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Sample records for nutrient cycling soil

  1. Influence of soil structure on nutrient cycling using microfluidic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano Caicedo, Carlos; Aleklett, Kristin; Ohlsson, Pelle; Hammer, Edith

    2017-04-01

    The rising of atmospheric CO2 levels and its effects on global warming make it necessary to understand the elements that regulate such levels and furthermore try to slow down the CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. The exchange of carbon between soil and atmosphere plays a significant role in the atmospheric carbon budget. Soil organisms deposit organic compounds on and in soil aggregates, either as exudates or dead remains. Much of this dead organic material is quickly recycled, but a portion, however, will stay in the soil for long term. Evidence suggests that micro-scale biogeochemical interactions could play a highly significant role in degradation or persistence of organic matter in soils, thus, soil physical structure might play a decisive role in preventing accessibility of nutrients to microorganisms. For studying effects of spatial microstructure on soil nutrient cycles, we have constructed artificial habitats for microbes that simulate soil structures. Microfluidic, so called Lab-on-a-chip technologies, are one of the tools used to achieve our purpose. Such micro-habitats consist of pillar structures of difference density and surface area, tunnels with increasing depth, and mazes of increasing complexity to simulate different stages of soil aggregation. Using microscopy and analytical chemistry, we can follow the growth of microorganisms inoculated into the "soil chip" as well as the chemical degradation of organic matter compounds provided as nutrient source. In this way, we want to be able to predict how soil structure influences soil microbial activity leading to different effects on the carbon cycle. Our first results of a chip inoculated with natural soil showed a succession of organisms colonizing channels leading to dead-end arenas, starting with a high presence of bacteria inside the chip during the first days. Fungal hyphae growth gradually inside the channels until it finally occupied the big majority of the spaces isolating bacteria which

  2. Nutrient stocks, nutrient cycling and soil changes in cocoa ecosystems - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that agricultural systems with perennial crops are more sustainable than systems with annual crops. Soil erosion is negligible and perennial crops have more closed nutrient cycling. Moreover, inorganic fertilizers are used more commonly in cash crops such as perennial crops s

  3. Nutrient cycling strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews pathways by which plants can influence the nutrient cycle, and thereby the nutrient supply of themselves and of their competitors. Higher or lower internal nutrient use efficiency positively feeds back into the nutrient cycle, and helps to increase or decrease soil

  4. Nutrient cycling strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews pathways by which plants can influence the nutrient cycle, and thereby the nutrient supply of themselves and of their competitors. Higher or lower internal nutrient use efficiency positively feeds back into the nutrient cycle, and helps to increase or decrease soil fertili

  5. Nutrient Cycling and Balance in Red Soil Agroecosystem and Their Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in a red soil derived from Quaternary red clay in the Ecological Experiment Station of Red Soil, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, located in Yingtan (28°15' 30" N, 116°55' 30" E), Jiangxi Province. The results show that the major ways of nutrient loss are leaching and nitrogen volatilization. Rationalizing crop distribution, stimulating nutrient recycling, and improving internal nutrient flow are effective measures to decrease nutrient loss and to promote nutrient utilization efficiency. The important ways of regulating nutrient cycling and balance in the agroecosystem of the red soil are to establish optimal eco-agricultural models, practice balanced fertilization and combine the cropping system with the livestock system.

  6. The microbial perspective of organic matter turnover and nutrient cycling in tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank

    2017-04-01

    A primary goal of low-input small-holder farming systems in the tropics is the appropriate management of organic matter (OM) turnover and nutrient cycling via adapted agricultural practices. These emphasize the promotion of soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and carbon (C) sequestration, nutrient use efficiency and soil microbial activity. Since soil microbial communities are acknowledged as key players in the terrestrial C and nutrient (e.g., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P)) cycles, they may respond sensitively to agricultural management with shifts in their community structure as well as functional traits (i.e., decomposition, mineralization). This may be in particular evident for tropical, agricultural soils which show an accelerated microbial decomposition activity induced by favourable climatic and unique physico-chemical soil conditions. While modern molecular techniques advanced primarily the understanding about the microbiome and their functional traits interacting closely with SOM dynamics in temperate soils, tropical soils under agricultural use have been still neglected to a great extent. The majority of available studies revealed mainly descriptive data on the structural composition of microbial communities rather than questioning if detected structural alterations of the soil microbiome influenced key processes in N and P cycling which actually maintain ecosystem functioning and soil productivity. This talk highlights latest efforts in deploying molecular techniques to study the compositional status of soil microbial decomposer communities and their functional attributes in response to land use change and OM management in tropical agro-ecosystems.

  7. A mechanistic soil biogeochemistry model with explicit representation of microbial and macrofaunal activities and nutrient cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, Simone; Manzoni, Stefano; Or, Dani; Paschalis, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    The potential of a given ecosystem to store and release carbon is inherently linked to soil biogeochemical processes. These processes are deeply connected to the water, energy, and vegetation dynamics above and belowground. Recently, it has been advocated that a mechanistic representation of soil biogeochemistry require: (i) partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools according to their functional role; (ii) an explicit representation of microbial dynamics; (iii) coupling of carbon and nutrient cycles. While some of these components have been introduced in specialized models, they have been rarely implemented in terrestrial biosphere models and tested in real cases. In this study, we combine a new soil biogeochemistry model with an existing model of land-surface hydrology and vegetation dynamics (T&C). Specifically the soil biogeochemistry component explicitly separates different litter pools and distinguishes SOC in particulate, dissolved and mineral associated fractions. Extracellular enzymes and microbial pools are explicitly represented differentiating the functional roles of bacteria, saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Microbial activity depends on temperature, soil moisture and litter or SOC stoichiometry. The activity of macrofauna is also modeled. Nutrient dynamics include the cycles of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. The model accounts for feedbacks between nutrient limitations and plant growth as well as for plant stoichiometric flexibility. In turn, litter input is a function of the simulated vegetation dynamics. Root exudation and export to mycorrhiza are computed based on a nutrient uptake cost function. The combined model is tested to reproduce respiration dynamics and nitrogen cycle in few sites where data were available to test plausibility of results across a range of different metrics. For instance in a Swiss grassland ecosystem, fine root, bacteria, fungal and macrofaunal respiration account for 40%, 23%, 33% and 4% of total belowground

  8. Metaproteogenomics reveals the soil microbial communities active in nutrient cycling processes under different tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, Katharina Maria; Masse, Jacynthe; Zühlke, Daniela; Riedel, Katharina; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Prescott, Cindy E.; Grayston, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Tree species exert strong effects on microbial communities in litter and soil and may alter rates of soil processes fundamental to nutrient cycling and carbon fluxes (Prescott and Grayston 2013). However, the influence of tree species on decomposition processes are still contradictory and poorly understood. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant influences on soil processes is important for our ability to predict ecosystem response to altered global/environmental conditions. In order to link microbial community structure and function to forest-floor nutrient cycling processes, we sampled forest floors under western redcedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) grown in nutrient-poor sites in common garden experiments on Vancouver island (Canada). We measured forest-floor total N, total C, initial NH4+ and NO3- concentrations, DOC, Cmic and Nmic. Gross rates of ammonification and NH4+ consumption were measured using the 15N pool-dilution method. Organic carbon quality was assessed through FTIR analyses. Microbial community structure was analysed by a metaproteogenomic approach using 16S and ITS amplification and sequencing with MiSeq platform. Proteins were extracted and peptides characterized via LC-MS/MS on a Velos Orbitrap to assess the active microbial community. Different microbial communities were active under the three tree species and variation in process rates were observed and will be discussed. This research provides new insights on microbial processes during organic matter decomposition. The metaproteogenomic approach enables us to investigate these changes with respect to possible effects on soil C-storage at even finer taxonomic resolution.

  9. Adaptability in linkage of soil carbon nutrient cycles - the SEAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutzler, Thomas; Zaehle, Sönke; Schrumpf, Marion; Ahrens, Bernhard; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand the coupling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, it is necessary to understand C and N-use efficiencies of microbial soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. While important controls of those efficiencies by microbial community adaptations have been shown at the scale of a soil pore, an abstract simplified representation of community adaptations is needed at ecosystem scale. Therefore we developed the soil enzyme allocation model (SEAM), which takes a holistic, partly optimality based approach to describe C and N dynamics at the spatial scale of an ecosystem and time-scales of years and longer. We explicitly modelled community adaptation strategies of resource allocation to extracellular enzymes and enzyme limitations on SOM decomposition. Using SEAM, we explored whether alternative strategy-hypotheses can have strong effects on SOM and inorganic N cycling. Results from prototypical simulations and a calibration to observations of an intensive pasture site showed that the so-called revenue enzyme allocation strategy was most viable. This strategy accounts for microbial adaptations to both, stoichiometry and amount of different SOM resources, and supported the largest microbial biomass under a wide range of conditions. Predictions of the SEAM model were qualitatively similar to models explicitly representing competing microbial groups. With adaptive enzyme allocation under conditions of high C/N ratio of litter inputs, N in formerly locked in slowly degrading SOM pools was made accessible, whereas with high N inputs, N was sequestered in SOM and protected from leaching. The finding that adaptation in enzyme allocation changes C and N-use efficiencies of SOM decomposition implies that concepts of C-nutrient cycle interactions should take account for the effects of such adaptations. This can be done using a holistic optimality approach.

  10. Autumn Maize Intercropped with Tropical Forages: Crop Residues, Nutrient Cycling, Subsequent Soybean and Soil Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cézar Belchor Lages Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Autumn maize intercropped with tropical forages can raise the amount of crop residues and improve nutrient cycling, favoring subsequent soybean crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of forms of implementation of intercropping of irrigated autumn maize with tropical forages on yield, decomposition, nutrient accumulation and release, and on the ratio of lignin/total N of forage residues, yield components, and grain yield of subsequent soybean, and on soil physical and chemical properties, under no-tillage in lowland Cerrado. The experiment was arranged in randomized blocks in a factorial (4 × 3 + 1 design with one control and four replications. The treatments consisted of four forages: Palisade grass, Congo grass, and two Guinea grass cultivars (Tanzânia and Áries; and three methods of sowing intercrops of forage-autumn maize: forage sown simultaneously with maize in the sowing furrow, mixed with fertilizer; forage sown by broadcasting on the day of maize sowing; and forage seeds mixed with fertilizer broadcast on maize in growth stage V4; plus a control (maize monoculture. The decomposition and nutrient release rate of the forage residues were evaluated by the litter bag method, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after desiccation. Sowing the forages in the furrow and by broadcasting raise the total amount of maize residues compared to method V4. Regardless of the forage type and sowing methods, intercropping increases the amount of residues compared to maize monoculture. The forages and sowing methods had no influence on nutrient accumulation in the residues at the time of desiccation and at the lowest lignin/total N ratio in Congo grass residues, and a logarithmic decay was observed. Forage and sowing methods did not influence the macronutrient release rate from crop residues for 120 days after desiccation; the release of N, P, K and Mg is logarithmic and the release of Ca and S exponential. Forage and sowing methods do

  11. Biomass production, nutrient cycling, and carbon fixation by Salicornia brachiata Roxb.: A promising halophyte for coastal saline soil rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Aditya P; Chaudhary, Doongar R; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-08-02

    In order to increase our understanding of the interaction of soil-halophyte (Salicornia brachiata) relations and phytoremediation, we investigated the aboveground biomass, carbon fixation, and nutrient composition (N, P, K, Na, Ca, and Mg) of S. brachiata using six sampling sites with varying characteristics over one growing season in intertidal marshes. Simultaneously, soil characteristics and nutrient concentrations were also estimated. There was a significant variation in soil characteristics and nutrient contents spatially (except pH) as well as temporally. Nutrient contents in aboveground biomass of S. brachiata were also significantly differed spatially (except C and Cl) as well as temporally. Aboveground biomass of S. brachiata ranged from 2.51 to 6.07 t/ha at maturity and it was positively correlated with soil electrical conductivity and available Na, whereas negatively with soil pH. The K/Na ratio in plant was below one, showing tolerance to salinity. The aboveground C fixation values ranged from 0.77 to 1.93 C t/ha at all six sampling sites. This study provides new understandings into nutrient cycling-C fixation potential of highly salt-tolerant halophyte S. brachiata growing on intertidal soils of India. S. brachiata have a potential for amelioration of the salinity due to higher Na bioaccumulation factor.

  12. Interactions between plant growth and soil nutrient cycling under elevated CO2: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.A.; Groenigen, van K.J.; Six, J.; Hungate, B.; Kessel, van C.

    2006-01-01

    free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) and open top chamber (OTC) studies are valuable tools for evaluating the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Using meta-analytic techniques, we summarized the results of 117 studies on plant biomass production, s

  13. Groundwater Availability Alters Soil-plant Nutrient Cycling in a Stand of Invasive, N-fixing Phreatophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, B. D.; Miyazawa, Y.; Hughes, F.; Ostertag, R.; Kettwich, S. K.; MacKenzie, R.; Dulaiova, H.; Waters, C. A.; Bishop, J.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    N-fixing phreatophytic trees are common in arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, and can play significant roles in modifying hydrology and soil-plant nutrient cycling where they are present. In light of reductions in groundwater levels in many arid regions we estimated annual transpiration rates at a stand level, and alterations to C, N and P accretion in soils as a function of groundwater depth in a ca.120 year old stand of Prosopis pallida along an elevation gradient in coastal leeward Hawaii. We measured sapflow and stand level sapwood area to quantify transpiration, and calculated groundwater transpiration rates using P. pallida stem water δ18O values. By measuring soil resistivity, we were able to compare the volume of groundwater transpired by these trees to groundwater depth across the stand. We examined nutrient deposition and accretion in soils in lowland areas of the stand with accessible shallow groundwater, compared to upland areas with no groundwater access, as indicated by stem water δ18O values. Resistivity results suggested that groundwater was at a height close to sea level throughout the stand. Transpiration was around 1900 m3 ha-1 year-1 in the areas of the stand closest to the sea (where groundwater was at around 1-4 m below ground level) and decreased to around a tenth of that volume where groundwater was not accessible. Litterfall rates over the course of the year studied were 17 times greater at lowland sites, but this litterfall contributed ca. 24 times the N, and 35 times the P of upland sites. Thus, groundwater access contributed to the total mass of nitrogen and phosphorus deposited in the form of litter through higher litter quantity and quality. Total N content of soils was 4.7 times greater and inorganic N pools were eight times higher at lowland plots. These results suggest that groundwater depth can have strong effects on soil-plant nutrient cycling, so that reductions in the availability of shallow groundwater are likely to impact

  14. Interactions between plants and soil nutrient cycling under elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of the greenhouse gas CO2 is rising and may stimulate plant production and soil C input. If soil C input rates exceed soil C respiration rates under elevated CO2, global warming may be mitigated by long-term soil C sequestration. However, whether s

  15. Nutrient cycling and soil biology in row crop systems under intensive tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent interest in management of the soil biological component to improve soil health requires a better understanding on how management practices (e.g., tillage) and environmental conditions influence soil organisms. Intensive tillage often results in reduced organic matter content in the surface so...

  16. Seasonal greenhouse gas and soil nutrient cycling in semi-arid native and non-native perennial grass pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research indicates that a difference occurs in native and non-native grass species in regard to drivers of greenhouse gas (GHG, (carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O))) emissions from soil. Drivers of soil nutrients could help establish best management practices to mit...

  17. Lichens and weathering: importance for soil formation, nutrient cycling and adaptation to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, O. W.; Convey, P.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Peat, H. J.; Najorka, J.

    2012-04-01

    Lichens comprise ca. 6% of the Earth's terrestrial vegetation, and are dominant in certain polar ecosystems, being primary colonists of rocks where they play a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of elements and contribute to soil formation. We present an historical overview of studies in the Antarctic, leading to recent collection opportunities on Signy Island providing new material to investigate how biodiversity has responded to regional and rapid environmental change. Mountainous, with an ice cap, glaciers, rugged topography, and a complex geology and pedology, Signy Island includes a wide range of terrestrial habitats. A small, inconspicuous lichen, Acarospora cf. badiofusca, was discovered colonizing iron-stained quartz mica schists on the lower slope of Manhaul Rocks, a recently exposed nunatak on the McLeod Glacier, Signy Island, maritime Antarctic. Thallus colour ranged from rust to paler orange and green. Many lichens are colourful, mostly due to the presence of secondary metabolites which are of fungal origin. In some cases colour may reflect chemical coordination reactions involving lichen biomass components and dissolved cations which can lead to metal complex and mineral formation. By far the greatest research effort into characterizing elements and minerals associated with lichens concerns those occurring beneath them, research driven partly from a desire to understand weathering processes. This study, for the first time in the maritime Antarctic, addressed the hypothesis that colour reflects element localization, and examined substance localization within lichen tissues and considered responses to stress. Methods utilised include macrophotography, X-Ray Diffraction with a position sensitive detector (PSD), Scanning Electron Microscopy in back-scattered and ED modes and electron probe microanalysis for the elements Fe, C and Si and by using a third generation variable pressure secondary detector employed as a panchromatic cathodoluminescence

  18. Decoupling of nutrient element cycles in soil and plants across an altitude gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiqi; Wang, Guoan

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have examined the decoupling of C, N, and P under rapid changes in climate. While this may occur in different environment types, such climactic changes have been reported over short distances in mountainous terrain. We hypothesized that the decoupling of C, N, and P could also occur in response to increases in altitude. We sampled soil and plants from Mount Gongga, Sichuan Province, China. Soil C and N were not related to altitude, whereas soil P increased with altitude. Soil N did not change with mean annual temperature (MAT), mean annual precipitation (MAP), vegetation and soil types, whereas soil P varied with MAT and vegetation type. Plant C remained constant with increasing altitude; plant N exhibited a quadratic change trend along the altitude gradient, with a turning point at 2350 m above average sea level; and plant P decreased with altitude. MAP mostly accounted for the variation in plant P. MAT was responsible for the variation of plant N at elevations below 2350 m, whereas MAT and vegetation type were the dominant influential factors of plants growing above 2350 m. Thus, the decoupling of C, N, and P in both soil and plants was significantly affected by altitude.

  19. Ecological role of reindeer summer browsing in the mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii) forests: effects on plant defense, litter decomposition, and soil nutrient cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Sari; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Kumpula, Jouko

    2007-03-01

    Mammalian herbivores commonly alter the concentrations of secondary compounds in plants and, by this mechanism, have indirect effects on litter decomposition and soil carbon and nutrient cycling. In northernmost Fennoscandia, the subarctic mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii) forests are important pasture for the semidomestic reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). In the summer ranges, mountain birches are intensively browsed, whereas in the winter ranges, reindeer feed on ground lichens, and the mountain birches remain intact. We analyzed the effect of summer browsing on the concentrations of secondary substances, litter decomposition, and soil nutrient pools in areas that had been separated as summer or winter ranges for at least 20 years, and we predicted that summer browsing may reduce levels of secondary compounds in the mountain birch and, by this mechanism, have an indirect effect on the decomposition of mountain birch leaf litter and soil nutrient cycling. The effect of browsing on the concentration of secondary substances in the mountain birch leaves varied between different years and management districts, but in some cases, the concentration of condensed tannins was lower in the summer than in the winter ranges. In a reciprocal litter decomposition trial, both litter origin and emplacement significantly affected the litter decomposition rate. Decomposition rates were faster for the litter originating from and placed into the summer range. Soil inorganic nitrogen (N) concentrations were higher in the summer than in the winter ranges, which indicates that reindeer summer browsing may enhance the soil nutrient cycling. There was a tight inverse relationship between soil N and foliar tannin concentrations in the winter range but not in the summer range. This suggests that in these strongly nutrient-limited ecosystems, soil N availability regulates the patterns of resource allocation to condensed tannins in the absence but not in the presence of browsing.

  20. Integration of soil microbial processes in a reactive transport model for simulating effects of root-controlled water flow on carbon and nutrient cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeleta, J. F.; Cardon, Z. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Rastetter, E. B.; Neumann, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The rhizosphere is a hotbed of microbial activity in terrestrial ecosystems, and numerous models of rhizosphere dynamics have been focused in two main arenas: (1) water flow and nutrient transport around roots, and (2) carbon and nutrient exchanges between roots and microbes. However, coupling of microbial processes with physical flow (water and nutrients) in soils around plant roots is key to understanding how water, carbon and nutrient cycles interact at different scales. In order to explore how spatial distribution and timing of water flow directed by plant roots shapes rhizosphere biogeochemical function, we have developed a mechanistic model that combines a microbial food web with dynamic water flow and associated solute transport (advection, diffusion and cation exchange). We used the flexibility of a previously developed code, MIN3P (a multicomponent reactive transport model developed for variably saturated porous media) and incorporated microbial processes of carbon and nitrogen uptake, assimilation and secretion; microbial growth and death; exo-enzyme production; protozoal grazing, and soil organic matter decomposition within a soil matrix. We focused our attention at the mm-spatial scale, exploring the interaction of temporal oscillations in the magnitude and direction of water flow with soil C and N gradients. In this first modeling step, we prescribed dynamic soil water content representative of the transpiration stream (soil water loss) and hydraulic redistribution (soil water gain), as well as the flux of carbon into the soil. Although we are still in the process of building explicit root and plant behavior into the model, our preliminary results suggest that the diel pulsing of water out/into the soil can potentially change patterns of microbial C/N limitation and soil N availability. We are currently expanding our model to include the effect of plant root processes (uptake and exudation) and investigating the mechanisms explaining the interplay

  1. Richness, biomass, and nutrient content of a wetland macrophyte community affect soil nitrogen cycling in a diversity-ecosystem functioning experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Alicia R.; Ahn, Changwoo; Noe, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The development of soil nitrogen (N) cycling in created wetlands promotes the maturation of multiple biogeochemical cycles necessary for ecosystem functioning. This development proceeds from gradual changes in soil physicochemical properties and influential characteristics of the plant community, such as competitive behavior, phenology, productivity, and nutrient composition. In the context of a 2-year diversity experiment in freshwater mesocosms (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 richness levels), we assessed the direct and indirect impacts of three plant community characteristics – species richness, total biomass, and tissue N concentration – on three processes in the soil N cyclesoil net ammonification, net nitrification, and denitrification potentials. Species richness had a positive effect on net ammonification potential (NAP) through higher redox potentials and likely faster microbial respiration. All NAP rates were negative, however, due to immobilization and high rates of ammonium removal. Net nitrification was inhibited at higher species richness without mediation from the measured soil properties. Higher species richness also inhibited denitrification potential through increased redox potential and decreased nitrification. Both lower biomass and/or higher tissue ratios of carbon to nitrogen, characteristics indicative of the two annual plants, were shown to have stimulatory effects on all three soil N processes. The two mediating physicochemical links between the young macrophyte community and microbial N processes were soil redox potential and temperature. Our results suggest that early-successional annual plant communities play an important role in the development of ecosystem N multifunctionality in newly created wetland soils.

  2. Accumulation of nutrients in soils affected by perennial colonies of piscivorous birds with reference to biogeochemical cycles of elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Slawomir; Smal, Halina

    2003-07-01

    The accumulation of selected N, K, and P forms in soils within three perennial colonies of black cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) and grey heron (Ardea cinerea) located in northern and eastern Poland were investigated. Soil samples were collected beneath the nests from the most representative for each colony plots. Control samples were taken outside the colonies within sites adjacent to the nesting areas but not affected by bird excrement. From each genetic horizon (20 horizons) in soil profiles, a cumulative sample of about 25-30 kg of soil was taken for analysis. Nitrogen by Kjeldahl, ammonium ions (N(NH(4))), nitrates (N(NO(3))), exchangeable potassium (K(ex)), available potassium (K(av)), and available phosphorus (P(av)) were determined. The soils affected by birds demonstrated a very strong enrichment with N, K, and P in comparison to the control sites, especially in the topsoil horizons. The content of N(NH(4)) in individual soil horizons from the colonies was from 1.7 to 10.1 times higher than the respective control, N(NO(3)) from 2.9 to 215.7, K(ex) from 2.0 to 35.1, K(av) from 1.1 to 48.1, and P(av) in the range from 2.4 to 53.0 times. The highest increment of chemical elements was noticeable in the soils of territories inhabited by cormorants and the least in forest occupied by herons. Some relationships between soil texture and accumulation of biogenic nutrients were determined. Clay loam soil showed the greatest enrichment with analysed forms of elements with the exception of N(NH(4)).

  3. Ciclagem de nutrientes por plantas de cobertura na entressafra em um solo de cerrado Nutrient cycling in off-season cover crops on a Brazilian savanna soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Adriano Boer

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o acúmulo e a liberação de nutrientes (N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S de resíduos culturais de plantas de cobertura na entressafra, em condições de Cerrado. O experimento foi conduzido em um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico com textura argilosa. As plantas de cobertura avaliadas foram: amaranto (Amaranthus cruentus L., milheto (Pennisetum glaucum L. e capim-pé-de-galinha (Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn.. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, no esquema de parcelas subdivididas, com quatro repetições. Na fase de florescimento das espécies, foi avaliada a produção de matéria seca e o acúmulo de nutrientes. A fim de avaliar a liberação de nutrientes dos resíduos culturais, o material vegetal de cada espécie foi acondicionado em sacolas de náilon, as quais foram dispostas sobre o solo e seu conteúdo analisado em intervalos de 30 dias, até 240 dias após sua instalação. As maiores quantidades de nutrientes acumulados na fitomassa das plantas de cobertura foram observadas no milheto e no capim-pé-de-galinha. O potássio foi o nutriente acumulado em maior quantidade, chegando a atingir 416,9 kg ha-1 no milheto. As maiores taxas de liberação de nutrientes foram observadas nos resíduos culturais do amaranto.The objective of this work was to evaluate the accumulation and the liberation of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S of cultural residues by three species of cover crops, in off-season. Tested cover crops were amaranthus (Amaranthus cruentus L., pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. and finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn.. The experiment was carried out in a Typic Haplorthox clay texture soil. A randomized block desing in a split-plot array in time, with four replications, was used. At the flowering of the species, the production of dry matter and the accumulation of nutrients were evaluated. Proportional samples of dry matter of each cover crop species were placed in

  4. Associations between soil bacterial community structure and nutrient cycling functions in long-term organic farm soils following cover crop and organic fertilizer amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Adria L; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Agricultural management practices can produce changes in soil microbial populations whose functions are crucial to crop production and may be detectable using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA. To apply sequencing-derived bacterial community structure data to on-farm decision-making will require a better understanding of the complex associations between soil microbial community structure and soil function. Here 16S rRNA sequencing was used to profile soil bacterial communities following application of cover crops and organic fertilizer treatments in certified organic field cropping systems. Amendment treatments were hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), winter rye (Secale cereale), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), beef manure, pelleted poultry manure, Sustane(®) 8-2-4, and a no-amendment control. Enzyme activities, net N mineralization, soil respiration, and soil physicochemical properties including nutrient levels, organic matter (OM) and pH were measured. Relationships between these functional and physicochemical parameters and soil bacterial community structure were assessed using multivariate methods including redundancy analysis, discriminant analysis, and Bayesian inference. Several cover crops and fertilizers affected soil functions including N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activity. Effects, however, were not consistent across locations and sampling timepoints. Correlations were observed among functional parameters and relative abundances of individual bacterial families and phyla. Bayesian analysis inferred no directional relationships between functional activities, bacterial families, and physicochemical parameters. Soil functional profiles were more strongly predicted by location than by treatment, and differences were largely explained by soil physicochemical parameters. Composition of soil bacterial communities was predictive of soil functional profiles. Differences in soil function were

  5. Nutrient Cycling in Piermont Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, N.; Gribbin, S.; Newton, R.; Diaz, K.; Laporte, N.; Trivino, G.; Ortega, J.; McKee, K.; Sambrotto, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the cycling of nutrients through a brackish tidal wetland about 40 km north of Manhattan in the Hudson River estuary. As part of a long-term ecological study of Piermont Marsh, a NOAA reference wetland managed by the NY State DEC, we are measuring dissolved inorganic nutrients on the Marsh surface and its drainage channels. The marsh occupies 400 acres along the southwest corner of Haverstraw Bay with approximately 2 km frontage to the estuary. It is supplied with nutrient-rich water and drained primarily along several tidal creeks and the hundreds of rivulets that feed them. During most tidal cycles the silty berm bounding the marsh is not topped. Human influence in the marsh's surrounding area has had profound effects, one of the most fundamental of which has been the shift from native grass species, predominantly Spartina alterniflora, to an invasive genotype of common reed, Phragmites australis. Along with this shift there have been changes in the root bed, the effective marsh interior and berm heights, the hydroperiod and, as a result, the ability of the marsh to be utilized by various types of Hudson estuary fish. The vegetative shift is believed to be anthropogenic, but the connection is not well understood, and it is not known what role biogeochemical perturbations are playing. We present two field seasons of nitrate, phosphate and silicate measurements from Sparkill Creek, a freshwater stream draining the surrounding highlands constitutes the northern boundary, two tidally driven creeks transect the Marsh from West to East: the Crumkill and an unnamed creek we have dubbed the "Tidal", Ludlow Ditch, a no-longer-maintained drainage channel grading gently from the northern part of the marsh to the South terminates in a wide tidal outlet that is its southern boundary. Net tidal cycle fluxes and fluxes resulting from runoff events are presented. Deviations from Redfield ratios and limiting nutrients are analyzed. Piermont Marsh data is compared

  6. Distribution of Prokaryotic Abundance and Microbial Nutrient Cycling Across a High-Alpine Altitudinal Gradient in the Austrian Central Alps is Affected by Vegetation, Temperature, and Soil Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Katrin; Lamprecht, Andrea; Pauli, Harald; Illmer, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Studies of the altitudinal distributions of soil microorganisms are rare or have led to contradictory results. Therefore, we studied archaeal and bacterial abundance and microbial-mediated activities across an altitudinal gradient (2700 to 3500 m) on the southwestern slope of Mt. Schrankogel (Central Alps, Austria). Sampling sites distributed over the alpine (2700 to 2900 m), the alpine-nival (3000 to 3100 m), and the nival altitudinal belts (3200 to 3500 m), which are populated by characteristic plant assemblages. Bacterial and archaeal abundances were measured via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Moreover, microbial biomass C, microbial activity (dehydrogenase), and enzymes involved in carbon (CM-cellulase), nitrogen (protease), phosphorus (alkaline phosphatase), and sulfur (arylsulfatase) cycling were determined. Abundances, microbial biomass C, and activities almost linearly decreased along the gradient. Archaeal abundance experienced a sharper decrease, thus pointing to pronounced sensitivity toward environmental harshness. Additionally, abundance and activities were significantly higher in soils of the alpine belt compared with those of the nival belt, whereas the alpine-nival ecotone represented a transitional area with intermediate values, thus highlighting the importance of vegetation. Archaeal abundance along the gradient was significantly related to soil temperature only, whereas bacterial abundance was significantly related to temperature and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations explained most of the variance in enzyme activities involved in the cycling of C, N, P, and S. Increasing temperature could therefore increase the abundances and activities of microorganisms either directly or indirectly via expansion of alpine vegetation to higher altitudes and increased plant cover.

  7. Effects of Epigeic Earthworms on Decomposition of Wheat Straw and Nutrient Cycling in Agricultural Soils in a Reclaimed Salinity Area: A Microcosm Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jun-Zhu; QIAO Yu-Hui; SUN Zhen-Jun; ZHANG Shuo-Xin; LI Yun-Le; ZHANG Rui-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms,one of the most important macroinvertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems of temperate zones,exert important influences on soil functions.A laboratory microcosm study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida on wheat straw decomposition and nutrient cycling in an agricultural soil in a reclaimed salinity area of the North China Plain.Each microcosm was simulated by thoroughly mixing wheat straw into the soil and incubated for 120 d with earthworms added at 3 different densities as treatments control with no earthworms,regular density (RD) with two earthworms,and increased density (ID) with six earthworms.The results showed that there was no depletion of carbon and nitrogen pools in the presence of the earthworms Basal soil respiration rates and metabolic quotient increased with the increase in earthworm density during the initial and middle part of the incubation period.In contrast,concentrations of microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass quotient decreased in the presence of earthworms.Earthworm activity stimulated the transfer of microbial biomass carbon to dissolved organic carbon and could lead to a smaller,but more metabolically active microbial biomass.Concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and NO3--N increased significantly with the increase in earthworm density at the end of the incubation (P < 0.05),resulting in a large pool of inorganic nitrogen available for plant uptake.Cumulative net nitrogen mineralization rates were three times higher in the ID treatment than the RD treatment.

  8. Improvement of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development by Inoculation of Soil with Phosphate-Solubilizing Rhizobacteria To Improve Rock Phosphate Bioavailability ((sup32)P) and Nutrient Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, M.; Azcon, R.; Barea, J.

    1997-01-01

    The interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant use of soil P sources of low bioavailability (endogenous or added as rock phosphate [RP] material) was evaluated by using soil microcosms which integrated (sup32)P isotopic dilution techniques. The microbial inocula consisted of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices and two phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterial isolates: Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus subtilis. These rhizobacteria behaved as "mycorrhiza helper bacteria" promoting establishment of both the indigenous and the introduced AM endophytes despite a gradual decrease in bacterial population size, which dropped from 10(sup7) at planting to 10(sup3) CFU g(sup-1) of dry rhizosphere soil at harvest. Dual inoculation with G. intraradices and B. subtilis significantly increased biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Regardless of the rhizobacterium strain and of the addition of RP, AM plants displayed lower specific activity ((sup32)P/(sup31)P) than their comparable controls, suggesting that the plants used P sources not available in their absence. The inoculated rhizobacteria may have released phosphate ions ((sup31)P), either from the added RP or from the less-available indigenous P sources, which were effectively taken up by the external AM mycelium. Soluble Ca deficiency in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. At least 75% of the P in dually inoculated plants derived from the added RP. It appears that these mycorrhizosphere interactions between bacterial and fungal plant associates contributed to the biogeochemical P cycling, thus promoting a sustainable nutrient supply to plants. PMID:16535730

  9. Improvement of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development by Inoculation of Soil with Phosphate-Solubilizing Rhizobacteria To Improve Rock Phosphate Bioavailability ((sup32)P) and Nutrient Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, M; Azcon, R; Barea, J

    1997-11-01

    The interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant use of soil P sources of low bioavailability (endogenous or added as rock phosphate [RP] material) was evaluated by using soil microcosms which integrated (sup32)P isotopic dilution techniques. The microbial inocula consisted of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices and two phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterial isolates: Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus subtilis. These rhizobacteria behaved as "mycorrhiza helper bacteria" promoting establishment of both the indigenous and the introduced AM endophytes despite a gradual decrease in bacterial population size, which dropped from 10(sup7) at planting to 10(sup3) CFU g(sup-1) of dry rhizosphere soil at harvest. Dual inoculation with G. intraradices and B. subtilis significantly increased biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Regardless of the rhizobacterium strain and of the addition of RP, AM plants displayed lower specific activity ((sup32)P/(sup31)P) than their comparable controls, suggesting that the plants used P sources not available in their absence. The inoculated rhizobacteria may have released phosphate ions ((sup31)P), either from the added RP or from the less-available indigenous P sources, which were effectively taken up by the external AM mycelium. Soluble Ca deficiency in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. At least 75% of the P in dually inoculated plants derived from the added RP. It appears that these mycorrhizosphere interactions between bacterial and fungal plant associates contributed to the biogeochemical P cycling, thus promoting a sustainable nutrient supply to plants.

  10. Degradation of Soil Nutrients in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A total of 2190 soil nutrient data in the Second National Soil Survey of China were collected to assess the degradation of soil nutrients in the hilly region of Southeast China. The definition of soil nutrient degradation is suggested firstly, then the evaluation criteria are set up and the current status of degradation of red soil and latosol is assessed. The percentages of areas in four grades of soil nutrient degradation, i.e., slightly deficient, medium deficient, severely deficient and extremely deficient, were 21.3%, 43.3%, 16.2% and 3.0% for soil total N; 0.7%, 6.4%, 16.7% and 76.2% for soil available P; and 25.4%, 26.3%, 8.6% and 5.0% for soil available K, respectively. The severity of soil nutrient degradation was in the order of P > N > K. The major factors leading to the degradation of soil nutrients in quantity include soil erosion, leaching and the consumption by crops. And the principal factor affecting the degradation of soil nutrients in availability is the fixation of N, P and K, especially the fixation of phosphorus. The average amount of P fixed by soils is 408 mg kg-1, and upland soils can fix more P than paddy soils.

  11. Modelling nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems; Modellering av naeringssyklus i skogoekosystemer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvindesland, Sheila H.S.B.

    1997-12-31

    Acid deposition`s threat to fresh water and forest environments became an issue in the late 1960s. Acid deposition and forest nutrient cycling then began to be researched in greater co-operation. This thesis studies nutrient cycling processes in Norway spruce forests, emphasizing the effects on soil chemical properties, soil solution chemistry and streamwater chemistry. It investigates the effects of different aged stands on nutrient cycling and sets up nutrient budgets of the base cations and nitrogen at two sites in Norway. It also selects, documents, calibrates, tests and improves nutrient cycling models for use in Norwegian forests. 84 refs., 44 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Dynamics of soil nutrients in larch plantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Deren; Chen Jinglian

    1999-01-01

    The annual dynamic changes of soil nutrients were measured in pure larch plantation and in mixed larch plantation in the arboretum of Inner Mongolia Academy of Forestry Science, Huhehaote. The results showed that soil nutrients in pure larch plantations changed rapidly in July and August. The variation of soil nutrients is more stable in mixed larch plantation. Compared with the pure larch plantation, the content of soil nutrients in mixed larch plantation obviously increased. The soil degradation occurred in the pure larch plantation, and related to the forest age.

  13. Seasonal greenhouse gas and soil nutrient cycling in semi-arid native and non-native perennial grass pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research indicates that photosynthetic metabolism of warm- and cool-season grass species affects greenhouse gas (GHG, (carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O))) emissions from soil. This information could help establish best management practices to mitigate GHGs and stor...

  14. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition, nutrient cycling and soil weathering on the sustainability of nine forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salm, C. van der; Vries, W.de; Olsson, M.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the impact of acid deposition on the long-term sustainability of nine oak, pine and spruce stands on sandy to loamy sandy parent material in Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands, a dynamic soil acidification model (ReSAM) was applied. Two deposition scenarios For the period 1990-2090 were...

  15. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition, nutrient cycling and soil weathering on the sustainability of nine forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salm, C. van der; Vries, W.de; Olsson, M.;

    1999-01-01

    To assess the impact of acid deposition on the long-term sustainability of nine oak, pine and spruce stands on sandy to loamy sandy parent material in Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands, a dynamic soil acidification model (ReSAM) was applied. Two deposition scenarios For the period 1990-2090 wer...

  16. Current Status and Advancements in Research of Plantation Nutrient Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Run; ZHANG Changshun; SUN Yongyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces concepts and current research status of plantation nutrients cyclings, and analyzes main contents of plantation nutrients cycling as nutrients contents, accumulation and distribution of nutrients elements, understory species and forest litter. At the same time, the paper summarizes the problems in plantation nutrients cycling and its prospects.

  17. Dry Matter Production, Nutrient Cycled and Removed, and Soil Fertility Changes in Yam-Based Cropping Systems with Herbaceous Legumes in the Guinea-Sudan Zone of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliki, Raphiou; Sinsin, Brice; Floquet, Anne; Cornet, Denis; Malezieux, Eric; Vernier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Traditional yam-based cropping systems (shifting cultivation, slash-and-burn, and short fallow) often result in deforestation and soil nutrient depletion. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of yam-based systems with herbaceous legumes on dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrients removed and recycled, and the soil fertility changes. We compared smallholders' traditional systems (1-year fallow of Andropogon gayanus-yam rotation, maize-yam rotation) with yam-based systems integrated herbaceous legumes (Aeschynomene histrix/maize intercropping-yam rotation, Mucuna pruriens/maize intercropping-yam rotation). The experiment was conducted during the 2002 and 2004 cropping seasons with 32 farmers, eight in each site. For each of them, a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replicates was carried out using a partial nested model with five factors: Year, Replicate, Farmer, Site, and Treatment. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the general linear model (GLM) procedure was applied to the dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrient contribution to the systems, and soil properties at depths 0-10 and 10-20 cm. DM removed and recycled, total N, P, and K recycled or removed, and soil chemical properties (SOM, N, P, K, and pH water) were significantly improved on yam-based systems with legumes in comparison with traditional systems.

  18. Nutrient Limitation of Microbial Mediated Decomposition and Arctic Soil Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melle, C. J.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Soils of northern permafrost regions currently contain twice as much carbon as the entire Earth's atmosphere. Traditionally, environmental constraints have limited microbial activity resulting in restricted decomposition of soil organic matter in these systems and accumulation of massive amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC), however climate change is reducing the constraints of decomposition in arctic permafrost regions. Carbon cycling in nutrient poor, arctic ecosystems is tightly coupled to other biogeochemical cycles. Several studies have suggested strong nitrogen limitations of primary productivity and potentially warm-season microbial activity in these nutrient deficient soils. Nitrogen is required for microbial extracellular enzyme production which drives the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). Nitrogen limited arctic soils may also experience limitation via labile carbon availability despite the SOM rich environment due to low extracellular enzyme production. Few studies have directly addressed nutrient induced microbial limitation in SOC rich arctic tundra soils, and even less is known about the potential for nutrient co-limitation. Additionally, through the process of becoming deglaciated, sites within close proximity to one another may have experienced drastic differences in their effective soil ages due to the varied length of their active histories. Many soil properties and nutrient deficiencies are directly related to soil age, however this chronology has not previously been a focus of research on nutrient limitation of arctic soil microbial activity. Understanding of nutrient limitations, as well as potential co-limitation, on arctic soil microbial activity has important implications for carbon cycling and the ultimate fate of the current arctic SOC reservoir. Analyses of nutrient limitation on soils of a single site are not adequate for fully understanding the controls on soil microbial activity across a vast land mass with large variation in

  19. [Effects of biochar on soil nutrients leaching and potential mechanisms: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-xue; Lyu, Hao-hao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Yao-feng; Zhong, Zhe-ke; Yang, Sheng-mao

    2015-01-01

    Controlling soil nutrient leaching in farmland ecosystems has been a hotspot in the research field of agricultural environment. Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in enhancing soil carbon storage, improving soil quality and increasing crop yield. As a kind of new exogenous material, biochar has the potential in impacting soil nutrient cycling directly or indirectly, and has profound influences on soil nutrient leaching. This paper analyzed the intrinsic factors affecting how biochar affects soil nutrient leaching, such as the physical and chemical properties of biochar, and the interaction between biochar and soil organisms. Then the latest literatures regarding the external factors, including biochar application rates, soil types, depth of soil layer, fertilization conditions and temporal dynamics, through which biochar influences soil nutrient (especially nitrogen and phosphorus) leaching were reviewed. On that basis, four related action mechanisms were clarified, including direct adsorption of nutrients by biochar due to its micropore structure or surface charge, influencing nutrient leaching through increasing soil water- holding capacity, influencing nutrient cycling through the interaction with soil microbes, and preferential transport of absorbed nutrients by fine biochar particles. At last future research directions for better understanding the interactions between biochar and nutrient leaching in the soil were proposed.

  20. Nutrient cycling and foodwebs in Dutch estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    In this review several aspects of the functioning of the Dutch estuaries (Ems-Dollard, Wadden Sea, Oosterschelde, Westerschelde, Grevelingen and Veerse Meer) have been compared. A number of large European rivers (especially Rhine) have a prevailing influence on the nutrient cycling of most Dutch est

  1. Nutrient Lossed in Soils on Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGLIN; WANGJI-ZENG; 等

    1995-01-01

    The soil nutrient losses due to excessive soil loss on Loess Plateau were studied by means of runoff plots and systematical determination of soil nutrients both in sediments and runoff.The results show that the amounts of nutrient losses depended on the amounts of ersoion sediments.Along with sediment,11-197kg nitrogen/hectare and 9-174kg phosphorus/hectare were lost,accounting for 92.46-99.47 percent of the total amount of nitrogen loss and 99.85-99.99 percent of the total amount of phosphorus loss respectively.The nutrient losses,very small in runoff,were mainly attributed to erosion of a few rainstorms during a year.The nutrient level in sediment was mostly higher than that in the original soil.Planting grass evidently redued the losses of soil nutrients.The N level was lower in runoff than in rainfall so that the N loss from runoff could be made up by rainfall.Fertilizer application to crops raised the nutrient level in runoff.

  2. Nutrient cycle of planted forest of Pinus tabulaeformis in the Miyun Reservoir Watershed, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihai LIU; Xinxiao YU

    2009-01-01

    We studied the nutrient cycle of a planted for-est ofPinus tabulaeformis in the Miyun Reservoir Water-shed, Beijing. Results show that the total biomass of P.tabulaeformis stands at age 29 in the experimental area is 92627 kg/hm2, and the total nutrient store is 695.17 kg/hm2 including nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), kalium (K), calium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg). The sequence of their contents in different organs was given as follows: needle > branch >trunk > root. The annual amount of 85.37 kg/hm2 of five nutrient elements were assimilated by P. tabulaeformis,about 0.34% of the total store in soil, and 3.30% of available nutrient store in soil depth from 0 to 30 cm. The nutrient annual retention is 35.92 kg/hm2, annual returning 49.46kg/hm2, the rain input 26.04kg/hm2 to the five nutrient elements. The parameter absorption coefficient,utilization coefficient, cycle coefficient and turnover period were cited to describe the nutrient elements cycle characteristic of the planted forest ecosystem of P.tabulaeformis. The absorption coefficient is the ratio of plant nutrient element content to soil nutrient element content, and its sequence of five nutrient elements was given as follows: N > P > K > Ca > Mg. Utilization coef-ficient is the ratio of the nutrient element annual uptake amount to the nutrient element storage in standing crops,and its sequence of five nutrient elements was: Mg > K >P > N > Ca. The big utilization coefficient means more nutrients stored in the plant. The cycle coefficient is the ratio of the nutrient element annual return amount to the nutrient element annual uptake amount, its sequence:Ca > N > P > K > Mg. Turnover period is the ratio of the nutrient storage in the crops to the annual returning, its sequence: Mg > K > P > N > Ca.

  3. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, CH4) from managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system simulating water and nutrient transport and associated carbon and nitrogen cycling at catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Steffen; Haas, Edwin; Kraus, David; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Plesca, Ina; Breuer, Lutz; Zhu, Bo; Zhou, Minghua; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wlotzka, Martin; Heuveline, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in a small catchment at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation

  4. Evaluation of soil nutrient status in poplar forest soil by soil nutrient systematic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUChang-bing; CHENFang; LUOZhi-jian; CHENWei-wen

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the soil nutrient status of poplar plantation by Soil Nutrient Systematic Approach(SNSA) in Jianghan Plain, Hubei Province, China. Soil physiochemical properties were analyzed in laboratory through collection soil samples of study site. Ten treatments of application different fertilizers were designed such as CK, optimum treatment (N, P,K, Zn), -N(P, K, Zn), -P(N, K, Zn), -K(N, P, Zn), +Mg(N, P, K, Zn, Mg), -Zn (N,P,K), +2P(N, 2P, K, Zn), +2K(N, P, 2K, Zn), and 2N+2P+2K(2N, 2P, 2K, Zn) for field experiment to test the effect on tree height, diameter (DBH) growth, and dry weight of poplar.The results showed that there was no significant difference in tree heights between treatments with different fertilizers, diameter growth of poplar trees in treatments of lack of N and Zn was significantly slower than that of trees in optimum treatment, and dry weight of poplar dropped significantly for treatment of CK as well as treatments without application N and Zn. It is concluded that N and Zn were main limiting factor for poplar growth. Results from laboratory analysis and field experiment were uniform perfectly, which proved that SNSA was reliable in evaluating soil nutrient status of poplar plantation.

  5. Biomass and nutrient cycling by winter cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Koefender

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops are of fundamental importance for the sustainability of the no-tillage system, to ensure soil coverage and to provide benefits for the subsequent crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the production of biomass and the content and accumulation of nutrients by winter cover crops. The experimental design used in the experiment was a randomized complete block with four replications and six treatments: oilseed radish, vetch, black oats, vetch + black oats, vetch + oilseed radish and fallow. Black oat, oilseed radish in single cultivation and black oat + vetch and vetch + oilseed radish intercroppings showed higher dry matter production. Vetch + oilseed radish intercropping demonstrates higher performance regarding cycling of nutrients, with higher accumulations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, Zn, Fe, Na and B.

  6. Ecoenzymatic Stoichiometry of Microbial Organic Nutrient Acquisition in Soil and Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrestrial soils and freshwater sediments contain reserves of organic carbon estimated at 1500 Pg and 0.2 Pg, respectively. Mineralization of this organic matter by heterotrophic microorganisms drives global carbon and nutrient cycles, controlling plant production and atmospher...

  7. Ecoenzymatic Stoichiometry of Microbial Organic Nutrient Acquisition in Soil and Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrestrial soils and freshwater sediments contain reserves of organic carbon estimated at 1500 Pg and 0.2 Pg, respectively. Mineralization of this organic matter by heterotrophic microorganisms drives global carbon and nutrient cycles, controlling plant production and atmospher...

  8. The soil life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil is one of the most important natural resource for life on Earth and provides important ecosystem services, such as food production, carbon sequestration, water regulation and contaminant attenuation. Soil quality, defined as the soil’s ability to provide these services, is drastically red

  9. Tillage and nutrient sources impact the productivity of eroded soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil degradation is a consequence of soil organic matter (SOM) losses due to soil disturbance, SOM decomposition, and soil erosion. Manure addition has been shown to enhance SOM, improve soil nutrient status, and increase soil productivity. Manure rates and degree of incorporation may also influenc...

  10. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  11. Productivity and nutrient cycling in bioenergy cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggenstaller, Andrew Howard

    One of the greatest obstacles confronting large-scale biomass production for energy applications is the development of cropping systems that balance the need for increased productive capacity with the maintenance of other critical ecosystem functions including nutrient cycling and retention. To address questions of productivity and nutrient dynamics in bioenergy cropping systems, we conducted two sets of field experiments during 2005-2007, investigating annual and perennial cropping systems designed to generate biomass energy feedstocks. In the first experiment we evaluated productivity and crop and soil nutrient dynamics in three prototypical bioenergy double-crop systems, and in a conventionally managed sole-crop corn system. Double-cropping systems included fall-seeded forage triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack), succeeded by one of three summer-adapted crops: corn (Zea mays L.), sorghum-sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], or sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.). Total dry matter production was greater for triticale/corn and triticale/sorghum-sudangrass compared to sole-crop corn. Functional growth analysis revealed that photosynthetic duration was more important than photosynthetic efficiency in determining biomass productivity of sole-crop corn and double-crop triticale/corn, and that greater yield in the tiritcale/corn system was the outcome of photosynthesis occurring over an extended duration. Increased growth duration in double-crop systems was also associated with reductions in potentially leachable soil nitrogen relative to sole-crop corn. However, nutrient removal in harvested biomass was also greater in the double-crop systems, indicating that over the long-term, double-cropping would mandate increased fertilizer inputs. In a second experiment we assessed the effects of N fertilization on biomass and nutrient partitioning between aboveground and belowground crop components, and on carbon storage by four perennial, warm-season grasses: big bluestem

  12. Rapid Shifts in Soil Nutrients and Decomposition Enzyme Activity in Early Succession Following Forest Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knelman, Joseph; Graham, Emily B.; Ferrenberg, Scott; Lecoeuvre, Aurelien; Labrado, Amanda; Darcy, John; Nemergut, Diana R.; Schmidt, Steven K.

    2017-09-15

    In post-disturbance landscapes nutrient availability has proven a major control on ecological succession. In this study, we examined variation in connections between soil nutrient availability and decomposition extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across post fire secondary succession in forest soils as well as after a secondary flood disturbance. We also examined possible linkages between edaphic properties and bacterial communities based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. We found that with advancing succession in a post-fire landscape, the relationship between soil nutrients and EEA became stronger over time. In general, late successional soils showed stronger connections between EEA and soil nutrient status, while early successional soils were marked by a complete decoupling of nutrients and EEA. We also found that soil moisture and bacterial communities of post-fire disturbance soils were susceptible to change following the secondary flood disturbance, while undisturbed, reference forest soils were not. Our results demonstrate that nutrient pools correlating with EEA change over time. While past work has largely focused on ecosystem succession on decadal timescales, our work suggests that nutrients shift in their relative importance as a control of decomposition EEA in the earliest stages of secondary succession. Thus, this work emphasizes the relevance of successional stage, even on short timescales, in predicting rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling, especially as disturbances become more frequent in a rapidly changing world.

  13. Closed-Cycle Nutrient Supply For Hydroponics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopf, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    Hydroponic system controls composition and feed rate of nutrient solution and recovers and recycles excess solution. Uses air pressure on bladders to transfer aqueous nutrient solution. Measures and adjusts composition of solution before it goes to hydroponic chamber. Eventually returns excess solution to one of tanks. Designed to operate in microgravity, also adaptable to hydroponic plant-growing systems on Earth.

  14. Improvement of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development by Inoculation of Soil with Phosphate-Solubilizing Rhizobacteria To Improve Rock Phosphate Bioavailability ((sup32)P) and Nutrient Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, M.; Azcon, R.; Barea, J.

    1997-01-01

    The interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant use of soil P sources of low bioavailability (endogenous or added as rock phosphate [RP] material) was evaluated by using soil microcosms which integrated (sup32)P isotopic dilution techniques. The microbial inocula consisted of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices and two phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterial isolates: Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus subtilis. These rhizobacteria behaved as "m...

  15. Variation in wood nutrients along a tropical soil fertility gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Katherine D; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains the majority of the nutrients in tropical trees, yet controls over wood nutrient concentrations and their function are poorly understood. We measured wood nutrient concentrations in 106 tree species in 10 forest plots spanning a regional fertility gradient in Panama. For a subset of species, we quantified foliar nutrients and wood density to test whether wood nutrients scale with foliar nutrients at the species level, or wood nutrient storage increases with wood density as predicted by the wood economics spectrum. Wood nutrient concentrations varied enormously among species from fourfold in nitrogen (N) to > 30-fold in calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). Community-weighted mean wood nutrient concentrations correlated positively with soil Ca, K, Mg and P concentrations. Wood nutrients scaled positively with leaf nutrients, supporting the hypothesis that nutrient allocation is conserved across plant organs. Wood P was most sensitive to variation in soil nutrient availability, and significant radial declines in wood P indicated that tropical trees retranslocate P as sapwood transitions to heartwood. Wood P decreased with increasing wood density, suggesting that low wood P and dense wood are traits associated with tree species persistence on low fertility soils. Substantial variation among species and communities in wood nutrient concentrations suggests that allocation of nutrients to wood, especially P, influences species distributions and nutrient dynamics in tropical forests.

  16. Linking soil and sediment properties for research on biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  17. Soil nutrient concentration and distribution at riverbanks undergoing different land management practices: Implications for riverbank management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Chang, S.; Yuan, L. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Riverbanks are important boundaries for the nutrient cycling between lands and freshwaters. This research aimed to explore effects of different land management methods on the soil nutrient concentration and distribution at riverbanks. Soils from the reed-covered riverbanks of middle Yangtze River were studied, including the soils respectively undergoing systematic agriculture (gathering young tender shoots, reaping reed straws, and burning residual straws), fires and no disturbances. Results showed that the agricultural activities sharply decreased the contents of soil organic matter (SOM), N, P and K in subsurface soils but less decreased the surface SOM, N and K contents, whereas phosphorus were evidently decreased at both surface and subsurface layers. In contrast, the single application of fires caused a marked increase of SOM, N, P and K contents in both surface and subsurface soils but had little impacts on soil nutrient distributions. Soils under all the three conditions showed a relative increase of soil nutrients at riverbank foot. This comparative study indicated that the different or even contrary effects of riverbank management practices on soil nutrient statuses should be carefully taken into account when assessing the ecological effects of management practices.

  18. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in reducing soil nutrient loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Bender, S Franz; Asghari, Hamid R; Heijden, Marcel G A van der

    2015-05-01

    Substantial amounts of nutrients are lost from soils via leaching and as gaseous emissions. These losses can be environmentally damaging and expensive in terms of lost agricultural production. Plants have evolved many traits to optimize nutrient acquisition, including the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), associations of plant roots with fungi that acquire soil nutrients. There is emerging evidence that AM have the ability to reduce nutrient loss from soils by enlarging the nutrient interception zone and preventing nutrient loss after rain-induced leaching events. Until recently, this important ecosystem service of AM had been largely overlooked. Here we review the role of AM in reducing nutrient loss and conclude that this role cannot be ignored if we are to increase global food production in an environmentally sustainable manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Interactive effects between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huilin; Peng, Shaolin; Zheng, Yuji; Mo, Jiangming; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Xiaoduo; He, Xiaoxia

    2006-09-01

    Plant allelopathy relates to many ecological factors. The deficit of soil nutrients can influence the production of plant allelochemicals, and thus, influence plant allelopathic potential, while plant allelochemicals can influence the form and level of soil nutrients by the ways of complexation, adsorption, acid dissolution, competition, inhibition, and others. In this paper, the interactive effects between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients were summarized, and further research aspects in this field were prospected. It was suggested that following aspects should be strengthened: (1) the integration of plant allelopathy and soil-plant nutrition research to more precisely and deeply interpret the relationships between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients, (2) the integration of plant allelopathy and ecosystem nutrient cycling research to simulate the plant nutrients disturbance in nature and make the allelopathy research results more true and more reliable, and (3) the allelopathy research with soils containing excessive nutrients or polluted to provide new ideas and scientific basis in revealing the mechanisms of plants interaction and biomass variation in agricultural and forestry production, and in ecological protection.

  20. Impacts of soil petroleum contamination on nutrient release during litter decomposition of Hippophae rhamnoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Zengwen; Luc, Nhu Trung; Yu, Qi; Liu, Xiaobo; Liang, Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Petroleum exploitation causes contamination of shrub lands close to oil wells. Soil petroleum contamination affects nutrient release during the litter decomposition of shrubs, which influences nutrient recycling and the maintenance of soil fertility. Hence, this contamination may reduce the long-term growth and stability of shrub communities and consequently, the effects of phytoremediation. Fresh foliar litter of Hippophae rhamnoides, a potential phytoremediating species, was collected for this study. The litter was placed in litterbags and then buried in different petroleum-polluted soil media (the petroleum concentrations were 15, 30, and 45 g kg(-1) dry soil, which were considered as slightly, moderately and seriously polluted soil, respectively) for a decomposition test. The impacts of petroleum contamination on the release of nutrients (including N, P, K, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg) were assessed. The results showed that (1) after one year of decomposition, the release of all nutrients was accelerated in the slightly polluted soil. In the moderately polluted soil, P release was accelerated, while Cu, Zn and Mn release was inhibited. In the seriously polluted soil, Cu and Zn release was accelerated, while the release of the other nutrients was inhibited. (2) The effect of petroleum on nutrient release from litter differed in different periods during decomposition; this was mainly due to changes in soil microorganisms and enzymes under the stress of petroleum contamination. (3) To maintain the nutrient cycling and the soil fertility of shrub lands, H. rhamnoides is only suitable for phytoremediation of soils containing less than 30 g kg(-1) of petroleum.

  1. Agricultural Nutrient Cycling at the Strawberry Creek Watershed: Insights Into Processes Using Stable Isotope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuss, E.; English, M. C.; Spoelstra, J.

    2009-05-01

    When nitrogen availability exceeds biological demand, excess nitrogen, especially nitrate, may subsequently pollute ground and surface water. Agricultural practices in Southern Ontario typically supplement soils with organic and inorganic nutrients to aid in crop development, and employ various management techniques to limit nutrient loss. Excess nitrogen has several potential fates, which are controlled by the net effects of numerous nitrogen cycling reactions in the soil that are often difficult to measure directly. Nitrogen cycling in soils is controlled in large part by soil moisture, as it affects microbial activity and soil redox conditions. Stable isotope geochemistry is a powerful tool that provides information on nitrogen sources and processes. This study uses crop nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios to provide insights into the net effects of soil nitrogen cycling and nitrogen fate. This research was conducted at the Strawberry Creek Watershed (SCW), an agricultural research watershed located between Kitchener-Waterloo and Guelph, Ontario. The SCW exhibits elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile discharge, and the stream itself. Previous isotopic work revealed that this nitrate is largely derived from chemical fertilizer and manure applications. Field-scale hydrological processes lead to areas where the fate of applied nitrogen differs, which has an isotopic effect on the residual nitrogen that is available to plants. Results of this study indicate significant patterns in the isotopic signature of plant tissue, in both temporal and spatial scales. At the plot-scale where soil conditions are similar, there is little to no variation in foliar isotope values, but at the field-scale there appears to be a significant amount of variability related to soil moisture and nitrogen loss. This relationship can potentially provide insight into ideal conditions for nitrogen uptake efficiency. Reducing agricultural nitrogen leaching to ground and surface

  2. Modeling energy flow and nutrient cycling in natural semiarid grassland ecosystems with the aid of thematic mapper data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Energy flow and nutrient cycling were modeled as affected by herbivory on selected intensive sites along gradients of precipitation and soils, validating the model output by monitoring selected parameters with data derived from the Thematic Mapper (TM). Herbivore production was modeled along the gradient of soils and herbivory, and validated with data derived from TM in a spatial data base.

  3. Balancing soil nutrient availability on commercial organic farms

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    Soils from two commercial farms were analysed for cation exchange capacities with the aim of improving the balance of available nutrients at soil level, and to support the basic organic principle of maintaining and improving the long-term fertility and microbiological activity of the soil.

  4. Quantifying the effects of interacting nutrient cycles on terrestrial biosphere dynamics and their climate feedbacks (QUINCY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Caldararu, Silvia; Eder, Lucia; Engel, Jan; Kern, Melanie; Schrumpf, Marion; Weber, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    Nutrient availability plays a pivotal role in the response of terrestrial ecosystems to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change. The first generation of global nutrient-carbon cycle models shows strongly diverging estimates of the nutrient effect, resulting from lacking integration of ecosystem observations and fundamental uncertainties in the representation of governing processes. The two fundamental areas in which advances in modelling are required at i)the effects of nutrient availability on plant photosynthesis and respiration by explicitly taking the energy requirement of nutrient acquisition into account, and ii) the effects of vegetation-soil interactions, namely rhizosphere processes, on plant nutrient availability and soil C turnover. Here we present the methodology and first results of the QUINCY project, which addresses these important issues by an approach encompassing experimentation and model development. In particular, we outline a novel modelling approach to systematically link carbon, nutrient and water flows within the framework of a general land surface model at time-scales of minutes to decades, and illustrate, how (new) experimental data can (better) constrain this novel model.

  5. Closing the water and nutrient cycles in soilless cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, E.A.M.; Blok, C.; Maas, van der A.A.; Os, van E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Soilless cultivation systems are common in Dutch greenhouse horticulture, i.e., less than 20% of the greenhouse area is still soil grown. For long, it was assumed that in these so-called closed systems the emission of nutrients and plant protection products (PPPs) was close to zero. However, Water

  6. Nutrient omission in Bt cotton affects soil organic carbon and nutrients status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Biradar, D. P.; Satyanarayana, T.; Majumdar, K.; Shivamurthy, D.

    2012-04-01

    Studies carried out at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, in medium black soils assessed the effect of nutrient omission in Bt cotton and its effect on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and available nutrients at the end of second consecutive year of nutrient omission. The study also assessed the extent of contribution of the macro and micronutrients towards seed cotton yield. The experiment consisting 11 treatments omitting a nutrient in each treatment including an absolute control without any nutrients was conducted in a Randomised Block Design with three replications. Cotton crop sufficiently fertilized with macro and micro nutrients (165 : 75 : 120 NPK kg ha-1 and 20 kg each of CaSO4, and MgSO4, 10 kg of S, 20 kg each of ZnSO4, FeSO4 and 0.1 per cent Boron twice as foliar spray) was taken as a standard check to assess the contribution of each nutrient in various nutrient omission treatments. Soils of each treatment were analysed initially and after each crop of cotton for SOC and available nutrient status. Results indicated that the SOC decreased after each crop of cotton in absolute control where no nutrients were applied (0.50 % to 0.38 %) and also in the N omission treatment (0.50 % to 0.35 %). But there was no significant impact of omission of P, K and other nutrients on soil organic carbon. Soil available N, P and K in the soil were reduced as compared to the initial soil status after first and second crop of cotton in the respective treatment where these nutrients were omitted. The soil available N, P and K were reduced to the extent of 61 kg ha-1, 7.1 kg ha-1 and 161.9 kg ha-1 in the respective nutrient omission treatment at end of second crop of cotton as compared to the initial status of these nutrients in the soil. This might be due to the mining of these nutrients from the soil nutrient pool with out addition of these nutrients extraneously. The nutrient status of N, P and K remained almost similar in omission of other nutrients

  7. Annual Cycle and Budgets of Nutrients in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liang; WEI Hao; FENG Shizuo

    2002-01-01

    The environmental problems in the Bohai Sea have become more serious in the last decade. High nutrient concentration contributes much to it. A Sino-German cooperation program has been carried out to improve the understanding of the ecosystem by observations and modelling. A three-dimensional ecosystem model, coupled with a physical transport model, is adopted in this study. The simulation for the year 1982 is validated by the data collected in 1982/1983. The simulated annual mean nutrient concentrations are in good agreement with observations. The nutrient concentrations in the Bohai Sea, which are crucial to the algal growth, are high in winter and low in summer. There are depletion from spring to summer and elevation from autumn to winter for nutrients. The nutrients' depletion is a response to the consumption of the phytoplankton bloom in spring. Internal recycle and external compensation affect the nutrient cycle. Their contributions to the nutrient budgets are discussed based on the simulated results. Production and respiration are the most important sink and source of nutrients. The process of photosynthesis consumes 152 kilotons-P and 831.1 kilotons-N while respiration releases 94.5 kilotons-P and 516.6 kilotons-N in the same period. The remineralization of the detritus pool is an important source of nutrient regeneration. It can compensate 23 percent of the nutrient consumed by the production process. The inputs of phosphates and nitrogen from rivers are 0.55 and 52.7 kilotons respectively. The net nutrient budget is - 3.05 kilotons-P and 31.6 kilotons-N.

  8. Impacts of climate change on nutrient cycling in semi-arid and arid ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belnap, J. [National Biological Survey, Moab, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Effective precipitation is a major factor in determining nutrient pathways in different ecosystems. Soil flora and fauna play a critical role in nutrient cycles of all ecosystems. Temperature, timing, and amounts of precipitation affect population composition, activity levels, biomass, and recovery rates from disturbance. Changes in these variables can result in very different inputs and outputs for different nutrients. As a result, areas with less effective precipitation have very different nutrient cycles than more mesic zones. Climate change, therefore, can profoundly affect the nutrient cycles of ecosystems. Nitrogen cycles may be especially sensitive to changes in temperature and to timing and amounts of precipitation. Rainfall contains varying amounts of nitrogen compounds. Changes in amounts of rainfall will change amounts of nitrogen available to these systems. Because rainfall is limited in semi-arid and regions, these systems tend to be more dependent on microbial populations for nitrogen input. Consequently, understanding the effects of climate change on these organisms is critical in understanding the overall effect on ecosystems.

  9. The potentials of multi-nutrient soil extraction with 0.01 M CaCl2 in nutrient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van P.J.

    2002-01-01

     Key words: 0.01 M CaCl 2 , soil testing, nutrient management, decision-making, multi-nutrientAim of this thesis is to improve the understanding of nutrient dynamics in soil and thereby to improve decision-making in nutrient management. There is a need for a more mechanistic

  10. The soil N cycle: new insights and key challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, J. W.; Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; Kuyper, Th. W.; Lubbers, I. M.; Rütting, T.; Groffman, P. M.

    2015-03-01

    The study of soil N cycling processes has been, is, and will be at the centre of attention in soil science research. The importance of N as a nutrient for all biota; the ever-increasing rates of its anthropogenic input in terrestrial (agro)ecosystems; its resultant losses to the environment; and the complexity of the biological, physical, and chemical factors that regulate N cycling processes all contribute to the necessity of further understanding, measuring, and altering the soil N cycle. Here, we review important insights with respect to the soil N cycle that have been made over the last decade, and present a personal view on the key challenges of future research. We identify three key challenges with respect to basic N cycling processes producing gaseous emissions: 1. quantifying the importance of nitrifier denitrification and its main controlling factors; 2. characterizing the greenhouse gas mitigation potential and microbiological basis for N2O consumption; 3. characterizing hotspots and hot moments of denitrification Furthermore, we identified a key challenge with respect to modelling: 1. disentangling gross N transformation rates using advanced 15N / 18O tracing models Finally, we propose four key challenges related to how ecological interactions control N cycling processes: 1. linking functional diversity of soil fauna to N cycling processes beyond mineralization; 2. determining the functional relationship between root traits and soil N cycling; 3. characterizing the control that different types of mycorrhizal symbioses exert on N cycling; 4. quantifying the contribution of non-symbiotic pathways to total N fixation fluxes in natural systems We postulate that addressing these challenges will constitute a comprehensive research agenda with respect to the N cycle for the next decade. Such an agenda would help us to meet future challenges on food and energy security, biodiversity conservation, water and air quality, and climate stability.

  11. Soil nutrient assessment for urban ecosystems in Hubei, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Guo Li

    Full Text Available Recent urban landscape vegetation surveys conducted in many cities in China identified numerous plant nutrient deficiencies, especially in newly developed cities. Soil nutrients and soil nutrient management in the cities of Hubei province have not received adequate attention to date. The aims of this study were to characterize the available nutrients of urban soils from nine cities in Hubei province, China, and to assess how soil nutrient status is related to land use type and topography. Soil nutrients were measured in 405 sites from 1,215 soil samples collected from four land use types (park, institutional [including government building grounds, municipal party grounds, university grounds, and garden city institutes], residential, and roadside verges and three topographies (mountainous [142-425 m a.s.l], hilly [66-112 m a.s.l], and plain [26-30 m a.s.l]. Chemical analyses showed that urban soils in Hubei had high pH and lower soil organic matter, available nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P, and available boron (B concentrations than natural soils. Nutrient concentrations were significantly different among land use types, with the roadside and residential areas having greater concentrations of calcium (Ca, sulfur (S, copper (Cu, manganese (Mn, and zinc (Zn that were not deficient against the recommended ranges. Topographic comparisons showed statistically significant effects for 8 of the 11 chemical variables (p < 0.05. Concentrations of N, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, and Mn in plain cities were greater than those in mountainous cities and show a negative correlation with city elevation. These results provide data on urban soils characteristics in land use types and topography, and deliver significant information for city planners and policy makers.

  12. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  13. Reducing Nutrient Losses with Directed Fertilization of Degraded Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, E.; Walter, M. T.; Schneider, R.

    2016-12-01

    Degraded soils around the world are stunting agricultural productivity in places where people need it the most. In China, hundreds of years of agriculture and human activity have turned large swaths of productive grasslands into expanses of sandy soils where nothing can grow. Returning soils such as these to healthy productive landscapes is crucial to the livelihoods of rural families and to feeding the expanding population of China and the world at large. Buried wood chips can be used to improve the soils' water holding capacity but additional nutrient inputs are crucial to support plant growth and completely restore degraded soils in China and elsewhere. Improperly applied fertilizer can cause large fluxes of soluble nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to pollute groundwater, and reach surface water bodies causing harmful algal blooms or eutrophication. Similarly, fertilization can create increases in nutrient losses in the form of greenhouse gases (GHGs). It is imperative that nutrient additions to this system be done in a way that fosters restoration and a return to productivity, but minimizes nutrient losses to adjacent surface water bodies and the atmosphere. The primary objective of this study is to characterize soluble and gaseous N and P losses from degraded sandy soils with wood chip and fertilizer amendments in order to identify optimal fertilization methods, frequencies, and quantities for soil restoration. A laboratory soil column study is currently underway to begin examining these questions results of this study will be presented at the Fall Meeting.

  14. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in reducing soil nutrient loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Bender, S. Franz; Asghari, Hamid R.; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2015-01-01

    Substantial amounts of nutrients are lost from soils via leaching and as gaseous emissions. These losses can be environmentally damaging and expensive in terms of lost agricultural production. Plants have evolved many traits to optimize nutrient acquisition, including the formation of arbuscular

  15. Assessment of soil nutrient balance: approaches and methodologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, R.N.; Misra, R.V.; Lesschen, J.P.; Smaling, E.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient-balance assessments are valuable tools for delineating the consequences of farming on soil fertility. Various approaches and methods for different situations have been used. This bulletin presents a state-of-the-art overview of nutrient-balance studies. It brings out the evolution of the ap

  16. Applying Sewage Sludge to Eucalyptus grandis Plantations: Effects on Biomass Production and Nutrient Cycling through Litterfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Müller da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In most Brazilian cities sewage sludge is dumped into sanitary landfills, even though its use in forest plantations as a fertilizer and soil conditioner might be an interesting option. Sewage sludge applications might reduce the amounts of mineral fertilizers needed to sustain the productivity on infertile tropical soils. However, sewage sludge must be applied with care to crops to avoid soil and water pollution. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of dry and wet sewage sludges on the growth and nutrient cycling of Eucalyptus grandis plantations established on the most common soil type for Brazilian eucalypt plantations. Biomass production and nutrient cycling were studied over a 36-month period in a complete randomized block design. Four experimental treatments were compared: wet sewage sludge, dry sludge, mineral fertilizer, and no fertilizer applications. The two types of sludges as well as mineral fertilizer increased significantly the biomass of Eucalyptus trees. Wood biomass productions 36 months after planting were similar in the sewage sludge and mineral fertilization treatments (about 80 tons ha−1 and 86% higher than in the control treatment. Sewage sludge application also affected positively leaf litter production and significantly increased nutrient transfer among the components of the ecosystem.

  17. Biochar Decelerates Soil Organic Nitrogen Cycling but Stimulates Soil Nitrification in a Temperate Arable Field Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50–80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  18. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Prommer

    Full Text Available Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies.

  19. Role of canopy interception on water and nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Wenxing; DENG Xiangwen; ZHAO Zhonghui

    2007-01-01

    The role of canopy interception on nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem was studied on the basis of the position data during four years.Results indicate that the average canopy interception amount was 267.0 mm/year.Canopy interception play a significant role in water cycle and nutrient cycle processes in ecosystem,and was an important part of evaporation from the Chinese fir plantation ecosystem,being up to 27.2%.The evaporation from the canopy interception was an important way of water output from ecosystem,up to 19.9%.The flush-eluviation of branches and leaves caused by canopy interception brought nutrient input of 143.629 kg/(hm2·year),which was 117.2% of the input 63.924kg/(hm2·year)from the atmospheric precipitation.The decreased amount of 80.1 mm precipitation input caused by canopy interception reduced the amount of rainfall into the stand surface and infiltration into the soil,reduced the output with runoff and drainage,and decreased nutrient loss through output water.Therefore,the additional preserve of nutrient by canopy interception was 8.664 kg/(hm2·year).

  20. Controls of bedrock geochemistry on soil and plant nutrients in Southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.; Sanford, R.L.; Fernandez, D.; Lamothe, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau contain numerous geologically and geochemically distinct sedimentary bedrock types. In the area near Canyonlands National Park in Southeastern Utah, geochemical variation in geologic substrates is related to the depositional environment with higher concentrations of Fe, Al, P, K, and Mg in sediments deposited in alluvial or marine environments and lower concentrations in bedrock derived from eolian sand dunes. Availability of soil nutrients to vegetation is also controlled by the formation of secondary minerals, particularly for P and Ca availability, which, in some geologic settings, appears closely related to variation of CaCO3 and Ca-phosphates in soils. However, the results of this study also indicate that P content is related to bedrock and soil Fe and Al content suggesting that the deposition history of the bedrock and the presence of P-bearing Fe and Al minerals, is important to contemporary P cycling in this region. The relation between bedrock type and exchangeable Mg and K is less clear-cut, despite large variation in bedrock concentrations of these elements. We examined soil nutrient concentrations and foliar nutrient concentration of grasses, shrubs, conifers, and forbs in four geochemically distinct field sites. All four of the functional plant groups had similar proportional responses to variation in soil nutrient availability despite large absolute differences in foliar nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry across species. Foliar P concentration (normalized to N) in particular showed relatively small variation across different geochemical settings despite large variation in soil P availability in these study sites. The limited foliar variation in bedrock-derived nutrients suggests that the dominant plant species in this dryland setting have a remarkably strong capacity to maintain foliar chemistry ratios despite large underlying differences in soil nutrient availability. ?? 2006 Springer Science

  1. Evidence for oxidative stress in sugar maple stands growing on acidic, nutrient imbalanced forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Samuel B St; Carlson, John E; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2005-09-01

    Soil acidification and the disruption of nutrient cycles appear to be important factors that weaken sugar maple resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses and predispose it to decline symptoms. Although connections between edaphic stress and decline symptoms have been identified, very little is known about the physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie this relationship. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that foliar nutrient imbalances impair the photosynthetic apparatus of sugar maple through oxidative stress. We examined leaf nutrition, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activity (a biomarker of oxidative stress) from early June to late August in three-paired overstory sugar maple stands on Pennsylvania's Allegheny Plateau that contrast in soil nutrient availability according to slope position. Beginning in early June, trees on upper slopes (nutrient-poor) had significantly lower foliar Ca and Mg concentrations and significantly higher foliar Mn concentrations than trees on lower slopes. These differences increased throughout summer peaking in late August. Photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activity closely reflected changes in foliar nutrient status throughout the summer. In the latter half of the summer, leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll content were significantly lower and antioxidant enzyme activity was significantly higher in stands on upper slope soils. At the end of August, leaf nutrient imbalances corresponded with lower rates of photosynthesis and higher antioxidant enzyme activity, suggesting that foliar nutrient imbalances may impair sugar maple function through mechanisms of oxidative stress.

  2. Nutrient Release from Disturbance of Infiltration System Soils during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Treese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface infiltration and surface bioretention systems composed of engineered and/or native soils are preferred tools for stormwater management. However, the disturbance of native soils, especially during the process of adding amendments to improve infiltration rates and pollutant removal, may result in releases of nutrients in the early life of these systems. This project investigated the nutrient release from two soils, one disturbed and one undisturbed. The disturbed soil was collected intact, but had to be air-dried, and the columns repacked when soil shrinkage caused bypassing of water along the walls of the column. The undisturbed soil was collected and used intact, with no repacking. The disturbed soil showed elevated releases of nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the undisturbed soil for approximately 0.4 and 0.8 m of runoff loading, respectively. For the undisturbed soil, the nitrogen release was delayed, indicating that the soil disturbance accelerated the release of nitrogen into a very short time period. Leaving the soil undisturbed resulted in lower but still elevated effluent nitrogen concentrations over a longer period of time. For phosphorus, these results confirm prior research which demonstrated that the soil, if shown to be phosphorus-deficient during fertility testing, can remove phosphorus from runoff even when disturbed.

  3. Plant species effects on soil nutrients and chemistry in arid ecological zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brittany G; Verburg, Paul S J; Arnone, John A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of vegetation strongly influences ecosystem function by controlling the distribution and transformation of nutrients across the landscape. The magnitude of vegetation effects on soil chemistry is largely dependent on the plant species and the background soil chemical properties of the site, but has not been well quantified along vegetation transects in the Great Basin. We studied the effects of plant canopy cover on soil chemistry within five different ecological zones, subalpine, montane, pinyon-juniper, sage/Mojave transition, and desert shrub, in the Great Basin of Nevada all with similar underlying geology. Although plant species differed in their effects on soil chemistry, the desert shrubs Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Atriplex spp., Coleogyne ramosissima, and Larrea tridentata typically exerted the most influence on soil chemistry, especially amounts of K(+) and total nitrogen, beneath their canopies. However, the extent to which vegetation affected soil nutrient status in any given location was not only highly dependent on the species present, and presumably the nutrient requirements and cycling patterns of the plant species, but also on the background soil characteristics (e.g., parent material, weathering rates, leaching) where plant species occurred. The results of this study indicate that the presence or absence of a plant species, especially desert shrubs, could significantly alter soil chemistry and subsequently ecosystem biogeochemistry and function.

  4. Impacts of harvesting forest residues for bioenergy on nutrient cycling and community assemblages in northern hardwood forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, D.M.; Zalesny, R.S. [United States Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, Rhinelander, WI (United States). Northern Research Station, Inst. for Applied Ecosystem Studies; St Pierre, M.; Eklund, D. [Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Rhinelander, WI (United States); Coyle, D.R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Ribic, C.A. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). United States Geological Survey, WI Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit

    2010-07-01

    This study assessed the impacts of whole-tree harvesting on the nutrient cycles and community assemblages in northern hardwood forests. The woody biomass left on the forest floor after logging is important for nutrient cycling in addition to providing seed beds and creating habitats for wildlife. The impact of fine woody debris (FWD) removal on nutrient availability and above and below ground community assemblages on rich soils in regenerating northern hardwood stands in Wisconsin was investigated at 9 sites within a national forest. Soil carbon and nitrogen availability was assessed. Insect pitfalls, amphibian time-constraint searches, herbaceous plant quadrants, and soil cores along transects were sampled during the summer months of 2009. Results of the study will be used to evaluate the trade-offs of harvesting woody biomass on public lands for energy use as well as to develop management guidelines for maintaining biodiversity and forest health.

  5. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  6. Effects of Chinese Fir,Loblolly Pine and Deciduous Oak Forests on Nutrient Status of Soils in Northern Subtropics of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUORU-YING; GAOZHI-QIN

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with a study on the effects of Chinese fir,lobolly pine and deciduous oak forests o the nutrient status of soils in northern subtropics of China,adopting the principle of forest ecology in the case of similar climate and soil type.The experimental area was situated in the Xiashu Experimental Centre of Forest,where the soil is yellow-brown soil derved from siliceous slope wash.Sample plots of these 3 stands were established to study the nutrient status in litter ,the amount of nutrient uptake by roots,the quantity of nutrient output by percolating water outside the deep layer of soil,and the seasonal dynamics of available nutrient in surface soil.It was whown that the intensity of nutrient cycling in soil under deciduous oak was the highest,and the effect of oak in improving soil fertility was the best.The result of improving soil fertility by Chinese fir was the most inferior,though the intensity of nutrient cycling under that stand was higher than that under loblolly pine stand.The influence of loblolly pine on the improvement of soil fertility was better than that of Chinese fir,in spite of its lowest intensity of nutrient cycling.

  7. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  8. A Metagenomic Perspective on Changes to Nutrient-cycling Genes Following Forest-to-agriculture Conversion in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K. M.; Womack, A. M.; Rodrigues, J.; Nüsslein, K.; Bohannan, B. J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest-to-agriculture conversion has been shown to alter nutrient cycling and the community composition of soil microorganisms. However, few studies have looked simultaneously at how the abundance, composition, and diversity of microbial genes involved in nutrient cycling change with conversion. We used shotgun metagenomic sequencing to analyze soil from primary rainforest and converted cattle pasture sampled at the Fazenda Nova Vida in Rondônia, Brazil. The diversity, richness, and evenness of nutrient cycling genes were significantly higher in the pasture, and the composition of nutrient cycling communities differed significantly between land use types. These results largely mirror taxonomic shifts following Amazon rainforest conversion, which tends to increase diversity, richness, and evenness of soil microbial communities. The abundance of genes related to N cycling and methane flux differed between land use types. Methanotrophy genes decreased in abundance in the pasture, whereas methanogenesis genes were not significantly different between land use types. These changes could underlie the commonly observed shift from methane sink to source following forest-to-agriculture conversion. Multiple genes in the nitrogen cycle also differed with land use, including genes related to N-fixation and ammonification. Metagenomics provides a unique perspective on the consequences of land use change on microbial community structure and function.

  9. The potentials of multi-nutrient soil extraction with 0.01 M CaCl2 in nutrient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: 0.01 M CaCl 2 , soil testing, nutrient management, decision-making, multi-nutrient

    Aim of this thesis is to improve the understanding of nutrient dynamics in soil and thereby to improve

  10. Adubação nitrogenada na aveia preta. I - Influência na produção de matéria seca e ciclagem de nutrientes sob sistema plantio direto Black oat biomass and nutrient cycling as affected by nitrogen fertilization in soil under no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Santi

    2003-12-01

    % higher than in oat without N application. At the estimated N application rate of 120 kg ha-1, the amount of recycled Ca increased by 95 % and the recycled Mg by 90 %, compared to the treatment without nitrogen fertilizer. The C/N ratio of the produced residues decreased by about one unit for each 10 kg ha-1 of applied N. In conclusion, N fertilization is a viable alternative to increase the quality and quantity of black oat biomass added to soils in no-tillage systems; besides, it improves nutrient cycling.

  11. Biochar and biological carbon cycling in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, S. A.; Vanbergen, A. J.; Bardgett, R. D.; Hopkins, D. W.; Ostle, N.

    2012-04-01

    Production of biochar, the recalcitrant residue formed by pyrolysis of plant matter, is suggested as a means of increasing storage of stable carbon (C) in the soil (1). Biochar has also been shown to act as a soil conditioner, increasing the productivity of certain crops by reducing nutrient leaching and improving soil water-holding capacity. However, the response of soil carbon pools to biochar addition is not yet well understood. Studies have shown that biochar has highly variable effects on microbial C cycling and thus on soil C storage (2,3,4). This discrepancy may be partially explained by the response of soil invertebrates, which occupy higher trophic levels and regulate microbial activity. This research aims to understand the role of soil invertebrates (i.e. Collembola and nematode worms) in biochar-mediated changes to soil C dynamics across a range of plant-soil communities. An open-air, pot-based mesocosm experiment was established in May, 2011 at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh. Three treatments were included in a fully-factorial design: biochar (presence [2 % w/w] or absence), soil type (arable sandy, arable sandy loam, grassland sandy loam), and vegetation type (Hordeum vulgare, Lolium perenne, unvegetated). Monitored parameters include: invertebrate and microbial species composition, soil C fluxes (CO2 and trace gas evolution, leachate C content, primary productivity and soil C content), and soil conditions (pH, moisture content and water-holding capacity). Preliminary results indicate that biochar-induced changes to soil invertebrate communities and processes are affected by pre-existing soil characteristics, and that soil texture in particular may be an important determinant of soil response to biochar addition. 1. Lehmann, 2007. A handful of carbon. Nature 447, 143-144. 2. Liang et al., 2010. Black carbon affects the cycling of non-black carbon in soil. Organic Geochemistry 41, 206-213. 3. Van Zwieten et al., 2010. Influence of

  12. Patterns and controls on nitrogen cycling of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Nichole N.; Zaady, Eli; Weber, Bettina; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Biocrusts play a significant role in the nitrogen [N ] cycle within arid and semi-arid ecosystems, as they contribute major N inputs via biological fixation and dust capture, harbor internal N transformation processes, and direct N losses via N dissolved, gaseous and erosional loss processes (Fig. 1). Because soil N availability in arid and semi-arid ecosystems is generally low and may limit net primary production (NPP), especially during periods when adequate water is available, understanding the mechanisms and controls of N input and loss pathways in biocrusts is critically important to our broader understanding of N cycling in dryland environments. In particular, N cycling by biocrusts likely regulates short-term soil N availability to support vascular plant growth, as well as long-term N accumulation and maintenance of soil fertility. In this chapter, we review the influence of biocrust nutrient input, internal cycling, and loss pathways across a range of biomes. We examine linkages between N fixation capabilities of biocrust organisms and spatio-temporal patterns of soil N availability that may influence the longer-term productivity of dryland ecosystems. Lastly, biocrust influence on N loss pathways such as N gas loss, leakage of N compounds from biocrusts, and transfer in wind and water erosion are important to understand the maintenance of dryland soil fertility over longer time scales. Although great strides have been made in understanding the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling, there are important knowledge gaps in our understanding of the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling that should be the focus of future studies. Because work on the interaction of N cycling and biocrusts was reviewed in Belnap and Lange (2003), this chapter will focus primarily on research findings that have emerged over the last 15 years (2000-2015).

  13. Biogeochemical C and N cycles in urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Klaus; Lal, Rattan

    2009-01-01

    The percentage of urban population is projected to increase drastically. In 2030, 50.7 to 86.7% of the total population in Africa and Northern America may live in urban areas, respectively. The effects of the attendant increases in urban land uses on biogeochemical C and N cycles are, however, largely unknown. Biogeochemical cycles in urban ecosystems are altered directly and indirectly by human activities. Direct effects include changes in the biological, chemical and physical soil properties and processes in urban soils. Indirect effects of urban environments on biogeochemical cycles may be attributed to the introductions of exotic plant and animal species and atmospheric deposition of pollutants. Urbanization may also affect the regional and global atmospheric climate by the urban heat island and pollution island effect. On the other hand, urban soils have the potential to store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) and, thus, contribute to mitigating increases in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. However, the amount of SOC stored in urban soils is highly variable in space and time, and depends among others on soil parent material and land use. The SOC pool in 0.3-m depth may range between 16 and 232 Mg ha(-1), and between 15 and 285 Mg ha(-1) in 1-m depth. Thus, depending on the soil replaced or disturbed, urban soils may have higher or lower SOC pools, but very little is known. This review provides an overview of the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in urban soils, with a focus on the effects of urban land use and management on soil organic matter (SOM). In view of the increase in atmospheric CO(2) and reactive N concentrations as a result of urbanization, urban land use planning must also include strategies to sequester C in soil, and also enhance the N sink in urban soils and vegetation. This will strengthen soil ecological functions such as retention of nutrients, hazardous compounds and water, and also improve urban ecosystem services by promoting

  14. Nutrient accumulation, export and cycling in Jatropha curcas L .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hissao Kurihara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The knowledge concerning nutrient accumulation rate allows defining the best amount and most appropriate time for its supply. Estimating nutrient amount in the aerial part of the plants is particularly important to species such as Jatropha curcas L., since there are no consistent calibration studies to indicate the amount of fertilizer to be applied. The objective of this study was to evaluate nutrient accumulation, export and cycling in Jatropha curcas. The experiment was carried out in Cassilândia, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, during 52 months in a completely randomized design, with four replications and fifteen treatments, which consisted of different evaluation times. A large variation in the amount of nutrients accumulated in leaves was found due to senescence and leaf abscission in the driest and/or coldest period of the year. Nutrient accumulation in the aerial part is relatively low in the first 22 months. To meet Jatropha curcas requirements, fertilization during the first two years must provide 40; 50; 50; 21; 16; 5; 0.7; 0.3; 4; 8 and 1 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn, respectively. From the third year of cultivation, topdressing fertilization should restitute 40, 110, 55 and 3 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O and S, respectively. To replace the exported amount of nutrients, it should be supplied more 50, 100, 30 and 3 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O and S, respectively, per ton of grain to be produced.

  15. Effects of soil applications of micro-nutrients and chelating agent citric acid on mineral nutrients in soybean seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micro-nutrients deficiency in soil result in crop yield loss and poor seed quality. Correcting this deficiency is normally conducted by foliar or soil application. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of soil applications of five micro-nutrients (Mn, Cu, Zn, Mo, and B) with a ...

  16. Soil Organic Carbon and Nutrient Dynamics in Reclaimed Appalachian Mine Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, P.; Fox, J.; Campbell, J. E.; Rowe, H. D.; Jones, A.

    2011-12-01

    Past research has shown that drastically disturbed and degraded soils can offer a high potential for soil organic carbon and aboveground carbon sequestration. Little work has been done on both the functioning of soil carbon accumulation and turnover in reclaimed surface mining soils. Reclamation practices of surface coal mine soils in the Southern Appalachian forest region of the United States emphasizes heavy compaction of surface material to provide slope stability and reduce surface erosion, and topsoil is not typically added. An analysis of the previously collected data has provided a 14 year chronosequence of SOC uptake and development in the soil column and revealed that these soils are sequestering carbon at a rate of 1.3 MgC ha-1 yr-1, which is 1.6 to 3 times less than mining soils reported for other regions. Results of bulk density analysis indicate a contrast between 0 - 10 cm (1.51 g cm-3) and 10 - 50 cm (2.04 g cm-3) depth intervals. Aggregate stability was also quantified as well as dynamic soil texture measurements. With this analysis, it has been established that these soils are well below their potential in terms of the ability to store and cycle carbon and other nutrients as well their ability to sustain a fully-functioning forested ecosystem typical for the region. We are taking an integrated approach that relies on ecological observations for present conditions combined with computational modeling to understand long-term soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation and turnover in regards to SOC sequestration potential and quantification of specific processes by which these soils develop. A dual-isotope end-member model, utilizing the carbon 13 and nitrogen 15 stable isotopes, is being developed to provide greater input into the mathematical separation of organic carbon derived from new soil inputs and existing coal carbon. Soils from the study sites have been isolated into three distinct size pools, and elemental and isotopic analysis of these samples

  17. Effects of Accelerated Soil Erosion on Soil Nutrient Loss After Deforestation on the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Fen-Li

    2005-01-01

    Soil erosion and nutrient losses on newly-deforested lands in the Ziwuling Region on the Loess Plateau of China were monitored to quantitatively evaluate the effects of accelerated soil erosion, caused by deforestation, on organic matter,nitrogen and phosphorus losses. Eight natural runoff plots were established on the loessial hill slopes representing different erosion patterns of dominant erosion processes including sheet, rill and shallow gully (similar to ephemeral gully). Sediment samples were collected after each erosive rainfall event. Results showed that soil nutrients losses increased with an increase of erosion intensity. Linear relations between the losses of organic matter, total N, NH4-N, and available P and erosion intensity were found. Nutrient content per unit amount of eroded sediment decreased from the sheet to the shallow gully erosion zones, whereas total nutrient loss increased. Compared with topsoil, nutrients in eroded sediment were enriched,especially available P and NH4-N. The intensity of soil nutrient losses was also closely related to soil erosion intensity and pattern with the most severe soil erosion and nutrient loss occurring in the shallow gully channels on loessial hill slopes.These research findings will help to improve the understanding of the relation between accelerated erosion process after deforestation and soil quality degradation and to design better eco-environmental rehabilitation schemes for the Loess Plateau.

  18. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Ping, C. L.; J. D. Jastrow; Jorgenson, M. T.; G. J. Michaelson; Y. L. Shur

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This...

  19. Deeper snow alters soil nutrient availability and leaf nutrient status in high Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R.; Elberling, Bo; Amtorp, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) mineralization, nutrient availability, and plant growth in the Arctic are often restricted by low temperatures. Predicted increases of cold-season temperatures may be important for plant nutrient availability and growth, given that N mineralization is also taking place during the cold...... season. Changing nutrient availability may be reflected in plant N and chlorophyll content and lead to increased photosynthetic capacity, plant growth, and ultimately carbon (C) assimilation by plants. In this study, we increased snow depth and thereby cold-season soil temperatures in high Arctic...... for some species. Responses to cold-season soil warming are vegetation type- and species-specific, with potentially stronger responses in moister vegetation types. This study therefore highlights the contrasting effect of snow in a tundra landscape and has important implications for projections of whole...

  20. [Soil nutrients spatial variability and soil fertility suitability in Qujing tobacco-planting area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhou, Ji-heng; Yang, Rong-sheng; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Yi-yang; Huang, Kua-ke; Li, Wei

    2011-04-01

    By adopting GPS technique, 2088 sampling sites were installed in the tobacco-planting area of Qujing City, Yunnan Province, with 0-20 cm soil samples collected to determine their main nutrients contents. The overall characteristics and spatial variability of the tobacco soil nutrients were analyzed by classic statistics and geo-statistics, and the soil fertility suitability in planting tobacco was evaluated by the methods of fuzzy mathematics. In the study area, soil pH and soil organic matter, available S, and water-soluble Cl contents were appropriate, soil total N and alkalihydrolyzable N contents were too high, soil available K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mo, and Mn contents were abundant, soil available P content was at medium level, while soil total P and K and available B contents were insufficient. All the nutrient indices presented anisotropic distribution, among which, the spatial variability of soil available P and B was mainly caused by random factors, and that of other nutrients was caused by the co-effects of structural and random factors. The spatial distribution map of soil fertility suitability index (SFI) showed that there was no the excellent grade region for tobacco-planting, good grade region accounted for 8.0%, general grade region accounted for 51.6%, moderate grade region accounted for 39.0%, and low grade region accounted for 1.4%.

  1. Human Activity and Soil Fertility—Nutrients Depletion of Arable Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LURU-KUN

    1991-01-01

    The reserve of soil nutrients is limited.In case of irrational use of land,nutrients would be depleted sooner.Before the 1950s the low grain production in China was maintained only by expanding the cultivated area and by recycling of nutrients in agriculture.Calculation of nutrients balance showed that in the year of 1949 there were great deficits of N,P and K elements in agriculture of China.It revealed that there would have really been danger of soil nutrients exhaustion if such a situation had continued.Things have changed since the beginning of 1950s.The nutrients balance in agriculture has been getting better and better.In the year 1987 N and P balance got rid of their great deficits.But for K and deficit grew even larger.This resulted in a rapid expansion of soil area deficient in K in China since the mid 1970s.In spite of the fact that the P balance in the arable land of the whole country was positive,the field which did not receive P fertilizer had become deficient in P.So the area deficient in P also increased.It is stressed that great attention should be paid to the depletion of soil nutrients,especially K in the northern part of China where the soil is relatively rich in K.Of course,soil sulfur and microelements should be considered next.

  2. Temporal Changes in the Spatial Variability of Soil Nutrients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Hoskinson; J. R. Hess; R. S. Alessi

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations across a field during the growing season, over a four-year period. This study is part of the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. Uniform fertilization did not produce a uniform increase in fertility. During the growing season, several of the nutrients and micronutrients showed increases in concentration although no additional fertilization had occurred. Potato plant uptake did not explain all of these changes. Some soil micronutrient concentrations increased above levels considered detrimental to potatoes, but the plants did not show the effects in reduced yield. All the nutrients measured changed between the last sampling in the fall and the first sampling the next spring prior to fertilization. The soil microbial community may play a major role in the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations. These temporal changes suggest potential impact when determining fertilizer recommendations, and when evaluating the results of spatially varying fertilizer application.

  3. Soil phosphorus - new insights into a critical cycle across many soil functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Peter; Zimmer, Dana

    2017-04-01

    The fate of phosphorus (P-) compounds in the soil - plant - water - system is linked with most soil functions such as productivity for agricultural crops, reactor for nutrient cycling, filter and buffer for water, and biodiversity. The P-compounds, mostly phosphates in a multitude of chemical bonds, may have contradicting influences on soil functions. For instance, P-concentrations may be suboptimal for crop yields but at the same time exceeding the soil filter/buffer capacity for water resources. Modern agriculture has increased this misbalance. Therefore, a better soil P management that balances all soil functions requires a deeper understanding of the P-cycling in the environment. The collaborative project "InnoSoilPhos" in the frame of the BonaRes-program of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) aims at disclosing the chemical composition, biogeochemical transformations and microbiological fundamentals of P-cycling and P-transport processes across all relevant scales from atomic to catchment and landscapes. The contribution will give an overview on the project and some examples for the latest findings on P-reactions at mineral surfaces (experimental and theoretical), microorganism diversity involved in soil P-transformations, crop yield responses to P-fertilizer regimes (including new P-recycling products) and, finally, hot spots and hot moments of P-release from soils into adjoining freshwater systems. These findings allow some preliminary demands and frame conditions for an improved soil P management to better balance the soil functions and safe the global mineable P resources.

  4. Effects of mountain tea plantations on nutrient cycling at upstream watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T.-C.; Shaner, P.-J. L.; Wang, L.-J.; Shih, Y.-T.; Wang, C.-P.; Huang, G.-H.; Huang, J.-C.

    2015-11-01

    The expansion of agriculture to rugged mountains can exacerbate negative impacts of agricultural activities on ecosystem function. In this study, we monitored streamwater and rainfall chemistry of mountain watersheds at the Feitsui Reservoir Watershed in northern Taiwan to examine the effects of agriculture on watershed nutrient cycling. We found that the greater the proportion of tea plantation cover, the higher the concentrations of fertilizer-associated ions (NO3-, K+) in streamwater of the four mountain watersheds examined; on the other hand, the concentrations of the ions that are rich in soils (SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+) did not increase with the proportion of tea plantation cover, suggesting that agriculture enriched fertilizer-associated nutrients in streamwater. Of the two watersheds for which rainfall chemistry was available, the one with higher proportion of tea plantation cover had higher concentrations of ions in rainfall and retained less nitrogen in proportion to input compared to the more pristine watershed, suggesting that agriculture can influence atmospheric deposition of nutrients and a system's ability to retain nutrients. As expected, we found that a forested watershed downstream of agricultural activities can dilute the concentrations of NO3- in streamwater by more than 70 %, indicating that such a landscape configuration helps mitigate nutrient enrichment in aquatic systems even for watersheds with steep topography. We estimated that tea plantation at our study site contributed approximately 450 kg ha-1 yr-1 of NO3-N via streamwater, an order of magnitude greater than previously reported for agricultural lands around the globe, which can only be matched by areas under intense fertilizer use. Furthermore, we constructed watershed N fluxes to show that excessive leaching of N, and additional loss to the atmosphere via volatilization and denitrification can occur under intense fertilizer use. In summary, this study demonstrated the pervasive impacts of

  5. Current Soil Nutrient Status of Intensively Managed Greenhouses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yun-Cai; SONG Zhi-Wen; LU Wen-Long; C.POSCHENRIEDER; U.SCHMIDHALTER

    2012-01-01

    Nine districts covering the main greenhouse vegetable areas in Tianjin Municipality of the North China Plain were selected for the soil investigation in 2010 to survey the current soil nutrient status (soil available N,P and K),acidification and salinization due to excessive input of fertilizers in greenhouses in Tianjin. The study showed that,in particular,soil available P content increased with the age of greenhouses.In contrast,our results did not reveal higher K accumulation and lowered pH in the greenhouse soils compared with cultivation in open fields.Over-fertilization,causing high NO3- accumulation,most likely resulted in salinity problems in the greenhouses.Ninety percent of the investigated greenhouse soils had electrical conductivity values of saturated paste extracts of 2-10 d S m-1,which might affect the yields of vegetable crops like green bean,pepper,cabbage,carrot,eggplant,lettuce,spinach,celery,cucumber and tomato. The findings of our survey of the current fertility and salinity problems in greenhouse soils suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the farmers' practices and strategies in fertilization management in greenhouses of China.Because education and the agricultural technical extension services may play a more important role in avoiding overuse of fertilizers,we suggest that current nutrient management practices should be improved in the near future through training of local farmers in farmers' schools and through strengthening the agricultural extension services with practical techniques.

  6. Sampling strategies for tropical forest nutrient cycling studies: a case study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sparovek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The precise sampling of soil, biological or micro climatic attributes in tropical forests, which are characterized by a high diversity of species and complex spatial variability, is a difficult task. We found few basic studies to guide sampling procedures. The objective of this study was to define a sampling strategy and data analysis for some parameters frequently used in nutrient cycling studies, i. e., litter amount, total nutrient amounts in litter and its composition (Ca, Mg, Κ, Ν and P, and soil attributes at three depths (organic matter, Ρ content, cation exchange capacity and base saturation. A natural remnant forest in the West of São Paulo State (Brazil was selected as study area and samples were collected in July, 1989. The total amount of litter and its total nutrient amounts had a high spatial independent variance. Conversely, the variance of litter composition was lower and the spatial dependency was peculiar to each nutrient. The sampling strategy for the estimation of litter amounts and the amount of nutrient in litter should be different than the sampling strategy for nutrient composition. For the estimation of litter amounts and the amount of nutrients in litter (related to quantity a large number of randomly distributed determinations are needed. Otherwise, for the estimation of litter nutrient composition (related to quality a smaller amount of spatially located samples should be analyzed. The determination of sampling for soil attributes differed according to the depth. Overall, surface samples (0-5 cm showed high short distance spatial dependent variance, whereas, subsurface samples exhibited spatial dependency in longer distances. Short transects with sampling interval of 5-10 m are recommended for surface sampling. Subsurface samples must also be spatially located, but with transects or grids with longer distances between sampling points over the entire area. Composite soil samples would not provide a complete

  7. [Response of fine roots to soil nutrient spatial heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingcheng; Cheng, Yunhuan

    2004-06-01

    The spatial heterogeneity is the complexity and variation of systems or their attributes, and the heterogeneity of soil nutrients is ubiquitous in all natural ecosystems. The scale of spatial heterogeneity varies considerably among different ecosystems, from tens of centimeters to hundred meters. Some of the scales can be detected by individual plant. Because the growth of individual plants can be strongly influenced by soil heterogeneity, it follows that the inter-specific competition should also be affected. During the long process of evolution, plants developed various plastic responses with their root system, including morphological, physiological and mycorrhizal plasticity, to maximize the nutrient acquisition from heterogeneous soil resources. Morphological plasticity, an adjustment in root system spatial allocation and architecture in response to spatial heterogeneous distribution of available soil resources, has been most intensively studied, and root proliferation in nutrient rich patches has been certified for many species. The species that do respond may have an increased rate of nutrient uptake, leading to a competitive advantage. Scale and precision are two important features employed in describing the size and foraging behavior of root system. It was hypothesized that scale and precision is negatively related, i. e., the species with high scale of root system tend to be a less precise forager. The outcomes of different research work have been diverse, far from reaching a consensus. Species with high scale are not necessarily less precise in fine root allocation, and vice versa. The proliferation of fine root in enriched micro-sites is species dependent, and also affected by other factors, such as patch attributes (size and nutrients concentration), nutrients, and overall soil fertility. Beside root proliferation in nutrient enriched patches, plants can also adapt themselves to the heterogeneous soil environment by altering other root characteristics

  8. Nutrient leaching, soil pH and changes in microbial community increase with time in lead-contaminated boreal forest soil at a shooting range area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selonen, Salla; Setälä, Heikki

    2017-02-01

    Despite the known toxicity of lead (Pb), Pb pellets are widely used at shotgun shooting ranges over the world. However, the impacts of Pb on soil nutrients and soil microbes, playing a crucial role in nutrient cycling, are poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unknown whether these impacts change with time after the cessation of shooting. To shed light on these issues, three study sites in the same coniferous forest in a shooting range area were studied: an uncontaminated control site and an active and an abandoned shooting range, both sharing a similar Pb pellet load in the soil, but the latter with a 20-year longer contamination history. Soil pH and nitrate concentration increased, whilst soil phosphate concentration and fungal phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) decreased due to Pb contamination. Our results imply that shooting-derived Pb can influence soil nutrients and microbes not only directly but also indirectly by increasing soil pH. However, these mechanisms cannot be differentiated here. Many of the Pb-induced changes were most pronounced at the abandoned range, and nutrient leaching was increased only at that site. These results suggest that Pb disturbs the structure and functions of the soil system and impairs a crucial ecosystem service, the ability to retain nutrients. Furthermore, the risks of shooting-derived Pb to the environment increase with time.

  9. Soil Hydrologic Response and Nutrient Movement in Three Small Tropical Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, N. H.; Hamann, H. B.; Stallard, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    The movement of water over and through soils by storm-generated flowpaths in tropical forests not only mediates nutrient movement and physical weathering, but also potentially influences vegetation growth and dynamics with seasonally dry or saturated soil conditions. However, few small-scale catchment studies (10-1000ha) have produced a comprehensive, standardized dataset on soil hydrologic properties among tropical forest catchments, due in part to complexities within tropical systems, and to inconsistencies in methods, data collection, and/or analyses. In response, this study has utilized the global, standardized network of forest dynamics plots of the Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) for the rapid assessment of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and the water chemistry from storm-generated flowpaths. Ks measurements at varying depths help in testing Elsenbeer's (2001) functional classification continuum of tropical forest soilscapes and resulting hydrologic flowpaths. In Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Ks decreased rapidly with soil depth where horizontal surface and near-surface flowpaths were most prevalent. Ks measurements in Yasuni National Park, Ecuador indicated limited vertical movement of water at depths >15cm due to an impermeable soil layer. Ks measurements from Lambir Hills National Park, Malaysia, represented both ends of the continuum due to variability in soil type and lithology. In relation to soil hydrology and hydrological flowpaths, runoff chemistry at Yasuni reveals a general pattern of increased nutrient export as water moves through the canopy and over the soil surface, with concentrations of K+ increasing significantly in throughfall, and concentrations of both K+, and NO3- remaining high in overland flow. The results from the composite overland flow samples may indicate a more open nutrient cycle in tropical forest environments than has been suggested from earlier studies using radioactively labeled isotopes.

  10. Application of the Nutrient Cycling Model NuCM to a Forest Monitoring Site Exposed to Acidic Precipitation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jian-Hua; YU Peng-Tao; T. A. SOGN; WANG Yan-Hui; J.MULDER

    2008-01-01

    The nutrient cycling model NuCM is one of the most detailed models for simulating processes that influence nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. A field study was conducted at Tieshanping, a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) forest site, in hongqing, China, to monitor the impacts of acidic precipitation on nutrient cycling. NuCM simulations were compared with observed data from the study site. The model produced an approximate fit with the observed data. It simulated the mean annual soil solution concentrations in the two simulation years, whereas it sometimes failed to reproduce seasonal variation. Even though some of the parameters required by modcl running were measured in the field,some others were still highly uncertain and the uncertainties were analyzed. Some of the uncertain parameters necessary for model running should be measured and calibrated to produce a better fit between modeled results and field data.

  11. 7 CFR 205.203 - Soil fertility and crop nutrient management practice standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soil fertility and crop nutrient management practice... Requirements § 205.203 Soil fertility and crop nutrient management practice standard. (a) The producer must... nutrients and soil fertility through rotations, cover crops, and the application of plant and animal...

  12. Bacterial weathering and its contribution to nutrient cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, Stéphane; Oger, Phil; Lepleux, Cendrella; Collignon, Christelle; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Turpault, Marie-Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Unlike farmland, forests growing on acidic soils are among the terrestrial ecosystems that are the least influenced or amended by man. Forests which developed on acidic soils are characterized by an important stock of inorganic nutrients entrapped in poorly weatherable soil minerals. In this context, the mineral-weathering process is of great importance, since such minerals are not easily accessible to tree roots. To date, several bacterial genera have been noted for their ability to weather minerals and, in the case of some of them, to improve tree nutrition. Nevertheless, few studies have focused their analyses on mineral-weathering bacterial communities in relation to geochemical cycles and soil characteristics, their ecological origin, associated tree species and forest management practices. Here we discuss the heterogeneity of the mineral-weathering process in forest soils and present what is known concerning the taxonomic and functional characteristics of mineral-weathering bacteria, as well as the different locations where they have been isolated in forest soils. We also discuss the biotic and abiotic factors that may influence the distribution of these bacteria, such as the effect of tree species or forest management practices.

  13. A Device for Simulating Soil Nutrient Extraction and Plant Uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xu-Jian; LAI Yong-Lin; MO Jin-Yu; SHEN Hong

    2012-01-01

    In situ evaluating the availability of soil nutrients has been a challenge.In this study,a new type of Device for Simulating Soil Nutrient Extraction and Plant Uptake (DSSNEPU) and its operating procedures were introduced.The device consists of a sampling tube,a fluid supply system,a low pressure system,a tube sheath and an elution cylinder.The sampling tube was firstly soaked in the solution of 0.5 mol L-1 NaHCO3 and then buried into soils.The fluid supply system was connected to the sampling tube and the deionized water was supplied.During the period,low pressure system started a vacuum for 3 min every 10 min interval.After extraction,the sampling tube was removed and the nutrients on the sampling tube were eluted with 0.5 mol L-1 HC1.The elution solution was used for nutrient measurement.The amounts of P and K extracted by DSSNEPU reached the maximal values after 4 h.No significant increases of P and K were observed for longer extraction duration.The optimal temperature for extracting P and K was 30 ℃ in this experiment.Extracted P and K were increased by 83.3% and 84.6% with the employment of low pressure system in comparison to those without employing low pressure system.Correlation analysis indicated that P and K extracted by DSSNEPU were highly correlated with those by conventional chemical extraction and by plant uptake.The above results suggest that this device is applicable to assess the availability of nutrients in soils.

  14. LIME REQUIREMENT DETERMINATION AND LIMING IMPACT ON SOIL NUTRIENT STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of conducted research was to determine the influence of liming, mineral and organic fertilization on soil chemical properties and nutrient availability in the soil, yield height and mineral composition of alfalfa. Results were used to create regression models for prediction of liming impact on soil chemical properties. Liming and fertilization experiment was sat up in 20 L volume plastic pots with two types of acid soils with different texture from two sites. Ten liming and fertilization treatments were applied in four repetitions. Lime treatments increased soil pH values and decreased hydrolytic acidity. Mineral and organic fertilization affected additional soil acidification. Application of lime intensified mineralization and humus decomposition, while organic fertilization raised humus content. The results showed significant increase of AL-P2O5 and K2O availability. The treatments increased soil Ca concentrations, but at the same time decreased exchangeable Mg concentrations. Soil pH increase resulted in lower Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability. Soil CEC was increased by applied treatments. Lime rates increased number and height of alfalfa plants, as well as yield of leaf, stalk increased concentrations of N, P, K and Ca in alfalfa leaf and stalk, but decreased leaf Mg and Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu concentrations. Regression computer models predicted with adequate accuracy P, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability and final pH value as a result of liming and fertilization impact.

  15. Impoverishment of Soil Nutrients in Gully Erosion Areas in Yuanmou Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian-guo; Li Hui-xia; He Xiao-rong; Sheng Xin-ju; Fan Jian-rong; Zhu Bo

    2003-01-01

    The impoverishment of soil nutrients of nine gully head areas in Yuanmou Basin is assessed through an integrated evaluation method established on the basis of Fuzzy mathematics and multivariate mathematical theory. Results show that soil erosion of gully erosion area in Yuanmou basin has resulted in severe impoverishment of soil nutrients. All gully head areas are at high leves of impoverishment except for one at middle. By probing into and analyzing the mechanism of impoverishment of soil nutrients, we find that soil erosion has led to impoverishment of soil nutrients in a way of compacting soil, heightening position of obstacle horizon, and reducing the content of organic matter, as well as the direct loss of nutrient elements. Finally, this paper points out that soil and water conservation arming at the prevention of soil erosion is the most effective way against impoverishment of soil nutrients in Yuanmou basin.

  16. Soil microbiology and soil health assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil scientists have long recognized the importance of soil biology in ecological health. In particular, soil microbes are crucial for many soil functions including decomposition, nutrient cycling, synthesis of plant growth regulators, and degradation of synthetic chemicals. Currently, soil biologis...

  17. Effects of Fallow Genealogical Cycles on the Build-up of Nutrients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    soil nutrients was attributed to the increased in tree size, vegetation cover and adequate ground cover which helped to conserve ..... depth distribution of plant roots, altered soil water ..... Interrelationships of Mangrove Swamps as revealed by ...

  18. The relative importance of vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity, and mean and depth-specific soil nutrient availabilities for tree species richness in tropical forests and woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirima, Deo D; Totland, Ørjan; Moe, Stein R

    2016-11-01

    The relative importance of resource heterogeneity and quantity on plant diversity is an ongoing debate among ecologists, but we have limited knowledge on relationships between tree diversity and heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability in tropical forests. We expected tree species richness to be: (1) positively related to vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity; (2) negatively related to mean soil nutrient availability; and (3) more influenced by nutrient availability in the upper than lower soil horizons. Using a data set from 60, 20 × 40-m plots in a moist forest, and 126 plots in miombo woodlands in Tanzania, we regressed tree species richness against vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity, both depth-specific (0-15, 15-30, and 30-60 cm) and mean soil nutrient availability, and soil physical properties, with elevation and measures of anthropogenic disturbance as co-variables. Overall, vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity was the best predictor of tree species richness in miombo but, contrary to our prediction, the relationships between tree species richness and soil nutrient heterogeneity were negative. In the moist forest, mean soil nutrient availability explained considerable variations in tree species richness, and in line with our expectations, these relationships were mainly negative. Soil nutrient availability in the top soil layer explained more of the variation in tree species richness than that in the middle and lower layers in both vegetation types. Our study shows that vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity and mean availability can influence tree species richness at different magnitudes in intensively utilized tropical vegetation types.

  19. Warming alters coupled carbon and nutrient cycles in experimental streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanner J; Cross, Wyatt F; Benstead, Jonathan P; Gíslason, Gísli M; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Welter, Jill R

    2016-06-01

    Although much effort has been devoted to quantifying how warming alters carbon cycling across diverse ecosystems, less is known about how these changes are linked to the cycling of bioavailable nitrogen and phosphorus. In freshwater ecosystems, benthic biofilms (i.e. thin films of algae, bacteria, fungi, and detrital matter) act as biogeochemical hotspots by controlling important fluxes of energy and material. Understanding how biofilms respond to warming is thus critical for predicting responses of coupled elemental cycles in freshwater systems. We developed biofilm communities in experimental streamside channels along a gradient of mean water temperatures (7.5-23.6 °C), while closely maintaining natural diel and seasonal temperature variation with a common water and propagule source. Both structural (i.e. biomass, stoichiometry, assemblage structure) and functional (i.e. metabolism, N2 -fixation, nutrient uptake) attributes of biofilms were measured on multiple dates to link changes in carbon flow explicitly to the dynamics of nitrogen and phosphorus. Temperature had strong positive effects on biofilm biomass (2.8- to 24-fold variation) and net ecosystem productivity (44- to 317-fold variation), despite extremely low concentrations of limiting dissolved nitrogen. Temperature had surprisingly minimal effects on biofilm stoichiometry: carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios were temperature-invariant, while carbon:phosphorus (C:P) ratios declined slightly with increasing temperature. Biofilm communities were dominated by cyanobacteria at all temperatures (>91% of total biovolume) and N2 -fixation rates increased up to 120-fold between the coldest and warmest treatments. Although ammonium-N uptake increased with temperature (2.8- to 6.8-fold variation), the much higher N2 -fixation rates supplied the majority of N to the ecosystem at higher temperatures. Our results demonstrate that temperature can alter how carbon is cycled and coupled to nitrogen and phosphorus. The

  20. Bacterial Community Structure after Long-term Organic and Inorganic Fertilization Reveals Important Associations between Soil Nutrients and Specific Taxa Involved in Nutrient Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiabao; Yin, Jun; Huang, Shaomin

    2017-01-01

    Fertilization has a large impact on the soil microbial communities, which play pivotal roles in soil biogeochemical cycling and ecological processes. While the effects of changes in nutrient availability due to fertilization on the soil microbial communities have received considerable attention, specific microbial taxa strongly influenced by long-term organic and inorganic fertilization, their potential effects and associations with soil nutrients remain unclear. Here, we use deep 16S amplicon sequencing to investigate bacterial community characteristics in a fluvo-aquic soil treated for 24 years with inorganic fertilizers and organics (manure and straw)-inorganic fertilizers, and uncover potential links between soil nutrient parameters and specific bacterial taxa. Our results showed that combined organic-inorganic fertilization increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and altered bacterial community composition, while inorganic fertilization had little impact on soil nutrients and bacterial community composition. SOC and TN emerged as the major determinants of community composition. The abundances of specific taxa, especially Arenimonas, Gemmatimonas, and an unclassified member of Xanthomonadaceae, were substantially increased by organic-inorganic amendments rather than inorganic amendments only. A co-occurrence based network analysis demonstrated that SOC and TN had strong positive associations with some taxa (Gemmatimonas and the members of Acidobacteria subgroup 6, Myxococcales, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), and Gemmatimonas, Flavobacterium, and an unclassified member of Verrucomicrobia were identified as the keystone taxa. These specific taxa identified above are implicated in the decomposition of complex organic matters and soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transformations. The present work strengthens our current understanding of the soil microbial community structure and functions under long-term fertilization

  1. Proficiency testing of growing media, soil improvers, soils, and nutrient solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.; Wever, G.

    2005-01-01

    At Applied Plant Research two (interlaboratory) proficiency tests for (peat-based) growing media, soil improvers, soil, and nutrient solution were being organized; one for the national and one for the European methods. Data were compiled according to ISO 5725. Reports containing all data, where the

  2. From agricultural use of sewage sludge to nutrient extraction: A soil science outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmann, Holger; Börjesson, Gunnar; Kätterer, Thomas; Cohen, Yariv

    2017-03-01

    The composition of municipal wastewater and sewage sludge reflects the use and proliferation of elements and contaminants within society. In Sweden, official statistics show that concentrations of toxic metals in municipal sewage sludge have steadily decreased, by up to 90 %, since the 1970s, due to environmental programmes and statutory limits on metals in sludge and soil. Results from long-term field experiments show that reduced metal pollution during repeated sewage sludge application has reversed negative trends in soil biology. Despite this Swedish success story, organic waste recycling from Swedish towns and cities to arable land is still limited to only about 20 % of the total amount produced. Resistance among industries and consumers to products grown on land treated with sewage sludge may not always be scientifically grounded; however, there are rational obstacles to application of sewage sludge to land based on its inherent properties rather than its content of pollutants. We argue that application of urban organic wastes to soil is an efficient form of recycling for small municipalities, but that organic waste treatment from large cities requires other solutions. The large volumes of sewage sludge collected in towns and cities are not equitably distributed back to arable land because of the following: (i) The high water and low nutrient content in sewage sludge make long-distance transportation too expensive; and (ii) the low plant availability of nutrients in sewage sludge results in small yield increases even after many years of repeated sludge addition. Therefore, nutrient extraction from urban wastes instead of direct organic waste recycling is a possible way forward. The trend for increased combustion of urban wastes will make ash a key waste type in future. Combustion not only concentrates the nutrients in the ash but also leads to metal enrichment; hence, direct application of the ash to land is most often not possible. However, inorganic

  3. Plant nutrients do not covary with soil nutrients under changing climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wentao; Elser, James J.; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Zhengwen; Bai, Edith; Yan, Caifeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Mai-He; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Han, Xingguo; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Wu, Yunna; Jiang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play vital roles in plant growth and development. Yet how climate regimes and soil fertility influence plant N and P stoichiometry is not well understood, especially in the belowground plant parts. Here we investigated plant aboveground and belowground N and P concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their stoichiometry in three dominant genera along a 2200 km long climatic gradient in northern China. Results showed that temperature explained more variation of [N] and [P] in C4 plants, whereas precipitation exerted a stronger influence on [N] and [P] in C3 plants. Both plant aboveground and belowground [N] and [P] increased with decreasing precipitation, and increasing temperatures yet were negatively correlated with soil [N] and [P]. Plant N:P ratios were unrelated with all climate and soil variables. Plant aboveground and belowground [N] followed an allometric scaling relationship, but the allocation of [P] was isometric. These results imply that internal processes stabilize plant N:P ratios and hence tissue N:P ratios may not be an effective parameter for predicting plant nutrient limitation. Our results also imply that past positive relationships between plant and nutrient stocks may be challenged under changing climatic conditions. While any modeling would need to be able to replicate currently observed relationships, it is conceivable that some relationships, such as those between temperature or rainfall and carbon:nutrient ratios, should be different under changing climatic conditions.

  4. Microbial mediation of biogeochemical cycles revealed by simulation of global changes with soil transplant and cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengxin; Xue, Kai; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shanshan; Bai, Shijie; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-10-01

    Despite microbes' key roles in driving biogeochemical cycles, the mechanism of microbe-mediated feedbacks to global changes remains elusive. Recently, soil transplant has been successfully established as a proxy to simulate climate changes, as the current trend of global warming coherently causes range shifts toward higher latitudes. Four years after southward soil transplant over large transects in China, we found that microbial functional diversity was increased, in addition to concurrent changes in microbial biomass, soil nutrient content and functional processes involved in the nitrogen cycle. However, soil transplant effects could be overridden by maize cropping, which was attributed to a negative interaction. Strikingly, abundances of nitrogen and carbon cycle genes were increased by these field experiments simulating global change, coinciding with higher soil nitrification potential and carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux. Further investigation revealed strong correlations between carbon cycle genes and CO2 efflux in bare soil but not cropped soil, and between nitrogen cycle genes and nitrification. These findings suggest that changes of soil carbon and nitrogen cycles by soil transplant and cropping were predictable by measuring microbial functional potentials, contributing to a better mechanistic understanding of these soil functional processes and suggesting a potential to incorporate microbial communities in greenhouse gas emission modeling.

  5. Land application of tylosin and chlortetracycline swine manure: Impacts to soil nutrients and soil microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James J; Dreis, Erin K; Lupo, Christopher D; Clay, Sharon A

    2011-01-01

    The land application of aged chortetracycle (CTC) and tylosin-containing swine manure was investigated to determine associated impacts to soil microbial respiration, nutrient (phosphorus, ammonium, nitrate) cycling, and soil microbial community structure under laboratory conditions. Two silty clay loam soils common to southeastern South Dakota were used. Aerobic soil respiration results using batch reactors containing a soil-manure mixture showed that interactions between soil, native soil microbial populations, and antimicrobials influenced CO(2) generation. The aged tylosin treatment resulted in the greatest degree of CO(2) inhibition, while the aged CTC treatment was similar to the no-antimicrobial treatment. For soil columns in which manure was applied at a one-time agronomic loading rate, there was no significant difference in soil-P behavior between either aged CTC or tylosin and the no-antimicrobial treatment. For soil-nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate), the aged CTC treatment resulted in rapid ammonium accumulation at the deeper 40cm soil column depth, while nitrate production was minimal. The aged CTC treatment microbial community structure was different than the no-antimicrobial treatment, where amines/amide and carbohydrate chemical guilds utilization profile were low. The aged tylosin treatment also resulted in ammonium accumulation at 40 cm column depth, however nitrate accumulation also occurred concurrently at 10 cm. The microbial community structure for the aged tylosin was also significantly different than the no-antimicrobial treatment, with a higher degree of amines/amides and carbohydrate chemical guild utilization compared to the no-antimicrobial treatment. Study results suggest that land application of CTC and tylosin-containing manure appears to fundamentally change microbial-mediated nitrogen behavior within soil A horizons.

  6. It is elemental: soil nutrient stoichiometry drives bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Reich, Peter B; Khachane, Amit N; Campbell, Colin D; Thomas, Nadine; Freitag, Thomas E; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren; Bardgett, Richard D; Singh, Brajesh K

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that resource quantity and elemental stoichiometry play major roles in shaping below and aboveground plant biodiversity, but their importance for shaping microbial diversity in soil remains unclear. Here, we used statistical modeling on a regional database covering 179 locations and six ecosystem types across Scotland to evaluate the roles of total carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availabilities and ratios, together with land use, climate and biotic and abiotic factors, in determining regional scale patterns of soil bacterial diversity. We found that bacterial diversity and composition were primarily driven by variation in soil resource stoichiometry (total C:N:P ratios), itself linked to different land uses, and secondarily driven by other important biodiversity drivers such as climate, soil spatial heterogeneity, soil pH, root influence (plant-soil microbe interactions) and microbial biomass (soil microbe-microbe interactions). In aggregate, these findings provide evidence that nutrient stoichiometry is a strong predictor of bacterial diversity and composition at a regional scale. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Herbivores, the Functional Diversity of Plants Species, and the Cycling of Nutrients in Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor; Cohen

    1997-06-01

    Numerous investigators have suggested that herbivores almost always increase rates of nutrient and energy flow through terrestrial ecosystems by returning to the soil fecal material and urine with faster turnover rate than shed plant litter. These previous theories and models always treat the producer compartment as a homogenous pool. Essentially, they assume that consumers feed through a pureed cream of vegetable soup. However, many field observations and experiments have shown that consumers feed selectively (i.e., in a cafeteria) and that consumer choice is made on the same chemical basis that determines decomposition rates. Plants that are preferred food sources often have higher nutrient content, higher growth rates, and faster decomposition rates. As consumption reduces dominance of these species in favor of unpreferred species with slower decomposition, rates of nutrient cycling and energy flow should therefore decline. We analyze a model in which the consumer is given a choice among producers that vary in nutrient uptake rates, rates of nutrient return to decomposers, and consumer preference, and which is parameterized for plants and consumers characteristic of boreal regions. In this model, in an open, well-mixed system with one consumer and two such producers, the nutrient/energy flow will not exceed that of a system without the consumer. If the consumer has a choice between two such producers, it must choose one plant over the other at a greater ratio than that between the two plants in uptake and decay rates. In contrast, in a closed system the consumer must be less selective to coexist with the two plants. The system behavior is determined by the level of nutrient return through the consumer and the differences between the plants in nutrient uptake rates and consumer preference. Species richness affects properties of this model system to the extent that species are functionally distinct (i.e., have different rate constants) in a multivariate space of

  8. Rapid peptide metabolism: A major component of soil nitrogen cycling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mark; Hill, Paul W.; Wanniarachchi, Sudas D.; Farrar, John; Bardgett, Richard D.; Jones, Davey L.

    2011-09-01

    Proteinaceous and peptidic nitrogen is a potential direct nutrient source for both plants and microbes in the soil, without prior degradation to amino acids and mineralization. We used a series of five sites along an elevation gradient from 15 m a.s.l. to 710 m a.s.l. along which primary productivity decreases to investigate peptide utilization rates by soil microbes. Using 14C-labeled L-alanine, L-dialanine, and L-trialanine in a series of incubation experiments, we show that peptides are directly and rapidly assimilated by soil microbes, and that they are utilized for both biomass production and respiration. Alanine, dialanine, and trialanine were mineralized rapidly by soil microbes from the five sites along the gradient. Across all five sites, dialanine and trialanine were mineralized faster than alanine. In competition experiments, a 100-fold excess of alanine had no effect on the rate of trialanine mineralization in four of the five sites, and the same excess of trialanine had no effect on alanine mineralization. This is indicative of uptake of the intact peptide by the soil microbial community. Our findings have implications for understanding terrestrial nitrogen cycling because they point to a short-circuit whereby large peptides and proteins need only be extracellularly cleaved to short chain length peptides before direct assimilation by microbes.

  9. Application of Matter-element Model in Soil Nutrient Evaluation of Ecological Fragile Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jie; WANG Chenye; LIN Nianfeng; LI Zhaoyang; LI Haiyi; MAO Zilong

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the soil environment investigation in Da'an City, Jilin Province, China, 40 soil samples from main land use types were obtained and tested by standard method. Soil organic matter (SOM), total N (TN), total P (TP), total K (TK), available N (AN), available P (AP) and available K (AK) were chosen as the evaluation factors. A regional soil nutrient evaluation model was developed based on the matter-element model. The results show that the soil samples with nutrient grade Ⅱ-Ⅴ respectively account for 10%, 30%, 32.5% and 27.5%, and those with grade Ⅳ and Ⅴ account for 60% in all samples. The relationship between soil nutrients and land types indicates that the nutrients of farmland are relatively good, with 41.7% of soil samples with the nutrient grade Ⅳ and Ⅴ. The nutrients of saline-alkali land and sandy land are the worst, with 100% of soil samples with the nutrient grade Ⅳ and Ⅴ. And the ratios of soil samples grade Ⅳ and Ⅴ in grassland and wasteland are respectively 62.5 % and 54.55%. Generally speaking, the soil nutrients status in Da'an City is poor, 60% of soil samples are in poor and extremely poor conditions, indicating that the soil has been severely eroded. Being a relatively superior evaluation method with more accurate resuits and spatial distribution consistency, matter-element analysis is more suitable for regional soil nutrient evaluation than previous models.

  10. Comparison of plant nutrient and environmental soil tests to predict Pb in urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minca, Kristen Kathleen; Basta, Nicholas Thomas

    2013-02-15

    Most urban soils are not tested for Pb because of the high costs associated with sampling and laboratory analysis of soil contaminants. However, soil testing for plant nutrients is inexpensive and routinely performed for agricultural soils used for food production. The objectives of this study are to determine the ability of 1 M HNO(3), Mehlich 3, and Modified Morgan soil tests to predict total Pb and other contaminants in urban soils. Total Pb was determined from 65 urban vacant residential lots being considered for urban gardens and food production in Cleveland, OH. Extractable Pb was determined using common soil nutrient test methods Mehlich 3 and Modified Morgan extraction, and a 1M HNO(3) extraction. Significant linear regressions between total Pb and Mehlich 3 (r(2)=0.83), 1M HNO(3) (r(2)=0.92), and Modified Morgan (r(2)=0.77) in study soils were found. Most commercial and university soil testing labs use Mehlich 3 which could be implemented as a screening tool for soil Pb, Cu, and Zn. The Mehlich 3 soil test is widely used and is relatively inexpensive (<$15). Our results show that total Pb can be conservatively estimated by the following equation Total Pb (mg kg(-1))=Mehlich 3 Pb (mg kg(-1))×2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. BOREAS TE-1 SSA-Fen Soil Profile Nutrient Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagno, Andrea; Anderson, Darwin; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall traniect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains soil profile measurements of various nutrients at the SSA-Fen site. The data were collected from 23-May to 21-Oct- 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. Analysis of field-scale spatial correlations and variations of soil nutrients using geostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Xu, Fei; Yu, Wenwen; Shi, Jianhan; Zhang, Peipei; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-02-01

    Spatial correlations and soil nutrient variations are important for soil nutrient management. They help to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Based on the sampled available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP), and available potassium (AK), soil nutrient data from 2010, the spatial correlation, was analyzed, and the probabilities of the nutrient's abundance or deficiency were discussed. This paper presents a statistical approach to spatial analysis, the spatial correlation analysis (SCA), which was originally developed for describing heterogeneity in the presence of correlated variation and based on ordinary kriging (OK) results. Indicator kriging (IK) was used to assess the susceptibility of excess of soil nutrients based on crop needs. The kriged results showed there was a distinct spatial variability in the concentration of all three soil nutrients. High concentrations of these three soil nutrients were found near Anzhou. As the distance from the center of town increased, the concentration of the soil nutrients gradually decreased. Spatially, the relationship between AN and AP was negative, and the relationship between AP and AK was not clear. The IK results showed that there were few areas with a risk of AN and AP overabundance. However, almost the entire study region was at risk of AK overabundance. Based on the soil nutrient distribution results, it is clear that the spatial variability of the soil nutrients differed throughout the study region. This spatial soil nutrient variability might be caused by different fertilizer types and different fertilizing practices.

  13. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  14. Nitrogen cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests responds rapidly to indirect N and P fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Amanda L; Corre, Marife D; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2014-12-01

    Although the canopy can play an important role in forest nutrient cycles, canopy-based processes are often overlooked in studies on nutrient deposition. In areas of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition, canopy soils may retain a significant proportion of atmospheric inputs, and also receive indirect enrichment through root uptake followed by throughfall or recycling of plant litter in the canopy. We measured net and gross rates of N cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests along an elevation gradient and assessed indirect effects of elevated nutrient inputs to the forest floor. Net N cycling rates were measured using the buried bag method. Gross N cycling rates were measured using (15) N pool dilution techniques. Measurements took place in the field, in the wet and dry season, using intact cores of canopy soil from three elevations (1000, 2000 and 3000 m). The forest floor had been fertilized biannually with moderate amounts of N and P for 4 years; treatments included control, N, P, and N + P. In control plots, gross rates of NH4 (+) transformations decreased with increasing elevation; gross rates of NO3 (-) transformations did not exhibit a clear elevation trend, but were significantly affected by season. Nutrient-addition effects were different at each elevation, but combined N + P generally increased N cycling rates at all elevations. Results showed that canopy soils could be a significant N source for epiphytes as well as contributing up to 23% of total (canopy + forest floor) mineral N production in our forests. In contrast to theories that canopy soils are decoupled from nutrient cycling in forest floor soil, N cycling in our canopy soils was sensitive to slight changes in forest floor nutrient availability. Long-term atmospheric N and P deposition may lead to increased N cycling, but also increased mineral N losses from the canopy soil system.

  15. Influence of snow cover distribution on soil temperature and nutrient dynamics in alpine pedoenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Freppaz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In Alpine sites snow is present on the ground from six to eight months per year in relation to elevation and exposure. Water is therefore immobilized into the solid state for the greater part of the winter season and released to the ground in a short period during spring snowmelt. In these areas, snow distribution exercises a fundamental role in influencing soil temperature and nutrient dynamics, in particular of nitrogen, with great consequences on plant nutrition. The dormant vegetation period, the low temperatures and the persistent snow cover suggest that soil biological activity is only concentrated during summer. As a matter of fact, soils covered with a consistent snow cover are isolated from the air temperature and can not freeze during winter. A snowpack of sufficient thickness, accumulated early in winter, insulates the ground from the surrounding atmosphere maintaining soil temperature closed to 0 °C during the whole winter season. The elevation of the snow line and the shorter permanence of snow on the ground, as a result of global warming (IPCC, 1996, 2001, might reduce the insulation effect of the snowpack, exposing soils of the mountain belt to lower temperatures and to a greater frequency of freeze/thaw cycles, which might alter organic matter dynamics and soil nutrient availability. Such thermal stresses may determine the lysis of microbial cells and the consequent increase of nitrogen and carbon mineralization by the survived microorganisms. Moreover, the freeze/thaw cycles can determine the exposure of exchange surfaces not available before, with release of organic matter of non-microbial origin, which may become available to surviving microorganisms for respiration. The reduced or absent microbial immobilization may cause the accumulation of remarkable amounts of inorganic nitrogen in soil, potentially leachable during spring snowmelt, when plants have not still started the growing season. Changes of snow distribution in

  16. Influence of snow cover distribution on soil temperature and nutrient dynamics in alpine pedoenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermanno Zanini

    Full Text Available In Alpine sites snow is present on the ground from six to eight months per year in relation to elevation and exposure. Water is therefore immobilized into the solid state for the greater part of the winter season and released to the ground in a short period during spring snowmelt. In these areas, snow distribution exercises a fundamental role in influencing soil temperature and nutrient dynamics, in particular of nitrogen, with great consequences on plant nutrition. The dormant vegetation period, the low temperatures and the persistent snow cover suggest that soil biological activity is only concentrated during summer. As a matter of fact, soils covered with a consistent snow cover are isolated from the air temperature and can not freeze during winter. A snowpack of sufficient thickness, accumulated early in winter, insulates the ground from the surrounding atmosphere maintaining soil temperature closed to 0 °C during the whole winter season. The elevation of the snow line and the shorter permanence of snow on the ground, as a result of global warming (IPCC, 1996, 2001, might reduce the insulation effect of the snowpack, exposing soils of the mountain belt to lower temperatures and to a greater frequency of freeze/thaw cycles, which might alter organic matter dynamics and soil nutrient availability. Such thermal stresses may determine the lysis of microbial cells and the consequent increase of nitrogen and carbon mineralization by the survived microorganisms. Moreover, the freeze/thaw cycles can determine the exposure of exchange surfaces not available before, with release of organic matter of non-microbial origin, which may become available to surviving microorganisms for respiration. The reduced or absent microbial immobilization may cause the accumulation of remarkable amounts of inorganic nitrogen in soil, potentially leachable during spring snowmelt, when plants have not still started the growing season. Changes of snow distribution in

  17. Modelling effects of soil acidification on tree growth and nutrient status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, G.M.J.; Ilvesniemi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the effects of soil acidification on tree growth requires understanding the nutrient relations of trees and stands, notably the uptake of nutrients by the roots in relation to soil conditions. Although a substantial amount of research has been carried out on nutrient relationships, bot

  18. Decadally cycling soil carbon is more sensitive to warming than faster-cycling soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junjie; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2015-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to globally rising surface temperature crucially determines the feedback between climate change and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC which is the main component of total soil carbon stock and the most relevant to global change. We tackled this issue using two decadally (13) C-labeled soils and a much improved measuring system in a long-term incubation experiment. Results indicated that the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC (>23 years in one soil and >55 years in the other soil) was significantly greater than that for faster-cycling SOC (<23 or 55 years) or for the entire SOC stock. Moreover, decadally cycling SOC contributed substantially (35-59%) to the total CO2 loss during the 360-day incubation. Overall, these results indicate that the decomposition of decadally cycling SOC is highly sensitive to temperature change, which will likely make this large SOC stock vulnerable to loss by global warming in the 21st century and beyond.

  19. Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil

    KAUST Repository

    Keuskamp, Joost A.

    2013-02-01

    Mangrove forests are sites of intense carbon and nutrient cycling, which result in soil carbon sequestration on a global scale. Currently, mangrove forests receive increasing quantities of exogenous nutrients due to coastal development. The present paper quantifies the effects of nutrient loading on microbial growth rates and the mineralisation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in two mangrove soils contrasting in carbon content. An increase in SOC mineralisation rates would lead to the loss of historically sequestered carbon and an enhanced CO2 release from these mangrove soils.In an incubation experiment we enriched soils from Avicennia and Rhizophora mangrove forests bordering the Red Sea with different combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and glucose to mimic the effects of wastewater influx. We measured microbial growth rates as well as carbon mineralisation rates in the natural situation and after enrichment. The results show that microbial growth is energy limited in both soils, with nitrogen as a secondary limitation. Nitrogen amendment increased the rate at which labile organic carbon was decomposed, while it decreased SOC mineralisation rates. Such an inhibitory effect on SOC mineralisation was not found for phosphorus enrichment.Our data confirm the negative effect of nitrogen enrichment on the mineralisation of recalcitrant carbon compounds found in other systems. Based on our results it is not to be expected that nutrient enrichment by itself will cause degradation of historically sequestered soil organic carbon in nitrogen limited mangrove forests. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Mass-Balance Constraints on Nutrient Cycling in Tropical Seagrass Beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erftemeijer, P.L.A.; Middelburg, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    A relatively simple mass balance model is presented to study the cycling of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) in tropical seagrass beds. The model is based on quantitative data on nutrient availability, seagrass primary production, community oxygen metabolism, seagrass tissue nutrient contents,

  1. Aeolian nutrient fluxes following wildfire in sagebrush steppe: implications for soil carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, N. J.; Germino, M. J.; Sankey, J. B.; Ingram, L. J.; Glenn, N. F.

    2011-12-01

    Pulses of aeolian transport following fire can profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. Our objective was to determine horizontal nutrient fluxes occurring in the saltation zone during an episodic pulse of aeolian transport that occurred following a wildfire in a semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystem in southern Idaho, USA. We also examined how temporal trends in nutrient fluxes were affected by changes in particle sizes of eroded mass as well as nutrient concentrations associated with different particle size classes. In the burned area, total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes were as high as 235 g C m-1 d-1 and 19 g N m-1 d-1 during the first few months following fire, whereas C and N fluxes were negligible in an adjacent unburned area throughout the study. Temporal variation in C and N fluxes following fire was largely attributable to the redistribution of saltation-sized particles. Total N and organic C concentrations in the soil surface were significantly lower in the burned relative to the unburned area one year after fire. Our results show how an episodic pulse of aeolian transport following fire can affect the spatial distribution of soil C and N, which, in turn, can have important implications for soil C storage. These findings demonstrate how an ecological disturbance can exacerbate a geomorphic process and highlight the need for further research to better understand the role aeolian transport plays in the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in recently burned landscapes.

  2. Soil bacterial community composition altered by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro eKoyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pool of soil organic carbon (SOC in the Arctic is disproportionally large compared to those in other biomes. This large quantity of SOC accumulated over millennia due to slow rates of decomposition relative to net primary productivity. Decomposition is constrained by low temperatures and nutrient concentrations, which limit soil microbial activity. We investigated how nutrients limit bacterial and fungal biomass and community composition in organic and mineral soils within moist acidic tussock tundra ecosystems. We sampled two experimental arrays of moist acidic tussock tundra that included fertilized and non-fertilized control plots. One array included plots that had been fertilized annually since 1989 and the other since 2006. Fertilization significantly altered overall bacterial community composition and reduced evenness, to a greater degree in organic than mineral soils, and in the 1989 compared to the 2006 site. The relative abundance of copiotrophic α-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria was higher in fertilized than control soils, and oligotrophic Acidobacteria were less abundant in fertilized than control soils at the 1989 site. Fungal community composition was less sensitive to increased nutrient availability, and fungal responses to fertilization were not consistent between soil horizons and sites. We detected two ectomycorrhizal genera, Russula and Cortinarius spp., associated with shrubs. Their relative abundance was not affected by fertilization despite increased dominance of their host plants in the fertilized plots. Our results indicate that fertilization, which has been commonly used to simulate warming in Arctic tundra, has limited applicability for investigating fungal dynamics under warming.

  3. Assessment of soil potential for microbial nitrogen cycling using quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily; McMillan, Mary; Aldorri, Sind

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen is an important nutrient for the synthesis of macromolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, in all organisms. Nitrogen cycling is essential for the production of different forms of nitrogenous molecules used by various organisms in the soil as available nitrogen sources. While nitrogen-fixing bacteria can utilize N2 as a nitrogen source, other microbes and plants need to assimilate N from fixed forms, e.g. ammonia or nitrate. Nitrogen cycling is largely derived by microbial activity in the soil. Examples include the reduction of N2 to ammonia by nitrogen fixation, production of nitrate by nitrification and the removal of available nitrogenous compounds by denitrification. We measured the potential of agricultural soils under various management practices to cycle nitrogen by measuring the abundance of functional genes involved in the nitrogen cycle. We report on the suitability of PCR-based methods as indicators of soil function potential.

  4. Pharmaceutical consumption and residuals potentially relevant to nutrient cycling in Greater Accra, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren Sinar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recycling nutrients form sanitary wastes back into agricultural ecosystems offers an option to alleviate soil depletion in regions where the use of mineral fertiliser is limited. Exemplary nutrient and water cycling approaches, including collection, treatment and use of human urine, are established at Valley View University (VVU in Greater Accra, Ghana.Concerns have been recently raised in regard to fate and impact of pharmaceutical residues in soils and interlinked environment. To evaluate in how far emerging knowledge can be transposed onto VVU, urban and rural environments in Greater Accra, spatial disease occurrence and drug consumption patterns were studied. Malaria has been found to represent the most severe health burden in Ghana, but there is also a high prevalence of infectious diseases. Drugs consumed in great quantities and in respect to their residual loads potentially problematic in the environment belong to therapeutic groups of: antibiotics, analgesics, drugs for diabetes, antimalarials, cardiovascular drugs and anthelmintics. Drug consumption revealed to be highest in urban and lowest in rural areas. At VVU the range of consumed drugs is comparable to urban areas except for the negligible use of diabetes and cardiovascular medication as well as contraceptives.

  5. Microbial control over carbon cycling in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eSchimel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A major thrust of terrestrial microbial ecology is focused on understanding when and how the composition of the microbial community affects the functioning of biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale (meters-to-kilometers and days-to-years. While research has demonstrated these linkages for physiologically and phylogenetically narrow processes such as trace gas emissions and nitrification, there is less conclusive evidence that microbial community composition influences the broad processes of decomposition and organic matter turnover in soil. In this paper, we consider how soil microbial community structure influences C-cycling. We consider the phylogenetic level at which microbes form meaningful guilds, based on overall life history strategies, and suggest that these are associated with deep evolutionary divergences, while much of the species-level diversity probably reflects functional redundancy. We then consider under what conditions it is possible for differences among microbes to affect process dynamics, and argue that while microbial community structure may be important in the rate of OM breakdown in the rhizosphere and in detritus, it is likely not important in the mineral soil. In mineral soil, physical access to occluded or sorbed substrates is the rate-limiting process. Microbial community influences on OM turnover in mineral soils are based on how organisms allocate the C they take up—not only do the fates of the molecules differ, but they can affect the soil system differently as well. For example, extracellular enzymes and extracellular polysaccharides can be key controls on soil structure and function. How microbes allocate C may also be particularly important for understanding the long-term fate of C in soil—is it sequestered or not?

  6. A spatially explicit methodology to quantify soil nutrient balances and their uncertainties at the national level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesschen, J.P.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Smaling, E.M.A.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2007-01-01

    A soil nutrient balance is a commonly used indicator to assess changes in soil fertility. In this paper, an earlier developed methodology by Stoorvogel and Smaling to assess the soil nutrient balance is given a major overhaul, based on growing insights and advances in data availability and

  7. Nutritional responses to soil drying and rewetting cycles under partial root-zone drying irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Jensen, Christian Richardt; Liu, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Repeated soil drying and rewetting (DRW) cycles occur in rainfed and irrigated agriculture. The intensity and frequency of DRW cycles regulate both microbial physiology and soil physical processes, hereby affecting the mineralization and immobilization of soil nutrients and their bioavai......Abstract Repeated soil drying and rewetting (DRW) cycles occur in rainfed and irrigated agriculture. The intensity and frequency of DRW cycles regulate both microbial physiology and soil physical processes, hereby affecting the mineralization and immobilization of soil nutrients...... and their bioavailability. Partial root-zone drying irrigation (PRI) irrigates half of the soil zone, while the other half is allowed to dry, and the two halves is alternately irrigated. PRI outweighs conventional deficit irrigation in further improving water use efficiency (WUE) by enhancing the root-to-shoot chemical......, and PRI-integrated fertigation are still lacking. In addition, the positive nutritional effect may be varied in terms of climatic conditions and intensity and frequency of precipitation or irrigation, and these merit further in-depth studies....

  8. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  9. Closing the Global Energy and Nutrient Cycles through Application of Biogas Residue to Agricultural Land – Potential Benefits and Drawback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Arthurson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is an optimal way to treat organic waste matter, resulting in biogas and residue. Utilization of the residue as a crop fertilizer should enhance crop yield and soil fertility, promoting closure of the global energy and nutrient cycles. Consequently, the requirement for production of inorganic fertilizers will decrease, in turn saving significant amounts of energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, and indirectly leading to global economic benefits. However, application of this residue to agricultural land requires careful monitoring to detect amendments in soil quality at the early stages.

  10. Effects of Earthworm and Microbe on Soil Nutrients and Heavy Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-bao; YANG Hong-qiang

    2008-01-01

    Earthworm and microbe are very important soil organisms. They play an important role in the stability of ecosystem and the bioavailability of nutrients and heavy metals in soils. This article reviewed the function of earthworm and microbes in improving soil structure and controlling soil nutrients as well as their effects on the bioavailability of heavy metals in soil through bioabsorption, enrichment, precipitation, dissolution, and oxidation-reduction. The aim is to provide a certain theoretical basis for modern agricultural production.

  11. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  12. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  13. Impact of Freezing and Thawing on Soil Oxygen Dynamics and Nutrient Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, T.; Rezanezhad, F.; Van Cappellen, P.; Smeaton, C. M.; Parsons, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs) influence the physical properties, microbial activity, biogeochemistry, nutrient and carbon cycling in soils, and regulate subsurface oxygen (O2) availability, affecting greenhouse gas exchanges between soils and the atmosphere. The ability to monitor changes in O2 levels, which are indicative of aerobic and anaerobic conditions, is key to understanding how changes in the frequency and amplitude of freeze-thaw cycles affect a soil's geochemical conditions and microbial activity. In this study, a highly instrumented soil column experiment was designed to accurately simulate freeze-thaw dynamics under controlled conditions. This design allowed us to reproduce realistic, time- and depth-dependent temperature gradients in the soil column. Continuous O2 levels throughout the soil column were monitored using high-resolution, luminescence-based, Multi Fiber Optode (MuFO) microsensors. Image-processing techniques were used to convert light intensity of high-resolution digital images of the sensor-emitted light into O2 concentrations. Water samples from various depths in the column were collected to monitor pore water composition changes. Headspace gas measurements were used to derive the effluxes of CO2 and CH4 during the experiment. The results indicate that the pulse of oxygen introduced by thawing caused partial and temporal oxidation of previously reduced sulfur and nitrogen species, leading to concomitant changes in pore water SO42- and NO3- concentrations. Pulsed CO2 emission to the headspace was observed at the onset of thawing, indicating that a physical ice barrier had formed during frozen conditions and prevented gas exchange between the soil and atmosphere. CO2 emission was due to a combination of the physical release of gases dissolved in pore water and entrapped below the frozen zone and changing microbial respiration in response to electron acceptor variability (O2, NO3-, SO42-).

  14. Early Effects of Afforestation with Willow (Salix purpurea, “Hotel” on Soil Carbon and Nutrient Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Farrell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Willow (Salix spp. is currently being researched as a source of biomass energy in Canada. However, it is not certain whether afforestation with willow plantations will enhance or diminish soil C storage and nutrient availability. Trees are known to have pronounced effects on biologically mediated nutrient cycling processes which can increase nutrient availability, but willows are known to be nutrient demanding. In this paper, the net effect of plantation establishment is examined at nine sites across the prairie and southern Ontario regions of Canada. Carbon, N, P, K, Ca and Mg levels in soils and harvestable biomass were compared between willow plantations and paired reference sites at the end of the first three-year rotation. Soils were depleted in total C (−2.22 mg·g−1, p < 0.05, inorganic N (−3.12 μg·N·g−1, p < 0.10, exchangeable K (−0.11 cmolc·kg−1, p < 0.10 and leachable P (−0.03 mg·g−1, p < 0.10. Exchangeable Ca was found to be consistently depleted only at the 20–40 depth. Depletion of soil K was more heavily influenced by disturbance, whereas soil N was directly affected by willow N uptake. Sites with greater growth and biocycling stabilized soil P concentrations.

  15. Soil properties, nutrient dynamics, and soil enzyme activities associated with garlic stalk decomposition under various conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Han

    Full Text Available The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5:100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C, highest concentration (5:100, and shortest duration (10 or 20 days. The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks.

  16. Soil properties, nutrient dynamics, and soil enzyme activities associated with garlic stalk decomposition under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5:100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5:100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks.

  17. Element cycling in forest soils - modelling the effects of a changing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walse, C.

    1998-11-01

    Element cycling and nutrient supply in forest ecosystems are of vital importance for short-term productivity and for longer-term land management in terms of nutrient leaching and CO{sub 2} fixation. This thesis includes a series of studies with the objective of modelling some aspects of the effect of acidification and climate change on element cycling and nutrient supply in forest soil. A reconstruction model of atmospheric deposition and nutrient uptake and cycling, MAKEDEP, was developed. An existing model of soil chemistry, SAFE, was analyzed and applied. SAFE+MAKEDEP were then applied in combination with the RAINS model to perform scenario analyses of soil acidification/recovery for six European forest sites. A decomposition model intended to run in conjunction with the SAFE model was developed. Key elements were N, Ca, K, Mg, S and Al. In the decomposition model, only carbon release was included to date.The results show, that understanding the history of soil geochemistry is important for modelling the system and for projecting the future impact of acidification on nutrient supply in forest soils. The applied reconstruction models of acid deposition (MAKEDEP, RAINS) seem to generate reasonable and consistent estimates of historic acid deposition, so that present day conditions can be simulated starting from pre-acidification conditions. From applications of the SAFE model to large-scale forest manipulation experiments, we conclude that the geochemical processes and the degree of detail in process descriptions included in SAFE are adequate to capture the most important aspects of soil solution dynamics of forest soils in northern and central Europe. Therefore, SAFE is appropriate for the simulation of acidification and recovery scenarios for these soils. The precision in model prediction on a more general scale is often limited by factors other than model formulation, such as consistency and representativity of input data. It is shown that the physical

  18. Farm management, not soil microbial diversity, controls nutrient loss from smallholder tropical agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen A; Almaraz, Maya; Bradford, Mark A; McGuire, Krista L; Naeem, Shahid; Neill, Christopher; Palm, Cheryl A; Tully, Katherine L; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Tropical smallholder agriculture is undergoing rapid transformation in nutrient cycling pathways as international development efforts strongly promote greater use of mineral fertilizers to increase crop yields. These changes in nutrient availability may alter the composition of microbial communities with consequences for rates of biogeochemical processes that control nutrient losses to the environment. Ecological theory suggests that altered microbial diversity will strongly influence processes performed by relatively few microbial taxa, such as denitrification and hence nitrogen losses as nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Whether this theory helps predict nutrient losses from agriculture depends on the relative effects of microbial community change and increased nutrient availability on ecosystem processes. We find that mineral and organic nutrient addition to smallholder farms in Kenya alters the taxonomic and functional diversity of soil microbes. However, we find that the direct effects of farm management on both denitrification and carbon mineralization are greater than indirect effects through changes in the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities. Changes in functional diversity are strongly coupled to changes in specific functional genes involved in denitrification, suggesting that it is the expression, rather than abundance, of key functional genes that can serve as an indicator of ecosystem process rates. Our results thus suggest that widely used broad summary statistics of microbial diversity based on DNA may be inappropriate for linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes in certain applied settings. Our results also raise doubts about the relative control of microbial composition compared to direct effects of management on nutrient losses in applied settings such as tropical agriculture.

  19. Farm management, not soil microbial diversity, controls nutrient loss from smallholder tropical agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Wood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical smallholder agriculture supports the livelihoods of over 900 million of the world’s poorest people. This form of agriculture is undergoing rapid transformation in nutrient cycling pathways as international development efforts strongly promote greater use of mineral fertilizers to increase crop yields. These changes in nutrient availability may alter the composition of microbial communities with consequences for rates of biogeochemical processes that control nutrient losses to the environment. Ecological theory suggests that altered microbial diversity will strongly influence processes performed by relatively few microbial taxa, such as denitrification and hence nitrogen losses as nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Whether this theory helps predict nutrient losses from agriculture depends on the relative effects of microbial community change and increased nutrient availability on ecosystem processes. We find that mineral and organic nutrient addition to smallholder farms in Kenya alters the taxonomic and functional diversity of soil microbes. However, we find that the direct effects of farm management on both denitrification and carbon mineralization are greater than indirect effects through changes in the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities. Changes in functional diversity are strongly coupled to changes in specific functional genes involved in denitrification, suggesting that it is the expression, rather than abundance, of key functional genes that can serve as an indicator of ecosystem process rates. Our results thus suggest that widely used broad summary statistics of microbial diversity based on DNA may be inappropriate for linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes in certain applied settings. Our results also raise doubts about the relative control of microbial composition compared to direct effects of management on nutrient losses in applied settings such as tropical agriculture.

  20. Determining Nutrient Requirements For Intensively Managed Loblolly Pine Stands Using the SSAND (Soil Supply and Nutrient Demand) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector G. Adegbidi; Nicholas B. Comerford; Hua Li; Eric J. Jokela; Nairam F. Barros

    2002-01-01

    Nutrient management represents a central component of intensive silvicultural systems that are designed to increase forest productivity in southern pine stands. Forest soils throughout the South are generally infertile, and fertilizers may be applied one or more times over the course of a rotation. Diagnostic techniques, such as foliar analysis and soil testing are...

  1. Effect of Different Vegetation Systems on Soil Erosion and Soil Nutrients in Red Soil Region of Southeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN GUANGMING; WANG FEIER; CHEN YINGXU; HE YUNFENG; FU QINGLIN; S.KUMAR; LIN QI

    2003-01-01

    The effect of different vegetation systems including bamboo plantation (BP), forest ecosystem (CF),citrus orchard (Ctr) and farmland (FL) on erosion and nutrients of red soil were investigated in hilly region of southeastern China to find effective control measures for soil erosion. The results showed that all the vegetation systems could significantly reduce soil erosion and nutrient losses compared to bare land (Br).The ability of different vegetation systems to conserve soil and water was in the order of Ctr > BP > CF > FL > Br. Vegetation could also improve soil fertility. The soil organic matter, total N and total P contents were much higher in all the vegetation systems than in bare land, especially for the top soils. Vegetation systems improved soil physical properties remarkably. Compared to the bare land, soil organic matter, TP,TK and available K, especially soil microbial biomass C, N and P, increased under all the vegetation covers.However, they were still much lower than expected, thus these biological measurements are still needed to be carried out continuously.

  2. Dominant mycorrhizal association of trees alters carbon and nutrient cycling by selecting for microbial groups with distinct enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeke, Tanya E; Phillips, Richard P; Brzostek, Edward R; Rosling, Anna; Bever, James D; Fransson, Petra

    2017-04-01

    While it is well established that plants associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi cycle carbon (C) and nutrients in distinct ways, we have a limited understanding of whether varying abundance of ECM and AM plants in a stand can provide integrative proxies for key biogeochemical processes. We explored linkages between the relative abundance of AM and ECM trees and microbial functioning in three hardwood forests in southern Indiana, USA. Across each site's 'mycorrhizal gradient', we measured fungal biomass, fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, extracellular enzyme activities, soil carbon : nitrogen ratio, and soil pH over a growing season. We show that the percentage of AM or ECM trees in a plot promotes microbial communities that both reflect and determine the C to nutrient balance in soil. Soils dominated by ECM trees had higher F : B ratios and more standing fungal biomass than AM stands. Enzyme stoichiometry in ECM soils shifted to higher investment in extracellular enzymes needed for nitrogen and phosphorus acquisition than in C-acquisition enzymes, relative to AM soils. Our results suggest that knowledge of mycorrhizal dominance at the stand or landscape scale may provide a unifying framework for linking plant and microbial community dynamics, and predicting their effects on ecological function.

  3. Plant root-driven hydraulic redistribution, root nutrient uptake and carbon exudation interact with soil properties to generate rhizosphere resource hotspots that vary in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeleta, J. F.; Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Rastetter, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by plants occurs in seasonally dry ecosystems worldwide. During drought, water flows from deep moist soil, through plant roots, into dry (often litter-rich) upper soil layers. Using modeling, we explored how physical transport processes driven by transpiration and hydraulic redistribution interact with root physiology (nutrient uptake and carbon exudation) and soil properties (soil texture and cation exchange) to influence nitrogen and carbon concentrations in the rhizosphere. At the single root scale, we modeled a 10-cm radial soil domain, and simulated solute transport, soil cation exchange, and root exudation and nutrient uptake under two water flow patterns: daytime transpiration without nighttime HR, and daytime transpiration with nighttime HR. During HR, water efflux flushed solutes away from the root, diluting the concentrations of key nutrients like nitrate. The transport of cations by transpiration in the day and their accumulation near the root led to competitive desorption of ammonium from soil further from the root and generation of hotspots of ammonium availability at night. HR influenced the spatial and temporal patterns of these hotspots and their intensity. They were also influenced by soil properties of texture and cation exchange capacity. This dynamic resource landscape caused by diel cycling between transpiration and hydraulic redistribution presents a stage for greater complexity of microbial interactions. We are currently embedding a microbial community and small food web into this rhizosphere model in order to explore how organisms responsible for nutrient and soil carbon cycling respond to these fluctuating resource regimes.

  4. Factors determining soil nutrient distribution in a small-scaled watershed in the purple soil region of Sichuan Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.J.; Shi, X.Z.; Yu, D.S.; Weindorf, D.C.; Huang, B.; Sun, W.X.; Ritsema, C.J.; Milne, E.

    2009-01-01

    Determining soil nutrient distribution is critical to identify sites which are at risk of N and P loading. Equally important are determining factors that influence such distribution (e.g. land use, land management, topography, etc.). In this research, soil nutrient distribution and its influencing

  5. Effects of wood chip ash fertilization on soil chemistry in a Norway spruce plantation on a nutrient-poor soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Morten; Hansen, Mette; Pedersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    Harvest of forest biomass for energy production may lead to export of nutrients from the forest. Recirculation of nutrients from wood chip combustion by ash spreading in forests has been proposed as a means for counteracting the nutrient export. This study was carried out to examine the effect...... of wood chip ash application on soil chemistry in a 44-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantation on a nutrient-poor soil in Denmark and to investigate the effect of applying different ash types and doses. Soil samples were collected and analyzed 2.5years (3 growing seasons) after ash application...

  6. Mountain pine beetle disturbance effects on soil respiration and nutrient pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, N. A.; Moore, D. J.; Brayden, B. H.; Dynes, E.; Monson, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, the mountain pine beetle Dendroctonos ponderosae has infested more than 86 million hectares of high elevation forest in the Western U.S.A. While bark beetles are endemic to western forests and important agents of regeneration, the current mountain pine beetle outbreak is larger than any other on record and the resulting tree mortality has significant consequences for nutrient cycling and regional carbon exchange. We established decade-long parallel disturbance chronosequences in two lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests in Colorado: one composed of mountain pine beetle killed lodgepole stands and one consisting of trees where beetle mortality was simulated by stem girdling. Over the 2010 and 2011 growing season we measured plot level soil respiration fluxes, as well as soil extractable dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, and pools of ammonium, nitrate and inorganic phosphorus. We show that soil respiration sharply declines with gross primary productivity after tree mortality, but rebounds during the next 4 years, then declines again from 6-8 years post-disturbance. Soil extractable dissolved organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, and inorganic phosphorous pools follow the pattern observed in soil respiration fluxes across disturbance age classes for both sites, while patterns in total dissolved nitrogen exhibit site specific variation. Levels of detectable soil nitrate were low and did not significantly change across the chronosequence, while soil ammonium increased in a similar pattern with soil moisture in disturbed plots. These patterns in soil respiration and nutrient pools reflect the loss of autotrophic respiration and rhizodeposition immediately after tree mortality, followed by a pulse in soil efflux linked to the decomposition of older, less labile carbon pools. This pulse is likely controlled by the fall rate of litter, coarse woody debris and the relative impact of post-disturbance water

  7. Multiple constraint modeling of nutrient cycling stoichiometry following forest clearing and pasture abandonment in the Eastern Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric; Nifong, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    While deforestation has declined since its peak, land-use change continues to modify Amazonian landscapes. The responses and feedbacks of biogeochemical cycles to these changes play an important role in determining possible future trajectories of ecosystem function and for land stewardship through effects on rates of secondary forest regrowth, soil emissions of greenhouse gases, inputs of nutrients to groundwater and streamwater, and nutrient management in agroecosystems. Here we present a new synthetic analyses of data from the NASA-supported LBA-ECO project and others datasets on nutrient cycling in cattle pastures, secondary forests, and mature forests at Paragominas, Pará, Brazil. We have developed a stoichiometric model relating C-N-P interactions during original forest clearing, extensive and intensive pasture management, and secondary forest regrowth, constrained by multiple observations of ecosystem stocks and fluxes in each land use. While P is conservatively cycled in all land uses, we demonstrate that pyrolyzation of N during pasture formation and during additional burns for pasture management depletes available-N pools, consistent with observations of lower rates of N leaching and trace gas emission and consistent with secondary forest growth responses to experimental N amendments. The soils store large stocks of N and P, and our parameterization of available forms of these nutrients for steady-state dynamics in the mature forest yield reasonable estimates of net N and P mineralization available for grasses and secondary forest species at rates consistent with observed biomass accumulation and productivity in these modified ecosystems. Because grasses and forests have much different demands for N relative to P, the land use has important biogeochemical impacts. The model demonstrates the need for periodic P inputs for sustainable pasture management and for a period of significant biological N fixation for early-to-mid-successional secondary forest

  8. Mussel farming as a nutrient reduction measure in the Baltic Sea: consideration of nutrient biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadmark, J; Conley, D J

    2011-07-01

    Nutrient loads from the land to the sea must be reduced to combat coastal eutrophication. It has been suggested that further mitigation efforts are needed in the brackish Baltic Sea to decrease nutrients, especially in eutrophic coastal areas. Mussel farming is a potential measure to remove nutrients directly from the sea. Mussels consume phytoplankton containing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P); when the mussels are harvested these nutrients are removed from the aquatic system. However, sedimentation of organic material in faeces and pseudo-faeces below a mussel farm consumes oxygen and can lead to hypoxic or even anoxic sediments causing an increased sediment release of ammonium and phosphate. Moreover, N losses from denitrification can be reduced due to low oxygen and reduced numbers of bioturbating organisms. To reveal if mussel farming is a cost-effective mitigation measure in the Baltic Sea the potential for enhanced sediment nutrient release must be assessed.

  9. How do persistent organic pollutants be coupled with biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems under global climate change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Ying [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation; Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmetnal Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences; Xu, Zhihong; Reverchon, Frederique [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmetnal Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences; Luo, Yongming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation

    2012-03-15

    Global climate change (GCC), especially global warming, has affected the material cycling (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and organic chemicals) and the energy flows of terrestrial ecosystems. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were regarded as anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) source, and be coupled with the natural carbon (C) and nutrient biogeochemical cycling in ecosystems. The objective of this work was to review the current literature and explore potential coupling processes and mechanisms between POPs and biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems induced by global warming. Global warming has caused many physical, chemical, and biological changes in terrestrial ecosystems. POPs environmental fate in these ecosystems is controlled mainly by temperature and biogeochemical processes. Global warming may accelerate the re-emissions and redistribution of POPs among environmental compartments via soil-air exchange. Soil-air exchange is a key process controlling the fate and transportation of POPs and terrestrial ecosystem C at regional and global scales. Soil respiration is one of the largest terrestrial C flux induced by microbe and plant metabolism, which can affect POPs biotransformation in terrestrial ecosystems. Carbon flow through food web structure also may have important consequences for the biomagnification of POPs in the ecosystems and further lead to biodiversity loss induced by climate change and POPs pollution stress. Moreover, the integrated techniques and biological adaptation strategy help to fully explore the coupling mechanisms, functioning and trends of POPs and C and nutrient biogeochemical cycling processes in terrestrial ecosystems. There is increasing evidence that the environmental fate of POPs has been linked with biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems under GCC. However, the relationships between POPs and the biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients are still not well understood. Further

  10. Economic benefits of combining soil and water conservation measures with nutrient management in semiarid Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zougmoré, R.; Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.; Ouédraogo, E.

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient limitation is the main cause of per capita decline in crop production in the Sahel, where water shortage also limits an efficient use of available nutrients. Combining soil and water conservation measures with locally available nutrient inputs may optimize crop production and economic benef

  11. Nutrient use preferences among soil Streptomyces suggest greater resource competition in monoculture than polyculture plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient use overlap among sympatric Streptomyces populations is correlated with pathogen inhibitory capacity, yet there is little information on either the factors that influence nutrient use overlap among coexisting populations or the diversity of nutrient use among soil Streptomyces. We examined ...

  12. Soil nutrient-landscape relationships in a lowland tropical rainforest in Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthold, F.K.; Stallard, R.F.; Elsenbeer, H.

    2008-01-01

    Soils play a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles as spatially distributed sources and sinks of nutrients. Any spatial patterns depend on soil forming processes, our understanding of which is still limited, especially in regards to tropical rainforests. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of landscape properties, with an emphasis on the geometry of the land surface, on the spatial heterogeneity of soil chemical properties, and to test the suitability of soil-landscape modeling as an appropriate technique to predict the spatial variability of exchangeable K and Mg in a humid tropical forest in Panama. We used a design-based, stratified sampling scheme to collect soil samples at 108 sites on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Stratifying variables are lithology, vegetation and topography. Topographic variables were generated from high-resolution digital elevation models with a grid size of 5 m. We took samples from five depths down to 1 m, and analyzed for total and exchangeable K and Mg. We used simple explorative data analysis techniques to elucidate the importance of lithology for soil total and exchangeable K and Mg. Classification and Regression Trees (CART) were adopted to investigate importance of topography, lithology and vegetation for the spatial distribution of exchangeable K and Mg and with the intention to develop models that regionalize the point observations using digital terrain data as explanatory variables. Our results suggest that topography and vegetation do not control the spatial distribution of the selected soil chemical properties at a landscape scale and lithology is important to some degree. Exchangeable K is distributed equally across the study area indicating that other than landscape processes, e.g. biogeochemical processes, are responsible for its spatial distribution. Lithology contributes to the spatial variation of exchangeable Mg but controlling variables could not be detected. The spatial variation of soil total K

  13. Measurement of nutrients in green house soil with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T; Gondal, M A; Yamani, Z H; Baig, M A

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for the determination of nutrients in the green house soil samples. We determined appropriate spectral signatures of vital nutrients and calibrated the method to measure the nutrients in a naturally fertilized plot, cultivated with tomato and cucumber plants. From the calibration curves we predicted the concentrations of important nutrients such as Ca, K, P, Mg, Fe, S, Ni and Ba in the soil. Our measurements proved that the LIBS method rapidly and efficiently measures soil nutrients with excellent detection limits of 12, 9, 7, 9, 7, 10, 8 and 12 mg/kg for Ca, K, P, Mg, Fe, S, Ni and Ba respectively with a precision of approximately 2%, The unique features of LIBS for rapid sample analysis demonstrated by this study suggests that this method offers promise for precision measurements of soil nutrients as compared to conventional methods in short span of time.

  14. Carbon storage and nutrient mobilization from soil minerals by deep roots and rhizospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Harrison, Robert; Stupak, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Roots mobilize nutrients via deep soil penetration and rhizosphere processes inducing weathering of primary minerals. These processes contribute to C transfer to soils and to tree nutrition. Assessments of these characteristics and processes of root systems are important for understanding long...... studies on potential release of nutrients due to chemical weathering indicate the importance of root access to deep soil layers. Nutrient release profiles clearly indicate depletion in the top layers and a much higher potential in B and C horizons. Reviewing potential sustainability of nutrient supplies......-term supplies of nutrient elements essential for forest growth and resilience. Research and techniques have significantly advanced since Olof Tamm’s 1934 “base mineral index” for Swedish forest soils, and the basic nutrient budget estimates for whole-tree harvesting systems of the 1970s. Recent research...

  15. Nutrient cycling in an agroforestry alley cropping system receiving poultry litter or nitrogen fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optimal utilization of animal manures as a plant nutrient source should also prevent adverse impacts on water quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term poultry litter and N fertilizer application on nutrient cycling following establishment of an alley cropping system with easter...

  16. Long-term effects of organic and inorganic nutrient sources on soil organic carbon and major nutrients in Vertisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Hallikeri, S. S.; Nandagavi, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Field experiment conducted over 10 years at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, assessed the long-term effects of various sources of organics (farmyard manure {FYM}, vermicompost and cotton crop residue) in conjunction with graded levels of inorganic fertilizers on the soil organic carbon (SOC), available major nutrients and seed cotton yield in cotton- (groundnut - winter Sorghum) rotation system. Main plots comprised FYM (10 Mg/ha), vermicompost (2.5 Mg/ha), cotton crop residue (2.5 Mg/ha) and combination of these organics in various proportions with an absolute control (no organics). No inorganic fertilizes, 50 and 100 % of the recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) were assigned to the sub plots. The organics were applied every year during rainy season and the inorganic fertilizers as per the University recommended dose to each crop. Initial SOC, available N, P and K were 0.68%, 220, 22.5 and 403 kg/ha, respectively. Results indicated that at the end of tenth year of crop rotation, application of FYM, vermicompost and cotton crop residue either alone or in combination increased the SOC (0.68 to 0.81%), available N (220 to 308 kg/ha), P (22.5 to 33.0 kg/ha) and K (403 to 530 kg/ha) compared to the control plot where no organics were applied. SOC in the control treatment decreased to 0.52% at the end of tenth year from 0.68%. Averaged over five cropping cycles, application of FYM gave significantly higher yields of seed cotton, groundnut pods and sorghum grain over all other organic sources. During fifth cycle of cotton crop or 10th year of rotation, application of FYM along with 100% RDF resulted in the highest productivity and was similar to FYM + 50 % RDF, indicating a saving of 50% chemical fertilizer in these crops. Combination of cotton crop residue and vermicompost were next best alternative sources of organics after FYM in order of preference. Our studies suggest that in the scarcity of good quality manure such as FYM, cotton crop

  17. Spatiotemporal Changes in Soil Nutrients:A Case Study in Taihu Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei-lei; ZHU Yan; LIU Xiao-jun; CAO Wei-xing; XU Mao; WANG Xu-kui; WANG En-li

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the spatiotemporal changes in soil nutrients inlfuenced by agricultural production provides the basis for development of management strategies to maintain soil fertility and balance soil nutrients. In this paper, we combined spatial measurements from 2 157 soil samples and geostatistical analysis to assess the spatiotemporal changes in soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium content (AK) from the ifrst soil survey (in the 1980s) to the second soil survey (in the 2000s) in the Taihu region of Jiangsu Province in China. The results showed that average soil nutrients in three soil types all exhibited the increased levels in the 2000s (except for AK in the yellow brown soil). The standard deviation of soil nutrient contents increased (except for TN in the paddy soil). Agricultural production in the 20 years led to increases in SOC, TN, AP and AK by 74, 82, 89 and 65%, respectively, of the Taihu areas analyzed. From the 1980s to 2000s all the nugget/sill ratios of soil nutrients indices were between 25 and 75%(except for AK in the yellow brown soil in the 2000s), indicating moderate spatial dependence. The ratio of AP in the yellow brown soil in the 2000s was 88.74%, showing weak spatial dependence. The spatial correlation range values for SOC, TN, AP and AK in the 2000s all decreased. The main areas showing declines in SOC, TN and AP were in the northwest. For AK, the main region with declining levels was in the east and middle of western areas. Apparently, the increase in soil nutrients in the Taihu region can be mainly attributed to the large increase in fertilizer inputs, change in crop systems and enhanced residues management since the 1980s. Future emphasis should be placed on avoiding excess fertilizer inputs and balancing the effects of the fertilizers in soils.

  18. Limestone, gypsum and residual effect of fertilizers in the biomass production and nutrient cycling of millet plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Conceição Santana Carvalho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cover crops can provide a higher nutrient cycling. This study aimed to determine the effect of annual applications of gypsum and lime to the soil surface and of fertilizer doses to the previous crop (soybean in the dry biomass production and nutrient accumulation by plants of pearl millet grown in succession, under no-tillage system. The experimental design was randomized blocks, in a 4x4 factorial scheme, with four replications. Treatments consisted of the combination of four types of soil conditioner (lime, lime + gypsum, gypsum and control, split in three parts (2 t ha-1 of lime and 1,0 t ha-1 of gypsum; 2 t ha-1 of lime and 1 t ha-1 of gypsum; and 1 t ha-1 of lime and 0.5 t ha-1 of gypsum, and four fertilizing rates with P (triple and simple superphosphate and K (potassium chloride (0%, 50%, 100% and 150% of the recommended fertilizing, applied at the sowing of the previous crop (soybean. Liming provided increments in the dry biomass production and in the accumulation of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S by millet plants. The application of gypsum did not increase the millet dry biomass yield. The use of increasing rates of fertilizers in the previous crop (soybean increased the biomass dry matter, density and accumulation of nutrients by millet plants. The intercropping of millet as a cover crop, with the residual effect of the fertilizer applied in the summer crop, provided a nutrient cycling that can be used by the following crops.

  19. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or can result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that although there are knowledge gaps that require further research, enough is known to start improving soils globally. The main challenge is in finding ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy-makers, so that best-practice management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge sharing must be in raising awareness of the multiple ecosystem services underpinned by soils, and the natural capital they provide. The International Year of Soils in 2015 presents the perfect opportunity to begin a step-change in how we harness scientific knowledge to bring about more sustainable use of soils for a secure global society.

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus resorption in a neotropical rain forest of a nutrient-rich soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    In tropical forests with nutrient-rich soil tree's nutrient resorption from senesced leaves has not always been observed to be low. Perhaps this lack of consistence is partly owing to the nutrient resorption methods used. The aim of the study was to analyse N and P resorption proficiency from tropical rain forest trees in a nutrient-rich soil. It was hypothesised that trees would exhibit low nutrient resorption in a nutrient-rich soil. The soil concentrations of total N and extractable P, among other physical and chemical characteristics, were analysed in 30 samples in the soil surface (10 cm) of three undisturbed forest plots at 'Estaci6n de Biologia Los Tuxtlas' on the east coast of Mexico (18 degrees 34' - 18 degrees 36' N, 95 degrees 04' - 95 degrees 09' W). N and P resorption proficiency were determined from senescing leaves in 11 dominant tree species. Nitrogen was analysed by microkjeldahl digestion with sulphuric acid and distilled with boric acid, and phosphorus was analysed by digestion with nitric acid and perchloric acid. Soil was rich in total N (0.50%, n = 30) and extractable P (4.11 microg g(-1) n = 30). As expected, trees showed incomplete N (1.13%, n = 11) and P (0.11%, n = 1) resorption. With a more accurate method of nutrient resorption assessment, it is possible to prove that a forest community with a nutrient-rich soil can have low levels of N and P resorption.

  1. Effect of soil carbohydrates on nutrient availability in natural forests and cultivated lands in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, R. R.; Seneviratne, G.; Kulasooriya, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrates supply carbon sources for microbial activities that contribute to mineral nutrient production in soil. Their role on soil nutrient availability has not yet been properly elucidated. This was studied in forests and cultivated lands in Sri Lanka. Soil organic matter (SOM) fractions affecting carbohydrate availability were also determined. Soil litter contributed to sugars of plant origin (SPO) in croplands. The negative relationship found between clay bound organic matter (CBO) and glucose indicates higher SOM fixation in clay that lower its availability in cultivated lands. In forests, negative relationships between litter and sugars of microbial origin (SMO) showed that litter fuelled microbes to produce sugars. Fucose and glucose increased the availability of Cu, Zn and Mn in forests. Xylose increased Ca availability in cultivated lands. Arabinose, the main carbon source of soil respiration reduced the P availability. This study showed soil carbohydrates and their relationships with mineral nutrients could provide vital information on the availability of limiting nutrients in tropical ecosystems.

  2. Anaerobic soil disinfestation impact on soil nutrients dynamics and nitrous oxide emissions in fresh-market tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is proposed as a pre-plant, non-chemical soil disinfestation technique to control several soilborne phytosanitary issues. Limited information is available on the impact of ASD on soil fertility, plant growth, and potential nutrient loss. The objectives of the curr...

  3. Contribution of Root Proliferation in Nutrient-Rich Soil Patches to Nutrient Uptake and Growth of Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Bo; ZHANG Fu-Suo; SHEN Jian-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Root proliferation can be stimulated in a heterogeneous nutrient patch; however,the functions of the root proliferation in the nutrient-rich soil patches are not fully understood.In the present study,a two-year field experiment was conducted to examine the comparative effects of localized application of ammonium and phosphorus (P) at early or late stages on root growth,nutrient uptake,and biomass of maize (Zea mays L.) on a calcareous soil in an intensive farming system.Localized supply of ammonium and P had a more evident effect on shoot and root growth,and especially stimulated fine root development at the early seedling stage,with most of the maize roots being allocated to the nutrient-rich patch in the topsoil.Although localized ammonium and P supply at the late stage also enhanced the fine root growth,the plant roots in the patch accounted for a low proportion of the whole maize roots in the topsoil at the flowering stage.Compared with the early stage,fine root length in the short-lived nutrient patch decreased by 44%-62% and the shoot dry weight was not different between heterogeneous and homogeneous nutrient supply at the late growth stage.Localized supply of ammonium and P significantly increased N and P accumulation by maize at 35 and 47 days after sowing (DAS); however,no significant difference was found among the treatments at 82 DAS and the later growth stages.The increased nutrient uptake and plant growth was related to the higher proportion of root length in the localized nutrient-enriched patch.The results indicated that root proliferation in nutrient patches contributed more to maize growth and nutrient uptake at the early than late stages.

  4. SOIL-PLANT NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS IN TWO MANGROVE AREAS AT SOUTHERN BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Lang Martins Madi; Maria Regina Torres Boeger; Carlos Bruno Reissmann; Kelly Geronazzo Martins

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTMangrove forests have a simple architecture. They shelter a few number of arboreal species that grow in a saline environment subject to tidal activity. The research objective was to evaluate possible interactions between physical-chemical soil attributes and plant-leaf nutrient concentrations of different mangrove species. Different mangrove species growing in the same soil, and the same mangrove species growing in two different soil classes were evaluated as to their leaf nutrient co...

  5. Leaf nutrient contents and morphology of invasive tamarisk in different soil conditions in the lower Virgin River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, S.; Acharya, K.; Tateno, R.; Yamanaka, N.

    2012-12-01

    Invasive plants can alter ecosystem nitrogen (N) cycling. To increase our understanding of nutrient use strategy of invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) on an arid riparian ecosystem, we examined leaf nutrient contents and morphology of Tamarix ramosissima and its relationship with soil properties in the lower Virgin River floodplain, Nevada, U.S. Leaves were collected in three different locations; near the river, near the stand edge (60-70 m from the river edge) and at 30-40 m from the river edge in the summer of 2011. Leaves were analyzed for carbon (C) and N contents, and specific leaf area (SLA). Soil samples at 10-20 cm depths and under the canopy were also collected for soil water, pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and inorganic nitrogen (NO3- and NH4+) analysis. Results suggested that tree size and SLA increased with decreasing distance from the river, whereas C isotope discrimination did not differ among the samples based on distance from the river. Nitrogen content per unit mass and N isotope discrimination (δ15N) were significantly higher in the trees near the river. Soil NO3- and total inorganic N had positive relationships with δ15N in leaves, which suggests that leaf δ15N may be influenced by N concentrations on the soil surface. Negative correlations were found between soil EC and leaf N contents, suggesting that high soil salinity may decrease Tamarix leaf N and thus limit tree growth.

  6. Soil nutrient competition in earth system models: an important but underappreciated driver of plant responses to nutrient fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C.

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) used to project future biosphere-climate feedbacks rely on predictions of terrestrial carbon dynamics. Furthermore, soil nutrient availability strongly modulates land surface carbon dynamics, including plant sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Plant growth under future environmental changes (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus deposition) depends on how well plants compete with microbial and abiotic competitors. Here, we surveyed recent developments of nutrient competition representations in ESMs that participated in the CMIP5 project. We found that nutrient competition is over-simplified despite its ecological significance. Existing ESMs either assume that soil-decomposing microbes (1) outcompete plants or (2) are evenly competitive, both of which are inconsistent with theoretical understanding and field observations. We compiled and synthesized global data of forest carbon productivity in response to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiments. Using this synthesis, we show that existing ESMs with the first and second competition schemes lead to underestimation and overestimation, respectively, of fertilization effects on plant growth. We reduced these systematic biases by applying a new competition scheme in CLM4.5 and the essentially equivalent ACME land model (ALMv0) based on the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, which is based on classical equilibrium chemical kinetics theory. This approach dynamically updates nutrient competitiveness among multiple consumers (e.g., plants, decomposing microbes, nitrifier, denitrifier, mineral surfaces) as a function of soil nutrient status. There has been a long-term debate regarding how to implement theoretically realistic and computationally efficient nutrient competition schemes in ESMs. Our approach reconciles the complex nature of ecosystem nutrient competition with a computationally tractable approach applicable to ESMs. More importantly, our results imply that previous estimates of plant

  7. Quantitative Retrieval of Soil Nutrient in Sandy Land Based on BJ-1 Multispectral Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Li, Zengyuan; Gao, Zhihai; Wang, Bengyu; Bai, Lina; Sun, Bin; Li, Changlong; Ding, Xiangyuan

    2014-11-01

    To research an indicator for sandy information, this paper conducts a study on soil nutrient in sandy land. Firstly, the difference of soil nutrient between sandy land and the other was analyzed. Secondly, the correlation between soil nutrient index and band was studied. Then the best inversion band and model was determined and evaluated. Finally, the distribution of soil nutrient was obtained. As the result indicated that the divergence of total nitrogen in different land was the maximum among the three nutrient indicators. With the development of desertification, total nitrogen declined dramatically. The correlation coefficient between each band and total nitrogen was relatively higher, and it reached 0.6. In addition, taking the reciprocal for the sum of three bands as the independent variable was an excellent choice, it could reflect the sandy information better than the single band. The quantitative retrieval model was checked by independent sample, and RMSE was 0.0407.

  8. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on nutrient uptake of maize in reclaimed soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Y.; Hu, Z.; Si, J.; Quan, W. [China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT), Beijing (China). Dept. of Resources Exploitation Engineering

    2002-05-01

    An experiment was carried out on the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, glomus mosseae, on the growth and nutrient uptaking of maize in reclaimed soil with coal fly ash layers at different depths. The research shows that plant yields increase with soil depth. Mycorrhizal plants can absorb more nutrients than non-mycorrhizal ones, and transport less Na to shoot, protecting plants from the excessive accumulation of Na. Plant biomass and nutrient content for mycorrhizal plants in reclaimed soil with a small soil thickness of 5 cm and a great fly ash thickness of 10 cm are higher than those for non-mycorrhizal plants in reclaimed soil with a great soil thickness of 10 cm and a small fly ash thickness of 5 cm. Arbuscular mycorrhizae have a potential to counteract the effect induced by a small thickness of covered soil, and so can reduce reclamation fee. 20 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Nutrient cycling in salt marshes: An ecosystem service to reduce eutrophication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebø, A. I.; Sousa, A. I.; Flindt, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    and discussed: By comparing young and mature marshes colonised by Saprtina maritima, we will evaluate their behaviour as sink or source of nutrients; By comparing two halophytes with distinct life cycles (Spartina maritima and Scirpus maritimus), we will evaluate species-specific N and P cycling...

  10. Phosphate addition enhanced soil inorganic nutrients to a large extent in three tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feifei; Lu, Xiankai; Liu, Lei; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-21

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may constrain soil phosphorus (P) and base cation availability in tropical forests, for which limited evidence have yet been available. In this study, we reported responses of soil inorganic nutrients to full factorial N and P treatments in three tropical forests different in initial soil N status (N-saturated old-growth forest and two less-N-rich younger forests). Responses of microbial biomass, annual litterfall production and nutrient input were also monitored. Results showed that N treatments decreased soil inorganic nutrients (except N) in all three forests, but the underlying mechanisms varied depending on forests: through inhibition on litter decomposition in the old-growth forest and through Al(3+) replacement of Ca(2+) in the two younger forests. In contrast, besides great elevation in soil available P, P treatments induced 60%, 50%, 26% increases in sum of exchangeable (K(+)+Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)) in the old-growth and the two younger forests, respectively. These positive effects of P were closely related to P-stimulated microbial biomass and litter nutrient input, implying possible stimulation of nutrient return. Our results suggest that N deposition may result in decreases in soil inorganic nutrients (except N) and that P addition can enhance soil inorganic nutrients to support ecosystem processes in these tropical forests.

  11. Nutrient cycling in salt marshes: An ecosystem service to reduce eutrophication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebø, A. I.; Sousa, A. I.; Flindt, M. R.;

    2013-01-01

    aims to draw attention to the sequestration capacity of salt marshes for the excess of nutrients, and to evaluate the ecological services provided by salt marsh halophytes by regulating the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). In this context, two case studies will be presented...... and discussed: By comparing young and mature marshes colonised by Saprtina maritima, we will evaluate their behaviour as sink or source of nutrients; By comparing two halophytes with distinct life cycles (Spartina maritima and Scirpus maritimus), we will evaluate species-specific N and P cycling...... and sequestration in salt marshes. This chapter will thus emphasise that salt marsh halophytes have a crucial role on nutrient cycling and sequestration, providing ecological services that contribute to maintain the ecosystem health. © 2012 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved....

  12. Oxygen isotopes unravel the role of microorganisms in phosphate cycling in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Federica; Pfahler, Verena; Bünemann, Else K; Guelland, Kathi; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2012-06-05

    Phosphorus (P) is considered the ultimate limiting nutrient for plants in most natural systems and changes in the distribution of inorganic and organic P forms during soil development have been well documented. In particular, microbial activity has been shown to be an important control on P cycling but its contribution in building up the pool of plant-available P during soil development is still poorly quantified. To determine the importance of different biological processes on P cycling, we analyzed the isotopic composition of oxygen in phosphate (δ(18)O-Pi) from the parent material, soil microorganisms, the available P pool, and from the vegetation along a 150-year soil chronosequence of a glacier forefield. Our results show that at all sites, δ(18)O-Pi of microbial Pi is within the range expected for the temperature-dependent equilibrium between phosphate and water. In addition, the isotopic signature of available Pi is close to the signature of microbial Pi, independently of the contribution of parent material Pi, vegetation Pi or Pi released from organic matter mineralization. Thus, we show that phosphate is cycled through soil microorganisms before being released to the available pool. This isotopic approach demonstrates for the first time in the field and over long time scales, and not only through controlled experiments, the role of the microbial activity in cycling of P in soils.

  13. Nutrient cycling for biomass: Interactive proteomic/transcriptomic networks for global carbon management processes within poplar-mycorrhizal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cseke, Leland [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    free living conditions. Together, the assembled team of experts completed all of the planned milestones set forth in this project. In addition to the planned approaches, several lines of exciting new research have also evolved during the course of this project that involved FTIR Imaging using the National Synchrotron Light Source at BNL. A summary of the approaches used in this project and key highlights are as follows: Having the right combination of microbes associated with plants is largely responsible for the plant’s ability to mine nutrients from the soil and to develop a strong “immune system”. Our current chemically focused and intensive culture tends to forget that plants obtain nutrients in two ways: (1) via water soluble chemical nutrients and (2) via the activity of acquired microbial symbionts. In healthy natural ecosystems, chemical nutrients are always in low abundance because the organisms within that system have already locked such nutrients away within the biological system itself. Thus, in nature it is the biological sources of nutrients and the microbes that have the capacity to mine those nutrients for their plant hosts that actually control the terrestrial nutrient cycles on this planet. Thus, a new push in the future may very well be to use our skills at elucidating complex patterns to strategically guide soil microbe communities to do what we want, essentially allowing nature to do the work of figuring out what is most efficient and effective for human needs. However, the findings of this project and other work in our lab lead to the hypothesis that the specific soil community composition is less important than the emergent properties of those communities. So, additional research into what soil communities are effective and how they are established will be key in developing human understanding of how to manipulate biological systems to meet human needs without causing undue damage to our environment.

  14. Drought regulates the C and N cycling in soil depending on plant community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaullah, Muhammad; Chabbi, Abad; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    Drought consequences on carbon (C) and nutrients cycling have been well explored, but little is known about interactions in the rhizosphere under various plant community composition. We compared drought effects on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and on enzyme activities in the rhizosphere of three plants grown individually or in mixture: two grasses (Lolium perenne and Festuca arundinacea) and one legume (Medicago sativa). The activities of extracellular enzymes involved in C cycle (xylanase, β-cellobiosidase and β-glucosidase) and nitrogen (N) cycle (chitinase and Leucine-aminopeptidase) were compared to MBC changes. The MBC was highly correlated with root biomass. MBC increased in response to drought in soil under the plant mixture, whereas it showed variable trends under monocultures. Drought and plant species composition were responsible for more than 90% of the variation of enzyme activities. Most enzyme activities decreased in unplanted soil in response to drought. The activity of the enzyme involved in the N cycle increased strongly under mixture and two out of three monocultures, indicating an increased N demand under drought conditions. The activities of enzymes involved in the C cycle in soil under mixture (1) generally were lower during drought compared to soil under monocultures and (2) were unchanged or tended to decrease, while they were more likely to increase under monocultures. This has an important ecological consequence: the decomposition of plant residues and soil organic matter will be slower under drought when plants are grown in mixture compared to monocultures.

  15. Impact of glyphosate-resistant corn, glyphosate applications and tillage on soil nutrient ratios, exoenzyme activities and nutrient acquisition ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael B; Locke, Martin A; Reddy, Krishna N; McChesney, Daniel S; Steinriede, R Wade

    2017-01-01

    We report results of the last two years of a 7 year field experiment designed to test the null hypothesis: applications of glyphosate on glyphosate-resistant (GR) and non-resistant (non-GR) corn (Zea mays L.) under conventional tillage and no-till would have no effect on soil exoenzymes and microbial activity. Bulk soil (BS) and rhizosphere soil (RS) macronutrient ratios were not affected by either GR or non-GR corn, or glyphosate applications. Differences observed between exoenzyme activities were associated with tillage rather than glyphosate applications. In 2013, nutrient acquisition ratios for bulk and rhizosphere soils indicated P limitations, but sufficient assimilable N. In 2014, P limitations were observed for bulk and rhizosphere soils, in contrast to balanced C and N acquisition ratios in rhizosphere soils. Stoichiometric relationships indicated few differences between glyphosate and non-glyphosate treatments. Negative correlations between C:P and N:P nutrient ratios and nutrient acquisition ratios underscored the inverse relation between soil nutrient status and microbial community exoenzyme activities. Inconsistent relationships between microbial community metabolic activity and exoenzyme activity indicated an ephemeral effect of glyphosate on BS exoenzyme activity. Except for ephemeral effects, glyphosate applications appeared not to affect the function of the BS and RS exoenzymes under conventional tillage or no-till. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Coupled Nitrogen and Calcium Cycling in Forests across a Gradient of Soil Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, S.; Maguire, D.; Bullen, T.; Cromack, K.; Waring, R.; Boyle, J.

    2004-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a critical limiting nutrient that regulates plant productivity and the cycling of essential base cations in forests. Increases in N availability beyond the threshold of plant and ecosystem needs may drive non-linear biogeochemical changes that include excess nitrate leaching and base cation depletion from soils. While such variations in N cycling are typically associated with polluted regions, comparable changes may also occur in unpolluted forests of the Pacific Northwest due to legacies of soil N enrichment from biological N fixation in red alder. We sampled 22 young Douglas-fir stands in the Oregon Coast Range, and found that surface soil calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations were inversely related to N across a gradient from 0.15 to 1.1 soil %N. Strontium isotope ratios indicate that N-rich forests are decoupled from weathering, and obtain > 97% of base cation nutrition from marine sea-salt aerosols. However, high Ca:Mg ratios of plant demands relative to aerosol inputs selectively fosters Ca deficiency at high soil N. Plant and soil patterns were similar for sandstone versus basalt derived soils, indicating that biological N availability - not bedrock - can be the primary control of coupled N and base cation cycling across areas of high N enrichment.

  17. Microbial fertilizer improving the soil nutrients and growth of reed in degraded wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. L.; Zhao, Y. G.; Yang, M.

    2017-06-01

    Wetland degradation is frequently observed in some river estuaries of China due to the imbalance of soil nutrient. In order to improve the soil nutrient and promote the restoration of plant, the microbial fertilizer containing the phosphorus-dissolving strain Pseudomonas plecoglossicida and potassium-dissolving strain Bacillus aryabhattai was developed to stimulate the growth of plant and increase soil nutrient in this study. Results showed that microbial fertilizer was more effective in increasing the contents of total N, P and K in soil and the activities of soil sucrase and urease. Compared with the control, the height and dry weight of reeds were increased 53.13% and 59.31%; the activities of soil sucrase and urease were improved 41.25% and 39.57%. Illumina Miseq sequencing showed that Pseudomonas spp. were the most predominant in microbial fertilizer treated soil but other treatments were quite different. Hence, the microbial fertilizer significantly promoted the growth of reed, increased soil nutrient and enzyme activity. It consequently revealed a promising application in improving the wetland soil nutrients and ecological restoration.

  18. Linking spatial patterns of soil redistribution traced with 137Cs and soil nutrients in a Mediterranean mountain agroecosystem (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean mountain agroecosystems are prone to soil loss mainly due to the accelerated erosion as a consequence of human induced changes from agriculture and grazing practices over the last centuries and the climatic conditions (i.e. irregular and scarce precipitations and drought periods). Soil erosion leads to soil degradation inducing the loss of soil functions. The progressive decline of soil functions thereof soil quality is associated to a decrease of soil productivity and can threat the sustainability of cultivated soils. The use of fallout 137Cs as a soil movement tracer provides useful data to identify areas where loss and gain of 137Cs occurs and that of soil. This study aims to address soil movement and soil nutrient dynamics closely related to the status of soil degradation. A rain-fed cereal field (1.6 ha) representative of Mediterranean mountain agricultural landscapes (42°25'41''N 1°13'8''W) was selected to examine the effects of soil redistribution processes on the spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON) and their relationships with soil properties and topographic characteristics. From the hydrological point of view, the field is isolated due to the effect of landscape features and man-made structures. Climate is continental Mediterranean with an average annual rainfall of 500 mm and soils are Calcisols. The reference inventories of 137Cs and soil nutrients were established from 21 soil samples collected in nearby undisturbed areas under typical Mediterranean vegetation cover. A total of 156 bulk soil samples (30-50 cm depth) and 156 topsoil samples (5 cm) were collected on a 10 m grid. 137Cs and soil nutrients loss and gain areas were identified by comparing the reference inventories with the values of inventories at the sampling points. A new approach to characterize and measure active (ACF) and stable (SCF) carbon fraction contents by using a dry combustion method based on the oxidation temperature of carbon

  19. Soil management with respect to nitrogen mobilization and nutrient supply of grapevines on loess soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehofer, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The effects of different methods of soil management on the nutrient supply and the vine quality of organically grown `Grüner Veltliner` grapevines (Guyot double) were investigated in the winegrowing region Wagram of Lower Austria (municipality: Großriedenthal). Under permanent green cover the mineral nitrogen content in the soil was significantly lower than under green cover only in each second row. Regarding the nitrogen demand of the vine the best results of the mineral nitrogen content in soil were found by loosening up the soil by the end of April and breaking it open two weeks later. Permanent green cover inhibited shoot length development and the total acidity of the must was lower. The content of yeast assimilable nitrogen and the yield were reduced, but must density as well as potassium and ash contents of the wine were slightly higher. There were no differences in the vinification of the grapes of different origins. Significant differences in the sensory evaluation could not be related to different methods of soil cultivation.

  20. Aromatic plants play an important role in promoting soil biological activity related to nitrogen cycling in an orchard ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxin; Song, Beizhou; Yao, Yuncong; Wu, Hongying; Hu, Jinghui; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-02-15

    Aromatic plants can substantially improve the diversity and structure of arthropod communities, as well as reduce the number of herbivore pests and regulate the abundance of predators and parasitoids. However, it is not clear whether aromatic plants are also effective in improving soil quality by enhancing nutrient cycling. Here, field experiments are described involving intercropping with aromatic plants to investigate their effect on soil nitrogen (N) cycling in an orchard ecosystem. The results indicate that the soil organic nitrogen and available nitrogen contents increased significantly in soils intercropped with aromatic plants. Similarly, the activities of soil protease and urease increased, together with total microbial biomass involved in N cycling, including nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and azotobacters, as well as the total numbers of bacteria and fungi. This suggests that aromatic plants improve soil N cycling and nutrient levels by enriching the soil in organic matter through the regulation of both the abundance and community structure of microorganisms, together with associated soil enzyme activity, in orchard ecosystems.

  1. Soil nitrogen biogeochemical cycles in karst ecosystems, southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejun; Chen, Hao; Xiao, Kongcao; Wang, Kelin

    2017-04-01

    of N mineralization, nitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and nitrate assimilation were significantly greater in the karst forest. Ammonium assimilation was comparable to gross N mineralization, so that ammonium could be efficiently conserved in the non-karst forest. Meanwhile, the produced nitrate was almost completely retained via DNRA and nitrate assimilation. This resulted in a negligible net nitrate production in the non-karst forest. In contrast, ammonium assimilation rate only accounted for half of gross N mineralization rate in the karst forest. DNRA and nitrate assimilation accounted for 21% and 51% of gross nitrification, respectively. Due to relatively low nitrate retention capacity, nitrate was accumulated in the karst forest. Our results indicate that 1) N would not be the limiting nutrient for secondary succession and ecological restoration in the karst region, 2) the decoupling of nitrate consumption with production results in the increase of soil nitrate level and hence nitrate leaching risk during post-agricultural succession in the karst region, and 3) the non-karst forest with red soil holds a very conservative N cycle, but the N cycle in the karst forest is leaky.

  2. Source and Cycling of Trace Metals and Nutrients in a Microbial Coalbed Methane System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earll, M. M.; Barnhart, E. P.; Ritter, D.; Vinson, D. S.; Orem, W. H.; Vengosh, A.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The source and cycling of trace metals and nutrients in coalbed methane (CBM) systems are controlled by both geochemical processes, such as dissolution or precipitation, and biological mediation by microbial communities. CBM production by the microbes is influenced by trace metals and macronutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P). Previous studies have shown the importance of these nutrients to both enhance and inhibit methane production; however, it's not clear whether they are sourced from coal via in-situ biodegradation of organic matter or transported into the seams with groundwater recharge. To address this knowledge gap, trace metal and nutrient geochemistry and the organic content of solid coal and associated groundwater will be investigated across a hydrologic gradient in CBM wells in the Powder River Basin, MT. Sequential dissolution experiments (chemical extraction of organic and inorganic constituents) using 8 core samples of coal and sandstone will provide insight into the presence of trace metals and nutrients in coalbeds, the associated minerals present, and their mobilization. If significant concentrations of N, P, and trace metals are present in core samples, in-situ sourcing of nutrients by microbes is highly probable. The biogeochemical evolution of groundwater, as it relates to trace metal and nutrient cycling by microbial consortia, will be investigated by targeting core-associated coal seams from shallow wells in recharge areas to depths of at least 165 m and across a 28 m vertical profile that include overburden, coal, and underburden. If microbial-limiting trace metals and nutrients are transported into coal seams with groundwater recharge, we would expect to see higher concentrations of trace metals and nutrients in recharge areas compared to deeper coalbeds. The results of this study will provide novel understanding of where trace metals and nutrients are sourced and how they are cycled in CBM systems.

  3. Soil and foliar nutrient and nitrogen isotope composition (δ(15)N) at 5 years after poultry litter and green waste biochar amendment in a macadamia orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhihong; Blumfield, Timothy J; Zhao, Haitao; Wallace, Helen; Reverchon, Frédérique; Van Zwieten, Lukas

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the improvement in soil fertility and plant nutrient use in a macadamia orchard following biochar application. The main objectives of this study were to assess the effects of poultry litter and green waste biochar applications on nitrogen (N) cycling using N isotope composition (δ(15)N) and nutrient availability in a soil-plant system at a macadamia orchard, 5 years following application. Biochar was applied at 10 t ha(-1) dry weight but concentrated within a 3-m diameter zone when trees were planted in 2007. Soil and leaf samples were collected in 2012, and both soil and foliar N isotope composition (δ(15)N) and nutrient concentrations were assessed. Both soil and foliar δ(15)N increased significantly in the poultry litter biochar plots compared to the green waste biochar and control plots. A significant relationship was observed between soil and plant δ(15)N. There was no influence of either biochars on foliar total N concentrations or soil NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N, which suggested that biochar application did not pose any restriction for plant N uptake. Plant bioavailable phosphorus (P) was significantly higher in the poultry litter biochar treatment compared to the green waste biochar treatment and control. We hypothesised that the bioavailability of N and P content of poultry litter biochar may play an important role in increasing soil and plant δ(15)N and P concentrations. Biochar application affected soil-plant N cycling and there is potential to use soil and plant δ(15)N to investigate N cycling in a soil-biochar-tree crop system. The poultry litter biochar significantly increased soil fertility compared to the green waste biochar at 5 years following biochar application which makes the poultry litter a better feedstock to produce biochar compared to green waste for the tree crops.

  4. Comparison of Nutrients and Salinity on Phenanthrene Removal from Polluted Soil 

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives:The poor accessibility of microorganisms to PAHs in soil has limited success in the process of bioremediation as an effective method for removing pollutants from soils. Different physicochemical factors are effective on the rate of biodegradation. The main objective of this study is to assess effects of nutrient and salinity on phenanthrene removal from polluted soils.Materials and Methods:The soil having no organic and microbial pollution was first artificially poll...

  5. Modulation of Soil Particle Size and Nutrient Availability in the Maize Rhizosheath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Wei; LI Xue-Xian; LI Chun-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Root exudates,microorganism colonization and soil aggregates together form the rhizosheath,a special cylinder of micro-ecosystem adhering to the root surface.To study how the rhizosheath affects soil structure and nutrient distribution,we analyzed the impact of maize rhizosheath on soil particle size and nutrient availability in pot and field experiments.The results showed that there was a significant size decrease of soil particles in the rhizosheath.Meanwhile,the soil mineral nitrogen in the rhizosheath was significantly higher than that in the rhizosphere or bulk soil at tasseling and maturity stages of maize.The contents of Fe and Mn were also differentially altered in the rhizosheath.Rhizosheath development,indicated by a dry weight ratio of rhizosheath soil to the root,was relatively independent of root development during the whole experimental period.The formation of maize rhizosheath contributed to the modulation of soil particle size and nutrient availability.The subtle local changes of soil physical and chemical properties may have profound influence on soil formation,rhizospheric ecosystem initiation,and mineral nutrient mobilization over the long history of plant evolution and domestication.

  6. Soil testing for P and K has value in nutrient management for annual crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geisseler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrients in forms available to plant roots are essential for sustainable crop production. Soil testing for phosphorus and potassium availability allows growers and crop advisers to determine whether a soil is likely to respond to fertilization. As yields have risen with improved management and production systems, crop nutrient demand and the removal of nutrients with harvested crops have increased. An in-depth discussion of soil tests for phosphorus and potassium and their use in California cropping systems is clearly needed. We review how these nutrients become available to plant roots, how samples are taken and test results interpreted, complementary ways to assess the adequacy of supplies and what research is needed to improve soil testing for phosphorus and potassium.

  7. Greenhouse gas and soil nutrient dynamics at Haliburton Forest: nitrogen and phosphorous amendments to soils to study the effects of high nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.

    2011-12-01

    Many of Canada's forests are currently experiencing a major environmental disturbance in the form of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition from fossil fuel burning and agricultural practices. Nitrogen is a major nutrient required for plants and soil microorganisms and is normally in short supply relative to biological demands. However, when N is in excess various negative impacts result including nutrient leaching, increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and disturbances to carbon and methane (CH4) cycling. Introducing soil amendments might have the potential to mitigate the negative impacts of excess N in forest soils. Previous research at Haliburton Forest in southeastern Ontario, Canada has demonstrated that N is no longer a limiting nutrient for plants, but rather phosphorous (P), where the addition of P resulted in rapid increased growth in sugar maple trees. We characterized long term (>5 years) and more immediate/short-term effects of P additions and short-term effects of N and N+P additions to soils at Haliburton Forest on the exchange of greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2) and cycling of N and P to determine the extent of excess N impact and potential N saturation. Long-term effects of P addition demonstrated suppressed levels of CH4 uptake likely due to an N limitation of CH4 oxidizing bacteria. Decreased pools of N with P addition suggest that P additions alleviate P limitation and induce N uptake, however overall low inorganic N pools suggest that N saturation has not yet appeared. Immediate effects demonstrated increased N2O and CO2 efflux and suppressed CH4 uptake in N amended plots while P amended plots remained similar to control plots. 1- and 2-year post-application greenhouse gas and nutrient data will help to elucidate these findings.

  8. Beneficial cyanobacteria and eubacteria synergistically enhance bioavailability of soil nutrients and yield of okra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallappa Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in the rhizosphere mediate the cycling of nutrients, their enhanced mobilisation and facilitate their uptake, leading to increased root growth, biomass and yield of plants. We examined the promise of beneficial cyanobacteria and eubacteria as microbial inoculants, applied singly or in combination as consortia or biofilms, to improve growth and yields of okra. Interrelationships among the microbial activities and the micro/macro nutrient dynamics in soils and okra yield characteristics were assessed along with the changes in the soil microbiome. A significant effect of microbial inoculation on alkaline phosphatase activity was recorded both at the mid-crop and harvest stages. Microbial biomass carbon values were highest due to the Anabaena sp. - Providencia sp. (CR1 + PR3 application. The yield of okra ranged from 444.6–478.4 g−1 plant and a positive correlation (0.69 recorded between yield and root weight. The application of Azotobacter led to the highest root weight and yield. The concentration of Zn at mid-crop stage was 60–70% higher in the Azotobacter sp. and Calothrix sp. inoculated soils, as compared to uninoculated control. Iron concentration in soil was more than 2–3 folds higher than control at the mid-crop stage, especially due to the application of Anabaena-Azotobacter biofilm and Azotobacter sp. Both at the mid-crop and harvest stages, the PCR-DGGE profiles of eubacterial communities were similar among the uninoculated control, the Anabaena sp. - Providencia sp. (CW1 + PW5 and the Anabaena-Azotobacter biofilm treatments. Although the profiles of the Azotobacter, Calothrix and CR1 + PR3 treatments were identical at these stages of growth, the profile of CR1 + PR3 was clearly distinguishable. The performance of the inoculants, particularly Calothrix (T6 and consortium of Anabaena and Providencia (CR1 + PR3; T5, in terms of microbiological and nutrient data, along with generation of distinct PCR-DGGE profiles

  9. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient transport in managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in various virtual landscapes / catchment to demonstrate the capabilities of the modelling system. The modelling system was applied to simulate water and nutrient transport at the at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the

  10. Soil fertility in deserts: a review on the influence of biological soil crusts and the effect of soil surface disturbance on nutrient inputs and losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.; Phillips, S.; Duniway, M.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Sources of desert soil fertility include parent material weathering, aeolian deposition, and on-site C and N biotic fixation. While parent materials provide many soil nutrients, aeolian deposition can provide up to 75% of plant-essential nutrients including N, P, K, Mg, Na, Mn, Cu, and Fe. Soil surface biota are often sticky, and help retain wind-deposited nutrients, as well as providing much of the N inputs. Carbon inputs are from both plants and soil surface biota. Most desert soils are protected by cyanobacterial-lichen-moss soil crusts, chemical crusts and/or desert pavement. Experimental disturbances applied in US deserts show disruption of soil surfaces result in decreased N and C inputs from soil biota by up to 100%. The ability to glue aeolian deposits in place is compromised, and underlying soils are exposed to erosion. The ability to withstand wind increases with biological and physical soil crust development. While most undisturbed sites show little sediment production, disturbance by vehicles or livestock produce up to 36 times more sediment production, with soil movement initiated at wind velocities well below commonly-occurring wind speeds. Soil fines and flora are often concentrated in the top 3 mm of the soil surface. Winds across disturbed areas can quickly remove this material from the soil surface, thereby potentially removing much of current and future soil fertility. Thus, disturbances of desert soil surfaces can both reduce fertility inputs and accelerate fertility losses.

  11. Artificial neural network estimation of soil erosion and nutrient concentrations in runoff from land application areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport of sediment and nutrients from land application areas is an environmental concern. New methods are needed for estimating soil and nutrient concentrations of runoff from cropland areas on which manure is applied. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) trained with a Backpropagation (BP) algor...

  12. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanderson, M.A.; Schmidt, J.; Feldmand, C.; Herrmann, A.

    2010-01-01

    Livestock concentration areas can be significant point sources of nutrient pollution. Our objective was to determine the spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas in pastures at the farm scale, along with the distribution of soil nutrients at the individual livestock concentration area

  13. Evolution of root plasticity responses to variation in soil nutrient distribution and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Judah D; Rice, Kevin J

    2012-12-01

    Root plasticity, a trait that can respond to selective pressure, may help plants forage for nutrients in heterogeneous soils. Agricultural breeding programs have artificially selected for increased yield under comparatively homogeneous soil conditions, potentially decreasing the capacity for plasticity in crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). However, the effects of domestication on the evolution of root plasticity are essentially unknown. Using a split container approach, we examined the differences in root plasticity among three domestication levels of barley germplasm (wild, landrace, and cultivar) grown under different concentrations and distribution patterns of soil nutrients. Domestication level, nutrient concentration, and nutrient distribution interactively affected average root diameter; differential root allocation (within-plant plasticity) was greatest in wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum), especially under low nutrient levels. Correlations of within-plant root plasticity and plant size were most pronounced in modern cultivars under low-nutrient conditions. Barley plants invested more resources to root systems when grown in low-nutrient soils and allocated more roots to higher-nutrient locations. Root plasticity in barley is scale dependent and varies with domestication level. Although wild barley harbors a greater capacity for within-plant root plasticity than domesticated barley, cultivars exhibited the greatest capacity to translate within-plant plasticity into increased plant size.

  14. Do agricultural terraces and forest fires recurrence in Mediterranean afforested micro-catchments alter soil quality and soil nutrient content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Lucas-Borja, Manuel; Calsamiglia, Aleix; Fortesa, Josep; García-Comendador, Julián; Gago, Jorge; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Bioclimatic characteristics and intense human pressure promote Mediterranean ecosystems to be fire-prone. Afforestation processes resulting from the progressive land abandonment during the last decades led to greater biomass availability increasing the risk of large forest fires. Likewise, the abandonment and lack of maintenance in the terraced lands constitute a risk of land degradation in terms of soil quantity and quality. Despite the effects of fire and the abandonment of terraced lands on soil loss and physico-chemical properties are identified, it is not clearly understood how wildfires and abandonment of terraces affect soil quality and nutrients content. Microbiological soil parameters and soil enzymes activities are biomarkers of the soil microbial communitýs functional ability, which potentially enables them as indicators of change, disturbance or stress within the soil community. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of terracing (abandoned and non-abandoned) on the soil enzyme activities, microbiological soil parameters and soil nutrients dynamics in three Mediterranean afforested micro-catchments (i.e., trend with higher values in terraced plots, although differences were weaker. We conclude that terraced landscapes present poorer soil quality parameters due to land abandonment and the lack of terraced management. In addition, forest fire recurrence exacerbates soil degradation processes due to the direct effects on vegetation and soil properties.

  15. Poultry feather wastes recycling possibility as soil nutrient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Mézes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry feathers are produced in large amounts as a waste in poultry slaughterhouses. Only 60-70% of the poultry slaughterhouse products are edible for human being. This means more million tons annually worldwide (Papadopoulus et al., 1986; Williams et al., 1991; Hegedűs et al., 1998. The keratin-content of feather can be difficulty digested, so physical, chemical and/or biological pre-treatment are needed in practice, which have to be set according to the utilization method. Feather was enzymatic degraded, and then fermented in separated bioreactors. The anaerobic bioreactor system (4 digesters with 6 litre volume was controlled by ACE SCADA software running on Linux platforms. Pot scale seed germination tests were established to suggest the quantity of digested slurry to be utilized. The chosen test plants were lettuce (Lactuca sativa. In case of reproduction test Student’s t-test was applied to examine significant differences between the root lengths of the control and the treated plant species. In case of pot seed germination variance analysis with Tukey B’s and Duncan test was applied to examine significant differences between the root lengths of plants, grown on different treatments. The effect of treatments on germination ability of the plant species was expressed in the percentage of the controls. According to Student’s t-test significant difference was found between root lengths of different treatments. Based on variance analysis with Tukey B’s and Duncan tests could be detected a significant difference between the treatments. Utilization of the fermented material reduces the use of fertilizers and because of its large moisture content it reduces the watering costs. Recycle of the slaughterhouse feather and different agricultural wastes and by-products can solve three main problems: disposal of harmful materials, producing of renewable energy and soil nutrient, measuring reflectance at the certain spectral range, which can

  16. Nutrient and toxic element soil concentrations during repeated mineral and compost fertilization treatments in a Mediterranean agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldantoni, Daniela; Morra, Luigi; Saviello, Giovanni; Alfani, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural soils of semi-arid Mediterranean areas are often subjected to depletion of their chemical, physical, and biological properties. In this context, organic fertilization, in addition to providing nutrients for a longer time in respect to mineral fertilization, improves many other characteristics related to soil fertility. Moreover, the combined use of organic and mineral fertilizers may promote a more sustainable crop production. However, a concern on the long-term use of organic fertilizers arises in relation to the possible accumulation of toxic elements in soil and their transfer to human beings. For this reason, a long-term study on nutrient and toxic element total concentrations and availabilities during fertilization treatments was carried out. In particular, mineral NPK fertilized soils, soils amended with biowaste compost, soils amended with biowaste compost plus mineral nitrogen, and unfertilized soils were analyzed for 11 chemical elements. The results highlighted that temporal variations in total and bioavailable concentrations of both nutrients and toxic elements, occurring also in unfertilized soils, are wider than those related to fertilization treatments. Anyway, soil amendments with biowaste compost, alone or in combination with mineral fertilizers, reduce Cu bioavailability but improve K, Fe, Mn, and Zn availabilities, excluding at the same time a long-term accumulation in soil. Total and bioavailable toxic element concentrations (apart from available Cd) do not vary in relation to fertilization treatments.

  17. Plant Foliar Response to Soil Nutrient Availability Across Contrasting Geologic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, S. C.; Neff, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Rock derived mineral nutrients such as P, Ca, Mg, Mn, and K play a significant, but poorly understood role in the structure and function of temperate forest ecosystems. Though these nutrients are not necessarily limiting to plant growth, they are essential to plant physiological functioning. In this study, we test the hypothesis that foliar nutrients are a proxy for soil nutrient availability across sites of different underlying geologies. Specifically, we focus on the plant nutrient-use strategies of rock derived nutrients (P and K) and how they relate to soil nutrient status. In order to assess the responses of plant species to nutrient availability, we monitored above ground net primary productivity (current annual increment + litterfall), plant chemistry, and soil nutrients for a period of 24 months. This research was completed in the San Juan Mountain region of southern Colorado, where there is a high local diversity of bedrock geochemistry. Within this region, two small sub-alpine basins were chosen; a sedimentary basin composed of Mesozoic cyclic limestone, sandstone & shale and a volcanic basin composed of Tertiary rhyolite. Across these basins, geology played a significant role in explaining the variability of rock derived nutrient availability. Initial results suggest that differences in bedrock geochemistry have little influence on the aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of plants or on the chemistry of foliar materials. This inflexibility of foliar chemistry to variations in nutrient availability suggests that genetic and physiologic controls play a strong role in determining the chemical content of plant materials. An alternative hypothesis is that deposition of eolian mineral dust into subalpine systems could play a role in offsetting the reliance of vegetation on deeper bedrock derived nutrient sources. An investigation is currently underway to assess the contribution of eolian dust derived nutrients to plant nutrition using Sr as a geochemical

  18. The Status and Evaluation of Main Soil Nutrients in Xilin Gol Grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguang; SHI

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the soil nutrient contents of Xilin Gol Prairie,practical data on the main soil nutrient contents from 2006 to 2011 were statistically analyzed and integrated evaluation of soil nutrients was finished on principal component theory. The result showed that the soil nutrients of Xilin Gol Grassland were mainly organic matter,the content of total N,total P and total K were 22. 444 g / kg,1. 047 g / kg,0. 371 g /kg and 23 g / kg respectively,and the degree of variation of each other was moderate except total K’s little variability. The contents of soil nutrients were in the moderate level,in which contents of organic matter and total N were in the moderate level( Level 3),content of total P was low level( Level 5),and the content of was much high level( Level 2). The regional integrated evaluation showing that the soil nutrients of Xilinhot was the highest level and Erenhot was the lowest level; the meadow steppe was the highest following by the typical grassland and the grassland as desertification was the lowest,provided a theoretical basis for promoting the restoration of farmland to forest and pasture and the development of animal husbandry and improving the grassland productivity and reasonable utilization of grassland resources.

  19. Nutrient cycling responses to fire frequency in the Kruger National Park (South Africa) as indicated by stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranibar, J N; Macko, S A; Anderson, I C; Potgieter, A L E; Sowry, R; Shugart, H H

    2003-06-01

    Fires, which are an intrinsic feature of southern African ecosystems, produce biogenic and pyrogenic losses of nitrogen (N) from plants and soils. Because of the long history of fires in these savannas, it was hypothesized that N2 fixation by legumes balances the N losses caused by fires. In this study, the N2 fixation activity of woody legumes was estimated by analyzing foliar delta15N and proportional basal area of N2 fixing species along experimental fire gradients in the Kruger National Park (South Africa). In addition, soil carbon (C) and N pools, foliar phosphorus (P) and gross N mineralization and nitrification rates were measured, to indicate the effects of fires on nutrient stocks and the possible N cycling processes modified by fires. Although observations of increased soil C/N and mineralization rates in frequently burned plots support previous reports of N losses caused by fires, soil %N did not decrease with increasing fire frequency (except in 1 plot), suggesting that N losses are replenished in burned areas. However, relative abundance and N2 fixation of woody legumes decreased with fire frequency in two of the three fire gradients analyzed, suggesting that woody legume N2 fixation is not the mechanism that balances N losses. The relatively constant %N along fire gradients suggests that these ecosystems have other mechanisms to balance the N lost by fires, which could include inputs by atmospheric deposition and N2 fixation by forbs, grasses and soil cyanobacteria. Soil isotopic signatures have been previously used to infer patterns of fire history. However, the lack of a relationship between soil delta15N and fire frequency found in this study indicates that the effects of fires on ecosystem delta15N are unpredictable. Similar soil delta15N along fire gradients may reflect the contrasting effects of increased N gaseous emissions (which increases delta15N) and N2 fixation other than that associated with woody legumes (which lowers delta15N) on

  20. [Nutrient Characteristics and Nitrogen Forms of Rhizosphere Soils Under Four Typical Plants in the Littoral Zone of TGR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-feng; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Jian-jun; Yue, Jun-sheng

    2015-10-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), which is the largest water conservancy project ever built in tne world, produced a drawdown area of about 348.93 km2 because of water level control. The biological geochemical cycle of the soil in the drawdown zone has been changed as the result of long-term winter flooding and summer drought and vegetation covering. The loss of soil nitrogen in the drawdown zone poses a threat to the water environmental in TGR. Pengxi river, is an important anabranch, which has the largest drawdown area has been selected in the present study. The four typical vegetation, contained Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus, Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. as the control, were studied to measure nutrient characteristics and nitrogen forms of rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils in three distribution areas with different soil types (paddy soil, purple soil and fluvo-aquic soils). The variables measured included organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), hydrolysis N, available P and available K, pH, ion-exchangeable N (IEE-N), weak acid extractable N (CF-N) , iron-manganese oxides N (IMOF-N), organic matter sulfide N (OSF-N), added up four N forms for total transferable N (TF-N) and TN minus TF-N for non-transferable N (NTF-N). The results showed: (1) pH of rhizosphere soil was generally lower than that of non-rhizosphere soil under different vegetation in different type soils because the possible organic acid and H+ released form plant roots and cation absorption differences, and the OM, TP, TN and hydrolysis N of rhizosphere soil were generally higher than those of non-rhizosphere soil, and that the enrichment ratio (ER) of all the four nutrient indicators showed Cyperus rotundus > Cynodon dactylon > Zea mays L. > Anthium sibiricum. Available P showed enrichment in the rhizosphere of three natural vegetations but lose under corn, and available K, TK showed different ER in different conditions. (2) IEF-N CF

  1. Remediation of Petroleum-contaminated Soil Using Bulrush Straw Powder, Biochar and Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Fayun; Rong, Xiangmin; Song, Haixing; Chen, Jiabo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the remediation efficiency of petroleum-contaminated soil from an oilfield using different types of remediation treatments under laboratory conditions. Compared with unamended soil as the control treatment (T1), soil samples were amended with bulrush straw powder (T2), with biochar alone (T3) and in combination with nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) (T4). The remediation experiment was carried out for 8 weeks. The extent of hydrocarbon degradation was monitored gravimetrically, and the residual oil fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography. The characteristics of the polluted soil (water-holding capacity and nutrients) were improved significantly by biochar addition (p soil can be remediated efficiently by adding biochar and nutrients simultaneously, and this combination of remediation was superior to that observed with added bulrush straw powder.

  2. Effects of nitrogen deposition on soil sulfur cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Liqiong; Wen, Li; Luo, Pan; Liu, Lu; Yang, Yi; Wang, Kelin; Li, Dejun

    2016-11-01

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been found to alter processes and functions of terrestrial ecosystems including the biogeochemical cycling of N and other elements, e.g., phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), and potassium (K). Nevertheless, how N deposition changes sulfur (S) cycling is largely unknown. Based on a meta-analysis and a lab N addition experiment, here we show that N addition significantly suppresses the activity of soil arylsulfatase, which is a major enzyme involved in the mineralization of organic S. The evidence suggests that N-induced decrease in soil pH is responsible for the decrease of arylsulfatase activity. Soil buffering capacity plays a critical role in mediating the extent of arylsulfatase activity response to N inputs via its regulation on soil pH. Our results suggest that N deposition may slow down S cycling by suppressing soil organic S mineralization.

  3. Runoff, Erosion and Nutrient Sedimentation due Vegetative Soil Conservation Applied on Oil Palm Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahrul Fuady

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Land cover crops play an important role in influencing erosion. Cover crops provide protection against the destruction of soil aggregates by rain and runoff. This research aims to study the effectiveness of vegetation as soil conservation in controlling erosion and runoff. This study was a field experiment on erosion plots measuring 10 m x 5 m were arranged in Split Plot design with replications as blocks, consists of a combination of two factors: the age of the oil palm and slope as the first factor, and vegetative soil conservation techniques as a second factor. The results showed the soil conservation techniques in oil palm cultivation can reduce the rate of surface runoff, soil erosion and nutrient loss. Soil conservation with upland rice planted with soybean sequence + strip Mucuna bracteata (T3 most effectively reduce runoff and prevent soil erosion and nutrient loss.

  4. Plant and soil nutrient stoichiometry along primary ecological successions: Is there any link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palo, Francesca; Fornara, Dario A

    2017-01-01

    Ecological stoichiometry suggests that plant Nitrogen (N)-to-Phosphorus (P) ratios respond to changes in both soil N:P stoichiometry and soil N and P availability. Thus we would expect that soil and plant N:P ratios be significantly related along natural gradients of soil development such as those associated with primary ecological successions. Here we explicitly search for linkages between plant and soil N:P stoichiometry along four primary successions distributed across Europe. We measured N and P content in soils and plant compartments (leaf, stem and root) of 72 wild plant species distributed along two sand dune and two glacier successions where soil age ranges from few to thousand years old. Overall we found that soil N:P ratios strongly increased along successional stages, however, plant N:P ratios were neither related to soil N:P stoichiometry nor to changes in soil N and P availability. Instead changes in plant nutrient stoichiometry were "driven" by plant-functional-group identity. Not only N:P ratios differed between legumes, grasses and forbs but each of these plant functional groups maintained N:P ratios relatively constant across pioneer, middle and advanced successional stages. Our evidence is that soil nutrient stoichiometry may not be a good predictor of changes in plant N:P stoichiometry along natural primary ecological successions, which have not reached yet a retrogressive stage. This could be because wild-plants rely on mechanisms of internal nutrient regulation, which make them less dependent to changes in soil nutrient availability under unpredictable environmental conditions. Further studies need to clarify what underlying evolutionary and eco-physiological mechanisms determine changes in nutrient stoichiometry in plant species distributed across natural environmental gradients.

  5. Biological Cycles of Mineral Elements in a Young Mixed Stand in Abandoned Mining Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Lun Tian; Wen-Hua Xiang; Wen-De Yan; Wen-Xing Kang; Xiang-Wen Deng; Zhu Fan

    2007-01-01

    Phytoremediation as a sustainable and inexpensive technology based on the removal of pollutants from the environment by plants is becoming an increasingly important objective in plant research. In this study, biological cycles of five nutrient elements (N, P, K, Ca, and Mg) and eight heavy metal elements (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ni, Pb and Co) were examined in young paniculed goldraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm) and common elaeocarpus (Elaeocarpus decipens) mixed stands in an abandoned mining area. We found that after vegetation restoration in abandoned mining areas, the organic matter and concentrations of nutrient elements were significantly increased and the heavy metal elements were significantly decreased, the annual retention, uptake and return were 75.0, 115.4, and 40.3 kg/hm2 for nutrient elements, and 1 878.0,3 231.0 and 1 353.0 g/hm2 for heavy metal elements, respectively, with the utilization coefficient, cycling coefficient and turnover rate of 0.92, 0.35 and 0.32 for nutrient elements, and 1.24, 0.42 and 1.92 for heavy metal elements, respectively.Our results suggested that the vegetation restoration in abandoned mining areas had significant effects in improving environmental conditions, enhancing soil available nutrients, and ensuring human health.

  6. Vegetation Change and Soil Nutrient Distribution along an Oasis-Desert Transitional Zone in Northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have focused on soil nutrient heterogeneity and islands of fertility in arid ecosystems.However,few have been conducted on an oasis-desert transitional zone where there is a vegetation pattern changing from shrubs to annual herbs.The goal of the present study was to understand vegetation and soil nutrient heterogenity along an oasis-desert transitional zone in northwestern China.Three replicated sampling belts were selected at 200 m Intervals along the transitional zone.Twenty-one quadrats(10 × 10m) at 50 m intervals were located along each sampling belt.The vegetation cover was estimated through the quadrats,where both the soil under the canopy and the open soil were sampled simultaneously.The dominated shrub was Haloxylon ammodendron in the areas close to the oasis and Nitraria tangutorum dominated the areas close to the desert.In general,along the transitional zone the vegetation cover decreased within 660 m,increased above 660 m and decreased again above 1020 m(close to the desert).The soil nutrients(organic matter,total N,NO3- and NH4+)showed significant differences along the zone.The soil nutrients except the soil NH4+ under the canopy were higher than those in open soil,confirming "Islands of fertility" or nutrient enrichment.Only a slight downward trend of the level of "islands of fertility" for soil organic matter appeared in the area within 900 m.Soil organic matter both under canopy and in interspace showed a positive correlation with the total vegetation cover,however,there was no significant correlation between the other soil nutrients and the total vegetation cover.We also analyzed the relationship between the shrubs and annuals and the soil nutrients along the zone.Similarly,there was no significant correlation between them,except soil organic matter with the annuals.The results implied that annual plants played an important role in soil nutrient enrichment in arid ecosystem.

  7. Energy and nutrient cycling in pig production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Peter J.

    United States pig production is centered in Iowa and is a major influence on the economic and ecological condition of that community. A pig production system includes buildings, equipment, production of feed ingredients, feed processing, and nutrient management. Although feed is the largest single input into a pig production system, nearly 30% of the non-solar energy use of a conventional--mechanically ventilated buildings with liquid manure handling--pig production system is associated with constructing and operating the pig facility. Using bedded hoop barns for gestating sows and grow-finish pigs reduces construction resource use and construction costs of pig production systems. The hoop based systems also requires approximately 40% less non-solar energy to operate as the conventional system although hoop barn-based systems may require more feed. The total non-solar energy input associated with one 136 kg pig produced in a conventional farrow-to-finish system in Iowa and fed a typical corn-soybean meal diet that includes synthetic lysine and exogenous phytase is 967.9 MJ. Consuming the non-solar energy results in emissions of 79.8 kg CO2 equivalents. Alternatively producing the same pig in a system using bedded hoop barns for gestating sows and grow-finish pigs requires 939.8 MJ/pig and results in emission of 70.2 kg CO2 equivalents, a reduction of 3 and 12% respectively. Hoop barn-based swine production systems can be managed to use similar or less resources than conventional confinement systems. As we strive to optimally allocate non-solar energy reserves and limited resources, support for examining and improving alternative systems is warranted.

  8. Impact of Microbial Inoculants on Microbial Quantity, Enzyme Activity and Available Nutrient Content in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-jie; Duan Xue-jiao; Ma Na; Sun Tao; Xu Jing-gang

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the impact of application of microbial inoculants, compared with no microbial fertilizer, on enzyme activity, microbial biomass and available nutrient contents in paddy soil in Heilongjiang Province. The application ofsoil phosphorus activator was able to increase the quantity of bacteria and fungi in soil, but its effect on actinomycetes in soil was not significant. The application of microbial inoculants increased the urease and sucrase activities in soil over the growing season, but only at the maturing stage soil acid phosphatase activity was enhanced with the applying soil phosphorus activator. The application of soil phosphorus activator increased alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available phosphorus contents in soil, but did not increase available potassium content in soil. The optimal microbial inoculant application rate as applied as soil phosphorus activator was 7.5 kg•hm-2.

  9. Comparison of Nutrients and Salinity on Phenanthrene Removal from Polluted Soil 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasoumeh Ravanipour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives:The poor accessibility of microorganisms to PAHs in soil has limited success in the process of bioremediation as an effective method for removing pollutants from soils. Different physicochemical factors are effective on the rate of biodegradation. The main objective of this study is to assess effects of nutrient and salinity on phenanthrene removal from polluted soils.Materials and Methods:The soil having no organic and microbial pollution was first artificially polluted with phenanthrene then nutrients and salinity solution in two concentrations were added to it in order to have the proportion of 10% w:v (soil: water. After that a microbial mixture enable to degrade phenanthrene was added to the slurry and was aerated. Finally, the residual concentration of Phenanthrene in the soil was extracted by ultrasonic and was analyzed using GC. We measured the microbial populationusing MPN test. This study was conducted based on the two level full factorial design of experiment. Results: MPN test showed that the trend of microbial growth has experienced a lag growth. The full factorial design indicated that nutrient had the maximum effect on bioremediation; the rate of phenanthrene removal in the maximum nutrients - minimum salinity solution was 75.14%.Conclusion: This study revealed that the more nutrient concentration increases, the more degradation will be happened by microorganisms in the soils. However, salinity in the concentration used had no effect on inhabitation or promoting on the Phenanthrene removal.

  10. Managing Soil Biota-Mediated Decomposition and Nutrient Mineralization in Sustainable Agroecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann K. Whalen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of organic residues into plant-available nutrients occurs through decomposition and mineralization and is mediated by saprophytic microorganisms and fauna. Of particular interest is the recycling of the essential plant elements—N, P, and S—contained in organic residues. If organic residues can supply sufficient nutrients during crop growth, a reduction in fertilizer use is possible. The challenge is synchronizing nutrient release from organic residues with crop nutrient demands throughout the growing season. This paper presents a conceptual model describing the pattern of nutrient release from organic residues in relation to crop nutrient uptake. Next, it explores experimental approaches to measure the physical, chemical, and biological barriers to decomposition and nutrient mineralization. Methods are proposed to determine the rates of decomposition and nutrient release from organic residues. Practically, this information can be used by agricultural producers to determine if plant-available nutrient supply is sufficient to meet crop demands at key growth stages or whether additional fertilizer is needed. Finally, agronomic practices that control the rate of soil biota-mediated decomposition and mineralization, as well as those that facilitate uptake of plant-available nutrients, are identified. Increasing reliance on soil biological activity could benefit crop nutrition and health in sustainable agroecosystems.

  11. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and their relationships with soil nutrients in Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Youjun; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Yu, Xiaojun

    2006-12-01

    The study on the soil microbial biomass and nutrient status under native broadleaved forest and Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations at the Huitong National Research Station of Forest Ecosystem showed that after the native broadleaved forest was replaced by mono-cultured C. lanceolata or C. lanceolata was planted continuously, soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool decreased greatly. In 0 - 10 cm soil layer, the concentrations of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen in broadleaved forest were 800.5 and 84.5 mg x kg(-1) , being 1.90 and 1.03 times as much as those in the first rotation of C. lanceolata plantation, and 2.16 and 1.27 times as much as those in the second rotation of the plantation, respectively, while in 10 - 20 cm soil layer, the microbial carbon and nitrogen in broad-leaved forest were 475.4 and 63.3 mg x kg(-1), being 1.86 and 1.60 times as much as those in the first rotation, and 2.11 and 1.76 times as much as those in the second rotation, respectively. Soil nutrient pools such as total nitrogen, total potassium, NH4(+) -N, and available potassium also declined after the C. lanceolata plantation replaced native broad-leaved forest, or C. lanceolata was planted continuously. Less litter and its slower decay rate in pure C. lanceolata plantation were the crucial factors leading to the decrease of soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool in this area, and human disturbance, especially slash-burning and site preparation, was the another factor leading to the decrease. There were significant positive correlations between soil microbial carbon and nitrogen and soil nutrients. To improve soil quality and maintain sustainable productivity, some measures including planting mixed conifer with hardwood, preserving residues after harvest, and adopting scientific site preparation should be taken.

  12. [Effect of Basic Soil Nutrients and Inorganic Elements on Quality of Pseudostellaria heterophylla Root].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chuan-zhi; Zhou, Tao; Jiang, Wei-ke; Guo, Lan-ping; Xiao, Cheng-hong

    2015-04-01

    To study the effect of basic soil nutrients and inorganic elements on the quality of Pseudostellaria heterophylla root, in order to reveal the inner link and to provide the scientific basis for rational cultivation of Pseudostellaria heterophylla. The medicinal materials of Pseudostellariae Radix and soil samples from 15 habitats were collected, and three essential nutrients, five inorganic elements in the soil and the medicinal contents of polysaccharides and pseudostellarin B were determined. Then using SPSS software to analyze its relevance. Significant difference of pseudostellarin B content was found in samples from different provinces, which was not detected in the sample of Fujian Province, but the difference of polysaccharides content was small, at around 30%. Basic nutrients and inorganic elements from the soil for comparison, Pseudostellaria heterophylla from different habitats and cultivation of soil nutrients and inorganic elements contents were very uneven. The contents of Pb, Cu and B in the soil sample of Guizhou Province were the highest, and Cr and available phosphorus content in the soil sample of Shandong Province, Zn and effective potassium in the soil sample of Fujian Province all were the highest. With reference to the Soil Environment Quality Standard (GB15618-1995), most of Pseudostellaria heterophylla soil reached the national standard. From the point of soil elements and medicinal materials quality correlation, pseudostellarin B content and polysaccharide content had no significant correlation between each element in the soil. The ammonium nitrogen, effective potassium, available phosphorus and elements of Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and B in the soil have no direct effect on effective component content of medicinal materials. 60% of Pseudostellaria heterophylla origin is generally lack of B in soil. It should be appropriate to increase the percentage of boron in the fertilizer management to ensure the quality of Pseudostellaria heterophylla root.

  13. Features of soil enzyme activities and the number of microorganisms in plantations and their relationships with soil nutrients in the Qinling Mountains,. China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang FU; Zengwen LIU; Fangfang CUI

    2009-01-01

    We studied the distribution of soil nutrients, the number of soil microorganisms, soil enzyme activities, and their relationships in pure and mixed plantations. Soil enzyme activities, the number of soil microorganisms, and soil nutrients were measured in plantations of Chinese pine (Pinustabulaeformis), larch (Larix kaempferi), sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata), Manchurian catalpa (Catalpa fargesii), and mixed plantations in the Qinling Mountains, China. Compared with pure plantations, the conifer-broad-leaved broadleaf mixed plantations increased total N, available N, total P, available K, and organic matter in the forest soil; promoted the activities ofinvertase and urease by 16.7% and 53.8%; and increased the total amount of soil microorganisms by 95.9% and the number of bacteria by 104.5% (p<0.05). The correlations between soil enzymes, number of microorganisms, and soil nutrients were significant(p<0.05), and the correlations between the number of soil bacteria and basic nutrient prosperities (total N, available N, available K, and organic matter (OM)) were significant or highly significant. The correlations between the number of soil actinomycetes, and soil total N, available N, OM, and pH were also significant or highly significant. A suitable mixture of planted conifers and broad-leaved species improves the quality and amount of soil nutrients, increases the number of soil microorganisms and changes their redistribution. The change of soil enzymes and the number of soil microorganisms are indications of the change tendency of soil nutrients.

  14. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and Im

  15. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and

  16. Nutrient and carbon cycling in the Kafue River (Zambia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbruegg, R.; Senn, D.; Lehmann, M.; Wamulume, J.; Nyambe, I.; Wehrli, B.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Kafue River in central Zambia flows through the Kafue Flats (830 sq. km), a sensitive floodplain ecosystem (Ramsar site), and serves as an important subsistence fishery. The lower Kafue River (Qavg ~ 300 m3/s) is heavily impacted by two dams that regulate flow and flooding, and in so doing have substantially degraded the habitats. While the hydrology and ecology of the system have been studied extensively in some sections, there have been no systematic studies of the dam impacts on floodplain biogeochemistry. In May 2008 we initiated a study of C, N, and P cycling in the lower Kafue River through sampling at 10-20 km resolution along 300 km of river. Low inorganic nitrogen levels (40 uM), suggesting that the riverine N budget is dominated by organic N. Phosphate concentrations increased by a factor of 4 along the river (0.2 uM to 0.8 uM), and transitioned from representing only a small fraction of total P upstream to accounting for nearly 100% of total P at downstream stations. Along one short (35 km; travel time ~ 16 h), relatively pristine stretch of river with a substantial flow rate (400 m3/s) and no visible tributaries, dissolved oxygen levels decreased from >5 mg/l to 1 mg/l. A drop in pH from (7.9 to 7.2) accompanied the sharp oxygen decline, consistent with respiration occurring either within the river or in the adjacent floodplain. Low dissolved oxygen levels (<2 mg/l). persisted for another 150 km downstream despite reaeration. This presentation will explore in greater detail the factors contributing to this persistent low oxygen stretch in the Kafue River, along with an exploration of N, C, and P cycling in the system

  17. Short communication: A laboratory study to validate the impact of the addition of Alnus nepalensis leaf litter on carbon and nutrients mineralization in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAURAV MISHRA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mishra G, Giri K, Dutta A, Hazarika S and Borgohain P. 2015. A laboratory study to validate the impact of the addition of Alnus nepalensis leaf litter on carbon and nutrients mineralization in soil. Nusantara Bioscience 8: 5-7. Plant litter or residues can be used as soil amendment to maintain the carbon stock and soil fertility. The amount and rate of mineralization depends on biochemical composition of plant litter. Alnus nepalensis (Alder is known for its symbiotic nitrogen fixation and capability to restore fertility of degraded lands. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 60 days under controlled conditions to validate the carbon and nutrients mineralization potential of alder litter. Soil fertility indicators, i.e. soil organic carbon (SOC, available nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P, and available potassium (K were analyzed using standard procedures. Significant differences were observed in the soil properties after addition of litter. Nutrient composition of alder litter was found superior by providing significantly higher organic matter and helped in better nutrient cycling. Therefore, alder based land use system may be replicated in other degraded lands or areas for productivity enhancement which is important for sustaining biodiversity and soil fertility.

  18. Connecting the cycles: Impact of sediment, carbon and nutrient erosion on GHG emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    The role of agriculture in generating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the use of fertilizers and fossil fuels is well documented. The negative impacts of soil erosion on agricultural land and its productivity have also been studied extensively. The lateral movement of soil through terrestrial ecosystems has also been recognized as a significant flux of C within the global C cycle. Soil erosion removes approximately 0.5 Gt of C/a from agricultural land. Much of this C is deposited in the landscape, effectively burying the organic matter from the atmosphere and taking it, at least for an unspecified time, out of the C exchange between soil and atmosphere. Such calculations raise the notion that soil erosion generates an unintentional benefit for climate, owing to the long-term burial of soil organic C. But limiting the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on climate change to organic C burial ignores, apart from economic and social damages, the coupling between biogeochemical cycles. For example, the eroded N has to be replaced, at least in part by artificial fertilizers, to maintain soil fertility. At this point the sediment, C and N cycles meet, because the production of fertilizer generates greenhouse gases. The production of one ton of fertilizer generates on the order of 850 kg of CO2 (West and Marland, 2002). Applying this number to the 0.5 Gt C erosion estimate, the amount of N lost owing to erosion each year yields CO2 emissions of 0.02-0.04 Pg/a. These emissions correspond to 15-30% of the organic C buried owing to soil erosion. In this presentation, the full complexity of biogeochemical cycling on agricultural land is explored and connections between cycles which require consideration for a full GHG emission balance of soil erosion on agricultural land are identified.

  19. Hydrologic connectivity to streams increases nitrogen and phosphorus inputs and cycling in soils of created and natural floodplain wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kristin L; Noe, Gregory B; Ahn, Changwoo

    2013-07-01

    Greater connectivity to stream surface water may result in greater inputs of allochthonous nutrients that could stimulate internal nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling in natural, restored, and created riparian wetlands. This study investigated the effects of hydrologic connectivity to stream water on soil nutrient fluxes in plots ( = 20) located among four created and two natural freshwater wetlands of varying hydrology in the Piedmont physiographic province of Virginia. Surface water was slightly deeper; hydrologic inputs of sediment, sediment-N, and ammonium were greater; and soil net ammonification, N mineralization, and N turnover were greater in plots with stream water classified as their primary water source compared with plots with precipitation or groundwater as their primary water source. Soil water-filled pore space, inputs of nitrate, and soil net nitrification, P mineralization, and denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) were similar among plots. Soil ammonification, N mineralization, and N turnover rates increased with the loading rate of ammonium to the soil surface. Phosphorus mineralization and ammonification also increased with sedimentation and sediment-N loading rate. Nitrification flux and DEA were positively associated in these wetlands. In conclusion, hydrologic connectivity to stream water increased allochthonous inputs that stimulated soil N and P cycling and that likely led to greater retention of sediment and nutrients in created and natural wetlands. Our findings suggest that wetland creation and restoration projects should be designed to allow connectivity with stream water if the goal is to optimize the function of water quality improvement in a watershed.

  20. Effects of litter addition and warming on soil carbon, nutrient pools and microbial communities in a subarctic heath ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2008-01-01

    Climatic warming leads to the expansion of deciduous shrubs and trees in the Arctic. This leads to higher leaf litter inputs, which together with warming may alter the rate of carbon and nutrient cycling in the arctic ecosystems. We assessed effects of factorial warming and additional litter...... on the soil ecosystem of a subarctic heath in a 7-year-long field experiment. Fine root biomass, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total C concentration increased in response to warming, which probably was a result of the increased vegetation cover. Litter addition increased the concentration of inorganic P...... in the uppermost 5 cm soil, while decreasing the pool of total P per unit area of the organic profile and having no significant effects on N concentrations or pools. Microbial biomass C and N were unaffected by the treatments, while the microbial biomass P increased significantly with litter addition. Soil...

  1. Soil organic matter and nitrogen cycling in response to harvesting, mechanical site preparation, and fertilization in a wetland with a mineral substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. McLaughlin; Margaret R. Gale; Martin F. Jurgensen; Carl C. Trettin

    2000-01-01

    Forested wetlands are becoming an important timber resource in the Upper Great Lakes Region of the US. However, there is limited information on soil nutrient cycling responses to harvesting and post-harvest manipulations (site preparation and fertilization). The objective of this study was to examine cellulose decomposition, nitrogen mineralization, and soil solution...

  2. Estimating the relative nutrient uptake from different soil depths in Quercus robur, Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göransson, Hans; Wallander, Håkan; Ingerslev, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of fine roots and external ectomycorrhizal mycelium of three species of trees was determined down to a soil depth of 55 cm to estimate the relative nutrient uptake capacity of the trees from different soil layers. In addition, a root bioassay was performed to estimate the nutrient...... or spruce roots was not influenced by soil depth. In modelling the nutrient sustainability of forest soils, the utilization of nutrient resources in deep soil layers has been found to be a key factor. The present study shows that the more shallow-rooted spruce can have a similar capacity to take up...

  3. Costs of Nutrient Losses in Priceless Soils Eroded From the Highlands of Northwestern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreselassie, Yihenew; Belay, Yihenew

    2014-05-01

    Soils formation is a geomorphic process that takes place through the interaction of soil forming factors in several hundreds and thousands of years. However, land degradation and soil erosion is consistently taking place in the horn of Africa washing away this priceless product in short period of time. The scale of the problem dramatically increased due to the increase in deforestation, overgrazing, over-cultivation, inappropriate farming practices, and increasing human population. Several research results were published in the region showing the extent of land degradation and soil loss. However, little attempt has been done to estimate the nutrient loss in monitory terms which made it difficult for policy makers to properly understand the extent of the problem. A study was, therefore, conducted in 2011 to estimate soil and nutrient losses caused by water erosion and predict nutrient replacement costs on different land use types and slope classes at Harfetay watershed, Northwestern Ethiopia. The revised soil loss equation (RUSLE) was used to estimate the soil loss from the different land uses and slope classes in watershed. Moreover, nutrient loss from similar units was calculated by multiplying the in situ nutrient concentration of soil samples by the estimated soil loss using RUSLE. The replacement costs of nutrient losses were calculated by multiplying the nutrient loss with the price of available nutrients in urea and diammonium phosphate. The estimate of the RUSLE indicated that the average soil losses in the study watershed were 119 tons ha-1 year-1 for non-conserved crop land, 23 tons for conserved farmlands, 23 tons for forest and shrub lands, 19 tons for grazing lands, and 6 tons for plantation forest. The mean soil loss for lower slope classes (30%) were 30.11, 48.09 and 57.22 tons ha-1 year-1, respectively. The highest losses of total nitrogen (154.7 kg ha-1 year-1), available phosphorus (1.84 kg ha-1 year-1), and organic matter (1677.9 kg ha-1 year-1

  4. Evidence of soil nutrient availability as the proximate constraint on growth of treeline trees in northwest Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Ellison, Sarah B Z; McNown, Robert W; Brownlee, Annalis H; Sveinbjörnsson, Bjartmar

    2015-03-01

    The position of the Arctic treeline, which is a key regulator of surface energy exchange and carbon cycling, is widely thought to be controlled by temperature. Here, we present evidence that soil nutrient availability, rather than temperature, may be the proximate control on growth of treeline trees at our study site in northwest Alaska. We examined constraints on growth and allocation of white spruce in three contrasting habitats. The habitats had similar aboveground climates, but soil temperature declined from the riverside terrace to the forest to the treeline. We identified six lines of evidence that conflict with the hypothesis of direct temperature control and/or point to the importance of soil nutrient availability. First, the magnitude of aboveground growth declined from the terrace to the forest to the treeline, along gradients of diminishing soil nitrogen (N) availability and needle N concentration. Second, peak rates of branch extension, main stem radial and fine-root growth were generally not coincident with seasonal air and soil temperature maxima. At the treeline, in particular, rates of aboveground and fine-root growth declined well before air and soil temperatures reached their seasonal peaks. Third, in contrast with the hypothesis of temperature-limited growth, growing season average net photosynthesis was positively related to the sum of normalized branch extension, main stem radial and fine-root growth across trees and sites. Fourth, needle nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was significantly higher on the terrace, where growth was greatest. Fifth, annual branch extension growth was positively related to snow depth, consistent with the hypothesis that deeper snow promotes microbial activity and greater soil nutrient availability. Finally, the tree ring record revealed a large growth increase during late 20th-century climate warming on the terrace, where soil N availability is relatively high. Meanwhile, trees in the forest and at the

  5. Carbon sequestration and plant nutrients in soil in different land types in Thingvellir Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdóttir, María; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Mankasingh, Utra

    2015-04-01

    Special properties of volcanic soils (andisol) that is most common in Iceland can sequestrate considerably more carbon (C) that other types of soils. A mellow developed andisol with natural ecosystem such as birch forest or grass- and heathland is presumably to be fertile and sequestrate a lot of carbon. Coniferous tree species have been imported to Iceland for large scale utilisation in Icelandic forestry and is therefore an imported species/ecosystem. Abroad it has been noticed that coniferous trees acidify soil and change the properties of the soil so other species cannot thrive in it. The Icelandic Forest service is aiming tenfold the coverage of forests in Iceland before the year 2100 but about 50% of tree species that the institution uses is coniferous species. It is therefore important to research the soil due to the plant types that are planted in the soil. The aim of this project is to compare soil properties, soil nutrients and soil sequestration in heathland, birch forest and coniferous forest in Thingvellir national park in Iceland. Heathland and birch forest represent the natural ecosystem but coniferous forest imported ecosystem. Carbon (C) in soil will be measured, proportion of carbon and nitrogen (C:N), respiration from soil (CO2) and live green biomass and organic matter in the soil. The speed of decomposition of organic matter will be estimated. Important nutrients, pH and cation exchange capacity will be measured among other physical properties as bulk density, grain size and water holding capacity of the soil.

  6. Root growth and plant biomass in Lolium perenne exploring a nutrient-rich patch in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryoji; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2008-11-01

    We investigated soil exploration by roots and plant growth in a heterogeneous environment to determine whether roots can selectively explore a nutrient-rich patch, and how nutrient heterogeneity affects biomass allocation and total biomass before a patch is reached. Lolium perenne L. plants were grown in a factorial experiment with combinations of fertilization (heterogeneous and homogeneous) and day of harvest (14, 28, 42, or 56 days after transplanting). The plant in the heterogeneous treatment was smaller in its mean total biomass, and allocated more biomass to roots. The distributions of root length and root biomass in the heterogeneous treatment did not favor the nutrient-rich patch, and did not correspond to the patchy distribution of inorganic nitrogen. Specific root length (length/biomass) was higher and root elongation was more extensive both laterally and vertically in the heterogeneous treatment. These characteristics may enable plants to acquire nutrients efficiently and increase the probability of encountering nutrient-rich patches in a heterogeneous soil. However, heterogeneity of soil nutrients would hold back plant growth before a patch was reached. Therefore, although no significant selective root placement in the nutrient-rich patch was observed, plant growth before reaching nutrient-rich patches differed between heterogeneous and homogeneous environments.

  7. Substrate and nutrient limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in temperate forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Norman; J.E. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbes control the rate-limiting step of nitrification, a critical ecosystem process, which affects retention and mobility of nitrogen in soil ecosystems. This study investigated substrate (NH4þ) and nutrient (K and P) limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in temperate forest soils at Coweeta Hydrologic...

  8. Impact of FGD gypsum on soil fertility and plant nutrient uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of FGD gypsum is thought to improve soil productivity and increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of FGD gypsum on yield, plant nutrient uptake and soil productivity. The study was conducted on an established bermudagrass pasture. Poultry litter was applied...

  9. Fungi benefit from two decades of increased nutrient availability in tundra heath soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Bååth, Erland

    2013-01-01

    If microbial degradation of carbon substrates in arctic soil is stimulated by climatic warming, this would be a significant positive feedback on global change. With data from a climate change experiment in Northern Sweden we show that warming and enhanced soil nutrient availability, which...

  10. Soil and vegetation nutrient response to bison carcasses in Bialowieza Primeval Forest, Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, C.; Selva, N.; Teurlings, I.J.M.; Skarpe, C.; Linnell, J.D.C.; Andersen, R.

    2007-01-01

    Ungulate carcasses can have important effects on the surrounding soil and vegetation. The impact of six carcasses of European bison (Bison bonasus) was investigated for the first time in a natural temperate forest (Bialeowieza, Poland) by measuring soil and plant nutrient concentrations along a grad

  11. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik Fred; Flores-Alsina, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating stra...

  12. Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the objective to evaluate the changes in the Oosterschelde ecosys

  13. Structure and activity of lacustrine sediment bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, Gilberto Jorge; Terada, Akihiko; Ribeiro, Daniel C;

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the bacterial community structure in sediments is essential to better design restoration strategies for eutrophied lakes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to quantify the abundance and activity of bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycling in sediments from four Azorean ...

  14. Biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace metals in the sediment of Haringvliet lake: reponse to salinization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canavan, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines sediment redox processes associated with organic matter degradation and their impact on the cycling of nutrients (N, P) and trace metals (Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn). Our study site, Haringvliet Lake, is located in the Rhine-Meuse River Delta in the southwest of The Netherlands. This wa

  15. Biogeochemical Cycling of Nutrients and Trace Metals in the Sediment of Haringvliet Lake: Response to Salinization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canavan, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines sediment redox processes associated with organic matter degradation and their impact on the cycling of nutrients (N, P) and trace metals (Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn). Our study site, Haringvliet Lake, is located in the Rhine-Meuse River Delta in the southwest of The Netherlands. This wa

  16. Precision control of soil N cycling via soil functional zone management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing the soil nitrogen (N) cycle is a major component of agricultural sustainability. Soil functional zone management (SFZM), a novel framework of agroecosystem management, may improve soil N management compared with conventional and no-tillage approaches by focusing on the timing and location (...

  17. Biochar from Swine solids and digestate influence nutrient dynamics and carbon dioxide release in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Rosa; Castelli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Large amounts of livestock manure solids are expected to become available in the near future due to the development of technologies for the separation of the solid fraction of animal effluents. The charring of manure solids for biochar (BC) production represents an opportunity for recycling organic matter (OM) of high nutrient value. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the suitability of BC from swine solids (SS) to improve soil fertility through nutrient supply and decomposition of the OM incorporated into soil and to verify a possible interaction effect on soil nutrient dynamics between digestate application and soil amendment with BC. We monitored at laboratory scale the soil mineral nitrogen (N) and Olsen phosphorus (P) content, and the cumulative carbon dioxide (CO-C) release in treatments with or without a supply of digestate obtained from a biogas plant. The experiment was performed in laboratory microcosms during a 3-mo incubation period. Compared treatments were soil amendments with SS, BC from SS, wood chip, BC from wood chip, and soil with no amendment, each of them with and without incorporation of digestate (10 treatments in total). Soil N levels were unaffected by BC amendments and only increased temporarily when digestate was applied to soil amended with SS or BC from SS. For the same N content, the BC from SS supplied much more P than the nontreated OM. The amount of cumulative CO-C released from soil with BC with or without digestate did not differ from that in the unamended control soil and was lower than that in the soils with noncharred amendments. Soil amendment with BC from SS does not modify soil N availability, whereas it increases the content of P available for crops and reduces the release of CO-C from digestate applied to soil for agricultural purposes.

  18. Differential nutrient limitation of soil microbial biomass and metabolic quotients (qCO2): is there a biological stoichiometry of soil microbes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Wyatt H; Richardson, Curtis J

    2013-01-01

    Variation in microbial metabolism poses one of the greatest current uncertainties in models of global carbon cycling, and is particularly poorly understood in soils. Biological Stoichiometry theory describes biochemical mechanisms linking metabolic rates with variation in the elemental composition of cells and organisms, and has been widely observed in animals, plants, and plankton. However, this theory has not been widely tested in microbes, which are considered to have fixed ratios of major elements in soils. To determine whether Biological Stoichiometry underlies patterns of soil microbial metabolism, we compiled published data on microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) pools in soils spanning the global range of climate, vegetation, and land use types. We compared element ratios in microbial biomass pools to the metabolic quotient qCO2 (respiration per unit biomass), where soil C mineralization was simultaneously measured in controlled incubations. Although microbial C, N, and P stoichiometry appeared to follow somewhat constrained allometric relationships at the global scale, we found significant variation in the C∶N∶P ratios of soil microbes across land use and habitat types, and size-dependent scaling of microbial C∶N and C∶P (but not N∶P) ratios. Microbial stoichiometry and metabolic quotients were also weakly correlated as suggested by Biological Stoichiometry theory. Importantly, we found that while soil microbial biomass appeared constrained by soil N availability, microbial metabolic rates (qCO2) were most strongly associated with inorganic P availability. Our findings appear consistent with the model of cellular metabolism described by Biological Stoichiometry theory, where biomass is limited by N needed to build proteins, but rates of protein synthesis are limited by the high P demands of ribosomes. Incorporation of these physiological processes may improve models of carbon cycling and understanding of the effects of

  19. Farmers' Perception of Integrated Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management for Sustainable Crop Production: A Study of Rural Areas in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouque, Md. Golam; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to determine farmers' perception of integrated soil fertility and nutrient management for sustainable crop production. Integrated soil fertility (ISF) and nutrient management (NM) is an advanced approach to maintain soil fertility and to enhance crop productivity. A total number of 120 farmers from eight villages in four districts…

  20. Major nutrients, heavy metals and PBDEs in soils after long-term sewage sludge application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Longhua; Li, Zhu; Ren, Jing; Shen, Libo; Wang, Songfeng; Luo, Yongming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation; Cheng, Miaomiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Graduate School; Christie, Peter [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast (United Kingdom). Agri-Environment Branch

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Two contrasting soils receiving long-term application of commercial sewage sludge fertilizers in China were investigated to determine the concentrations of selected nutrients, heavy metals (HMs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) present to evaluate the impact of sewage sludge fertilizer on soil fertility and environmental risk. Materials and methods: Soil samples were collected from Tangshan City, Hebei province and Ningbo City, Zhejiang province and divided into two portions, one of which was air-dried and sieved through 2-, 0.25- and 0.149-mm nylon mesh for determination of nutrients and heavy metals. The other portion was frozen at -20 C, freeze-dried and sieved through 2-mm nylon mesh for PBDE analysis. The concentrations of nutrients, heavy metals and PBDEs were determined in all samples. Results and discussion: Concentrations of nutrients and heavy metals in soils amended with low rates of sewage sludge fertilizer (SSF) and conventional fertilizer were compared. After long-term excessive amendment with SSF from Ningbo City (SSF-N), the concentrations of soil total N, P, aqua regia-extractable HMs and DTPA extractable HMs were higher than the control, especially in the arable layer. Moreover, the concentration of aqua regia-extractable Zn (457 mg kg{sup -1}) exceeded the recommended China Environmental Quality Standard for soils (GB15618-1995). All 8 target PBDE congeners were found in fertilizer SSF-N and soil with excessive amendment with SSF-N for 12 years, but the concentrations of 8 different PBDEs in SSF-N-amended soil were not significantly different from control soil. Conclusions: Both economic and environmental benefits can be obtained by careful application of sewage sludge fertilizer to recycle plant nutrients. Repeated and excessive application rates of sewage sludge fertilizer may pose environmental risk, especially in respect of soil heavy metal and PBDE contamination, and high concentrations of phosphorus may also be

  1. Connecting the cycles: impact of farming practices, Carbon and nutrient erosion on GHG emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on identifying links between GHG emissions, soil management and soil erosion that are not considered in the commonly applied emission calculations associated with farming and soil erosion. The role of agriculture in generating GHG emissions through the use of fertilizers and fossil fuels is well documented. The negative impacts of soil erosion on agricultural land and its productivity have also been studied extensively. The lateral movement of soil through terrestrial ecosystems has also been recognized as a significant flux of C within the global C cycle. Soil erosion removes approximately 0.5 Gt of C per year from agricultural land. Much of this C is deposited in the landscape, effectively burying the organic matter from the atmosphere and taking it, at least for an unspecified time, out of the C exchange between soil and atmosphere. Such calculations raise the notion that soil erosion generates an unintentional benefit for climate, owing to the long-term burial of soil organic Carbon. But limiting the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on climate change to organic carbon burial ignores, apart from economic and social damages, the coupling between biogeochemical cycles. For example, the eroded nitrogen has to be replaced, at least in part by artificial fertilizers, to maintain soil fertility. At this point the sediment, Carbon and nitrogen cycles meet, because the production of fertilizer generates greenhouse gases. The production of one ton of fertilizer generates on the order of 850 kg of carbon dioxide. Applying this number to the 0.5 GT C erosion estimate, the amount of nitrogen lost owing to erosion each year yields carbon dioxide emissions of 0.02-0.04 Pg per year. These emissions correspond to 15-30% of the organic carbon buried owing to soil erosion. In this presentation, the full complexity of biogeochemical cycling on agricultural land is explored and connections between cycles which require consideration for a full GHG emission

  2. Ecological network analysis reveals the inter-connection between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function as affected by land use across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creamer, R.C.; Hannula, S.E.; Leeuwen, van J.P.; Stone, D.; Rutgers, M.; Schmelz, R.M.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Bohse Hendriksen, N.; Bolger, T.; Bouffaud, M.L.; Buee, M.; Calvalho, F.; Costa, D.; Dirilgen, T.; Francisco, R.; Griffiths, B.S.; Griffiths, R.; Martin, F.; Martins da Silva, P.; Mendes, S.; Morais, P.V.; Pereira, C.; Philippot, L.; Plassart, P.; Redecker, D.; Römbke, J.; Sousa, J.P.; Wouterse, M.; Lemanceau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organisms are considered drivers of soil ecosystem services (primary productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, water regulation) associated with sustainable agricultural production. Soil biodiversity was highlighted in the soil thematic strategy as a key component of soil quality. The

  3. Ecological network analysis reveals the inter-connection between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function as affected by land use across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creamer, R.E.; Hannula, S.E.; Leeuwen, J.P.Van; Stone, D.; Rutgers, M.; Schmelz, R.M.; Ruiter, P.C.de; Hendriksen, N.Bohse; Bolger, T.; Bouffaud, M.L.; Buee, M.; Carvalho, F.; Costa, D.; Dirilgen, T.; Francisco, R.; Griffiths, B.S.; Griffiths, R.; Martin, F.; Silva, P.Martins da; Mendes, S.; Morais, P.V.; Pereira, C.; Philippot, L.; Plassart, P.; Redecker, D.; Römbke, J.; Sousa, J.P.; Wouterse, M.; Lemanceau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Soil organisms are considered drivers of soil ecosystem services (primary productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, water regulation) associated with sustainable agricultural production. Soil biodiversity was highlighted in the soil thematic strategy as a key component of soil

  4. Ecological network analysis reveals the inter-connection between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function as affected by land use across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creamer, R.C.; Hannula, S.E.; Leeuwen, van J.P.; Stone, D.; Rutgers, M.; Schmelz, R.M.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Bohse Hendriksen, N.; Bolger, T.; Bouffaud, M.L.; Buee, M.; Calvalho, F.; Costa, D.; Dirilgen, T.; Francisco, R.; Griffiths, B.S.; Griffiths, R.; Martin, F.; Martins da Silva, P.; Mendes, S.; Morais, P.V.; Pereira, C.; Philippot, L.; Plassart, P.; Redecker, D.; Römbke, J.; Sousa, J.P.; Wouterse, M.; Lemanceau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organisms are considered drivers of soil ecosystem services (primary productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, water regulation) associated with sustainable agricultural production. Soil biodiversity was highlighted in the soil thematic strategy as a key component of soil quality. The lac

  5. Ecological network analysis reveals the inter-connection between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function as affected by land use across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creamer, R.E.; Hannula, S.E.; Leeuwen, J.P.Van; Stone, D.; Rutgers, M.; Schmelz, R.M.; Ruiter, P.C.de; Hendriksen, N.Bohse; Bolger, T.; Bouffaud, M.L.; Buee, M.; Carvalho, F.; Costa, D.; Dirilgen, T.; Francisco, R.; Griffiths, B.S.; Griffiths, R.; Martin, F.; Silva, P.Martins da; Mendes, S.; Morais, P.V.; Pereira, C.; Philippot, L.; Plassart, P.; Redecker, D.; Römbke, J.; Sousa, J.P.; Wouterse, M.; Lemanceau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Soil organisms are considered drivers of soil ecosystem services (primary productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, water regulation) associated with sustainable agricultural production. Soil biodiversity was highlighted in the soil thematic strategy as a key component of soil quality

  6. Spatial variability of soil nutrient in paddy plantation: Sites FELCRA Seberang Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, H.; Adnan, N. A.; Mispan, M. R.; Athirah. A, A.

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods currently used for rice cultivation in Malaysia are unable to give maximum yield although the yield production of paddy is increasing. This is due to the conversional method being unable to include soil properties as one of their parameters in agriculture management. Soil properties vary spatially in farm scale due to differences in topography, parent material, vegetation or land management and soil characteristics; also plantation productivity varies significantly over small spatial scales. Knowledge of spatial variability in soil fertility is important for site specific nutrient management. Analysis of spatial variability of soil nutrient of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were conducted in this study with the aid of GIS (i.e ArcGIS) and statistical softwares. In this study different temporal and depths of soil nutrient were extracted on the field and further analysis of N,P,K content were analysed in the chemical laboratory and using spatially technique in GIS sofware. The result indicated that for the Seberang Perak site of 58 hactares area, N and K are met minimum requirements nutrient content as outlines by the MARDI for paddy cultivation. However, P indicated poor condition in the study area; therefore the soil needs further attention and treatment.

  7. Soil, water and nutrient conservation in mountain farming systems: case-study from the Sikkim Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, E; Rai, S C; Sharma, R

    2001-02-01

    The Khanikhola watershed in Sikkim is agrarian with about 50% area under rain-fed agriculture representing the conditions of the middle mountains all over the Himalaya. The study was conducted to assess overland flow, soil loss and subsequent nutrient losses from different land uses in the watershed, and identify biotechnological inputs for management of mountain farming systems. Overland flow, soil and nutrient losses were very high from open agricultural (cropped) fields compared to other land uses, and more than 72% of nutrient losses were attributable to agriculture land use. Forests and large cardamom agroforestry conserved more soil compared to other land uses. Interventions, like cultivation of broom grass upon terrace risers, N2-fixing Albizia trees for maintenance of soil fertility and plantation of horticulture trees, have reduced the soil loss (by 22%). Soil and water conservation values (> 80%) of both large cardamom and broom grass were higher compared to other crops. Use of N2-fixing Albizia tree in large cardamom agroforestry and croplands contributed to soil fertility, and increased productivity and yield. Bio-composting of farm resources ensured increase in nutrient availability specially phosphorus in cropped areas. Agricultural practices in mountain areas should be strengthened with more agroforestry components, and cash crops like large cardamom and broom grass in agroforestry provide high economic return and are hydroecologically sustainable.

  8. Leaching and Redistribution of Nutrients in Surface Layer of Red Soils in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The leaching and redistribution of nutrients in the surface layer of 4 types of red soils in Southeast China were studied with a lysimeter experiment under field conditions. Results showed that the leaching concentrated in the rainy season (from April to June). Generally, the leaching of soil nutrients from the surface layer of red soils was in the order of Ca > Mg > K > NO3-N. In fertilization treatment, the total amount of soil nutrients leached out of the surface layer in a red soil derived from granite was the highest in all soils. The uptake by grass decreased the leaching of fertilizer ions in surface layer, particularly for NO3-N. Soil total N and exchangeable K, Ca and Mg in the surface layer decreased with leaching and grass uptake during the 2 years without new fertilization of urea, Ca(H2PO4)2, KCl, CaCO3 and MgCO3. Ca moved from the application layer (0~5 cm) of fertilizer and accumulated in the 10~30 cm depth in the soils studied except that derived from Quaternary red clay. The deficiency of soil exchangeable K will become a serious degradation process facing the Southeast China.

  9. Thermal supplementing soil nutrients through biocomposting of night-soil in the northwestern Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinam, Santaram S; Rawat, Yashwant S; Kuniyal, Jagdish C; Vishvakarma, S C R; Pandey, Dinesh C

    2008-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the prime activities of the hill people residing in the northwestern Indian Himalaya. However, poor soil fertility in these areas is a big hurdle to sustainable farming. The effects of washout of topsoil and its nutrients, year after year, due to the abundance of snowfall, avalanches, landslides and erosion further add to the woes of the farmers. In the cold and harsh climatic conditions of the region, with grass and vegetation cover being scanty, it is not possible to maintain large herds of cattle for the adequate production of farmyard manure. Faced with this situation, the locals have relied heavily on obtaining organic manure derived from composting of human excreta. In earlier times the dire necessity of the farmers helped them overcome the revulsion associated with the practice of handling human excreta, but now with the advent of modernisation and the easy availability of chemical fertilisers, the people are distancing themselves from this age-old practice. More and more people are opting for modern toilets and leaving behind the traditional toilets that made possible the harvesting of manure from night-soil. As a result, this primitive practice is on the verge of extinction. This eco-friendly practice, that has sustained the land for so many generations, needs to be continued and strengthened as the long-term consequences of excessive and indiscriminant use of chemical fertilisers are becoming too obvious to ignore. Traditional knowledge needs to be combined with modern scientific know-how to make this practice safer and more acceptable. If the composting operation is managed properly, the handling will be less loathsome and the concerns of health and hygiene too will stand addressed. The present study attempts a detailed profile of the practice of 'supplementing soil nutrients through biocomposting of night-soil' in the cold desert region of Lahaul Valley. Four villages running from the northwestern part to the southeastern part of

  10. Survey and Study of Soil Nutrients of Sugarcane Field in Southern Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; ZENG; Jinsheng; HUANG; Rulin; XIE; Liuqiang; ZHOU; Yongxian; LIU; Yumo; TAN; Hongwei; TAN

    2015-01-01

    To survey and analyze soil nutrients of sugarcane field in southern Guangxi and provide basic data for reasonable land use and scientific fertilization,combining GIS technology,a total of 498 samples of topsoil of typical soil types in southern Guangxi sugarcane planting areas were collected and soil nutrients were measured. Survey results indicate that the p H value of 95% soil in southern Guangxi is lower than 6. 5;acid soil is major soil type of sugarcane planting areas in southern Guangxi; the organic matter content is 6. 03- 44. 58 g / kg; alkali-hydrolyzable N is 14. 0- 175. 0 mg / kg; available P is 1. 7- 95. 0 mg / kg; available K is 11. 0- 358. 0 mg / kg; the content of most nutrients remains at medium level,and there is still a large gap with high-yield soil condition. In various trace elements,the average content of B is 0. 24 mg / kg,- 98% soil lacks B; the average content of available Mg is 62. 34 mg / kg and 69. 08% soil lacks Mg; the average content of active Ca is 592.68 mg / kg and the active Ca is relatively low in 54. 84% soil; the average content of available Zn is 0. 93 mg / kg,and 19. 08% soil lacks Zn;the average content of available Cu is 0. 65 mg / kg,and 7. 02% soil lacks Cu. It is concluded that the overall soil fertility of sugarcane planting areas in southern Guangxi is not high,the organic matter is relatively low,the content of rapidly available N,P and K is at medium or low level,the content of Fe and Mn is high,and the available Cu and available Zn of most soil remain at medium level.

  11. Incorporating redox processes improves prediction of carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Zheng, Jianqiu; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David; Gu, Baohua; Mayes, Melanie; Painter, Scott; Thornton, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Among the coupled thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes, redox processes play major roles in carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. Increasingly, mechanistic representation of redox processes is acknowledged as necessary for accurate prediction of GHG emission in the assessment of land-atmosphere interactions. Simple organic substrates, Fe reduction, microbial reactions, and the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) were added to a reaction network used in the land component of an Earth system model. In conjunction with this amended reaction network, various temperature response functions used in ecosystem models were assessed for their ability to describe experimental observations from incubation tests with arctic soils. Incorporation of Fe reduction reactions improves the prediction of the lag time between CO2 and CH4 accumulation. The inclusion of the WHAM model enables us to approximately simulate the initial pH drop due to organic acid accumulation and then a pH increase due to Fe reduction without parameter adjustment. The CLM4.0, CENTURY, and Ratkowsky temperature response functions better described the observations than the Q10 method, Arrhenius equation, and ROTH-C. As electron acceptors between O2 and CO2 (e.g., Fe(III), SO42-) are often involved, our results support inclusion of these redox reactions for accurate prediction of CH4 production and consumption. Ongoing work includes improving the parameterization of organic matter decomposition to produce simple organic substrates, examining the influence of redox potential on methanogenesis under thermodynamically favorable conditions, and refining temperature response representation near the freezing point by additional model-experiment iterations. We will use the model to describe observed GHG emission at arctic and tropical sites.

  12. Vegetation composition and soil nutrients status from polyculture to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    Arunachalam A, Maithani K, Pandey HN, Tripathi RS (1996). The impact of disturbance on detrital ... Nitrogen cycling in coniferous ecosystems. In: Terrestrial nitrogen cycles, F.E. Clark & T. Rosswall (ed.), Ecol. Bull. (Stockholm), 33: 405-426.

  13. Effect of crop rotation on soil nutrient balance and weediness in soddy podzolic organic farming fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarina, Livija; Zarina, Liga

    2017-04-01

    The nutrient balance in different crop rotations under organic cropping system has been investigated in Latvia at the Institute of Agricultural Resources and Economics since 2006. Latvia is located in a humid and moderate climatic region where the rainfall exceeds evaporation (soil moisture coefficient > 1) and the soil moisture regime is characteristic with percolation. The average annual precipitation is 670-850 mm. The average temperature varies from -6.7° C in January to 16.5 °C in July. The growing season is 175 - 185 days. The most widespread are podzolic soils and mainly they are present in agricultural fields in all regions of Latvia. In a wider sense the goal of the soil management in organic farming is a creation of the biologically active flora and fauna in the soil by maintaining a high level of soil organic matter which is good for crops nutrient balance. Crop rotation is a central component of organic farming systems and has many benefits, including growth of soil microbial activity, which may increase nutrient availability. The aim of the present study was to calculate nutrient balance for each crop in the rotations and average in each rotation. Taking into account that crop rotations can limit build-up of weeds, additionally within the ERA-net CORE Organic Plus transnational programs supported project PRODIVA the information required for a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European organic arable cropping systems was summarized. It was found that the nutrient balance was influenced by nutrients uptake by biomass of growing crops in crop rotation. The number of weeds in the organic farming fields with crop rotation is dependent on the cultivated crops and the succession of crops in the crop rotation.

  14. Mathematical Analyses for the Influence of Soil Conditions and Nutrient Interactions on Cotton Yields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJIANHUI; HUCHANGQING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soil chemical properties and soil nutrition on cotton yields was studied by means of establishing mathematical models.The nultivarate quadratic regression equations developed by a stepwise regression method not only presented the single effect of soil factors but also displayed the interaction(synergistic or antagonistic) of soil nutrients.The effect of individual factor and the way of nutrient interaction were further analysed by the path analysis method.The results showed that among major factors affecting cotton yields,there existed the interactions between macronutrients(available P× available K),and between macronutrients and microelements(N×Zn,P×Mo,P×Cu,P×Zn,K×Mo)besides the single effect of soil pH,total P ,available Cu and available Zn.

  15. Seasonal changes in microbial community structure and nutrients content in rhizospheric soil of Aegle marmelos tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shital M. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary investigation was carried out on dominance of different types of microbial communities at different monsoon seasons in rhizospheric soils of Aegle marmelos tree. Nutrients content of soil were also determined simultaneously to correlate with the microbial population. Results show that the rhizosphere of Aegle marmelos contains gram-negative bacteria, Rhizobium, Azotobacter,Actinomycetes and Yeast and major plant nutrients and their count as well as dominance changes with moisture content in rhizosphere.Except actinomycetes all the microorganisms were found highest duringmonsoon season whereas in post-monsoon season Actinomycetes were dominant. Amount of water in rhizosphere soil also affects soil chemical properties. Soil pH, organic carbon, C:N ratio, available nitrogen and available phosphorus were recorded maximum in monsoon, whereas electrical conductivity and total nitrogen content were found maximum in post-monsoon.

  16. Ca, Sr and Ba stable isotopes reveal the fate of soil nutrients along a tropical climosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient biolifting is an important pedogenic process in which plant roots obtain inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca) from minerals at depth and concentrate those nutrients at the surface. Here we use soil chemistry and stable isotopes of the alkaline earth elements Ca, strontium (Sr) and barium (Ba) to test the hypothesis that biolifting of P has been an important pedogenic process across a soil climosequence developed on volcanic deposits at Kohala Mountain, Hawaii. The geochemical linkage between these elements is revealed as generally positive site-specific relationships in soil mass gains and losses, particularly for P, Ba and Ca, using the ratio of immobile elements titanium and niobium (Ti/Nb) to link individual soil samples to a restricted compositional range of the chemically and isotopically diverse volcanic parent materials. At sites where P is enriched in surface soils relative to abundances in deeper soils, the isotope compositions of exchangeable Ca, Sr and Ba in the shallowest soil horizons (materials and trend toward those of plants growing on fresh volcanic deposits. In contrast the isotope composition of exchangeable Ba in deeper soil horizons (> 10 cm depth) at those sites is consistently heavier than the volcanic parent materials. The isotope compositions of exchangeable Ca and Sr trend toward heavier compositions with depth more gradually, reflecting increasing leakiness from these soils in the order Ba recycling flux returned to the surface as litterfall. This observation implicates an uptake flux from an additional source which we attribute to biolifting. We view the heavy exchangeable Ba relative to soil parent values in deeper soils at sites where P is enriched in surface soils, and indeed at all but the wettest site across the climosequence, to represent the complement of an isotopically light Ba fraction removed from these soils by plant roots consistent with the biolifting hypothesis. We further suggest that

  17. Effect of root derived organic acids on the activation of nutrients in the rhizosphere soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Four types of soils, including brown coniferous forest soil, dark brown soil, black soil, and black calic soil, sampled from three different places in northeast China were used in this test. The functions of two root-derived organic acids and water were simulated and compared in the activation of mineral nutrients from the rhizosphere soil. The results showed that the organic acids could activate the nutrients and the activated degree of the nutrient elements highly depended on the amount and types of the organic acid excreted and on the physiochemical and biochemical properties of the soil tested. The activation effect of the citric acid was obviously higher than that of malic acid in extracting Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn for all the tested soil types. However, the activation efficiencies of P, K, Ca, and Mg extracting by the citric acid were not much higher, sometimes even lower, than those by malic acid. The solution concentration of all elements increased with increase of amount of the citric acid added.

  18. Coupling of Belowground Carbon Cycling and Stoichiometry from Organisms to Ecosystems along a Soil C Gradient Under Rice Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, W.; Ye, R.; Horwath, W. R.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological stoichiometry is a framework linking biogeochemical cycles to organism functional traits that has been widely applied in aquatic ecosystems, animals and plants, but is poorly explored in soil microbes. We evaluated relationships among soil stoichiometry, carbon (C) cycling, and microbial community structure and function along a soil gradient spanning ~5-25% C in cultivated rice fields with experimental nitrogen (N) amendments. We found rates of soil C turnover were associated with nutrient stoichiometry and phosphorus (P) availability at ecosystem, community, and organism scales. At the ecosystem scale, soil C turnover was highest in mineral soils with lower C content and N:P ratios, and was positively correlated with soil inorganic P. Effects of N fertilization on soil C cycling also appeared to be mediated by soil P availability, while microbial community composition (by 16S rRNA sequencing) was not altered by N addition. Microbial communities varied along the soil C gradient, corresponding with highly covariant soil %C, N:P ratios, C quality, and carbon turnover. In contrast, we observed unambiguous shifts in microbial community function, imputed from taxonomy and directly assessed by shotgun sequenced metagenomes. The abundance of genes for carbohydrate utilization decreased with increasing soil C (and declining C turnover), while genes for aromatic C uptake, N fixation and P scavenging increased along with potential incorporation of C into biomass pools. Ecosystem and community-scale associations between C and nutrient substrate availability were also reflected in patterns of resource allocation among individual genomes (imputed and assembled). Microbes associated with higher rates of soil C turnover harbored more genes for carbohydrate utilization, fewer genes for obtaining energetically costly forms of C, N and P, more ribosomal RNA gene copies, and potentially lower C use efficiency. We suggest genome clustering by functional gene suites might

  19. Combined Effect of Nutrient and Pest Management on Soil Ecological Quality in Hybrid Rice Double-Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO MIN; XIE XIAOMEI; A. SUBHANI

    2003-01-01

    The mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pesticide, including herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, were applied alone or in combination and the soil sampling was done at different growth stages during the crop cycle to study the changes in soil organic matter, microbial biomass and their activity parameters in a paddy soil with different nutrient and pest management practices in a hybrid rice double-cropping system. A consistent increase in the electron transport system (ETS) activity was measured during the different crop growth stages of rice. The use of fertilizers (NPK) alone or with pesticides increased ETS activity, while a decline of ETS activity was noticed with pesticides alone as compared with the control. Nearly an increasing trend in soil phenol content was observed with the progression of crop growth stages, while the usage of pesticides alone caused maximum increments in the soil phenol content. The soil protein content was found nearly stable with fertilizers and/or pesticides application at various growth stages in both crops taken. But notable changes were noticed at different growth stages probably because of fluctuations in moisture and temperature at particular stages, which might have their effects on N mineralization. Marked depletions in the phospholipid content were found with the advancement of crop growth stages, while the incorporation of fertilizers and/or pesticides also produced slight changes, in which a higher decline was noticed with pesticide application alone compared with the control.

  20. Effect of Water Logging Conditions on Solubility of Soil Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wide use of herbicides, fungicides, fertilizers, and soil amendments affect the rhizosphere biochemistry and ecology. Soils in the Midwest of the US tend to be saturated in the early spring when snow and ice melt, and frequent rain occurs. Saturated conditions also occur after heavy rainfall eve...

  1. THE EFFECT OF ROCK PHOSPHATE ON SOIL NUTRIENT DYNAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    plot measured 17.6 m x 17.6 m and had 6 palm trees. There were four treatments ...... tributed to mineralization. This is consistent .... corn. Soil Science Society of America. Journal 51:1656-1658. Adu, S.V. and Tenadu, D.O. (1979). Soils of.

  2. Nutrient movement in a 104-year old soil fertility experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama’s “Cullars Rotation” experiment (circa 1911) is the oldest, continuous soil fertility experiment in the southern U.S. Treatments include 5 K variables, P variables, S variables, soil pH variables and micronutrient variables in 14 treatments involving a 3-yr rotation of (1) cotton-winter legu...

  3. Responses of soil nutrient to driving mechanism in Taihu Lake basin in last 20 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to understand the changing law of soil nutrient quality in Taihu Lake basin, Yangtze Delta in last 20 years, and reveal the relationship between soil nutrient changes and human driving forces in regional level over long period of time. Experiment on long-term collecting samples was conducted to study changes of soil organic matter, total N, available N, available P and available K in Dongting town, Wuxi city during the last 20 years. The paper analyses the co-relationship of the fluctuation of soil nutrient and state policy, cultivating practice, agricultural input, and per hectare agricultural net income. The results showed that at first the content of soil organic matter increased, then decreased, and increased again. The content of total N and available N steadily increased. The content of available K and available P steadily decreased. The authors found that the influence of state policy and cultivating practice on soil nutrient quality index (SNQI) is obvious, agricultural input and SNQI are positively correlated, and per hectare agricultural net income and SNQI are negatively correlated.

  4. [An optical-fiber-sensor-based spectrophotometer for soil non-metallic nutrient determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dong-xian; Hu, Juan-xiu; Lu, Shao-kun; He, Hou-yong

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve rapid, convenient and efficient soil nutrient determination in soil testing and fertilizer recommendation, a portable optical-fiber-sensor-based spectrophotometer including immersed fiber sensor, flat field holographic concave grating, and diode array detector was developed for soil non-metallic nutrient determination. According to national standard of ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer with JJG 178-2007, the wavelength accuracy and repeatability, baseline stability, transmittance accuracy and repeatability measured by the prototype instrument were satisfied with the national standard of III level; minimum spectral bandwidth, noise and excursion, and stray light were satisfied with the national standard of IV level. Significant linear relationships with slope of closing to 1 were found between the soil available nutrient contents including soil nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, available phosphorus, available sulfur, available boron, and organic matter measured by the prototype instrument compared with that measured by two commercial single-beam-based and dual-beam-based spectrophotometers. No significant differences were revealed from the above comparison data. Therefore, the optical-fiber-sensor-based spectrophotometer can be used for rapid soil non-metallic nutrient determination with a high accuracy.

  5. Technique of wheat breeding for efficiently utilizing soil nutrient elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继云; 刘秀娣; 周伟; 孙建华; 童依平; 刘文杰; 李振声; 王培田; 姚树江

    1995-01-01

    500 wheat varieties were grown and screened,and 18 of them with better characters identified inthe low phosphorus,low zinc,low boron soil and in contrast with the control(appilied with N,P,Zn andB).A few varieties showed able to efficiently utilize P,Zn or B in soil,and it has been demonstrated by theanalysis that their roots can secrete more organic acids making the soil pH around the roots decrease.Six or-ganic acids in the roots of four representative varieties were analysed,their contents were of difference amongthe varieties and had a positive correlation with the yield of the varieties in low nutrition soil.All theabove-mentioned provided the scientific basis of crop breeding for efficient utilization of soil nutritions.

  6. Carbon and Nitrogen cycling in a permafrost soil profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, V. G.; Schaedel, C.; Mack, M. C.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    In high latitude ecosystems, active layer soils thaw during the growing season and are situated on top of perennially frozen soils (permafrost). Permafrost affected soil profiles currently store a globally important pool of carbon (1330-1580 PgC) due to cold temperatures constraining the decomposition of soil organic matter. With global warming, however, seasonal thaw is expected to increase in speed and extend to deeper portions of the soil profile. As permafrost soils become part of the active layer, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) previously stored in soil organic matter will be released via decomposition. In this experiment, the dynamic relationship between N mineralization, C mineralization, and C quality was investigated in moist acidic tundra soils. Soils from the active layer surface down through the permafrost (80cm) were incubated aerobically at 15°C for 225 days. Carbon dioxide fluxes were fit with a two pool exponential decay model so that the size and turnover of both the quickly decomposing C pool (Cfast) and the slowly decomposing C pool (Cslow) could be assessed. Soil extractions with 2M KCl were performed at six time points throughout the incubation so that dissolve inorganic N (DIN) and dissolved organic C (DOC) could be measured. DIN was readily extractable from deep permafrost soils throughout the incubation (0.05 mgN/g dry soil) but in active layer soils DIN was only produced after Cfast had been depleted. In contrast, active layer soils had high levels of DOC (0.65 mgC/g dry soil) throughout the incubation but in permafrost soils, DOC became depleted as Cfast reduced in size. The strong contrasts between the C and N cycling in active layer soils versus permafrost soils suggest that the deeper thaw will dramatically increase N availability in these soil profiles. Plants and soil microbes in the tundra are currently N limited so our findings imply that deepening thaw will 1) provide N necessary for increased plant growth and 2) stimulate losses of

  7. A novel nanoparticle approach for imaging nutrient uptake by soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S. L.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Boyanov, M.; Durall, D. M.; Jones, M. D.; Lai, B.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The metabolic activities of soil microbes are the primary drivers of biogeochemical processes controlling the terrestrial carbon cycle, nutrient availability to plants, contaminant remediation, water quality, and other ecosystem services. However, we have a limited understanding of microbial metabolic processes such as nutrient uptake rates, substrate preferences, or how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout their habitat. Here we use a novel imaging technique with quantum dots (QDs, engineered semiconductor nanoparticles that produce size or composition-dependent fluorescence) to measure bacterial uptake of substrates of varying complexity. Cultures of two organisms differing in cell wall structure — Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens — were grown in one of four ecologically relevant experimental conditions: nitrogen (N) limitation, phosphorus (P) limitation, N and P limitation, or no nutrient limitation. The cultures were then exposed to QDs with and without organic nutrients attached. X-ray fluorescence imaging was performed at 2ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to determine the elemental distributions within both planktonic and surface-adhered (i.e, biofilms) cells. Uptake of unconjugated QDs was neglibible, and QDs conjugated to organic substrates varied depending on growth conditions and substrate, suggesting that they are a useful indicator of bacterial ecology. Cellular uptake was similar for the two bacterial species (2212 ± 273 nanoparticles per cm3 of cell volume for B. subtilis and 1682 ± 264 for P. fluorescens). On average, QD assimilation was six times greater when N or P was limiting, and cells took up about twice as much phosphoserine compared to other substrates, likely because it was the only compound providing both N and P. These results showed that regardless of their cell wall structure, bacteria can selectively take up quantifiable levels of QDs based on substrate and environmental conditions. APS

  8. Environmental impacts of innovative dairy farming systems aiming at improved internal nutrient cycling: A multi-scale assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, W; Kros, J; Dolman, M A; Vellinga, Th V; de Boer, H C; Gerritsen, A L; Sonneveld, M P W; Bouma, J

    2015-12-01

    Several dairy farms in the Netherlands aim at reducing environmental impacts by improving the internal nutrient cycle (INC) on their farm by optimizing the use of available on-farm resources. This study evaluates the environmental performance of selected INC farms in the Northern Friesian Woodlands in comparison to regular benchmark farms using a Life Cycle Assessment. Regular farms were selected on the basis of comparability in terms of milk production per farm and per hectare, soil type and drainage conditions. In addition, the environmental impacts of INC farming at landscape level were evaluated with the integrated modelling system INITIATOR, using spatially explicit input data on animal numbers, land use, agricultural management, meteorology and soil, assuming that all farms practised the principle of INC farming. Impact categories used at both farm and landscape levels were global warming potential, acidification potential and eutrophication potential. Additional farm level indicators were land occupation and non-renewable energy use, and furthermore all farm level indicators were also expressed per kg fat and protein corrected milk. Results showed that both on-farm and off-farm non-renewable energy use was significantly lower at INC farms as compared with regular farms. Although nearly all other environmental impacts were numerically lower, both on-farm and off-farm, differences were not statistically significant. Nitrogen losses to air and water decreased by on average 5 to 10% when INC farming would be implemented for the whole region. The impact of INC farming on the global warming potential and eutrophication potential was, however, almost negligible (<2%) at regional level. This was due to a negligible impact on the methane emissions and on the surplus and thereby on the soil accumulation and losses of phosphorus to water at INC farms, illustrating the focus of these farms on closing the nitrogen cycle.

  9. Stimulation of nitrogen turnover due to nutrients release from aggregates affected by freeze-thaw in wetland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Zou, Yuanchun; Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei

    2017-02-01

    The freeze-thaw phenomenon will occur more frequently in mid-high latitude ecosystems under climate change which has a remarkable effect on biogeochemical processes in wetland soils. Here, we used a wet sieving procedure and a barometric process separation (BaPS) technique to examine the responses of wetland soil aggregates and related carbon and nitrogen turnover affected by the freeze-thaw treatment. Wetland soil samples were divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group was incubated at temperatures fluctuating from 10 °C to -10 °C, whereas the control group was incubated at the constant temperature of 10 °C. A 24 h process was set as the total freeze-thaw cycle, and the experiment had 20 continuous freeze-thaw cycles. In our results, the freeze-thaw process caused great destruction to the >2 mm water-stable aggregates (WSA) fraction and increased the carbon (DOC) content was stimulated during the initial freeze-thaw cycles followed by a rapid decline, and then still increased during subsequent freeze-thaw cycles, which was mainly determined by the soil organic carbon (SOC). The NH4+ and NO3- content, respiration rate and gross nitrification rate were all significantly improved by the freeze-thaw effect. Because the amount of NH4+ and NO3- expressed prominent negative responses to the content of >2 mm WSA fraction and the gross nitrification rate can be stimulated at the initial freeze-thaw cycles, nutrients and substrates may play a leading role in the freeze-thaw treatment regardless of the minimal influences on microbial biomass pools.

  10. [Assessment of soil nutrient status in urban green space of main cities in Hubei Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Guo-Shi; Liu, Yi; Wan, Kai-Yuan; Zhang, Run-Hua; Chen, Fang

    2013-08-01

    According to the topography of the cities in Hubei Province, soil samples were collected from the urban green space in two mountainous cities (Enshi and Shiyan), three hilly cities (Jing-men, Xiangfan and Yichang), and five plain cities (Wuhan, Xiaogan, Xianning, Jingzhou, Suizhou and Huangshi). Within each city, subsoil samples were taken in accordance with four different types of land use, including park, residential, institutional (school, hospital and government, etc.), and roadside. In the main cities in Hubei, the soil pH of urban green space was averagely 7.9, being obviously higher than that of natural soils, while the soil organic matter content was rather low (6.8 g x kg(-1)). The soil available N and P contents were at a low level, while the soil available trace element (Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and B) contents were moderate. Land use type had significant effects on the soil nutrient contents in plain cities. The soil pH in the residential green space was significantly higher than that in the park, roadside and institutional green space, while the contents of soil available trace elements (S, Cu, Mn and Zn) in roadside green space were significantly higher than those of green space in the other land use types. Park green space had the lowest soil nutrient contents. There existed significant differences in the soil nutrient contents among the cities with different topography. The soil organic matter, NH4-N, available K and P, and Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Cu and Mn contents were significantly higher in plain cities than in mountainous cities.

  11. Chemical and Microbiological Parameters of Paddy Soil Quality as Affected by Different Nutrient and Water Regimes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chang-Ming; YANG Lin-Zhang; YAN Ting-Mei

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted from 1999 to 2002 to compare and evaluate the effects of nutrient and water regimes on paddy soil quality by investigating soil chemical and microbiological parameters. Four nutrient regimes, a control, chemical fertilizers only (CF), chemical fertilizers with swine manure (SM), and chemical fertilizers with wheat straw (WS), and two soil moisture regimes, continuous waterlogging (CWL) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD),were investigated. With SM and WS total organic carbon and total nitrogen in the paddy soil were significantly higher (P <0.05) than those with CF. A similar effect for organic amendments was observed in the soil light fraction organic C (LFOC), water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC), and water-soluble organic C (WSOC). CWL, in particular when swine manure was incorporated into the paddy soil, markedly decreased soil redox potential (Eh) and increased total active reducing substances (ARS). Meanwhile, as compared to CF, SM and WS significantly (P < 0.05) increased soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and mineralizable carbon, with differences in AWD being higher than CWL. In addition, SM and WS treatments significantly (P < 0.05) improved rice above-ground biomass and grain yield, with AWD being greater than CWL. Thus, for ecologically sustainable agricultural management of paddy soils, long-term waterlogging should be avoided when organic manure was incorporated into paddy soil.

  12. Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (United States). Center for Tropical Research & Education

    2006-04-15

    A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

  13. Laboratory and field methods for measurement of hyphal uptake of nutrients in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Jakobsen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental systems for measuring nutrient transport by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in soil are described. The systems generally include two soil compartments that are separated by fine nylon mesh. Both roots and root-external hyphae grow in one compartment, but only hyphae are fine enough...... to grow through the mesh into the other compartment. Application of tracer isotopes to the soil of this hyphal compartment can be used to measure nutrient uptake by plants via AM fungal hyphae. Use of compartmented systems is discussed with particular reference to phosphorus, which is the mineral nutrient...... transported in the largest quantity by AM fungi. Laboratory and field applications of the compartmentation methodology are presented with emphasis on the functioning of native AM fungal communities. Advantages and limitations of the method are considered and future important research directions are discussed...

  14. Characteristic of Soil Nutrients Loss in Beiyunhe Reservoir Under the Simulated Rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Field nutrient loss from soil became the major factor of the water pollution control in countryside in China. Beiyunhe reservoir is located in semiarid zone, where field nutrient loss distributed in summer. To assess the flied nutrient loss in Beiyunhe reservoir, we conducted experiments to study the characteristic of soil nutrients loss by analysis of the content of runoff water, soil nutrients and runoff water sediment under simulated rainfall. The results showed that the runoff happened in the rainstorm. In runoff water, the content of TN was 4.7~11.3 mg·L-1, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen accounted for 44.51% of TN; the content of P was 0.66~1.35 mg·L-1, water soluble phosphorus accounted for 54.08% of TP. And the main loss of nutrients was in the surface soil, the loss of TN, NH4+-N, NO3--N, TP and DP were 29.79%, 52.09%, 10.21%, 16.48% and 5.27%, respectively. However, the most of field nutrient loss were in runoff sediment, the content of TN and TP were 0.66~1.27 mg·g-1 and 14.73~20 mg·g-1 in sediment, and TN and TP account for 82.28% and 99.89% of total loss of nutrient. After the rainstorm, the macro-aggregates were reduced 8.8%, and the micro-aggregates increased 9.5%.

  15. Life cycle assessment and nutrient analysis of various processing pathways in algal biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Dongyan; Ruan, Roger; Addy, Min; Mack, Sarah; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Yong

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing nutrient distributions and environmental impacts of nutrient recycling, reusing, and discharging in algal biofuels production. The three biomass conversion pathways compared in this study were: hydrothermal liquefaction technology (HTL), hydrothermal hydrolysis pretreatment +HTL (HTP), and wet lipid extraction (WLE). Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous (C, N, P) flows were described in each pathway. A primary cost analysis was conducted to evaluate the economic performance. The LCA results show that the HTP reduced life cycle NOx emissions by 10% from HTL, but increased fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions, and eutrophication potential by 14%, 5%, and 28% respectively. The cost of per gallon biodiesel produced in HTP was less than in HTL. To further reduce emissions, efforts should be focused on improving nutrient uptake rates in algae cultivation, increasing biomass carbon detention in hydrothermal hydrolysis, and/or enhancing biomass conversion rates in the biooil upgrading processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling the soil carbon cycle of pine ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, K. [Hiroshima, Univ., Dept. of Environ. Studies, Fac. of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Higashi Hiroshima (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Soil carbon cycling rates and carbon budgets were calculated for stands of four pine species. Pinus sylvestris (at Jaedraaas, Sweden), P. densiflora (Hiroshima, Japan), P. elliottii (Florida, USA) and P. radiata (Canberra, Australia), using a simulation model driven by daily observations of mean air temperature and precipitation. Inputs to soil carbon through litterfall differ considerably among the four pine forests, but the accumulation of the A{sub 0} layer and humus in mineral soil is less variable. Decomposition of the A{sub 0} layer and humus is fastest for P. densiflora and slowest for P. sylvestris stands with P. radiata and P. elliottii intermediate. The decomposition rate is lower for the P. elliottii stand than for P. densiflora in spite of its higher temperatures and slightly higher precipitation. Seasonal changes in simulated soil carbon are observed only for the A{sub 0} layer at the P. densiflora site. Simulated soil respiration rates vary seasonally in three stands (P. sylvestris, P. densiflora and P. radiata). In simulations for pine trees planted on bare soil, all soil organic matter fractions except the humus in mineral soil recover to half their asymptotic values within 30 to 40 years of planting for P. sylvestris and P. densiflora, compared with 10 to 20 years for P. radiata and P. elliottii. The simulated recovery of soil carbon following clear-cutting is fastest for the P. elliottii stand and slowest for P. sylvestris. Management of P. elliottii and P. radiata stands on 40-years rotations is sustainable because carbon removed through harvest is restored in the interval between successive clear-cuts. However p. densiflora and P. sylvestris stands may be unable to maintain soil carbon under such a short rotation. High growth rates of P. elliottii and p. radiata stands in spite of relatively poor soil conditions and slow carbon cycling may be related to the physiological responses of species to environmental conditions. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Optimal Management of Water, Nutrient and Carbon Cycles of Green Urban Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelli, R.; Pelak, N. F., III; Porporato, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The urban ecosystem is a complex, metastable system with highly coupled flows of mass, energy, people and capital. Their sustainability is in part linked to the existence of green spaces which provide important ecosystem services, whose sustainable management requires quantification of their benefits in terms of impacts on water, carbon and energy fluxes. An exploration of problems of optimal management of such green urban spaces and the related biogeochemical fluxes is presented, extending probabilistic ecohydrological models of the soil-plant system to the urban context, where biophysical and ecological conditions tend to be radically different from the surrounding rural and natural environment (e.g. heat islands, air and water pollution, low quality soils, etc…). The coupled soil moisture, nutrient and plant dynamics are modeled to compute water requirements, carbon footprint, nutrient demand and losses, and related fluxes under different design, management and climate scenarios. The goal is to provide operative rules for a sustainable water use through focused irrigation and fertilization strategies, optimal choice of plants, soil and cultivation conditions, accounting for the typical hydroclimatic variability that occur in the urban environment. This work is part of a project that has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 701914. The work is also cofounded by USDA Agricultural Research Service cooperative agreement 58-6408-3-027; National Science Foundation (NSF) grants: EAR-1331846, EAR-1316258, and the DGE-1068871 and FESD EAR-1338694.

  18. Consumption of atmospheric hydrogen during the life cycle of soil-dwelling actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Laura K; Rao, Deepa; Bosak, Tanja; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Tada, Kendall R; Hansel, Colleen M; Ono, Shuhei; Prinn, Ronald G

    2014-06-01

    Microbe-mediated soil uptake is the largest and most uncertain variable in the budget of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 ). The diversity and ecophysiological role of soil microorganisms that can consume low atmospheric abundances of H2 with high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenases is unknown. We expanded the library of atmospheric H2 -consuming strains to include four soil Harvard Forest Isolate (HFI) Streptomyces spp., Streptomyces cattleya and Rhodococcus equi by assaying for high-affinity hydrogenase (hhyL) genes and quantifying H2 uptake rates. We find that aerial structures (hyphae and spores) are important for Streptomyces H2 consumption; uptake was not observed in S. griseoflavus Tu4000 (deficient in aerial structures) and was reduced by physical disruption of Streptomyces sp. HFI8 aerial structures. H2 consumption depended on the life cycle stage in developmentally distinct actinobacteria: Streptomyces sp. HFI8 (sporulating) and R. equi (non-sporulating, non-filamentous). Strain HFI8 took up H2 only after forming aerial hyphae and sporulating, while R. equi only consumed H2 in the late exponential and stationary phase. These observations suggest that conditions favouring H2 uptake by actinobacteria are associated with energy and nutrient limitation. Thus, H2 may be an important energy source for soil microorganisms inhabiting systems in which nutrients are frequently limited.

  19. Enhancing Bioremediation of Oil-contaminated Soils by Controlling Nutrient Transport using Dual Characteristics of Soil Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Y.; Suetsugu, A.; Matsumoto, Y.; Fujihara, A.; Suyama, K.; Miyamoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    Soil structure is heterogeneous with cracks or macropores allowing bypass flow, which may lead to applied chemicals avoiding interaction with soil particles or the contaminated area. We investigated the bioremediation efficiency of oil-contaminated soils by applying suction at the bottom of soil columns during bioremediation. Unsaturated flow conditions were investigated so as to avoid bypass flow and achieve sufficient dispersion of chemicals in the soil column. The boundary conditions at the bottom of the soil columns were 0 kPa and -3 kPa, and were applied to a volcanic ash soil with and without macropores. Unsaturated flow was achieved with -3 kPa and an injection rate of 1/10 of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The resultant biological activities of the effluent increased dramatically in the unsaturated flow with macropores condition. Unsaturated conditions prevented bypass flow and allowed dispersion of the injected nutrients. Unsaturated flow achieved 60-80% of saturation, which enhanced biological activity in the soil column. Remediation results were better for unsaturated conditions because of higher biological activity. Moreover, unsaturated flow with macropores achieved uniform remediation efficiency from upper through lower positions in the column. Finally, taking the applied solution volume into consideration, unsaturated flow with -3 kPa achieved 10 times higher efficiency when compared with conventional saturated flow application. These results suggest that effective use of nutrients or remediation chemicals is possible by avoiding bypass flow and enhancing biological activity using relatively simple and inexpensive techniques.

  20. Tree species and soil nutrient profiles in old-growth forests of the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alison; Perakis, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest provide a unique opportunity to examine tree species – soil relationships in ecosystems that have developed without significant human disturbance. We characterized foliage, forest floor, and mineral soil nutrients associated with four canopy tree species (Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don), and bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum Pursh)) in eight old-growth forests of the Oregon Coast Range. The greatest forest floor accumulations of C, N, P, Ca, Mg, and K occurred under Douglas-fir, primarily due to greater forest floor mass. In mineral soil, western hemlock exhibited significantly lower Ca concentration and sum of cations (Ca + Mg + K) than bigleaf maple, with intermediate values for Douglas-fir and western redcedar. Bigleaf maple explained most species-based differences in foliar nutrients, displaying high concentrations of N, P, Ca, Mg, and K. Foliar P and N:P variations largely reflected soil P variation across sites. The four tree species that we examined exhibited a number of individualistic effects on soil nutrient levels that contribute to biogeochemical heterogeneity in these ecosystems. Where fire suppression and long-term succession favor dominance by highly shade-tolerant western hemlock, our results suggest a potential for declines in both soil Ca availability and soil biogeochemical heterogeneity in old-growth forests.

  1. [Effects of long-term tillage and rice straw returning on soil nutrient pools and Cd concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-guang; Xiao, Xiao-ping; Tang, Hai-ming; Zhang, Hai-lin; Chen, Fu; Chen, Zhong-du; Xue, Jian-fu; Yang, Guang-li

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of tillage and straw returning on soil nutrient and its pools, and soil Cd concentration, and to identify the strategies for rational tillage and remediation of Cd contaminated paddy fields. The experiment was established with no-tillage with straw retention (NTS) , rotary tillage with straw incorporation (RTS) , conventional plow tillage with straw incorporation (CTS), conventional plow tillage with straw removed ( CT) from 2005 to 2013. The results indicated that tillage and rice straw retention had a great impact on soil properties at 0-10 cm soil depth. The soil aeration, and concentrations of soil nutrient and soil Cd increased under CTS, CT, and RTS. Due to the shallow plow layers, soil nutrient pools and the Cd concentration in rice shoot decreased in long-term tilled soil. Under long-term no-tillage, the soil bulk, soil nutrient pools and Cd concentration in rice shoot increased, but concentrations of soil nutrients decreased. In addition, rice straw returning significantly increased the soil nutrient concentrations, cation exchange capacity, depth of plow layer, and soil nutrient pools. However, the Cd in the rice straw was also returned to the soil by rice straw returning, which would not benefit the remediation of soil Cd. Therefore, it is necessary to improve tillage and straw retention practices due to the disadvantages of long-term continuous single tillage method and rice straw returning practices. Some recommended managements (e.g., rotational tillage or subsoiling, reducing straw returning amount, and rotational straw returning) could be good options in enhancing soil fertility and remedying soil pollution.

  2. Nutrient Content in Soils and Adaptability of Corn n Yuanzhou District, Guyuan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to research rational fertilization of corn in Yuanzhou District, Guyuan, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region. [Method] Nutrient con- tents in soils in Yuanzhou District were measured with conventional analysis method and the suitable fertilization scheme of corn growth was proposed based on fertiliz- er-application rule of corn growth and nutrient balance. [Result] Soil in farmlands in Yuanzhou District was of alkalinity; organic matter, N, P and Zn were shortage; S was extremely insufficient; Fe and Mn were moderate; K was abundant; Cu would satisfy crop growth, [Conclusion] The research provides references for yield increase, reduction of chemical fertilizer and related pollution for corn growth.

  3. Diagnosis & Correction of Soil Nutrient Limitations in Intensively managed southern pine forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Florida

    2002-10-25

    Forest productivity is one manner to sequester carbon and it is a renewable energy source. Likewise, efficient use of fertilization can be a significant energy savings. To date, site-specific use of fertilization for the purpose of maximizing forest productivity has not been well developed. Site evaluation of nutrient deficiencies is primarily based on empirical approaches to soil testing and plot fertilizer tests with little consideration for soil water regimes and contributing site factors. This project uses mass flow diffusion theory in a modeling context, combined with process level knowledge of soil chemistry, to evaluate nutrient bioavailability to fast-growing juvenile forest stands growing on coastal plain Spodosols of the southeastern U.S. The model is not soil or site specific and should be useful for a wide range of soil management/nutrient management conditions. In order to use the model, field data of fast-growing southern pine needed to be measured and used in the validation of the model. The field aspect of the study was mainly to provide data that could be used to verify the model. However, we learned much about the growth and development of fast growing loblolly. Carbon allocation patterns, root shoot relationships and leaf area root relationships proved to be new, important information. The Project Objectives were to: (1) Develop a mechanistic nutrient management model based on the COMP8 uptake model. (2) Collect field data that could be used to verify and test the model. (3) Model testing.

  4. [Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qiannan mountainous region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Chuan; Luo, Hong-Xiang; Song, Ze-Min; Guo, Guang-Dong; Chen, Yong-An; Li, Yu-Xiang; Jiang, Yu-Ping; Li, Zhang-Hai

    2014-06-01

    Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qian-nan mountainous region were analyzed using geostatistics and fuzzy c-mean algorithm. Results indicated that the level of soil organic matter (OM) was moderate, and alkalytic nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK) were rich according to tobacco soil nutrient classification standards. Coefficients of variation (CV) of OM, AN, AP and AK were moderate. Contents of OM, AN, AP and AK fitted log-normal distributions. Correlation analysis showed moderate correlations between OM and AN, AP and AK. OM and AN were best described by Gaussian semivariogram models, while AP and AK were described by exponential models. The four nutrients displayed moderate spatial autocorrelation. There were significant differences among lag distances of four soil nutrients. OM, AN, AP and AK in the majority of studied regions varied at moderate to very rich levels, and deficiencies of OM, AN, AP and AK only accounted for 0.93%, 0.53%, 0.24% and 7.91% of the total studied region, respectively. Based on the results, the studied region was divided into two management zones (MZ), namely MZ1 and MZ2, accounting for 69. 8% and 30. 2% of the studied region respectively. The soil levels of OM, AN, AP and AK in MZ1 were significantly lower than those in MZ2 (P < 0.01).

  5. Soil Nutrients in Intensive Agricultural Areas with Different Land-Use Types in Qingzhou County, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Geng-Xing; LI Xiu-Juan; WANG Ri-Yan; LI Tao; YUE Yu-De

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the data obtained from a field survey,the relationship between land use and soil nuttients was evaluated in Qingzhou County,Shandong Province, China,through a statistical analysis of differences in 17 nutrients in five types of cultivated land.The results showed significant effects(P≤0.05 or P≤0.01)of land-use type on soil organic matter and concentration of macronutrients,secondary nutrients,and micronutrients,as well as total salt and soil pH.In vegetable land,because of the large amounts of fertilizer applied to vegetable crops,the concentrations of most soil nutrients,with exception of available Si and micronutrients,were higher than those in grain cropland.Grain cropland had a significantly lower total salt content(P≤0.01)and tended to have a higher soil pH than vegetable land.Within subtypes of land use,dry land,irrigable land,and open-air vegetable land had the highest coefficient of variation(CV)for available P,whereas protected vegetable land had the highest CV for total N and available S.In general,land-use types had greater impact on macronutrients than on secondary nutrients and micronutrients.

  6. The Input of Chemical Fertilizer and Soil Nutrient in Apple Orchard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li-zhi; YOU Hai-xia; WANG Gan; SUN Xue-yan

    2012-01-01

    In order to get the formation about the content of alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen in soil, available phosphorus and available potassium, and the input of chemical fertilizer in apple orchard, we survey 25 peasant households’ input of chemical fertilizer in apple orchard, and collect soil samples for measuring and analysis. The results show that the average input of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium nutrient is 839.6 kg/hm2, 520.4 kg/hm2, and 899.7 kg/hm2, respectively; the input proportion of nitrogen to phosphorus to potassium nutrient is 1∶0.62∶1.07; in 0-60cm soil, the average content of alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen is 53.49 mg/kg, the average content of available phosphorus in soil is 70.73 kg/mg, and the average content of available potassium in soil is 180.1 mg/kg (the proportion of alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen to available phosphorus to available potassium in soil is 1:1.32:3.37). It indicates that the overall level of input of chemical fertilizer in apple orchard is relatively high; the content of alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen in soil is very low on the whole, the content of available phosphorus in soil is very high, and the content of available potassium in soil is high.

  7. Relationship Between Water-Stable Aggregates and Nutrients in Black Soils After Reclamation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qiang; YU Wan-Tai; ZHAO Shao-Hua; ZHANG Lu

    2007-01-01

    Water-stable aggregates, which are an index for the evaluation of the structural properties of the soil, are affected by many factors. Zhaoguang Farm, Longzhen Farm, and Jiusan Farm were chosen as the representative study sites in the region of black soils, a typical soil resource in Northeast China. The variation in the content of>0.25 mm water-stable aggregates and its relationship with the nutrients in black soil were investigated after different years of reclamation. The results showed that the>0.25 mm water-stable aggregates were more in the surface than in the subsurface soil and they changed in the following order: Longzhen Farm>Zhaoguang Farm>Jiusan Farm. The water-stable aggregates decreased sharply at the initial stage of reclamation and then became stable gradually with time. They were significantly correlated with the contents of organic C, total N, total P, and CEC in black soil, with the correlation coefficients r being 0.76, 0.68, 0.61, and 0.81 (P<0.01), respectively; however, their relationships with available P, available K, and total K were unclear. These showed that organic matter was the cementation of soil water-stable aggregates. Increasing decompositions and decreasing inputs of organic matter after reclamation were responsible for the amount of reduction of the water-stable aggregates. Thus, to maintain good soil aggregate structure, attention should be paid to improvement of soil nutrient status, especially the supply of organic C and N.

  8. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment.

  9. Influence of microbially enriched vermicompost on yield, microbial dynamics and soil nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeldurai Tensingh Baliah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been conducted to explore the microbial enrichment of vermicompost with microbial inoculants such as Azospirillum brasilense, Bacillus megaterium and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The enrichment had a positive effect on the crop response, soil biological activity and soil nutrient status. The results indicated that the enriched vermicompost significantly increased crop response of Okra with reference to yield attributes. Further, the microbial enriched vermicompost significantly improved the soil microbial dynamics such as bacteria and fungi and nutrient status such as total N and available P in the amended soil. The enrichment with agronomically important microbes such as nitrogen fixer, phosphate solubilizer and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria had positive response but the response varied among the beneficial microorganisms.

  10. Characteristics of carbon and nitrogen of soil microbial biomass and their relationships with soil nutrients in Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Youjun; WANG Qingkui; WANG Silong; YU Xiaojun

    2007-01-01

    The soil microbial biomass and nutrient status under the native broadleaved forest and Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations at the Huitong National Research Station of Forest Ecosystem (in Hunan Province,midland of China) were examined in this study.The results showed that after the native broadleaved forest was replaced by mono-cultured C.lanceolata or C.lanceolata,soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool decreased significantly.In the 0-10cm soil layer,the concentrations of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen in the broadleaved forest were 800.5 and 84.5 mg/kg,respectively.These were 1.90 and 1.03 times as much as those in the first rotation of the C.lanceolata plantation,and 2.16 and 1.27 times as much as those in the second rotation of the plantation,respectively.While in the 10-20 cm soil layer,the microbial carbon and nitrogen in the broadleaved forest were 475.4 and 63.3 mg/kg,respectively.These were 1.86 and 1.60 times as much as those in the first rotation,and 2.11 and 1.76times as much as those in the second rotation,respectively.Soil nutrient pools,such as total nitrogen,total potassium,NH,+-N,and available potassium,also declined after the C.lanceolata plantation replaced the native broadleaved forest,or Chinese fir was planted continuously.Less litter and slower decay rate in pure Chinese fir plantation were the crucial factors leading to the decrease of soil microbial biomass and nutrient pool in this area.Human disturbance,especially slash-burning and site preparation,was another factor leading to the decrease.There were significant positive correlations between soil microbial carbon and nitrogen and soil nutrients.To improve soil quality and maintain sustainable productivity, some measures,including planting mixed conifer with hardwood,preserving residues after harvest,and adopting scientific site preparation,should be taken.

  11. Dust and nutrient enrichment by wind erosion from Danish soils in dependence of tillage direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Behbahani, Ali; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion is a selective process, which promotes erosion of fine particles. Therefore, it can be assumed that increasing erosion rates are generally associated with increasing loss of dust sized particles and nutrients. However, this selective process is strongly affected by the orientation and respective trapping efficiency of tillage ridges and furrows. Since tillage ridges are often the only protection measure available on poorly aggregated soils in absence of a protective vegetation cover, it is very important to know which orientation respective to the dominant wind direction provides best protection. This knowledge could be very helpful for planning erosion protection measures on fields with high wind erosion susceptibility. The main objective of this study, therefore, was to determine the effect of tillage direction on dust and nutrient mobilization by wind, using wind tunnel simulations. In order to assess the relationship between the enrichment ratio of specific particle sizes and the amount of eroded nutrients, three soils with loamy sand texture, but varying amounts of sand-sized particles, were selected. In addition, a soil with slightly less sand, but much higher organic matter content was chosen. The soils were tested with three different soil surface scenarios - flat surface, parallel tillage, perpendicular tillage. The parallel tillage operation experienced the greatest erosion rates, independent of soil type. Particles with D50 between 100-155 μm showed the greatest risk of erosion. However, due to a greater loss of dust sized particles from perpendicularly tilled surfaces, this wind-surface arrangement showed a significant increase in nutrient enrichment ratio compared to parallel tillage and flat surfaces. The main reason for this phenomenon is most probably the trapping of larger particles in the perpendicular furrows. This indicates that the highest rate of soil protection does not necessarily coincide with lowest soil nutrient losses and

  12. Evolution of root plasticity responses to variation in soil nutrient distribution and concentration

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Root plasticity, a trait that can respond to selective pressure, may help plants forage for nutrients in heterogeneous soils. Agricultural breeding programs have artificially selected for increased yield under comparatively homogeneous soil conditions, potentially decreasing the capacity for plasticity in crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). However, the effects of domestication on the evolution of root plasticity are essentially unknown. Using a split container approach, we examined th...

  13. Soil, water and nutrient losses by interrill erosion from green cane cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilka Rocha Vasconcelos da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Interrill erosion occurs by the particle breakdown caused by raindrop impact, by particle transport in surface runoff, by dragging and suspension of particles disaggregated from the soil surface, thus removing organic matter and nutrients that are essential for agricultural production. Crop residues on the soil surface modify the characteristics of the runoff generated by rainfall and the consequent particle breakdown and sediment transport resulting from erosion. The objective of this study was to determine the minimum amount of mulch that must be maintained on the soil surface of a sugarcane plantation to reduce the soil, water and nutrient losses by decreasing interrill erosion. The study was conducted in Pradópolis, São Paulo State, in 0.5 x 1.0 m plots of an Oxisol, testing five treatments in four replications. The application rates were based on the crop residue production of the area of 1.4 kg m-2 (T1- no cane trash; T2-25 % of the cane trash; T3- 50 % trash; T4-75 % trash; T5-100 % sugarcane residues on the surface, and simulated rainfall was applied at an intensity of 65 mm h-1 for 60 min. Runoff samples were collected in plastic containers and soon after taken to the laboratory to quantify the losses of soil, water and nutrients. To minimize soil loss by interrill erosion, 75 % of the cane mulch must be maintained on the soil, to control water loss 50 % must be maintained and 25 % trash controls organic matter and nutrient losses. This information can contribute to optimize the use of this resource for soil conservation on the one hand and the production of clean energy in sugar and alcohol industries on the other.

  14. Soil carbon fractions under maize-wheat system: effect of tillage and nutrient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, S; Manjaiah, K M; Pal, Sharmistha; Singh, A K

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in sustaining agroecosystems and maintaining environmental quality as it acts as a major source and sink of atmospheric carbon. The present study aims to assess the impact of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon pools in a maize-wheat cropping system of Indo-Gangetic Plains, India. Soil samples from a split plot design with two tillage systems (bed planting and conventional tillage) and six nutrient treatments (T1 = control, T2 = 120 kg urea-N ha(-1), T3 = T2 (25 % N substituted by FYM), T4 = T2 (25 % N substituted by sewage sludge), T5 = T2 + crop residue, T6 = 100 % organic source (50 % FYM + 25 % biofertilizer + 25 % crop residue) were used for determining the organic carbon pools. Results show that there was a significant improvement in Walkley and Black carbon in soil under integrated and organic nutrient management treatments. KMnO4-oxidizable carbon content of soil varied from 0.63 to 1.50 g kg(-1) in soils and was found to be a better indicator for monitoring the impact of agricultural management practices on quality of soil organic carbon than microbial biomass carbon. Tillage and its interaction were found to significantly influence only those soil organic carbon fractions closely associated with aggregate stability viz, labile polysaccharides and glomalin. The highest amount of C4-derived carbon was found to be in plots receiving recommended doses of N as urea (29 %) followed by control plots (25 %). The carbon management index ranged between 82 to 195 and was better in integrated nutrient sources than ones receiving recommended doses of nutrients through mineral fertilizers alone.

  15. Oxygen isotopes and P cycle in the soil/plant system: where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Federica; Pfahler, Verena; von Sperber, Christian; Bernasconi, Stefano; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major nutrient for all living organisms. In the terrestrial environment, P is a double-edged sword. For this reason, a better understanding of P cycling in the soil/plant system and the processes influencing its transfers and transformations is needed to provide agricultural and environmental managers with better concepts for P use. In fact, whereas the effect of abiotic reactions on the P concentration in the soil solution are well understood, we still know too little about the forms of soil organic P, and about the importance of soil biological processes (e.g. on organic matter mineralization-immobilization, or on the role of microorganisms) in controlling P availability. Together with more traditional and routine analysis for P, in the last 20 years researchers have started using the ratio of stable oxygen isotopes in phosphate (δ18O-P) to investigate P cycle in the soil/plant system. The scientific community interested in using this isotopic tracer is expanding because δ18O-P has proven to provide important information on biological processes. A large part of the published studies has shown how δ18O-P can be used to track P in the environment, providing information on P transfer from one pool and/or sink to the other. The other part has used this tool as a tracer of biological activity, clarifying how P is cycled through the microbial biomass or by plants. Together with a short review of the most relevant published results, we will discuss whether, and under which conditions, the δ18O-P can be applied to study P cycling and transformations from the process to the ecosystem level.

  16. Changes in land use driven by urbanization impact nitrogen cycling and the microbial community composition in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Marshall, Christopher W.; Cheng, Minying; Xu, Huijuan; Li, Hu; Yang, Xiaoru; Zheng, Tianling

    2017-03-01

    Transition of populations from rural to urban living causes landscape changes and alters the functionality of soil ecosystems. It is unclear how this urbanization disturbs the microbial ecology of soils and how the disruption influences nitrogen cycling. In this study, microbial communities in turfgrass-grown soils from urban and suburban areas around Xiamen City were compared to microbial communities in the soils from rural farmlands. The potential N2O emissions, potential denitrification activity, and abundances of denitrifiers were higher in the rural farmland soils compared with the turfgrass soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) were more abundant than ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in turfgrass soils. Within turfgrass soils, the potential nitrification activities and AOA abundances were higher in the urban than in the suburban soils. These results indicate a more pivotal role of AOA in nitrification, especially in urban soils. Microbial community composition was distinctly grouped along urbanization categories (urban, suburban, and rural) classified according to the population density, which can in part be attributed to the differences in soil properties. These observed changes could potentially have a broader impact on soil nutrient availability and greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Changes in land use driven by urbanization impact nitrogen cycling and the microbial community composition in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Marshall, Christopher W.; Cheng, Minying; Xu, Huijuan; Li, Hu; Yang, Xiaoru; Zheng, Tianling

    2017-01-01

    Transition of populations from rural to urban living causes landscape changes and alters the functionality of soil ecosystems. It is unclear how this urbanization disturbs the microbial ecology of soils and how the disruption influences nitrogen cycling. In this study, microbial communities in turfgrass-grown soils from urban and suburban areas around Xiamen City were compared to microbial communities in the soils from rural farmlands. The potential N2O emissions, potential denitrification activity, and abundances of denitrifiers were higher in the rural farmland soils compared with the turfgrass soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) were more abundant than ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in turfgrass soils. Within turfgrass soils, the potential nitrification activities and AOA abundances were higher in the urban than in the suburban soils. These results indicate a more pivotal role of AOA in nitrification, especially in urban soils. Microbial community composition was distinctly grouped along urbanization categories (urban, suburban, and rural) classified according to the population density, which can in part be attributed to the differences in soil properties. These observed changes could potentially have a broader impact on soil nutrient availability and greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:28281565

  18. Characterization of Surface Runoff, Soil Erosion, Nutrient Loss and their relationship for Agricultural plots in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan La

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to explore the existence of relationship among rainfall, runoff, soil loss and nutrient losses from the agricultural plots located at Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India. The natural rainfall generated runoff and soil loss from the 12 agricultural runoff plots (with four land uses namely sugarcane, maize, black gram and fallow land and having slope 5%, 3% and 1% for each land use were recorded during monsoon period (June 2013 to September 2013. The highest grade plot was found to yield the highest magnitude of runoff (i.e. runoff coefficient for a given land use and soil type. The soil loss from the experimental plots of various characteristics shown that for given rainfall input, on average, the plots with sugarcane land use were found to produce high amount of soil loss followed by Maize, fallow land and Blackgram. The nutrients losses were very low in the sediment as compared to the dissolved losses. Nutrients concentrations in sediment and runoff water were found to be more during the critical period. The higher limit of seasonal sediment yield obtained from the present study is lower than soil loss tolerance limit of 2.5 to 12.5 t/ha /yr for Indian subcontinent.

  19. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility. PMID:27589265

  20. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility.

  1. Consequences of warming and resource quality on the stoichiometry and nutrient cycling of a stream shredder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Martí, Esther; Romaní, Anna M; Muñoz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    As a result of climate change, streams are warming and their runoff has been decreasing in most temperate areas. These changes can affect consumers directly by increasing their metabolic rates and modifying their physiology and indirectly by changing the quality of the resources on which organisms depend. In this study, a common stream detritivore (Echinogammarus berilloni Catta) was reared at two temperatures (15 and 20°C) and fed Populus nigra L. leaves that had been conditioned either in an intermittent or permanent reach to evaluate the effects of resource quality and increased temperatures on detritivore performance, stoichiometry and nutrient cycling. The lower quality (i.e., lower protein, soluble carbohydrates and higher C:P and N:P ratios) of leaves conditioned in pools resulted in compensatory feeding and lower nutrient retention capacity by E. berilloni. This effect was especially marked for phosphorus, which was unexpected based on predictions of ecological stoichiometry. When individuals were fed pool-conditioned leaves at warmer temperatures, their growth rates were higher, but consumers exhibited less efficient assimilation and higher mortality. Furthermore, the shifts to lower C:P ratios and higher lipid concentrations in shredder body tissues suggest that structural molecules such as phospholipids are preserved over other energetic C-rich macromolecules such as carbohydrates. These effects on consumer physiology and metabolism were further translated into feces and excreta nutrient ratios. Overall, our results show that the effects of reduced leaf quality on detritivore nutrient retention were more severe at higher temperatures because the shredders were not able to offset their increased metabolism with increased consumption or more efficient digestion when fed pool-conditioned leaves. Consequently, the synergistic effects of impaired food quality and increased temperatures might not only affect the physiology and survival of detritivores but

  2. Consequences of warming and resource quality on the stoichiometry and nutrient cycling of a stream shredder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Mas-Martí

    Full Text Available As a result of climate change, streams are warming and their runoff has been decreasing in most temperate areas. These changes can affect consumers directly by increasing their metabolic rates and modifying their physiology and indirectly by changing the quality of the resources on which organisms depend. In this study, a common stream detritivore (Echinogammarus berilloni Catta was reared at two temperatures (15 and 20°C and fed Populus nigra L. leaves that had been conditioned either in an intermittent or permanent reach to evaluate the effects of resource quality and increased temperatures on detritivore performance, stoichiometry and nutrient cycling. The lower quality (i.e., lower protein, soluble carbohydrates and higher C:P and N:P ratios of leaves conditioned in pools resulted in compensatory feeding and lower nutrient retention capacity by E. berilloni. This effect was especially marked for phosphorus, which was unexpected based on predictions of ecological stoichiometry. When individuals were fed pool-conditioned leaves at warmer temperatures, their growth rates were higher, but consumers exhibited less efficient assimilation and higher mortality. Furthermore, the shifts to lower C:P ratios and higher lipid concentrations in shredder body tissues suggest that structural molecules such as phospholipids are preserved over other energetic C-rich macromolecules such as carbohydrates. These effects on consumer physiology and metabolism were further translated into feces and excreta nutrient ratios. Overall, our results show that the effects of reduced leaf quality on detritivore nutrient retention were more severe at higher temperatures because the shredders were not able to offset their increased metabolism with increased consumption or more efficient digestion when fed pool-conditioned leaves. Consequently, the synergistic effects of impaired food quality and increased temperatures might not only affect the physiology and survival of

  3. Influence of activated charcoal amendment to contaminated soil on dieldrin and nutrient uptake by cucumbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilber, Isabel; Wyss, Gabriela S; Mäder, Paul; Bucheli, Thomas D; Meier, Isabel; Vogt, Lea; Schulin, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) amendments have been suggested as a promising, cost-effective method to immobilize organic contaminants in soil. We performed pot experiments over two years with cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in agricultural soil with 0.07 mg kg(-1) of weathered dieldrin and 0, 200, 400, and 800 mg AC per kg soil. Dieldrin fresh weight concentrations in cucumber fruits were significantly reduced from 0.012 to an average of 0.004 mg kg(-1), and total uptake from 2 to 1 microg in the 800 mg kg(-1) AC treatment compared to the untreated soil. The treatment effects differed considerably between the two years, due to different meteorological conditions. AC soil treatments did neither affect the availability of nutrients to the cucumber plants nor their yield (total fruit wet weight per pot). Thus, some important prerequisites for the successful application of AC amendments to immobilize organic pollutants in agricultural soils can be considered fulfilled.

  4. A review on beneficial effects of rhizosphere bacteria on soil nutrient availability and plant nutrient uptake.

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio Vega, Nelson Walter

    2011-01-01

    Este artículo se constituye en una revisión de los beneficios de bacterias rizosféricas sobre la nutrición vegetal. La interacción entre planta y bacterias solubilizadoras de fosfato es explicada en mayor detalle y usada como modelo para ilustrar el rol que algunas bacterias de la rizosfera juegan en la disponibilidad de nutrientes en el suelo. Las condiciones ambientales de la rizosfera también se discuten con detalle. Los beneficios de estas bacterias han sido obtenidos, y mejorados, en pre...

  5. The role of the everglades mangrove ecotone region (EMER) in regulating nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Twilley, R.R.; Davis, S.E.; Childers, D.L.; Simard, M.; Chambers, R.; Jaffe, R.; Boyer, J.N.; Rudnick, D.T.; Zhang, K.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Ewe, S.M.L.; Price, R.M.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.J.; Michot, B.; Meselhe, E.; Nuttle, W.; Troxler, T.G.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors summarize the main findings of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (FCE-LTER) program in the EMER, within the context of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), to understand how regional processes, mediated by water flow, control population and ecosystem dynamics across the EMER landscape. Tree canopies with maximum height <3 m cover 49% of the EMER, particularly in the SE region. These scrub/dwarf mangroves are the result of a combination of low soil phosphorus (P < 59 ??g P g dw-1) in the calcareous marl substrate and long hydroperiod. Phosphorus limits the EMER and its freshwater watersheds due to the lack of terrigenous sediment input and the phosphorus-limited nature of the freshwater Everglades. Reduced freshwater delivery over the past 50years, combined with Everglades compartmentalization and a 10 cm rise in coastal sea level, has led to the landward transgression (???1.5 km in 54 years) of the mangrove ecotone. Seasonal variation in freshwater input strongly controls the temporal variation of nitrogen and P exports (99%) from the Everglades to Florida Bay. Rapid changes in nutrient availability and vegetation distribution during the last 50years show that future ecosystem restoration actions and land use decisions can exert a major influence, similar to sea level rise over the short term, on nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in the EMER. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  6. Nutrient Availability in the Surface Horizons of Four Tropical Agricultural Soils in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verloo, MG.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of nutrient availability are important for the understanding and the estimation of soil fertility in areas like West Africa, where low nutrient availability is still one of the major constraints for food production. Physico-chemical soil analyses were used to assess the fertility status of the surface horizon samples of four Malian agricultural soils, (Bougouni, Kangaba, Baguinéda and Gao abbreviated as Bgni, Kgba, Bgda and Gao. Soil texture was sandy loam for Bgni and Kgba, sandy clay loam for Bgda and loamy sand for Gao. Soil pH values varied from moderately acid for Bgda to neutral for the other sites. Organic carbon ranged from very low (for Gao or low (for Bgni and Bgda to medium (for Kgba. Total N, P and CEC were low for the four soils. Available contents of Fe and Mn in all soils, except Gao, were higher than the critical levels while available Cu and Zn contents (except in Kgba were below or close to it. Results indicated that Kgba soil had a better macronutrient status for plant growth than the other sites.

  7. Insights into the biodegradation of weathered hydrocarbons in contaminated soils by bioaugmentation and nutrient stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Brassington, Kirsty J; Prpich, George; Paton, Graeme I; Semple, Kirk T; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The potential for biotransformation of weathered hydrocarbon residues in soils collected from two commercial oil refinery sites (Soil A and B) was studied in microcosm experiments. Soil A has previously been subjected to on-site bioremediation and it was believed that no further degradation was possible while soil B has not been subjected to any treatment. A number of amendment strategies including bioaugmentation with hydrocarbon degrader, biostimulation with nutrients and soil grinding, were applied to the microcosms as putative biodegradation improvement strategies. The hydrocarbon concentrations in each amendment group were monitored throughout 112 days incubation. Microcosms treated with biostimulation (BS) and biostimulation/bioaugmentation (BS + BA) showed the most significant reductions in the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. However, soil grinding was shown to reduce the effectiveness of a nutrient treatment on the extent of biotransformation by up to 25% and 20% for the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions, respectively. This is likely due to the disruption to the indigenous microbial community in the soil caused by grinding. Further, ecotoxicological responses (mustard seed germination and Microtox assays) showed that a reduction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was not directly correlable to reduction in toxicity; thus monitoring TPH alone is not sufficient for assessing the environmental risk of a contaminated site after remediation.

  8. Effects of wildfire on soil nutrients in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caon, L.; Vallejo, V.R.; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity and fast-spreading wildfires are natural in the Mediterranean basin. However, since 1960, wildfire occurrence has increased because of changes in land use, which resulted in extensive land abandonment, increases in the fuel load and continuity in the landscape. The level of soil degra

  9. Soil nutrient heterogeneity alters competition between two perennial grass species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, B.; Kroon, de H.; Berendse, F.

    2001-01-01

    Differences in root foraging behavior between species have been well documented, but the effects of these differences on belowground competitive ability are only beginning to be studied. Here we report the results of a competition experiment in homogeneous and heterogeneous soils between two species

  10. Inorganic Nutrients Increase Humification Efficiency and C-Sequestration in an Annually Cropped Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive A Kirkby

    Full Text Available Removing carbon dioxide (CO2 from the atmosphere and storing the carbon (C in resistant soil organic matter (SOM is a global priority to restore soil fertility and help mitigate climate change. Although it is widely assumed that retaining rather than removing or burning crop residues will increase SOM levels, many studies have failed to demonstrate this. We hypothesised that the microbial nature of resistant SOM provides a predictable nutrient stoichiometry (C:nitrogen, C:phosphorus and C:sulphur-C:N:P:S to target using supplementary nutrients when incorporating C-rich crop residues into soil. An improvement in the humification efficiency of the soil microbiome as a whole, and thereby C-sequestration, was predicted. In a field study over 5 years, soil organic-C (SOC stocks to 1.6 m soil depth were increased by 5.5 t C ha-1 where supplementary nutrients were applied with incorporated crop residues, but were reduced by 3.2 t C ha-1 without nutrient addition, with 2.9 t C ha-1 being lost from the 0-10 cm layer. A net difference of 8.7 t C ha-1 was thus achieved in a cropping soil over a 5 year period, despite the same level of C addition. Despite shallow incorporation (0.15 m, more than 50% of the SOC increase occurred below 0.3 m, and as predicted by the stoichiometry, increases in resistant SOC were accompanied by increases in soil NPS at all depths. Interestingly the C:N, C:P and C:S ratios decreased significantly with depth possibly as a consequence of differences in fungi to bacteria ratio. Our results demonstrate that irrespective of the C-input, it is essential to balance the nutrient stoichiometry of added C to better match that of resistant SOM to increase SOC sequestration. This has implications for global practices and policies aimed at increasing SOC sequestration and specifically highlight the need to consider the hidden cost and availability of associated nutrients in building soil-C.

  11. Effects of Pig Manure Organic Fertilizer Application on Available Nutrient Content and Soil Aggregate Distribution in Fluvo-aquic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHI Wen-xuan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on environmental risk caused by livestock manure disorderly discharged from integrated livestock and poultry industry. 2-year pot experiment was carried out to study the effects of pig manure organic fertilizer on fluvo-aquic soil organic carbon, available nutrient content and soil aggregate distribution, which designed in 5 levels of organic fertilizer application(0, 6.7, 13.3, 26.7, 40.0 g·kg-1 soil. The results showed that the organic carbon, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, available P and available K contents in soil were enhanced with organic fertilizer application increasing, and the indicators of soil were increased significantly in second year, such as organic carbon content was 2.7%~54.0% higher than that of the first year, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen content was higher 6.7%~34.6%, available P content was higher 36.8%~159.5% and available K content was higher 20.3%~35.7%. There was a significant linear relationship between soil organic carbon content and external organic carbon input. Organic fertilizer application could significantly improve lettuce yield, and it had a significant effect. The soil micro-aggregate contents for 0.053~0.25 mm and 0.5 mm soil macro-aggregates were increased with organic fertilizer application increasing. Organic fertilizer application could promote soil macro-aggregates formation, when the pig manure organic fertilizer applied 40.0 g·kg-1 soil, the contents of >0.25 mm soil aggregates reached maximum, and also the mean weight diameter(MWD and geometric average diameter(GWD of soil aggregates were higher than that of other treatments, the soil agglomeration became more stronger and the soil structure became more stable.

  12. Nutrient cycles in agricultural systems at sub-catchment scale within the UK and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellarby, Jessica; Surridge, Ben; Haygarth, Philip M.; Lai, Xin; Zhang, Guilong; Song, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jianbin; Meng, Fanqiao; Shen, Jianbo; Rahn, Clive; Smith, Laurence; Burke, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Diffuse water pollution from agriculture (DWPA) represents a significant challenge in both the UK and China. The UK has developed policies and practices which seek to mitigate DWPA, yet the risks and adverse impacts of DWPA remain widespread. In contrast, China's past priorities have largely focussed on food security, with an emphasis on increasing food production through high fertiliser application rates with little attention being paid to enhanced nutrient export from land to water and to air. This has contributed to severe environmental problems which are only now beginning to be recognised and addressed. We have prepared nutrient balances (phosphorus and nitrogen) in contrasting agricultural production systems at sub-catchment scale within China and the UK. These draw from a variety of sources ranging from general yearly statistics collected by the respective government to farm surveys. Our aim is to use the resulting nutrient balances to underpin the sharing of knowledge and innovation to mitigate DWPA in both nations. In the UK, the case studies focus on the three Demonstration Test Catchment locations, covering a range of livestock and arable production systems across England. Here, the high frequency monitoring of phosphorus river loads enables the cross-validation of the simple nutrient budget approaches applied in this study. In China, our case studies span kiwi orchard, fruit and vegetable solar greenhouse systems, double cropped rice-wheat and wheat-maize production systems. Substantial differences in nutrient stocks and flows exist between individual production systems both across and within the two countries. These differences will be expressed along the source-mobilisation-delivery-impact continuum that underpins our budgets for both phosphorus and nitrogen. We will present the phosphorus cycles of some case studies and highlight their challenges and relevance at sub-catchment scale. Based on our nutrient budgets, general recommendations can be

  13. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  14. Facilitated Bioavailability of PAHs to Native Soil Bacteria Promoted by Nutrient Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, J. J.; Li, J.

    2006-12-01

    Facilitated bioavailability refers to the ability of an organism to have access to pools of non-labile chemical. Mechanisms proposed for this ability include release of biosurfactants, direct mining of adsorbed chemical, alteration of interfacial chemistry, and passive effects of attached biofilms on molecular diffusion. We investigated the biodegradation by indigenous organisms of a set of 16 standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal tar contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant site in Connecticut in well- mixed aerobic reactors containing various additives over a 93-106 day period. Parallel desorption experiments were conducted in the presence of a biocide and an excess of Tenax-TA adsorbent beads to simulate desorption to infinite dilution (i.e., maximal concentration gradient for diffusion). Both biotransformation and desorption decreased with PAH ring size, as expected. Biodegradation by native organisms was strongly accelerated by addition of inorganic nutrients (N, P, K, and trace metals). In the absence of added nutrients, the biodegradation resistant fraction correlated well with the desorption resistant fraction. However, in the presence of added nutrients, the extent of biodegradation was greater than the extent of desorption except for the largest compounds, which neither degraded nor desorbed. The ability of nutrients to accelerate degradation of bioavailable PAHs by native cells indicates that the persistence of PAHs for many decades at this site is likely due to nutrient-limited natural attenuation. The surprising result of this study is that application of nutrients promotes `facilitated bioavailability' of PAHs in this soil to indigenous microorganisms.

  15. Coupling of soil respiration and nutrient mineralization: What is the role of land use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huei Ying; Schoening, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion

    2017-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is coupling carbon (C) and nutrient mineralization. In order to meet their stoichiometric requirements for growth, it can be assumed that microbes have to mineralize (or remove) relative more organic carbon (OC) to acquire limiting nutrients at sites with large carbon-to-nutrient (C:N, C:P, C:S) ratios of SOM. Land use and management intensities are important controls for belowground C and nutrient availabilities, but their effect on the combined carbon and nutrient mineralization and carbon use efficiency (CUE) have rarely been addressed. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of land use (forest versus grassland), forest management (unmanaged beech forest and age-class managed coniferous and deciduous forests) and grassland management (fertilized and unfertilized meadow, mown pasture and pasture) on the stoichiometry of mineralized C, N, P and S. We incubated a total of 120 topsoil samples (0-10 cm) from three German study regions with different soil types for two weeks in microlysimeters and measured CO2 evolution and leachable organic carbon (DOC) and nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, SO42- and PO43-). The relationships between metabolic quotient (microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass; qCO2) and soil nutrient concentrations were compared between different land use and management. Preliminary results showed that qCO2 was significantly higher (pnutrient limitations in forest, more energy may be allocated for maintenance than growth. In forest, qCO2 was strongly correlated to C:N ratio (r =0.84, p0.05). As C:N ratio was significantly higher (p0.05). The stronger correlation in forests might indicate higher P limitation as compared to grasslands. Soil pH showed strong negative effect on qCO2 in the forests (r =-0.68, psoil pH in forests results in higher qCO2 and lower CUE, but higher soil pH in the grasslands could also constrain microbial activities and result in lower CUE. Our first results

  16. Nitrogen cycling in young mine soils in southwest Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rensheng.

    1991-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study the nature of N form and dynamics in southwest Virginia mine soils. Fresh mine spoils contained a large amount of indigenous N, ranging from 650 to 2,500 mg/kg soil, which complicated N studies. Most of the indigenous N was geologic N which was unavailable to plants. The geologic N came from either 2:1 silicate minerals or coal fragments. Active N, consisting of hydrolyzable organic N and exchangeable N, comprised the minor fraction of indigenous N available to plants. With mine soil development, N accumulated mainly in the surface layer of mine soils via symbiotic fixation. Based on this fact, a simple, accurate method for measuring N accumulation which is corrected for indigenous N (Corr-N) has been developed. Corr-N is obtained by subtracting soil total N at 10-20 cm from soil total N at 0-5 cm. Under natural conditions the annual rate of N accumulation estimated by this method was 26 kg N/ha. Careful management enhanced N accumulation, and thus reduced the time required to build up soil N and to establish a vigorous, self-sustaining vegetative community in mine soils. Selecting proper overburn materials as a topsoil substitute, planting suitable legume species, and adding sewage sludge are effective methods for stimulating quick N accumulation and successful reclamation. For example, in experimental plots containing birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) the accumulation rate was more than 150 kg N/ha per year. This work also showed that about 43%-63% of litter N was released during one year's decomposition, and about 2.3%-11.6% of litter N was subsequently taken up by plants depending on the plant species and soil N level. This indicates that N will effectively cycle through the plant-litter-soil system once a vegetative community is established on the young mine soil.

  17. Combating Human Micronutrient Deficiencies through Soil Management Practices that Enhance Bioavailability of Nutrients to Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition affects the health and well being of 3 billion people globally. Identifying means to improve the micronutrient density in the edible portions of crops is an important way to combat nutrient deficiencies. By studying how plants obtain micronutrients from the soil, we can develop methods to enhance uptake. Although more…

  18. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1997-01-01


    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute

  19. Exploring the Nutrient Release Potential of Organic Materials as Integrated Soil Fertility Management Components Using SAFERNAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maro, G.P.; Mrema, J.P.; Msanya, B.M.; Janssen, B.H.; Teri, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the nutrient release potential of different organic materials and assess their role in integrated soil fertility management for coffee using the new coffee yield model SAFERNAC. It involved an incubation experiment conducted at TaCRI Lyamungu Screenhouse for

  20. Reciprocal effects of litter from exotic and congeneric native plant species via soil nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meisner, A.; Boer, de W.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive exotic plant species are often expected to benefit exclusively from legacy effects of their litter inputs on soil processes and nutrient availability. However, there are relatively few experimental tests determining how litter of exotic plants affects their own growth conditions compared to

  1. Contaminant immobilization and nutrient release by carbonized biomass in water and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chars contain functional surface groups such as carboxylic, phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl, and quinones, in addition to porous structures that can impact essential soil properties such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), pH, and retention of water, nutrients, and pesticides. Physical and chemical pro...

  2. Protein and Chlorophyll Contents of Solanum melongena on Diesel Oil Polluted Soil Amended with Nutrient Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Akujobi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the remediation effect of nutrient amendments of diesel oil polluted soil on protein and chlorophyll contents of eggplant (Solanum melongena. Soil samples were polluted and amended separately with different weights of poultry waste, pig waste, cow dung and inorganic fertilizer. Soil samples were also polluted with diesel oil without amendment to achieve 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% pollution. Samples were analyzed at two weeks interval for sixteen weeks. The plant protein and chlorophyll were affected adversely by the diesel oil pollution and the higher the level of pollution, the more the effect. The nutrient amendments were able to remedy the effect of the diesel oil pollution. The remediation effect was nutrient weight dependent and the best remediation effect was observed in poultry waste amended samples. This study has shown that diesel oil contaminated soil may have adverse effect on the protein and chlorophyll contents of plants, but this can be remedied by addition of organic nutrient supplements especially poultry waste.

  3. Soil biota enhance agricultural sustainability by improving crop yield, nutrient uptake and reducing nitrogen leaching losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bender, S.F.; van der Heijden, M.G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient resource use is a key factor for sustainable production and a necessity for meeting future global food demands. However, the factors that control resource use efficiency in agro-ecosystems are only partly understood. We investigated the influence of soil biota on nutrient leaching,

  4. Exploring the Nutrient Release Potential of Organic Materials as Integrated Soil Fertility Management Components Using SAFERNAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maro, G.P.; Mrema, J.P.; Msanya, B.M.; Janssen, B.H.; Teri, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the nutrient release potential of different organic materials and assess their role in integrated soil fertility management for coffee using the new coffee yield model SAFERNAC. It involved an incubation experiment conducted at TaCRI Lyamungu Screenhouse for 18

  5. Combating Human Micronutrient Deficiencies through Soil Management Practices that Enhance Bioavailability of Nutrients to Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition affects the health and well being of 3 billion people globally. Identifying means to improve the micronutrient density in the edible portions of crops is an important way to combat nutrient deficiencies. By studying how plants obtain micronutrients from the soil, we can develop methods to enhance uptake. Although more…

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus resorption in a neotropical rain forest of a nutrient-rich soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Martínez-Sánchez

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In tropical forests with nutrient-rich soil tree’s nutrient resorption from senesced leaves has not always been observed to be low. Perhaps this lack of consistence is partly owing to the nutrient resorption methods used. The aim of the study was to analyse N and P resorption proficiency from tropical rain forest trees in a nutrient-rich soil. It was hypothesised that trees would exhibit low nutrient resorption in a nutrient-rich soil. The soil concentrations of total N and extractable P, among other physical and chemical characteristics, were analysed in 30 samples in the soil surface (10 cm of three undisturbed forest plots at ‘Estación de Biología Los Tuxtlas’ on the east coast of Mexico (18°34’ - 18°36’ N, 95°04’ - 95°09’ W. N and P resorption proficiency were determined from senescing leaves in 11 dominant tree species. Nitrogen was analysed by microkjeldahl digestion with sulphuric acid and distilled with boric acid, and phosphorus was analysed by digestion with nitric acid and perchloric acid. Soil was rich in total N (0.50%, n = 30 and extractable P (4.11 µg g-1, n = 30. As expected, trees showed incomplete N (1.13%, n = 11 and P (0.11%, n = 11 resorption. With a more accurate method of nutrient resorption assessment, it is possible to prove that a forest community with a nutrient-rich soil can have low levels of N and P resorption. Rev. Biol. Trop. 53(3-4: 353-359. Epub 2005 Oct 3.En las selvas tropicales con suelos fértiles se ha observado que la reabsorción de nutrientes de los arboles de las hojas seniles no siempre es baja. Esta falta de consistencia en el resultado es talvez debida en parte a la metodología de reabsorción de nutrientes utilizada. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la reabsorción final de N y P de arboles de la selva húmeda tropical en un suelo rico en nutrientes. La hipótesis planteada fue que en un suelo rico en nutrientes los arboles presentarían una baja reabsorción final de

  7. Conversion of tropical forests to smallholder rubber and oil palm plantations impacts nutrient leaching losses and nutrient retention efficiency in highly weathered soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Syahrul; Corre, Marife D.; Matson, Amanda L.; Schulte-Bisping, Hubert; Rahayu Utami, Sri; van Straaten, Oliver; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2017-04-01

    We examined the impact of forest conversion to rubber and oil palm plantations on nutrient leaching and nutrient retention efficiency in the soil. In Jambi province, Indonesia, we selected two landscapes with highly weathered Acrisol soils, which differed in texture: loam and clay. Within each landscape, we compared two reference land uses (lowland forest and jungle rubber, defined as rubber trees interspersed in secondary forest) with two converted land uses (smallholder rubber and oil palm plantations). The first three land uses were represented by four replicate sites and the oil palm by three sites within each landscape. We measured leaching losses using suction cup lysimeters, sampled biweekly to monthly from February to December 2013. In these highly weathered soils, texture controlled nutrient- and water-holding capacity and leaching losses. The clay Acrisol reference land uses had larger soil cation exchange capacity, base saturation and soil organic C than those in the loam Acrisol; this resulted in lower leaching of dissolved N and base cations (P=0.01-0.06) and in higher retention efficiency of N and base cations in the clay soils (Poil palm plantations resulted in increased leaching of dissolved N, organic C and base cation (Poil palm plantations had decreased soil solution pH and increased dissolved Al. The unfertilized rubber plantations had low nutrient leaching fluxes brought about by its reduced soil fertility. Our results highlight the importance of developing soil management practices to maintain soil fertility in unfertilized rubber plantations and to increase nutrient retention efficiency in fertilized oil palm plantations in order to minimize the reductions of ecosystem provisioning services (e.g., soil fertility and water quality) in these converted landscapes.

  8. Life-Cycle Assessment of Advanced Nutrient Removal Technologies for Wastewater Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sheikh M; Eckelman, Matthew J; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    Advanced nutrient removal processes, while improving the water quality of the receiving water body, can also produce indirect environmental and health impacts associated with increases in usage of energy, chemicals, and other material resources. The present study evaluated three levels of treatment for nutrient removal (N and P) using 27 representative treatment process configurations. Impacts were assessed across multiple environmental and health impacts using life-cycle assessment (LCA) following the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) impact-assessment method. Results show that advanced technologies that achieve high-level nutrient removal significantly decreased local eutrophication potential, while chemicals and electricity use for these advanced treatments, particularly multistage enhanced tertiary processes and reverse osmosis, simultaneously increased eutrophication indirectly and contributed to other potential environmental and health impacts including human and ecotoxicity, global warming potential, ozone depletion, and acidification. Average eutrophication potential can be reduced by about 70% when Level 2 (TN = 3 mg/L; TP = 0.1 mg/L) treatments are employed instead of Level 1 (TN = 8 mg/L; TP = 1 mg/L), but the implementation of more advanced tertiary processes for Level 3 (TN = 1 mg/L; TP = 0.01 mg/L) treatment may only lead to an additional 15% net reduction in life-cycle eutrophication potential.

  9. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavenia Ratnarajah

    Full Text Available The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas.

  10. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas.

  11. Agroforestry systems, nutrients in litter and microbial activity in soils cultivated with coffee at high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal de Alcantara Notaro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry systems are an alternative option for sustainable production management. These systems contain trees that absorb nutrients from deeper layers of the soil and leaf litter that help improve the soil quality of the rough terrain in high altitude areas, which are areas extremely susceptible to environmental degradation. The aim of this study was to characterize the stock and nutrients in litter, soil activity and the population of microorganisms in coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations under high altitude agroforestry systems in the semi-arid region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Samples were collected from the surface litter together with soil samples taken at two depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm from areas each subject to one of the following four treatments: agroforestry system (AS, native forest (NF, biodynamic system (BS and coffee control (CT.The coffee plantation had been abandoned for nearly 15 years and, although there had been no management or harvesting, still contained productive coffee plants. The accumulation of litter and mean nutrient content of the litter, the soil nutrient content, microbial biomass carbon, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, basal respiration, microbial quotient, metabolic quotient and microbial populations (total bacteria, fluorescent bacteria group, total fungi and Trichoderma spp. were all analyzed. The systems thatwere exposed to human intervention (A and BS differed in their chemical attributes and contained higher levels of nutrients when compared to NF and CT. BS for coffee production at high altitude can be used as a sustainable alternative in the high altitude zones of the semi-arid region in Brazil, which is an area that is highly susceptible to environmental degradation.

  12. CICLAJE Y PÉRDIDA DE NUTRIENTES DEL SUELO EN BOSQUES ALTOANDINOS DE ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA NUTRIENT CYCLING AND NUTRIENT LOSSES IN ANDEAN MONTANE FORESTS FROM ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Londoño Álvarez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El agua gravitacional y su composición química fueron medidos en bosques montanos de Quercus humboldtii y reforestados (Pinus patula y Cupressus lusitanica de la región de Piedras Blancas, Antioquia (Colombia, por un período de tiempo de dos años. Se utilizaron lisímetros sin tensión con el fin de estimar el agua gravitacional y los flujos de nutrientes a diferentes profundidades en el perfil del suelo. El mayor valor anual de agua gravitacional en el nivel más profundo (50- 80 cm, fue hallado en la cobertura de ciprés ( 492,7 mm, seguido por pino pátula ( 14,2 mm y roble ( 2,0 mm. De manera similar ocurrió con la pérdida de nutrientes, mostrando el mismo patrón hallado para el agua gravitacional. Así, para roble, pátula y ciprés, en su orden, se presentaron los siguientes valores de pérdida: Ca: 0,004, 0,084 y 2,270 kg ha-1 año-1; P: 0,008, 0,052 y 1,234 kg ha-1 año-1; Mg: 0,004, 0,022 y 0,667 kg ha-1 año-1. De K se registraron 0,08 y 7,092 kg ha-1 año-1 para roble y ciprés respectivamente. Estos flujos siguieron el siguiente orden según cobertura, roble: K>P>Ca>Mg, pátula: Ca>Fe>P>Mg>Zn>Mn, y ciprés: K>Mn>Ca>P>Fe>Zn>Mg.Gravitational flow and its chemical composition were measured in montane oak forests (Quercus humboldtii, in pine (Pinus patula and cypress (Cupressus lusitanica plantations in Piedras Blancas, Antioquia ( Colombia , over two years. Zero tension lysimeters were used at different depth soil levels. The highest gravitational flow value at highest depth (50- 80 cm was obtained in cypress plot ( 492,7 mm, followed by pine ( 14,2 mm and oak forest ( 2,0 mm. A similar behavior was encountered for nutrient losses, following the same pattern as gravitational flow. Thus, for oak, pine and cypress, nutrient losses were respectively: Ca: 0,004, 0,084 and 2,270 kg ha-1 y-1; P: 0,008, 0,052 and 1,234 kg ha-1 y -1; Mg: 0,004, 0,022 and 0,667 kg ha-1 y-1. K losses were 0,08 and 7,092 kg ha-1 y-1 for oak forest and

  13. [Correlation analysis of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Luo, Shi-qiong; Yang, Zhan-nan; Ma, Jing; Hong, Liang

    2015-04-01

    The relationship of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata were investigated by measuring nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, concentrations of microbe phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils, and determining concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata. The research is aimed to understand characteristics of the planting soils and improve the quality of cultivated H. cordata. The soils at different sample sites varied greatly in nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, microbic PLFAs and polyphenols and all flavonoids. The content of total PLFAs in sample sites was following: bacteria > fungi > actinomyces > nematode. The content of bacteria PLFAs was 37.5%-65.0% at different sample sites. Activities of polyphenol oxidease, concentrations of available P and content of PLFAs of bacteria, actinomyces and total microorganisms in soils were significantly and positively related to the concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P flavonoids of H. cordata.

  14. Influence of activated charcoal amendment to contaminated soil on dieldrin and nutrient uptake by cucumbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilber, Isabel [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture, Ackerstrasse, CH-5070 Frick (Switzerland); Wyss, Gabriela S., E-mail: gabriela.wyss@fibl.or [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture, Ackerstrasse, CH-5070 Frick (Switzerland); Maeder, Paul [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture, Ackerstrasse, CH-5070 Frick (Switzerland); Bucheli, Thomas D. [Agroscope Reckenholz-Taenikon Research Station ART, Reckenholzstr. 191, CH-8046 Zuerich (Switzerland); Meier, Isabel; Vogt, Lea; Schulin, Rainer [Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstr. 16, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-08-15

    Activated charcoal (AC) amendments have been suggested as a promising, cost-effective method to immobilize organic contaminants in soil. We performed pot experiments over two years with cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in agricultural soil with 0.07 mg kg{sup -1} of weathered dieldrin and 0, 200, 400, and 800 mg AC per kg soil. Dieldrin fresh weight concentrations in cucumber fruits were significantly reduced from 0.012 to an average of 0.004 mg kg{sup -1}, and total uptake from 2 to 1 mug in the 800 mg kg{sup -1} AC treatment compared to the untreated soil. The treatment effects differed considerably between the two years, due to different meteorological conditions. AC soil treatments did neither affect the availability of nutrients to the cucumber plants nor their yield (total fruit wet weight per pot). Thus, some important prerequisites for the successful application of AC amendments to immobilize organic pollutants in agricultural soils can be considered fulfilled. - The addition of activated charcoal to soil reduced dieldrin residues in cucumbers and did not affect nutrients availability.

  15. Biomass and nutrient cycle in fertilized and unfertilized pine, mixed birch and pine and spruce stands on a drained mire.

    OpenAIRE

    Finér, Leena

    1989-01-01

    Biomass, biomass increment and nutrient cycling were studied in (1) a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand, (2) a Norway spruce (Picea abies) stand and (3) a mixed birch (Betula pubescens)/pine stand on a drained mire at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland in 1979-85. In addition, the effect of NPK and micronutrient fertilizer treatment was studied. Above-ground and root measurements were taken. These data formed the basis of stand biomass and nutrient cycle simulations of fertilized and unfertilized s...

  16. Aspen increase soil moisture, nutrients, organic matter and respiration in Rocky Mountain forest communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Joshua R; St Clair, Samuel B

    2012-01-01

    Development and change in forest communities are strongly influenced by plant-soil interactions. The primary objective of this paper was to identify how forest soil characteristics vary along gradients of forest community composition in aspen-conifer forests to better understand the relationship between forest vegetation characteristics and soil processes. The study was conducted on the Fishlake National Forest, Utah, USA. Soil measurements were collected in adjacent forest stands that were characterized as aspen dominated, mixed, conifer dominated or open meadow, which includes the range of vegetation conditions that exist in seral aspen forests. Soil chemistry, moisture content, respiration, and temperature were measured. There was a consistent trend in which aspen stands demonstrated higher mean soil nutrient concentrations than mixed and conifer dominated stands and meadows. Specifically, total N, NO(3) and NH(4) were nearly two-fold higher in soil underneath aspen dominated stands. Soil moisture was significantly higher in aspen stands and meadows in early summer but converged to similar levels as those found in mixed and conifer dominated stands in late summer. Soil respiration was significantly higher in aspen stands than conifer stands or meadows throughout the summer. These results suggest that changes in disturbance regimes or climate scenarios that favor conifer expansion or loss of aspen will decrease soil resource availability, which is likely to have important feedbacks on plant community development.

  17. [Nutrient spatial variability of tobacco soil restoration area and fertility suitability level evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da-Bing; Deng, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Bi; Si, Guo-Han; Peng, Cheng-Lin; Yuan, Jia-Fu; Zhao, Shu-Jun; Wang, Rui

    2014-03-01

    By using geographic information system technology (GIS) and geostatistics methods, this paper studied the spatial variability of soil properties and available nutrients in the new regulation area units located in Qingjiangyuan modern tobacco agriculture science and technology park (Enshi, Hubei), suburb of Enshi City and the Baiyang base of Lichuan City, and further evaluation of the soil fertility suitability index (SFI) was carried out by use fuzzy mathematics. The results indicated that the effects of land restoration on the soil available phosphorus content variability and spatial distribution were very obvious, possibly due to the landform characteristics and restoration extent. The effect of land restoration on soil pH was small, however, serious soil acidification was detected in the soil sampled from Baiyang (pH soils taken from the suburb, Baiyang and Qingjiangyuan, respectively. In conclusion, attentions should be paid on soil acidification in Baiyang, soil fertility and equalization in the suburb, and soil fertility in the region of Qingjiangyuan with low SFI.

  18. [Effects of nighttime warming on winter wheat root growth and soil nutrient availability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Qian; Chen, Jin; Guo, Jia; Tian, Yun-Lu; Yang, Shi-Jia; Zhang, Li; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jian

    2013-02-01

    Climate warming has an obvious asymmetry between day and night, with a greater increment of air temperature at nighttime than at daytime. By adopting passive nighttime warming (PNW) system, a two-year field experiment of nighttime warming was conducted in the main production areas of winter wheat in China (Shijiazhuang of Hebei Province, Xuzhou of Jiangsu Province, Xuchang of Henan Province, and Zhenjiang of Jiangsu Province) in 2009 and 2010, with the responses of soil pH and available nutrient contents during the whole growth periods and of wheat root characteristics at heading stage determined. As compared with the control (no nighttime warming), nighttime warming decreased the soil pH and available nutrient contents significantly, and increased the root dry mass and root/shoot ratio to a certain extent. During the whole growth period of winter wheat, nighttime warming decreased the soil pH in Shijiazhuang, Xuzhou, Xuchang, and Zhenjiang averagely by 0.4%, 0.4%, 0.7%, and 0.9%, the soil alkaline nitrogen content averagely by 8.1%, 8.1%, 7.1%, and 6.0%, the soil available phosphorus content averagely by 15.7%, 12.1%, 19.6%, and 25.8%, and the soil available potassium content averagely by 11.5%, 7.6%, 7.6% , and 10.1%, respectively. However, nighttime warming increased the wheat root dry mass at heading stage in Shijiazhuang, Xuzhou, and Zhenjiang averagely by 31. 5% , 27.0%, and 14.5%, and the root/shoot ratio at heading stage in Shijiazhuang, Xuchang, and Zhenjiang averagely by 23.8%, 13.7% and 9.7%, respectively. Our results indicated that nighttime warming could affect the soil nutrient supply and winter wheat growth via affecting the soil chemical properties.

  19. Land Use Change Impacts on Water, Salt, and Nutrient Cycles: Case Study Semiarid Southern High Plains, Texas, USA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Gates, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Land use change can have large scale impacts on the salt and nutrient cycles by changing partitioning of water at the land surface, applying irrigation and fertilizers to the system, and transporting salts and nutrients to underlying aquifers. The objective of this study was to evaluate impacts of land-use change on salt and nutrient cycles by quantifying water fluxes and salt and nutrient inventories under natural ecosystems (3 boreholes) and rain-fed agroecosystem (19 boreholes) and irrigated agroecosystem (13 boreholes) in the Southern High Plains, Texas. Salt and nutrient inventories were estimated by measuring water-extractable anion concentrations in sampled boreholes and water fluxes were estimated using the chloride mass balance approach. Large salt inventories accumulated under natural ecosystems from bulk precipitation since the Pleistocene (median chloride: 2,200 kg/ha/m; perchlorate: 46 g/ha/m; sulfate: 5,600 kg/ha/m). Conversion of natural ecosystems to rainfed agroecosystems flushed these pre-existing salt reservoirs towards and into the underlying Ogallala aquifer as a result of increased recharge rates (median of 19 profiles: 24 mm/yr). The flushed zone of rain-fed profiles are characterized by extremely low inventories of salts (chloride: 15 kg/ha/m; perchlorate: 6.3 g/ha/m; sulfate, 750 kg/ha/m). Cultivation also resulted in mineralization and nitrification of soil organic nitrogen, creating nitrate reservoirs at the leading edge of the front that represent 74% of profile nitrate-N and that are being mobilized into the aquifer. Irrigation has the greatest impact on nonpoint source contaminants by adding salts and nutrients to the system. Chloride inventories under irrigated agroecosystems (median 1,600 kg/ha/m) are similar to those under natural ecosystems (median 2,200 kg/ha/m) but accumulated over decades rather than millennia typical of natural ecosystems. Peak Cl concentrations in profiles represent evapoconcentration factors of 12-42 relative

  20. Influence of soil pH in vegetative filter strips for reducing soluble nutrient transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmana, Atikur; Rahmana, Shafiqur; Cihacek, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Low efficacy of vegetative filter strips (VFS) in reducing soluble nutrients has been reported in research articles. Solubility of phosphorus and nitrogen compounds is largely affected by pH of soil. Changing soil pH may result in a decrease in soluble nutrient transportation through VFS. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH levels of VFS soil on soluble nutrient transport reduction from manure-borne runoff. Soil (loamy sand texture; bulk density 1.3 g cm-3) was treated with calcium carbonate to change pH at different pH treatment levels (5.5-6.5, 6.5-7.5, and 7.5-8.5), soil was packed into galvanized metal boxes, and tall fescue grasses were established in the boxes to simulate VFS. Boxes were placed in an open environment, tilted to a 3.0% slope, and 44.0 L manure-amended water was applied through the VFS by a pump at a rate of 1.45 L min-1. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet as well as from the leachate. Samples were analysed for ortho-phosphorus, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and potassium. Highest transport reductions in ortho-phosphorus (42.4%) and potassium (20.5%) were observed at pH range 7.5-8.5. Ammonium nitrogen transport reduction was the highest at pH level of 6.5-7.5 and was 26.1%. Surface transport reduction in nitrate nitrogen was 100%, but leachate had the highest concentration of nitrate nitrogen. Mass transport reduction also suggested that higher pH in the VFS soil are effective in reducing some soluble nutrients transport.

  1. The Effect of Integrated Grasses in Controlling Soil, Nutrient and Organic Matter in Loess Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honest Augustine Mosha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil and nutrient loss is one of a serious problem in Loess plateau china. The eroded materials are directly transported to the lakes and rivers specifically yellow river in China, this might lead to eutrophication if no prevention measures will be taken. The experiment was conducted on soil, and nutrient loss from 5º slope. Individual grasses plots for rye grass(Lolium, white clover(Trifolium repens and integrated grass (rye + white clover plots were prepared with a percentage cover of 25, 50, 80 and 100 in each treatment. Bare land was used as a reference plot. The results show that, the sediment loss in a bare land reported to be 1.5, 3, 2.7 and 1.3, 2.1, 1.9 in 100 % and 80 % cover plots. The runoff rate as compared to bare land, shown to be about 2 times less for white clover and rye grass plots, while more than 2 times less for integrated grasses plots. The total nitrogen and organic matter loss the results were in the order bare land white clover rye grasses and integrated grasses in which 100 %, 80 % and 50 % vegetative cover shown to perform better. On average enrichment ratio range was 40 % to 90 % for nutrient loss, and 50 % to 85 % for organic matter for all plots in comparison with soil origin. The enrichment ration significantly shown to be high from bare land> rye and white clover plots> integrated grasses plot. It has been concluded that integrated grasses is more effective measure over others in controlling both soil, nutrient and organic matter loss in the soil. This study contributed some information on the erosion modeling and improvement of soil and grassland conservation techniques for better land use for sustainable development

  2. Calcium oxalate contribution to calcium cycling in forests of contrasting nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (Ca oxalate) is an insoluble biomineral that forms in plants and fungi, and occurs in soils across many types of ecosystems. Assessing how Ca oxalate may shape ecosystem Ca cycling requires information on the distribution of Ca oxalate among plant biomass, detritus, and mineral soil, and how it varies with ecosystem Ca status. We compared two Douglas-fir forests of contrasting ecosystem Ca availability, and found that Ca oxalate was partitioned similarly among plant biomass, detritus and mineral soil major ecosystem compartments at both sites, and total pools of Ca oxalate were greater in the high-Ca forest. However, the proportional importance of Ca oxalate was greater in the low-Ca than high-Ca forest (18% versus 4% of actively cycling ecosystem Ca, respectively). And calcium oxalate in mineral soil, which is of particular interest as a potential long-term Ca reservoir, was a larger portion of total available Ca (exchangeable Ca plus Ca oxalate Ca) in the low-Ca site than the high-Ca site (9% versus 1% of available soil Ca, respectively). Calcium oxalate was the dominant form of Ca returned from plants to soil as leaf litterfall at the high-Ca site, yet calcium oxalate disappeared rapidly from decomposing litter (0.28 yr−1 or faster) at both sites. We conclude that accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest ecosystems appears most closely related to overall Ca supply for live biomass pools, and that the accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest floor and mineral soil is limited by rapid microbial degradation of putatively unavailable Ca oxalate.

  3. Strong sensitivity of Southern Ocean carbon uptake and nutrient cycling to wind stirring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we test the hypothesis that winds have an important role in determining the rate of exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and ocean through wind stirring over the Southern Ocean. This is tested with a sensitivity study using an ad hoc parameterization of wind stirring in an ocean carbon cycle model. The objective is to identify the way in which perturbations to the vertical density structure of the planetary boundary in the ocean impacts the carbon cycle and ocean biogeochemistry. Wind stirring leads to reduced uptake of CO2 by the Southern Ocean over the period 2000–2006, with differences of order 0.9 Pg C yr−1 over the region south of 45° S. Wind stirring impacts not only the mean carbon uptake, but also the phasing of the seasonal cycle of carbon and other species associated with ocean biogeochemistry. Enhanced wind stirring delays the seasonal onset of stratification, and this has large impacts on both entrainment and the biological pump. It is also found that there is a strong sensitivity of nutrient concentrations exported in Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW to wind stirring. This finds expression not only locally over the Southern Ocean, but also over larger scales through the impact on advected nutrients. In summary, the large sensitivity identified with the ad hoc wind stirring parameterization offers support for the importance of wind stirring for global ocean biogeochemistry, through its impact over the Southern Ocean.

  4. Biochar-Induced Changes in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Dissolved Nutrient Fluxes Constrained by Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rebecca T.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent

  5. The role of submerged macrophytes and macroalgae in nutrient cycling: A budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Lucienne R. D.; Snow, Gavin C.; Adams, Janine B.; Bate, Guy C.; Yang, Sheng-Chi

    2015-03-01

    This study used a budget approach to determine the effect of submerged macrophytes and macroalgae on the storage of N and P in an estuary. Above and below ground tissue content of nitrogen and phosphorus were determined for the various macrophyte species. The mouth of the estuary was artificially breached in February 2011 with a volume of 0.3 × 106 m3 and closed a week later. A 1:100 year flood with volume close to 3 × 106 m3 breached the mouth naturally in June 2011 flushing water and sediment out of the estuary. In order to track the change in the nutrient acquisition of the submerged macrophytes and macroalgae over a closed-mouth state, the nutrient budget was constructed for the period February 2011 to July 2011, from the time the mouth closed until it opened again. Relative to other inputs the sediment contributed 30% of the TN and 40% TP toward the nutrient budget, while the submerged macrophytes and macroalgae stored 20-30 % TN and 30-38 % TP. The river and precipitation contributed less than 3% of the TN and TP input. It was previously thought that the sediments of South African temporarily open/closed estuaries did not have the necessary organic stock to fuel primary production. However this research showed this to be incorrect. Submerged macrophytes and macroalgae significantly influenced nutrient cycling and this is the first detailed account of incorporating vegetation into a nutrient budget without relying solely on C:N:P ratios.

  6. Degradation of Tibetan grasslands: Consequences for soil organic carbon and nutrients losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shibin; Schleuss, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The Kobresia pastures, commonly known as "alpine meadow", cover the southeastern quarter of the Tibetan Highlands ( 450, 000 km2). They host important grazing ground for livestock (i.e. yaks, sheep and goats) and thus ensure the livelihood of the Tibetan herders. The Kobresia pastures also store huge amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)), which are required for sufficient forage production. In recent decades, the Kobresia pastures have experienced severe degradation due to anthropogenic activities and climate change, which has initiated high losses of SOC and nutrients and threatened the functioning of this ecosystem. Plenty studies have been implemented showing the response of degradation on SOC and nutrients levels on local scale. They classify these alpine pastures into various degradation stages that are mainly based on vegetation characteristics (e.g. vegetation coverage, proportion of edible plants). Within this study we synthesized their results in a review for a better understanding of SOC and nutrients losses following pasture degradation across the whole ecosystem. We aggregated the degraded Kobresia pastures into five degradation stages: Non-degraded, Light degradation, Moderate degradation, Heavy degradation and Extreme degradation. Results show that degradation from light to extreme stages has lost on average 42 ± 2 % SOC, 33 ± 6 % N and 17 ± 4 % P as compared to the non-degraded pastures. This implies strong reduction of soil fertility and an exacerbation prevailing N and P limitations. Concurrently, degradation has decreased aboveground and belowground biomass by 42 ± 3 % and 45 ± 6 %, which reflects (a) decreasing photosynthetic C input and (b) less available forage for livestock. Besides, the declining vegetation promotes wind and water erosion. In conclusion, our results provide an overview and a quantification of degradation impacts on plant characteristics and soil properties that improve

  7. Impact of electromagnetic microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a peat soil and in a liquid nutrient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, A. S.; Likhacheva, A. A.; Lapygina, E. V.; Maksimova, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a liquid nutrient medium and in a peat soil was studied. The treatment of inoculums with microwave radiation affected the development of the microorganisms from the stage of spore germination to the stage of the formation of microcolonies of actinomycetes upon the spore cultivation in the liquid medium. Typical hypnum-herbaceous peat was used to study the rate of germination of the actinomycetal spores in soil. The study of the dynamics of the Streptomyces xanthochromogenes population in the control soil (without treatment with microwaves) showed that the most active development of the culture took place in the soil moistened to 60% of the maximum water capacity. When the soil was moistened to the minimum adsorption capacity, the streptomyces did not complete their full cycle of development. The stimulation of the spore germination and mycelium growth with microwaves in the soil medium required a longer period in comparison with that for the liquid medium. The stimulation of the spore germination was observed in the liquid nutrient medium in the case of 30-s treatment and in the soil in the case of 60-s treatment.

  8. Biochar can be used to recapture essential nutrients from dairy wastewater and improve soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ghezzehei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the potential for biochar use to recapture excess nutrients from dairy wastewater has been a focus of a growing number of studies. It is suggested that biochar produced from locally available waste biomass can be important in reducing release of excess nutrient elements from agricultural runoff, improving soil productivity, and long-term carbon (C sequestration. Here we present a review of a new approach that is showing promise for the use of biochar for nutrient capture. Using batch sorption experiments, it has been shown that biochar can adsorb up to 20 to 43% of ammonium and 19–65% of the phosphate in flushed dairy manure in 24 h. These results suggest a potential of biochar for recovering essential nutrients from dairy wastewater and improving soil fertility if the enriched biochar is returned to soil. Based on the sorption capacity of 2.86 and 0.23 mg ammonium and phosphate, respectively, per gram of biochar and 10–50% utilization of available excess biomass, in the state of California (US alone, 11 440 to 57 200 t of ammonium-N and 920–4600 t of phosphate can be captured from dairy waste each year while at the same time disposing up to 8–40 million tons of waste biomass.

  9. Climate change impairs processes of soil and plant N cycling in European beech forests on marginal soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Javier; Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Pole, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Bilela, Silvija; Dannenmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Beech forests of Central Europe are covering large areas with marginal calcareous soils, but provide important ecological services and represent a significant economical value. The vulnerability of these ecosystems to projected climate conditions (higher temperatures, increase of extreme drought and precipitation events) is currently unclear. Here we present comprehensive data on the influence of climate change conditions on ecosystem performance, considering soil nitrogen biogeochemistry, soil microbiology, mycorrhiza ecology and plant physiology. We simultaneously quantified major plant and soil gross N turnover processes by homogenous triple 15N isotope labeling of intact beech natural regeneration-soil-microbe systems. This isotope approach was combined with a space for time climate change experiment, i.e. we transferred intact beech seedling-soil-microbe mesocosms from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Transfers within N slope served as controls. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed. Reduced soil water content resulted in a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB). Consequently, we found a massive five-fold reduction of gross nitrification in the climate change treatment and a subsequent strong decline in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech. Because nitrate was the major nutrient for beech in this forest type with little importance of ammonium and amino acids, this resulted in a strongly reduced performance of beech natural regeneration with reduced N content, N metabolite concentrations and plant biomass. These findings provided an explanation for a large-scale decline of distribution of beech forests on calcareous soils in Europe by almost 80% until 2080 predicted by statistical modeling. Hence, we

  10. Nutrient levels within leaves, stems, and roots of the xeric species Reaumuria soongorica in relation to geographical, climatic, and soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingzhu; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Huijuan; Hu, Rui; Su, Jieqiong; Wang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Li, Xinrong

    2015-04-01

    Besides water relations, nutrient allocation, and stoichiometric traits are fundamental feature of shrubs. Knowledge concerning the nutrient stoichiometry of xerophytes is essential to predicting the biogeochemical cycling in desert ecosystems as well as to understanding the homoeostasis and variability of nutrient traits in desert plants. Here, we focused on the temperate desert species Reaumuria soongorica and collected samples from plant organs and soil over 28 different locations that covered a wide distributional gradient of this species. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry were determined and subsequently compared with geographic, climatic, and edaphic factors. The mean leaf C, N, and P concentrations and C/N, C/P, and N/P ratios were 371.6 mg g(-1), 10.6 mg g(-1), 0.73 mg g(-1), and 59.7, 837.9, 15.7, respectively. Stem and root C concentrations were higher than leaf C, while leaf N was higher than stem and root N. Phosphorus concentration and N/P did not differ among plant organs. Significant differences were found between root C/N and leaf C/N as well as between root C/P and leaf C/P. Leaf nutrient traits respond to geographic and climatic factors, while nutrient concentrations of stems and roots are mostly affected by soil P and pH. We show that stoichiometric patterns in different plant organs had different responses to environmental variables. Studies of species-specific nutrient stoichiometry can help clarify plant-environment relationships and nutrient cycling patterns in desert ecosystems.

  11. Assessment of mycorrhizal colonisation and soil nutrients in unmanaged fire-impacted soils from two target restoration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J. M.; Oliveira, R. S.; Franco, A. R.; Ritz, K.; Nunan, N.; Castro, P. M. L.

    2010-07-01

    The mycorrhizal colonisation of plants grown in unmanaged soils from two restoration sites with a fire history in Northern Portugal was evaluated from the perspective of supporting restoration programmes. To promote restoration of original tree stands, Quercus ilex L. and Pinus pinaster Ait. were used as target species on two sites, denoted Site 1 and 2 respectively. The aim of the study was to assess whether mycorrhizal propagules that survived fire episodes could serve as in situ inoculum sources, and to analyse the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and mycorrhizal parameters. In a laboratory bioassay, P. pinaster and Q. ilex seedlings were grown on soils from the target sites and root colonisation by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi was determined. The ECM root colonisation levels found indicated that soil from Site 2 contained sufficient ECM propagules to serve as a primary source of inoculum for P. pinaster. The low levels of ECM and AM colonisation obtained on the roots of plants grown in soil from Site 1 indicated that the existing mycorrhizal propagules might be insufficient for effective root colonisation of Q. ilex. Different ECM morphotypes were found in plants grown in soil from the two sites. At Site 2 mycorrhizal parameters were found to be spatially structured, with significant differences in ECM colonisation and soil P concentrations between regions of either side of an existing watercourse. The spatial distribution of mycorrhizal propagules was related to edaphic parameters (total C and extractable P), and correlations between soil nutrients and mycorrhizal parameters were found. (Author) 31 refs.

  12. Effects of soil characteristics on grape juice nutrient concentrations and other grape quality parameters in Shiraz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria; Romero, Maria Paz

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the response of grapes to soil properties in the variety Shiraz (SH) cultivated in the Costers de Segre Designation of Origin (NE, Spain). The research was carried out in two areas with differences in vigor, which was examined using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Soil properties such as organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity and nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn and Mn) were analysed in the two areas. Soil analyses were limited to the upper 40 cm. Soil N-NO3 was measured in 2M KCl extracts. Assimilable phosphorus was analysed by extraction with 0.5 M NaHCO3 at pH 8.5 using the Olsen method. The available K, Ca and Mg were evaluated in hemaaxinecobalt trichloride extracts and the available fraction of Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe in DTPA- trietanolamine extracts, by spectroscopy atomic emission/absorption. Berry grapes were collected at maturity. Nutrients in grape juice (K, Ca, Mg Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe) were determined after a microwave hydrogen peroxide digestion in a closed vessel microwave digestion system and measured by spectroscopy. Other grape properties that determine grape quality such as pH, berry weight and sugar content were analysed using the methods proposed by the OIV. Differences in soil properties were observed between plots, which determined the differences in vigour. The vines with lower vigour were grown in the soils with higher pH, electrical conductivity and silt content, which had in addition higher Ca, Mg and K available levels as well as higher levels of Fe and Mn than the soil in which vines had higher vigour. However, the available fraction of Cu and Zn was smaller. Similar differences in nutrient concentration in the berry were observed for all nutrients except for Cu. Grape juice pH and total soluble solids (°Brix) were higher in the most vigorous vines. However, the differences in berry weight and total acidity at ripening were not significant. Keywords: acidity; berry weight; nutrients; p

  13. The function of the superficial root mat in the biogeochemical cycles of nutrients in congolese eucalyptus plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laclau, Jean-Paul; Toutain, François; M'bou, Armel Thongo; Arnaud, Michel; Joffre, Richard; Ranger, Jacques

    2004-03-01

    The importance of superficial root mats inside the forest floor for the nutrition of Amazonian rain forests has been extensively investigated. The present study was aimed at assessing the function of a root mat adherent to decomposing organic material observed in Eucalyptus plantations. The development of the root mat was studied through micromorphological observations of thin litter sections, and the influence of soil microtopography and soil water repellency on root mat biomass was assessed in situ on an area of 5 m2. In addition, input-output budgets of nutrients within the forest floor were established from measurements of litterfall, dissolved nutrients in gravitational solutions, and forest floor nutrient contents. The amounts of nutrients released during litter decay in this ecosystem during the period of study were, on average, 46, 3, 4, 19 and 17 kg ha-1 year-1 for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. The simultaneous measurements of the chemical composition of throughfall solutions and leachates beneath the forest floor showed a very quick uptake of nutrients by the root mat during the decomposition processes. Indeed, the solutions did not become noticeably enriched in nutrients during their passage through the holorganic layer, despite large amounts of elements being released during litter decay. The root mat biomass decreased significantly during the dry season, and a preferential development in microdepressions at the soil surface was observed. A strong water repellency observed in these depressions might enhance the ability of the roots to take up water and nutrients during the dry periods. The root mat was active throughout the year to catch the flux of nutrients from the biodegradation of the forest floor, preventing the transfer of dissolved nutrients toward deeper soil horizons. This mechanism is involved in the successful adaptation of this Eucalyptus hybrid in areas covered by 'climacic' savannas in Congo.

  14. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  15. Effects of Different Types of Chinese Fir Stands on Nutrient Status of Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUYUAN-CHUN; ZHANGHUAN-CHAO

    1995-01-01

    The effects of different types of Chinese fir stand,including those with varous composition (pure and mixed),in various cropping systems (first and continuous cropping system)and at different ages,on the nutrient status of soils the hilly regions of southern Anhui Province were studied by means of ecological sequential comparison on the basis of similar climate and soil type.The work was carried out in the Xiaoxi Forest Farm of Jingxian County and the Caijiaqiao Forest Farm of Jingde Coundy,where the soil is parayellow soil derived from phyllite and sandstone,The results revealed that with the increase of age,Chinese fir pure stand could accumulate organic matter and nitrogen in the soil but it resulted in decreasing of soil pH and base ions(especially Ca2+) compared to its mixed stand with broad-leaf trees such as Chinese sassafras,In order to improve the soil fertility,It would be better to mix Chinese fir with broad-leaf trees when afforestation In the management of Chinese fir pure stand,base compounds and phosphates should be added to the soil for mintaining soil fertility and raising and raising forest productivity.

  16. Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

  17. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  18. Microbial properties and litter and soil nutrients after two prescribed fires in developing savannas in an upland Missouri Ozark Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; Mahasin Tadros; Edward F. Loewenstein

    2009-01-01

    On some landscapes periodic fire may be necessary to develop and maintain oak-dominated savannas. We studied the effects of two annual prescribed burns to determine their effect on microbial activity and soil and litter nutrients 1 year after the last burn. Surface litter and soil from the upper 0?5 cm soil layer in three developing savannas (oak-hickory, ...

  19. Effects of Straw Incorporation on Soil Nutrients, Enzymes, and Aggregate Stability in Tobacco Fields of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of straw incorporation on soil nutrients, enzyme activity, and aggregates in tobacco fields, we conducted experiments with different amounts of wheat and maize straw in Zhucheng area of southeast Shandong province for three years (2010–2012. In the final year of experiment (2012, straw incorporation increased soil organic carbon (SOC and related parameters, and improved soil enzyme activity proportionally with the amount of straw added, except for catalase when maize straw was used. And maize straw incorporation was more effective than wheat straw in the tobacco field. The percentage of aggregates >2 mm increased with straw incorporation when measured by either dry or wet sieving. The mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD in straw incorporation treatments were higher than those in the no-straw control (CK. Maize straw increased soil aggregate stability more than wheat straw with the same incorporation amount. Alkaline phosphatase was significantly and negatively correlated with soil pH. Sucrase and urease were both significantly and positively correlated with soil alkali-hydrolysable N. Catalase was significantly but negatively correlated with soil extractable K (EK. The MWD and GMD by dry sieving had significantly positive correlations with SOC, total N, total K, and EK, but only significantly correlated with EK by wet sieving. Therefore, soil nutrients, metabolic enzyme activity, and aggregate stability might be increased by increasing the SOC content through the maize or wheat straw incorporation. Moreover, incorporation of maize straw at 7500 kg·hm−2 was the best choice to enhance soil fertility in the tobacco area of Eastern China.

  20. Urban parks provide ecosystem services by retaining metals and nutrients in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setälä, H; Francini, G; Allen, J A; Jumpponen, A; Hui, N; Kotze, D J

    2017-08-19

    Urban greenspaces provide ecosystem services like more natural ecosystems do. For instance, vegetation modifies soil properties, including pH and soil organic matter content, yet little is known about its effect on metals. We investigated whether the accumulation and mobility of heavy metals, nutrients and carbon is affected by plant functional types (evergreen or deciduous trees, lawns) in urban parks of varying ages in southern Finland. Plant types modified soil physico-chemical parameters differently, resulting in diverging accumulation and mobility of metals and other elements in park soils. However, the effects of plant functional type depended on park age: lawns in parks of ca. 50 y old had the highest contents of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn, and in these, and older parks (>100 y old), contents of most metals were lowest under evergreen trees. The mobility of metals and other elements was influenced by the amount of water leached through the soils, highlighting the importance of vegetation on hydrology. Soils under evergreen trees in young parks and lawns in intermediately-aged parks were most permeable to water, and thus had high loads of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, tot-P and tot-N. The loads/concentrations of elements in the leachates was not clearly reflected by their content/concentration in the soil, alluding to the storage capacity of these elements in urban park soils. Our results suggest that in urban systems with a high proportion of impermeable surfaces, park soil has the potential to store nutrients and metals and provide an important ecosystem service particularly in polluted cities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Boron isotopes in soils: investigation of horizon reactivity and vegetation cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cividini, D.; Lemarchand, D.; Chabaux, F. J.; Turpault, M.; Viville, D.; Stille, P.; Pierret, M.

    2009-12-01

    Investigating the soil/plant coupling requires the development of specific approaches being unambiguously sensitive to mineral- and biology-derived reactions. Boron presents chemical properties that, a priori, well meet the conditions for tracing bio-geochemical reactions. In particular, it is present in moderate to high concentrations in minerals; it is very sensitive to water/rock interactions during which it is partitioned between solid and liquid phases and undergoes a great isotopic fractionation and, finally, it is an essential nutrient for plants. Here, we present an extensive study on B isotopes in two distinct soil/tree systems from the well-characterized Strengbach basin (http://ohge.u-strasbg.fr/indexuk.html). Both bulk soil samples and granulometric fractions were analyzed. Soil solutions (down to 60 cm depth) were monitored every 6 weeks over two years (2005-2006). Tree samples (spruce needles and beech leaves) punctually sampled during this period. A Mass budget based on B concentration and hydrology model clearly first indicates that trees largely control the distribution of B in soil uppermost layers by yearly mobilizing 4 times more B than it is drained by soil solutions below 60 cm depth. B isotopes in soil solution depth profile highlight the presence of a highly reactive layer a 10 cm depth, which is interpreted as resulting from seasonal chemical oscillations caused by the biology and hydrology cycles. Isotopic budget indicates that this layer is not at steady state and accumulates B over years. The increasing contribution with depth of the weathering-derived B flux is clearly observable by a shift of the δ11B values towards low values. At the soil scale, mass and isotopic budgets help distinguishing both the B fluxes related to the mineral weathering reactions and the vegetation cycling and even show a strong correlation between them. Detailed analyses of granulometric fractions permit the determination of the B-carrier phases in these two

  2. [Responses of Agriophyllum squarrosum phenotypic plasticity to the changes of soil nutrient and moisture contents and population density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-xin; Zhao, Xue-yong; Zhang, Hong-xuan; Luo, Ya-yong; Mao, Wei

    2008-12-01

    This paper studied the phenotypic plasticity of Agriophyllum squarrosum under effects of soil nutrient and moisture contents and population density. The results showed that with the increase of soil nutrient content, the root/shoot ratio of A. squarrosum was decreased from 0.135 to 0.073. However, soil moisture content and population density had less effect on the root/shoot ratio. The plasticity of reproductive allocation of A. squarrosum as responding to the changes of soil nutrient and moisture contents was a "real plasticity", and the allocation was negatively correlated with soil nutrient content but positively correlated with soil moisture content. When soil nutrient content was high or moisture content was low, the reproductive allocation of A. squarrosum changed larger with plant size. Population density had no effects on the reproductive allocation, while plant size conditioned the allocation. Among the three test affecting factors, soil nutrient content had the greatest effects on the morphological characters and biomass of A. squarrosum.

  3. Sustainability of Wood Productivity of Pinus TaedaBased on Nutrient Export and Stocks in the Biomass and in the Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Michael de Melo Sixel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The impact of intensive management practices on the sustainability of forest production depends on maintenance of soil fertility. The contribution of forest residues and nutrient cycling in this process is critical. A 16-year-old stand of Pinus taeda in a Cambissolo Húmico Alumínico léptico (Humic Endo-lithic Dystrudept in the south of Brazil was studied. A total of 10 trees were sampled distributed in five diameter classes according to diameter at breast height. The biomass of the needles, twigs, bark, wood, and roots was measured for each tree. In addition to plant biomass, accumulated plant litter was sampled, and soil samples were taken at three increments based on sampling depth: 0.00-0.20, 0.20-0.40, 0.40-0.60, 0.60-1.00, 1.00-1.40, 1.40-1.80, and 1.80-1.90 m. The quantity and concentration of nutrients, as well as mineralogical characteristics, were determined for each soil sample. Three scenarios of harvesting intensities were simulated: wood removal (A, wood and bark removal (B, and wood + bark + canopy removal (C. The sum of all biomass components was 313 Mg ha-1.The stocks of nutrients in the trees decreased in the order N>Ca>K>S>Mg>P. The mineralogy of the Cambissolo Húmico Alumínico léptico showed the predominance of quartz sand and small traces of vermiculite in the silt fraction. Clay is the main fraction that contributes to soil weathering, due to the transformation of illite-vermiculite, releasing K. The depletion of nutrients from the soil biomass was in the order: P>S>N>K>Mg>Ca. Phosphorus and S were the most limiting in scenario A due to their low stock in the soil. In scenario B, the number of forest rotations was limited by N, K, and S. Scenario C showed the greatest reduction in productivity, allowing only two rotations before P limitation. It is therefore apparent that there may be a difference of up to 30 years in the capacity of the soil to support a scenario such as A, with a low nutrient removal

  4. Crescimento e absorção de nutrientes pelo Lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum cultivado em solo Growing and nutrients absorption by lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum cultivated in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica S. de Camargo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available O lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum é uma planta ornamental com grande procura pelo mercado consumidor, mas há poucas informações sobre sua nutrição em condições edafo-climáticas tropicais. Neste trabalho avaliou-se o crescimento e a absorção de nutrientes pelo lisianthus (var. Echo em estufa comercial. Plântulas de lisianthus foram transplantadas para canteiros aos 60 dias após a semeadura, em outubro de 1999. As amostragens do material vegetal foram feitas aos 8; 22; 36; 50; 64; 78; 92; 106 e 120 dias após o transplantio. O crescimento em altura e a produção de matéria seca da parte aérea foram lentos até os 36 dias e atingiram altura de 90,5 cm e produção de matéria seca de 28,4 g por planta no final do ciclo. A absorção de nutrientes (kg ha-1 pela parte aérea do lisianthus aos 120 dias foi: 238,8 de N, 157,1 de K, 33,9 de S, 17,5 de Mg, 14,9 de P, 10,6 de Ca e para os micronutrientes (g ha-1: 1281,3 de Fe, 294,4 de B, 127,1 de Mn, 121,1 de Zn e 35,8 de Cu.Lisianthus is a cut flower crop that has been intensively studied around the world. However, there is not enough information about its nutrition under tropical conditions. In this work the growth and nutrient absorption of lisianthus (var. Echo cultivated in soil was evaluated. Seedlings were transplanted 60 days after sowing in October 99. Plant samples were taken at 8; 22; 36; 50; 64; 78; 92; 106 and 120 days after transplanting. Plant growth and dry matter production were slow in the beginning but plants reached 90.5 cm in height and 28.4 of dry weight at the end of cycle. Nutrient uptake (kg ha-1 at 120 days was: 238.8 of N, 157.1 of K, 33.9 of S, 17.5 of Mg, 14.9 of P, 10.6 of Ca and micronutrients (g ha-1: 1281.3 of Fe, 294.4 of B, 127.1 of Mn, 121.1 of Zn and 35.8 of Cu.

  5. Productivity and nutrient cycling in an agroforestry ecosystem for interplant of pineapple and coconut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the biomass productivity and nutrient cycling in an agroforestry system of coconut (Cocus nucifera ) interplanted with pineapple (Ananas comosus) had been studied. The result showed that the biomass productivity of this ecosystem was 47 460 kg·hm-2·a-1, which was 4.3 times as much as that of pure coconut plantation. In the biological cycling of N, P, K elements, the total annual retention was 559.470 kg·hm-2, the annual return was 410.745 kg·hm-2, the annual uptake was 970.475 kg·hm-2, respectively. The average circulation rate in three nutrient elements (N, P, K) was 42.32%, which was 27.53% more than that in pure coconut stands. Coconut interplanted with pineapple was proved to be one of optimum cultural patterns, which had the higher biomass productivity, and better usage efficiency of environment resources in tropical areas.

  6. Evergreen shrub traits and peatland carbon cycling under high nutrient load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Bui, Vi; Bubier, Jill L.; Wang, Meng; Murphy, Meaghan; Moore, Tim R.

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (N) assimilated by plants is usually invested in chlorophyll to improve light harvesting capacity and in soluble proteins such as Rubisco to enhance carbon (C) assimilation. We studied the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on different traits of two evergreen shrubs Chamaedaphne calyculata and Rhododendron groenlandicum in a nutrient-poor Mer Bleue Bog, Canada that has been fertilized with N as NO3 and NH4 (2-8 times ambient annual wet deposition) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) for 7-12 years. We examined how nutrient addition influences the plant performance at leaf and canopy level and linked the trait responses with ecosystem C cycling. At the leaf level, we measured physiological and biochemical traits: CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence, an indicator of plant stress in terms of light harvesting capacity; and to study changes in photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency, we also determined the foliar chlorophyll, N, and P contents. At the canopy level, we examined morphological and phenological traits: growth responses and leaf longevity during two growing seasons. Regardless of treatment, the majority of leaves showed no signs of stress in terms of light harvesting capacity. The plants were N saturated: with increasing foliar N content, the higher proportion of N was not used in photosynthesis. Foliar net CO2 assimilation rates did not differ significantly among treatments, but the additions of N, P, and K together resulted in higher respiration rates. The analysis of the leaf and canopy traits showed that the two shrubs had different strategies: C. calyculata was more responsive to nutrient additions, more deciduous-like, whereas R. groenlandicum maintained evergreen features under nutrient load, shedding its leaves even later in the season. In all, simulated atmospheric N deposition did not benefit the photosynthetic apparatus of the dominant shrubs, but resulted in higher foliar respiration

  7. Influence of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds on soil nutrient contents in a temperate humid climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Ehlers-Koch, Camilla; Gregersen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    conductivity and content of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium and potassium in a reference area and in two cormorant sub-colonies. In general, the soils exposed to cormorant guano had lower pH and higher contents of plant available phosphorus, calcium and potassium compared to the control reference soil......, but the bird’s influence on the soil conditions has only in few cases been studied in detail. In this study the influence of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds on soil nutrient contents and accumulation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in a humid climate has been determined by measuring pH, electric......During the last decades, the number of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds especially cormorant colonies in North-western Europe has grown rapidly due to protection. Their impact on vegetation has been recognized, as many trees containing perennial colonies of piscivorous birds have collapsed...

  8. Fungi benefit from two decades of increased nutrient availability in tundra heath soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Bååth, Erland

    2013-01-01

    is a predicted long-term consequence of climatic warming and mimicked by fertilization, both increase soil microbial biomass. However, while fertilization increased the relative abundance of fungi, warming caused only a minimal shift in the microbial community composition based on the phospholipid fatty acid......If microbial degradation of carbon substrates in arctic soil is stimulated by climatic warming, this would be a significant positive feedback on global change. With data from a climate change experiment in Northern Sweden we show that warming and enhanced soil nutrient availability, which...... of complex organic compounds such as vanillin, while warming has had no such effects. Furthermore, the NLFA-to-PLFA ratio for (13)C-incorporation from acetate increased in warmed plots but not in fertilized ones. Thus, fertilization cannot be used as a proxy for effects on warming in arctic tundra soils...

  9. Nutrient biogeochemical cycles in the Gulf of Riga: scaling up field studies with a mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Oleg P.

    2002-05-01

    A box model has been implemented to understand the large-scale biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon in the Gulf of Riga. The large data sets collected within the international Gulf of Riga Project in 1993/1995 were used to validate the model. The comparison to data was useful in scaling up to the gulf-wide level and scrutinizing the conclusions based on short-term field surveys and experimental studies. The simulations indicate that the limiting role was passing from silicon to phosphorus to nitrogen over the seasons of organic production. However, on an annual scale, nutrient limitation was close to the "Redfield equilibrium". Mass balance considerations, based on modeled coupled fluxes, disagree with the conclusions on low sediment denitrification and high phosphorus retention in the pelagic system, which were derived from isolated measurements. Nutrient budgets constructed with the model revealed the high buffer capacity of the Gulf of Riga. The nutrient residence times span a range from 6 years for N to 70 years for Si. The buffering arises from intensive internal recycling in the water body and by the bottom sediments. The budgets indicate that the Gulf retains about two-thirds of external nitrogen and silicon inputs, while phosphorus retention is only 10%. A slow response to external perturbations is demonstrated with numerical experiments run for 15 years under 50% reductions of terrestrial nutrient inputs. These experiments imply that the most effective is the N+P reduction scenario, which resulted in a 20% decrease of primary production after 12 years. A reduction of P resulted in only a 6% decrease of primary production; however, it yielded an 80% drop in the amount of nitrogen fixation.

  10. Impact of rice-straw biochars amended soil on the biological Si cycle in soil-plant ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zimin; Delvaux, Bruno; Struyf, Eric; Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ronsse, Frederik; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar used as soil amendment can enhance soil fertility and plant growth. It may also contribute to increase the plant mineralomass of silicon (Si). However, very little studies have focused on the plant Si cycling in biochar amended soils. Here, we study the impact of two contrasting biochars derived from rice straws on soil Si availability and plant Si uptake. Rice plants were grown in a hydroponic device using Yoshida nutrient solution, respectively devoid of H4SiO4 (0 ppm Si: Si-) and enriched with it (40 ppm Si: Si+). After 12 weeks, the plants were harvested for further pyrolysis, conducted with holding time of 1h at 500˚ C. The respective rice-biochars are Si-/biochar and Si+/biochar. They exhibit contrasting phytolith contents (0.3 g Si kg-1 vs. 51.3 g Si kg-1), but identical physico-chemical properties. They were applied in two soils differing in weathering stage: a weathered Cambisol (CA) and a highly weathered Nitisol (NI). We then studied the effects of the amended biochar on CaCl2 extractable Si using a 64-days kinetic approach, on the content of soil biogenic Si, and on the uptake of Si by wheat plants grown for 5 weeks. We also quantified Si mineralomass in plants. We compared the effects of biochars to that of wollastonite (Wo)-(CaSiO3), a common Si-fertilizer. Our results show that Si+/biochar significantly increase the content of BSi in both soils. In CA, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si amounts to 85 mg kg-1 after Si+/biochar amendment, which is below the amount extracted after Wo application (100 mg kg-1). In contrast, in NI, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si is 198 mg kg-1 in the Si+/biochar amended treatment, which is far above the one measured after Wo application (93 mg kg-1). The Si-/biochar has no effect on the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si in either soil type. Biochars and wollastonite increase the biomass of wheat on both soils. The increase is, however, larger in NI than in CA. In terms of Si

  11. Linking global-change induced shifts in soil nitrogen cycling with the abundance of key microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C.; Eviner, V.; Beman, M.; Hart, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Since western colonization, the ecology of California has seen marked transformations. In particular, invasion of terrestrial ecosystems by exotic plants has altered plant community composition, disturbances, soil hydrologic regimes, and nutrient cycling. In addition, as a result of fertilization and combustion of fossil fuels, California experiences some of the highest nitrogen (N) deposition rates in the country. Land use has also changed with the introduction of domestic livestock grazing about 250 years ago. Currently, approximately 32% of land in California experiences grazing pressure. These ecological changes likely affect the ecosystems of California simultaneously. However, with multifactor global change experiments in their infancy, little is known about potential interactive effects on ecosystem structure and function. Our study measured the response of soil N dynamics to a unique combination of treatments: invasion by exotic plants (Aegilops triuncialis and Taeniatherum caput-medusae), elevated N additions, and simulated cattle grazing (aboveground vegetation removal). In addition, we quantified the abundance of key functional genes involved in nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirS/nirK) in order to gain a mechanistic insight into changes in ecosystem functioning. We found that, while responses of soil N pools and processes to global change factors tend to be dominated by main effects, interactions among factors can substantially alter the overall response of the ecosystem. For instance, N additions increased potential nitrification and pools of total inorganic N (TIN; NH4+ and NO3-); when N additions and grazing were combined, however, nitrification potentials and TIN decreased to those of ambient N (control) levels. Additionally, neither N additions nor simulated grazing independently affected soil microbial biomass of invaded plots; yet, when combined, the microbial biomass increased significantly. Our results help to provide a better

  12. Trends in nitrogen and phosphorus cycling are consistent and constrained during tropical secondary forest succession: is secondary forest young primary forest from a nutrient perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, B. W.; Nasto, M.; Alvarez-Clare, S.; Cole, R. J.; Reed, S.; Chazdon, R.; Davidson, E. A.; Cleveland, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive deforestation of tropical rainforest often leads to agricultural abandonment and secondary forest regeneration. The land area of secondary rainforest is soon likely to exceed that of primary forest, highlighting the importance of secondary tropical rainforest in the global carbon (C) cycle. Secondary forests often grow rapidly, but the role soil nutrients play in regulating secondary forest productivity remains unsettled. Consistent with biogeochemical theory, a landmark study from a set of sites in the Amazon Basin showed that secondary forests had low nitrogen (N) availability and relatively higher phosphorus (P) availability immediately after abandonment, but that as succession proceeded, N availability "recuperated" and there was relatively less P available. To address whether such changes in N and P availability during secondary forest growth are common, we reviewed 38 studies in lowland tropical rainforest that reported changes in 23 different metrics of N and P cycling during secondary succession. We calculated slopes (rates of change) during secondary succession for each metric in each study, and analyzed patterns in these rates of change. Significant trends during secondary succession were more evident in soils than in plants, but in most cases, the variability among studies was surprisingly low. Both soil N and P availability increased through succession, at least in surface soil. Such consistent changes imply substantial biogeochemical resilience of tropical forest soils in spite of differing land use histories and species compositions among studies. In most cases, slopes were similar whether primary forest was included in, or excluded from, our analysis, suggesting that secondary succession eventually leads to similar biogeochemical conditions as those found in primary forest. Our results suggesting consistent changes in N and P availability during succession provide a biogeochemical rationale for the conservation and restoration value of

  13. Microprofiling of nitrogen patches in paddy soil: Analysis of spatiotemporal nutrient heterogeneity at the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Shi, Weiming

    2016-06-01

    Flooded paddy soil ecosystems in the tropics support the cultivation of the majority of the world’s leading crop, rice, and nitrogen (N) availability in the paddy-soil rooting zone limits rice production more than any other nutritional factor. Yet, little is known about the dynamic response of paddy soil to N-fertiliser application, in terms of horizontal and vertical patchiness in N distribution and transformation. Here, we present a microscale analysis of the profile of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3‑), nitrification, oxygen (O2water and O2soil), and pH (pHwater and pHsoil) in paddy soils, collected from two representative rice-production areas in subtropical China. NH4+ and NO3‑ exhibited dramatic spatiotemporal profiles within N patches on the microscale. We show that pHsoil became constant at 1.0–3.5 mm depth, and O2soil became undetectable at 1.7–4.0 mm. Fertiliser application significantly increased pH, and decreased O2, within N patches. Path analysis showed that the factors governing nitrification scaled in the order: pHwater > pHsoil > NH4+ > O2water > NO3‑ > O2soil. We discuss the soil properties that decide the degree of nutrient patchiness within them and argue that such knowledge is critical to intelligent appraisals of nutrient-use efficiencies in the field.

  14. [Determination of soil available nutrient contents using multi-element hollow cathode lamp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shao-kun; He, Dong-xian; Hu, Juan-xiu; Wang, Yu-chang

    2011-07-01

    The soil available nutrient determination based on atomic absorption spectrometry using multi-element hollow cathode lamp (HCL) is improved from the instrument using single-element HCLs via modifying the software and hardware. As a test, available Cu, Fe, Zn, Mg and Ca contents of 30 fluvo-aquic soil samples measured by atomic absorption spectrometry using a multi-element HCL were compared with that measured by using single-element HCLs for 3 replications. A significant linear relationship with the slope close to 1 was found in soil available Cu, Fe, Zn and Ca contents measured by using multi-element HCL and single-element HCLs. The linear correlation coefficient of 0.86 and the slope of 0.85 were found in soil available Mg content. No significant difference was revealed from the above comparison data via analysis of variance. Therefore, the soil available nutrient determination based on atomic absorption spectrometry using multi-element HCL has the same measurement accuracy and is 50%-60% time-saving compared to that by using single-element HCLs.

  15. Leaf structure vs. nutrient relationships vary with soil conditions in temperate shrubs and trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Kull, Kalevi

    2003-09-01

    Often there are significant positive interspecific relationships between leaf area per unit dry mass (SLA) and foliar phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations ([P] and [N]). Most of these studies have been conducted on moderately acidic soils, and little is known of the generality of these relations as potentially affected by soil characteristics. We investigated foliage mineral composition in relation to leaf structure in a wooded meadow on calcareous alkaline soil, in a bog on strongly acidic soil, and in a flood plain on moderately acidic soil. Foliar nutrient contents and fertilization experiments indicated that foliage physiological activity was co-limited by both P and N availabilities in the wooded meadow, by P in the bog, and by N in the flood plain. In the wooded meadow and in the bog, there were positive relationships between SLA and P concentration ([P]), and no relationship between SLA and nitrogen concentration [N]. Given that the fraction of support tissues generally increases with decreasing SLA, the requirement for mineral nutrients is lower at low SLA. Thus, these contrasting relations between mineral nutrients and SLA suggest that P was distributed in a more "optimal" manner among the leaves with varying structure than N in P-limited communities. In the flood plain, SLA was positively related to both [P] and [N], possibly manifesting a strategy to cope with N limitations by enhancing N turnover, and accordingly, greater P requirement for nucleic acid formation in N-limited soils. Total variation in foliar structural and chemical characteristics was similar in all sites, and was mainly determined by variation among the species. Part of this variability was explained by life form and plant size. [P] was higher in trees than in shrubs, and [P] and P/N ratio increased with increasing total plant height, indicating that P nutrition was improved relative to N nutrition with increasing plant size. Since the capture of less mobile soil elements such as P is

  16. The global significance of omitting soil erosion from soil organic carbon cycling schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Baldock, Jeffrey; Sanderman, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) cycling schemes used in land surface models (LSMs) typically account only for the effects of net primary production and heterotrophic respiration. To demonstrate the significance of omitting soil redistribution in SOC accounting, sequestration and emissions, we modified the SOC cycling scheme RothC (ref. ) to include soil erosion. Net SOC fluxes with and without soil erosion for Australian long-term trial sites were established and estimates made across Australia and other global regions based on a validated relation with catchment-scale soil erosion. Assuming that soil erosion is omitted from previous estimates of net C flux, we found that SOC erosion is incorrectly attributed to respiration. On this basis, the Australian National Greenhouse Gas inventory overestimated the net C flux from cropland by up to 40% and the potential (100 year) C sink is overestimated by up to 17%. We estimated global terrestrial SOC erosion to be 0.3-1.0 Pg C yr-1 indicating an uncertainty of -18 to -27% globally and +35 to -82% regionally relative to the long-term (2000-2010) terrestrial C flux of several LSMs. Including soil erosion in LSMs should reduce uncertainty in SOC flux estimates with implications for CO2 emissions, mitigation and adaptation strategies and interpretations of trends and variability in global ecosystems.

  17. The Fate of Molecular Markers in Soils and Their Implications for Soil Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenberg, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    During the past decades molecular markers were discovered to be of diagnostic character for tracing the origin and fate of organic matter in soils. Molecular proxies themselves and their combination with compound-specific isotope analyses became powerful tools to distinguish between various biogenic and anthropogenic sources of organic matter and to trace carbon turnover at a molecular level. In the meantime various field and laboratory experiments provided deeper insight into soil organic matter dynamics at a molecular scale. We learnt from these experiments that carbon turnover at a molecular scale occurs in a similar time frame like for bulk soil organic matter and that selective preservation is not an issue for most coumpounds in active soils, but e.g. in fossil soils. Nevertheless, e.g. plant wax-derived alkanes and root-derived suberin markers point to a slower turnover of specific compounds. Recently, molecular markers enabled deciphering root-derived processes that occur in the rhizosphere of living and dead roots within the soil or even in the deep subsoil (up to several meters below the soil surface). Thus, the proposed carbon sequestration by roots in subsoils is not necessarily relevant in the long-term on a decadal or centennial scale. Although molecular markers were not determined to be valuable tools to sequester carbon in the soil, they strongly help elucidating processes relevant for cycling of bulk organic matter from the soil surface towards the deep subsoil.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE SOIL FOR IMPROVED NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT IN SELECTED MAIZE GROWING AREAS OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad I. Fauzi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for maize, the second most important food crop in Indonesia, is steadily increasing. Knowledge of soil properties is a key element in developing nutrient management system. The aims of this study were to characterize and classify the soils at the family level of Soil Taxonomy and linking the taxa with nutrient management systems. The study was conducted at the Site Specific Nutrient Management (SSNM for maize in Indonesia from June to October 2005. Eight soil profiles were taken from Karo (North Sumatra, Sidomulyo (Lampung, Wonogiri and Grobogan (Central Java, Wonokerto, Mojoayu, and Tuban (East Java, and Jeneponto (South Sulawesi. The soil samples were analyzed for their physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics. Soil profile description followed the Standard Guidelines of the Food and Agriculture Organiza-tion. Results showed that the sites for the SSNM represented a wide range of soils and climate characteristics from Entisols with 1,050 mm annual rainfall in Jeneponto to Oxisols with 2,200 mm annual rainfall in Lampung. Most soils had a fine texture class (clay and clay loam, but in places like Lampung and Wonogiri, the clay had a low activity leading to a low cation exchange capacity (CEC and low exchangeable cations, especially K. The relatively high-K status soils were found in Karo, Grobogan, and Tuban sites. Organic matter and, in consequence, total N were relatively low for all SSNM sites. Available P status ranged from low to high. The low available P in Grobogan, Wonokerto, and Mojoayu soils seemed to be related to high pH, while in Lampung it was due to low pH. Exchangeable Ca and Mg were high in Grobogan, Mojoayu, Karo, and Tuban due to the presence of weatherable minerals such as hypersthene, augite, and hornblende. In general, this study suggests that organic matter, N, and P will be needed across the sites. K addition will be necessary for Karo, Lampung and Wonogiri, while in other SSNM areas, maintenance

  19. The role of bigleaf maple in soil chemistry and nutrient dynamics in coastal temperate forests

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Tanya D.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum Pursh) in a forest dominated by Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziessi (Mirb.) Franco] and western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla (RAF.) Sarg.] was studied in a paired-plot design through an examination of the annual contribution of bigleaf maple litterfall to nutrient flux, its rate of decay, and its properties within the forest floor and mineral soil. Compared to conifer plots, bigleaf maple plots had litterfall significantly higher in all elements...

  20. Soil fertility status and nutrients provided to spring barley (Hordeum distichon L. by pig slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Gómez-Garrido

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient recycling using pig slurry is a common agricultural practice to manage the ever-increasing amounts of wastes from the pig industry. This study was conducted in the southeast of Spain to quantify the enrichments in major (N, P, K, Mg and minor (Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn nutrients in soils amended with D1-170 kg N ha-1 (European Union legislated dose or D2-340 kg N ha-1, and understand the influence of pig slurry on yield and nutrient uptake in two crop seasons of spring barley (Hordeum distichon L. Compared to control, D2 increased NO3--N by 11.4X to 109 mg kg-1, Olsen-P by 6.9X to 423 mg kg-1, exchange K (2.5X to 1.6 cmol+ kg-1, Mg (1.7X to 1.8 cmol+ kg-1, diethylene-triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA-Zn (94X to 18.2 mg kg-1, and Fe (2X to 11.3 mg kg-1. Available NO3--N, Olsen-P, and DTPA-Zn have the best correlations with crop yield and nutrient uptake. These results indicate that the assessment of soil fertility status at 1-mo after pig slurry addition provides a good indicator for potential yield and uptake of barley. However, it is suggested that leachates should be monitored to effectively manage potential releases of nitrate and phosphate into the environment.

  1. Coupling ANIMO and MT3DMS for 3D regional-scale modeling of nutrient transport in soil and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, G.; Del Val Alonso, L.; Groenendijk, P.; Griffioen, J.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an on-line coupling between the 1D/quasi-2D nutrient transport model ANIMO and the 3D groundwater transport model code MT3DMS. ANIMO is a detailed, process-oriented model code for the simulation of nitrate leaching to groundwater, N- and P-loads on surface waters and emissions of greenhouse gasses. It is the leading nutrient fate and transport code in the Netherlands where it is used primarily for the evaluation of fertilization related legislation. In addition, the code is applied frequently in international research projects. MT3DMS is probably the most commonly used groundwater solute transport package worldwide. The on-line model coupling ANIMO-MT3DMS combines the state-of-the-art descriptions of the biogeochemical cycles in ANIMO with the advantages of using a 3D approach for the transport through the saturated domain. These advantages include accounting for regional lateral transport, considering groundwater-surface water interactions more explicitly, and the possibility of using MODFLOW to obtain the flow fields. An additional merit of the on-line coupling concept is that it preserves feedbacks between the saturated and unsaturated zone. We tested ANIMO-MT3DMS by simulating nutrient transport for the period 1970-2007 in a Dutch agricultural polder catchment covering an area of 118 km2. The transient groundwater flow field had a temporal resolution of one day and was calculated with MODFLOW-MetaSWAP. The horizontal resolution of the model grid was 100x100m and consisted of 25 layers of varying thickness. To keep computation times manageable, we prepared MT3DMS for parallel computing, which in itself is a relevant development for a large community of groundwater transport modelers. For the parameterization of the soil, we applied a standard classification approach, representing the area by 60 units with unique combinations of soil type, land use and geohydrological setting. For the geochemical parameterization of the deeper subsurface, however, we

  2. Soil Nutrient Dynamics under Old and Young Cocoa, Coffee and Cashew Plantations at Uhonmora, Edo State, Nigeria

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    Rotimi Rufus Ipinmoroti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to assess nutrient dynamics of soils under old and young cocoa, coffee and cashew plantations and the leaf nutrient contents of the crops at Uhonmora, Edo State, Nigeria for proper cultural and soil fertility management of the plantations. Soil and crop leaf samples were collected from each plantation using a random sampling technique. The samples were analyzed using standard procedures for sand, silt, clay, pH (H2O, electrical conductivity (EC, total N, available P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, and Effective Cation Exchange Capacity (ECEC. Leaf samples were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Na. Data were compared with the corresponding soil and foliar critical nutrient values for each crop. Results indicated that the soils were texturally sandy clay loam and acidic. The soils varied in their nutrient contents, with soil P for the old cocoa, young coffee and cashew plantations far below critical values. The young cashew plot was low in N content but adequate for other plots. However, the soil ECEC increased with the increasing of calcium contents. Leaf N was below critical for all the crops. Leaf K was low for cocoa and coffee plants, leaf Ca was low for the young cashew plants, while leaf Mg was low for the young cocoa and old cashew. The high soil Mg/K ratio of 8.7- 22.3 as against the established value of 2.0 might have resulted in gross nutrient imbalance which must have affected the absorption and utilization of other nutrients. Hence, adequate soil N did not translate the same availability to the crops. The ECEC showed that the soil needs to be improved upon for sustainable productivity. Soil nutrient content variation across the plantations with age of establishment will necessitate the need for consistent routine soil nutrient assessment for proper and balanced soil nutrient supply to the crops, for healthy crop growth and optimum yield. Management practices of soil surface mulching using organic wastes and cover crops under

  3. Bioaccumulation of nutrient elements from fly ash-amended soil in Jatropha curcas L.: a biofuel crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Doongar R; Ghosh, Arup

    2013-08-01

    Fly ash (FA) from coal-burning industries may be a potential inorganic soil amendment; the insight of its nutrient release and supply to soil may enhance their agricultural use. The study was conducted to assess the ability of fly ash (a coal fired thermal plant waste) to reduce soil fertility depletion and to study bioaccumulation of mineral nutrients in Jatropha curcas grown on soils amended with fly ash. Fly ash was amended to field soil at six rates (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 70 % w/w) on which J. curcas was grown. After 8 months of growth, the height of jatropha plants was significantly increased at 5 and 10 % FA-amended soil, whereas, biomass significantly increased at 5, 10, and 20 % FA-amended soil compared to control soil (0 % FA). Leaf nutrients uptake, followed by stems and roots uptake were highly affected by fly ash amendment to soil. Most of nutrients accumulation were increased up to 20 % fly ash and decreased thereafter. The results of available nutrient analysis of soil revealed that availability of nitrogen, potassium, sulfur, copper, iron, mangnese, and zinc declined significantly at higher levels of fly ash amendments, whereas, availability of phosphorus increased at these levels. However, pH, organic carbon, and available boron were not influenced significantly by fly ash amendment to soil. Microbial biomass C, N, and ratio of microbial-C to organic C were significantly reduced at 20 % fly ash and higher amounts. This study revealed that J. curcas plants could gainfully utilize the nutrients available in fly ash by subsequently amending soil.

  4. Contrasting responses between vegetation and soil microbial biomass and nutrient pools may exacerbate the detrimental impacts of climate change in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta, José Ignacio; León-Sánchez, Lupe; Nicolás, Emilio; Prieto, Iván; Ondoño, Sara; Maestre, Fernando; García-Izquierdo, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a 4-year manipulative experiment in a semiarid shrubland in Southeastern Spain in which we simulated the warmer and drier climate conditions forecasted for the Mediterranean Region. We evaluated the effects of warming (W), rainfall reduction (RR) and their combination (W+RR) on the performance of a native plant community, with a focus on six coexisting shrub species. Warming (W and W+RR treatments) consistently decreased net photosynthesis rates and water use efficiency across species throughout the study. Shoot dry biomass production was strongly decreased by the three climate manipulation treatments in all the target species. Leaf nutrient (N, P, K, Fe, Zn, Cu) concentrations and pool sizes in foliage were consistently decreased by warming across species, indicating reduced plant nutrient uptake and status. Plant survival rate at the end of the 4 yr. study period was also drastically decreased by experimental warming. In contrast to the strong detrimental effects of warming on plant performance, microbial biomass in rhizosphere soil increased in response to warming. However, despite increased soil microbial biomass, the activity and/or production efficiency of key microbial extracellular enzymes for soil nutrient cycling (phosphatase, urease, glycine-aminopeptidase) were significantly decreased by warming, suggesting slowed N and P mobilization and cycling rates and increased microbial immobilization, especially in the W+RR treatment. Overall, the data indicate that a warmer and drier climate could shift the competitive balance between plants and soil microbes, thereby exacerbating nutrient limitation of photosynthesis and water use efficiency, with detrimental feedback effects on vegetation productivity and cover in this dryland ecosystem.

  5. Soil Fertility and Electrical Conductivity Affected by Organic Waste Rates and Nutrient Inputs

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    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The composition of organic waste (OW and its effect on soil processes may change soil fertility and electrical conductivity (EC. The side effects of waste use in crop fertilization are poorly understood for Brazilian soils. This study examined the effect of the addition of 15 different organic wastes to Oxisols and a Neosol on pH, base saturation, EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7, and the availability of Al, macro (P, K, Ca2+, Mg2+ and S and micronutrients (B, Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. Soil samples (150 g were treated with chicken, pig, horse, cattle, and quail manures, sewage sludge 1 and 2, eucalyptus sawdust, plant substrate, coconut fiber, pine bark, coffee husk, peat, limed compost, and biochar. Wastes were added considering a fixed amount of C (2 g kg-1, which resulted in waste rates ranging from 2.5 to 25.6 Mg ha-1. The soil-waste mixtures were incubated for 330 days in laboratory conditions. The waste liming or acidification values were soil-dependent. The use of some manures and compost increased the pH to levels above of those considered adequate for plant growth. The soil EC was slightly increased in the Neosol and in the medium textured Oxisol, but it was sharply changed (from 195 to 394 µS cm-1 by the addition of organic wastes in the clayey Oxisol, although the EC values were below the range considered safe for plant growth. Changes in the soil availability of P, K+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ were highly related to the inputs of these nutrients by the wastes, and other factors in soil changed due to waste use. Organic waste use simultaneously affects different soil fertility attributes; thus, in addition to the target nutrient added to the soil, the soil acidity buffering capacity and the waste liming and agronomic value must be taken into account in the waste rate definition.

  6. Effects of Biochar on Chemical Properties of Three Types of Soil and Nutrient Uptake of Maize under Drought Stress

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    ThiHuong Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of biochar on the chemical properties of three types of soils and the nutrient uptake and yield of the maize plant grown on the soils. The experimental results are as follows: (i In Loess soil, when the biochar application rate was 15 t/ha, the soil chemical properties was barely improved, but the nutrient uptake of maize was obviously improved. The amount of biochar application was at 30 t/ha, the result was just on the contrary and 60 t/ha application of biochar performed a poor effect on the soil chemical properties as well as on the nutrient uptake of maize. (ii In sandy soil, when the application of biochar reached to 15 t/ha, there were not remarkable effects on soil chemical properties and moderate promoting effect on nutrient uptake of maize. Additionally, the biochar application at a rate of 30 t/ha led to a small effect on the both, but 60 t/ha amount made a significant improvement in both. (iii In loessal soil, applying 15 t/ha biochar to soil had a moderate effect on chemical properties’ improvement, but the promotional effect on nutrient uptake of maize is poor. When the amount of biochar application was at 30 t/ha, soil chemical properties were significantly improved but the effect on nutrient uptake of maize was moderate. However, 60 t/ha biochar application obviously improved nutrient uptake of maize, but the effect of chemical properties improvement was poor.

  7. SOIL-PLANT NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS IN TWO MANGROVE AREAS AT SOUTHERN BRAZIL

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    Ana Paula Lang Martins Madi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMangrove forests have a simple architecture. They shelter a few number of arboreal species that grow in a saline environment subject to tidal activity. The research objective was to evaluate possible interactions between physical-chemical soil attributes and plant-leaf nutrient concentrations of different mangrove species. Different mangrove species growing in the same soil, and the same mangrove species growing in two different soil classes were evaluated as to their leaf nutrient concentration patterns. The study was carried out in mangrove areas of the State of Paraná, southern Brazil, in two distinct soil classes: HISTOSOL THIOMORPHIC Salic sodic and GLEYSOL THIOMORPHIC Salic sodic; and three different species: Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle. Two subareas were delimited within each area from which soil and leaf samples were collected. Samplings from five individuals of each dominant mangrove species were taken from the soil (0-10 cm deep under each tree crown projection. The data was submitted to statistical analysis using a set of simple and multivariate analysis in order to determine possible differences among mangrove species leaf nutrient concentrations, and whether these differences might be correlated with the soil attributes or not. The results exposed that the nutritional state of the mangrove species is different and independent form the soil attributes in which they grow. Few correlations were found among leaf nutrient concentrations and soil attributes, suggesting differential selective nutrient uptake among species.RESUMENLos manglares son bosques de arquitectura simple que albergan pocas especies arbóreas, creciendo en un ambiente salino sometido a la influencia de las mareas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar las posibles interacciones entre las propiedades fisicoquímicas del suelo y la concentración de nutrientes en hojas de diferentes especies de mangle. Se investigó si

  8. Soil nutrients affect spatial patterns of aboveground biomass and emergent tree density in southwestern Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Gary D; Curran, Lisa M; Slik, J W F

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the relationship between soil fertility and aboveground biomass in lowland tropical forests have yielded conflicting results, reporting positive, negative and no effect of soil nutrients on aboveground biomass. Here, we quantify the impact of soil variation on the stand structure of mature Bornean forest throughout a lowland watershed (8-196 m a.s.l.) with uniform climate and heterogeneous soils. Categorical and bivariate methods were used to quantify the effects of (1) parent material differing in nutrient content (alluvium > sedimentary > granite) and (2) 27 soil parameters on tree density, size distribution, basal area and aboveground biomass. Trees > or =10 cm (diameter at breast height, dbh) were enumerated in 30 (0.16 ha) plots (sample area = 4.8 ha). Six soil samples (0-20 cm) per plot were analyzed for physiochemical properties. Aboveground biomass was estimated using allometric equations. Across all plots, stem density averaged 521 +/- 13 stems ha(-1), basal area 39.6 +/- 1.4 m(2) ha(-1) and aboveground biomass 518 +/- 28 Mg ha(-1) (mean +/- SE). Adjusted forest-wide aboveground biomass to account for apparent overestimation of large tree density (based on 69 0.3-ha transects; sample area = 20.7 ha) was 430 +/- 25 Mg ha(-1). Stand structure did not vary significantly among substrates, but it did show a clear trend toward larger stature on nutrient-rich alluvium, with a higher density and larger maximum size of emergent trees. Across all plots, surface soil phosphorus (P), potassium, magnesium and percentage sand content were significantly related to stem density and/or aboveground biomass (R (Pearson) = 0.368-0.416). In multiple linear regression, extractable P and percentage sand combined explained 31% of the aboveground biomass variance. Regression analyses on size classes showed that the abundance of emergent trees >120 cm dbh was positively related to soil P and exchangeable bases, whereas trees 60-90 cm dbh were negatively related to these

  9. Impact of hydrochar application on soil nutrient dynamics and plant availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, I.; Greef, J. M.; Kücke, M.

    2012-04-01

    In order to investigate potentials for the use of HTC-products (hydrochar) in agriculture, the influence of soil application of different hydrochars on soil nutrient dynamics as well as on plant growth and plant nutrient uptake was determined. Hydrochars were produced from sugar beet pulps and brewer's grains by carbonization at 190°C for 4 respectively 12 hours each. Incubation experiments with two soil types showed an increase of soil pH by 0.5 to 2.5 pH units, depending on the amount of hydrochar added and the process conditions (i.e. addition of calcium carbonate during production). The application of HTC to soil decreased the plant available nitrogen to almost zero in the first week after HTC-addition, followed by a slow re-release of nitrate in the following weeks. A similar immobilization of soluble phosphate was observed for one soil type, although to a lower extent. The plant availability of phosphorus in hydrochars and biochars is subject of current trials. Furthermore it is actually investigated to what extend the N immobilization is related to soil microbial activity. Germination tests with barley showed toxic effects of hydrochar application on germination, both by direct contact of grains with HTC as well as by release of gaseous compounds from HTC. Effects differ significantly for different parent materials and pretreatments (washing, drying, storage). The influence of HTC-addition to soil on plant growth and nutrient uptake was investigated in pot experiments with various crop species (barley, phaseolus bean, leek), comparing HTC from different parent materials and process parameters such as carbonization time. With increasing addition of HTC, the N availability was decreased and N contents in the plant were significantly lower compared with the untreated control. The plant growth response was different for each tested crop. On barley, leaf tip necroses were observed, but not on phaseolus. Biomass yield of barley and beans was generally increased

  10. Liming and fertilisation in Pinus taeda plantations with severe nutrient deficiency in savanna soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soils with high acidity and low exchangeable bases may be responsible for low yields of Pinus taeda in a forest plantation at Jaguariaíva, Paraná State, Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liming and fertilisation, applied over litter, on two selected areas with Pinus taeda plantations. Soil, litter and pine needles were evaluated for K, Ca and Mg concentrations and soil acidity parameters. Seven treatments were applied: (i complete (N, P, K, Zn, Cu, B, Mo, and lime; (ii without N, P, and K; (iii without Zn, Cu, B, and Mo; (iv without K; (v without Zn; (vi without lime; and (vii control (without nutrients and lime. Soil samples were collected at five soil depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm simultaneously with litter samples. Needles were also collected from the first and second pine flushes. Liming induced soil pH, Ca2+, and Mg2+ increases, and the opposite was observed for Al3+ and Al saturation. Fertilisation increased soil exchangeable K+ concentrations and needle and litter K concentrations. The low Ca and Mg concentrations found in the plant needles might be attributable to their low mobility.

  11. Altitudinal patterns and controls of plant and soil nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry in subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianjin; Hou, Enqing; Liu, Yang; Wen, Dazhi

    2016-04-01

    Altitude is a determining factor of ecosystem properties and processes in mountains. This study investigated the changes in the concentrations of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and their ratios in four key ecosystem components (forest floor litter, fine roots, soil, and soil microorganisms) along an altitudinal gradient (from 50 m to 950 m a.s.l.) in subtropical China. The results showed that soil organic C and microbial biomass C concentrations increased linearly with increasing altitude. Similar trends were observed for concentrations of total soil N and microbial biomass N. In contrast, the N concentration of litter and fine roots decreased linearly with altitude. With increasing altitude, litter, fine roots, and soil C:N ratios increased linearly, while the C:N ratio of soil microbial biomass did not change significantly. Phosphorus concentration and C:P and N:P ratios of all ecosystem components generally had nonlinear relationships with altitude. Our results indicate that the altitudinal pattern of plant and soil nutrient status differs among ecosystem components and that the relative importance of P vs. N limitation for ecosystem functions and processes shifts along altitudinal gradients.

  12. Wading bird guano enrichment of soil nutrients in tree islands of the Florida Everglades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, Daniel L. [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, 18905 SW 280th St., Homestead, FL 33031 (United States); Gu, Binhe [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, 2181 McCarty Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong C., E-mail: yunli@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, 18905 SW 280th St., Homestead, FL 33031 (United States); Inglett, Patrick W. [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, 2181 McCarty Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Frederick, Peter C. [University of Florida, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, 110 Newins-Ziegler Hall, PO Box 110430, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ross, Michael S. [Florida International University, Department of Earth and Environment, Southeast Environmental Research Center, 11200 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Wright, Alan L. [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, Everglades Research and Education Center, 3200 E. Palm Beach Rd., Belle Glade, FL 33430 (United States); Ewe, Sharon M.L. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., 12300 South Shore Blvd, Wellington, FL 33414 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Differential distribution of nutrients within an ecosystem can offer insight of ecological and physical processes that are otherwise unclear. This study was conducted to determine if enrichment of phosphorus (P) in tree island soils of the Florida Everglades can be explained by bird guano deposition. Concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen (N), and P, and N stable isotope ratio (δ{sup 15}N) were determined on soil samples from 46 tree islands. Total elemental concentrations and δ{sup 15}N were determined on wading bird guano. Sequential chemical extraction of P pools was also performed on guano. Guano contained between 53.1 and 123.7 g-N kg{sup −1} and 20.7 and 56.7 g-P kg{sup −1}. Most of the P present in guano was extractable by HCl, which ranged from 82 to 97% of the total P. Total P of tree islands classified as having low or high P soils averaged 0.71 and 40.6 g kg{sup −1}, respectively. Tree island soil with high total P concentration was found to have a similar δ{sup 15}N signature and total P concentration as bird guano. Phosphorus concentrations and δ{sup 15}N were positively correlated in tree island soils (r = 0.83, p < 0.0001). Potential input of guano with elevated concentrations of N and P, and {sup 15}N enriched N, relative to other sources suggests that guano deposition in tree island soils is a mechanism contributing to this pattern. - Highlights: • Tree island soil P concentration and δ{sup 15}N values exceed other Everglades soils. • Characteristics of Everglades tree island soil may indicate guano deposition. • Deposition of stable guano P can exceed other P sources to tree island soil.

  13. [Characteristics of spatial variation of soil nutrients in sloping field in a gorge karst region, southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fu-Jing; Song, Tong-Qing; Huang, Guo-Qin; Zeng, Fu-Ping; Peng, Wan-Xia; Du, Hu; Lu, Shi-Yang; Shi, Wei-Wei; Tan, Qiu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Based on a grid (20 m x 20 m) sampling, spatial heterogeneity and pattern of soil nutrients in sloping field in the gorge karst region, southwestern China, were explored by using classical statistics and geostatistics methods. The results showed that soil nutrient contents in slope field in the canyon karst region were more abundant, where pH value had a weak variation and the soil organic matter (SOM) had a moderate degree of variation. All the soil nutrients had moderate or strong variation with an order of available phosphorus (AP) > total potassium (TK) > SOM > alkaline nitrogen (AN) > total nitrogen (TN) > total phosphorus (TP) > available potassium (AK). All of the soil nutrients had a good spatial autocorrelation and the autocorrelation function performed in the same law of developing from positive to negative direction with the inflection point ranged from 80 to 100 m. In addition, the Moran's I was small for TK and AP while large for other nutrients. Characteristics of spatial variation differed among soil nutrients. Exponential model fitted best for TK and AP, in which the ratio of nugget to sill (C0/(C0 + C)) and the range (A) were small and the fractal dimension (D) was high, showed a strong spatial correlation. Spherical model fitted best for other soil nutrients, with C0/(C0 + C) , the range (A) and D showing a moderate autocorrelation. Kriging analysis clearly indicated that pH, SOM, TN, TP and AN were distributed in a concave pattern, while AP and AK had fragmented patch distribution. Therefore, vegetation, topography, human disturbance and strong heterogeneity of microhabitats are main factors leading to the differences in patterns of soil nutrients on the sloping land in the gorge karst region.

  14. Strategies to optimize allocation of limited nutrients to sandy soils of the Sahel: a case study from Niger, West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandah, M.; Brouwer, J.; Hiernaux, P.; Duivenbooden, van N.

    2003-01-01

    Soils used for rainfed cereal production in Niger are sandy, deficient in major nutrients (N and P), and also low in organic matter content. Scarce rainfall with an unpredictable distribution in space and time makes crop and nutrient management difficult. Observations were made in 1996 and 1997 on m

  15. [Moisture and nutrient characteristics of deep layer soil in apple orchards on the Luochuan highland of Shaanxi, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Jumahan, Kasimu; Fan, Peng; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Taking the 11-, 15-, 20-, and 43 years old apple orchards on the Luochuan highland of Shaanxi, Northwest China as test objects, this paper measured the moisture content in 0-1500 cm soil layer and the organic matter and total and available nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium contents in 0-300 cm soil layer, with the soil moisture and nutrient regimes as well as their variation characteristics with apple tree age and soil depth analyzed. The moisture content in 0-1500 cm soil layer in 11-, 15-, 20-, and 43 years old apple orchards was averagely 18.6%, 13.7%, 17.0%, 11.5%, and 13.1%, respectively, and decreased with apple tree age. Soil desiccation did not occurr in the orchards with supplementary irrigation, but a slight or medium soil desiccation occurred in the rainfed orchards. Nevertheless, the moisture content in 0-300 cm soil layer in the rainfed orchards was still higher than that in wheat field. The contents of organic matter and total and available nitrogen in 0-300 cm soil layer in the five apple orchards were less than 10 g.kg-1, 0.75 g. kg-1, and 50 mg.kg-1, respectively, all at shortage level, whilst the content of available phosphorous in 0-300 cm soil layer was 3.30-6.42 mg.kg-1, being moderate in upper soil layer and scarce in deep soil layer. The content of available potassium in 0-300 cm soil layer was 78.09-98.31 mg.kg-1, presenting abundant. The contents of nutrients were all higher in 0-100 cm soil layer than in 100-300 cm soil layer. The soil organic matter and total and available nitrogen contents and the soil nutrient index (SNI) all presented a trend of decrease after an initial increase with the increasing apple tree age. The contents of the test nutrients except total potassium in 0-100 cm soil layer all decreased rapidly with soil depth, while those in deeper soil layers kept relatively stable. There existed significant correlations between the contents of soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available nitrogen, total phosphorous

  16. Microbial potential for carbon and nutrient cycling in a geogenic supercritical carbon dioxide reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Adam J E; Tan, BoonFei; Thompson, Janelle R

    2017-06-01

    Microorganisms catalyze carbon cycling and biogeochemical reactions in the deep subsurface and thus may be expected to influence the fate of injected supercritical (sc) CO2 following geological carbon sequestration (GCS). We hypothesized that natural subsurface scCO2 reservoirs, which serve as analogs for the long-term fate of sequestered scCO2 , harbor a 'deep carbonated biosphere' with carbon cycling potential. We sampled subsurface fluids from scCO2 -water separators at a natural scCO2 reservoir at McElmo Dome, Colorado for analysis of 16S rRNA gene diversity and metagenome content. Sequence annotations indicated dominance of Sulfurospirillum, Rhizobium, Desulfovibrio and four members of the Clostridiales family. Genomes extracted from metagenomes using homology and compositional approaches revealed diverse mechanisms for growth and nutrient cycling, including pathways for CO2 and N2 fixation, anaerobic respiration, sulfur oxidation, fermentation and potential for metabolic syntrophy. Differences in biogeochemical potential between two production well communities were consistent with differences in fluid chemical profiles, suggesting a potential link between microbial activity and geochemistry. The existence of a microbial ecosystem associated with the McElmo Dome scCO2 reservoir indicates that potential impacts of the deep biosphere on CO2 fate and transport should be taken into consideration as a component of GCS planning and modelling. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Freeze-Thaw Cycles Effects on Soil Compaction in a Clay Loam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabro, J.; Evans, R.; Iversen, W.

    2012-04-01

    Inappropriate soil management practices and heavier farm machinery and equipment have led to an increase in soil compaction in the last two decades prompting increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agriculture. A 3-yr comprehensive study was established to evaluate the dynamic of freeze-thaw cycles on soil compaction in a clay loam soil. Plots of frozen soils were compared with plots where soils were prevented from freezing with electrically heated blankets commonly used on concrete. Results showed that frequent freeze-thaw cycles over the winter alleviated a majority of soil compaction at the 0 - 20 cm depth. Soil penetration resistance in compacted soils was reduced by 73 and 68% over the winter at the 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm depths, respectively, due to dynamic effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil structure and particles configuration. In unfrozen compacted soils, the penetration resistance was also reduced by 50 and 60% over winter at the 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm depths, respectively, due to the biology of soil, microbial activity, and disruptive effects of shrink-swell cycles. These results have demonstrated of how repeated freeze-thaw cycles can alleviate soil compaction, alter soil physical quality and create optimal soil conditions required for profitable growth of agricultural crops. The results from this study will save growers considerable time, money and energy currently required to alleviate soil compaction using other methods such as sub-soiling and deep tillage. We believe that Mother Nature provides ways to reverse soil compaction and improve soil structure and aggregation through the dynamic of freeze-thaw cycles that soils in Montana and other parts of the country go through each year. We concluded that the Mother Nature is the most effective and cheapest way to alleviate soil compaction.

  18. In situ electrokinetic control of moisture and nutrients in unsaturated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    Many DOE facilities have unsaturated soils contaminated with metals and organic solvents. Because of the large volumes, in situ remediation is often the most economically attractive remediation technique. The success of many in situ treatment technologies depends critically on the degree to which the movement of water and desired ions can be engineered in the vadose zone. Bioremediation efforts in the vadose zone are limited by the ability to provide moisture and nutrients to contaminant-metabolizing microorganisms. An in situ electrokinetic remediation process has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for use in unsaturated soils, and is presently undergoing field demonstration. The electrokinetic process is not limited by low soil permeabilities and, therefore, provides a level of control not achievable by hydraulic means. Moisture is added to the subsurface in a controlled fashion such that the field capacity is never exceeded, preventing the unwanted mobilization of dissolved contaminants by saturated wetting fronts. The Sandia electrokinetic process can potentially transport both water and nutrients for bioremediation efforts and is compatible with vapor phase in situ techniques such as bioventing. The approach should as bioventing. The approach should lend itself to the directed transport of biodegradable chelating agents and complexed metals from contaminated soils.

  19. Mineralization of alanine enantiomers in soil treated with heavy metals and nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Formánek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the determination of the effect of heavy metals and nutrients applied to the soil on alanine enatiomers mineralization with the main focus on evaluating the effect on L/D alanine respiration rate ratio. This study was initiated because previous research works revealed a change in L/D amino acid respiration under acid- or heavy metal-stress in soil. Generally, D-amino acids artificially supplied to soil are less utilized by microorganisms compared with their L-enantiomers. Stress of soil microorganisms cause decreased discrimination of D-amino acids utilization. Also, previous research showed that an application of fertilizers or combinations of fertilizers may affect the mineralization rate of L-amino acids differently, compared with their D-enantiomers. The results of this study show, that the effect of both heavy metals and nutrients on the L/D ratio was not clear, increasing or decreasing this ratio. Further research is necessary to broaden this study.

  20. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik F; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-10-15

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating strategies. Therefore, the LCA evaluation is repeated for three different scenarios depending on the limitation of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or both, when evaluating the nutrient enrichment impact in water bodies. The LCA results indicate that for treated effluent discharged into N-deficient aquatic systems (e.g. open coastal areas) the most eco-friendly strategies differ from the ones dealing with discharging into P-deficient (e.g. lakes and rivers) and N&P-deficient systems (e.g. coastal zones). More particularly, the results suggest that strategies that promote increased nutrient removal and/or energy savings present an environmental benefit for N&P and P-deficient systems. This is not the case when addressing N-deficient systems for which the use of chemicals (even for improving N removal efficiencies) is not always beneficial for the environment. A sensitivity analysis on using weighting of the impact categories is conducted to assess how value choices (policy decisions) may affect the management of WWTPs. For the scenarios with only N-limitation, the LCA-based ranking of the control strategies is sensitive to the choice of weighting factors, whereas this is not the case for N&P or P-deficient aquatic systems.

  1. Nutrient-cycling microbes in Coastal Douglas-fir forests: Regional-scale correlation between communities, in situ climate, and other factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip-Edouard eShay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbes such as fungi and bacteria play fundamental roles in litter-decay and nutrient-cycling; however their communities may respond differently than plants to climate change. The structure (diversity, richness and evenness and composition of microbial communities in climate transects of mature Douglas-fir stands of coastal British Columbia rainshadow forests was analysed, in order to assess in situ variability due to different temperature and moisture regimes. We compared DGGE profiles of fungi (18S-FF390/FR1, nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NifH-universal and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AmoA PCR amplicons in forest floor and mineral soil samples from three transects located at different latitudes, each transect spanning the Coastal Western Hemlock and Douglas-fir biogeoclimatic zones. Composition of microbial communities in both soil layers was related to degree days above 0°C (2725 - 3489, while pH (3.8 - 5.5 best explained shifts in community structure. At this spatial scale, climatic conditions were likely to directly or indirectly select for different microbial species while local site heterogeneity influenced community structure. Significant changes in microbial community composition and structure were related to differences as small as 2.47% and 2.55°C in mean annual moisture and temperature variables, respectively. The climatic variables best describing microbial composition changed from one functional group to the next; in general they did not alter community structure. Spatial distance, especially associated with latitude, was also important in accounting for community variability (4 - 23%; but to a lesser extent than the combined influence of climate and soil characteristics (14 - 25%. Results suggest that in-situ climate can independently account for some patterns of microbial biogeography in coastal Douglas-fir forests. The distribution of up to 43% of nutrient-cycling microorganisms detected in forest soils responded to smaller

  2. Nutrient-cycling microbes in coastal Douglas-fir forests: regional-scale correlation between communities, in situ climate, and other factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Philip-Edouard; Winder, Richard S.; Trofymow, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbes such as fungi and bacteria play fundamental roles in litter-decay and nutrient-cycling; however, their communities may respond differently than plants to climate change. The structure (diversity, richness, and evenness) and composition of microbial communities in climate transects of mature Douglas-fir stands of coastal British Columbia rainshadow forests was analyzed, in order to assess in situ variability due to different temperature and moisture regimes. We compared denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of fungi (18S-FF390/FR1), nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NifH-universal) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AmoA) polymerase chain reaction amplicons in forest floor and mineral soil samples from three transects located at different latitudes, each transect spanning the Coastal Western Hemlock and Douglas-fir biogeoclimatic zones. Composition of microbial communities in both soil layers was related to degree days above 0°C (2725–3489), while pH (3.8–5.5) best explained shifts in community structure. At this spatial scale, climatic conditions were likely to directly or indirectly select for different microbial species while local site heterogeneity influenced community structure. Significant changes in microbial community composition and structure were related to differences as small as 2.47% and 2.55°C in mean annual moisture and temperature variables, respectively. The climatic variables best describing microbial composition changed from one functional group to the next; in general they did not alter community structure. Spatial distance, especially associated with latitude, was also important in accounting for community variability (4–23%); but to a lesser extent than the combined influence of climate and soil characteristics (14–25%). Results suggest that in situ climate can independently account for some patterns of microbial biogeography in coastal Douglas-fir forests. The distribution of up to 43% of nutrient-cycling microorganisms

  3. Effect of Integrated Water-Nutrient Management Strategies on Soil Erosion Mediated Nutrient Loss and Crop Productivity in Cabo Verde Drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Isaurinda; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion, runoff and related nutrient losses are a big risk for soil fertility in Cabo Verde drylands. In 2012, field trials were conducted in two agro-ecological zones to evaluate the effects of selected techniques of soil-water management combined with organic amendments (T1: compost/manure + soil surfactant; T2: compost/animal or green manure + pigeon-pea hedges + soil surfactant; T3: compost/animal or green manure + mulch + pigeon-pea hedges) on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses in eroded soil and runoff and on crop yields. Three treatments and one control (traditional practice) were tested in field plots at three sites with a local maize variety and two types of beans. Runoff and eroded soil were collected after each erosive rain, quantified, and analysed for NO3-N and PO4-P concentrations. In all treatments runoff had higher concentrations of NO3-N (2.20-4.83 mg L-1) than of PO4-P (0.02-0.07 mg L-1), and the eroded soil had higher content of PO4-P (5.27-18.8 mg g-1) than of NO3-N (1.30-8.51 mg g-1). The control had significantly higher losses of both NO3-N (5.4, 4.4 and 19 kg ha-1) and PO4-P (0.2, 0.1 and 0.4 kg ha-1) than the other treatments. T3 reduced soil loss, runoff and nutrient losses to nearly a 100% while T1 and T2 reduced those losses from 43 to 88%. The losses of NO3-N and PO4-P were highly correlated with the amounts of runoff and eroded soil. Nutrient losses from the applied amendments were low (5.7% maximum), but the losses in the control could indicate long-term nutrient depletion in the soil (19 and 0.4 kg ha-1 of NO3-N and PO4-P, respectively). T1-T3 did not consistently increase crop yield or biomass in all three sites, but T1 increased both crop yield and biomass. We conclude that T3 (combining crop-residue mulch with organic amendment and runoff hedges) is the best treatment for steep slope areas but, the pigeon-pea hedges need to be managed for higher maize yield. T1 (combining organic amendment with soil surfactant) could be a

  4. Soil Carbon and Nutrient Changes Associated with Deforestation for Pasture in Southern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Timothy J.; Porder, Stephen; Chaves, Joaquin; Whiteside, Jessica H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the effects of deforestation on soil carbon (C) and nutrient stocks in the premontane landscape near Las Cruces Biological Station in southern Costa Rica, where forests were cleared for pasture in the mid-1960s. We excavated six soil pits to a depth of 1 m in both pasture and primary forest, and found that C stocks were 20 kg C per square meters in both settings. Nevertheless, soil delta C-13 suggests 50 percent of the forest-derived soil C above 40 cm depth has turned over since deforestation. Soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) stocks derived from the soil pits were not significantly different between land uses (P = 0.43 and 0.61, respectively). At a larger spatial scale, however, the ubiquity of ruts produced by cattle-induced erosion indicates that there are substantial soil effects of grazing in this steep landscape. Ruts averaged 13 cm deep and covered 45 percent of the landscape, and thus are evidence of the removal of 0.7 Mg C/ ha/yr, and 70, 9 and 40 kg/ha/yr of N, P and potassium (K), respectively. Subsoils in this region are 10 times less C- and N-rich, and 2 times less P- and K-rich than the topsoil. Thus, rapid topsoil loss may lead to a decline in pasture productivity in the coming decades. These data also suggest that the soil C footprint of deforestation in this landscape may be determined by the fate of soil C as it is transported downstream, rather than C turnover in situ.

  5. Soil nutrient budgets following projected corn stover harvest for biofuel production in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengxi; Liu, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Increasing demand for food and biofuel feedstocks may substantially affect soil nutrient budgets, especially in the United States where there is great potential for corn (Zea mays L) stover as a biofuel feedstock. This study was designed to evaluate impacts of projected stover harvest scenarios on budgets of soil nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) currently and in the future across the conterminous United States. The required and removed N, P, and K amounts under each scenario were estimated on the basis of both their average contents in grain and stover and from an empirical model. Our analyses indicate a small depletion of soil N (−4 ± 35 kg ha−1) and K (−6 ± 36 kg ha−1) and a moderate surplus of P (37 ± 21 kg ha−1) currently on the national average, but with a noticeable variation from state to state. After harvesting both grain and projected stover, the deficits of soil N, P, and K were estimated at 114–127, 26–27, and 36–53 kg ha−1 yr−1, respectively, in 2006–2010; 131–173, 29–32, and 41–96 kg ha−1 yr−1, respectively, in 2020; and 161–207, 35–39, and 51–111 kg ha−1 yr−1, respectively, in 2050. This study indicates that the harvestable stover amount derived from the minimum stover requirement for maintaining soil organic carbon level scenarios under current fertilization rates can be sustainable for soil nutrient supply and corn production at present, but the deficit of P and K at the national scale would become larger in the future.

  6. Relationships between nutrient-related plant traits and combinations of soil N and P fertility measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Fujita

    Full Text Available Soil fertility and nutrient-related plant functional traits are in general only moderately related, hindering the progress in trait-based prediction models of vegetation patterns. Although the relationships may have been obscured by suboptimal choices in how soil fertility is expressed, there has never been a systematic investigation into the suitability of fertility measures. This study, therefore, examined the effect of different soil fertility measures on the strength of fertility-trait relationships in 134 natural plant communities. In particular, for eight plot-mean traits we examined (1 whether different elements (N or P have contrasting or shared influences, (2 which timescale of fertility measures (e.g. mineralization rates for one or five years has better predictive power, and (3 if integrated fertility measures explain trait variation better than individual fertility measures. Soil N and P had large mutual effects on leaf nutrient concentrations, whereas they had element-specific effects on traits related to species composition (e.g. Grime's CSR strategy. The timescale of fertility measures only had a minor impact on fertility-trait relationships. Two integrated fertility measures (one reflecting overall fertility, another relative availability of soil N and P were related significantly to most plant traits, but were not better in explaining trait variation than individual fertility measures. Using all fertility measures together, between-site variations of plant traits were explained only moderately for some traits (e.g. 33% for leaf N concentrations but largely for others (e.g. 66% for whole-canopy P concentration. The moderate relationships were probably due to complex regulation mechanisms of fertility on traits, rather than to a wrong choice of fertility measures. We identified both mutual (i.e. shared and divergent (i.e. element-specific and stoichiometric effects of soil N and P on traits, implying the importance of explicitly

  7. Relationships between nutrient-related plant traits and combinations of soil N and P fertility measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; van Bodegom, Peter M; Witte, Jan-Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Soil fertility and nutrient-related plant functional traits are in general only moderately related, hindering the progress in trait-based prediction models of vegetation patterns. Although the relationships may have been obscured by suboptimal choices in how soil fertility is expressed, there has never been a systematic investigation into the suitability of fertility measures. This study, therefore, examined the effect of different soil fertility measures on the strength of fertility-trait relationships in 134 natural plant communities. In particular, for eight plot-mean traits we examined (1) whether different elements (N or P) have contrasting or shared influences, (2) which timescale of fertility measures (e.g. mineralization rates for one or five years) has better predictive power, and (3) if integrated fertility measures explain trait variation better than individual fertility measures. Soil N and P had large mutual effects on leaf nutrient concentrations, whereas they had element-specific effects on traits related to species composition (e.g. Grime's CSR strategy). The timescale of fertility measures only had a minor impact on fertility-trait relationships. Two integrated fertility measures (one reflecting overall fertility, another relative availability of soil N and P) were related significantly to most plant traits, but were not better in explaining trait variation than individual fertility measures. Using all fertility measures together, between-site variations of plant traits were explained only moderately for some traits (e.g. 33% for leaf N concentrations) but largely for others (e.g. 66% for whole-canopy P concentration). The moderate relationships were probably due to complex regulation mechanisms of fertility on traits, rather than to a wrong choice of fertility measures. We identified both mutual (i.e. shared) and divergent (i.e. element-specific and stoichiometric) effects of soil N and P on traits, implying the importance of explicitly

  8. Spatial Variability of Nutrient Properties in Black Soil of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xing-Yi; SUI Yue-Yu; ZHANG Xu-Dong; MENG Kai; S.J.HERBERT

    2007-01-01

    A total of 1400 soil samples from the plow layer (0-20 cm) at an approximate interval of 5 km were collected in the autumn of 2002 over the entire black soil arable crops region to determine the spatial variability of seven variables, such as total organic matter content (OMC), total N, total P, total K, alkali-dissolvable N (AN), available P (AP) and available K (AK), with classical statistics and geostatistical analysis across the entire black soil area in Northeast China. In nonsampled areas ordinary kriging was utilized for interpolation of estimated nutrient determinations. Classical statistics revealed highly significant (P ≤ 0.01) correlations with all seven of the soil properties, except for OMC with AP and total K with AK. In addition, using coefficients of variation, all soil properties, except for total K, were moderately variable. A geostatistical analysis indicated that structural factors, such as parent material, terrain, and water table, were the main causes of the spatial correlations. Strong spatial correlations were noted with OMC, total N, total P, AN, and AP, while they were moderate for total K and AK. The effective spatial autocorrelation of OMC, total N, total P, and AN ranged from 1 037 to 1 353 km, whereas the ranges of total K, AP, and AK were only from 6 to 138 km. The fit of the experimental semi-variograms to the theoretical models indicated that except for AN, kriging could successfully interpolate other six variables. Thus, the geostatistical method used on a large scale could accurately evaluate the spatial variability of most black soil nutrient properties in Northeast China.

  9. Characterization and nutrient release from silicate rocks and influence on chemical changes in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Guelfi Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of Brazilian agriculture has led to a heavy dependence on imported fertilizers to ensure the supply of the growing food demand. This fact has contributed to a growing interest in alternative nutrient sources, such as ground silicate rocks. It is necessary, however, to know the potential of nutrient release and changes these materials can cause in soils. The purpose of this study was to characterize six silicate rocks and evaluate their effects on the chemical properties of treated soil, assessed by chemical extractants after greenhouse incubation. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized plots, in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with four replications. The factors were potassium levels (0-control: without silicate rock application; 200; 400; 600 kg ha-1 of K2O, supplied as six silicate rock types (breccia, biotite schist, ultramafic rock, phlogopite schist and two types of mining waste. The chemical, physical and mineralogical properties of the alternative rock fertilizers were characterized. Treatments were applied to a dystrophic Red-Yellow Oxisol (Ferralsol, which was incubated for 100 days, at 70 % (w/w moisture in 3.7 kg/pots. The soil was evaluated for pH; calcium and magnesium were extracted with KCl 1 mol L-1; potassium, phosphorus and sodium by Mehlich 1; nickel, copper and zinc with DTPA; and the saturation of the cation exchange capacity was calculated for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and overall base saturation. The alternative fertilizers affected soil chemical properties. Ultramafic rock and Chapada mining byproduct (CMB were the silicate rocks that most influenced soil pH, while the mining byproduct (MB led to high K levels. Zinc availability was highest in the treatments with mining byproduct and Cu in soil fertilized with Chapada and mining byproduct.

  10. Impact of climate change on water balance, and nutrient leaching of (pre-) alpine grassland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jin; Lu, Haiyan; Butterbach-bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    On a global perspective terrestrial biosphere hosts significant pools of carbon and nitrogen. Due to cool and moist climatic conditions alpine grassland soils of moderate elevation (app. 1000m) in particular, are rich in soil organic carbon and associated nitrogen. In the framework of an in-situ climate change experiment we test the hypothesis that soil organic carbon and nitrogen are either volatilized (GHG emissions) or leached with seepage water due to increase in air temperature as induced by climate change. The infrastructure of the in-situ climate change experiment was funded by Helmholtz society and BMBF and allowed IMK-IFU to install a lysimeter network with undisturbed intact grassland soil cores (diameter approx. 1 m, depth 1.4 m, 2-3 t of soil) at three sites (Graswang 860m, Rottenbuch 750m, Fendt 600m) differing in altitude and climate. The lysimeter network consisting of a total of 36 lysimeters is operated since September 2011 and is run for climate change research with a long term perspective (>10years). Lysimeters were partly moved along the altitudinal gradient, with some soil cores still staying at sites as controls and some others translocated from higher elevation to sites at lower elevation with higher temperatures and slightly lower mean annual rainfall. The different components of the water balance i.e. precipitation, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge of each lysimeter are measured by precision weighing of the lysimeters and a separate container for collection of seepage water at the lower boundary condition (1.4m). In addition, soil moisture (volumetric water content as well as water tension) and temperature are measured with sensors installed in 10, 30, 50, 140cm soil depth. Soil water in 10, 30, 50 and 140cm soil depth is drawn into glass bottles by under-pressurized suction cups. Water samples are collected regularly any 2 weeks and more often (e.g. 3 times a week) during fertilization events, and analyzed for nutrient

  11. Nutrients, Trace Elements and Water Deficit in Greek Soils Cultivated with Olive Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Karyotis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The studied soils consist of alluvial and/or colluvial deposits  located in the Prefecture of Messinia, Western Peloponnese (Greece. A total number of 263 surface soil layers were selected and analysed for the main properties. Minimum and maximum values and  the distribution of soil properties varied greatly and can be attributed mainly to various fertilization practices adopted by  farmers, inputs of nutrients by irrigation water and differences due to inherent soil conditions. Lower variability was recorded for the parameters pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC, total soil nitrogen (N and soil organic matter (SOM, while coefficients of variation for properties that can be affected easily by human activities such as available phosphorus and micronutrients, are much higher. Minor content for trace elements was observed in the following order:Zinc (Zn>Manganese (Mn>Boron (B>Iron (Fe. During the dry period, irrigation of olive trees is recommended and the appropriate irrigation demands were defined, taking into account rainfall and  water requirements.

  12. Effects of Magnesium Compound with Fertilizer on Daylily (Hemerocallis citrina Baroni) Growth and Soil Nutrients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Nan; ZENG Xi-bai; LI Ju-mei; GAO Ju-sheng; WANG Bo-ren

    2006-01-01

    Effects of two kinds of magnesium compound with fertilizer on Daylily (Hemerocallis citrina Baroni) growth, yield, and soil nutrients in red soil were studied. The results indicated that significant effects of magnesium applied to soils were observed in increasing Daylily (Hemerocallis citrina Baroni) yield, improving its growth, and strengthening its antivirus property as well as increasing the amount of exchangeable Mg, N, P, and K in red soil. In particular, the effects of magnesium compound fertilizer Ⅱ (MCF2) with higher Mg content were better than that of the others, which increased Daylily (Hemerocallis citrina Baroni) yield by 57.4, 32.8, and 14.5% compared to that of control treatment (CK), chemical fertilizer with nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium treatment (CF), and magnesium compound fertilizer Ⅰ treatment (MCF1) with lower Mg content. It increased soil Alkali N, available P, exchangeable K, and exchangeable Mg by 94.9, 46.5, 31.1,and 35.3%, respectively, compared with that of CK treatment. Therefore, the application of magnesium compound with fertilizer is an optimum method for improving red soil quality.

  13. Reciprocal effects of litter from exotic and congeneric native plant species via soil nutrients.

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    Annelein Meisner

    Full Text Available Invasive exotic plant species are often expected to benefit exclusively from legacy effects of their litter inputs on soil processes and nutrient availability. However, there are relatively few experimental tests determining how litter of exotic plants affects their own growth conditions compared to congeneric native plant species. Here, we test how the legacy of litter from three exotic plant species affects their own performance in comparison to their congeneric natives that co-occur in the invaded habitat. We also analyzed litter