictate what weaning foods to use based on their beliefs and practices which often contribute to poor nutritional status. Many nurses are not entirely informed of the nutritional problems and do not make time to learn about them thus making it difficult to combat theses problems. They need to familiarize themselves with child rearing and food practices in their communities and work with village health workers and dais to teach mothers about good nutrition.

  2. A Primary Care-Based Early Childhood Nutrition Intervention: Evaluation of a Pilot Program Serving Low-Income Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Toni Terling; Appel, Louis; Lopez, Veronica; Flores, Bianca; Lawhon, Brittany

    2015-12-01

    Nutrition in early childhood can significantly impact physical and mental health outcomes for children. However, research on broadly defined pre/postnatal nutrition interventions is sparse. The present study is a process and outcome evaluation of a primary care-based nutrition intervention targeting low-income Hispanic women. Pregnant women enrolled in the program were in their first trimester and received services through their 6-month well child check. The program provided vouchers for fruits and vegetables from the local farmers' market, nutrition classes, cooking classes, and lactation counseling. We conducted a prospective study of program participants (n = 32) and a comparable group of women for whom the program was not available (n = 29). Panel survey data measured maternal diet, exercise, stress, depression, social support, infant feeding practices, and demographics. Outcome measures obtained from medical records included pregnancy weight gain, infant weight at 6 and 12 months, and infant development at 9 months. Findings reveal that the program was not associated with infant weights. However, despite similar profiles at baseline, women in the intervention group were more likely than women in the comparison group to have significant improvements in diet, exercise, and depression (p ≤ .05). In addition, participants were more likely to breastfeed (p = .07) and their infants were more likely to pass the ages and stages developmental screen (p = .06) than women in the comparison group. The study was limited by a lack of random assignment and small samples. However, the breadth and size of the effects suggest pre/postnatal nutrition interventions integrated into primary care warrant additional investigation.

  3. Normal Diet: Pregnancy and Lactation. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Janice Hovasi; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  4. Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  5. Nutrient and Drug Interactions. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  6. Sports Nutrition for the Primary Care Physician: The Importance of Carbohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Keith B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between nutrition and fatigue and how carbohydrates and timing of carbohydrate consumption can affect fatigued athletes. Nutrition plays a significant role in successful training and competition. Key concerns are the specific needs of athletes for carbohydrates before, during, and after exercise. (Author/SM)

  7. Dietary Management in Hyperlipidemia. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Townley, Nancy A.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  8. Sports Nutrition for the Primary Care Physician: The Importance of Carbohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Keith B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between nutrition and fatigue and how carbohydrates and timing of carbohydrate consumption can affect fatigued athletes. Nutrition plays a significant role in successful training and competition. Key concerns are the specific needs of athletes for carbohydrates before, during, and after exercise. (Author/SM)

  9. Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs about lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Sirisha; Lin, Jenny J; Nelson, Judith E; Powell, Charles A; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Berman, Andrew R; Keller, Steven M; Smith, Cardinale B; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2012-11-01

    Disparities in lung cancer treatment and palliative care are well documented. However,the mechanisms underlying these disparities are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in beliefs and attitudes about lung cancer treatment and palliative care among patients receiving a new diagnosis of lung cancer. Patients were recruited from four medical centers in New York City and surveyed about their beliefs regarding lung cancer care, including disease-directed treatments, palliative and end-of-life care, and fatalistic and spiritual beliefs. We used univariate and multiple regression analyses to compare the distribution of beliefs among minority (black and Hispanic) and nonminority patients. Of the 335 patients, 21% were black, 20% were Hispanic, and 59% were nonminority. Beliefs about chemotherapy and radiotherapy were similar across the three groups ( P > .05),whereas black patients were more likely to believe that surgery might cause lung cancer to spread( P =.008). Fatalistic beliefs potentially affecting cancer treatment were more common among both minority groups ( P ≤ .02). No signifi cant differences were found in attitudes toward clinician communication about cancer prognosis ( P > .05). However, both blacks and Hispanics were more likely to have misconceptions about advance directives and hospice care ( P ≤ .02). Similarities and differences in beliefs about disease-directed treatment were observed between minority and nonminority patients with lung cancer. Minority patients hold more fatalistic views about the disease and misperceptions about advance care planning and hospice care. Further research is needed to assess the impact of these beliefs on decisions about lung cancer care and patient outcomes.

  10. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Beliefs About Lung Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Sirisha; Lin, Jenny J.; Nelson, Judith E.; Powell, Charles A.; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Berman, Andrew R.; Keller, Steven M.; Smith, Cardinale B.; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Disparities in lung cancer treatment and palliative care are well documented. However, the mechanisms underlying these disparities are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in beliefs and attitudes about lung cancer treatment and palliative care among patients receiving a new diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods: Patients were recruited from four medical centers in New York City and surveyed about their beliefs regarding lung cancer care, including disease-directed treatments, palliative and end-of-life care, and fatalistic and spiritual beliefs. We used univariate and multiple regression analyses to compare the distribution of beliefs among minority (black and Hispanic) and nonminority patients. Results: Of the 335 patients, 21% were black, 20% were Hispanic, and 59% were nonminority. Beliefs about chemotherapy and radiotherapy were similar across the three groups (P > .05), whereas black patients were more likely to believe that surgery might cause lung cancer to spread (P = .008). Fatalistic beliefs potentially affecting cancer treatment were more common among both minority groups (P ≤ .02). No significant differences were found in attitudes toward clinician communication about cancer prognosis (P > .05). However, both blacks and Hispanics were more likely to have misconceptions about advance directives and hospice care (P ≤ .02). Conclusions: Similarities and differences in beliefs about disease-directed treatment were observed between minority and nonminority patients with lung cancer. Minority patients hold more fatalistic views about the disease and misperceptions about advance care planning and hospice care. Further research is needed to assess the impact of these beliefs on decisions about lung cancer care and patient outcomes. PMID:22700777

  11. The contribution of three components of nutrition knowledge to socio-economic differences in food purchasing choices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKinnon, Loretta; Giskes, Katrina; Turrell, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    ..., (ii) the nutrient content of foods and (iii) dietary guideline recommendations; furthermore, to determine if socio-economic differences in nutrition knowledge contribute to inequalities in food purchasing choices...

  12. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Kreinfeldt Skovgaard Møller, Tina; Boll Hansen, Eigil; Keiding, Hans

    2014-08-28

    Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss or poor nutrition. Hence a structured and multidisciplinary approach, focusing on the nutritional risk factors and involving e.g. dieticians, occupational therapists, and physiotherapist, may be necessary to achieve benefits. Up till now a few studies have been done evaluating the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus will be on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified by screening, by involving physiotherapist, registered dietician, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system.The primary outcome parameter will be change in quality of life (by means of Euroquol-5D-3L). Secondary outcomes will be: physical performance (chair stand), nutritional status (weight, Body Mass Index and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary

  13. A comparison of cognitive and functional care differences in four long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Alyce S; Owen, Donna C; Feng, Du

    2006-02-01

    Matching residential setting with cognitive and physical abilities is crucial for the provision of a supportive long-term care (LTC) environment. This study compares the cognitive and functional care differences of LTC residents on skilled nursing units designed for dementia care, chronic care, or ambulatory care, and an assisted living setting using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) Texas Index of Level for Effort (TILE) clinical categories (heavy care, rehabilitation/restorative, clinically unstable, clinically stable), MDS Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The goal of the comparison was to find a parsimonious approach for determining resident placement in LTC using the MDS and MMSE. Using a descriptive comparative design, the study took place at a not-for-profit, urban, continuing care retirement center (CCRC) with a 120-bed skilled nursing facility and a 34-unit assisted living facility. Sixty residents, 15 from each of the 3 skilled nursing units and assisted living unit, consented to participate. To understand the differences in the MDS and MMSE scores between units, a Level of Care Algorithm was constructed to analyze resident placement. Results revealed that MDS and MMSE scores placed greater than 75% of elders who had extremely poor cognitive or physical function but did not discriminate well for residents with moderate cognitive and/or physical impairment. For these residents, interaction between institutional philosophy (aging in place versus moving to a new location); resource availability; and elder, family, and staff values and preferences may have influenced placement.

  14. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torović Ljilja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered dieticians, standardized terminology as well as nutrition diagnosis categorization. It consists of four distinct, but interrelated and connected steps: (a nutrition assessment, (b nutrition diagnosis, (c nutrition intervention, and (d nutrition monitoring and evaluation. An individual approach is essential for successful medical nutrition therapy. Nutrition guidelines facilitate the process of understanding and application of medical nutrition therapy. Conclusion. The Nutrition Care process provides dietetic professionals information on high-quality client nutrition care. The success of medical nutrition therapy rests not only upon the advice of the dietician, but also upon the client’s compliance.

  16. Nutritional Composition of Different Varieties of Apple Purees Sweetened with Green and White Stevia Powder

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of apple purees of four different apple varieties: ‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Idared’, ‘Jonagold’ and ‘Cripps Pink’, in the fresh state (FP) and after thermal treatment by process of pasteurization with added green (PG) or white stevia powder (PW) derived from the leaves of the stevia plant. Also, to determine whether there is a significant influence of sweetening with stevia on the change of analyzed nutritional parameters of appl...

  17. Biochemical and nutritional traits of sea bass (Dicentrachus labrax from different rearing systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Santulli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, sampled from three different culture systems (intensive in sea-cages, intensive in land-based basins and extensive in lagoon and storage basins of salt-work, of the Northern, Central and Southern Italy, were analyzed with the aim to employ nutritional trait to describe and to distinguish the “origin” of the product. Lipid and fatty acid profile, strongly affected by the feeding history and environmental factors, responsible of the nu- tritional and perceived quality of fish product, are proposed as marker of origin.

  18. Nutrition algorithms and bedside nutrient delivery practices in pediatric intensive care units: an international multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Enid E; Bechard, Lori J; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2014-06-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) delivery is associated with improved outcomes in critically ill patients. We aimed to describe EN practices, including details of algorithms and individual bedside practices, in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Available EN algorithm details from 31 international PICUs were obtained. Daily nutrient intake data from 524 mechanically ventilated patients, 1 month to 18 years old, were prospectively documented, including EN delivery, adjunct therapies, and energy prescription. Practices associated with higher percentage adequacy of EN delivery were determined by regression analysis. Nine EN algorithms were available. All algorithms defined advancement and EN intolerance; 7 of 9 defined intolerance by gastric residual volume; 3 of 9 recommended nutrition screening and fasting guidelines. Few elements were in agreement with the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. Of the 341 patients who received EN exclusively 32.9% received ≥66.6% of prescribed energy on day 7. Percentage adequacy of EN delivered was inversely associated with days to EN initiation (-8.92; P algorithms, promotility agents, or postpyloric feeding. A minority of PICUs employ EN algorithms; recommendations were variable and not in agreement with national guidelines. Optimal EN delivery was achieved in less than one-third of our cohort. EN adjunct therapies were not associated with increased EN delivery. Studies aimed at promoting early EN and decreasing interruptions may optimize energy delivery in the PICU.

  19. The impact of a statewide training to increase child care providers' knowledge of nutrition and physical activity rules in Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, Stefanie; Lessard, Laura; Dupont Phillips, Kate

    2013-02-01

    Childhood obesity has been recognized as a national problem of epidemic proportions. Child care represents an ideal venue in which to address this problem, as many young children spend a significant amount of time and consume the majority of their meals in this setting. Recognizing this opportunity, Delaware recently enacted reforms to statewide licensing regulations designed to improve the quality of the nutrition-, physical activity-, and screen viewing-related environments in child care settings. To facilitate the translation of these regulations into practices, a series of broad-scale trainings was held throughout the state. Attendance was required for all Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)-participating facilities, although child care providers from non-CACFP facilities also attended. Pre- and posttraining surveys were used to assess changes in providers' knowledge of the regulations and satisfaction with the training. In total 1094 presurveys and 1076 postsurveys were received. Participants were highly satisfied with the training format and content, including the instructors, materials, and schedule. Data analysis demonstrates improved knowledge of all 26 regulation components from presurvey to postsurvey. Family child care providers, providers with more years of experience, CACFP-participating facilities, and facilities with food service personnel scored significantly higher than their center staff, less experienced and non-CACFP counterparts, as well as those without food service personnel. Broad-scale, in-person training can effectively increase child care providers' knowledge of the regulations and is well received by this audience. Other states and jurisdictions seeking to improve nutrition, physical activity, and screen-viewing practices in child care settings should consider this model of quality improvement.

  20. Study protocol: Cost-effectiveness of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients in comparison with usual care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren Marian AE

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a common consequence of disease in older patients. Both in hospital setting and in community setting oral nutritional support has proven to be effective. However, cost-effectiveness studies are scarce. Therefore, the aim of our study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients, starting at hospital admission until three months after discharge. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial. Patients are included at hospital admission and followed until three months after discharge. Patients are eligible to be included when they are ≥ 60 years old and malnourished according to the following objective standards: Body Mass Index (BMI in kg/m2 Conclusion In this randomized controlled trial we will evaluate the effect of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients after hospital discharge, compared to usual care. Primary endpoints of the study are changes in activities of daily living, body weight, body composition, quality of life, and muscle strength. An economic evaluation will be performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention in comparison with usual care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (ISRCTN29617677, registered 14-Sep-2005

  1. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  2. Does Depressive Affect Mediate the Relationship between Self-Care Capacity and Nutritional Status Among Rural Older Adults? : A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung Eun; Bishop, Alex J; Kim, Minjung; Hermann, Janice; Kim, Giyeon; Lawrence, Jeannine

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationships of self-care capacity and depressive affect on nutritional status and whether depressive affect mediated the relationship of self-care capacity on nutritional status. A convenience sample of 171 rural community-dwelling older adults, 65 years and above, participated. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to test a mediation model. The hypothesized SEM model was supported with adequate fit (χ(2) (1) = 1.87, p = 0.17; CFI = 0.94; RMSEA = 0.07; SRMR = 0.03). SEM analysis revealed a significant positive direct effect of self-care capacity on nutritional status (γ = 0.14, p = 0.042). Significant negative direct effects were observed for self-care capacity on depressive affect (γ = -0.15, p = 0.027) and for depressive affect on nutritional status (β = -0.27, p nutrition status (γ = 0.04, p = 0.046). Findings highlight the importance of emotional well-being on rural older adults' nutritional status, particularly those with decreased ability to engage in self-care practices.

  3. Nutritional composition and aerobic stability of winter cereal silage at different storage times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Fernando Mattos Leão

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the nutritional composition, dry matter (DM recovery and aerobic stability of winter cereal silages under different storage periods. The materials used were wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. BRS Gralha Azul, barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. BRS Brau, white oat (Avena sativa cv. URS Guará, black oat (Avena strigosa cv. Embrapa 139 and triticale (X Triticosecale IPR 11, in three storage periods: 60, 120 and 180 days. The experiment was conducted in a 5x3 factorial, completely randomized design, consisting of five forage species and three storage periods, with five replicates. In nutritional assessment, barley silage presented low values of acid detergent fiber (ADF; 331.2, 355.2 and 378.5 g kg DM-1 for 60, 120, 180 days, respectively, high total digestible nutrients (TDN; 558.2, 544.7 and 531.6 g kg DM-1 for 60, 120, 180 days, respectively, high DM recovery and aerobic stability. Wheat and triticale showed a decrease in DM recovery with the increase in storage length, although showed high aerobic stability. The storage period had a different effect on forages; however, storage period above 60 days provided no benefits for the variables evaluated.

  4. The relationship between iodine nutrition and thyroid disease in lactating women with different iodine intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Dandan; Liu, Peng; Meng, Fangang; Wen, Da; Jia, Qingzhen; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoye; Jiang, Peng; Shen, Hongmei

    2015-11-14

    Areas with low, adequate and excessive I content in water co-exist in China. Limited data are currently available on I nutrition and thyroid disease in lactating women and their breast-fed infants with different I intakes. This study aimed to evaluate I nutrition in both lactating women and their infants and the prevalence of thyroid disease in areas with different levels of I in water. From January to June 2014, a total of 343 healthy lactating women (excluding those taking anti-thyroid drugs or I supplements within a year of the study, consuming seafood at the time of the study or those diagnosed with congenital thyroid disease) from Beihai in Guangxi province and Jiajiazhuang, Yangcheng, Jicun and Pingyao townships in Shanxi province were selected. Compared with the I-sufficient group, median urinary I concentrations in both lactating women and infants as well as breast milk I levels were significantly lower in the I-deficient group (Prisk factors for abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Our data collectively suggest that excessive I intake potentially causes subclinical hypothyroidism in lactating women. Moreover, enhanced monitoring of I status is important to avoid adverse effects of I deficiency or excess, particularly in susceptible populations such as pregnant or lactating women and infants.

  5. Urinary excretion of carnitine in multiply injured patients on different regimens of total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederblad, G; Schildt, B; Larsson, J; Liljedahl, S O

    1983-04-01

    Carnitine derives from intake of preformed exogenous carnitine and synthesis from lysine and methionine, but is absent in parenteral fluids. Urinary excretions of carnitine and its derivatives was measured in 30 patients 2-8 days after severe multiple injuries and compared with controls. The patients received five different isocaloric parenteral nutritional regimens;group 1 glucose and fat, group 2 glucose, fat and amino acids, group 3 glucose and insulin, group 4 glucose and amino acids, and group 5 branched-chain amino acids. The mean total carnitine excretion in healthy men was 420 mumol/24 h +/- 57 (SEM), and in women 266 mumol/24 h +/- 29, 41% of which was free carnitine. Mean excretion of total carnitine during days 2-8 after trauma for the five groups was: 900 +/- 100, 1169 +/- 112, 1251 +/- 102, 1023 +/- 117, and 668 +/- 128 mumol/24 h, being significantly higher in groups 1-4 than in healthy men. The free carnitine fraction in the patients was significantly higher than in controlled healthy subjects. Total carnitine excretion was unaffected by different nutritional regimens in the very first days. During days 6-8, group 5, receiving branched-chain amino acids had lower excretion of total carnitine (compared to groups 2-4) and free carnitine (compared to groups 3-4). Groups 3 and 4 excreted a higher percentage as free carnitine compared to the other groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Nutritional status of older persons presenting in a primary care clinic in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebusoye, L A; Ajayi, I O; Dairo, M D; Ogunniyi, A O

    2012-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the nutritional status and its association with sociodemographic characteristics and health complaints of older persons presenting at the General Outpatients Department (GOPD) Clinic of University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to select 500 consecutively presenting participants aged 60 years and older between September and December, 2009. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) tool and body mass index were used to assess undernutrition and overweight, respectively. The prevalence of nutritional problems was 61.9% (undernutrition = 7.8% and overweight = 54.1%). Being unmarried (P problems (mouth, teeth, and tongue) were significantly (P nutritional problems in this study underscores the need for intervention in this population. Correlation analysis (Pearson's) showed a positive association between BMI and MNA scores (r = 0.152, P = 0.001).

  7. Quality of life and nutritional assessment in peritoneal surface malignancy (PSM): recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuellon, Richard; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Piso, Pompiliu; Swain, David; Levine, Edward

    2008-09-15

    Quality of life (QOL) and nutritional status of patients treated for peritoneal surface malignancy are important areas for ongoing assessment. A working group of clinicians including a dietitian, physicians, and quality of life researchers was formed as part of the Fifth International Workshop on Peritoneal Surface Malignancy. The purpose of the group was to form a consensus statement on both quality of life and nutritional assessment in PSM. The relevant literature from the quality of life and nutritional assessment in peritoneal surface malignancy was reviewed and integrated to form a consensus statement. Baseline and ongoing assessment of both quality of life and nutritional status of patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is recommended.

  8. Gender Difference in Care of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamod Dhoj Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: The result of this study provided evidence that there are gender differences in reporting of symptoms, mode of diagnosis and certain self-management behaviors. Therefore there is a need to design gender specific behavior change communication strategies for better management of type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes care; gender; self-efficacy; self-management.

  9. Nutritional quality of dietary patterns of children: are there differences inside and outside school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diva Aliete Dos Santos; Castro, Michelle Alessandra; Fisberg, Mauro; Fisberg, Regina Mara

    To describe the dietary patterns of children inside and outside school and investigate their associations with sociodemographic factors and nutritional status. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study in which children of both sexes, aged 1-6 years, attending private and public daycare centers and preschools in Brazil, were evaluated (n=2979). Demographic, socioeconomic and dietary data (weighed food records and estimated food records) were collected. Dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis from 36 food groups. Four dietary patterns were identified inside school, and three outside. Inside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated to low income and presented high nutritional quality. The "dual" pattern was associated with low income and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "snack" pattern was associated with children enrolled at private schools and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of added sugar and trans fat. Outside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated with high intake of saturated fat, trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of trans fats and glycemic load, whereas the "snack" pattern was associated with overweight, private schools, high income, and high intake of trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. There are differences in the nutritional quality of dietary patterns inside and outside school, and heterogeneity in adherence to these patterns were observed across regions and socioeconomic classes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence and Severity of Prescribing Errors in Parenteral Nutrition for Pediatric Inpatients at a Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Hermanspann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesPediatric inpatients are particularly vulnerable to medication errors (MEs, especially in highly individualized preparations like parenteral nutrition (PN. Aside from prescribing via a computerized physician order entry system (CPOE, we evaluated the effect of cross-checking by a clinical pharmacist to prevent harm from PN order errors in a neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit (NICU/PICU.MethodsThe incidence of prescribing errors in PN in a tertiary level NICU/PICU was surveyed prospectively between March 2012 and July 2013 (n = 3,012 orders. A pharmacist cross-checked all PN orders prior to preparation. Errors were assigned to seven different error-type categories. Three independent experts from different academic tertiary level NICUs judged the severity of each error according to the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP Index (categories A–I.ResultsThe error rate was 3.9% for all 3,012 orders (118 prescribing errors in 111 orders. 77 (6.0%, 1,277 orders errors occurred in the category concentration range, all concerning a relative overdose of calcium gluconate for peripheral infusion. The majority of all events (60% were assigned to categories C and D (without major harmful consequences while 28% could not be assigned due to missing majority decision. Potential harmful consequences requiring interventions (category E could have occurred in 12% of assessments.ConclusionNext to systematic application of clinical guidelines and prescribing via CPOE, order review by a clinical pharmacist is still required to effectively reduce MEs and thus to prevent minor and major adverse drug events with the aim to enhance medication safety.

  11. Different methods for assessment of nutritional status in newborn infants based on physical and anthropometric indexes: a short review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several complications during childhood is associated with nutritional status of infants at birth. Therefore, nutritional status of newborns must be evaluated properly after birth. Assessment of the nutritional status of neonates based on anthropometric and physical indices is simple and inexpensive without the need for advanced medical equipment. However, no previous studies have focused on the assessment methods of the nutritional status of infants via anthropometric and physical indices. This study aimed to review some of the key methods used to determine the nutritional status of neonates using anthropometric and physical indices. To date, most studies have focused on the diagnosis of fetal malnutrition (FM and growth monitoring. In order to diagnose FM, researchers have used growth charts and Ponderal index (PI based on anthropometric indices, as well as Clinical Assessment of Nutritional (CAN Score based on physical features. Moreover, in order to assess the growth status of infants, growth charts were used. According to the findings of this study, standard intrauterine growth curves and the PI are common measurement tools in the diagnosis of FM. Furthermore, CAN score is widely used in the evaluation of the nutritional status of neonates. Given the differences in the physical features of term and preterm infants, this index should be adjusted for preterm neonates. Longitudinal growth charts are one of the most prominent methods used for monitoring of the growth patterns of infants.

  12. Just a subtle difference? Findings from a systematic review on definitions of nutrition literacy and food literacy.

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Corinna; Sommerhalder, Kathrin; Beer-Borst, Sigrid; Abel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition literacy and food literacy have become increasingly important concepts in health promotion. Researchers use one or the other term to describe the competencies needed to maintain a healthy diet. This systematic review examines whether these terms are synonymous or if their meanings are substantially different.We searched major bibliographic databases (Web of Science, PubMed, ScienceDirect, CINAHL, SocIndex and ERIC) for publications that provided an original definition of nutrition o...

  13. Different research designs and their characteristics in intensive care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedel, Wagner Luis; da Silveira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Different research designs have various advantages and limitations inherent to their main characteristics. Knowledge of the proper use of each design is of great importance to understanding the applicability of research findings to clinical epidemiology. In intensive care, a hierarchical classification of designs can often be misleading if the characteristics of the design in this context are not understood. One must therefore be alert to common problems in randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews/meta-analyses that address clinical issues related to the care of the critically ill patient. PMID:27737421

  14. Biology and nutrition of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae fed on different food sources

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    Débora Mello da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: We studied Spodoptera frugiperda development using different food sources in the laboratory and field. Newly hatched larvae were fed soybean, cotton, maize, wheat, and oat leaves. An artificial diet was used as the control. Duration of pre-pupal, pupal, and larva-adult period, pupal weight, sex ratio, survival, larva feeding preferences, oviposition preferences, and nutritional quality of different hosts were evaluated. Insects fed on wheat showed the shortest larva-adult period. The insects fed on cotton and soybean had longer larval development cycles and pupae of lower weight. Feeding preference was evident for third instar larvae and did not differ between wheat, oat, maize, and soybean, which were the preferred hosts. Moths oviposited to a greater extent on the upper canopy of wheat than that of other plants in both the no-choice and free-choice tests. Treatments influenced insect growth, food consumption, and digestion when nutritional variables were analyzed. Thus, grasses were better hosts for S. frugiperda development. Cotton was the least preferred food, followed by soybean. The present study can improve our understanding of S. frugiperda in these different crops and help in developing management strategies. Even though S. frugiperda is considered to be polyphagous, this pest is closely associated with grasses (maize, wheat, oat and has lower potential as a soybean or cotton feeder. Howerver, S. frugiperda food intake regulation appears to be triggered by a complex of different mechanisms. Thus, S. frugiperda can also damage soybean and cotton and adapt to them in the absence of preferred hosts.

  15. Social marketing approaches to nutrition and physical activity interventions in early care and education centres: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecking, C T; Hennink-Kaminski, H; Ihekweazu, C; Vaughn, A; Mazzucca, S; Ward, D S

    2017-09-29

    Social marketing is a promising planning approach for influencing voluntary lifestyle behaviours, but its application to nutrition and physical activity interventions in the early care and education setting remains unknown. PubMed, ISI Web of Science, PsycInfo and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health were systematically searched to identify interventions targeting nutrition and/or physical activity behaviours of children enrolled in early care centres between 1994 and 2016. Content analysis methods were used to capture information reflecting eight social marketing benchmark criteria. The review included 135 articles representing 77 interventions. Two interventions incorporated all eight benchmark criteria, but the majority included fewer than four. Each intervention included behaviour and methods mix criteria, and more than half identified audience segments. Only one-third of interventions incorporated customer orientation, theory, exchange and insight. Only six interventions addressed competing behaviours. We did not find statistical significance for the effectiveness of interventions on child-level diet, physical activity or anthropometric outcomes based on the number of benchmark criteria used. This review highlights opportunities to apply social marketing to obesity prevention interventions in early care centres. Social marketing could be an important strategy for early childhood obesity prevention efforts, and future research investigations into its effects are warranted. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  16. Biochemical and nutritional characterization of three prickly pear species with different ripening behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Talia; Carrillo-López, Armando; Guevara-Lara, Fidel; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Paredes-López, Octavio

    2005-12-01

    Biochemical and nutritional changes were studied during the ripening process of three Opuntia morphospecies with different ripening behavior: Naranjona (O. ficus-indica), Blanca Cristalina (Opuntia sp.), and Esmeralda (Opuntia sp.) of early, early-intermediate, and intermediate-late ripening, respectively. In loss of fresh weight, Naranjona showed the highest values, while in Blanca Cristalina and Esmeralda, a discrete weight loss was found. No significant differences were found among morphospecies in soluble solids, total titratable acidity and pH during the postharvest days. Blanca Cristalina and Esmeralda showed an increase in the content of carotenoids, while these diminished in Naranjona. The cell wall enzymes evaluated showed particular behaviors during the ripening of each morphospecies suggesting a fine biochemical control and not a clear relationship between fruit softening and enzyme activity. This study provides basic information on prickly pear ripening, in order to understand this process for its control and for improving shelf life.

  17. Nutritive value of fermented palm oil sludge added with different sources of phosphorus

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    Tiurma Pasaribu

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment has been conducted to determine the nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermented with A. niger added with different sources of phosphorus (NPK, P2O5, NaH2PO4. The experiment was assigned in a factorial (3x3 design. The main factor was sources of phosphorus, while the sub factor was time of incubation (0, 4 days aerobic incubation, and 4 days aerobic incubation followed by 2 days anaerobic incubation. Parameters measured were pH, soluble nitrogen, true protein and crude protein, total α-amino acid (TAAA, soluble phosphorus and total phosphor, in vitro dry matter (DCBK, and true protein digestibilities (DCP. Results from the analyses showed that fermentation increased the contents of soluble and total P, protein and TAAA and the value of in vitro protein digestibility. Fermented product added with P2O5 had the highest in vitro dry matter digestibility, while the one added with NPK had true protein content and digestibility. It was concluded that additional NPK gave the best result interm of nutritive value.

  18. Genetic Disease Burden, Nutrition and Determinants of Tribal Health Care in Chhattisgarh State of Central-East India: A Status Paper

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    Balgir RS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Tribal health is an important aspect of development and progress of the people. This study pertaining to genetic disease burden, nutritional status and biomedical anthropological assessment with particular reference to determinants of tribal health care has been carried out among the four tribes, namely, Bhatra, Gond, Kondh and Paraja of Orissa residing adjacent to the bordering districts of Chhattisgarh The population genetic structure of a tribe is the outcome of socio-cultural practices, bio-psychological behavior, genetic constitution, and eco-environmental conditions. Tribal communities in India, in general and of Chhattisgarh state in particular, are highly vulnerable to various genetic diseases, nutritional deficiencies and unrealistic practices and lack of access to basic health facilities. A total of 815 blood samples comprising of 166 Bhatra, 219 Gond, 254 Kondh and 176 Paraja tribes were collected randomly under aseptic conditions. The frequency of sickle cell hemoglobinopathy (3.2-22.5%, β-thalassemia trait (0.5-8.5%, and G6PD enzyme deficiency (6-16% is very high among the tribes of Chhattisgarh. However, the prevalence of Rhesus negative blood group is very low (0-0.6%. The frequency of hereditary hemolytic anemia is also high among the tribals of Chhattisgarh. Both communicable and non-communicable diseases harbor the tribal population. The nutritional deficiencies are rampant. Tribal people are engrossed with superstitions and have faith in traditional healers who practice magico-religious rites along with indigenous herbal treatment for the common ailments. Traditional folk medicine and health culture play a significant role in shaping tribal life. These health practices differ from one tribe to another. Unless locality specific, tribe specific and need-based health care system is evolved which should be appropriate, acceptable, accessible, and affordable, the true goal of health for all cannot be achieved in India.

  19. Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension in primary health care: A comparative clinical trial of two education strategies in health and nutrition

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    Ribeiro Andréia Q

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor adherence to non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension represents a serious challenge for public health policies in several countries. This study was conducted to compare two intervention strategies regarding the adherence of adult women to dietary changes recommended for the treatment of hypertension in a community covered by Primary Health Care Unit. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial of a sample composed of 28 women with hypertension enrolled in the Primary Health Care Unit located in the urban area of southeastern Brazil. The participants were already undergoing treatment for hypertension but devoid of nutritional care; and were divided into two groups, each composed of 14 individuals, who received interventions that consisted of two different strategies of nutritional guidance: monthly health education workshops alone (Group 1 and combined with family orientation through home visits (Group 2. Adherence to nutritional guidelines was evaluated by dietary, anthropometric, clinical and serum biochemical parameters, measured before and after the interventions. Knowledge on control and risk of hypertension was also investigated. The study lasted five months. Results Mean age was 55.6 (± 2.8 and 50.7 (± 6.5 in the groups 1 and 2, respectively. The home orientation strategy promoted greater adherence to dietary changes, leading to a statistically significant improvement in the clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and dietary parameters. The group 2 reduced the consumption of risk foods (p = 0.01, oil (p = 0.002 and sugar (p = 0.02, and decreased body mass index (-0.7 kg/m2; p = 0.01; waist circumference (-4.2 cm; p = 0.001, systolic blood pressure (-13 mm HG; p = 0.004 and glycemia (-18.9 mg/dl; p = 0. 01. In group 1 only waist circumference (-2 cm; p = 0.01 changed significantly. Conclusion Nutritional orientations at the household level were more effective with regard to the adherence of

  20. Nest site selection and nutritional provision through excreta: a form of parental care in a tropical endogeic earthworm

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    Angel I. Ortiz-Ceballos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nest construction is a common form of parental care in soil organisms. However, it is unknown whether the tropical earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus produces nests in soils with low nutritional quality habitats. Here we studied the reproductive behaviour and nest site selection of P. corethrurus, and tested the hypothesis whether P. corethrurus produces more cocoons in habitats with low nutritional quality. In bidimensional terrariums we evaluated the combined effect of the nutritional quality of habitat: (Poor Quality Habitat = PQH, Medium Quality Habitat = MQH, High Quality Habitat = HQH and soil depth (Shallow, Intermediate, Deep in a factorial 32 design. The number and biomass of cocoons, progeny and the production of internal and external excreta were evaluated. The quality habitat and depth of soil and their interaction had a significant effect on nest site construction and the deposition of internal excreta. Pontoscolex corethrurus built a higher amount of nests in the PQH-Intermediate and MQH-Intermediate treatments while more internal excreta were found in the HQH-Intermediate treatment. Offspring biomass was positively associated with internal excreta in the PQH (soil only and MQH (soil + grass treatments, suggesting that this could be a form of parental care. Since P. corethrurus produces more cocoons in low and medium quality habitats, while produces more internal excreta at high quality habitats, there does not seem to be an association between number of offspring and parental care. We suggest P. corethrurus could have two reproductive strategies that act as diversified bet-hedging (do not put all cocoons in one basket behavior in unpredictable environment, and thus build a higher amount of nests in low and medium quality habitats; and another where they produce more internal excreta as a form of parental care in high quality habitats. Parental care in the form of internal excreta may be particularly important in poor and medium

  1. Nest site selection and nutritional provision through excreta: a form of parental care in a tropical endogeic earthworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ceballos, Angel I; Pérez-Staples, Diana; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino

    2016-01-01

    Nest construction is a common form of parental care in soil organisms. However, it is unknown whether the tropical earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus produces nests in soils with low nutritional quality habitats. Here we studied the reproductive behaviour and nest site selection of P. corethrurus, and tested the hypothesis whether P. corethrurus produces more cocoons in habitats with low nutritional quality. In bidimensional terrariums we evaluated the combined effect of the nutritional quality of habitat: (Poor Quality Habitat = PQH, Medium Quality Habitat = MQH, High Quality Habitat = HQH) and soil depth (Shallow, Intermediate, Deep) in a factorial 3(2) design. The number and biomass of cocoons, progeny and the production of internal and external excreta were evaluated. The quality habitat and depth of soil and their interaction had a significant effect on nest site construction and the deposition of internal excreta. Pontoscolex corethrurus built a higher amount of nests in the PQH-Intermediate and MQH-Intermediate treatments while more internal excreta were found in the HQH-Intermediate treatment. Offspring biomass was positively associated with internal excreta in the PQH (soil only) and MQH (soil + grass) treatments, suggesting that this could be a form of parental care. Since P. corethrurus produces more cocoons in low and medium quality habitats, while produces more internal excreta at high quality habitats, there does not seem to be an association between number of offspring and parental care. We suggest P. corethrurus could have two reproductive strategies that act as diversified bet-hedging (do not put all cocoons in one basket) behavior in unpredictable environment, and thus build a higher amount of nests in low and medium quality habitats; and another where they produce more internal excreta as a form of parental care in high quality habitats. Parental care in the form of internal excreta may be particularly important in poor and medium quality habitats

  2. Nutrition in pelvic radiation disease and inflammatory bowel disease: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Tiffany; Hegazi, Refaat

    2014-01-01

    Due to the intestinal inflammation, tissue damage, and painful abdominal symptoms restricting dietary intake associated with both diseases, patients with intestinal pelvic radiation disease (PRD) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk to develop protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. In the current paper, we review the nutritional management of both diseases, listing the similar approaches of nutritional management and the nutritional implications of intestinal dysfunction of both diseases. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with either disease and nutritional risk screening and assessment of nutritional status are required for designing the proper nutritional intervention plan. This plan may include dietary management, oral nutritional supplementation, and enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. In addition to managing malnutrition, nutrients exert immune modulating effects during periods of intestinal inflammation and can play a role in mitigating the risks associated with the disease activity. Consistently, exclusive enteral feeding is recommended for inducing remission in pediatric patients with active Crohn's disease, with less clear guidelines on use in patients with ulcerative colitis. The field of immune modulating nutrition is an evolving science that takes into consideration the specific mechanism of action of nutrients, nutrient-nutrient interaction, and preexisting nutritional status of the patients.

  3. Effectiveness of different methods for delivering tailored nutrition education to low income, ethnically diverse adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Kim M; Risica, Patricia M; Strolla, Leslie O; Fournier, Leanne; Kirtania, Usree; Upegui, David; Zhao, Julie; George, Tiffiney; Acharyya, Suddhasatta

    2009-05-05

    Computer-tailored written nutrition interventions have been shown to be more effective than non-tailored materials in changing diet, but continued research is needed. Your Healthy Life/Su Vida Saludable (YHL-SVS) was an intervention study with low income, ethnically diverse, English and Spanish-speaking participants to determine which methods of delivering tailored written nutrition materials were most effective in lowering fat and increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake. YHL-SVS was a randomized controlled trial with four experimental conditions: 1) Nontailored (NT) comparison group; 2) Single Tailored (ST) packet; 3) Multiple Tailored (MT) packet mailed in four installments; 4) Multiple Re-Tailored (MRT) MT packets re-tailored between mailings via brief phone surveys. A baseline telephone survey collected information for tailoring as well as evaluation. Follow-up evaluation surveys were collected 4- and 7-months later. Primary outcomes included F&V intake and fat related behaviors. Descriptive statistics, paired t-test and ANOVA were used to examine the effectiveness of different methods of delivering tailored nutrition information. Both the ST and MT groups reported significantly higher F&V intake at 4-months than the NT and MRT groups. At 7 months, only the MT group still had significantly higher F&V intake compared to the NT group. For changes in fat-related behaviors, both the MT and MRT groups showed more change than NT at 4 months, but at 7 months, while these differences persisted, they were no longer statistically significant. There was a significant interaction of experimental group by education for change in F&V intake (P = .0085) with the lowest educational group demonstrating the most change. In this study, tailored interventions were more effective than non-tailored interventions in improving the short-term dietary behaviors of low income, ethnically diverse participants. Delivery of information in multiple smaller doses over time appeared to

  4. The contribution of three components of nutrition knowledge to socio-economic differences in food purchasing choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Loretta; Giskes, Katrina; Turrell, Gavin

    2014-08-01

    To assess socio-economic differences in three components of nutrition knowledge, i.e. knowledge of (i) the relationship between diet and disease, (ii) the nutrient content of foods and (iii) dietary guideline recommendations; furthermore, to determine if socio-economic differences in nutrition knowledge contribute to inequalities in food purchasing choices. The cross-sectional study considered household food purchasing, nutrition knowledge, socio-economic and demographic information. Household food purchasing choices were summarised by three indices, based on self-reported purchasing of sixteen groceries, nineteen fruits and twenty-one vegetables. Socio-economic position (SEP) was measured by household income and education. Associations between SEP, nutrition knowledge and food purchasing were examined using general linear models adjusted for age, gender, household type and household size. Brisbane, Australia in 2000. Main household food shoppers (n 1003, response rate 66·4 %), located in fifty small areas (Census Collectors Districts). Shoppers in households of low SEP made food purchasing choices that were less consistent with dietary guideline recommendations: they were more likely to purchase grocery foods comparatively higher in salt, sugar and fat, and lower in fibre, and they purchased a narrower range of fruits and vegetables. Those of higher SEP had greater nutrition knowledge and this factor attenuated most associations between SEP and food purchasing choices. Among nutrition knowledge factors, knowledge of the relationship between diet and disease made the greatest and most consistent contribution to explaining socio-economic differences in food purchasing. Addressing inequalities in nutrition knowledge is likely to reduce socio-economic differences in compliance with dietary guidelines. Improving knowledge of the relationship between diet and disease appears to be a particularly relevant focus for health promotion aimed to reduce socio

  5. Position of the American Dietetic Association, American Society for Nutrition, and Society for Nutrition Education: Food and nutrition programs for community-residing older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Barbara J; Wellman, Nancy S; Russell, Carlene

    2010-03-01

    Given the federal cost-containment policy to rebalance long-term care away from nursing homes to home- and community-based services, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Society for Nutrition Education that all older adults should have access to food and nutrition programs that ensure the availability of safe, adequate food to promote optimal nutritional status. Appropriate food and nutrition programs include adequately funded food assistance and meal programs, nutrition education, screening, assessment, counseling, therapy, monitoring, evaluation, and outcomes documentation to ensure more healthful aging. The growing number of older adults, the health care focus on prevention, and the global economic situation accentuate the fundamental need for these programs. Yet far too often food and nutrition programs are disregarded or taken for granted. Growing older generally increases nutritional risk. Illnesses and chronic diseases; physical, cognitive, and social challenges; racial, ethnic, and linguistic differences; and low socioeconomic status can further complicate a situation. The beneficial effects of nutrition for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management need emphasis. Although many older adults are enjoying longer and more healthful lives in their own homes, others, especially those with health disparities and poor nutritional status, would benefit from greater access to food and nutrition programs and services. Food and nutrition practitioners can play a major role in promoting universal access and integrating food and nutrition programs and nutrition services into home- and community-based services.

  6. Nutritional assessment of children at the day care center “Marineritos del Sur” in Cienfuegos province, Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeida Bárbara Alejo Cruz

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many countries in the last few years, there has been an increasing interest for the assessment of the Nutritional System which can be defined as a systemic and permanent process of collection, transmission analysis and interpretation of the information that allows to keep updated knowledge of the nutritional state. The follow up of the children´s growth and development has the importance not only to assist the children´s needs at a determined age but also to assist them with a preventive criteria taking into account their dynamic and changing characteristics. Objectives: To assess nutritionally the children gathered at the ages from 2 to 6 years that attend the day care center ¨Marineritos del Sur¨ for more than one year during the period September 1 st - March 2000. Methods: The variables under study were age, sex, weight, folds brachial circumference and past illnesses. Results: According to the indicators weight/size, size/age, weight / age, tricipital fold/ age, brachial circumference / age, patients between 10 and 90 percentile had a predominance. The calculus of the Z point showed that 67,66 % of the children were eutrophic, 27,=6 tended to obesity and 5,28 malnourished. Giardia Lambia was the most frequent isolated parasite.

  7. "Generally the young mom suffers much:" Socio-cultural influences of maternal capabilities and nutrition care in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Scott B; Heymsfield, Grace A; Wright, Timothy W; Baguma, Charles

    2016-09-20

    We conducted 40 in-depth interviews and eight focus groups among mothers and fathers (n = 91) of diverse ages in western Uganda to define the relevant domains of maternal capabilities and their relationship to infant and young child feeding practices. This study was directed by a developing theory of maternal capabilities that posits that the impact of health-directed interventions may be limited by unmeasured and poorly understood maternal characteristics. Ugandan caregivers defined three major life events that constrain women's capabilities for childcare: early pregnancy, close child spacing, and polygamous marriage. Women describe major constraints in their decision-making capabilities generally and specifically to procuring food for young children. Future nutrition programs may improve their impact through activities that model household decision-making scenarios, and that strengthen women's social support networks. Findings suggest that efforts to transform gender norms may be one additional way to improve nutrition outcomes in communities with a generally low status of women relative to men. The willingness of younger fathers to challenge traditional gender norms suggests an opportunity in this context for continued work to strengthen resources for children's nutritional care.

  8. Effects of Nitrogen on Grain Yield, Nutritional and Processing Quality of Wheat for Different End Uses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xin-kai; GUO Wen-shan; ZHOU Jun-liang; HU Hong; ZHANG Ying; LI Chun-yan; FENG Chao-nian; PENG Yong-xin

    2003-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen on grain yield, nutritional quality and processing quality of wheat for different end uses were studied in Yangzhou from 2000 to 2002. Increasing N application amount and/or the ratio of topdressing N after elongation stage could raise grain yield, protein content, wet gluten content, sedimentation, falling number, development time and stability time. To produce strong-gluten and medium-gluten wheat, the suitable ratio of basis : tillering: elongation: booting N fertilizer was 3: 1: 3 : 3 or 5: 1 : 2: 2with 180 - 240 kg N ha-1. To produce weak-gluten wheat, the ratio of basis: tillering: elongation N fertilizer should be 7 : 1: 2 with 180 kg N ha-1 and 240 × 104 ha-1 seedlings.

  9. Effect of Different Fertilizing Methods on Zinc Nutrition in Zn-Deficiency Apple Trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-an; FAN Wei-guo; ZHANG Fang-ai; LI Ling; LI De-quan

    2002-01-01

    Red Fuji apple trees of Zn-deficiency were used as material in the experiment. The effect of dif-ferent Zn application methods on the regularity of Zn transportation and nutrition was studied. It was foundthat the storage of Zn in the branches was greatly increased by foliar application of the solution of 15%as well as between Zn and P and K, which increased Zn transportation and reusability. Zn content in roots in-creased when Zn was used in soil in autumn. However, the absorbed Zn did not transport to the top of thegrowth enhanced Zn content of the branch. However, the effect was kept for a short time. It had little effecton Zn transportation when Zn was sprayed three weeks after blossoming.

  10. Nutritional and antioxidant properties of different brown and red Spanish edible seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofrades, S; López-López, I; Bravo, L; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Bastida, S; Larrea, M T; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2010-10-01

    This article reports a study of the nutritional composition, total dietary fiber (TDF), mineral contents, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, polyphenolic concentration and antioxidant activity of three Spanish seaweeds: two brown seaweeds (Himanthalia elongata and Undaria pinnatifida) and one red (Porphyra umbilicalis). TDF and ash were the most abundant components in the brown seaweeds, while TDF and protein were the main components in the red one. In all seaweeds, the lipid contents were very low but the polyunsaturated fatty acid contents were high. Although the red seaweed contained significantly (p Himanthalia elongata displayed remarkably high polyphenolic content, endowing it with appreciable antioxidant activity. These seaweeds offer considerable potential as functional food ingredients due to components like dietary fiber, minerals and trace elements, protein and lipids, which produce many different kinds of biological activities, and also to their high antioxidant capacity.

  11. [Nutritional status of Cuban elders in three different geriatric scenarios: community, geriatrics service, nursery home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Alina; Cuyá Lantigua, Magdalena; González Escudero, Hilda; Sánchez Gutiérrez, Ramón; Cortina Martínez, Rafael; Barreto Penié, Jesús; Santana Porbén, Sergio; Rojas Pérez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    The undernutrition rates observed in Cuban elders surveyed in three different geriatric scenarios: Community: coastal town of Cojímar (City of Havana); Geriatrics Service ("Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital, City of Havana); and Nursery Home (city of Cárdenas, province of Matanzas) by means of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) of the Elderly are presented. Undernutrition rates were 2.7% among elders surveyed in the coastal community of Cojímar, but increased to become 91.6% among those admitted to the hospital Geriatrics Service, and 95.3% for those institutionalized in the Nursery Home, respectively. The occurrence of undernutrition can be low among elders living freely in the community, but it might affect a vast number of those seeking medical assistance at the public health institutions. Extent of undernutrition among elders in geriatric assistance scenarios should lead to the adoption of the required measures for early identification, and timely treatment, of this health problem.

  12. Executive summary: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Hand, Rosa K

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth (infants born at nutritional care of preterm infants. To address the current state of knowledge and to support systematic reviews that will be used to develop evidence-informed guidance, a consortium consisting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the ASN, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Food and Drug Administration, the CDC, the USDA/Agricultural Research Service (USDA/ARS), and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/NIH initiated the Pre-B Project. The project included the constitution of 4 thematic working groups charged with the following tasks: 1) develop a series of topics/questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL), leading to the development of new guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants, and 2) develop a targeted research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in the health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This review consists of a project overview including a summary of a workshop hosted by the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center and summary reports of the 4 working groups established to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications, 2) clinical/practical issues in enteral feeding, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards for assessing infant feeding outcomes. These reports will serve as the basis for the ultimate guideline development process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' EAL. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Effects of Different Protein Levels on the Growth Performance and Metabolic Rate of Nutrition in Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hongda

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of different protein levels on the growth performance and metabolic rate of nutrition in broilers. Total 360 healthy and weight closed local broilers of 3 weeks were chosen and then divided into three groups randomly by one factor. Each group contains three handlings, each handling consists of 40 broilers. The period of experiment was 7 weeks. The metabolic experiment was performed at the 7th week. Three different protein levels were used in broilers' diet. The levels of protein were 19%, 17.5% and 16%. The results showed that the different levels of protein in crude dietary had significant difference between 19% group and the other two groups. The average daily weight gain and daily efficiency were significantly higher than that of the other two groups (P0.05), and the metabolic rate of the impact of phosphorus was significantly different (P<0.05). The result showed that when protein level was 19%, the growth of the local broiler was the best.

  14. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children’s body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children’s body mass index (BMI). Methods A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center’s written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children’s nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Results Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers’ and parents’ knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children’s zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. Conclusions The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by

  15. Nutritional health attitudes and behaviors and their associations with the risk of overweight/obesity among child care providers in Michigan Migrant and Seasonal Head Start centers

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Won O; Song, Sujin; Nieves, Violeta; Gonzalez, Andie; Crockett, Elahé T

    2016-01-01

    Background Children enrolled in Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs are at high risks of health problems. Although non-family child care providers play important roles on children’s health status as role models, educators, program deliverers, and information mediators, little is known about their nutritional health attitudes and behaviors, and weight status. Therefore, we investigated nutritional health attitudes and behaviors and their associations with overweight/obesity among c...

  16. Nutrition and physical activity in child care centers: the impact of a wellness policy initiative on environment and policy assessment and observation outcomes, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney; Maalouf, Joyce; Evers, Sarah; Davis, Justin; Griffin, Monica

    2013-05-23

    The child care environment has emerged as an ideal setting in which to implement policies that promote healthy body weight of children. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a wellness policy and training program on the physical activity and nutrition environment in 24 child care centers in Georgia. We used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation instrument to identify changes to foods served, staff behaviors, and physical activity opportunities. Observations were performed over 1 day, beginning with breakfast and concluding when the program ended for the day. Observations were conducted from February 2010 through April 2011 for a total of 2 observations in each center. Changes to nutrition and physical activity in centers were assessed on the basis of changes in scores related to the physical activity and nutrition environment documented in the observations. Paired t test analyses were performed to determine significance of changes. Significant improvements to total nutrition (P environments of centers by enhancing active play (P = .02), the sedentary environment (P = .005), the portable environment (P = .002), staff behavior (P = .004), and physical activity training and education (P environment (P < .001), and nutrition training and education (P < .001). Findings from this study suggest that implementing wellness policies and training caregivers in best practices for physical activity and nutrition can promote healthy weight for young children in child care settings.

  17. Relationships among sense of coherence, oral health status, nutritional status and care need level of older adults according to path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewake, Nanae; Hamasaki, Tomoko; Sakai, Rie; Yamada, Shima; Nima, Yuko; Tomoe, Miki; Kakuta, Satoko; Iwasaki, Masanori; Soh, Inho; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2017-03-27

    Sense of coherence (SOC) is a measurement of ability of an individual to cope with psychological stress and remain in good health. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships among SOC score, oral health status, nutritional status and care need level of older adults using path analysis. We enrolled 53 older adults (17 men and 36 women) who were attending a day care service (mean age 80.4 ± 6.5 years). SOC was assessed using a 13-item, seven-scale instrument. Oral health status (number of present teeth, denture use) and nutritional status (assessed with Mini-Nutritional Assessment Short-Form) were also evaluated. Path analysis was used to examine the relationship of SOC with other related factors, including care need level. The mean SOC score was 57.0 ± 13.9. Mini-Nutritional Assessment Short-Form results showed that one participant (1.8%) was malnourished, 26 (49.1%) were at risk of malnutrition and 26 (49.1%) had normal nutritional status. Participants with high SOC scores showed a strong positive attitude, had a relatively large number of teeth, were in good nutritional condition and showed low care need levels. The present results showed that maintaining a high SOC level and good oral health help to reduce care need levels in older adults, and also prevent a worsening of their nutritional condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••:••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Gender differences in nutritional behavior and weight status during early and late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askovic, Branka; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    The current study aimed to determine gender differences in nutritional habits, eating behaviour, weight status, body image and weight control practices during early and late adolescence. 677 Viennese pupils (253 boys and 424 girls) between the ages 10 and 18 years (x = 14.1 yrs; +/- 2.2) were enrolled in the study. Weight status was determined by means of body mass index percentiles. To assess eating behavior, food preferences, body image and weight control practices, a 48 item questionnaire was developed. Significant gender differences in weight status were observable during late adolescence only. Girls are significantly less satisfied with their body weight. Furthermore, girls practice dieting and weight control to avoid any weight gain more frequently than boys. Gender differences in eating behavior intensified from early to late adolescence. From early to late adolescence, meal size decreased among girls, while it remains stabile or increased among boys. Boys eat generally more than girls. Furthermore, boys preferred meat and fast food while girls consumed fruits, vegetables and healthy food significantly more frequently. These gender differences are explained by gender specific energetic demands and culture typical beauty ideals.

  19. Lipid droplets in cultured luteal cells in non-pregnant sheep fed different planes of nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanthusaeng, Vilaivan; Thammasiri, Jiratti; Bass, Casie S; Navanukraw, Chainarong; Borowicz, Pawel; Redmer, Dale A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) in luteal cells likely is important for energy storage and steroidogenesis in the highly metabolically active corpus luteum (CL). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plane of nutrition on progesterone (P4) secretion, and lipid droplet number and size in cultured ovine luteal cells. Ewes were randomly assigned to one of three nutritional groups: control (C; 100% NRC requirements, n=9), overfed (O; 2×C, n=12), or underfed (U; 0.6×C, n=10). Superovulation was induced by follicle stimulating hormone injections. At the early and mid-luteal phases of the estrous cycle, CL were dissected from ovaries, and luteal cells isolated enzymatically. Luteal cells were incubated overnight in medium containing serum in chamber slides. Media were then changed to serum-free and after 24h incubation, media were collected for P4 analysis, and cells were fixed in formalin and stained with BODIPY followed by DAPI staining. Z-stacks of optical sections of large and small luteal cells (LLC and SLC, respectively) were obtained using a laser-scanning microscope. Rendered 3D images of individual LLC and SLC were analyzed for cell volume, and total and individual LD volume, number and percentage of cellular volume occupied by LD by using Imaris software. Concentrations of P4 in serum and media were greater (Pplane. LD total volume and number were greater (Pplane affect selected LD measurements and thus may affect luteal functions. Furthermore, these data confirm that LD dynamics differ among parenchymal steroidogenic luteal cell types.

  20. Corn types with different nutritional profiles, extruded or not, on piglets (6 to 15 kg feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina de Oliveira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to determine the nutritional value and verify piglets' performance in the nursery phase fed with diets containing common corn (CC, extruded common corn (ECC, high-lysine corn (HLC, extruded high-lysine corn (EHLC, high-oil corn (HOC and extruded high-oil corn (EHOC. In the total digestibility trial 14 barrows averaging 6.49 ± 0.16 kg initial body weight were allotted in metabolism cages, distributed in a randomized design with seven diets, six replicates, and one piglet per experimental unit. The values of digestible energy (DE, as well as metabolizable energy (ME as-fed basis for CC, ECC, HLC, EHLC, HOC and EHOC were: 3,428 and 3,327 kcal/kg; 3,439 and 3,355 kcal/kg; 3,533 and 3,414 kcal/kg; 3,515 and 3,427 kcal/kg; 3,483 and 3,377 kcal/kg; 3,585 and 3,482 kcal/kg, respectively. In the performance experiment, 84 piglets, weaned at 21 days old, initial live weight of 6.06 ± 0.54 kg were used. Animals were allotted in a completely randomized design in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, using three types of corn (CC, HLC and HOC, two forms of processing (processed or not by extrusion, seven replicates and two piglets per experimental unit. Six diets containing CC, ECC, HLC, EHLC, HOC and EHOC were studied. There were no advantages in the digestibility and performance by extruding the types of corn with different nutritional profiles, for their use in commercial diets for piglets. The results of the two experiments emphasize the importance of segregating the types of corn, extruded or not, in their real chemical and energetic composition as well as the values of true digestible amino acids for the formulation of piglet diets in the nursery phase.

  1. Differential response to sulfur nutrition of two common bean genotypes differing in storage protein composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar ePandurangan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the relatively low concentration of sulfur amino acids in legume seeds might be an ecological adaptation to nutrient poor, marginal soils. SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 are genetically related lines of common bean (dry bean, Phaseolus vulgaris differing in seed storage protein composition. In SMARC1N-PN1, the lack of phaseolin and major lectins is compensated by increased levels of sulfur-rich proteins, resulting in an enhanced concentration of cysteine and methionine, mostly at the expense of the abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methylcysteine. To identify potential effects associated with an increased concentration of sulfur amino acids in the protein pool, the response of the two genotypes to low and high sulfur nutrition was evaluated under controlled conditions. Seed yield was increased by the high sulfate treatment in SMARC1N-PN1. The seed concentrations of sulfur, sulfate and S-methylcysteine were altered by the sulfur treatment in both genotypes. The concentration of total cysteine and extractible globulins was increased specifically in SMARC1N-PN1. Proteomic analysis identified arcelin-like protein 4, lipoxygenase-3, albumin-2 and alpha amylase inhibitor beta chain as having increased levels under high sulfur conditions. Lipoxygenase-3 accumulation was sensitive to sulfur nutrition only in SMARC1N-PN1. Under field conditions, both SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 exhibited a slight increase in yield in response to sulfur treatment, typical for common bean.

  2. Nutritional Balance of broilers fed diets containing two calcium levels and supplemented with different phytase levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DCZ Donato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing different calcium and phytase levels on the nutritional balance of broilers.A total of 108 male AG Ross 308 broilers were used in each of the replicates phases used in the study: starter (1-21 days, grower (29-35 days and finisher (36-42 days. A completely randomized experimental design in a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement, with three phytase levels (0, 600 or 1200 FTU/kg and two calcium levels (0.94 and 0.66%; 0.84 and 0.59%; e 0.78 and 0.54% in the starter, grower, and finisher phases, respectively, totaling six treatments with six replicates each.The experimental feeds also contained reduced available phosphorus levels and minimum crude protein level.The method of total excreta collection was applied to determine dry matter, nitrogen, gross energy, calcium, and phosphorus nutritional balance.Reducing dietary calcium levels to 0.66, 0.59, and 0.54%, and using 0.27, 0.22, and 0.20% available phosphorus, 18.50, 17.50, and 16.00% crude protein, and 600 FTU phytase/kg in the diets of the starter, grower, and finisher phases, respectively, allow higher nitrogen, phosphorus, and calcium retention in broilers.During the grower phase, there was positive linear effect of increasing phytase levels in high-calcium diets on AMEn utilization, and the optimal phytase levels for low-calcium diets was 598.71 FTU/kg.In the finisher phase, the best AMEn utilization was obtained with the high-calcium diets.

  3. National Nutritional Programs for the 2012 London Olympic Games: a systematic approach by three different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Meyer, Nanna L; Pearce, Jeni

    2013-01-01

    Preparing a national team for success at major sporting competitions such as the Olympic Games has become a systematic and multi-faceted activity. Sports nutrition contributes to this success via strategic nutritional interventions that optimize the outcomes from both the training process and the competitive event. This review summarizes the National Nutrition Programs involved with the 2012 London Olympic Games preparation of the Australian, British and American sports systems from the viewpoints of three key agencies: the Australian Institute of Sport, the English Institute of Sport and the United States Olympic Committee. Aspects include development of a nutrition network involving appropriately qualified sports dietitians/nutritionists within a multi-disciplinary team, recognition of continual updates in sports nutrition knowledge, and a systematic approach to service delivery, education and research within the athlete's daily training environment. Issues of clinical nutrition support must often be integrated into the performance nutrition matrix. Food service plays an important role in the achievement of nutrition goals during the Olympic Games, both through the efforts of the Athlete Dining Hall and catering activities of the host Olympic Games Organizing Committees as well as adjunct facilities often provided by National Olympic Committees for their own athletes.

  4. Nutrition awareness before and throughout different trimesters in pregnancy: a quantitative study among Dutch women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szwajcer, E.M.; Hiddink, G.J.; Maas, L.; Koelen, M.; Woerkum, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Method. Data were collected in a cross-sectional study with the aid of a face-to-face interview, based on our conceptualization of nutrition awareness and the 'rules of thumb' designed by the Dutch Nutrition Centre. The sample consisted of five groups each of similar to 100 Dutch nulliparous women:

  5. Nutritional therapy in paediatric intensive care units: a consensus statement of the Section of Paediatric Anaesthesia and Intensive Therapy the Polish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Polish Society of Neonatology and Polish Society for.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Zielińska, Marzena; Świder, Magdalena; Bittner, Grażyna; Sarnowska-Wroczyńska, Irena; Witulska, Katarzyna; Migdał, Marek; Piotrowski, Andrzej; Bober-Olesińska, Krystyna; Kęsiak, Marcin; Lauterbach, Ryszard; Gawecka, Agnieszka; Danko, Mikołaj; Popińska, Katarzyna; Romanowska, Hanna; Szlagatys-Sidorkiewicz, Agnieszka; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa; Żyła, Aleksandra; Książyk, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Providing nutritional therapy via the gastrointestinal tract in patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) is an effective method for delivering energy and other nutrients. In the event of contraindications to using this method, it is necessary to commence parenteral nutrition. In the present study, methods for nutritional treatments in critically ill children are presented, depending on the clinical situation.

  6. Calidad del soporte nutricional artificial en una unidad de cuidados intensivos Quality of artificial nutritional support in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santana-Cabrera

    2006-12-01

    situación permite tomar medidas encaminadas a optimizar el soporte nutricional de nuestros pacientes. Posiblemente la motivación en el personal médico y de enfermería en llevar a cabo protocolos de nutrición que se establezcan podría ser la medida más efectiva, lo que habría que confirmar en estudios posteriores.Objectives: To assess what are the reasons for discrepancies between the amount of nutrients delivered, prescribed and theoretical requirements, in an intensive care unit. Design: Prospective cohort study over a 5 months period. Setting: Intensive Care Unit of the Insular University Hospital in Gran Canaria. Patients: Adult patients who were prescribed enteral and or parenteral nutrition for ≥ 2 days and we followed them for the first 14 days of nutrition delivery. Intervention: The prescribed and the delivered calories were calculated every day, whereas the theoretical requeriments were calculated after the ICU stay, by using the Harris-Benedict formula adjusted with a stress factor. Also the reason for cessation of enteral tube feeding> 1 hour in the days of artificial nutrition were analyzed. Results: Fifty-nine consecutive patients, receiving nutritional support either enterally or intravenously, and 465 nutrition days analyzed. Nutrition was initiated within 48 hours after ICU admission. Enteral nutrition was the preferential route used. Seventy-nine percent of the mean caloric amount required was prescribed, and 66% was effectively delivered; also 88% of the amount prescribed was delivered. The low ratio of delivered-prescribed calories concerned principally enteral nutrition and was caused by gastrointestinal intolerance. We observe a wide variation in practice patterns among physicians to start, increase, reduce or stop enteral nutrition when symptoms of intolerance appear. Conclusions: In our ICU exists an important difference between the caloric theoretical requests and the quantity really delivered; this deficit is more clear in the enteral

  7. The Effects of Peanut Intercropping with Different Gramineous Species and Their Intercropping Model on Iron Nutrition of Peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Yuan-mei; ZHANG Fu-suo

    2003-01-01

    The effects of peanut intercropped with five different gramineous species with different phyto-siderophore release rate on iron nutrition of peanut were studied in field experiment. The rate of phyto-siderophore release of five gramineous species was as following: barley> oats> wheat>> maize> sorghum.The results showed that intercropping of peanut with five gramineous species could improve iron nutrition ofpeanut respectively. This indicated that root exudates, especially for phytosiderophore of gramineous plantsplayed an important role in improvement of iron nutrition of peanut. Although phytosiderophore release ratesof maize and sorghum were lower than those of barley, oats and wheat, the five gramineous species had thesame effects on iron improvement of peanut. The less phytosiderophore release of maize was enough to improveiron nutrition of peanut in intercropping system. For every intercropping system, intercropping model Ⅱ ( theratio of gramineous plants: peanut: gramineous plants was 2: 3 : 2) was much better in improvement of ironnutrition of peanut than that of intercropping model Ⅰ (the ratio of gramineous plants: peanut : gramineousplants was 2: 6: 2). This led to have greater rhizosphere effect of gramineous plants on iron nutrition of pea-nut in intercropping model Ⅱ than intercropping model Ⅰ .

  8. Evaluation of a Nutrition Care Process-based audit instrument, the Diet-NCP-Audit, for documentation of dietetic care in medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövestam, Elin; Orrevall, Ylva; Koochek, Afsaneh; Karlström, Brita; Andersson, Agneta

    2014-06-01

    Adequate documentation in medical records is important for high-quality health care. Documentation quality is widely studied within nursing, but studies are lacking within dietetic care. The aim of this study was to translate, elaborate and evaluate an audit instrument, based on the four-step Nutrition Care Process model, for documentation of dietetic care in medical records. The audit instrument includes 14 items focused on essential parts of dietetic care and the documentation's clarity and structure. Each item is to be rated 0-1 or 0-2 points, with a maximum total instrument score of 26. A detailed manual was added to facilitate the interpretation and increase the reliability of the instrument. The instrument is based on a similar tool initiated 9 years ago in the United States, which in this study was translated to Swedish and further elaborated. The translated and further elaborated instrument was named Diet-NCP-Audit. Firstly, the content validity of the Diet-NCP-Audit instrument was tested by five experienced dietitians. They rated the relevance and clarity of the included items. After a first rating, minor improvements were made. After the second rating, the Content Validity Indexes were 1.0, and the Clarity Index was 0.98. Secondly, to test the reliability, four dietitians reviewed 20 systematically collected dietetic notes independently using the audit instrument. Before the review, a calibration process was performed. A comparison of the reviews was performed, which resulted in a moderate inter-rater agreement with Krippendorff's α = 0.65-0.67. Grouping the audit results in three levels: lower, medium or higher range, a Krippendorff's α of 0.74 was considered high reliability. Also, an intra-rater reliability test-retest with a 9 weeks interval, performed by one dietitian, showed strong agreement. To conclude, the evaluated audit instrument had high content validity and moderate to high reliability and can be used in auditing documentation of dietetic

  9. Energy and protein allowances and requirements in stallions during the breeding season, comparing different nutritional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, R; Bailoni, L

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the nutritional value of diets given to stallions of different breeds during the reproductive season, and comparing allowances with requirements. The systems compared were the French INRA, the 1989 NRC, and the 2007 NRC. Data on reproductive activity, daily exercise, BW, BCS, feed intake, and feed composition during 4 mo (from March to June) were recorded on 12 stallions used for commercial AI programs. Stallions belonged to 3 different breeds: Italian Haflinger (IH, n=4), Holstein (HOL, n=4), and Italian Heavy Draft horse (IHDH, n=4). Data recorded were used to estimate the actual energy and protein intakes and theoretical requirements of the stallions using the aforementioned systems. A deviation index [DI = (intake - requirement)/intake × -1] was calculated to allow a comparison among methods as a proportion of under- or overestimates of theoretical requirements. All data were statistically analyzed with a mixed model for repeated measurements. The reproductive activity of the stallions was affected by month (less in March and greater in subsequent months; Prequirements considering all 3 nutritional systems. Energy and protein INRA recommendations showed, on average, +0.90 and +0.27 greater DI than actual intakes, respectively, for IH and HOL stallions, whereas the theoretical requirements were much closer to allowances for the IHDH stallions (DI close to 0). The 1989 NRC energy and protein recommendations, respectively, were +0.67 and +0.87 greater than intake for IH, +0.28 and +0.43 greater for HOL, and only +0.06 and +0.17 greater for IHDH stallions. The 2007 NRC energy and protein recommendations, respectively, were +0.70 and +0.52 greater for IH, +0.33 and +0.17 greater for HOL, and +0.52 and +0.49 greater for IHDH than actual intakes. Therefore, all systems overestimated the requirements of the stallion, particularly in lighter breeds. Further studies to validate requirements for breeding stallions of different sizes

  10. Reducing the inappropriate use of parenteral nutrition in an acute care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J; Weinbaum, F; Turner, J; Brady, T; Pistone, B; D'Addario, V; Lun, W; Ghazali, B

    1996-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a form of nutrition that can be life-saving, but its use has inherent risks and it is expensive. Nutrition support teams have been shown to reduce both the rate of complications and excessive use of PN. Criteria were established to evaluate the appropriateness of PN use in a 487-bed community teaching hospital. A prospective study of 50 consecutive patients, who received either central or peripheral PN, was conducted. The 50 patients received 469 days of PN. We found that 233 (49.7%) of the 469 days of PN were avoidable. This resulted in the creation of a formal approval process that required prior approval by a physician-directed multidisciplinary advisory committee before PN could be instituted. The amount of PN subsequently decreased from 500 patient days of PN per month to less than 100. This study supports the idea that inappropriate use of PN can be reduced by physician education plus the continuing oversight of a physician-directed multidisciplinary advisory group.

  11. Maternal nutritional knowledge and child nutritional status in the Volta region of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appoh, Lily Yaa; Krekling, Sturla

    2005-04-01

    The relationship between mother's nutritional knowledge, maternal education, and child nutritional status (weight-for-age) was the subject of investigation in this study. The data were collected in Ghana on 55 well nourished and 55 malnourished mother-child pairs. A questionnaire designed to collect data on mother's knowledge and practices related to child care and nutrition was administered to the mothers. Data on mother's demographic and socio-economic characteristics as well as child anthropometric data were also collected. A nutrition knowledge score was calculated based on mother's responses to the nutrition related items. Bivariate analysis gave significant associations between child nutritional status and the following variables: time of initiating of breastfeeding, mother's knowledge of importance of colostrum and whether colostrum was given to child, age of introduction of supplementary food, and mother's knowledge about causes of kwashiorkor. The two groups also showed significant differences in their nutrition knowledge scores. Maternal formal education, and marital status were also found to be associated with child nutritional status in bivariate analyses. Further analysis with logistic regression revealed that maternal nutrition knowledge was independently associated with nutritional status after the effects of other significant variables were controlled for. Maternal education on the other hand was not found to be independently associated with nutritional status. These results imply that mother's practical knowledge about nutrition may be more important than formal maternal education for child nutrition outcome.

  12. Drug supersaturation in simulated and human intestinal fluids representing different nutritional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Clarysse, Sarah; Vertzoni, Maria; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    It was the purpose of this study to explore supersaturation of poorly soluble drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF), and to assess potential food effects on the creation and maintenance of supersaturation. Duodenal fluids were collected from healthy volunteers and pooled according to three nutritional states (fasted-, fed-, and fat-enriched fed state). Supersaturation was created at a fixed degree of supersaturation (DS=20) using the solvent-shift method. Fasted- and fed-state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF) were used as intestinal simulation media. Supersaturation in HIF showed to be stable up to a certain degree for different poorly soluble drugs. In HIF as well as in FaSSIF and FeSSIF, supersaturation appeared to be compound and medium specific. Supersaturation stability was found to be inversely proportional to the solubility in the corresponding media. Food intake affected itraconazole supersaturation positively. On the contrary, etravirine and loviride supersaturation decreased upon food intake. Supersaturation experiments in FaSSIF and FeSSIF showed similar results as in HIF for etravirine and loviride, whereas itraconazole supersaturation behaved differently in HIF versus simulation media. The present study illustrates, for the first time, that supersaturation can be created and maintained in HIF, even in the absence of excipients. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  13. Satisfaction in different life domains in children receiving home parenteral nutrition and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, Frédéric; Staszewski, Pierre; Colomb, Virginie; Loras-Duclaux, Irène; Guimber, Dominique; Marinier, Evelyne; Breton, Anne; Magnificat, Sabine

    2005-06-01

    To assess the quality-of-life (QOL) of children receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). A national multicenter study of 72 patients (median age 4 years) presenting with a digestive disease requiring HPN, and 90 siblings, 67 fathers, and 69 mothers of these children. Median duration of HPN was 2 years (3 months-18 years). QOL was measured using validated, nondisease-specific questionnaires appropriate to the children's ages. The QOL scores were high in patients of all ages and were not significantly different from scores in a reference population of healthy children and adolescents. Lower QOL scores were recorded in the domains related to hospital, health, doctors, medications, and obligations. The QOL was not affected in siblings but was significantly impaired in parents, especially in mothers, who showed a lower level of satisfaction than did fathers for items related to work, inner life, and freedom. Presence of an ileostomy was the only factor that influenced QOL, especially of adolescents. QOL of HPN-dependent children and siblings is not different from that of healthy children, suggesting that these children actively use effective coping strategies. In contrast, the QOL of parents of HPN-dependent children is low.

  14. A comparison between different concentrations and sources of cobalt in goat kid nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfoulian, A H; Aliarabi, H

    2017-04-01

    There have been extensive studies in sheep and cattle considering cobalt (Co) supplementation and its effects on vitamin B12 concentrations in the body. However, there are limited studies on goats. The aim of this study was to compare two different sources of Co (sulfate v. glucoheptonate) at two different concentrations (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg dry matter) in goat kid nutrition, and to evaluate the effects of these supplements on performance, serum vitamin B12, blood biochemistry and rumen volatile fatty acids. For this purpose, 30 weaned male goat kids were randomly allotted to five treatments. Serum vitamin B12 increased during the trial in the Co-supplemented groups. Co supplementation increased serum glucose concentrations. On day 35, Co-supplemented groups had greater glucose concentrations compared with control. Propionic+iso-butyric acid concentrations increased only in the 0.5 mg Co glucoheptonate treatment (P<0.05). Our results suggest that, despite the two sources of Co proving mostly similar, the main advantage of Co glucoheptonate compared with Co sulfate was in the ruminal synthesis of vitamin B12. However, although providing Co at National Research Council recommendation levels maintained vitamin B12 above or at normal concentrations, Co supplementation of the Co sufficient basal diet increased vitamin B12 and glucose concentrations.

  15. Influence of long-term nutrition with different dietary fats on fatty acid composition of heavy pigs backfat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Corino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of long-term fat supplementation on the fatty acid profile of heavy pig adipose tissue. Fifty-four Large White barrows, averaging 25 kg LW, were randomized (matched weights to one of three isoenergetic diets supplemented with either tallow (TA, maize oil (MO, or rapeseed oil (RO. The fats were supplement- ed at 3% as fed from 25 to 110 kg LW, and at 2.5 % from 110 kg to slaughtering. Following slaughter at about 160 kg LW, backfat samples were collected from ten animals per treatment and analyzed. Fatty acid composition of backfat close- ly reflected the fatty acid composition of the supplemented fats. The backfat of pigs fed TA had the highest saturated fatty acid content (SFA (P<0.01; those fed MO had the highest content in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA and the lowest in monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA content; those fed RO had the highest content of linolenic acid (C18:3 and cis 11- ecosenoic acid (C20:1. Only MO treatment had an effect on linoleic acid levels and the iodine value (IV of backfat, result- ing in levels higher than those (IV = 70; C18:2 = 15% accepted by the Parma Consortium for dry-cured ham. The IV and unsaturation index in both layers of subcutaneous backfat tissue differed significantly between treatments. These results show that long-term dietary supplementation with different fats changes the fatty acid profile of heavy pig adipose tissue. Supplementation with rapeseed oil increases the proportion of “healthy” fatty acids in pig fat, thereby improving the nutritional quality, however the effects on the technological quality of the fat must be carefully assessed.

  16. Comparative evaluation of Jatropha curcas L. seed meals obtained by different methods of defatting on toxic, antinutritional and nutritive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianhui; Zhang, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Different methods of defatting have a great impact on toxic, antinutritional and nutritive factors in the oilseed meals. In order to find the most suitable methods of defatting for Jatropha curcas seed meals, the Jatropha curcas L. seed meals, defatted by Soxhlet extraction and screw-press were characterized for their toxic, anti-nutritional and nutrient factors in this study. The toxins (phorbolesters, 3.1 and 2.9 mg/g) and some anti-nutritional factors (saponins, 2.9 and 2.6%; phytates, 11.1 and 11.6%) in meals obtained by the two defatting methods were present at high concentrations. However, the trypsin inhibitors activity (TIA) and lectin (2.7 mg/g and 1.5 mg/ml) in the screw-pressed meal were significantly lower, due to the high temperature (120 °C) used in this defatting process. From nutritional side, the values of crude protein (CP), buffer-soluble nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen, pepsin insoluble nitrogen, in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD), as well as essential amino acid index (EAAI), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI) and protein-digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of the meal obtained by Soxhlet extraction were better than the screw-pressed meal. However, taking practical application into account, from detoxification side, screw-pressed meal is better for detoxification.

  17. Reason for Visit: Is Migrant Health Care that Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, George F.; Graybill, Marie; George, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the reasons for which migrant agricultural workers in Pennsylvania seek health care. Methods: Participants were individuals 14 years of age and over, actively involved in agricultural labor and presenting for medical care at 6 migrant health care centers. Bilingual health care providers…

  18. Nutritional knowledge and attitudes of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietz, C L; Fryer, B A; Fryer, H C

    1980-03-01

    The nutritional knowledge and attitudes of 230 dental students were studied. The students answered 68.6% of the nutritional knowledge questions currectly, but the test scores were low because they were adversely affected by the degree of certainty. First-year students scored significantly higher than fourth-year students. There was no significant difference between scores of men and women. Knowledge scores were highest for questions on nutrition and oral health and lowest for those on nutritional assessment. Dental students generally expressed favorable attitudes toward nutrition and nutritional care of patients. They agreed that dentists were vital members of the health team and had a responsibility to become involved in health screening and nutrition education of patients. Dietitians were seen as valuable resources to be consulted about nutrition education of the dental patient. More first-year students supported the idea that dentists should prescribe nutritoinal supplements for patients, whereas more fourth-year students were undecided about this matter. There were no differences in nutrition attitude scores attributable to gender of the student or year in dental school. In this study, nutritional knowledge scores did not correlate with nutrition attitude scores.

  19. Effects of Different Operative Procedures on the Digestive and Nutritional Status of Patients Treated with a Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Liang; Xishan Hao

    2006-01-01

    Postgastrectomy syndromes evoked by the loss of several gastric functions after total or subtotal gastrectomy are very common. Different kinds of reconstruction have been developed to overcome the problem. Patients with preservation of a duodenal passage and jejunal interposition with or without a pouch show a better quality of life and minimal symptoms postoperatively. A jejunal interposition with or without a pouch after proximal or distal subtotal gastrictomy seems to improve the nutritional condition and quality of life. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI), Visick score, Spitzer index and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) questionnaire (QLQ-C30) are available to evaluate the quality of life and nutritional status after gastrectomy.

  20. Examining Preschoolers' Nutrition Knowledge Using a Meal Creation and Food Group Classification Task: Age and Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Shayla C.; Musher-Eizenman, Dara R.

    2010-01-01

    Eating behaviours begin to develop during early childhood, but relatively little is known about preschoolers' nutrition knowledge. The current study examined age and gender differences in this knowledge using two tasks: food group classification and the creation of unhealthy, healthy and preferred meals. Sixty-nine three- to six-year-old children…

  1. Validity of the doubly labeled water method for estimating CO2 production in mice under different nutritional conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meijer, Harro A. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    The doubly labeled water (DLW) technique is used to assess metabolic rate (MR) in free-living conditions. We investigated whether differences in the nutritional and body adiposity status affect validity of the assessment of CO2 production (rCO(2)) by the DLW technique. To serve this purpose, we comp

  2. Validity of the doubly labeled water method for estimating CO2 production in mice under different nutritional conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meijer, Harro A. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    The doubly labeled water (DLW) technique is used to assess metabolic rate (MR) in free-living conditions. We investigated whether differences in the nutritional and body adiposity status affect validity of the assessment of CO2 production (rCO(2)) by the DLW technique. To serve this purpose, we

  3. Examining Preschoolers' Nutrition Knowledge Using a Meal Creation and Food Group Classification Task: Age and Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Shayla C.; Musher-Eizenman, Dara R.

    2010-01-01

    Eating behaviours begin to develop during early childhood, but relatively little is known about preschoolers' nutrition knowledge. The current study examined age and gender differences in this knowledge using two tasks: food group classification and the creation of unhealthy, healthy and preferred meals. Sixty-nine three- to six-year-old children…

  4. Differences in fat and sodium intake across hypertension subgroups in the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living (MCHL) Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study is to examine differences between self-reported intakes of sodium, trans-fat, and total fat among hypertension (HTN) subgroups of participants in Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living nutrition education intervention. Dietary intake was measured using a food frequenc...

  5. Just a subtle difference? Findings from a systematic review on definitions of nutrition literacy and food literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Corinna; Sommerhalder, Kathrin; Beer-Borst, Sigrid; Abel, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition literacy and food literacy have become increasingly important concepts in health promotion. Researchers use one or the other term to describe the competencies needed to maintain a healthy diet. This systematic review examines whether these terms are synonymous or if their meanings are substantially different.We searched major bibliographic databases (Web of Science, PubMed, ScienceDirect, CINAHL, SocIndex and ERIC) for publications that provided an original definition of nutrition or food literacy. Then we used Nutbeam's tripartite health literacy model as an analytical grid. The definitions we found included specific competencies, which we mapped to the domains of functional, interactive, or critical literacy.In the 173 full-text publications we screened, we found six original definitions of nutrition literacy, and 13 original definitions of food literacy. Seven food literacy definitions were integrated into a conceptual framework. Analysing their structure revealed that nutrition literacy and food literacy are seen as specific forms of health literacy, and represent distinct but complementary concepts. Definitions of nutrition literacy mainly described the abilities necessary to obtain and understand nutrition information. Definitions of food literacy incorporated a broader spectrum of theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. To be food literate also means to apply information on food choices and critically reflect on the effect of food choice on personal health and on society. Since food literacy is based on a more comprehensive understanding of health behaviours, it is the more viable term to use in health promotion interventions. For the practical implication, a harmonization of the different definitions is desirable.

  6. Social isolation, support, and capital and nutritional risk in an older sample: ethnic and gender differences

    OpenAIRE

    Locher, Julie L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; Baker, Patricia Sawyer; Bodner, Eric V.; Allman, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the relationships that exist between social isolation, support, and capital and nutritional risk in older black and white women and men. The paper reports on 1000 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 and older enrolled in the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Study of Aging, a longitudinal observational study of mobility among older black and white participants in the USA. Black women were at greatest nutritional risk; and black women and men were the groups mos...

  7. Swallowing Function and Nutritional Status in Japanese Elderly People Receiving Home-care Services: A 1-year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Y; Furuta, M; Akifusa, S; Takeuchi, K; Adachi, M; Kinoshita, T; Kikutani, T; Nakamura, S; Yamashita, Y

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a serious health concern for frail elderly people. Poor oral function leading to insufficient food intake can contribute to the development of malnutrition. In the present study, we explored the longitudinal association of malnutrition with oral function, including oral health status and swallowing function, in elderly people receiving home nursing care. Prospective observational cohort study with 1-year follow-up. Two mid-sized cities in Fukuoka, Japan from November 2010 to March 2012. One hundred and ninety-seven individuals, aged ≥ 60 years, living at home and receiving home-care services because of physical disabilities, without malnutrition. Oral health status, swallowing function, taking modified-texture diets such as minced or pureed foods, nutritional status, cognitive function, and activities of daily living were assessed at baseline. The associations between malnutrition at 1-year follow-up and these related factors were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Swallowing disorders [risk ratio (RR): 5.21, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.65-16.43] were associated with malnutrition. On the other hand, oral health status did not have a direct association with malnutrition. Swallowing disorders may be associated with the incidence of malnutrition in elderly people receiving home-care. The findings indicate that maintaining swallowing function may contribute to the prevention of malnutrition in frail elderly people.

  8. Time trends in social differences in nutrition habits of a Lithuanian population: 1994-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriaucioniene Vilma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the post-communist transition period, political, economic, and social changes affected the lifestyles of the Lithuanian population, including their nutritional habits. However, people of lower socio-economic position were more vulnerable to these changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trends in selected food habits of the Lithuanian adult population by their level of education and place of residence from 1994 to 2010. Methods The data were obtained from nine biannual cross-sectional postal surveys of Lithuanian health behaviours, beginning in 1994. Each survey used a randomly selected nationally representative sample of 3000 inhabitants aged 20-64 drawn from the population register. In total, 7358 men and 9796 women participated in these surveys. Questions about food consumption were included within all health behaviour questionnaires. Results During the transition period, use of vegetable oil in cooking and the frequency of consumption of fresh vegetables increased, use of butter on bread decreased, and the proportion of women drinking high-fat milk declined. Lithuanians with higher education reported more frequent use of vegetable oil in cooking as well as daily consumption of fresh vegetables than those with a lower level of education. Consumption of high-fat milk was inversely associated with educational background. In addition, the proportion of persons spreading butter on bread increased with higher education level. The greatest urban-rural difference was observed in high-fat milk consumption. The increase in the use of vegetable oil in cooking, and the reduction of spreading butter on bread was more evident among less educated and rural inhabitants. Meanwhile, a greater proportion of the rural population, compared to urban, reduced their use of butter on bread. Daily consumption of fresh vegetables increased most among highly educated Lithuanians. Conclusions The data from our study indicate

  9. Health, nutrition and hydration status of Indonesian workers: a preliminary study in two different environmental settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptawati Bardosono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydration status in the working environment of hot and conveniently cool may influence the health status of workers, including their hydration status. This study aimed to determine the health, nutrition and hydration status of workers in two different working environment, i.e. hot and conveniently cool environment.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was done on apparently healthy male subjects, age 25-45 years. Two groups of factory workers consisted of  39 subjects working in environment exposed directly to heat and the other doing administrative work in cool environment. Data on their health status (physical examination, weight, height, waist circumference, fat body composition, laboratory result, were collected. The data was presented as average value and  proportion; statistical analysis with unpaired-t (Mann-Whitney test and chi-square test was used.Results: Subjects working in a hot environment were more prone to dehydration  in comparison to their counterparts, as was shown by significantly higher values of several hydration status biomarkers: hemoglobin (15.6 vs 14.8 g/dL, p = 0.017, hematocrit (46 vs 44.5%, p = 0.040, blood viscosity (23 vs 12 mEq/L, p < 0.001, and blood sodium concentration (140 vs 138 mEq/L, p < 0.001. In contrast, subjects working in a conveniently cool environment who did more administrative tasks were physically less active, had significantly lower HDL-cholesterol level (43 vs 52.1 mg/dL, p = 0.005, higher body and visceral fat compositions (21.6 vs 17.6%, p = 0.008, and 10 vs 8%, p = 0.015, respectively compared to their counterparts.Conclusion: Workers in hot and cool working environment are prone to nutrition- and health problems as well as dehydration, suggesting special attention to the provision of timely drinking water, and physical activity during working time.

  10. Nutritional Composition of Different Varieties of Apple Purees Sweetened with Green and White Stevia Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šic Žlabur

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of apple purees of four different apple varieties: ‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Idared’, ‘Jonagold’ and ‘Cripps Pink’, in the fresh state (FP and after thermal treatment by process of pasteurization with added green (PG or white stevia powder (PW derived from the leaves of the stevia plant. Also, to determine whether there is a significant influence of sweetening with stevia on the change of analyzed nutritional parameters of apple purees based on the results. Significant increase of dry matter content in PG and PW samples of apple purees was determined for approximately 10%, and also for total soluble solid content for 1%. High increase of natural invert content, for approximately five times higher, and some lower increase of total invert content of analyzed purees was determined in PG and PW samples in comparison with the FP samples. Total acid content and pH value did not show any significant change during the process of pasteurization and sweetening with stevia. The pasteurization significantly influenced the slight vitamin C reduction as well as the high reduction of total phenols in PG and PW samples. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the thermal processing by pasteurization significantly affects the degradation of high antioxidant activity compounds. Adding a green and white stevia powder significantly influenced the alterations of some nutritional components analyzed in apple purees: the dry matter content, soluble solids, and natural invert content (sugar glucose. It is important to emphasize, that the main effect of green and white stevia powder was the increase of natural invert content i.e. content of glucose and fructose, thereby increasing the sweetness of product, without increasing the content of “harmful” sugars e.g. sucrose. Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table

  11. Nutritional evaluation of babassu endocarp meal type II with different inclusions in sheep diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemilly Cristina Menezes Sá

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization of the Babassu coconut for edible oil production generates many co-products and has great potential to be used in ruminant nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different inclusions of endocarp meal type II of Babassu coconut (BEMII on intake and digestibility of sheep diets. Twenty non-castrated male sheep with an undefined breed were distributed in a completely randomized design with four treatments and five replications. The animals received an experimental diet with increasing inclusions of BEMII (0.0%, 7.5%, 15.0%, and 22.5%. Increasing additions of the coproduct negatively influenced dry matter intake (g/BW and g/kg0.75. Crude protein intake (in grams per day decreased linearly with the inclusion of BEMII, presenting a reduction of 49.35 g/d. The inclusion of 7.5% showed the best response for energy balance among all inclusions and presented the closest nitrogen balance value when compared to the control group; therefore, this inclusion percentage is the best for endocarp meal utilization.

  12. Evaluation of nutrient excretion and retention in broilers submitted to different nutritional strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL Graña

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of different nutritional strategies on nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and calcium (Ca balance and on copper (Cu, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn excretion in broilers during the periods of 1 to 21 days and 1 to 46 days of age. Four hundred male Cobb-500 broilers were used. A randomized block experimental design was applied, including five treatments with eight replicates of 10 birds each. A five-phase feeding program was adopted (1-8, 9-21, 22-33, 34-40 and 41-46 days of age. Treatments consisted of a control diet (C with typical protein level and low amino acid supplementation; a reduced-protein diet supplemented with synthetic amino acids formulated on ideal protein concept (IP; C with phytase (C+PHY supplementation; C with inorganic-organic mineral supplementation (C+MIN; and a diet formulated on ideal protein (IP basis, and supplemented with phytase and organic and inorganic minerals (IP+PHY+MIN. IP and IP+PHY+MIN diets reduced nitrogen excretion in 13.6 and 13.1% respectively, and promoted the same nitrogen retention (g/bird and retention efficiency as compared to the diet with typical crude protein level. C+PHY and IP+PHY+MIN reduced phosphorus, calcium and manganese excretion, and improved phosphorus retention. C+MIN and IP+PHY+MIN reduced manganese excretion, but did not influence copper or zinc excretion.

  13. Lipid nutritional value of legumes: Evaluation of different extraction methods and determination of fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Giusti, Federica; Ballini, Roberto; Sagratini, Gianni; Vila-Donat, Pilar; Vittori, Sauro; Fiorini, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to contribute to the assessment of the nutritional properties of legumes by determining the fatty acid (FA) composition of 29 legume samples after the evaluation of nine extraction methods. The Folch method and liquid-solid extraction with hexane/isopropanol or with hexane/acetone were investigated, as was the effect of previous hydration of samples. Soxhlet extractions were also evaluated with different solvent mixtures. Results on FA composition using the hexane/isopropanol extraction method were the same in terms of FA composition of the Folch method, but the extraction yield was only around 20-40% of that of the Folch method preceded by hydration. Some types of legumes showed particularly interesting values for the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) n-6/n-3, such as lentils, with the value of 4.0, and Azuki beans, at 3.2. In lentils, the PUFAs% ranged from 42.0% to 57.4%, while in Azuki beans it was 57.5%.

  14. Nutritional Assessment and Antioxidant Activities of Different Varieties of Vigna radiata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Ullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cultivars of Vigna radiata, namely, NM-92, NM-98, and NM-06, were analyzed for their proximate composition. The samples were also tested by HPLC for amino acid content. The data showed that all the varieties had same moisture level. The maximum ash content (4.29% was present in NM-92, and crude fat (2.26% was highest in NM-98 while NM-06 contained maximum amount of crude protein. About eighteen types of amino acids were detected in each of the three varieties. Acidic amino acids, that is, aspartic and glutamic acids, were in considerable amount ranged from 13 to 23% followed by leucine, isoleucine, alanine, valine, lysine, phenyl alanine, serine, and arginine which fell in the range of 3–8% of total protein. The maximum amount (13.00 and 22.80% of aspartic and glutamic acids was present in NM-98. Similarly arginine (6.83% and serine (5.45% were also in highest amount in this variety. Leucine (7.46% was maximum in NM-92 variety. NM-06 contained almost all the amino acids in lesser quantity except for few like threonine, proline, glycine, and alanine. It was concluded from the present study that varieties were of different nutritional value and HPLC was a sensitive method for amino acids determination. Antioxidant activities of all three varieties were also assayed and showed significant results.

  15. Calidad de la atención nutricional en el paciente pediátrico hospitalizado Quality of nutritional care in the hospitalized pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Betancourt Guerra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la nutrición es un aspecto importante en la terapéutica actual de los pacientes y tiene una repercusión social, por lo que todo el personal de salud debe considerarlo como un pilar terapéutico a la hora de atender a un enfermo. Objetivo: evaluar la calidad de la atención nutricional del paciente pediátrico hospitalizado. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal, y la muestra estuvo constituida por 50 pacientes. Se confeccionó un Formulario de Atención Nutricional que sirvió para registrar el estado actual del apoyo nutricional, y de esta forma, se evaluó la calidad de su atención. Resultados: la evaluación nutricional, al momento del ingreso, fue solo de un 18 %, y el diagnóstico del estado nutricional no se realizó en el 96 % de los pacientes ingresados. La realización de exámenes de laboratorio con relevancia nutricional fue de un 12 %, mientras las acciones terapéuticas para corregir los exámenes patológicos fueron de un 50 %. No se daba seguimiento a la curva de peso, y todos los pacientes ingresados mantenían regímenes de ayuno hospitalario por encima del 10 %. Conclusiones: la calidad de la atención nutricional en el paciente pediátrico hospitalizado fue deficiente.Introduction: nutrition is an important element of the present therapy of patients and has social impact, so the health professional staff should take it as a therapeutic support in the care of a patient. Objective: to evaluate the quality of nutritional care of the hospitalized pediatric patient. Methods: a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in which the sample was made up of 50 patients. A Formulary of Nutritional Care was prepared, which served to register the current state of the nutritional support and thus evaluated the quality of nutritional care. Results: the nutritional assessment at the time of admission was just made in 18 % of cases and the diagnosis of nutritional state was ignored in 96 % of

  16. Sensory evaluation of coob 500 chicken meat after application of different additives in their nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mellen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to verify the effect of different feed additives in nutrition of Cobb 500 broiler chickens  on the sensory quality of breast and thigh muscle modified by baking at temperature 200 ºC for 60 minutes. The experiment included 250 one-day-old Cobb 500 hybrid chickens, which were divided into 5 groups (n=50: control (I and experimental groups (E1 with Agolin Poultry at doses of 100 mg.kg-1, E2 with Agolin Tannin Plus at doses of 500 mg.kg-1, E3 with Biostrong 510+FortiBac at doses of 1000 mg.kg-1 and E4 with Agolin Acid at doses of 1000 mg.kg-1. The chickens were fed during 42 days of age by ad libitum system with feed mixtures: BR1 starter feed mixture (until the of 10th day of age, BR2 growth feed mixture (from 11th to 20th day of age, BR3 growth feed mixture (from 21st to 35th days of age and BR4 final feed mixture (from 36th to 42nd days of age. Feed mixtures were produced with coccidiostats in powder form. Panellists evaluate aroma, juiciness, taste and tenderness on 5 point hedonic scale where 1 (the worst and 5 (the best were the extremes of each characteristic. Significant differences were found between control and experimental group E3 in juiciness and tenderness of breast muscles and between control and experimental group E2 in smell of thigh muscles. Sensory evaluation of breast and thigh muscles in Cobb 500 chickens after application of different feed additives indicated that these additives have not worsened the quality of meat. The highest sensory score was obtained in experimental group E4 (with addition of Agolin Acid at the dose of 1000 mg.kg-1. Normal 0 21 false false false CS JA X-NONE

  17. Wheat response to differences in water and nutritional status between zeoponic and hydroponic growth systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Ming, D. W.; Henderson, K. E.; Carrier, C.; Gruener, J. E.; Barta, D. J.; Henninger, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Hydroponic culture has traditionally been used for controlled environment life support systems (CELSS) because the optimal environment for roots supports high growth rates. Recent developments in zeoponic substrate and microporous tube irrigation (ZPT) also offer high control of the root environment. This study compared the effect of differences in water and nutrient status of ZPT or hydroponic culture on growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. USU-Apogee). In a side-by-side test in a controlled environment, wheat was grown in ZPT and recirculating hydroponics to maturity. Water use by plants grown in both culture systems peaked at 15 to 20 L m-2 d-1 up to Day 40, after which it declined more rapidly for plants grown in ZPT culture due to earlier senescence of leaves. No consistent differences in water status were noted between plants grown in the two culture systems. Although yield was similar, harvest index was 28% lower for plants grown in ZPT than in hydroponic culture. Sterile green tillers made up 12 and 0% of the biomass of plants grown in ZPT and hydroponic culture, respectively. Differences in biomass partitioning were attributed primarily to NH4-N nutrition of plants grown in ZPT compared with NO3-N in hydroponic nutrient solution. It is probable that NH4-N-induced Ca deficiency produced excess tillering and lower harvest index for plants grown in ZPT culture. These results suggest that further refinements in zeoponic substrate would make ZPT culture a viable alternative for achieving high productivity in a CELSS.

  18. Differences in vitamin D nutritional status between newly diagnosed cancer patients from rural or urban settings in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, K L; Wiggins, A T; Van Meter, E M; Means, R T; Hayslip, J W; Roach, J P

    2013-01-01

    Although poor nutritional status and weight loss in cancer patients is known to affect outcomes, little is known about malnutrition differences based on geographic location. We investigated nutritional and inflammatory status of 220 newly diagnosed adults with solid tumors at the University of Kentucky's Markey Cancer Center during December 2008 through October 2011. Chi-square tests were used to determine any associations between suboptimal nutritional levels and rural-urban areas of residence. Out of the 13 lab values collected, the only significant difference between rural and urban participants was found for vitamin D resulting in more rural subjects (67.4%) having a suboptimal vitamin D status as compared to those residing in urban areas (53.3%, P = 0.04). Controlling for baseline demographics including age, race, sex, body mass index, nutritional status, and type of cancer, logistic regression analyses concluded those in rural areas had nearly a twofold increase in the odds of having a suboptimal vitamin D level compared to those in urban areas (odd's ratio = 1.97; 95% confidence interval = 1.04, 3.74). Further investigation into the rural-urban differences in vitamin D needs to be investigated in order to improve outcomes during cancer treatment.

  19. Prevalence and Factors Associated with the Use of Eye Care Services in South Korea: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Seok; Heo, Hwan; Ye, Byeong Jin; Suh, Young-Woo; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Park, Shin Hae; Lim, Key Hwan; Lee, Sung Jin; Park, Song Hee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the factors and prevalence of eye care service utilization in the South Korean population. Methods This cross-sectional, population-based study included data from 22,550 Koreans aged ≥5 years who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012. For people aged 5 to 11 years (young children), information was based on self-reports of contact with eye care service in the past year; for people aged ≥12 years (older population), the information was based on the self-reported lifetime contact with eye care service. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses of the complex sample survey data were performed. Results The prevalence of eye care service use in young children during the past year was 61.1% (95% confidence interval, 58.1%–64.1%), while that in the older population during their lifetime was 73.5%. Subjects aged 7 to 11 years were more likely to have had an eye examination in the past year than subjects aged 5 to 6 years (odds ratio, 3.83; 95% confidence interval, 2.37–6.19). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that higher monthly household income, being a National Health Insurance holder, and having private health insurance were related to more frequent use of eye care services in young children. For the older population and women, those living in an urban area and those with a best-corrected visual acuity less than 20 / 40 in the worse-seeing eye were more likely to have had an eye examination during their lifetime. Low education level was associated with low lifetime use of eye care services in the older population. Conclusions There are sociodemographic disparities with use of eye care services in South Korea. This population-based study provides information that is useful for determining different intervention programs based on sociodemographic disparities to promote eye care service utilization in South Korea. PMID:28243025

  20. Living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): part II. RNs' experience of nursing care for patients with COPD and impaired nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odencrants, Sigrid; Ehnfors, Margareta; Grobe, Susan J

    2007-03-01

    This study is the second part of a project with the main purpose of obtaining a deeper understanding of the consequences of living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) concerning meal-related situations and an impaired nutritional status. COPD is a slowly progressive lung disease that results in several complications, including malnutrition. Nutritional status is an important part of COPD treatment, and there are criteria recommended for nutritional assessment and interventions among patients with COPD. Despite this, patients with extreme malnutrition and unnoticed weight loss are reported. The aim of the study was to investigate how Registered Nurses (RNs) in primary care describe nutritional assessment practices and interventions in COPD patients with impaired nutritional status. An interview approach using semistructured questions and case vignettes was chosen. The sample included 19 RNs working specifically with COPD patients. Data from interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis, and nine categories corresponding to the aim were identified. The RNs reported that their assessment of nutritional status was based largely on intuition. Assessment also included detection of the patients' current beliefs and being sensible about information provision - When and How. Interventions were supportive eating interventions, practical and cognitive participation, and making patients aware of the illness trajectory. An overall category that influenced nursing was respecting patients' feelings of shame and guilt about a self-inflicted disease. It seems that RNs use intuition because of a lack of knowledge of systematic methods of nutritional assessment. The findings also indicate that the RNs attempted to build a relationship of trust with the patients rather than provide early information on sensitive topics (e.g. nutritional information). The study reports areas of nursing care for COPD patients that must be improved in the future.

  1. Informing Nutrition Care in the Antenatal Period: Pregnant Women’s Experiences and Need for Support

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    Khlood Bookari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide insights into Australian women’s experiences in gaining nutrition information during pregnancy. Individual semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 17 pregnant (across all trimesters and 9 postpartum women in five Australian states. Data were transcribed and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Women valued nutrition information, actively sought it, and passively received it mainly from three sources: healthcare providers (HCPs, media, and their social networks. Women reported HCPs as highest for reliability but they had limited time and indifferent approaches. Various media were easily and most frequently accessed but were less reliable. Social networks were considered to be the least reliable and least accessed. Women reported becoming overwhelmed and confused. This in turn influenced their decisions (pragmatic/rational and their eating behaviours (“overdo it,” “loosen it,” “ignore it,” and “positive response”. Individual and environmental barriers impacted their application of knowledge to dietary practice. Women wanted more constructive and interactive engagement with their HCPs. This study identified the need to establish and maintain mutually respectful environments where women feel able to raise issues with their HCPs throughout their pregnancies and where they are confident that the information they receive will be accurate and meet their needs.

  2. Nurses knowledge and attitudes regarding nutrition in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endevelt, R; Werner, P; Goldman, D; Karpati, T

    2009-06-01

    Nurses in the community are in contact with the elderly at different levels of care. The aim of this study was to assess nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding nutritional-care for the elderly, and the impact of their attitude on the quality of assessment-care they provide to this growing population in need of nutritional-care. A structured questionnaire was distributed by mail to 600 nurses working in Maccabi-Health-Care-Services (MHS). The questionnaire assessed different aspects of elderly nutrition. The vast majority (91%) of the participants reported treating elderly in their practice. Religious nurses and the nurses with an individual orientation specialty reported more positive attitudes about nutritional-care for the elderly than others did (p=0.05). Nurses with a bachelor's degree had better attitudes than registered nurses about the importance of nutrition for the elderly (p nurses were found to be more knowledgeable than older ones (p nurses perceived nutrition as influencing different health conditions, and 85% pointed to the importance of feeding at the end of life. Nurses working in the community recognize the impact of proper nutrition on elderly patients' health, but need more training in screening for nutritional problems in the elderly.

  3. Morphological Characteristics, Phenolic and Terpenoid Profiles in Garden Chrysanthemum Grown in Different Nutritional Conditions

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    Cristina Cerasela MIRCEA (ARSENE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemum indicum L. (Dendranthema indicum (L. Des Moul became useful as herbs and curatives in different parts of the world. In the current study, the chemical profile of outdoor cultivated Chrysanthemum indicum ‘Avalone Red’ was investigated for polyphenolic acid derivatives, flavonoids, alantolactone and ursolic acid using thin layer chromatography (TLC. Total phenolic content was determined through a classical method and semiquantitative analyses of alantolactone were performed through the HPLC method. Morphological and yield parameters and the chemical profile of plants were registered in two different nutritional statuses (local and enriched soil conditions. The results indicate that the studied cultivar is a potent source of phenolics and that the fertilisation increases the plant biosynthetic capacity for polyphenols (159.74 mg/100 g in leaves and 79.82 mg/100 g in flowers, in unfertilised plants, and 388.54 mg/100 g and 144.86 mg/100 g in leaves and flowers of fertilised plants, respectively, expressed as gallic acid equivalent value. The studied cultivar contains hyperoside (and other derivatives and four main polyphenol carboxylic acids (including chlorogenic acid. Ursolic acid was not detected. The high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC analyses confirmed the presence of alantolactone identified in TLC chromatogram. Moreover, the fertilised plant samples contain only traces of alantolactone compared to the unfertilised plants. Alantolactone is present in a small amount (less than 0.1 mg % but its presence alerts to the potential allergenic effect of the plant. Besides their ornamental value, chrysanthemums can have a wide array of uses due to their high amounts of bioactive compounds.

  4. Thermal acclimation and nutritional history affect the oxidation of different classes of exogenous nutrients in Siberian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus.

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    McCue, Marshall D; Voigt, Christian C; Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał S

    2014-11-01

    During acclimatization to winter, changes in morphology and physiology combined with changes in diet may affect how animals use the nutrients they ingest. To study (a) how thermal acclimation and (b) nutritional history affect the rates at which Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) oxidize different classes of dietary nutrients, we conducted two trials in which we fed hamsters one of three (13) C-labeled compounds, that is, glucose, leucine, or palmitic acid. We predicted that under acute cold stress (3 hr at 2°C) hamsters previously acclimated to cold temperatures (10°C) for 3 weeks would have higher resting metabolic rate (RMR) and would oxidize a greater proportion of dietary fatty acids than animals acclimated to 21°C. We also investigated how chronic nutritional stress affects how hamsters use dietary nutrients. To examine this, hamsters were fed four different diets (control, low protein, low lipid, and low-glycemic index) for 2 weeks. During cold challenges, hamsters previously acclimated to cold exhibited higher thermal conductance and RMR, and also oxidized more exogenous palmitic acid during the postprandial phase than animals acclimated to 21°C. In the nutritional stress trial, hamsters fed the low protein diet oxidized more exogenous glucose, but not more exogenous palmitic acid than the control group. The use of (13) C-labeled metabolic tracers combined with breath testing demonstrated that both thermal and nutritional history results in significant changes in the extent to which animals oxidize dietary nutrients during the postprandial period.

  5. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: central venous catheters (access, care, diagnosis and therapy of complications).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittiruti, Mauro; Hamilton, Helen; Biffi, Roberto; MacFie, John; Pertkiewicz, Marek

    2009-08-01

    When planning parenteral nutrition (PN), the proper choice, insertion, and nursing of the venous access are of paramount importance. In hospitalized patients, PN can be delivered through short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters, through peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), or - for limited period of time and with limitation in the osmolarity and composition of the solution - through peripheral venous access devices (short cannulas and midline catheters). Home PN usually requires PICCs or - if planned for an extended or unlimited time - long-term venous access devices (tunneled catheters and totally implantable ports). The most appropriate site for central venous access will take into account many factors, including the patient's conditions and the relative risk of infective and non-infective complications associated with each site. Ultrasound-guided venepuncture is strongly recommended for access to all central veins. For parenteral nutrition, the ideal position of the catheter tip is between the lower third of the superior cava vein and the upper third of the right atrium; this should preferably be checked during the procedure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important and still too common complication of parenteral nutrition. The risk of infection can be reduced by adopting cost-effective, evidence-based interventions such as proper education and specific training of the staff, an adequate hand washing policy, proper choices of the type of device and the site of insertion, use of maximal barrier protection during insertion, use of chlorhexidine as antiseptic prior to insertion and for disinfecting the exit site thereafter, appropriate policies for the dressing of the exit site, routine changes of administration sets, and removal of central lines as soon as they are no longer necessary. Most non-infective complications of central venous access devices can also be prevented by appropriate, standardized protocols for line insertion

  6. Testing cost-benefit models of parental care evolution using lizard populations differing in the expression of maternal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-San; Pike, David A

    2013-01-01

    Parents are expected to evolve tactics to care for eggs or offspring when providing such care increases fitness above the costs incurred by this behavior. Costs to the parent include the energetic demands of protecting offspring, delaying future fecundity, and increased risk of predation. We used cost-benefit models to test the ecological conditions favoring the evolution of parental care, using lizard populations that differ in whether or not they express maternal care. We found that predators play an important role in the evolution of maternal care because: (1) evolving maternal care is unlikely when care increases predation pressure on the parents; (2) maternal care cannot evolve under low levels of predation pressure on both parents and offspring; and (3) maternal care evolves only when parents are able to successfully defend offspring from predators without increasing predation risk to themselves. Our studies of one of the only known vertebrate species to exhibit interpopulation differences in the expression of maternal care provide clear support for some of the hypothesized circumstances under which maternal care should evolve (e.g., when nests are in exposed locations, parents are able to defend the eggs from predators, and egg incubation periods are brief), but do not support others (e.g., when nest-sites are scarce, life history strategies are "risky", reproductive frequency is low, and environmental conditions are harsh). We conclude that multiple pathways can lead to the evolution of parental care from a non-caring state, even in a single population of a widespread species.

  7. Metabolomics has great potential for clinical and nutritional care and research with exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Alistair D M

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the potential of metabolomics for exotic animal research in a zoological setting. Metabolomics is a suite of analytical tools aimed at gaining a holistic understanding of animal metabolism without prior knowledge of the compounds to be measured. These metabolic fingerprints can be used to define normal metabolism for an unstudied species, to characterize the metabolic deviation of diseased animals from the normal state over time, to identify biomarker compounds that best capture such deviations, and to measure the metabolic impact of clinical and nutritional interventions. Two approaches, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) provide large amounts of complimentary pure and applied biological data. Metabolomic methods hold great potential for researchers, clinicians, and nutritionists studying exotic and aquatic animals because they can produce a huge data return on research effort, and because they do not require much a priori knowledge of the animals' metabolism, which is so often then case in zoological settings.

  8. Relation of Root Growth of Rice Seedling with Nutrition and Water Use Efficiency Under Different Water Supply Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bing-song; JIANG De-an; WU Ping; WENG Xiao-yan; LU Qing; WANG Ni-yan

    2006-01-01

    Water deficiency is one of the primary yield-limiting factors in rice. In plants, the nutrition and water use efficiency depend on root growth efficiency under different water supply conditions (WSC). Three rice genotypes, Azucena (an upland japonica),IR1552 (a lowland indica) and Jia 9522 (a lowland japonica), were grown under different WSC with 0 cm (submerged), 40 cm and 80cm groundwater levels below the soil surface to investigate the root parameters, water use efficiency, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium contents, net photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate of the rice plant. The relative parameters were defined as the ratio of the parameters under submerged conditions (0 cm groundwater level below soil surface) to these under upland conditions (40 cm and 80 cm groundwater levels below soil surface). The results indicated that different genotypes showed different relative root parameters and relative nutrition content and water use efficiency under different WSC. The length and number of adventitious root are more important than seminal root length in water and nutrition uptake, and maintaining the grain yield and increasing dry matter,but the adventitious root number could not be served as an index for screening drought-resistant genotypes. Furthermore, different drought-resistant genotypes have been also found, and Azucena was resistant to drought, IR1552 sensitive to drought and Jia 9522neither sensitive nor resistant to drought.

  9. Effect of different cooking methods on nutritional value and antioxidant activity of cultivated mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero-Ramos, Irene; Mendiola-Lanao, Mónica; Pérez-Clavijo, Margarita; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    Influence of culinary treatments (boiling, microwaving, grilling, and deep frying) on proximate composition and antioxidant capacity of cultivated mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus, Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Pleurotus eryngii) was studied. Proximate composition was affected by the cooking method and the mushrooms species. Frying induced more severe losses in protein, ash, and carbohydrates content but increased the fat and energy. Boiling improved the total glucans content by enhancing the β-glucans fraction. A significant decrease was detected in the antioxidant activity especially after boiling and frying, while grilled and microwaved mushrooms reached higher values of antioxidant activity. Maillard reaction products could be partially responsible, as supported by the absorbance values measured at 420 nm. Since cooking techniques clearly influence the nutritional attributes of mushrooms, the proper selection of treatments is a key factor to prevent/reduce nutritional losses. Microwaving and grilling were established as the best processes to maintain the nutritional profile of mushrooms.

  10. The evolution of nutrition in critical care: how much, how soon?

    OpenAIRE

    Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Critical care is a very recent advance in the history of human evolution. Prior to the existence of ICU care, when the saber-tooth tiger attacked you had but a few critical hours to recover or you died. Mother Nature, and her survival of the fittest mentality, would never have favored the survival of the modern ICU patient. We now support ICU patients for weeks, or even months. During this period, patients appear to undergo phases of critical illness. A simplification of this concept would in...

  11. ICU患者肠内营养并发症的护理%Care of Enteral Nutrition Complications in ICU Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王香君; 吴翠

    2013-01-01

    目的探讨ICU患者行肠内营养支持的护理。方法对63例ICU患者给予合理的、有计划的肠内营养,对患者并发症采取相应对症护理。结果肠内营养并发症减少,营养支持效果好,患者预后良好。结论加强对ICU患者肠内营养并发症的护理有利于患者康复。%Objective to probe the nursing care of the ICU patients with enteral nutrition. Methods Apply proper and planned enteral nutrition to the 63 cases of ICU patients and take relevant measures to the complications accordingly. Result Patients have sound conditions after recovery with fewer enteral nutrition complications and bet er nutrition support ef ect. Conclusion Enhancing the nursing care of the ICU patients with enteral nutrition complications does good to their recovery.

  12. [Nutritional guidelines and standards in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, D

    2011-04-01

    Nutritional problems and deficiencies are widespread in geriatric institutions. On the other hand, benefits of different interventions to improve the nutritional situation of elderly people--from amelioration of mealtime ambience to the use of artificial nutrition--have been shown in many studies. In recent years, several guidelines and standards have been developed to facilitate the transfer of this scientific knowledge into practice. These are in particular the medical Guidelines for Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Geriatrics (DGEM/DGG and ESPEN), the DNQP Expert Standard for qualified nurses, the DGE Quality Standards for dietetic personnel, and the interdisciplinary BUKO-QS Standard. These guidelines and standards provide recommendations for adequate nutritional care and assistance for the institutionalized elderly person based on the scientific state of the art. They should be used as the basis for the development of local instructions for the management of nutritional problems and malnutrition. Elderly people will only profit, if these guidelines are used in daily routine.

  13. Nutritional status of care-dependent people with dementia in shared-housing arrangements--a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Saskia; Gräske, Johannes; Worch, Andreas; Wolf-Ostermann, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Malnutrition in the elderly is an important nursing challenge. Persons with dementia disease are often affected by malnutrition. During recent years, shared-housing arrangements (SHA) for older care-dependent people, frequently with dementia disease, have evolved in Germany. SHA can be an alternative to traditional residential care in nursing homes. The prevalence of malnutrition in SHA is compared to the prevalence in community dwellings and lower than the prevalence of malnutrition in nursing homes. There are no scientific data about the development of the nutritional status of older care-dependent people in SHA over one year. The aim of this study is to describe the nutritional status of care-dependent people with dementia disease living in SHA and to investigate changes over a period of one year. A longitudinal study with a one-year follow-up was performed. Standardised interviews with nurses were conducted concerning nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment--MNA), cognitive capacities (Mini Mental State Examination--MMSE), activities of daily living (Extended Barthel-Index--EBI) and socio-demographic characteristics. Nutritional data were available for 45 residents at baseline and 36 residents at follow-up. At baseline, 45 residents with an average age of 78.4 years living in SHA in the state of Berlin, Germany, were included in the study. Predominantly, residents were female (73.3%) and diagnosed with dementia (88.9%), with a moderate to severe cognitive impairment (MMSE: 10.8) and low daily living abilities (EBI: 33.7). Most residents (80.6%) have a risk of malnutrition regarding the MNA. The average MNA score did decline slightly within one year (t0 = 20.8 vs. t1 = 19.7). Regular screenings for malnutrition using validated standardised assessments, which are easy to apply, should be implemented in SHA to avoid nutritional and health-related problems arising from malnutrition. Flexible structures for care, as in SHA, can facilitate coping with

  14. Culture in Prenatal Development: Parental Attitudes, Availability of Care, Expectations, Values, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Irene M.; Noya, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Culture is a universal phenomenon, but most interest about culture during pregnancy has focused on medical care, neglecting psychological aspects of normative development. Objective: The purpose of this article was to examine normative gestational experiences using the framework of a broaden and build model of culture, positive…

  15. Culture in Prenatal Development: Parental Attitudes, Availability of Care, Expectations, Values, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Irene M.; Noya, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Culture is a universal phenomenon, but most interest about culture during pregnancy has focused on medical care, neglecting psychological aspects of normative development. Objective: The purpose of this article was to examine normative gestational experiences using the framework of a broaden and build model of culture, positive…

  16. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Essel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa’s Western Cape Province participated in the audit process.Aim: To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time.Setting: Western Cape Province, South Africa.Methods: Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’ to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’.Results: The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31.Conclusion: These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes.

  17. Assessment of nutritional status and meal-related situations among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Primary health care - obese patients; a challenge for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odencrants, Sigrid; Theander, Kersti

    2013-04-01

    To describe nutritional status, meal related situations, food habits and food preferences of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a Primary health care (PHC) setting. To date, guidelines have mainly focused on underweight patients with COPD, as a low body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for mortality. However, in recent years there has been an increase in the number of overweight patients with COPD, and therefore nutritional management must be developed to cover problems related to both under and overweight. Descriptive. One hundred and three patients from PHC centres representing COPD stages 2 and 3 were included. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) was used to collect nutritional status data while semi-structured interviews provided information on food and meal related situations. Mean age was 69 (± 5)years and 45% were women. Among all patients mean BMI was 27 and 14% had a BMI ≤ 21 kg/m(2) . More women (31%) than men (26%) had a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) . According to the MNA screening score, 86% of the patients were assessed as normal or not at risk of malnutrition. The total MNA assessment score revealed that 10 patients were at risk of malnutrition or malnourishment. Problems with meal related situations were mostly associated with eating, and only a small number reported difficulties with shopping or preparing food. In PHC, more patients with COPD were obese than malnourished and their self-reported nutritional status was not always accurate. It is challenging to identify the patient's nutritional status, individualize nutritional care and educate obese patients with COPD at PHC centres. It is necessary to develop screening instruments to assess the risk of both obesity and malnutrition. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Effect of three different doses of arginine enhanced enteral nutrition on nutritional status and outcomes in well nourished postsurgical cancer patients: a randomized single blinded prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luis, D A; Izaola, O; Terroba, M C; Cuellar, L; Ventosa, M; Martin, T

    2015-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery have a high occurrence of postoperative complications. The aim of our study was to investigate whether postoperative nutrition of head and neck cancer patients, using an enhanced enteral formula with three different doses of arginine could improve nutritional variables as well as clinical outcome, depending of arginine dose. A population of 84 patients with oral and laryngeal cancer was enrolled. At surgery patients were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups, each one containing at less 28 patients. Group I (28 patients) received an enteral diet supplements with a low physiological dose of arginine (5.7 g per day), group II (28 patients) received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous enteral formula with a medium dose of arginine (12.3 g per day) and group III (28 patients) received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous enteral formula with a high dose of arginine (18.9 g per day). The length of postoperative stay had a trend to be better with high dose of arginine received (31.9 ± 17.2 days in group I vs 27.8 ± 15.2 days in group II vs 24.8 ± 18.3 days in group III: p = 0.034). No differences were detected in postoperative infections complications and diarrhea. Fistula was less frequent in groups II and III than I (10.7% group I vs 3.6% group II vs 3.6% group III: p = 0.033), The length of postoperative stay had a trend to be better with high dose of arginine received (31.9 ± 17.2 days in group I vs 27.8 ± 15.2 days in group II vs 24.8 ± 18.3 days in group III: p = 0.034). Our results suggest that these patients could benefit from a high dose of arginine enhanced enteral formula to decrease length of hospital stay and fistula wound complications.

  19. Attitudinal Difference Among Women Of Different Educational Status Towards Infant And Mother Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papiya Upadhyay and Deb Prasad Sikdar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Children are the gem of the future. They contribute utmost to the national development of a country. If a country has healthy population, it can fight against all odds. In order to achieve this women come into the forefront. Women in their development process become mothers. A healthy mother can only give rise to healthy babies. The concern for the health of women is very significant and thus cannot be neglected. Against this back drop our present study aims to find out the relationship between women’s educational level and their attitudinal difference towards infant and personal care. The effect of marital status and location variations- rural and urban areas of Nadia district are also taken into consideration. The statistical analyses reflect mothers with higher educational status have positive attitude towards mother (personal and infant care. The rural women lag far behind their urban counterparts in this respect. There is no significant difference between married and unmarried women in attitude towards infant and mother care.

  20. Working group reports: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Carlson, Susan E; Griffin, Ian; Anderson, Diane; Hay, William W; Robins, Sandra; Neu, Josef; Georgieff, Michael K; Groh-Wargo, Sharon; Fenton, Tanis R

    2016-02-01

    The "Evaluation of the Evidence to Support Practice Guidelines for the Nutritional Care of Preterm Infants: The Pre-B Project" is the first phase in a process to present the current state of knowledge and to support the development of evidence-informed guidance for the nutritional care of preterm and high-risk newborn infants. The future systematic reviews that will ultimately provide the underpinning for guideline development will be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL). To accomplish the objectives of this first phase, the Pre-B Project organizers established 4 working groups (WGs) to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications for preterm infants, 2) clinical and practical issues in enteral feeding of preterm infants, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards of infant feeding. Each WG was asked to 1) develop a series of topics relevant to their respective themes, 2) identify questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process conducted by the EAL, and 3) develop a research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This article is a summary of the reports from the 4 Pre-B WGs.

  1. The status of diabetes care in Mexican population: are we making a difference? Results of the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 El cuidado de la diabetes en población mexicana: ¿estamos siguiendo la estrategia correcta? Resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clicerio González-Villalpando

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Examine clinical indicators to evaluate diabetes care in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Diabetics (self reported, with therapy were examined with standardized questionnaires, anthropometry, glucose, lipids and glycohemoglobin. Data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: There were 2 644 patients, 677 cases without access to medical care (73% women, most lived in rural communities and spoke aboriginal dialect. Prevalence of obesity for private access group was 21.2%, for other or non access group was between 31 and 65%. The group without or basic education was most common, 76% of the cases had HDL OBJETIVO: Examinar indicadores para evaluar la atención de diabetes en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se examinaron diabéticos (autorreportados, con tratamiento con cuestionario estandarizado, antropometría, glucosa, lípidos y hemoglobina glucosilada. Los datos se analizaron estadísticamente. RESULTADOS: De 2 644 casos, 677 no tenían acceso a atención médica (73% mujeres, la mayoría eran de comunidades rurales y hablaban un dialecto indígena. La prevalencia de obesidad en el grupo con acceso privado fue 21,2%; en personas con otro o sin acceso, fue entre 31 y 65%. El grupo sin o con educación básica fue el más común. El 76% de los casos tenían colesterol HDL <40 mg/dl y 36% tenía hipertrigliceridemia. Sólo 6.6% tenían la HbA1c <7%. No hubo diferencias entre valores de HbA1c en el grupo con o sin acceso. La mayoría recibían hipoglucemiantes orales, muchos sin tratamiento. La evaluación de complicaciones fue infrecuente. CONCLUSIONES: El modelo de atención de diabetes en México es ineficaz y es preciso cambiar de paradigma.

  2. [Evaluation of the cost of home enteral nutrition in relation to different access routes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Rabaneda, R M; Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; González Fernández, B; Iglesias Rosado, C

    1998-01-01

    When home enteral nutrition is needed, there is still, despite the undisputed increase in the quality of life that can be achieved with a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG), a reservation in its use because this technique and its maintenance is considered to be very costly. We aim to assess the true cost of home enteral nutrition using the oral route, a nasogastric tube, and PEG. The data of 65 patients who required home enteral nutrition during 1996, were analyzed retrospectively. The access route was a nasogastric tube in 20 cases, 18 patients had PEG, and 27 candidates used an oral route. The average age was 56 years. 50% were men and 50% were women. The most common diagnoses that led to the indication were oropharyngeal-maxillofacial neoplasms and neurological disorders. In all cases the material and formula used was assessed, as were the associated complications and the cost of the at home enteral nutrition. The average duration of the treatment was 175 +/- 128 days, and this was similar in all three groups. The average formula/day cost was slightly higher in the patients using the oral access route. The average total day cost and the average material/day cost was slightly higher in patients with a PEG. Patients with a PEG presented fewer complications than those with a nasogastric tube. The cost derived from possible complications must be higher in the nasogastric tube group, especially considering the repeated tube changes due to obstruction or loss. The cost of home enteral nutrition is slightly lower if one uses a nasogastric tube. The greater incidence of complications that were mild but required a tube change, in this case a nasogastric tube, suggests higher indirect costs. The oral route is associated with the need for special formulae that are more expensive.

  3. Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery: Protocol of a Prospective Observational Trial to Evaluate the Prognostic Value of Different Nutritional Scores in Pancreatic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Pascal; Haller, Sebastian; Dörr-Harim, Colette; Bruckner, Thomas; Ulrich,Alexis; Hackert, Thilo; Diener, Markus K; Knebel, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of patients’ preoperative nutritional status on their clinical outcome has already been proven. Therefore, patients with malnutrition are in need of additional therapeutic efforts. However, for pancreatic surgery, evidence suggesting the adequacy of existing nutritional assessment scores to estimate malnutrition associated with postoperative outcome is limited. Objective The aim of the observational trial “Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery (NURIMAS) Pancreas...

  4. Neonatal hormone changes and growth in lambs born to dams receiving differing nutritional intakes and selenium supplementation during gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Leticia E; Meyer, Allison M; Neville, Tammi L; Hammer, Carolyn J; Redmer, Dale A; Reynolds, Lawrence P; Caton, Joel S; Vonnahme, Kimberly A

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of maternal selenium (Se) supplementation and nutritional intake during gestation on hormone changes, percentage body weight (BW) change, and organ mass in neonatal lambs, ewes were allocated to differing Se levels (adequate Se (ASe, 11.5 μg/kg BW) or high Se (HSe, 77.0 μg/kg BW)) initiated at breeding and nutritional intake (60% (RES), 100% (CON), or 140% (HIGH) of NRC requirements) initiated at day 40 of gestation. At parturition, all lambs were removed from dams, fed common diets, and BW and blood samples were collected until day 19. There was a Se × nutritional intake × day interaction for percentage BW change from birth. Lambs born to ASe-HIGH ewes tended to have decreased BW change compared with ASe-CON and ASe-RES groups on day 7. Lambs from HSe-HIGH ewes tended to have increased BW change compared with HSe-RES and HSe-CON groups from days 7 to 19. At birth, there was a Se × sex of offspring interaction, in which male lambs from HSe ewes had decreased cortisol concentrations compared with all other lambs. By 24 h, lambs from RES ewes had decreased cortisol compared with those from HIGH ewes, with lambs from CON ewes being intermediate. Lambs from RES- and CON-fed ewes had greater thyroxine than HIGH ewes at 24 h. Organ masses on day 19 were mainly impacted by maternal nutritional intake and sex of the offspring. Birth weight alone did not predict growth performance during neonatal life. Moreover, despite a similar postnatal diet, maternal nutritional plane and Se status did impact neonatal endocrine profiles. Exact mechanisms of how neonatal endocrine status can influence later growth and development need to be determined.

  5. Postoperative nutrition practices in abdominal surgery patients in a tertiary referral hospital Intensive Care Unit: A prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejaswini Arunachala Murthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benefit of early enteral feeds in surgical patients admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs has been emphasized by several studies. Apprehensions about anastomotic leaks in gastrointestinal surgical patients prevent initiation of early enteral nutrition (EN. The impact of these practices on outcome in Indian scenario is less studied. Aims: This study compares the impact of early EN (within 48 h after surgery with late EN (48 h postsurgery on outcomes in abdominal surgical ICU patients. Settings and Design: Postabdominal surgery patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital ICU over a 2-year period were analyzed. Methods: Only patients directly admitted to ICU after abdominal surgery were included in this study. ICU stay>3 days was considered as prolonged; with average ICU length of stay (LOS for this ICU being 3 days. The primary outcome was in-patient mortality. ICU LOS, hospital LOS, infection rates, and ventilator days were secondary outcome measures. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were calculated. SPSS and Microsoft Excel were used for analysis. Results: Of 91 ICU patients included, 58 received early EN and 33 late EN. Hospital LOS and infection rates were less in early EN group. Use of parenteral nutrition (odds ratio [OR] 5.25, 95% confidence interval (CI; P = 0.003 and number of nil-per-oral days (OR 8.25, 95% CI; P ≤ 0.001 were other predictors of prolonged LOS. Conclusions: Early EN in postabdominal surgery ICU patients was associated with reduced hospital LOS and infection rates. ICU LOS, duration of mechanical ventilation and mortality rates did not vary.

  6. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  7. Microbiological profile and nutritional quality of raw foods for neutropenic patients under hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Galati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyze and compare the microbiological profile and vitamin C content of raw and cooked foods destined for neutropenic inpatients. METHODS: Three vegetables and nine fruits, raw and boiled, washed and sanitized were examined. Heat-tolerant coliforms and coagulase-positive staphylococci were counted and the presence of Salmonella spp was investigated. The vitamin C content was analyzed by a colorimetric reaction. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software was used for statistical analysis and the nonparametric Wilcoxon test was used to compare the mean vitamin C values of the cooked and raw foods. The Spearman correlation test was applied to determine the associations between the parameters evaluated RESULTS: Salmonella spp was absent in all samples and the populations of coagulase-positive staphylococci and heat-tolerant coliforms were below the minimum detectable limits of the methods employed (< 100 colony forming units (CFU/g and < 3 most probable number (MPN/g, respectively. There was a significant loss of vitamin C in the cooked foods, 38.9% on average, compared to the raw foods, a loss that was positively correlated with cooking time. CONCLUSION: The fresh fruits and vegetables properly sanitized in this study had a microbiological profile consistent with that required by Brazilian law. Furthermore, the nutritional value of the neutropenic diet is diminished, at least in terms of the vitamin C content.

  8. NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR CORRELATIONS OF MORNING CORTISOL IN HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN A GASTROENTEROLOGY SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline GUERRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Workplace stress has been associated with obesity. Diminished body weight has also been anticipated in some contexts. Objective In a cohort of healthcare personnel, morning cortisol was compared to nutritional and metabolic variables, aiming to identify the correlates of such marker. Methods Population n=185, 33.8 ± 9.8 years, 88.1% females, body mass index (BMI 25.6 ± 4.4 kg/m2, included nurses and other nosocomial professionals, the majority with high social-economic status (75.2%. Participants were stratified according to BMI, fasting blood glucose (FBG and metabolic syndrome (MS. Fasting plasma cortisol and the Framingham Coronary Risk Score was calculated. Results Mean cortisol was acceptable (19.4 ± 7.9 µg/dL although with elevation in 21.6%. No correlation with FBG or MS occurred, and nonobese persons (BMI <25 exhibited the highest values (P=0.049. Comparison of the lowest and highest cortisol quartiles confirmed reduced BMI and waist circumference in the former, with unchanged Framingham Coronary Risk Score. Conclusion Cortisol correlated with reduced BMI. Despite low BMI and waist circumference, Framingham Coronary Risk Score was not benefitted, suggesting that exposure to cardiovascular risk continues, besides psychological strain. Initiatives to enhance organizational and staff health are advisable in the hospital environment.

  9. Nutritional, metabolic and cardiovascular correlations of morning cortisol in health care workers in a gastroenterology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aline; Soares, Rafael Marques; Pezzi, Fernanda; Karkow, Francisco Juarez; Faintuch, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Workplace stress has been associated with obesity. Diminished body weight has also been anticipated in some contexts. In a cohort of healthcare personnel, morning cortisol was compared to nutritional and metabolic variables, aiming to identify the correlates of such marker. Population n=185, 33.8 ± 9.8 years, 88.1% females, body mass index (BMI) 25.6 ± 4.4 kg/m2, included nurses and other nosocomial professionals, the majority with high social-economic status (75.2%). Participants were stratified according to BMI, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and metabolic syndrome (MS). Fasting plasma cortisol and the Framingham Coronary Risk Score was calculated. Mean cortisol was acceptable (19.4 ± 7.9 µg/dL) although with elevation in 21.6%. No correlation with FBG or MS occurred, and nonobese persons (BMI Framingham Coronary Risk Score. Cortisol correlated with reduced BMI. Despite low BMI and waist circumference, Framingham Coronary Risk Score was not benefitted, suggesting that exposure to cardiovascular risk continues, besides psychological strain. Initiatives to enhance organizational and staff health are advisable in the hospital environment.

  10. 77 FR 43229 - Food and Nutrition Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2012 Through June 30, 2013 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service... Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition Service, U.S. Department...

  11. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  12. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  13. Gut microbiota composition in male rat models under different nutritional status and physical activity and its association with serum leptin and ghrelin levels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Seoane, Luisa María; Murri, Mora; Pardo, María; Gomez-Zumaquero, Juan Miguel; Cardona, Fernando; Casanueva, Felipe; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    .... To evaluate the differences in the composition of gut microbiota in rat models under different nutritional status and physical activity and to identify their associations with serum leptin and ghrelin levels...

  14. Gut Microbiota Composition in Male Rat Models under Different Nutritional Status and Physical Activity and Its Association with Serum Leptin and Ghrelin Levels: e65465

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Isabel Queipo-Ortuño; Luisa María Seoane; Mora Murri; María Pardo; Juan Miguel Gomez-Zumaquero; Fernando Cardona; Felipe Casanueva; Francisco J Tinahones

    2013-01-01

    .... Objective To evaluate the differences in the composition of gut microbiota in rat models under different nutritional status and physical activity and to identify their associations with serum leptin and ghrelin levels...

  15. Nutrition attitudes and knowledge in medical students after completion of an integrated nutrition curriculum compared to a dedicated nutrition curriculum: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Carolyn O; Ziniel, Sonja I; Delichatsios, Helen K; Ludwig, David S

    2011-08-12

    Nutrition education has presented an ongoing challenge to medical educators. In the 2007-2008 academic year, Harvard Medical School replaced its dedicated Preventive Medicine and Nutrition course with an integrated curriculum. The objective of the current study was to assess the effect of the curriculum change on medical student attitudes and knowledge about nutrition. A survey was administered in a quasi-experimental design to students in the last class of the dedicated curriculum (n = 131) and the first class of the integrated curriculum (n = 135) two years after each class completed the required nutrition course. Main measures were attitude scores based on modified Nutrition in Patient care Survey and satisfaction ratings, performance on a nutrition knowledge test, and demographic variables. Two-tailed t-tests were performed. Response rates were 50.4% and 42.2%. There were no differences between the groups in attitude scores from the Nutrition in Patient care Survey (p = 0.43) or knowledge scores (p = 0.63). Students with the integrated curriculum were less satisfied with both the quantity (p nutrition education, and were more likely to have completed optional online nutrition training modules (p = 0.0089). Medical student attitudes and knowledge about nutrition were not affected by the model of nutrition education they receive, though students in an integrated curriculum may feel their education is inadequate and seek additional training.

  16. Gender differences among oral health care workers in caring for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... among oral health care workers in caring for HIV/AIDS patients in Osun state, Nigeria. ... Health care workers (OHCWs) enlisted in the public dental health clinics. ... HIV/AIDS oral manifestations (p <0.001) and recognition of HIV/AIDS risk ...

  17. Comparison of different nutritional assessments in detecting malnutrition among gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung; Wan; Ryu; In; Ho; Kim

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of preoperative and postoperative malnutrition and the relationships between objective and subjective nutritional assessment of gastric cancer patients. METHODS: From October 2005 to July 2006, we studied 80 patients with no evidence of recurrent disease and no loss to follow-up after curative surgery for gastric cancer. In this group, 9 patients underwent total gastrectomy and 71 patients subtotal gastrectomy. At admission, 6 and 12 mo after surgery, the patients were assess...

  18. The stem structure of Triticum aestivum L. under different mineral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I. Zhuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of supplying of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. plants by nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on the main stem structure and plant productivity was studied for cultivars ‘Mironivska 808’ and ‘Smuglyanka’. It was shown that increased mineral nutrition causes increasing stem and central xylem vessels diameter on average of 1 mm. Increased plant productivity was supported by increasing grains quantity per ear and mass of 1000 grains.

  19. Differences in food intake and nutritional habits between Spanish adolescents who engage in ski activity and those who do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Monteagudo, Celia; Hernandez-Elizondo, Jessenia; Benhammou, Samira; Lorenzo, M Luisa; Olea-Serrano, Fatima

    2014-10-31

    Increasing obesity among adolescents in the industrialized world may result from poor nutritional habits and inadequate exercise. To determine differences in food intake, nutritional habits, and body mass index between Spanish adolescents who engage in ski activity and those who do not. A socio-demographic survey, food frequency questionnaire, 24-hr dietary recall, and physical activity questionnaire were completed by 300 Spanish schoolchildren aged 10 to 18 yrs. RESULTS were compared (Student's t, chi-square and Fisher's exact test) between adolescents engaged (SP) and not engaged (N-SP) in skiing according to their sex. SP adolescents devoted > 4 h/day to physical activity versus factor in maintaining a healthy body mass index. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Two Different Levels of Dietary Protein on Body Composition and Protein Nutritional Status of Growing Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapegui, Julio; Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Pires, Ivanir Santana de Oliveira; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a high-protein diet on growth, body composition, and protein nutritional status of young rats. Newly-weaned Wistar rats, weighing 45–50 g, were distributed in two experimental groups, according to their diets, which contained 12% (G12) or 26% protein (G26), over a period of 3 weeks. The animals were euthanized at the end of this period and the following analyses were performed: chemical composition of the carcass, proteoglycan synthesis, IGF-I concentration (serum, muscle and cartilage), total tissue RNA, protein concentration (muscle and cartilage) and protein synthesis (muscle and cartilage). The high-protein diet was found to result in a higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass in the carcass, with no difference in growth or protein nutritional status. PMID:23112920

  1. Iron concentration, bioavailability, and nutritional quality of polished rice affected by different forms of foliar iron fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wanling; Shohag, M J I; Wei, Yanyan; Feng, Ying; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-12-15

    The present study compared the effects of four different forms of foliar iron (Fe) fertilizers on Fe concentration, bioavailability and nutritional quality of polished rice. The results showed that foliar fertilisation at the anthesis stage was an effective way to promote Fe concentration and bioavailability of polished rice, especially in case of DTPA-Fe. Compared to the control, foliar application of DTPA-Fe increased sulphur concentration and the nutrition promoter cysteine content, whereas decreased phosphorus concentration and the antinutrient phytic acid content of polished rice, as a result increased 67.2% ferrtin formation in Caco-2 cell. Moreover, foliar DTPA-Fe application could maintain amylase, protein and minerals quality of polished rice. According to the current study, DTPA-Fe is recommended as an excellent foliar Fe form for Fe biofortification program.

  2. Effects of two different levels of dietary protein on body composition and protein nutritional status of growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapegui, Julio; Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Pires, Ivanir Santana de Oliveira; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a high-protein diet on growth, body composition, and protein nutritional status of young rats. Newly-weaned Wistar rats, weighing 45-50 g, were distributed in two experimental groups, according to their diets, which contained 12% (G12) or 26% protein (G26), over a period of 3 weeks. The animals were euthanized at the end of this period and the following analyses were performed: chemical composition of the carcass, proteoglycan synthesis, IGF-I concentration (serum, muscle and cartilage), total tissue RNA, protein concentration (muscle and cartilage) and protein synthesis (muscle and cartilage). The high-protein diet was found to result in a higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass in the carcass, with no difference in growth or protein nutritional status.

  3. The relationship between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, length of hospital stay, and mortality in old people living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sin-Jie; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2012-06-01

    Nutrition is an important issue for elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). About 20% of elderly LTCF residents in Taiwan are malnourished. This study investigated correlations between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, hospitalstay duration, and mortality in elderly LTCF residents. Researchers used a retrospective study design and convenient sampling to enroll 174 subjects aged 67 to 105 years (average, 82.5 years) who were living in legally registered LTCFs in Beitou District, Taipei City, Taiwan. A review of LTCF resident files provided data on subjects' demographics, physical examination laboratory results for the most recent 1-year period, anthropometry, physical function, admission frequency, hospital stay duration, and causes of admissions. Subjects had lived in their LTCF for more than 1 year before their enrollment date. Subjects who died during and after the study period were also included in analysis. Results showed significant changes over the study year in subjects' nutritional status, physical function, and calf circumference. Physical function was found significantly correlated with calf circumference, hospitalization status was found correlated with nasal-gastric tube feeding status, and eating pattern was found correlated with calf circumference and levels of both serum albumin and cholesterol. Nutritional status, calf circumference, albumin level, and cholesterol level also correlated significantly with hospitalization status. In this study, the likelihood of hospitalization increased with age and nasal-gastric tube feeding use. Hospital stay duration for subjects receiving nasal-gastric tube feeding was longer than that for those receiving oral feeding. Also, weak nutritional status scores for calf circumference and hemoglobin levels were factors associated with increased mortality risk. Findings recommend that greater attention should be paid to the nutritional status of elderly persons living in LTCFs

  4. Prevalence of different modes of parental care in birds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew Cockburn

    2006-01-01

    Estimates of the incidence of major classes of parental care by birds are drawn from classical studies that preceded both the publication of a massive secondary literature and the revolution driven...

  5. Improving Nutrition Through Multisectoral Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the nutrition sensitive social protection are: 1) target activities to the most nutritionally vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children less than 24 months; 2) include nutrition education and counseling activities within social protection interventions to increase household awareness of care giving and health seeking behaviors; 3) integrate nutrition serv...

  6. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  7. Making a measurable difference in advanced Huntington disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Carol Brown; Rao, Ashwini K

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists' role in the care of people with advanced Huntington disease (HD) (total functional capacity <7), often limited by a lack of clinical research to support good practice, includes the following: (1) provide comprehensive health records to an interdisciplinary care staff before admission to a more intense care setting (home health services, day program, assisted living, group home, long-term skilled nursing facility, palliative care); (2) consult with and refer to rehabilitation (occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language pathology), behavioral and psychiatric professionals for problem-solving strategies, which must be reviewed with direct care staff before implementation; (3) encourage and support qualitative and quantitative interdisciplinary research studies, and randomized controlled studies of nonpharmacologic interventions; and (4) assist in the development of meaningful measures to further document what works to provide a good quality of life for the patient and family and a comfortable thoughtful approach to a good death. Collaborative models of care depend on: (1) clear communication; (2) ongoing education and support programs; with (3) pharmacologic and rehabilitation interventions, always in the context of respect for the person with HD, a preservation of the individuals' dignity, autonomy, and individual preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Providing Nutritional Care in the Office Practice: Teams, Tools, and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2016-11-01

    Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling. The stages of change, self-determination, health belief model, social cognitive model, theory of planned behavior, and cognitive behavioral therapy are used in the counseling process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 初产妇乳汁不足的中西医结合营养护理%The ifrst cooperation of Chinese and western medicine nutrition care by the lack of maternal milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜秀梅

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨分析初产妇乳汁不足的中西医结合营养护理效果。方法选取我院2010年1月~2014年6月收治的90例初产妇乳汁不足患者,随机分为观察组与对照组,各45例。观察组患者给予中西医结合营养护理,对照组患者给予中药营养护理,观察对比两组患者的疗效。结果观察组患者的症状明显改善,其总有效率为100.0%,明显高于对照组的77.8%,组间对比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论初产妇乳汁不足患者给予中西医结合营养护理,可以有效改善患者的产乳情况,并且对患者无毒副作用,不易复发,是一种值得推广应用的营养护理方法。%objective To study the analysis of the ifrst effect of combining traditional Chinese and western medicine nutrition care maternal milk shortage. Methods From January 2010 to June 2014 treated 90 patients with ifrst maternal milk shortage, randomly divided into observation group and control group, 45 cases each. To combine traditional Chinese and western medicine group patients nutrition care, control group patients give Chinese medicine nutrition care, to observe the clinical efficacy of compared two groups of patients. results Observation group of patients with symptoms improved significantly, the total effective rate was 100.0%, signiifcantly higher than the control group 77.8%, comparing differences between group signiifcantly (P<0.05), with statistical signiifcance. conclusion The ifrst maternal milk to combine traditional Chinese and western medicine nursing, nutrition deifciency patients can effectively improve the patient’s milk, and non-toxic side effects on the patients, not easy to relapse, is a kind of method is worth popularization and application of nutrition care.

  10. Testing Cost-Benefit Models of Parental Care Evolution Using Lizard Populations Differing in the Expression of Maternal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-San; Pike, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Parents are expected to evolve tactics to care for eggs or offspring when providing such care increases fitness above the costs incurred by this behavior. Costs to the parent include the energetic demands of protecting offspring, delaying future fecundity, and increased risk of predation. We used cost-benefit models to test the ecological conditions favoring the evolution of parental care, using lizard populations that differ in whether or not they express maternal care. We found that predators play an important role in the evolution of maternal care because: (1) evolving maternal care is unlikely when care increases predation pressure on the parents; (2) maternal care cannot evolve under low levels of predation pressure on both parents and offspring; and (3) maternal care evolves only when parents are able to successfully defend offspring from predators without increasing predation risk to themselves. Our studies of one of the only known vertebrate species to exhibit interpopulation differences in the expression of maternal care provide clear support for some of the hypothesized circumstances under which maternal care should evolve (e.g., when nests are in exposed locations, parents are able to defend the eggs from predators, and egg incubation periods are brief), but do not support others (e.g., when nest-sites are scarce, life history strategies are “risky”, reproductive frequency is low, and environmental conditions are harsh). We conclude that multiple pathways can lead to the evolution of parental care from a non-caring state, even in a single population of a widespread species. PMID:23408934

  11. Testing cost-benefit models of parental care evolution using lizard populations differing in the expression of maternal care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-San Huang

    Full Text Available Parents are expected to evolve tactics to care for eggs or offspring when providing such care increases fitness above the costs incurred by this behavior. Costs to the parent include the energetic demands of protecting offspring, delaying future fecundity, and increased risk of predation. We used cost-benefit models to test the ecological conditions favoring the evolution of parental care, using lizard populations that differ in whether or not they express maternal care. We found that predators play an important role in the evolution of maternal care because: (1 evolving maternal care is unlikely when care increases predation pressure on the parents; (2 maternal care cannot evolve under low levels of predation pressure on both parents and offspring; and (3 maternal care evolves only when parents are able to successfully defend offspring from predators without increasing predation risk to themselves. Our studies of one of the only known vertebrate species to exhibit interpopulation differences in the expression of maternal care provide clear support for some of the hypothesized circumstances under which maternal care should evolve (e.g., when nests are in exposed locations, parents are able to defend the eggs from predators, and egg incubation periods are brief, but do not support others (e.g., when nest-sites are scarce, life history strategies are "risky", reproductive frequency is low, and environmental conditions are harsh. We conclude that multiple pathways can lead to the evolution of parental care from a non-caring state, even in a single population of a widespread species.

  12. Current Challenges in Home Nutrition Services for Frail Older Adults in Japan—A Qualitative Research Study from the Point of View of Care Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Hirakawa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventive care for frail older adults includes providing tailor-made diet information suited to their health conditions. The present study aims to explore the current situation and challenges of home nutrition advice for Japanese frail older adults using qualitative data from a ten-person group discussion among care managers. As the results of our analysis, nine themes were identified: (1 Homebound older adults develop poor eating habits; meals turn into a lonely and unpleasant experience; (2 With age, people’s eating and drinking patterns tend to deteriorate; (3 Many older adults and their family know little about food management according to condition and medication; (4 Many older adults do not understand the importance of maintaining a proper diet; (5 Many homebound older adults do not worry about oral hygiene and swallowing ability; (6 Some older adults are at high risk for food safety problems; (7 Only a limited range of boil-in-the-bag meal options are available for older adults; (8 Many older adults feel unduly confident in their own nutrition management skills; and (9 For many family caregivers, nutrition management is a burden. We conclude that the provision of tailor-made information by skilled dietitians and high-quality home-delivered meal service are essential for the successful nutrition management of the older adults.

  13. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Different Areas of Health Care Over a 20-Year Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardim, Thiago Veiga, E-mail: thiagoveiga@cardiol.br; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima [Liga de Hipertensão Arterial - Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Povoa, Thais Rolim [Faculdade de Educação Física - Universidade Estadual de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Barroso, Weimar Sebba; Chinem, Brunela; Jardim, Paulo Cesar Veiga [Liga de Hipertensão Arterial - Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. Knowledge about cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) in young adults and their modification over time are measures that change the risks and prevent CVDs. To determine the presence of CVRFs and their changes in different health care professionals over a period of 20 years. All students of medicine, nursing, nutrition, odontology, and pharmacy departments of Federal University of Goiás who agreed to participate in this study were evaluated when they started their degree courses and 20 years afterward. Questionnaires on CVRFs [systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and family history of early CVD, smoking, alcohol consumption, and sedentarism] were administered. Cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels, blood pressure, weight, height, and body mass index were determined. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate distribution, the chi-square test was used to compare different courses and sexes, and the McNemar test was used for comparing CVRFs. The significance level was set at a p value of < 0.05. The first stage of the study included 281 individuals (91% of all the students), of which 62.9% were women; the mean age was 19.7 years. In the second stage, 215 subjects were reassessed (76% of the initial sample), of which 59.07% were women; the mean age was 39.8 years. The sample mostly consisted of medical students (with a predominance of men), followed by nursing, nutrition, and pharmacy students, with a predominance of women (p < 0.05). Excessive weight gain, SAH, and dyslipidemia were observed among physicians and dentists (p < 0.05). Excessive weight gain and SAH and a reduction in sedentarism (p < 0.05) were observed among pharmacists. Among nurses there was an increase in excessive weight and alcohol consumption (p < 0.05). Finally, nutritionists showed an increase in dyslipidemia (p < 0.05). In general, there was an unfavorable progression of CVRFs in the

  14. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Different Areas of Health Care Over a 20-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Veiga Jardim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. Knowledge about cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs in young adults and their modification over time are measures that change the risks and prevent CVDs. Objectives: To determine the presence of CVRFs and their changes in different health care professionals over a period of 20 years. Methods: All students of medicine, nursing, nutrition, odontology, and pharmacy departments of Federal University of Goiás who agreed to participate in this study were evaluated when they started their degree courses and 20 years afterward. Questionnaires on CVRFs [systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and family history of early CVD, smoking, alcohol consumption, and sedentarism] were administered. Cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels, blood pressure, weight, height, and body mass index were determined. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate distribution, the chi-square test was used to compare different courses and sexes, and the McNemar test was used for comparing CVRFs. The significance level was set at a p value of < 0.05. Results: The first stage of the study included 281 individuals (91% of all the students, of which 62.9% were women; the mean age was 19.7 years. In the second stage, 215 subjects were reassessed (76% of the initial sample, of which 59.07% were women; the mean age was 39.8 years. The sample mostly consisted of medical students (with a predominance of men, followed by nursing, nutrition, and pharmacy students, with a predominance of women (p < 0.05. Excessive weight gain, SAH, and dyslipidemia were observed among physicians and dentists (p < 0.05. Excessive weight gain and SAH and a reduction in sedentarism (p < 0.05 were observed among pharmacists. Among nurses there was an increase in excessive weight and alcohol consumption (p < 0.05. Finally, nutritionists showed an increase in dyslipidemia (p < 0.05. Conclusion

  15. How Managed Care Affects Medicaid Utilization : A Synthetic Difference-in-Difference Zero-Inflated Count Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, D.A.; Kniesner, T.J.; LoSasso, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    We develop a synthetic difference-in-differences statistical design to apply to experimental data for adult women living in Hennepin County, Minnesota, to estimate the impact of Medicaid managed care on various modes of medical care use.Because the outcomes of interest are utilization counts with ma

  16. Factors associated with medication information in diabetes care: differences in perceptions between patients and health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langst, G.; Seidling, H.M.; Stutzle, M.; Ose, D.; Baudendistel, I.; Szecsenyi, J.; Wensing, M.; Mahler, C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This qualitative study in patients with type 2 diabetes and health care professionals (HCPs) aimed to investigate which factors they perceive to enhance or impede medication information provision in primary care. Similarities and differences in perspectives were explored. METHODS: Eight sem

  17. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  18. 荸荠营养成分及保健价值的研究%Study on nutritional ingredients and health care value of Chinese water chestnut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡; 胡月珍; 李小根

    2013-01-01

    Chinese water chestnut has abundant nutritions which are essential to the health of human beings.Modern medical research has found that Chinese water chestnut with a variety of health care value. The paper summarized the nutritional ingredients and health care value of Chinese water chestnut.The study provides a reliable basis for the processing of Chinese water chestnut.%  荸荠富含人体需要的多种营养成分,现代医学研究发现,荸荠含有多种保健价值。本文论述了荸荠的营养成分及保健价值,为荸荠的开发利用开辟了一条途径。

  19. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Carmona, T; López Martínez, J; Vila García, B

    2011-11-01

    Severe acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation is one of the most frequent reasons for admission to the intensive care unit. Among the most frequent causes for admission are exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory failure with acute lung injury (ALI) or with criteria of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). These patients have a high risk of malnutrition due to the underlying disease, their altered catabolism and the use of mechanical ventilation. Consequently, nutritional evaluation and the use of specialized nutritional support are required. This support should alleviate the catabolic effects of the disease, avoid calorie overload and, in selected patients, to use omega-3 fatty acid- and antioxidant-enriched diets, which could improve outcome.

  20. Partnership of the Sociedade Brasileira de Oncologia Pediátrica and International Society of Pediatric Oncology to improve nutritional care for children with cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Karina; Filho, Vicente Odone; Ferman, Sima; Fonseca, Teresa Cristina Cardoso; Oliveira, Vanessa da Cunha; Lemos, Priscila Dos Santos Maia; Barr, Ronald D; Ladas, Elena J

    The authors present a proposal of a partnership between the Sociedade Brasileira de Oncologia Pediátrica (SOBOPE) and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) to promote the standardization and improvement of nutritional care of kids under cancer treatment in Brazil. The results of the first meeting in Brazil as well as plans for future meetings are described. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. A study to assess knowledge and attitude of antenatal women about maternal nutrition attending a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    Renu Gupta; Shaily Agarwal; Neetu Singh; Rimjhim Jain; Arti Katiyar; Almas siddiqui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutrition is the fundamental pillar of human life. All human beings need a balanced amount of nutrients for proper functioning of body system. Inadequate nutrition during pregnancy has a negative impact on the pregnant mother as well as short and long term consequences on the newborn. This study aims to assess knowledge and attitude of antenatal women about maternal nutrition in pregnancy and highlights the need of interventions aimed at promoting awareness about healthy diet duri...

  2. Corn types with different nutritional profiles, extruded or not, on piglets (6 to 15 kg) feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Cristina de Oliveira; Ivan Moreira; Antonio Claudio Furlan; Liliane Maria Piano; Juliana Beatriz Toledo; Lina Maria Peñuela Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to determine the nutritional value and verify piglets' performance in the nursery phase fed with diets containing common corn (CC), extruded common corn (ECC), high-lysine corn (HLC), extruded high-lysine corn (EHLC), high-oil corn (HOC) and extruded high-oil corn (EHOC). In the total digestibility trial 14 barrows averaging 6.49 ± 0.16 kg initial body weight were allotted in metabolism cages, distributed in a randomized design with seven diets, six replicates...

  3. Relation between body composition and bone mineral density in young undregraduate students with different nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Filho, Edil de Albuquerque; Santos, Marcos André Moura Dos; Silva, Amanda Tabosa Pereira da; Farah, Breno Quintella; Costa, Manoel da Cunha; Campos, Florisbela de Arruda Camara E Siqueira; Falcão, Ana Patrícia Siqueira Tavares

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between total and segmental body fat, bone mineral density and bone mineral content in undergraduate students stratified according to nutritional status. The study included 45 male undergraduate students aged between 20 and 30 years. Total and segmental body composition, bone mineral density and bone mineral content assessments were performed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subjects were allocated into three groups (eutrophic, overweight and obese). With the exception of upper limb bone mineral content, significantly higher (pstudents, particularly in overweight individuals.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality of Agaricus bisporus strains cultivated in different composts

    OpenAIRE

    MEIRE C.N. ANDRADE; JOÃO P.F. JESUS; FABRÍCIO R. VIEIRA; STHEFANY R.F. VIANA; MARTA H.F. SPOTO; MARLI T.A. MINHONI

    2014-01-01

    The effect of irradiation doses (0, 125, 250 and 500 Gy) on the nutritional quality of A. bisporus mushrooms (strains ABI-07/06, ABI-05/03 and PB-1) cultivated in composts based on oat straw (Avena sativa) and brachiaria (Brachiaria sp.) was evaluated. The experimental design was 4 x 3 x 2 factorial scheme (irradiation doses x strains x composts), with 24 treatments, consisting of two repetitions each, totaling 48 experimental units (samples of mushrooms). The samples were irradiated in Cobal...

  5. Qualifying instrument for evaluation of food and nutritional care in hospital Validación de un instrumento de evaluación del cuidado alimentario y nutricional en hospitales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Díez García

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Establishing criteria for hospital nutrition care ensures that quality care is delivered to patients. The responsibility of the Hospital Food and Nutrition Service (HFNS is not always well defined, despite efforts to establish guidelines for patient clinical nutrition practice. This study describes the elaboration of an Instrument for Evaluation of Food and Nutritional Care (IEFNC aimed at directing the actions of the Hospital Food and Nutrition Service. This instrument was qualified by means of a comparative analysis of the categories related to hospital food and nutritional care, published in the literature. Elaboration of the IEFNC comprised the following stages: (a a survey of databases and documents for selection of the categories to be used in nutrition care evaluation, (b a study of the institutional procedures for nutrition practice at two Brazilian hospitals, in order to provide a description of the sequence of actions that should be taken by the HFNS as well as other services participating in nutrition care, (c design of the IEFNC based on the categories published in the literature, adapted to the sequence of actions observed in the routines of the hospitals under study, (d application of the questionnaire at two different hospitals that was mentioned in the item (b, in order to assess the time spent on its application, the difficulties in phrasing the questions, and the coverage of the instrument, and (e finalization of the instrument. The IEFNC consists of 50 open and closed questions on two areas of food and nutritional care in hospital: inpatient nutritional care and food service quality. It deals with the characterization and structure of hospitals and their HFNS, the actions concerning the patients' nutritional evaluation and monitoring, the meal production system, and the hospital diets. "This questionnaire is a tool that can be seen as a portrait of the structure and characteristics of the HFNS and its performance in clinical

  6. Pre-school manager training: a cost-effective tool to promote nutrition- and health-related practice improvements in the Irish full-day-care pre-school setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnston Molloy, Charlotte

    2013-10-18

    To evaluate the impact on nutrition- and health-related practice of two methods of delivery of a nutrition and health intervention in Irish full-day-care pre-schools: training of pre-school managers only or training of managers and their staff.

  7. Nutritional support of the hospitalized patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-23

    Apr 23, 1983 ... Improve- ment in the nutritional status of cancer patients by oral feeding .... Ambulatory home care using total parenteral nutrition is a novel and ... major burns treated with aggressive nutritional support have a ... phase.56.

  8. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: nutrition intervention in the care of persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields-Gardner, Cade; Fergusson, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have had a significant impact on domestic and global health, social, political, and economic outcomes. Prevention and treatment efforts to control HIV infection are more demanding than in previous decades. Achieving food and nutrition security, and managing nutrition-related complications of HIV infection and the multiple aspects of disease initiated by or surrounding HIV infection, referred to as HIV disease, remain challenges for patients and for those involved with HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment efforts. Confounding clinical issues include medication interactions, coinfection with other infections and diseases, wasting, lipodystrophy, and others. Dietetics professionals, other health care professionals, and people infected with HIV will need to understand and address multiple complex aspects of HIV infection and treatment to improve survival, body functions, and overall quality of life. Individualized nutrition care plans will be an essential feature of the medical management of persons with HIV infection and AIDS.

  9. Does Care Reasoning Make a Difference? Relations between Care, Justice and Dispositional Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juujarvi, Soile; Myyry, Liisa; Pesso, Kaija

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between care and justice reasoning, dispositional empathy variables and meta-ethical thinking among 128 students from a university of applied sciences. The measures were Skoe's Ethic of Care Interview, the Defining Issues Test, Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Meta-Ethical…

  10. Comprehensive actions of PSF on different health care levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Corrêa Vogel Koury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This case report is referring to the summary care of a patient with history. Lower limb pain. that had initially made the diagnosis of osteoarthritis in a service of Attendance. The post was evaluated at the Family Health Unit and together with the local Health Department and Reference Center in another municipality, where he established a conclusive diagnosis of acute arterial insufficiency and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The trajectory of the patient until the diagnosis and enca-spect to timely and appropriate interventions demonstrates the importance of customer service based on the principles of bonding, continuity, comprehensiveness, with the rear of a reference system and cross-reference structured. Health services need to be organized into levels of increasing complexity, with appropriate technology for each level, increasing the resolution. The Primary Health Care-guard mutually complementary relationship of authority with other levels of health care, and therefore not independent. When seeking to guide the organization of health services by the principles of completeness, what is sought is to increase awareness of the needs of groups and wonder about the best ways to respond to these needs. Thus, the Family Health should work closely with other levels of health care that can address the problems adequately.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality of Agaricus bisporus strains cultivated in different composts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Meire Cristina Nogueira, E-mail: mcnandrade@hotmail.com [Universidade do Sagrado Coracao (USC), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Sociais Aplicadas; Jesus, Joao P.F.; Vieira, Fabricio R.; Viana, Sthefany R.F.; Minhoni, Marli T.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCA/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Producao Vegetal/Defesa Fitossanitaria, Modulo de Cogumelos; Spoto, Marta H.F. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2014-05-15

    The effect of irradiation doses (0, 125, 250 and 500 Gy) on the nutritional quality of A. bisporus mushrooms (strains ABI-07/06, ABI-05/03 and PB-1) cultivated in composts based on oat straw (Avena sativa) and brachiaria (Brachiaria sp.) was evaluated. The experimental design was 4 x 3 x 2 factorial scheme (irradiation doses x strains x composts), with 24 treatments, consisting of two repetitions each, totaling 48 experimental units (samples of mushrooms). The samples were irradiated in Cobalt-60 irradiator, model Gammacell 220 kGy, with dose rate of 0.740 kGy h{sup -1}, according to the treatments proposed. Subsequently, the control (unirradiated) and the other treatments were maintained at 4±1°C and 90% RH in a climatic chamber for carrying out the chemical analysis of the mushrooms on the 1st and 14th day of storage. It was found that all A. bisporus strains evaluated were food with excellent nutritional value, because they presented high protein and fiber contents and low ethereal extract content; the chemical characterization of the mushrooms was influenced by the compost type in which they were cultivated; gamma irradiation influenced the chemical composition of mushrooms. (author)

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality of Agaricus bisporus strains cultivated in different composts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEIRE C.N. ANDRADE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of irradiation doses (0, 125, 250 and 500 Gy on the nutritional quality of A. bisporus mushrooms (strains ABI-07/06, ABI-05/03 and PB-1 cultivated in composts based on oat straw (Avena sativa and brachiaria (Brachiaria sp. was evaluated. The experimental design was 4 x 3 x 2 factorial scheme (irradiation doses x strains x composts, with 24 treatments, consisting of two repetitions each, totaling 48 experimental units (samples of mushrooms. The samples were irradiated in Cobalt-60 irradiator, model Gammacell 220 kGy, with dose rate of 0.740 kGy h–1, according to the treatments proposed. Subsequently, the control (unirradiated and the other treatments were maintained at 4±1°C and 90% RH in a climatic chamber for carrying out the chemical analysis of the mushrooms on the 1st and 14th day of storage. It was found that all A. bisporus strains evaluated were food with excellent nutritional value, because they presented high protein and fiber contents and low ethereal extract content; the chemical characterization of the mushrooms was influenced by the compost type in which they were cultivated; gamma irradiation influenced the chemical composition of mushrooms.

  13. Identification of different nutritional status groups in institutionalized elderly people by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, María José; López, Maria Ángeles; Canteras, Manuel; Candela, María Emilia; Zamora, Salvador; Pérez-Llamas, Francisca

    2014-03-01

    To apply a cluster analysis to groups of individuals of similar characteristics in an attempt to identify undernutrition or the risk of undernutrition in this population. A cross-sectional study. Seven public nursing homes in the province of Murcia, on the Mediterranean coast of Spain. 205 subjects aged 65 and older (131 women and 74 men). Dietary intake (energy and nutrients), anthropometric (body mass index, skinfold thickness, mid-arm muscle circumference, mid-arm muscle area, corrected arm muscle area, waist to hip ratio) and biochemical and haematological (serum albumin, transferrin, total cholesterol, total lymphocyte count). Variables were analyzed by cluster analysis. The results of the cluster analysis, including intake, anthropometric and analytical data showed that, of the 205 elderly subjects, 66 (32.2%) were over - weight/obese, 72 (35.1%) had an adequate nutritional status and 67 (32.7%) were undernourished or at risk of undernutrition. The undernourished or at risk of undernutrition group showed the lowest values for dietary intake and the anthropometric and analytical parameters measured. Our study shows that cluster analysis is a useful statistical method for assessing the nutritional status of institutionalized elderly populations. In contrast, use of the specific reference values frequently described in the literature might fail to detect real cases of undernourishment or those at risk of undernutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Selected biomarkers of age-related diseases in older subjects with different nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicova-Kudlackova, M; Babinska, K; Blazicek, P; Valachovicova, M; Spustova, V; Mislanova, C; Paukova, V

    2011-01-01

    The nutritionists introduce on the base of epidemiological and clinical studies that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Aging belongs to the main risks of cardiovascular disease. Markers of age-related diseases (cardiovascular, metabolic syndrome, diabetes) were assessed in two nutritional groups of older apparently healthy non-obese non-smoking women aged 60-70 years, 45 vegetarians (lacto-ovo-vegetarians and semi-vegetarians) and 38 non-vegetarians (control group on a traditional mixed diet, general population). Vegetarian values of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin and insulin resistance are significantly reduced. Non-vegetarian average values of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and C-reactive protein are risk. Vegetarians have a better antioxidative status (significantly increased vitamin C, lipid-standardized vitamine E and beta-carotene plasma concentrations). Favourable values of cardiovascular risk markers in older vegetarian women document a beneficial effect of vegetarian nutrition in prevention of this disease as well as the vegetarian diet can be an additional factor in therapy. Vegetarians suffer from mild hyperhomocysteinemia; it is due to the lower vitamin B12 concentration. Vitamin B12 supplements are inevitable for the hyperhomocysteinemia prevention (Tab. 2, Ref. 26).

  15. Nutritional status in mexican elderlys: comparative study between groups with different social assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Armando Osuna-Padilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study were to determine the prevalence of undernutrition and obesity in older people with various types of social support from Sinaloa, México.Material and methods: Comparative, observational, prospective and cross-sectional study in 91 elderly. Determined body weight, height and anthropometric measurements. Applied the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA. Means and standard deviations are estimated. Chi-square2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyzed data. Pearson correlation were utilized for evaluated