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Sample records for nursing-sensitive patient outcomes

  1. The Impact of Electronic Knowledge-Based Nursing Content and Decision-Support on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    the impact of technology when it is used to guide nurse-delivered patient education . The KBN care plans are designed to include phenomena-specific... Impact of a Technology -based Innovation to Support Evidence-based Patient Education by Nurses in Acute Care. Accepted for podium presentation at the...hold great promise. Hospitals use varied strategies to increase the uptake of EBP including policy-, education -, and technology -based interventions

  2. Identifying paediatric nursing-sensitive outcomes in linked administrative health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sally

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the contribution of the quality of nursing care to patient outcomes. Due to different casemix and risk profiles, algorithms for administrative health data that identify nursing-sensitive outcomes in adult hospitalised patients may not be applicable to paediatric patients. The study purpose was to test adult algorithms in a paediatric hospital population and make amendments to increase the accuracy of identification of hospital acquired events. The study also aimed to determine whether the use of linked hospital records improved the likelihood of correctly identifying patient outcomes as nursing sensitive rather than being related to their pre-morbid conditions. Methods Using algorithms developed by Needleman et al. (2001, proportions and rates of records that identified nursing-sensitive outcomes for pressure ulcers, pneumonia and surgical wound infections were determined from administrative hospitalisation data for all paediatric patients discharged from a tertiary paediatric hospital in Western Australia between July 1999 and June 2009. The effects of changes to inclusion and exclusion criteria for each algorithm on the calculated proportion or rate in the paediatric population were explored. Linked records were used to identify comorbid conditions that increased nursing-sensitive outcome risk. Rates were calculated using algorithms revised for paediatric patients. Results Linked records of 129,719 hospital separations for 79,016 children were analysed. Identification of comorbid conditions was enhanced through access to prior and/or subsequent hospitalisation records (43% of children with pressure ulcers had a form of paralysis recorded only on a previous admission. Readmissions with a surgical wound infection were identified for 103 (4.8/1,000 surgical separations using linked data. After amendment of each algorithm for paediatric patients, rates of pressure ulcers and pneumonia reduced by

  3. Influence of workplace culture on nursing-sensitive nurse outcomes in municipal primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahtela, Nina; Paavilainen, Eija; McCormack, Brendan; Slater, Paul; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-10-01

    To explore the influence of workplace culture on sickness absences, overtime work and occupational injuries in municipal primary health care. The need to improve nursing sensitive outcomes has been highlighted. Therefore, an adequate understanding of the influence of workplace culture on nursing-sensitive nurse outcomes is essential for nurse managers to meet the requirements of improving nursing outcomes. A cross-sectional survey design was used to incorporating the data from 21 inpatient acute care units of nine organisations at the Finnish municipal primary health care system from 2011 to 2012. Findings emphasise in particular the importance of the practice environment as being an interpretative factor for nurses' absences owing to sickness, overtime work and occupational injuries. To ensure favourable nursing sensitive outcomes it is essential that there is a shared interest in the unit to invest in the creation of a supportive practice environment. Outcome improvements require a special focus on issues related to nursing management, adequate staffing and resources and intention to leave. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Engaging the learner by bridging the gap between theory and clinical competence: the impact of concept mapping and simulation as innovative strategies for nurse-sensitive outcome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Therese; Lis, Gail A

    2014-03-01

    Concept mapping and simulation provide professional nurses in the academic and practice environment with an opportunity for experiential learning. This integral combination allows for learning to be congruent with the national clinical practice guidelines that support and promote nurse-sensitive indicators. Implications for practice are forthcoming as data are collected on the impact on health outcomes when using concept mapping and simulation.

  5. Reducing risk for ventilator associated pneumonia through nursing sensitive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micik, Svatka; Besic, Nihada; Johnson, Natalie; Han, Matilda; Hamlyn, Stephen; Ball, Hayley

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an improvement initiative designed to implement nurse sensitive interventions known to reduce patients' risk for ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), in cardiothoracic intensive care patients. This initiative is a part of one Australian critical care unit's efforts to identify and measure compliance with key nursing interventions known to improve cardiac surgical patients' outcomes. The premise behind the initiative is that improved nursing process and surveillance systems allow emerging trends to catalyse action and motivate nurses to reduce patients' risk for infection acquisition. At five and nine months following implementation of the initiative a>70% compliance rate in 11 out of the 15 nurse sensitive interventions known to reduce patients' risks for VAP and a drop in VAP incidence from 13.4% to 7.69% from per 1000 ventilator days was accomplished.

  6. The Relationship of Workplace Culture With Nursing-Sensitive Organizational Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahtela, Nina; McCormack, Brendan; Paavilainen, Eija; Slater, Paul; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relations of workplace culture on nursing-sensitive organizational factors. The need for standardized and valid measures for nursing-sensitive organizational outcomes has already been recognized in the literature. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 21 inpatient acute care units in 9 organizations at the municipal primary healthcare level was conducted. Participants included licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, and nurse managers. Workplace culture, especially the overarching factor of stress, correlated with the use of supplemental nursing staff and patients' length of stay. It is essential to find and test workplace-sensitive indicators so that managers will have a wider range of methods to plan and evaluate nursing outcomes.

  7. The Impact of Electronic Knowledge-Based Nursing Content and Decision-Support on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    facilitator) and their ability/ skills to articulate , advocate, and communicate support for the policy. Leaders can choose a “dissemination...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...JAN-2014  Job descriptions were created & posted for Project Manager (PM) & Graduate Intern; An interim PM (part time) helped to set up the

  8. [Psychometric properties of Q-DIO, an instrument to measure the quality of documented nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller-Staub, M.; Lunney, M.; Lavin, M.A.; Needham, I.; Odenbreit, M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2010-01-01

    The instrument Q-DIO was developed in the years 2005 till 2006 to measure the quality of documented nursing diagnoses, interventions, and nursing sensitive patient outcomes. Testing psychometric properties of the Q-DIO (Quality of nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes.) was the study aim. In

  9. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient-centered outcomes research to improve asthma outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anise, Ayodola; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is funding 8 comparative effectiveness research projects to improve patient-centered outcomes for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with uncontrolled asthma. These projects aim to compare multilevel interventions with known efficacy at the community, home, and health system levels to enhance patient and clinician uptake of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines and improve outcomes. The National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines provide clinicians with a range of acceptable approaches for the diagnosis and management of asthma and define general practices that meet the needs of most patients. Yet disparities in asthma care and outcomes remain pervasive for African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute AsthmaNet consortium has identified several top research priorities for pediatric and adult populations, including a recommendation to examine tailored approaches based on race/ethnicity. In addition, the guidelines emphasize the need for studies that focus on multicomponent interventions recognizing that single interventions are generally ineffective. This article will describe the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded asthma projects and how they are individually and collectively addressing evidence gaps in asthma care by focusing on multicomponent and tailored approaches for improving outcomes and reducing disparities for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Nursing care and patient outcomes: international evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Robyn B.; Aiken, Linda H.; Clarke, Sean P.; Sloane, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    Countries across the globe are experiencing nursing shortages. In hospitals, supportive practice environments have positive effects on both nurse and patient outcomes. However, these relationships have been established primarily in the US. International studies of the effects of nurse staffing levels and the practice environment on nurse outcomes and the quality of care mirror the findings from the US, thus raising these issues to the international level. The solutions that have been successful in the US for improving practice environment and patient outcomes are solutions that should be successful in any country, thus putting them on a global scale. The Magnet hospital program is one model that has been shown to improve nurse and patient outcomes and is one solution to the shortage of hospital nurses. PMID:18218265

  12. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina FJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. Keywords: hip fractures, geriatric assessment, orthogeriatric care, recovery of function, mortality

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in patients with systemic autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canti, Valentina; Castiglioni, Maria Teresa; Rosa, Susanna; Franchini, Stefano; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Manfredi, Angelo A; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2012-03-01

    The impact of maternal systemic autoimmune diseases on pregnancy outcome is not unequivocally defined. We analysed the pregnancy outcome of 221 pregnancies from 181 autoimmune patients, consecutively followed in a single Italian reference centre from 2001 to 2009. All patients were prospectively followed with monthly visits. Pregnancy outcome was compared with the previous obstetrical history. The patient population comprised five groups: primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS, 39 pregnancies), antiphospholipid syndrome associated with a rheumatic disease (APS/RD, 17 pregnancies), other RD (92 pregnancies), isolated autoantibodies (autoAbs) in the absence of a definite autoimmune disease (aAbs, 38 pregnancies) and reactive arthritis or spondyloarthropathies (35 pregnancies). Of these patients, 50.6% had previous pregnancy complications with an anamnestic live-birth rate of 43.4%. In these patients, complications dropped to 28.2% (44/156). This percentage was very similar to that observed in the 221 pregnancies (29.9%, 66/221) with a live-birth rate of 87.3%. Mean neonatal weight was 3018 ± 611 g; mean gestational age at delivery was 38.17 ± 2.79 weeks. Thus, 10.4% of pregnancies resulted in preterm delivery and 10.9% newborns had low weight at delivery. APS/RD patients had the worse outcome: 17.6% resulted in miscarriage, 14.3% resulted in growth restriction and 50% resulted in preterm delivery. This result was mainly due to patients with APS/systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that had the lowest gestational age at delivery (30.8 ± 3.56 weeks) and the lowest newborn weight (1499 ± 931 g). Results confirm that a strict follow-up and targeted treatments significantly improve pregnancy outcomes in autoimmune patients with PAPS, SLE and isolated autoAbs. The pregnancy outcome in patients with APS/SLE remains unsatisfactory.

  14. Effects of Environmental Design on Patient Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . The following databases were searched: Medline/PubMed, Cinahl, and Embase. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of built environment design interventions such as music, natural murals, and plants in relation to patients' health outcome. RESULTS: Built environment...... design aspects such as audio environment and visual environment had a positive influence on patients' health outcomes. Specifically the studies indicated a decrease in patients' anxiety, pain, and stress levels when exposed to certain built environment design interventions. CONCLUSIONS: The built...

  15. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M.;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus....... CONCLUSION: The Neck OutcOme Score has excellent content validity and preliminary results support a 5-subscale structure. Additional work is needed to assess the reliability, further construct validity and responsiveness....

  16. Working with patients to optimise cataract outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Astbury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the delights of ophthalmology is to witness the joy on the face of a patient with cataract when the dressing is taken off and sight has been restored. Unfortunately, for some patients, the result does not live up to their expectations. Despite cataract surgery being one of the most successful surgical interventions available, there is evidence that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in sub-Saharan Africa is not always good (defined as a VA of 6/18 or better. The proportion of good outcomes range from only 23% up to 70%, failing to reach the WHO target of 85% or better.

  17. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A M M; Van Der Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive

  18. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitri van der Linden; Prof. Dr. Marieke J. Schuurmans; Dewi Stalpers; Marian J. Kaljouw; Renate A.M.M. Kieft

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses’ satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive

  19. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A M M; Van Der Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive scr

  20. Effects of environmental design on patient outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Danielsen, Anne; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . The following databases were searched: Medline/PubMed, Cinahl, and Embase. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of built environment design interventions such as music, natural murals, and plants in relation to patients' health outcome. RESULTS: Built environment......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to assess how inpatients were affected by the built environment design during their hospitalization. BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, the healthcare system has become increasingly aware of how focus on healthcare environment might affect patient...... design aspects such as audio environment and visual environment had a positive influence on patients' health outcomes. Specifically the studies indicated a decrease in patients' anxiety, pain, and stress levels when exposed to certain built environment design interventions. CONCLUSIONS: The built...

  1. Effects of Environmental Design on Patient Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . The following databases were searched: Medline/PubMed, Cinahl, and Embase. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of built environment design interventions such as music, natural murals, and plants in relation to patients' health outcome. RESULTS: Built environment......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to assess how inpatients were affected by the built environment design during their hospitalization. BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, the healthcare system has become increasingly aware of how focus on healthcare environment might affect patient...... design aspects such as audio environment and visual environment had a positive influence on patients' health outcomes. Specifically the studies indicated a decrease in patients' anxiety, pain, and stress levels when exposed to certain built environment design interventions. CONCLUSIONS: The built...

  2. Outcome of orthognathic surgery in Chinese patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Ming Tak; Sandham, John; Soh, Jen; Wong, Hwee Bee

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of orthognathic surgery by objective cephalometric measurement of posttreatment soft-tissue profile and by subjective evaluation of profile esthetics by laypersons and clinicians. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 30 Chinese patients who had completed

  3. Outcomes of pancreaticoduodenectomy in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayman El Nakeeb; Ehab Atef; Ehab El Hanafy; Ali Salem; Waleed Askar; Helmy Ezzat; Ahmed Shehta; Mohamed Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the mortality and morbidity of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) have improved signiifcantly over the past years, the concerns for elderly patients undergo-ing PD are still present. Furthermore, the frequency of PD is increasing because of the increasing proportion of elderly pa-tients and the increasing incidence of periampullary tumors. This study aimed to analyze the outcomes of PD in elderly patients. METHODS: We studied all patients who had undergone PD in our center between January 1995 and February 2015. The patients were divided into three groups based on age: group I (patients aged RESULTS: A total of 828 patients who had undergone PD for resection of periampullary tumor were included in this study. There were 579 (69.9%) patients in group I, 201 (24.3%) in group II, and 48 (5.8%) in group III. The overall incidence of complications was higher in elderly patients (25.9% in group I, 36.8% in group II, and 37.5% in group III;P=0.006). There were more patients complicated with delayed gastric empty-ing in group II compared with the other two groups. There was no signiifcant difference in the incidence of postoperative pancreatic ifstula, biliary leakage, pancreatitis, pulmonary complications and hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: PD can be performed safely in selected elderly patients. Advanced age alone should not be a contra-indication for PD. The outcome of elderly patients who have undergone PD is similar to that of younger patients, and the increased rate of complications is due to the presence of asso-ciated comorbidities.

  4. Patient reported outcomes in benign multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Line E; Healy, Brian C; Rintell, David J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Glanz, Bonnie I

    2011-07-01

    Benign MS patients have a mild course of disease and show no or minimal accumulation of disability over time. Little is known about the patient reported outcomes (PROs) in benign MS. The objective of the study was to compare PROs in benign MS patients and patients with similar disease duration or disability status, and to investigate how the definition of benign MS affected this outcome. Two groups of Benign MS patients (disease duration ≥15 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score ≤1.5 [Benign-1.5], or ≤3.0 [Benign-3]) were compared with four other MS groups: disease duration ≥15 years, EDSS score >3.0 (Late-MS); disease duration MS). PROs included measures of QOL, fatigue, depression, and social support. Cognitive function was also assessed. Both benign groups had better PROs than Late MS patients on all measures (p QOL, depression, and fatigue were significantly different between Benign-1.5 and Early-MS groups (p QOL than Low EDSS-1.5, but was otherwise similar. Benign-3 patients had worse depression than Early-MS (p QOL and lower fatigue (p MS had better PROs than other groups of MS patients, suggesting that both disease duration and disability influence PROs. The study also showed a difference in PROs based on the way benign MS was defined.

  5. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus...... deviation (SD) 15.9) years, range 24-85 years); 19 women) and 12 healthcare professionals were conducted before data saturation was achieved. A total of 196 patients with neck pain (mean age 47.8 (SD 13.7) years), range 18-89 years; 146 women) completed the preliminary questionnaire. Overall 35 items were....... CONCLUSION: The Neck OutcOme Score has excellent content validity and preliminary results support a 5-subscale structure. Additional work is needed to assess the reliability, further construct validity and responsiveness....

  6. Pregnancy Outcomes Among Patients With Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowse, Megan E. B.; Richeson, Rachel L.; Pieper, Carl; Merkel, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pregnancy outcomes of patients with vasculitis are unknown, but are of great concern to patients and physicians. Through an online survey, this study assessed pregnancy outcomes among patients with vasculitis. Methods Participants in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium Patient Contact Registry were invited to respond to an anonymous, internet-based survey that included questions about pregnancy outcomes, the timing of pregnancy relative to a diagnosis of vasculitis, and medication use. Results A total of 350 women and 113 men completed the survey. After a diagnosis of vasculitis, 74 pregnancies were reported by women and 18 conceptions were reported by men. The rate of pregnancy loss was higher among women who conceived after a diagnosis of vasculitis compared to those who conceived prior to diagnosis (33.8% versus 22.4%; P = 0.04). Among women, the rate of preterm births increased significantly for pregnancies conceived after a diagnosis of vasculitis relative to those conceived before diagnosis (23.3% versus 11.4%; P = 0.03). Only 18% of women reported worsening of vasculitis during pregnancy, but those who experienced increased vasculitis activity were more likely to deliver preterm. Exposure to cyclophosphamide or prednisone did not appear to impact pregnancy outcomes; however, the number of pregnancies among women taking these medications was small. Among the pregnancies conceived by men with vasculitis, the timing of diagnosis had no significant effect on the rate of pregnancy loss. Conclusion Women who conceived after a diagnosis of vasculitis had a higher rate of pregnancy loss than those who conceived prior to diagnosis. Vasculitis did not worsen during the majority of pregnancies conceived after diagnosis. PMID:23401494

  7. Patient Reported Outcomes from Sacroiliac Joint Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Shane M.; Audley, Brittany N.; Sokunbi, Gbolabo; Puccio, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, case series. Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine morbidity, complications, and patient reported outcomes from minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. Overview of Literature Lumbar back pain emanating from the SIJ can be surgically treated via a percutaneous approach in the appropriately selected patient with minimal morbidity and acceptable functional outcomes. Methods Patients diagnosed by >2 physical examination maneuvers and subjective relief from a computed tomography–guided lidocaine-bupivacaine-steroid injection underwent SIJ fusion after failing conservative management with a combination of oral anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and pelvic belt stabilization. Perioperative data collected include estimated blood loss (EBL) and operative time. Oswestry disability index, 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), visual analogue score, and functional status were analyzed. All complications were noted. Results The study cohort of 45 cases (69% female) achieved postoperative survey follow-up at 9.9 and 32.3 months. SF-12 physical component summary statistically improved while all other scores were equivalent. Mean EBL and operative time were 22 mL and 36 minutes, respectively. Initial survey showed that 64% of patients discontinued narcotics (29/45), 71% do not use an assistive device (32/45), and 15.6% do not work due to pain (7/45). 73% of patients stated they would have the surgery again (33/45). For the second survey, 65% of patients discontinued narcotics (26/40), 70% did not use an assistive device (28/40), and 17.5% did not work due to pain (7/40). A history of thoracolumbar instrumentation (16/45) did not significantly affect outcomes. Three complications described by screw malposition with neurologic deficit (6.7%) were treated with screw repositioning (1 case) and removal of a single superior implant (2 cases) with time to revision of 2.2 months. All three ultimately had resolution of

  8. [Patient-reported outcomes: definition and measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botturi, Davide; Rodella, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The concept of "patient-reported outcomes" have been proposed by the Food and Drug Administration in the year 2000, in order to describe one of the different and potential sources of information on the drug's safety and effectiveness. It represents an "umbrella" term, which covers a multiplicity of meanings and primarily identifies a conceptual approach and a methodology specifically oriented to the patients' point of view on outcomes, instead of the traditional clinical and professional perspective. The patient-reported outcomes measures are frequently self-completed questionnaires. The measures can be classified in general and specific. The first one, general, relates to the assessment of the quality of life or the health status, in the general population or in subgroups with particular health problems (eg. SF-36 Health Survey, EQ-5D). The second one, specific, mainly relates to the assessment of particular types of symptoms (eg. pain, anxiety, fear, depression) and functions (eg. daily living activities), in population's subgroups with definite health problems, undergoing or not to a healthcare procedure (eg. Adult Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument, Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score). For the selection of an instrument a series of criteria needs to be taken into account, among which the psychometric properties, the expert judgement, the interpretability, the acceptability, and the feasibility of the entire process.

  9. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  10. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  11. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roderick; Welk, Blayne

    2016-02-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can't be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose.

  12. Treatment Outcome in Patients Receiving Assertive Community Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortrijk, H. E.; Mulder, C. L.; Roosenschoon, B. J.; Wiersma, D.

    2010-01-01

    In an observational study of severely mentally ill patients treated in assertive community treatment (ACT) teams, we investigated how treatment outcome was associated with demographic factors, clinical factors, and motivation for treatment. To determine psychosocial outcome, patients were routinely

  13. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A. M. M.; Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive screening indicators and nurse-perceived quality of care. Methods: To calculate a composite performance score for each of six Dutch non-university teaching hospitals, the percentage scores...

  14. Pregnancy outcome in patients with fibroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antima Kirtikumar Maliwad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibroids are benign smooth muscle cell tumour of the uterus. In some patients of pregnancy associated with fibroid, it does not affect the outcome of pregnancy. On the other hand, various complications have been reported. Objective of current study was to assess the prevalence and obstetric complications of fibroid during pregnancy and it management. Methods: This was a prospective study. The study was conducted at tertiary care centre, obstertrics and gynecology department over a period of nine months September 2013 to May 2014. Total 17 pregnant patients with >3 cm fibroid were included in the study. They were followed during antenatal period. Maternal age, parity, size of fibroid, complications during pregnancy, labour, and delivery, mode of delivery and indications of cesarean section were noted. Results: Incidence of fibroid during pregnancy was 0.4%. Out of 17 patients, majority 9 (52.9% were between 26-30 years of age group, majority 7 (41.1% were diagnosed between 21-28 weeks and 14 (82.3% were multigravidas. Normal vaginal delivery occurred in 3 (20%, while 12 (80% delivered by cesarean section. There were 8 (47% patients who had no complication whereas 9 (52.9% had some complication. Pain was present in 7 (41.1%. PROM and preterm labour was present in 3 (17.6% and 2 (11.7% respectively. Abortion and IUD occurred in 2 (11.7% and in 1 (5.8% respectively. LBW and IUGR was present in 5 (29.4% and 3 (17.6% respectively. PPH was present in 6 (35.2%. Antenatal myomectomy performed in 1 (5.8% and myomectomy at cesarean section performed in 2 (11.7%. Blood transfusion was given to 8 (47% patients. Conclusions: Pregnant patients who have fibroids are to be carefully screened in the antenatal period, so as to have a regular follow up. The wide spread use of ultrasonography has facilitated diagnosis and management of fibroids in pregnancy. The site and size of fibroid is very important to predict its effect on the pregnancy. In

  15. Pregnancy outcome of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizkiyahu, Ranit; Levy, Amalia; Sheiner, Eyal

    2010-01-01

    We sought to identify whether schizophrenia during pregnancy is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. A population-based study comparing women with and without schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders was performed. Stratified analysis using multiple logistic regression models was performed to control for confounders. During the study period, there were 186,554 deliveries, of which 97 occurred in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders. The schizophrenic patients were significantly older (mean age 30.6 versus 28.6, P = 0.001), with higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus as compared with the comparison group (13.4% versus 6.7%, P = 0.009). The need for induction and augmentation of delivery, congenital malformations, and low birth weight (schizophrenic patients. No significant differences were noted between the groups regarding labor complications such as cesarean delivery (16.5% versus 13.2%, P = 0.337) and placenta previa and placental abruption (1% versus 4%, P = 0.333 and 1% versus 0.7%, P = 0.51, respectively). Using a multivariable logistic regression model, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders during pregnancy were independent risk factors for congenital malformations (odds ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 3.9, P = 0.027). Schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders are independent risk factors for congenital malformations.

  16. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients.

  17. Patient outcomes in the field of nursing: A concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Providing good nursing care to all patients is a central goal of nursing. Patient outcomes in nursing are primarily about the results for the patient receiving nursing care. This analysis provides nurses with a new perspective by helping them to understand all the components within the concept of patient outcomes.

  18. Angiographic outcomes in the PLATO Trial (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunadian, Vijay; James, Stefan K; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Zorkun, Cafer; Wu, Jinhui; Storey, Robert F; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Katus, Hugo; Emanuelsson, Hakan; Horrow, Jay; Maya, Juan; Wallentin, Lars; Harrington, Robert A; Gibson, C Michael

    2013-01-01

    The PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) angiographic substudy sought to compare the efficacy of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel with respect to angiographic outcomes before and after PCI in the setting of acute coronary syndrome...

  19. How outcomes are achieved through patient portals: A realist review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T. Otte-Trojel (Eva Terese); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.G. Rundall (Thomas); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To examine how patient portals contribute to health service delivery and patient outcomes. The specific aims were to examine how outcomes are produced, and how variations in outcomes can be explained. Methods: We used a realist review method, which aims to describe how 'an

  20. Relationship Between Patient-Reported Outcomes and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Morquio A Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lampe MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analysis assessed the correlation between patient-reported outcomes (PROs and clinical outcomes in 24 German patients with Morquio A. Clinical outcomes included 6-minute walk test (6MWT, 3-minute stair climb (3MSC test, and joint range of motion as measures for endurance/mobility, forced vital capacity (FVC and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV as measures for respiratory function, and height as an important manifestation. The PROs included the EuroQoL (EQ 5D-5L (EQ5D-5L, to measure health-related QoL (HRQoL, and patients’ rating of their ability to walk, climb, or breathe. In adults, endurance and pulmonary function measures and height showed strong and statistically significant correlation with the patients’ EQ5D-5L (6MWT: R = .884, 3MSC test: R = .852, FVC: R = .815, MVV: R = .825, height: R = .842. The adult patients’ rating of their ability to walk and climb also correlated strongly with 6MWT (R = .839 and 3MSC test (R = .700 results. Improvements in these clinical outcomes may be robust surrogate parameters of a better EQ5D-5L/HRQoL in patients with Morquio A.

  1. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  2. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  3. Patient preferences and healthcare outcomes: an ecological perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Street Jr, R.L.; Elwyn, G.; Epstein, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the nature of patients' preferences for healthcare and whether clinician accommodation of patient preferences influences health outcomes. First, we provide a conceptualization of patient preferences along with their key attributes. Second, we review research on the relationship

  4. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Renu Joshi, Disha Joshi, Pramil Cheriyath Department of Endocrinology, Pinnacle Health Hospitals, Harrisburg, PA, USA Objective: Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim: The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods: Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107, subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group.Results: Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9, diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28, and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33. At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6 than baseline (10.7. Conclusion: Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c

  5. Hyperglycemia has a stronger relation trauma patients than in other critically with outcome in ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, M; Nijboer, JMM; van der Horst, ICC; Zijlstra, F; ten Duis, HJ; Nijsten, MWN

    2006-01-01

    Background. Acute hyperglycemia is associated with adverse outcome in critically ill patients. Glucose control with insulin improves outcome in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients, but the effect in trauma patients is unknown. We investigated hyperglycemia and outcome in SICU patients with

  6. Patient-reported outcome measures for asthma : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worth, Allison; Hammersley, Victoria; Knibb, Rebecca; Flokstra-de-Blok, Bertine; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Walker, Samantha; Dubois, Anthony EJ; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measures of the outcome of treatment(s) reported directly by the patient or carer. There is increasing international policy interest in using these to assess the impact of clinical care. AIMS: To identify suitably validated PROMs for asthma a

  7. Five-Year Outcome in Stroke Patients Submitted to Thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Célia; Pinho, João; Alves, José Nuno; Santos, Ana Filipa; Ferreira, Maria do Céu; Abreu, Maria João; Oliveira, Liliana; Mota, João; Fontes, João Ramalho; Ferreira, Carla

    2015-08-01

    Little is known on long-term follow-up after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients because the majority of studies evaluated outcome at 3 to 12 months. We aimed to assess 5-year outcome after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Cohort study based on the prospective registry of all consecutive ischemic stroke patients submitted to IVT in our Stroke Unit. Five-year outcome, including living settings, functional outcome, stroke recurrence, and mortality, was ascertained by telephonic interviews and additional review of clinical records. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of outcome and mortality. Excellent outcome was defined as modified Rankin scale 0 to 1. Five-year outcome was available for 155/164 patients submitted to IVT. At 5 years, 32.9% of patients had an excellent outcome (95% confidence interval (CI) =25.5-43.3) and mortality was 43.9% (95%CI=36.1-51.7). Increasing age (odds ratio =0.93, 95% CI =0.90-0.97) and increasing National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) 24 h after thrombolysis (odds ratio =0.81, 95% CI =0.74-0.90) were independently associated with a lower likelihood of an excellent 5-year outcome. Age (hazards ratio =1.07, 95% CI =1.03-1.11) and excellent functional outcome 3 months after thrombolysis (hazards ratio =0.28, 95%CI=0.12-0.66) were independently associated with mortality during follow-up. One third of ischemic stroke patients have excellent 5-year outcome after IVT. Younger age, lower NIHSS 24 h after IVT, and excellent 3-month functional outcome are independent predictors of excellent 5-year outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Stalpers (Dewi); R.A.M.M. Kieft (Renate A. M. M.); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); M.J. Kaljouw (Marian J.); M.J. Schuurmans (Marieke )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between

  9. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Stalpers (Dewi); R.A.M.M. Kieft (Renate A. M. M.); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); M.J. Kaljouw (Marian J.); M.J. Schuurmans (Marieke )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-s

  10. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Stalpers (Dewi); R.A.M.M. Kieft (Renate A. M. M.); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); M.J. Kaljouw (Marian J.); M.J. Schuurmans (Marieke )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-s

  11. Lisfranc injuries: patient- and physician-based functional outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, P A

    2012-02-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess functional outcome of patients with a Lisfranc fracture dislocation of the foot by applying validated patient- and physician-based scoring systems and to compare these outcome tools. Of 25 injuries sustained by 24 patients treated in our institution between January 1995 and June 2001, 16 were available for review with a mean follow-up period of 36 (10-74) months. Injuries were classified according to Myerson. Outcome instruments used were: (a) Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), (b) Baltimore Painful Foot score (PFS) and (c) American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) mid-foot scoring scale. Four patients had an excellent outcome on the PFS scale, seven were classified as good, three fair and two poor. There was a statistically significant correlation between the PFS and Role Physical (RP) element of the SF-36.

  12. Long-term outcome in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, P; Hegaard, H; Herlin, Troels

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a group of 53 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), on average 13.9 years after disease onset, in order to describe the long-term disease outcome and to identify disease-related parameters associated with poor disease outcome.......To evaluate a group of 53 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), on average 13.9 years after disease onset, in order to describe the long-term disease outcome and to identify disease-related parameters associated with poor disease outcome....

  13. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt-Johansen, Ida Maria; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIn the past decade, early treatment of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has been improved in several ways, leading to more optimistic over all prognoses. However, the global survival rate after out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) is still not more than 5-10%. With a better knowledge of the predictors...... circulation (ROSC).ResultsThe overall mortality was 44% and a favorable neurological outcome was seen among 52%. Strong predictors for survival and favorable neurological outcome were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) as initial rhythm, cardiac etiology and time to ROSC¿... rhythm of VT/VF and a cardiac etiology were the strongest....

  14. outcomes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of functional performance, HIV status, malnutrition, and .... Interrupted or default (patient whose treatment was interrupted .... fever, night sweat, and chest pain were not associated ... need of special care and attention. Such patients ...

  15. Long-term outcomes in patients after epilepsy surgery failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzí, Michal; Brázdil, Milan; Novák, Zdeněk; Hemza, Jan; Chrastina, Jan; Ošlejšková, Hana; Rektor, Ivan; Kuba, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to analyze the long-term outcomes of patients who were classified as Engel IV one year after resective epilepsy surgery. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment options and to examine the reasons that the patients did not undergo resective reoperation. Our study was designed as a retrospective open-label investigation of the long-term outcomes of 34 patients (12% of all surgically treated patients) who were classified as Engel IV one year after epilepsy surgery. At the last follow-up visit (average of 7.6 ± 4.2 years after surgery), 12 of the 34 examined patients (35.3%) were still classified as Engel IV; 22 of the 34 patients (64.7%) were improved (Engel I-III). Of the 34 patients, 8 (23.5%) achieved an excellent outcome, classified as Engel I, 3 patients (8.8%) were classified as Engel II, and 11 patients (32.4%) as Engel III. The seizure outcome in the patients classified as Engel I was achieved by resective reoperation in 4; by a change in antiepileptic medication in 3 patients; and by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in 1 patient. The seizure outcome of Engel II was achieved by a change in antiepileptic medication in all 3 patients. Of the 34 patients, a total of 6 (17.6%) underwent resective reoperation only. The major reasons for this were the absence of a plausible hypothesis for invasive re-evaluation, the risk of postoperative deficit, and multifocal epilepsy in the rest of patients. Although the reoperation rate was relatively low in our series, we can achieve better or even excellent seizure outcomes using other procedures in patients for whom resective surgery initially failed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Physicians' empathy and clinical outcomes for diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Louis, Daniel Z; Markham, Fred W; Wender, Richard; Rabinowitz, Carol; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2011-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that physicians' empathy is associated with positive clinical outcomes for diabetic patients. A correlational study design was used in a university-affiliated outpatient setting. Participants were 891 diabetic patients, treated between July 2006 and June 2009, by 29 family physicians. Results of the most recent hemoglobin A1c and LDL-C tests were extracted from the patients' electronic records. The results of hemoglobin A1c tests were categorized into good control (9.0%). Similarly, the results of the LDL-C tests were grouped into good control (130). The physicians, who completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy in 2009, were grouped into high, moderate, and low empathy scorers. Associations between physicians' level of empathy scores and patient outcomes were examined. Patients of physicians with high empathy scores were significantly more likely to have good control of hemoglobin A1c (56%) than were patients of physicians with low empathy scores (40%, P < .001). Similarly, the proportion of patients with good LDL-C control was significantly higher for physicians with high empathy scores (59%) than physicians with low scores (44%, P < .001). Logistic regression analyses indicated that physicians' empathy had a unique contribution to the prediction of optimal clinical outcomes after controlling for physicians' and patients' gender and age, and patients' health insurance. The hypothesis of a positive relationship between physicians' empathy and patients' clinical outcomes was confirmed, suggesting that physicians' empathy is an important factor associated with clinical competence and patient outcomes.

  17. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A M M; van der Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2016-04-06

    Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive screening indicators and nurse-perceived quality of care. To calculate a composite performance score for each of six Dutch non-university teaching hospitals, the percentage scores of the publicly reported nurse-sensitive indicators: screening of delirium, screening of malnutrition, and pain assessments, were averaged (2011). Nurse-perceived quality ratings were obtained from staff nurses working in the same hospitals by the Dutch Essentials of Magnetism II survey (2010). Concordance between the quality measures was analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation. The mean screening performances ranged from 63% to 93% across the six hospitals. Nurse-perceived quality of care differed significantly between the hospitals, also after adjusting for nursing experience, educational level, and regularity of shifts. The hospitals with high-levels of nurse-perceived quality were also high-performing hospitals according to nurse-sensitive indicators. The relationship was true for high-performing as well as lower-performing hospitals, with strong correlations between the two quality measures (rS = 0.943, p = 0.005). Our findings showed that there is a significant positive association between objectively measured nurse-sensitive screening indicators and subjectively measured perception of quality. Moreover, the two indicators of quality of nursing care provide corresponding quality rankings. This implies that improving factors that are associated with nurses' perception of what they believe to be quality of care may also lead to better screening processes. Although convergent validity seems to be established, we emphasize that different kinds of quality measures could be used to complement each other

  18. Patient-reported outcomes for total hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, Natalie J; Roos, Ewa M.

    2012-01-01

    , and high personal and financial cost associated with THA and TKA, patient-reported outcomes are required to ensure optimal selection of patients, and that postoperative outcomes outweigh the burden associated with surgical procedures. It is clear from the information presented that clinicians need...... to consider a number of factors when selecting a "good" patientreported outcome for use in their TJA patients. Not only does the instrument need to measure dimensions appropriate for THA and TKA patients, but it also needs to have minimal administrative burden, accessibility to a variety of clinicians...... and patients, reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change. Furthermore, knowledge regarding the minimal score that patients deem to be meaningful is useful in interpreting whether a patient has experienced real improvement in their condition after surgery. It is clear that further studies are required...

  19. Proteinuria and clinical outcome in CHD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-08-01

    CHD patients, especially those with associated hypoxaemia, usually have some level of renal function impairment, even though they are relatively young. The aim of the study was to evaluate those clinical and analytical factors that may contribute to microalbuminuria and determine the association of 24-hour proteinuria with thrombotic events and mortality. A total of 251 CHD patients were studied and demographic characteristics, blood test, and 24-hour urinalysis were analysed. Of the patients, 221 were non-hypoxaemic, and 30 were hypoxaemic (oxygen saturation of 84.3±5.9%). Of the non-hypoxaemic patients, 30 (13.6%), and of the hypoxaemic patients 9 (30%), showed proteinuria (>0.15 g/24 hours) (p=0.028). Hypoxaemic CHD patients also showed higher haematocrit (%) (50.7 (34.6; 72.1) versus 42.8 (34.6; 48.9), pproteinuria (gr/24 hours) (1.0 (0.4; 3.1) versus 0.08 (0.04; 0.52), p=0.043), and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (pg/ml) (417.8 (35.7; 8534.0) versus 44.9 (0.0; 670.5), pproteinuria and four patients did not (p=0.581) - and three patients had some type of thrombosis - two patients had 24-hour proteinuria and one patient did not (p=0.014). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant difference between CHD patients with and without 24-hour proteinuria (p=0.631). CHD patients with proteinuria have significantly more thrombosis and more hypoxaemia than those patients without proteinuria.

  20. Functional outcome in adult patients following Bernese periacetabular osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Mohammad I; Anand, Ashish; Straight, Joseph J; Sala, Debra A; Ruchelsman, David E; Feldman, David S

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated functional outcome following Bernese periacetabular osteotomy. In 24 patients with mean follow-up of 3.5 years, mean dysfunction score was 15.23 on the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment. Eighteen patients (75%) scored = or <20, indicating a high functional level. Irrespective of preoperative Shenton line continuity, most patients demonstrated a high functional level. However, a trend toward a poorer outcome was observed in patients with preoperative noncongruent joints and Tonnis osteoarthritis grade 3. These results suggest patients with less than optimal presentation may still benefit from this surgery, delaying or eliminating the need for total hip arthroplasty.

  1. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...... treated with IV-tPA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis of MRI-selected stroke patients treated with IV-tPA between 2004 and 2010. The Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria were used to establish the stroke subtype by 3 months. The outcomes...... of interest were a 3-month modified Rankin Scale score of 0-1 (favorable outcome), and early neurological improvement defined as complete remission of neurological deficit or improvement of ≥4 on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale at 24 h. The outcomes among stroke subtypes were compared...

  2. 2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Christiansen, Evald Høj;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES). BACKGROUND: In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comp...

  3. Determinants of outcome in hip fracture patient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vochteloo, Anne Jochem Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, clinical and functional outcomes of a large cohort of hip fracture patients are described, with regards to anemia, blood transfusion, concomitant fractures, loss of mobility and place of residence. Secondly, risk factors for poor outcome, both in a clinical and a functional

  4. Outcomes in hospitalized pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mary Beth F; Johnson, Victor M; Hersh, Aimee O; Lo, Mindy S; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in outcomes among adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been documented. We investigated associations between sociodemographic factors and volume of annual inpatient hospital admissions with hospitalization characteristics and poor outcomes among patients with childhood-onset SLE. By using the Pediatric Health Information System, we analyzed admissions for patients aged 3 to <18 years at index admission with ≥ 1 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for SLE from January 2006 to September 2011. Summary statistics and univariable analyses were used to examine demographic characteristics of hospital admissions, readmissions, and lengths of stay. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for patient gender, age, race, ethnicity, insurance type, hospital volume, US census region, and severity of illness, to examine risk factors for poor outcomes. A total of 10,724 admissions occurred among 2775 patients over the study period. Hispanic patients had longer lengths of stay, more readmissions, and higher in-hospital mortality. In multivariable analysis, African American race was significantly associated with ICU admission. African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with end-stage renal disease and death. Volume of patients with SLE per hospital and hospital location were not significantly associated with outcomes. In this cohort of hospitalized children with SLE, race and ethnicity were associated with outcomes. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between sociodemographic factors and poor outcomes in patients with childhood-onset SLE.

  5. Baseline Biomarkers for Outcome of Melanoma Patients Treated with Pembrolizumab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, Benjamin; Martens, Alexander; Hassel, Jessica C.; Berking, Carola; Postow, Michael A.; Bisschop, Kees; Simeone, Ester; Mangana, Johanna; Schilling, Bastian; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Brenner, Nicole; Kaehler, Katharina; Heinzerling, Lucie; Gutzmer, Ralf; Bender, Armin; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Romano, Emanuela; Meier, Friedegund; Martus, Peter; Maio, Michele; Blank, Christian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Dummer, Reinhard; Ascierto, Paolo A.; Hospers, Geke; Garbe, Claus; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Biomarkers for outcome after immune-checkpoint blockade are strongly needed as these may influence individual treatment selection or sequence. We aimed to identify baseline factors associated with overall survival (OS) after pembrolizumab treatment in melanoma patients. Experimental Design:

  6. OASIS C Based Home Health Agency Patient Outcome, Process...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — OASIS C Based Home Health Agency Patient Outcome, Process and Potentially Avoidable Event Reports This report includes the state mean values for all measures...

  7. Does pharmacotherapy improve cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mayank; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel L; Agrawal, Harsh; Alpert, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) occurs commonly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) including those treated with hemodialysis (HD), and is associated with poor outcomes in this population. Pharmacologic management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, acute and chronic coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation in the general population is supported by the results of high-quality, randomized, controlled clinical trials. Pharmacotherapy of these disorders in the general population is effective in improving clinical outcomes. In contrast, information concerning the effect of pharmacotherapy on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, and particularly in HD patients, is limited. Available data suggest that, in general, pharmacotherapy of hypertension and dyslipidemia, anti-platelet therapy of CVD, and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation are less effective in HD patients than in the general population or even in patients with early stage of CKD.

  8. Total joint arthroplasties: current concepts of patient outcomes after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C Allyson; Beaupre, Lauren A; Johnston, D W C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2007-02-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasties are effective surgical interventions for relieving hip pain and improving physical function caused by arthritis. Although the majority of patients substantially improve, not all report gains or are satisfied after receiving total joint arthroplasty. This article reviews the literature on patient outcomes after total hip and knee arthroplasties for osteoarthritis, and the evidence pertaining to factors that affect these patient-centered outcomes. Mounting evidence suggests that no single patient-related or perioperative factor clearly predicts the amount of pain relief or functional improvement that will occur following total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  9. Social outcome compared in psychotic and nonpsychotic bipolar I patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, L N; Rosenthal, N E; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1983-05-01

    Eighty-nine bipolar I patients were given a structured interview, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Those who had experienced delusions or hallucinations at some time during the course of their illness were designated "psychotic," and those who had not were designated "nonpsychotic." The two groups were compared with regard to a number of outcome variables as well as age, age at first treatment, and duration of illness. The psychotic group had significantly poorer outcome in terms of social functioning. Although age, age at first treatment, and duration of illness distinguished between the two groups of patients, statistical analyses indicated that these variables did not account for differences in social outcome.

  10. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  11. Renal outcomes with aliskiren in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Persson, Frederik; Brenner, Barry M;

    2016-01-01

    diabetes and chronic kidney disease or cardiovascular disease. We did a prespecified analysis of the ALTITUDE trial to analyse the effects of aliskiren on surrogate renal outcomes in all patients and on primary renal outcomes in subgroups of patients. METHODS: In the double-blind, randomised, controlled...... ALTITUDE trial, 8561 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease or cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive aliskiren 300 mg per day or placebo as an adjunct to ACE inhibitors or ARBs. Randomisation was stratified on the basis of baseline urinary albumin......-to-creatinine ratio and presence of cardiovascular disease history, and treatment assignments were masked to all patients and study staff. Patients were followed up for a median of 2·6 years (IQR 2·0-3·2). In our secondary analysis, we investigated prespecified intermediate renal outcomes of transitions...

  12. Dyslipidemia and Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tian; ZHANG Jin Tao; YANG Mei; ZHANG Huan; LIU Wen Qing; KONG Yan; XU Tan; ZHANG Yong Hong

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the relationship between dyslipidemia and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MethodsData about 1 568 patients with acute ischemic stroke werecollected from 4 hospitals in Shandong Province from January 2006 to December 2008. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >10 at discharge or death was defined as the outcome. Effect of dyslipidemia on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis, respectively. ResultsThe serum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C were significantly associated with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis showed that the ORs and 95% CIs were 3.013 (1.259, 7.214)/2.655 (1.298, 5.43), 3.157(1.306, 7.631)/3.405(1.621, 7.154), and 0.482 (0.245, 0.946)/0.51 (0.282, 0.921), respectively, for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed no significant difference in observed and predicted risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke (chi-square=8.235, P=0.411). ConclusionSerum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C are positively related with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  13. Clinical outcome after traumatic spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders compared with control patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, L.A.; van Bemmel, J.C.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Öner, F.C.; Verlaan, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background context The clinical outcome of patients with ankylosing spinal disorders (ASDs) sustaining a spinal fracture has been described to be worse compared with the general trauma population. Purpose To investigate clinical outcome (neurologic deficits, complications, and mortality) after spina

  14. Nurse Engagement in Shared Governance and Patient and Nurse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Germack, Hayley; Hatfield, Linda; Kelly, Sharon; Maguire, Patricia; Dierkes, Andrew; Del Guidice, Mary; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine differences in nurse engagement in shared governance across hospitals and to determine the relationship between nurse engagement and patient and nurse outcomes. There is little empirical evidence examining the relationship between shared governance and patient outcomes. A secondary analysis of linked cross-sectional data was conducted using nurse, hospital, and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey data. Engagement varied widely across hospitals. In hospitals with greater levels of engagement, nurses were significantly less likely to report unfavorable job outcomes and poor ratings of quality and safety. Higher levels of nurse engagement were associated with higher HCAHPS scores. A professional practice environment that incorporates shared governance may serve as a valuable intervention for organizations to promote optimal patient and nurse outcomes.

  15. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes.

  16. Seizure Outcomes in Patients With Surgically Treated Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Brelie, Christian; Simon, Matthias; Esche, Jonas; Schramm, Johannes; Boström, Azize

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common symptom in cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) patients. The consecutive reduction of life quality is a clinically underrated problem because treatment usually focuses on the prevention of intracerebral hemorrhage. To evaluate postoperative seizure outcome with the aim of more accurate counseling for postoperative seizure outcome. From 1985 to 2012, 293 patients with an AVM were surgically treated by J.S. One hundred twenty-six patients with preoperative seizures or epilepsy could be identified; 103 of 126 had a follow-up of at least 12 months and were included in the analysis. The different epilepsy subtypes were categorized (sporadic seizures, chronic epilepsy, drug-resistant epilepsy [DRE]). Preoperative workup and surgical technique were evaluated. Seizure outcome was analyzed by using International League Against Epilepsy classification. Sporadic seizures were identified in 41% of patients (chronic epilepsy and DRE were identified in 36% and 23%, respectively). Detailed preoperative epileptological workup was done in 13%. Seizure freedom was achieved in 77% (79% at 5 years, 84% at 10 years). Outcome was significantly poorer in DRE cases. More extensive resection was performed in 11 cases with longstanding symptoms (>24 months) and resulted in better seizure outcome as well as the short duration of preoperative seizure history. Patients presenting with AVM-associated epilepsy have a favorable seizure outcome after surgical treatment. Long-standing epilepsy and the progress into DRE markedly deteriorate the chances to obtain seizure freedom and should be considered an early factor in establishing the indication for AVM removal.

  17. Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in the upper extremity: the future of outcomes reporting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Meadows, Molly; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-02-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) serve an integral role in clinical research by helping to determine the impact of clinical care as experienced by the patient. With recent initiatives in health care policy and pay for performance, outcome reporting is now recognized as a policy-driven requirement in addition to a clinical research tool. For outcome measures to satisfy these regulatory requirements and provide value in understanding disease outcomes, they must be responsive and efficient. Recent research has uncovered certain concerns regarding traditional PROs in patients with upper extremity disability and injury. These include lack of consensus regarding selection of PROs for a given diagnoses, inconsistent techniques of administration of the same PROs, and the administrative burden to patients and providers of completing these forms. To address these limitations, emphasis has been placed on streamlining the outcomes reporting process, and, as a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). PROMIS forms were created to comprehensively and efficiently measure outcomes across multiple disease states, including orthopedics. These tools exist in computer adaptive testing and short forms with the intention of more efficiently measuring outcomes compared with legacy PROs. The goals of this review are to highlight the main components of PROMIS reporting tools and identify recent use of the scores in the upper extremity literature. The review will also highlight the research and health policy potentials and limitations of implementing PROMIS into everyday orthopedic practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient reported outcomes: looking beyond the label claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doward Lynda C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of patient reported outcome scales in clinical trials conducted by the pharmaceutical industry has become more widespread in recent years. The use of such outcomes is particularly common for products developed to treat chronic, disabling conditions where the intention is not to cure but to ameliorate symptoms, facilitate functioning or, ultimately, to improve quality of life. In such cases, patient reported evidence is increasingly viewed as an essential complement to traditional clinical evidence for establishing a product's competitive advantage in the marketplace. In a commercial setting, the value of patient reported outcomes is viewed largely in terms of their potential for securing a labelling claim in the USA or inclusion in the summary of product characteristics in Europe. Although, the publication of the recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance makes it difficult for companies to make claims in the USA beyond symptom improvements, the value of these outcomes goes beyond satisfying requirements for a label claim. The European regulatory authorities, payers both in the US and Europe, clinicians and patients all play a part in determining both the availability and the pricing of medicinal products and all have an interest in patient-reported data that go beyond just symptoms. The purpose of the current paper is to highlight the potential added value of patient reported outcome data currently collected and held by the industry for these groups.

  19. Affection for Patients as a Factor in Therapists' Outcome Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Explores the possibility of separating psychotherapists' judgments of treatment outcome from their affective reactions to their patients. If therapists' judgments of symptom remission cannot be utilized independently of their affection for their patients, this would present reason to doubt the utility of such judgments despite their current…

  20. Patient-reported outcomes in left ventricular assist device therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Nicolaas;

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have created today's potential for extending the lives of patients with end-stage heart failure. Few studies have examined the effect of LVAD therapy on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as health status, quality of life...

  1. A brief Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument to improve patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ridgeway

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeff Sloan and colleagues describe the development of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument, which captures and stores patient-recorded outcomes in the medical record for patients with diabetes. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  2. Patient preferences and healthcare outcomes: an ecological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; Elwyn, Glyn; Epstein, Ronald M

    2012-04-01

    This article examines the nature of patients' preferences for healthcare and whether clinician accommodation of patient preferences influences health outcomes. First, we provide a conceptualization of patient preferences along with their key attributes. Second, we review research on the relationship between health outcomes and patient preferences for treatments and for the process of care (e.g., preferred involvement in decision-making). Third, following a critique of this literature, we present an ecological model of patient preferences that, while acknowledging that patient preferences may emerge from various contexts (e.g., family or media exposure), we focus on the important role that clinical encounters and patients' health-related experiences play in the elicitation and construction of patient preferences. Fourth, we propose two pathways, one behavioral (adherence) and the other psychological (sense of autonomy or satisfaction with decision), through which meeting patient preferences could lead to better health outcomes. Fifth, we discuss how preferences can be elicited and clarified through patient-centered conversations. We conclude with implications for future research and clinical practice.

  3. Do illness perceptions predict health outcomes in primary care patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, Eva; Christensen, Kaj S

    2007-01-01

    patients, (2) patients without chronic disorders presenting physical disease, and (3) patients presenting medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). RESULTS: Negative illness perceptions were associated with poor physical and mental health at baseline. They most strongly predicted changes in health status......OBJECTIVE: Little is known about whether illness perceptions affect health outcomes in primary care patients. The aim of this study was to examine if patients' illness perceptions were associated with their self-rated health in a 2-year follow-up period. METHODS: One thousand seven hundred eighty......-five primary care patients presenting a new or recurrent health problem completed an adapted version of the illness perception questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and 3, 12, and 24 months' follow-up. Linear regressions were performed for (1) all...

  4. Nurse Value-Added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakusheva, Olga; Lindrooth, Richard; Weiss, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to (1) estimate the relative nurse effectiveness, or individual nurse value-added (NVA), to patients’ clinical condition change during hospitalization; (2) examine nurse characteristics contributing to NVA; and (3) estimate the contribution of value-added nursing care to patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Electronic data on 1,203 staff nurses matched with 7,318 adult medical–surgical patients discharged between July 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011 from an urban Magnet-designated, 854-bed teaching hospital. Study Design Retrospective observational longitudinal analysis using a covariate-adjustment value-added model with nurse fixed effects. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from the study hospital's electronic patient records and human resources databases. Principal Findings Nurse effects were jointly significant and explained 7.9 percent of variance in patient clinical condition change during hospitalization. NVA was positively associated with having a baccalaureate degree or higher (0.55, p = .04) and expertise level (0.66, p = .03). NVA contributed to patient outcomes of shorter length of stay and lower costs. Conclusions Nurses differ in their value-added to patient outcomes. The ability to measure individual nurse relative value-added opens the possibility for development of performance metrics, performance-based rankings, and merit-based salary schemes to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. PMID:25256089

  5. Patients with learning difficulties: outcome on peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs, Mercè; Sorolla, Carol; Carrera, Dolores; Martín, Marisa; Villagrassa, Esther; Fernández, Elvira

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we identified patients who had difficulties learning the minimum knowledge and skills required to carry out peritoneal dialysis (PD), and we compared the outcomes in this subgroup of patients with outcomes in the general PD population. We calculated the mean learning sessions needed by our total PD population during the training period. We then assigned patients to one of two groups according to the number of learning sessions they needed. Patients who required a number of sessions equal to or less than the mean were placed in the "standard learning" group; patients who required more sessions but who reached the minimum knowledge and skills were placed in the "learning difficulties " group. We compared these two groups in terms of age, sex, diabetes status, autonomy to perform PD, family support, education level, residual renal function, and Charlson comorbidity index. Outcomes on PD included time to first peritonitis episode, peritonitis rate, percentage of patients free of peritonitis during follow-up, survival time on PD, and transfer to hemodialysis. Patients with learning difficulties were older and had more comorbidities. Outcomes on PD in the learning difficulties group were similar to those in the standard learning group, except for time to first peritonitis.

  6. Investigating the relationship between competence and patient outcome with CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Amanda; Shafran, Roz; Myles, Pamela

    2015-05-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between therapist competence and the outcome of patients treated for common mental health disorders. Understanding the relationship between competence and patient outcome is of fundamental importance to the dissemination and implementation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The current study extends existing literature by exploring the relationship between CBT competence and patient outcome in routine clinical practice within the framework of the British Government's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. Participants comprised 43 therapists treating 1247 patients over a training period of one year. Results found little support of a general association between CBT competence and patient outcome; however significantly more patients of the most competent therapists demonstrated a reliable improvement in their symptoms of anxiety than would be expected by chance alone, and fewer experienced no reliable change. Conversely, significantly more patients treated by the least competent therapists experienced a reliable deterioration in their symptoms than would be expected. The implications of these results for the dissemination and implementation of CBT are discussed.

  7. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  8. Maxillary Complete Denture Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Patient-Based Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer; McGraw, Kate; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge regarding patient satisfaction as a primary outcome for maxillary complete denture therapy. We asked, "For the maxillary edentulous patient treated using maxillary dentures, what are the patient-based outcomes regarding quality of life and treatment satisfaction." An electronic search of publications up to March 2014 was established using four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase. To meet the ultimate goal of establishing clinical guidelines based on available information, prospective comparative studies, cohort prospective studies, and retrospective studies on more than 10 subjects were included. The electronic search identified 4,530 articles that were evaluated at the title, abstract, and article level to include 31 articles of interest. The patient-based outcomes and satisfaction data included were examined and reported. The studies included 5,485 participants. Of these, 2,685 were identified as wearing maxillary complete dentures. Reported mean ages ranged from 59.7 to 73.6 years. A systematic review indicated that the provision of new maxillary complete dentures for edentulous patients results in improved self-reported satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life. The included reports, while providing evidence that complete denture satisfaction of participants and new dentures improve self-reported outcomes, did not include variables that influence these positive outcomes. A broad range of evidence supports the use of complete dentures for rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla. When considering treatment of the edentulous maxilla, the expectations of patients for esthetic and phonetic (social) rehabilitation are high and can be met using maxillary complete dentures as the mode of prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients dissatisfied with new complete dentures may be referred for dental implant therapies involving fixed or removable prostheses.

  9. Decompressive Craniectomy Following Brain Injury: Factors Important to Patient Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghwrudjakpor PO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decompressive craniectomy is often performed as an empirical lifesaving measure to protect the injured brain from the damaging effects of propagating oedema and intracranial hypertension. However, there are no clearly defined indications or specified guidelines for patient selection for the procedure. Aims: To evaluate outcome determinants and factors important in patientselection for the procedure. Methods: We reviewed the literature on decompressive craniectomy, including single case reports and reported case series, to identify factors affecting outcome followingthe procedure, as well as its pitfalls and associated complications. Results: Glasgow coma score of 8 and above, age less than 50 years and early intervention were found to be among the most significantdeterminants of prognosis. Conclusion: Improving patient selection for decompressive craniectomy may be expected to further improve the outcome following the procedure in severely brain injured patients.

  10. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered during the fourth year of medical school. A Neurologic Physical Exam (NPE score of 0.0 to 6.0 was calculated for each student based on a neurologic examination checklist completed by the SPs during the OSCE. Composite NPE scores in the control and intervention groups were compared with the unpaired t-test. Results: In the fourth year OSCE, composite NPE scores in the intervention group (3.5±1.1 were statistically significantly greater than those in the control group (2.2±1.1 (p<0.0001. Conclusions: SP sessions are an effective tool for teaching the neurologic examination. We determined that a single, structured SP session conducted as an adjunct to our traditional lectures and small groups is associated with a statistically significant improvement in student performance measured 2 years after the session.

  11. Cannabis Use and Outcomes in Patients With Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza; Birnbaum, Lee; Grandhi, Ramesh; Johnson, Jeremiah; Misra, Vivek; Palacio, Santiago; Seifi, Ali; Topel, Christopher; Garvin, Rachel; Caron, Jean-Louis

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of cannabis use in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its impact on morbidity, mortality, and outcomes are unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between cannabis use and outcomes in patients with aSAH. Records of consecutive patients admitted with aSAH between 2010 and 2015 were reviewed. Clinical features and outcomes of aSAH patients with negative urine drug screen and cannabinoids-positive (CB+) were compared. Regression analyses were used to assess for associations. The study group consisted of 108 patients; 25.9% with CB+. Delayed cerebral ischemia was diagnosed in 50% of CB+ and 23.8% of urine drug screen negative patients (P=0.01). CB+ was independently associated with development of delayed cerebral ischemia (odds ratio, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-6.99; P=0.01). A significantly higher number of CB+ than urine drug screen negative patients had poor outcome (35.7% versus 13.8%; P=0.01). In univariate analysis, CB+ was associated with the composite end point of hospital mortality/severe disability (odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-8.01; P=0.04). However, after adjusting for other predictors, this effect was no longer significant. We offer preliminary data that CB+ is independently associated with delayed cerebral ischemia and possibly poor outcome in patients with aSAH. Our findings add to the growing evidence on the association of cannabis with cerebrovascular risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Outcome of ICU survivors: a comprehensive review. The role of patient-reported outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, C; Amaro, A; Dias, C; Costa-Pereira, A

    2012-10-01

    Problems survivors face after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge begin while they are still in the ward, where many of their specific problems may run unrecognized, but they assume a heavy weight when they arrive at their homes and face several kind of limitations, from being unable to climb stairs because of weight loss, asthenia, dyspnea or joint stiffness to anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Follow-up consultations have given us a better understanding of these specific problems, and the information gained has been used to improve intensive care itself and promote a quality service for patients and relatives. The aim of this article is to provide an overview on adult ICU outcome studies and discuss how they have influenced and improved the delivery of intensive care. We will explain how we went from real patients to outcome studies and what we have learned concerning the consequences of critical illness and critical care. Development of outcome studies, what we have learned through them and our own experience will be outlined focusing mainly in four topics: mortality, physical disability, neuropsychological disability and health-related quality of life. Interventions to improve outcome on these main topics will be presented, and we will explain how we went from outcome studies to clinical interventions, focusing on the most recent proposals of intervention to improve outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Beissner

    Full Text Available Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD, several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success.Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5% were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9% had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6% had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15 cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified monitoring of disease progression and healing process, to facilitate implementation of therapeutic measures and to optimize treatment success.

  14. Predictors and outcomes of patient safety culture in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Maha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing a patient safety culture was one of the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine to assist hospitals in improving patient safety. In recent years, a multitude of evidence, mostly originating from developed countries, has been published on patient safety culture. One of the first efforts to assess the culture of safety in the Eastern Mediterranean Region was by El-Jardali et al. (2010 in Lebanon. The study entitled "The Current State of Patient Safety Culture: a study at baseline" assessed the culture of safety in Lebanese hospitals. Based on study findings, the objective of this paper is to explore the association between patient safety culture predictors and outcomes, taking into consideration respondent and hospital characteristics. In addition, it will examine the correlation between patient safety culture composites. Methods Sixty-eight hospitals and 6,807 respondents participated in the study. The study which adopted a cross sectional research design utilized an Arabic-translated version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC. The HSOPSC measures 12 patient safety composites. Two of the composites, in addition to a patient safety grade and the number of events reported, represented the four outcome variables. Bivariate and mixed model regression analyses were used to examine the association between the patient safety culture predictors and outcomes. Results Significant correlations were observed among all patient safety culture composites but with differences in the strength of the correlation. Generalized Estimating Equations for the patient safety composite scores and respondent and hospital characteristics against the patient safety grade and the number of events reported revealed significant correlations. Significant correlations were also observed by linear mixed models of the same variables against the frequency of events reported and the overall perception of safety

  15. Patients' Outcome Expectations Matter in Psychological Interventions for Patients with Diabetes and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Evelien; Schroevers, Maya J.; Tovote, Annika; Sanderman, Robbert; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Fleer, Joke

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether patients' expectations of treatment outcome predict treatment completion, homework compliance, and depressive symptom improvement in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Study participants were patients with diabetes and comorbi

  16. Functional outcome of patients with spinal cord injury : rehabilitation outcome study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, M.C.; Groothoff, J.W.; Mulder, G.A.; Eisma, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To increase our knowledge of neurological recovery and functional outcome of patients with spinal cord injuries in order to make more successful rehabilitation programmes based on realistic goals. Design: Descriptive analysis of data gathered in an information system. Setting: Rehabilitat

  17. Functional outcome of patients with spinal cord injury : rehabilitation outcome study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, M.C.; Groothoff, J.W.; Mulder, G.A.; Eisma, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To increase our knowledge of neurological recovery and functional outcome of patients with spinal cord injuries in order to make more successful rehabilitation programmes based on realistic goals. Design: Descriptive analysis of data gathered in an information system. Setting: Rehabilitat

  18. Lumbar disc herniation in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial: does educational attainment impact outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Patrick R; Lurie, Jon D; Frymoyer, John; Walsh, Thomas; Zhao, Wenyan; Morgan, Tamara S; Abdu, William A; Weinstein, James N

    2011-12-15

    Randomized trial with concurrent observational cohort. A total of 1171 patients were divided into subgroups by educational attainment: high school or less, some college, and college degree or above. To assess the influence of education level on outcomes for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Educational attainment has been demonstrated to have an inverse relationship with pain perception, comorbidities, and mortality. The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial enrolled surgical candidates (imaging-confirmed disc herniation with at least 6 weeks of persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy) from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Treatments were standard open discectomy versus nonoperative treatment. Outcomes were changes from baseline for 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), bodily pain (BP), and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly through 4 years. Substantial improvement was seen in all patient cohorts. Surgical outcomes did not differ by level of education. For nonoperative outcomes, however, higher levels of education were associated with significantly greater overall improvement over 4 years in BP (P = 0.007), PF (P = 0.001), and ODI (P = 0.003). At 4 years a "dose-response" type relationship was shown for BP (high school or less = 25.5, some college = 31, and college graduate or above = 36.3, P = 0.004) and results were similar for PF and ODI. The success of nonoperative treatment in the more educated cohort resulted in an attenuation of the relative benefit of surgery. Patients with higher educational attainment demonstrated significantly greater improvement with nonoperative treatment while educational attainment was not associated with surgical outcomes.

  19. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  20. Treatment of patients with hand osteoarthritis : outcome measures, patient satisfaction, and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the limitations in daily life, outcome measures, clinical outcomes with the emphasis on patient satisfaction, and economic aspects of the treatment of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with hand OA report severe restrictions in daily life, in particular in

  1. Emerging versions of patient involvement with Patient Reported Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langstrup, Henriette

    It is a central argument in the growing Danish PRO-arena, that a large-scale collection of PRO from patients in the Danish Healthcare system will pave the way for more genuine patient involvement in clinical decision-making, quality management and governance of the health services. In this paper I...... discuss how patient involvement is being (re)configured when increasingly connected to national visions of participatory healthcare. A central discussion centers on ‘meaningful use’ of patient-generated data promoting patients’ expectations and experiences as a criterion for how to proceed...... involvement with PRO, I want to point to the need for further empirical exploration of how patients and professionals engage with PRO in specific daily practices and to stimulate a general discussion of all too simple normativities of the so-called ‘participatory turn’ in healthcare. I draw onempirical...

  2. Effect of Allopurinol on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Hyperuricemic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Søltoft; Pottegård, Anton; Lindegaard, Hanne M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperuricemia and gout have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Allopurinol is an effective urate-lowering drug. Whether lowering of urate by allopurinol improves the cardiovascular risk in hyperuricemic patients remains to be established. OBJECTIVE: Our objective...... competing risk regression model, with respect to Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration composite outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Among 65,971 patients with hyperuricemia, we found 7127 patients on allopurinol treatment. In the propensity...... treatment is associated with a decreased cardiovascular risk among hyperuricemic patients....

  3. Digital audio recordings improve the outcomes of patient consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolderslund, Maiken; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Holst, René

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects on patients' outcome of the consultations when provided with: a Digital Audio Recording (DAR) of the consultation and a Question Prompt List (QPL). METHODS: This is a three-armed randomised controlled cluster trial. One group of patients received standard care......, while the other two groups received either the QPL in combination with a recording of their consultation or only the recording. Patients from four outpatient clinics participated: Paediatric, Orthopaedic, Internal Medicine, and Urology. The effects were evaluated by patient-administered questionnaires...

  4. Digital audio recordings improve the outcomes of patient consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolderslund, Maiken; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Axboe, Mette

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects on patients' outcome of the consultations when provided with: a Digital Audio Recording (DAR) of the consultation and a Question Prompt List (QPL). METHODS: This is a three-armed randomised controlled cluster trial. One group of patients received standard care......, while the other two groups received either the QPL in combination with a recording of their consultation or only the recording. Patients from four outpatient clinics participated: Paediatric, Orthopaedic, Internal Medicine, and Urology. The effects were evaluated by patient-administered questionnaires...

  5. Predictors of eating disorders outcomes in Polish teenage patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilecki, Maciej Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with the outcome of eating disorders in Polish teenage patients. Material and methods. Analyses covered the data of 47 patients diagnosed with any of the eating disorders according to DSM IV consulted for the first time in the outpatients clinic of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit between 2002/2004 in Krakow (DGN1, Poland and then followed up between 2009/2011 (DGN2. The influence of the number of variables collected at DGN1 on outcomes was analysed. Results. The outcomes of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are influenced by some aspects of clinical picture, patients’ objective family situation, their self-image and the perception they have of their family relations. The co-occurrence of depressive symptoms and younger age of parents proved to be the most clinically important negative outcome predictors in the whole group of eating disorders. Discussion. The small size of group in the follow-up study is the most important limitating factor. Conclusion. Outcomes in eating disorders are affected by several psycho-bio-social factors common to all patients and specific for the diagnosis type they initially present.

  6. Outcomes in pediatric patients with nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Saba; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    Recognition of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is gaining increasing attention in the assessment and evaluation of critically ill pediatric patients. The underlying cause of NCSE is often the most important factor in determining outcome. However, there is a growing body of literature suggesting that electrical seizure burden in NCSE also contributes to unfavorable outcomes. Determination of impact of NCSE on outcome based on current evidence involves consideration of heterogeneous study settings, study populations, and process of care and outcome measures. In addition, the lack of data on neurocognitive function prior to episodes of NCSE as well as limited long-term neurocognitive assessment data confines precise conclusions about neurocognitive changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  7. Outcome of Guillain–Barre syndrome patients with respiratory paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, J.; Ranjan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate the outcome of patients with Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) having respiratory failure treated with modified intubation policy. Design and Methods: Consecutive patients with GBS having single breath count below 12 and respiratory rate >30/min were included and their clinical details noted. The patients were intubated and mechanically ventilated (MV) if their PaO2 was  50 mmHg or pH < 7.3. Their electrophysiological subtypes and complications were noted. The hospital mortality and 3 months outcome were compared in MV and those could be managed without MV even with respiratory compromise. Results: Out of 369 patients, 102 (27.6%) patients had respiratory compromise who were included in this study. Of the patients with respiratory compromise, 44 (43.1%) were intubated and mechanically ventilated after a median of 4 days of hospitalization. The median duration of MV was 21 (range 1–88) days. The patients with autonomic dysfunction (56.8% vs. 19%), facial weakness (78% vs. 36.2%), bulbar weakness (81.8% vs. 31%), severe weakness (63.8% vs. 31%) and high transaminase level (47.7% vs. 25.9%) needed MV more frequently. In our study, 6.8% patients died and 26.6% had poor outcome which was similar between MV and non-MV patients. The MV patients had longer hospitalization and more complications compared with non-MV group. Conclusion: In GBS patients with respiratory compromise, conservative intubation does not increase mortality and disability. PMID:26475599

  8. Malnutrition Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients with Neuroendocrine Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasberg, Sebastian; Knappe-Drzikova, Barbora; Vonderbeck, Dorothée; Jann, Henning; Weylandt, Karsten H; Grieser, Christian; Pascher, Andreas; Schefold, Jörg C; Pavel, Marianne; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Sturm, Andreas; Pape, Ulrich-Frank

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in oncological diseases, influencing treatment outcomes, treatment complications, quality of life and survival. The potential role of malnutrition has not yet been studied systematically in neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN), which, due to their growing prevalence and additional therapeutic options, provide an increasing clinical challenge to diagnosis and management. The aim of this cross-sectional observational study, which included a long-term follow-up, was therefore to define the prevalence of malnutrition in 203 patients with NEN using various methodological approaches, and to analyse the short- and long-term outcome of malnourished patients. A detailed subgroup analysis was also performed to define risk factors for poorer outcome. When applying malnutrition screening scores, 21-25% of the NEN patients were at risk of or demonstrated manifest malnutrition. This was confirmed by anthropometric measurements, by determination of serum surrogate parameters such as albumin as well as by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), particularly phase angle α. The length of hospital stay was significantly longer in malnourished NEN patients, while long-term overall survival was highly significantly reduced. Patients with high-grade (G3) neuroendocrine carcinomas, progressive disease and undergoing chemotherapy were at particular risk of malnutrition associated with a poorer outcome. Multivariate analysis confirmed the important and highly significant role of malnutrition as an independent prognostic factor for NEN besides proliferative capacity (G3 NEC). Malnutrition is therefore an underrecognized problem in NEN patients which should systematically be diagnosed by widely available standard methods such as Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS), serum albumin assessment and BIA, and treated to improve both short- and long-term outcomes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Prediction of outcome in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Andersen, Cathrine Hedegaard; Hansen, Martin Mørk;

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course of low back pain (LBP) cannot be accurately predicted by existing prediction tools. Therefore clinicians rely largely on their experience and clinical judgement. The objectives of this study were to investigate 1) which patient characteristics were associated with chiropractors...... at baseline and related to all outcomes. The accuracies of predictions made by clinicians (AUC .58-.63) and the SBT (AUC .50-.61) were comparable and low. No substantial increase in the predictive capability was achieved by combining clinicians' expectations and the SBT. In conclusion, chiropractors......' predictions were associated with well-established prognostic factors but not simply a product of these. Chiropractors were able to predict differences in outcome on a group level, but prediction of individual patients' outcomes were inaccurate and not substantially improved by the SBT. It is worth...

  10. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Vad; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross....... This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups....

  11. Our clinical experience on laparoscopic splenectomy: Outcomes of 38 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyir Bozdağ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Laparoscopic splenectomy has gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of hematological diseases in recent years. In this study, we aimed to present the outcomes of the patients who underwent laparoscopic splenectomy. Methods: Between 2012 and 2015, the data of 38 patients, who underwent laparoscopic splenectomy for hematological diseases at our clinic, were evaluated retrospectively. Results: 15 males and 23 females patients were underwent laparoscopic splenectomy, and the average age was 33.9 ± 12.9 years. Indications for splenectomy were idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP in 34 patients, and hereditary spherocytosis in 4 patients. During the surgical exploration, accessory spleen was detected in 7 patients, and removed. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed at the same session in 2 hereditary spherocytosis patients who had stones in the gallbladder. One patient was converted to the open surgery due to the bleeding which was eliminated the exposure during the dissection. At the postoperative period, we observed atelectasis in one patient, and wound fat necrosis in one patient. In addition, thrombocytosis was observed in one patient. Hematological treatment was continued because of persistent refractory thrombocytopenia in two patients, and temporary thrombocytopenia in four patients. An accessory spleen was detected with splenic scintigraphy in one of these patients at the postoperative period. The average hospitalization time was 2.6 ± 0.7 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic splenectomy for hematological diseases may be considered as first-line therapy with less hospital stay and morbidity.

  12. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosk, Christina A; Mus, Marnix; Vroemen, Jos Pam; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Vos, Dagmar I; Elmans, Leon Hgj; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2017-01-01

    Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium. This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA) was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes. Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9). Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001), increased association with complications (Pdelirium rate (57.7%, Pdelirium, especially when the patient has dementia. Patients who underwent an episode of delirium were at increased risk for adverse outcomes.

  13. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia : Patient selection and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, J. D.; Contarino, M. F.; Schuurman, P. R.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; de Bie, R. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In a literature survey, 341 patients with primary and 109 with secondary dystonias treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) were identified. In general, the outcomes for primary dystonias were more favourable compared to the secondary forms. For

  14. Improving patient outcomes in psoriasis: strategies to ensure treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yélamos O

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oriol Yélamos, Sandra Ros, Lluís Puig Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau – Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: Psoriasis is a frequent inflammatory disease with a chronic and relapsing course. Therefore, patients with psoriasis are likely to undergo different treatments for long periods of time. Traditionally, therapies used in psoriasis have been associated with poor levels of adherence due to the complexity of the regimens and the poor results obtained with the topical therapies. These poor outcomes are associated with high levels of frustration and anxiety, which decrease adherence and worsen the disease. With the recent introduction of highly efficacious biologic therapies, patients can achieve very good and prolonged responses. However, most patients with psoriasis have mild disease and may be treated with skin-directed therapies. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies to improve adherence in order to achieve better outcomes, and to improve the overall quality of life. Hence, acknowledging the causes of nonadherence is crucial for implementing these strategies. In this summary, we review the causes of nonadherence, and we provide behavioral strategies in order to improve adherence and, ultimately, the outcome of patients with psoriasis. Keywords: psoriasis, adherence, outcome, drug therapy, psychotherapy

  15. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and u...

  16. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben B; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related functional outcomes after fast-track total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, we wanted to assess physical areas where an additional need for rehabilitation could be identified, and finally, we...

  17. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gadsden J; Warlick A

    2015-01-01

    Jeff Gadsden, Alicia Warlick Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional...

  18. Outcomes following cardiac surgery in patients with preoperative renal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Armstrong, Lesley A; Modi, Amit; Barlow, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was that whether patients who are dependent on chronic dialysis have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population when undergoing cardiac surgery. These patients often require surgery in view of their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 278 relevant papers were identified using the below mentioned search, 16 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Dialysis-dependent (DD) patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve replacement have higher morbidity but acceptable outcomes. There is some evidence to show that outcomes after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are better than after on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (ONCAB) and that results are worse in DD patients with diabetic nephropathy. Patients undergoing combined procedures have a higher mortality.

  19. The Impact of Information Culture on Patient Safety Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Santtu; Saranto, Kaija; Bates, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background An organization’s information culture and information management practices create conditions for processing patient information in hospitals. Information management incidents are failures that could lead to adverse events for the patient if they are not detected. Objectives To test a theoretical model that links information culture in acute care hospitals to information management incidents and patient safety outcomes. Methods Reason’s model for the stages of development of organizational accidents was applied. Study data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 909 RNs who work in medical or surgical units at 32 acute care hospitals in Finland. Structural equation modeling was used to assess how well the hypothesized model fit the study data. Results Fit indices indicated a good fit for the model. In total, 18 of the 32 paths tested were statistically significant. Documentation errors had the strongest total effect on patient safety outcomes. Organizational guidance positively affected information availability and utilization of electronic patient records, whereas the latter had the strongest total effect on the reduction of information delays. Conclusions Patient safety outcomes are associated with information management incidents and information culture. Further, the dimensions of the information culture create work conditions that generate errors in hospitals.

  20. Instrument development and evaluation for patient-related outcomes assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnik M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Małgorzata Farnik, Władysław PierzchałaDepartment of Pneumonology, Silesian University of Medicine, Katowice, PolandAbstract: Patient-related outcomes measures could provide important information for the current state of the art in medical care and even have an impact on macrodecisions in the health care system. Patient-related outcomes were initially defined as subjective health indicators that allow disability and illness to be assessed, based on patient, caregiver, or physician self-reports. As illness involves psychological and behavioral complex processes of care, a multidisciplinary approach in measuring patient-reported outcomes should be recommended, such as quality of life questionnaires. Patient-related outcomes measures should correspond to specific clinical situations and bring opportunities to improve quality of care. Objective measurements enable quantitative data to be collected and analyzed. Depending on the aim of the research, investigators can use existing methods or develop new tools. This publication presents a methodology for developing patient-related outcomes measures, based on a multistage procedure. The proper definition of specific study objectives and the methodology of instrument development are crucial for successfully transferring the study concept. The model of instrument development is the process of starting from the preliminary phase and includes questionnaire design and scaling, pilot testing (cognitive debriefing, revision of the preliminary version, evaluation of the new tool, and implementation. Validation of the new instrument includes reliability, reproducibility, internal consistency, and responsiveness. The process of designing the new tool should involve a panel of experts, including clinicians, psychologists (preliminary phase, and statisticians (scale development and scoring, and patients (cognitive debriefing. Implementation of a new tool should be followed by evaluation study – assessment of

  1. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Croudace

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til Wykes O3 Examining the change process over time qualitatively: transformative learning and response shift Nasrin Nasr, Pamela Enderby O4 Developing a PROM to evaluate self-management in diabetes (HASMID: giving patients a voice Jill Carlton, Donna Rowen, Jackie Elliott, John Brazier, Katherine Stevens, Hasan Basarir, Alex Labeit O5 Development of the Primary Care Outcomes Questionnaire (PCOQ Mairead Murphy, Sandra Hollinghurst, Chris Salisbury O6 Developing the PKEX score- a multimodal assessment tool for patients with shoulder problems Dominic Marley, James Wilson, Amy Barrat, Bibhas Roy O7 Applying multiple imputation to multi-item patient reported outcome measures: advantages and disadvantages of imputing at the item, sub-scale or score level Ines Rombach, Órlaith Burke, Crispin Jenkinson, Alastair Gray, Oliver Rivero-Arias O8 Integrating Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs into routine primary care for patients with multimorbidity: a feasibility study Ian Porter, Jaheeda Gangannagaripalli, Charlotte Bramwell, Jose M. Valderas O9 eRAPID: electronic self-report and management of adverse-events for pelvic radiotherapy (RT patients Patricia Holch, Susan Davidson, Jacki Routledge, Ann Henry, Kevin Franks, Alex Gilbert, Kate Absolom & Galina Velikova O10 Patient reported outcomes (PROMs based recommendation in clinical guidance for the management of chronic conditions in the United Kingdom Ian Porter, Jose M.Valderas O11 Cross-sectional and

  2. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile.

  3. Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Scheer, Justin K; Neuman, Brian J; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Burton, Douglas C; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Hostin, Richard A; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-01

    For patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), surgical treatment may improve their health-related quality of life. This study investigates when the greatest improvement in outcomes occurs and whether incremental improvements in patient-reported outcomes during the first postoperative year predict outcomes at 3 years. Using a multicenter registry, we identified 84 adults with ASD treated surgically from 2008 to 2012 with complete 3-year follow-up. Pairwise t tests and multivariate regression were used for analysis. Significance was set at P years (both P year, ODI and SRS-22r scores improved by 19 and 0.5 points, respectively (both P year predicted 3-year outcomes in ODI and SRS-22r scores (adjusted R(2) = 0.52 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant differences in the measured or predicted 3-year ODI (P = 0.991) or SRS-22r scores (P = 0.986). In surgically treated patients with ASD, the greatest improvements in outcomes occurred between 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. A model with incremental improvements from baseline to 6 weeks and from 6 weeks to 1 year can be used to predict ODI and SRS-22r scores at 3 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  5. Gestational outcomes in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, G R; Rodrigues, B C; Lacerda, M I; Dos Santos, F C; de Jesus, N R; Klumb, E M; Levy, R A

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a reference unit. This retrospective cohort study included 26 pregnancies of patients seen between 2011 and 2015 included with history and/or active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus among 135 pregnancies. Three patients had active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus at conception, but only one remained with neurological activity during gestation, characteristically related to the inadvertent suspension of medications. Twenty six percent of the newborns were small for gestational age and 40% of live births were premature, with no neonatal death or early complications of prematurity. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in nine pregnancies, with two cases of early severe form that resulted in intrauterine fetal death. Patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus had more prematurity and preeclampsia compared to patients without neuropsychiatric disease. However, when concomitant lupus nephritis was excluded, the gestational results of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients were more favorable.

  6. Outcomes from the Patient Perspective Workshop at OMERACT 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, John; Heiberg, Turid; Hewlett, Sarah; Hughes, Rod; Kvien, Tore; Ahlmèn, Monica; Boers, Maarten; Minnock, Patricia; Saag, Kenneth; Shea, Beverley; Suarez Almazor, Maria; Taal, Erik

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the Patient Perspective Workshop at OMERACT 6 was to address the question of assessing the outcomes of intervention in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the perspective of those who experience the disease themselves. This was done by reviewing the current state of research in the area, identifying the requirements for the development of valid instruments, delineating a research agenda that can attain these requirements, and motivating participants to undertake the appropriate research. Through a series of meetings and discussion sessions a research agenda emerged that includes: exploring subjective experiences of RA identified by patients as important but not encompassed within the current "core set" of outcome measures (such as a sense of well being, fatigue, and disturbed sleep); clarifying terminology; and empowering patients to be more effective partners in outcomes research. These were supported by the OMERACT plenary session. Specific actions were required by both patient participants and organizers to ensure the nature of the conference, its focus and method of working were understood, and that the patient participants were sufficiently confident to make their contribution.

  7. Dysphagia outcomes in patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesling, Michele; Brady, Susan; Jensen, Mary; Nickell, Melissa; Statkus, Donna; Escobar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare functional dysphagia outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation for patients with brain tumors with that of patients following a stroke. Group 1 (n = 24) consisted of consecutive admissions to the brain injury program with the diagnosis of brain tumor and dysphagia. Group 2 (n = 24) consisted of matched, consecutive admissions, with the diagnosis of acute stroke and dysphagia. Group 2 was matched for age, site of lesion, and initial composite cognitive FIM score. The main outcome measures for this study included the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, length of stay, hospital charges, and medical complications. Results showed that swallowing gains made by both groups as evaluated by the admission and discharge ASHA NOMS levels were considered to be statistically significant. The differences for length of stay, total hospital charges, and speech charges between the two groups were not considered to be statistically significant. Three patients in the brain tumor group (12.5%) demonstrated dysphagia complications of either dehydration or pneumonia during their treatment course as compared to 0% in the stroke group. This study confirms that functional dysphagia gains can be achieved for patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and that they should be afforded the same type and intensity of rehabilitation for their swallowing that is provided to patients following a stroke.

  8. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE, improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like "well-oiled machines," multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include "staff" from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses′ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others. Their enhanced teamwork counters the "silo effect" by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of "teamwork" for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs, hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs, and most critically, operating rooms (ORs. Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS, and yielded greater patient "staff" satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a "team sport." The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers′ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their "well-oiled machines" enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling "staff" to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction.

  9. Identifying Effectors of Outcomes in Patients with Large Umbilical Hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Steven A; Heniford, Davis W; Prasad, Tanushree; Lincourt, Amy E; Augenstein, Vedra A

    2016-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become an important focus of hernia repair outcomes. This study aims to identify factors which lead to ideal outcomes (asymptomatic and without recurrence) in large umbilical hernias (defect size ≥9 cm(2)). Review of the prospective International Hernia Mesh Registry was performed. The Carolinas Comfort Scale was used to measure QOL at 1-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Demographics, operative details, complications, and QOL data were evaluated using standard statistical methods. Forty-four large umbilical hernia repairs were analyzed. Demographics included: average age 53.6 ± 12.0 and body mass index 34.9 ± 7.2 kg/m(2). The mean defect size was 21.7 ± 16.9 cm(2), and 72.7 per cent were performed laparoscopically. Complications included hematoma (2.3%), seroma (12.6%), and recurrence (9.1%). Follow-up and ideal outcomes were one month = 28.2 per cent, six months = 42.9 per cent, one year = 55.6 per cent. All patients who remained symptomatic at one and two years were significantly symptomatic before surgery. Symptomatic preoperative activity limitation was a significant predictor of nonideal outcomes at one year (P = 0.02). Symptomatic preoperative pain was associated with nonideal outcomes at one year, though the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). Operative technique, mesh choice, and fixation technique did not impact recurrence or QOL. Repair of umbilical hernia with defects ≥9 cm(2) had a surprising low rate of ideal outcomes (asymptomatic and no recurrence). All patients with nonideal long-term outcomes had preoperative pain and activity limitations. These data may suggest that umbilical hernia should be repaired when they are small and asymptomatic.

  10. Semaglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Steven P; Bain, Stephen C; Consoli, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory guidance specifies the need to establish cardiovascular safety of new diabetes therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes in order to rule out excess cardiovascular risk. The cardiovascular effects of semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue with an extended half......-life of approximately 1 week, in type 2 diabetes are unknown. METHODS: We randomly assigned 3297 patients with type 2 diabetes who were on a standard-care regimen to receive once-weekly semaglutide (0.5 mg or 1.0 mg) or placebo for 104 weeks. The primary composite outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular...... death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. We hypothesized that semaglutide would be noninferior to placebo for the primary outcome. The noninferiority margin was 1.8 for the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio. RESULTS: At baseline, 2735 of the patients (83...

  11. Facilitating communication with patients for improved migraine outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Lipton, Richard B

    2008-06-01

    Effective communication is integral to good medical care. Medical professional groups, regulatory agencies, educators, researchers, and patients recognize its importance. Quality of medical communication is directly related to patient satisfaction, improvement in medication adherence, treatment compliance, other outcomes, decreased risk of malpractice, and increase in health care providers' levels of satisfaction. However, skill level and training remain problematic in this area. Fortunately, research has shown that medical communication skills can be successfully taught and acquired, and that improvement in communication skills improves outcomes. The American Migraine Communication Studies I and II evaluated the current state of health care provider-patient communication in headache care and tested a simple educational intervention. They found problematic issues but demonstrated that these areas could be improved. We review theoretical models of effective communication and discuss strategies for improving communication, including active listening, interviewing strategies, and methods for gathering information about headache-related impairment, mood, and quality of life.

  12. Systemic inflammation worsens outcomes in emergency surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Robert D; Hoth, J Jason; Miller, Preston R; Meredith, J Wayne; Chang, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    Acute care surgeons are uniquely aware of the importance of systemic inflammatory response and its influence on postoperative outcomes; concepts like damage control have evolved from this experience. For surgeons whose practice is mostly elective, the significance of such systemic inflammation may be underappreciated. This study sought to determine the influence of preoperative systemic inflammation on postoperative outcome in patients requiring emergent colon surgery. Emergent colorectal operations were identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2008 dataset. Four groups were defined by the presence and magnitude of the inflammatory response before operation: no inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, or severe sepsis/septic shock. Thirty-day survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 3,305 patients were identified. Thirty-day survival was significantly different (p SIRS was 1.9 (p SIRS or sepsis patients, operations surgery. II, prognostic study.

  13. Clinical outcomes in patients with ICU-related pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Cheng Tseng; Wen-Feng Fang; Yu-Hsiu Chung; Yi-Hsi Wang; Ivor S Douglas; Meng-Chih Lin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors predictive of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in patients with ventilatorrelated pancreatitis. The clinical outcomes of patients with ventilator-related pancreatitis were compared with those of patients with pancreatitis-related respiratory failure as well as controls.METHODS: One hundred and forty-eight patients with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and concomitant acute pancreatitis were identified from a prospectively collected dataset of 9108 consecutive patients admitted with respiratory failure over a period of five years. Sixty patients met the criteria for ventilator-related pancreatitis, and 88 (control patients), for pancreatitis-related respiratory failure.RESULTS: Mortality rate in ventilator-related pancreatitis was comparable to that in ICU patients without pancreatitis by case-control methodology ( P = 0.544). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified low PaO_2/FiO_2 (OR: 1.032, 95% CI: 1.006-1.059, P = 0.016) as an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with ventilator-related pancreatitis. The mortality rate in patients with ventilator-related pancreatitis was lower than that in patients with acute pancreatitis-related respiratory failure ( P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: We found that low PaO_2/FiO_2 was an independent clinical parameter predictive of ICU mortality in patients with ventilator-related pancreatitis.

  14. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  15. Anaemia to predict outcome in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Pinçon, Claire; Finzi, Jonathan; Barrailler, Stéphanie; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Van Belle, Eric; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the heterogeneous population of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), risk stratification with tools such as the GRACE risk score is recommended to guide therapeutic management and improve outcome. To evaluate whether anaemia refines the value of the GRACE risk model to predict midterm outcome after an ACS. A prospective registry of 1064 ACS patients (63 ± 14 years; 73% men; 57% ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [MI]) was studied. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin less than 13 mg/dL in men or less than 12 mg/dL in women. The primary endpoint was 6-month death or rehospitalization for MI. The primary endpoint was reached in 132 patients, including 68 deaths. Anaemia was associated with adverse clinical outcomes (hazard ratio 3.008, 95% confidence interval 2.137-4.234; PAnaemia provided additional prognostic information to the GRACE score as demonstrated by a systematic improvement in global model fit and discrimination (c-statistic increasing from 0.633 [0.571;0.696] to 0.697 [0.638;0.755]). Subsequently, adding anaemia to the GRACE score led to reclassification of 595 patients into different risk categories; 16.5% patients at low risk (≤ 5% risk of death or rehospitalization for MI) were upgraded to intermediate (>5-10%) or high risk (>10%); 79.5% patients at intermediate risk were reclassified as low (55%) or high risk (24%); and 45.5% patients at high risk were downgraded to intermediate risk. Overall, 174 patients were reclassified into a higher risk category (17.3%) and 421 into a lower risk category (41.9%). Anaemia provides independent additional prognostic information to the GRACE score. Combining anaemia with the GRACE score refines its predictive value, which often overestimates the risk. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  17. Outcomes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia after discontinuing ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jain, Nitin; George, Binsah; James, Danelle; Kantarjian, Hagop; Burger, Jan; O'Brien, Susan

    2015-03-26

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RR-CLL). We describe the characteristics, causes of discontinuation, and outcomes in patients who discontinued treatment with ibrutinib. One hundred twenty-seven patients were enrolled in various clinical trials of ibrutinib, with or without rituximab, at our center. Thirty-three (26%) patients have discontinued ibrutinib to date. The majority of those patients had high-risk features: 94% with unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene rearrangement, 58% with del(17p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and 54% with a complex karyotype. Causes of discontinuation were disease transformation (7), progressive CLL (7), stem cell transplantation (3), adverse events (11), serious adverse events/deaths (3), and miscellaneous reasons (2). Twenty five patients (76%) died after discontinuing ibrutinib; the median overall survival was 3.1 months after discontinuation. Most patients with RR-CLL who discontinued ibrutinib early were difficult to treat and had poor outcomes.

  18. Long-term Outcome of Patients With Undiagnosed Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunluoglu, Gulsah; Olcmen, Aysun; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Dincer, Ibrahim; Sayar, Adnan; Camsari, Gungor; Yilmaz, Veysel; Altin, Sedat

    2015-12-01

    The cause of exudative pleural effusion cannot be determined in some patients. The longterm outcomes of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion were analyzed. Patients with exudative pleural effusion whose diagnostic procedures included pleural biopsy using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery carried out between 2008 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients diagnosed with non-specific pleuritis were included. Fifty-three patients with available follow-up data were included in the study. Forty men and 13 women (mean age 53.9±13.9 years) were included. Median follow-up time was 24 months. No diagnosis was given in 27 patients (51%), and a clinical diagnosis was given in 26 patients (49%) during the follow-up period. Malignant disease (malignant mesothelioma) was diagnosed in 2 (3.7%) patients. Other diseases were parapneumonic effusion in 12, congestive heart failure in 8, and miscellaneous in 4 patients. Volume of effusion at the time of initial examination and re-accumulation of fluid after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were associated with malignant disease (P=.004 and .0001, respectively). Although the probability is low, some patients with exudative pleural effusion undiagnosed after pleural biopsy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery may have malignant disease. Patients with an initially large volume of effusion that re-accumulates after examination should be closely monitored. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes for institutionalized patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula,Escalada-Hernández

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the most frequent NANDA-I nursing diagnoses and the associated NIC in-terventions and NOC outcomes used in nursing care plans for a sample of institutionalized patients with dementia. Methods: Descriptive analyses were performed based on a subsample from a multicentric and cross-sectional study. Data were obtained retrospectively from the electronic patient records and included socio-demografic details, NANDA-I, NIC and NOC labels and the HoNOS scale. Results: In total, 108 patients diagnosed with dementia were included. The nine most prevalent NANDA-I nursing diagnoses and the NOC outcomes and NIC interventions linked to them were presented. According to HoNOS scale, the most common problems among elders with dementia were cognitive problems and problems with activities of daily living, with relationships and related to physical illness or disability. Conclusions: Thisstudy identified patterns of nursing care for institutionalized patients with dementia where the most prevalent nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes addressed a wide range of functional, psychosocial and physiological care needs.

  20. Trauma patient outcome after the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Williams, J I

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in trauma patient outcome after the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. In January of 1992, a Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program was also instituted. This study assessed trauma patient outcome after the PHTLS program. Morbidity (length of stay and degree of disability), mortality, injury severity score, mechanism of injury, age, and sex among all adult trauma patients transported by ambulance to the major trauma hospital were assessed between July of 1990 to December of 1991 (pre-PHTLS, n = 332) and January of 1994 to June of 1995 (post-PHTLS, n = 350). Age, sex distribution, percentage blunt injury, and injury severity score were similar for both groups. Mortality pre-PHTLS (15.7%) was greater than post-PHTLS (10.6%). Length of stay and disability were statistically significantly decreased post-PHTLS. Age, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury were positively correlated with mortality in both periods. The previously reported post-ATLS mortality was similar to the pre-PHTLS mortality. Post-PHTLS mortality and morbidity were significantly decreased, suggesting a positive impact of the PHTLS program on trauma patient outcome.

  1. Determination of manipulative physiotherapy treatment outcome in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niere, K.; Robinson, P.

    1997-11-01

    SUMMARY. Although physiotherapists are frequently involved in the treatment of headache when cervical spine dysfunction is thought to be a cause or contributing factor there does not appear to be a consistent definition of treatment success. This study analysed treatment outcome in a population of 112 headache patients presenting for manipulative physiotherapy. Two months after the initial consultation, statistically significant improvements were observed in mean scores for each of headache frequency (P < 0.001), duration (P < 0.05) and intensity (P < 0.001). When a combination of patient estimate of treatment effect and a headache index incorporating scores for frequency, intensity and duration was used to classify treatment outcome, 51 of the 91 subjects analysed at follow-up were deemed to have had a positive response to treatment. This method of classification of treatment outcome appeared to be sensitive to cases where the patient's headaches were improved by factors other than the physiotherapy treatment. However the classification used was less sensitive when the patient's headaches were aggravated by other factors or where there was not consistent improvement or deterioration in the measures of headache frequency, intensity and duration. Copyright 1997 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  2. Outcomes measurement in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourin, Christine G

    2014-03-01

    Outcomes research is defined as clinical and population-based research that investigates the results of healthcare practices or interventions through the filter of the benefit to the patient and other stakeholders. Outcomes research is an increasingly important field or research, because of the pressing need for evidence-based information that can be used to make better informed health and healthcare decisions, and define desired health care practices in the current era of healthcare reform. This article will review the head and neck cancer (HNCA) outcomes literature published in the past year, with a focus on studies evaluating treatment and survival, short-term and long-term complications, and quality of life (QOL).

  3. Benchmarking outcomes in the critically injured burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Goverman, Jeremy; Hayden, Douglas L; Fagan, Shawn P; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Alexander, Andrew K; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Arnoldo, Brett; Wispelwey, Bram; Mindrinos, Michael N; Xiao, Wenzhong; Honari, Shari E; Mason, Philip H; Schoenfeld, David A; Herndon, David N; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2014-05-01

    To determine and compare outcomes with accepted benchmarks in burn care at 6 academic burn centers. Since the 1960s, US morbidity and mortality rates have declined tremendously for burn patients, likely related to improvements in surgical and critical care treatment. We describe the baseline patient characteristics and well-defined outcomes for major burn injuries. We followed 300 adults and 241 children from 2003 to 2009 through hospitalization, using standard operating procedures developed at study onset. We created an extensive database on patient and injury characteristics, anatomic and physiological derangement, clinical treatment, and outcomes. These data were compared with existing benchmarks in burn care. Study patients were critically injured, as demonstrated by mean % total body surface area (TBSA) (41.2 ± 18.3 for adults and 57.8 ± 18.2 for children) and presence of inhalation injury in 38% of the adults and 54.8% of the children. Mortality in adults was 14.1% for those younger than 55 years and 38.5% for those aged 55 years and older. Mortality in patients younger than 17 years was 7.9%. Overall, the multiple organ failure rate was 27%. When controlling for age and % TBSA, presence of inhalation injury continues to be significant. This study provides the current benchmark for major burn patients. Mortality rates, notwithstanding significant % TBSA and presence of inhalation injury, have significantly declined compared with previous benchmarks. Modern day surgical and medically intensive management has markedly improved to the point where we can expect patients younger than 55 years with severe burn injuries and inhalation injury to survive these devastating conditions.

  4. Outcome of 121 patients with renal amyloid a amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbis Ahbap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amyloid A (AA amyloidosis is a multisystem, progressive and fatal disease. Renal involvement occurs early in the course of AA. We aimed to investigate the etiology, clinical and laboratory features, and outcome of patients with biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 patients (male/female: 84/37, mean age 42.6 ± 14.4 years were analyzed retrospectively between January of 2001 and May of 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory features and outcomes data were obtained from follow-up charts. Results: Familial Mediterranean fever (37.2% and tuberculosis (24.8% were the most frequent causes of amyloidosis. Mean serum creatinine and proteinuria at diagnosis were 2.3 ± 2.1 mg/dL and 6.7 ± 5.3 g/day, respectively. Sixty-eight (56.2% patients were started dialysis treatment during the follow-up period. Mean duration of renal survival was 64.7 ± 6.3 months. Age, serum creatinine and albumin levels were found as predictors of end-stage renal disease. Fifty patients (%41.3 died during the follow-up period. The mean survival of patients was 88.7 ± 7.8 months (median: 63 ± 13.9. 1, 2 and 5 years survival rates of patients were 80.7%, 68.2% and 51.3%, respectively. Older age, male gender, lower levels of body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum albumin, calcium, and higher levels of phosphor, intact parathyroid hormone and proteinuria were associated with a higher mortality. Higher serum creatinine, lower albumin, dialysis requirement and short time to dialysis were predictors of mortality. Conclusion: The outcome of patients with AA amyloidosis and renal involvement is poor, particularly in those who had massive proteinuria, severe hypoalbuminemia and dialysis requirement at the outset.

  5. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosk, Christina A; Mus, Marnix; Vroemen, Jos PAM; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Vos, Dagmar I; Elmans, Leon HGJ; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2017-01-01

    Background Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA) was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes. Results Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9). Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001), increased association with complications (PPatients with dementia (N=168) had a higher delirium rate (57.7%, Ppatients with (34.0%) and without dementia (26.3%). Conclusion Elderly patients with a hip fracture are vulnerable for delirium, especially when the patient has dementia. Patients who underwent an episode of delirium were at increased risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:28331300

  6. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of patients with apraxia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Burgard, Emily; Radel, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Stroke-induced paresis commands much attention during rehabilitation; other stroke-related consequences receive less consideration. Apraxia is a stroke disorder that may have important implications for rehabilitation and recovery. To investigate association of apraxia with stroke rehabilitation outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation. This cohort study compared patients with and without apraxia after a first left hemispheric stroke. All study patients received standard of care. Clinical measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) administered upon admission and at discharge. Length of stay was also documented. Florida Apraxia Battery subtests were used to classify patients with apraxia. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 10 of whom had apraxia. Data analysis revealed that patients with apraxia exhibited improvement from admission to discharge in clinical measures; however, admission FIM score was significantly lower compared to patients without apraxia. There was no statistically significant difference between groups on FMA score, length of stay, or amount of change on clinical measures. This study of acute patients found those with apraxia to be significantly less independent upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation compared to patients without apraxia. Although both groups improved a similar amount during rehabilitation, patients with apraxia discharged at a level of independence comparable to patients without apraxia upon admission. Such disparity in independence is of concern, and apraxia as a factor in stroke rehabilitation and recovery deserves further attention.

  7. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

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    Ray Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137 and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75, differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p 2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar.

  8. Outcome of Polish teenage patients with eating disorders

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    Pilecki, Maciej Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The aim of the study was to assess outcome of patients with eating disorders in a Polish socio-cultural context. Material and methods. Re-assessed after 6.72 years (SD 0.99 years, min 4.58 years, max 8.81 years, 47 of 112 patients consulted initially in the outpatient clinic of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit between 2002/2004 in Krakow, Poland with one of the eating disorders. Results. Complete remission (absence of symptoms for three months took place in 55% of patients from the restrictive anorexia nervosa group and in 27.3% of patients from the bulimia nervosa group. A full range of symptoms was observed in 10% of patients from the restrictive anorexia nervosa group and in 36.4% of patients from the bulimia nervosa group. In both groups, the longer the follow-up study, the worse outcome observed. Discussion. Small size of group in the follow-up study caused a significant limitation. Conclusion. The remission rates indices for restrictive anorexia nervosa are similar to those presented in other follow-up studies. In the case of bulimia nervosa, they are lower than average. An analysis of diagnosis variability between the initial and the follow up assessment indicates low crossover rate from anorexia nervosa to the bulimia nervosa group.

  9. Multiple myeloma: patient outcomes in real-world practice.

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    Yong, Kwee; Delforge, Michel; Driessen, Christoph; Fink, Leah; Flinois, Alain; Gonzalez-McQuire, Sebastian; Safaei, Reza; Karlin, Lionel; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Raab, Marc S; Schoen, Paul; Cavo, Michele

    2016-10-01

    With increasing number of therapies available for the treatment of multiple myeloma, it is timely to examine the course of patients' journeys. We investigated patient characteristics, treatment durations and outcomes, and symptom burden across the treatment pathway in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the UK. In total, 435 physicians retrospectively reviewed 4997 patient charts. Profiles of patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma during the last 12 months were similar across countries; bone pain was the most common presentation. Median duration of first-line therapy was 6 months, followed by a median treatment-free interval of 10 months; both these decreased with increasing lines of therapy, as did time to progression. Depth of response, as assessed by the treating physician, also decreased with each additional line of therapy: 74% of patients achieved at least a very good partial response at first line, compared with only 11% at fifth line. Deeper responses were associated with longer time to progression, although these were physician-judged. Toxicities and co-morbidities increased with later treatment lines, and were more likely to have led to discontinuation of treatment. These real-world data provide an insight into patient outcomes and treatment decisions being made in clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Assessing and predicting successful tube placement outcomes in ALS patients.

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    Beggs, Kathleen; Choi, Marcia; Travlos, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews feeding tube placement outcomes in 69 ALS outpatients seen at an outpatient interdisciplinary ALS clinic in British Columbia, Canada. The objective was to determine at which point the risks outweigh the benefits of tube placement by reviewing outcomes against parameters of respiratory function, nutritional status and speech and swallowing deterioration. The study was a retrospective review of tube placements between January 2000 and 2005, analysing data on respiratory function (forced vital capacity and respiratory status), weight change from usual body weight (UBW) and speech/swallowing deterioration using ALS Severity Score ratings (Hillel et al., 1989) at time of tube placement. Results show a statistically significant association between nutritional status and successful tube placement outcomes (p=0.003), and none between respiratory status, speech/swallowing variables, or number of deteriorated variables in each patient. Study findings were impacted by lack of available respiratory data. The only study variable that predicted successful tube placement outcome was a body weight greater than or equal to 74% UBW at time of tube placement. In the absence of access to respiratory testing, the relatively simple assessment of weight may assist patients and caregivers in appropriate decisions around tube placement.

  11. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

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    Mosk CA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Mosk,1 Marnix Mus,1 Jos PAM Vroemen,1 Tjeerd van der Ploeg,2 Dagmar I Vos,1 Leon HGJ Elmans,3 Lijckle van der Laan1 1Department of Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 2Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC–University Medical Center, Rotterdam, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands Background: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium.Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes.Results: Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9. Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001, increased association with complications (P<0.001, institutionalization (P<0.001, and 6-month mortality (P<0.001. Patients with dementia (N=168 had a

  12. Evaluation and outcomes of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Cositha; Santhakumar; Ken; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding(OGIB) is defined as recurrent or persistent bleeding or presence of iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation with a negative bidirectional endoscopy. OGIB accounts for 5% of gastrointestinal bleeding and presents a diagnostic challenge. Current modalities available for the investigation of OGIB include capsule endoscopy, balloon assisted enteroscopy, spiral enteroscopy and computed tomography enterography. These modalities overcome the limitations of previous techniques. Following a negative bidirectional endoscopy, capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy remain the cornerstone of investigation in OGIB given their high diagnostic yield. Longterm outcome data in patients with OGIB is limited, but is most promising for capsule endoscopy. This article reviews the current literature and provides an overview of the clinical evaluation of patients with OGIB, available diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and longterm clinical outcomes.

  13. Admission glycaemia and outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

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    Müdespacher, Damaris; Radovanovic, Dragana; Camenzind, Edoardo; Essig, Manfred; Bertel, Osmund; Erne, Paul; Eberli, Franz Robert; Gutzwiller, Felix

    2007-12-01

    Some studies of patients with acute myocardial infarction have reported that hyperglycaemia at admission may be associated with a worse outcome. This study sought to evaluate the association of blood glucose at admission with the outcome of unselected patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Using the Acute Myocardial Infarction and unstable angina in Switzerland (AMIS Plus) registry, ACS patients were stratified according to their blood glucose on admission: group 1: 2.80-6.99 mmol/L, group 2: 7.00-11.09 mmol/L and group 3: > 11.10 mmol/L. Odds ratios for in-hospital mortality were calculated using logistic regression models. Of 2,786 patients, 73% were male and 21% were known to have diabetes. In-hospital mortality increased from 3% in group 1 to 7% in group 2 and to 15% in group 3. Higher glucose levels were associated with larger enzymatic infarct sizes (p<0.001) and had a weak negative correlation with angiographic or echographic left ventricular ejection fraction. High admission glycaemia in ACS patients remains a significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 1.08; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.05-1.14, p<0.001) per mmol/L. The OR for in-hospital mortality was 1.04 (95% CI 0.99-1.1; p=0.140) per mmol/L for patients with diabetes but 1.21 (95% CI 112-1.30; p<0.001) per mmol/L for non-diabetic patients. In conclusion, elevated glucose level in ACS patients on admission is a significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and is even more important for patients who do not have known diabetes.

  14. Measuring patient satisfaction for the Quality and Outcomes Framework

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    Hankins, Matthew; Fraser, Alice; Hodson, Andrew; Hooley, Claire; Smith, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The general medical services (GMS) contract Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) awards up to 70 points for measuring patient satisfaction with either the Improving Practices Questionnaire (IPQ) or the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ). The usefulness of data collected depends crucially on the validity and reliability of the measurement instrument. The literature was reviewed to assess the validity and reliability of these questionnaires. The literature was searched for peer-re...

  15. Long- term outcome of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis

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    Pusey Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary systemic vasculitis presenting in childhood is an uncommon but serious condition. As these patients transfer to adult clinics for continuing care, defining long term outcomes with emphasis on disease and treatment- related morbidity and mortality is important. The aim of this study is to describe the long- term clinical course of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis. Methods The adult patients in our vasculitis clinics who had presented in childhood, with a follow up time of greater than 10 years were included. We also reviewed the literature for articles describing the clinical outcome of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis. Results We describe the clinical course of 8 adults who presented in childhood with ANCA vasculitis. 7 patients had Wegener's granulomatosis and 1 had microscopic polyangiitis. The median age at presentation was 11.5 years, and follow up time ranged form 11 to 30 years. Induction therapy for all patients was steroids and/or cyclophosphamide. Maintenance therapy was with azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil. Biological agents were used in 3 patients for relapsed disease in adulthood only. Seven patients achieved complete remission. All patients experienced disease relapse, with a median of 4 episodes. Kidney function was generally well preserved, with median eGFR 76 ml/min. Only one patient developed end-stage renal failure and one patient died after 25 years of disease. Treatment-related morbidity rates were high; 7 suffered from infections, 4 were infertile, 2 had skeletal complications, and 1 developed malignancy. Conclusion Close long- term follow up of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis is imperative, as this patient cohort is likely to live long enough to develop significant treatment and disease- related morbidities. Prospective cohort studies with novel therapies including paediatric patients are crucial to help us determine the best approach to managing this complex group

  16. Umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients: outcome of elective repair.

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    Lasheen, Adel; Naser, Hatem M; Abohassan, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    Cirrhotic patients with umbilical hernia have an increased likelihood of complications following repair. The aim of this study was to assess the outcomes of elective umbilical hernia repair in cirrhotic patients. Fifty patients having uncomplicated umbilical hernia with a cirrhotic liver were studied prospectively. These patients divided into three groups' according to Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) classification. After management of coagulopathy, correction of hypoalbuminaemia and electrolytes imbalance, and control of ascites, all patients underwent elective hernia repair under regional anesthesia. A comparison was made between the three groups as regard the size of the defect in the linea Alba, operative time, postoperative morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, time of return to daily life and postoperative changes in liver function tests (LFTs) in relation to the regional anesthesia applied. hernioplasty was done under spinal anesthesia in 13 patients (26%), under epidural anesthesia in 10 patients (20%), under intercostal nerve block in 7 patients (14%), and under local anesthesia in 20 patients (40%). There was an increased safety (less changes in LFTs) in cases done under local anesthesia and intercostal nerve block. The overall complications rate was 30%. There was an increased complications rate towards the decompensated cases. The differences in the mean length of hospital stay and mean time of return to daily life are statistically significant between the three groups. Umbilical hernia recurrence rate was 2% and no mortality was reported in the study groups.

  17. Diabetes does not affect outcome in patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia

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    Peralta Galo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about the effect of diabetes on the prognosis of patients with bacterial infections. We performed a retrospective cohort study to investigate possible correlations between diabetes and prognosis in patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia. Methods We reviewed the medical charts of 1112 patients who were treated at a community teaching hospital for Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia from January 1997 through June 2007. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 1112 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, 181 (16.3% were diabetic patients; 90 patients (8.1% died while in the hospital. Compared to non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients were older (75.4 ± 11.9 years vs. 70 ± 16.6 years, p p = 0.39]. In a multivariate analysis, the variables associated with in-hospital mortality were age, the origin of the bacteremia, and the presence of immunosuppression. Diabetes was not associated with outcome. Conclusion In this cohort of patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, diabetes was not associated with a poorer prognosis.

  18. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

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    Andrew R Block

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM, an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities.

  19. Pancreatic Fistula Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Clinical Predictors and Patient Outcomes

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    Schmidt, C. Max; Choi, Jennifer; Powell, Emilie S.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Zyromski, Nicholas J.; Nakeeb, Attila; Pitt, Henry A.; Wiebke, Eric A.; Madura, James A.; Lillemoe, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic fistula continues to be a common complication following PD. This study seeks to identify clinical factors which may predict pancreatic fistula (PF) and evaluate the effect of PF on outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We performed a retrospective analysis of a clinical database at an academic tertiary care hospital with a high volume of pancreatic surgery. Five hundred ten consecutive patients underwent PD, and PF occurred in 46 patients (9%). Perioperative mortality of patients with PF was 0%. Forty-five of 46 PF (98%) closed without reoperation with a mean time to closure of 34 days. Patients who developed PF showed a higher incidence of wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, need for reoperation, and hospital length of stay. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an invaginated pancreatic anastomosis and closed suction intraperitoneal drainage were associated with PF whereas a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and endoscopic stenting conferred protection. Development of PF following PD in this series was predicted by gender, preoperative stenting, pancreatic anastomotic technique, and pancreas pathology. Outcomes in patients with PF are remarkable for a higher rate of septic complications, longer hospital stays, but in this study, no increased mortality. PMID:19461951

  20. Pancreatic Fistula Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Clinical Predictors and Patient Outcomes

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    C. Max Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic fistula continues to be a common complication following PD. This study seeks to identify clinical factors which may predict pancreatic fistula (PF and evaluate the effect of PF on outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD. We performed a retrospective analysis of a clinical database at an academic tertiary care hospital with a high volume of pancreatic surgery. Five hundred ten consecutive patients underwent PD, and PF occurred in 46 patients (9%. Perioperative mortality of patients with PF was 0%. Forty-five of 46 PF (98% closed without reoperation with a mean time to closure of 34 days. Patients who developed PF showed a higher incidence of wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, need for reoperation, and hospital length of stay. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an invaginated pancreatic anastomosis and closed suction intraperitoneal drainage were associated with PF whereas a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and endoscopic stenting conferred protection. Development of PF following PD in this series was predicted by gender, preoperative stenting, pancreatic anastomotic technique, and pancreas pathology. Outcomes in patients with PF are remarkable for a higher rate of septic complications, longer hospital stays, but in this study, no increased mortality.

  1. Epidemiology and outcome of patients with postoperative abdominal fistula

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    Janaina Wercka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to present the epidemiological profile, incidence and outcome of patients who developing postoperative abdominal fistula. Methods: This observational, cross-sectional, prospective study evaluated patients undergoing abdominal surgery. We studied the epidemiological profile, the incidence of postoperative fistulas and their characteristics, the outcome of this complication and the predictors of mortality. Results: The sample consisted of 1,148 patients. The incidence of fistula was 5.5%. There was predominance of biliary fistula (26%, followed by colonic fistulas (22% and stomach (15%. The average time to onset of fistula was 6.3 days. For closure, the average was 25.6 days. The mortality rate of patients with fistula was 25.4%. Predictors of mortality in patients who developed fistula were age over 60 years, presence of comorbidities, fistula closure time more than 19 days, no spontaneous closure of the fistula, malnutrition, sepsis and need for admission to the Intensive Care Unit Conclusion: abdominal postoperative fistulas are still relatively frequent and associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

  2. Transformational Teamwork: Exploring the Impact of Nursing Teamwork on Nurse-Sensitive Quality Indicators.

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    Rahn, Debbie J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between nursing teamwork and NDNQI outcomes including pressure ulcers, falls, and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Correlational analysis resulted in statistically significant relationships. Improving teamwork in medical-surgical acute care units can transform care and impact the occurrence of preventable adverse outcomes.

  3. Nurse practitioner care improves renal outcome in patients with CKD.

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    Peeters, Mieke J; van Zuilen, Arjan D; van den Brand, Jan A J G; Bots, Michiel L; van Buren, Marjolijn; Ten Dam, Marc A G J; Kaasjager, Karin A H; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W J; Sluiter, Henk E; van de Ven, Peter J G; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-02-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD.

  4. A retrospective study of patient outcomes and satisfaction following pinnaplasty

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    Hope N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Hope,1 Caroline P Smith,1 Jim R Cullen,2 Neil McCluney2 1Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency, Belfast, 2Head and Neck Unit, Altnagelvin Area Hospital, Derry, Northern Ireland, UK Introduction: Up to 5% of all children have prominent ears. Psychological distress and bullying adversely affect these children and can cause significant social exclusion. In times of austerity, cosmetic procedures such as surgical correction of prominent ears are felt to be an unnecessary cost to the health service. Materials and methods: A retrospective case note review of all patients undergoing pinnaplasty was undertaken. Postoperative outcomes were compared against the Royal College of Surgeons of England standards. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory, a validated post-intervention questionnaire, was then posted out to all patients. Results: A total of 72 patients were identified. Average age at procedure was 13 years. Eleven patients were above the age of 19 years. Twenty-eight patients were male and forty-four female. Sixty-two cases underwent bilateral pinnaplasty. No patients developed hematoma, and there were no readmissions within 30 days of surgery. Twenty-nine patients responded to the questionnaire (40%, of whom 27 reported a positive impact on their psychosocial well-being with a mean score of 36. Conclusion: Pinnaplasty offers patients an opportunity to alleviate the psychological distress of bullying and harassment secondary to the appearance of prominent ears. Keywords: bullying, Glasgow Benefit Inventory, hematomas, prominent ears, psychological distress

  5. Patients' views on outcome following head injury: a qualitative study

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    Mayle Wendy

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head injuries are a common occurrence, with continuing care in the years following injury being provided by primary care teams and a variety of speciality services. The literature on outcome currently reflects areas considered important by health-care professionals, though these may differ in some respects from the views of head injured individuals themselves. Our study aimed to identify aspects of outcome considered important by survivors of traumatic head injury. Methods Thirty-two individuals were interviewed, each of whom had suffered head injury between one and ten years previously from which they still had residual difficulties. Purposive sampling was used in order to ensure that views were represented from individuals of differing age, gender and level of disability. These interviews were fully transcribed and analysed qualitatively by a psychologist, a sociologist and a psychiatrist with regular meetings to discuss the coding. Results Aspects of outcome mentioned by head injury survivors which have received less attention previously included: specific difficulties with group conversations; changes in physical appearance due to scarring or weight change; a sense of loss for the life and sense of self that they had before the injury; and negative reactions of others, often due to lack of understanding of the consequences of injury amongst both family and general public. Conclusion Some aspects of outcome viewed as important by survivors of head injury may be overlooked by health professionals. Consideration of these areas of outcome and the development of suitable interventions should help to improve functional outcome for patients.

  6. Non-operative outcomes in Chiari I malformation patients.

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    Killeen, Amy; Roguski, Marie; Chavez, Alexis; Heilman, Carl; Hwang, Steven

    2015-01-01

    While postoperative outcomes of Chiari I malformation patients have been well-reported, there is a paucity of literature concerning non-operative management in these patients. We retrospectively identified patients with Chiari I malformation who were not recommended for surgery based on lack of clinical objective findings or inconsistent cough headaches and conducted patient follow-up with a prospective telephone survey. Of the 68 patients (mean age at diagnosis 30.1 ± 17.4 years), 72% were female and 31% were pediatric patients (age at diagnosis ⩽ 18 years). Average follow up was 4.9 ± 2.9 years. Typical presenting symptoms included cough headache, non-specific headache, nausea, ataxia, dysphagia and paresthesias. Overall, 40% of patients who had cough headaches and 61.5% of patients with non-specific headaches reported improvement. The presence of subjective sensory symptoms was significantly associated with less likelihood of cough headache improvement while the presence of a cough headache was also associated with a lower likelihood of improvement in all non-cough symptoms. The pediatric subgroup had a greater rate of improvement with all cases of nausea/emesis and paresthesias improved or resolved at follow-up. Overall 67% of pediatric patients had improved cough headache and 71% had improvement of migraines/diffuse headaches. We found that many symptoms of Chiari I patients from our conservatively managed cohort either improved or remained unchanged over time. However, the presence of cough headaches was a significant negative predictor of concomitant symptom improvement. This further validates the view that patients with cough headaches should be considered for surgical intervention and provides useful information to counsel patients.

  7. Can pegylated interferon improve the outcome of polycythemia vera patients?

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    Crisà, Elena; Cerrano, Marco; Beggiato, Eloise; Benevolo, Giulia; Lanzarone, Giuseppe; Manzini, Paola Maria; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Riera, Ludovica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2017-01-13

    Pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) was proven by phase II trials to be effective in polycythemia vera (PV); however, it is not clear whether it could improve patient outcome compared to hydroxyurea (HU). Here, we present an observational study on 65 PV patients aged 65 years or younger, who received either peg-IFN (30) or HU (35) according to the physician choice. Median follow-up was 75 months. The two cohorts were comparable for patient and disease characteristics. Eighty-seven percent of the patients treated with peg-INF responded, with a CR rate of 70% as compared to 100 and 49% with HU, respectively. Discontinuation rate was similar in the two groups (20% in peg-IFN vs 17% in HU). JAK2 allele burden was monitored in peg-INF arm only, and a reduction was observed in 88% of the patients. No thrombotic events were observed during peg-IFN treatment compared to three on HU. Disease progression to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia occurred to a patient only in peg-INF, compared to three in HU. Overall, three second malignancies were observed during the study, two in patients who received HU only, and one in a patient largely treated HU who received also peg-IFN for 3 months. Overall survival was significantly better for peg-IFN patients compared to HU, p = 0.027. Our study, albeit limited by small patient and event number and lack of randomization, confirms the efficacy of peg-INF in PV and shows a significant survival advantage for peg-INF-treated patients. Waiting for confirming data from the ongoing phase III trials, our study can support peg-INF as a first-line treatment option for PV, at least for younger patients.

  8. Can pegylated interferon improve the outcome of polycythemia vera patients?

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    Elena Crisà

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pegylated interferon (peg-IFN was proven by phase II trials to be effective in polycythemia vera (PV; however, it is not clear whether it could improve patient outcome compared to hydroxyurea (HU. Here, we present an observational study on 65 PV patients aged 65 years or younger, who received either peg-IFN (30 or HU (35 according to the physician choice. Median follow-up was 75 months. The two cohorts were comparable for patient and disease characteristics. Eighty-seven percent of the patients treated with peg-INF responded, with a CR rate of 70% as compared to 100 and 49% with HU, respectively. Discontinuation rate was similar in the two groups (20% in peg-IFN vs 17% in HU. JAK2 allele burden was monitored in peg-INF arm only, and a reduction was observed in 88% of the patients. No thrombotic events were observed during peg-IFN treatment compared to three on HU. Disease progression to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia occurred to a patient only in peg-INF, compared to three in HU. Overall, three second malignancies were observed during the study, two in patients who received HU only, and one in a patient largely treated HU who received also peg-IFN for 3 months. Overall survival was significantly better for peg-IFN patients compared to HU, p = 0.027. Our study, albeit limited by small patient and event number and lack of randomization, confirms the efficacy of peg-INF in PV and shows a significant survival advantage for peg-INF-treated patients. Waiting for confirming data from the ongoing phase III trials, our study can support peg-INF as a first-line treatment option for PV, at least for younger patients.

  9. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

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    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  10. Factors associated with outcomes in ruptured aneurysmal patients: Clinical Study of 80 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfotih Gobran Taha Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to insufficient data in the literature, the optimal timing for surgical intervention for ruptured intracranial aneurysms is still controversial. Some practitioners advocate early surgery, but others not. It is important to identify other factors that can be used to predict poor prognosis in ruptured intracranial aneurysm patients. Objective: To determine the influence of timing of clipping surgery, and other factors on the outcomes of ruptured intracranial aneurysms in Hunt & Hess I~III grade patients. Method: We have performed a retrospective study involving 80 patients who were surgically treated for ruptured intracranial aneurysm between 2007 and 2012. The patient population consisted of 50(62.5% females and 30(37.5% males, with an age range of 12 to 75 years old, mean age 52.33 ± 10.63 years. We measured association between the Glasgow Outcome Scores and Sex, timing of clipping surgery, aneurysm location and pre-operative patient's neurological condition using famous Hunt and Hess grade system. Results: We did not find any correlation between the outcomes of ruptured intracranial aneurysm patients and timing (early, intermediate, late stage of clipping, sex, aneurysm location. Whereas there is a significant correlation between patients outcomes and pre-operative patient neurological condition (Hunt & Hess grade. Conclusion: Timing of Surgery (early, intermediate, late does not affect outcomes in low Hunt and Hess grade patients I~III. Whereas neurological condition (Hunt & Hess has strong impact on postoperative outcomes. Others factors like sex, Age, Aneurysm location have no effect on outcomes in ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

  11. Nursing outcomes content validation according to Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) for clinical, surgical and critical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seganfredo, Deborah Hein; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the Nursing Outcomes (NO) from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) for the two Nursing Diagnoses (ND) most frequent in hospitalized surgical, clinical and critical patients. The content validation of the REs was performed adapting the Fehring Model. The sample consisted of 12 expert nurses. The instrument for data collection consisted of the NOs proposed by NOC for the two NDs in the study, its definition and a five-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The NOs that obtained averages of 0.80 or higher were validated. The ND Risk for Infection was the most frequent, being validated eight (38.1%) of 21 NOs proposed by the NOC. The ND Self-Care Deficit: Bathing/Hygiene was the second most frequent and five (14.28%) out of 35 NOs were validated.

  12. Trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders: frequency and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, J A; Keersmaekers, K

    1996-02-01

    Controversy exists on the aetiological importance and the effect of jaw macrotrauma (fractures excluded) on the occurrence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of jaw injury in TMD patients and to compare the severity of the symptoms, the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome in TMD patients with or without a history of trauma to the head and neck region directly linked to the onset of symptoms. The study sample included 400 consecutive TMD clinical patients. In 24.5% of patients the onset of the pain and dysfunction could be linked directly to the trauma, mainly whiplash accidents. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in daily recurrent headache, dizziness, neck pain, joint crepitation and pain in the joints. Maximal mouth opening was less than 20 mm in 14.3% of patients with a history of trauma and in 4.1% of those without such a history. According to the Helkimo dysfunction index (DI), more trauma than non-trauma TMD patients belonged to the severe dysfunction groups (DI 4 and 5) at first examination. The outcome of a conservative treatment procedure (counselling, occlusal splint, physiotherapy, occasionally occlusal therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs was not different between the two groups at the 1 year evaluation. The degree of maximal opening was similar: less than 20 mm in 3.7% and 2.2% in trauma and non-trauma patients respectively. Forty percent and 41% respectively were symptom free or had DI = 1. The results suggest that external trauma to the joint or to the jaw in general is an important initiating factor in the aetiology of TMD but also that the prognosis is favourable.

  13. Reproductive outcomes of patients being hospitalised with pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayachinda, Chenchit; Rekhawasin, Thanapa

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and the predictors of the adverse reproductive outcomes in patients who had been hospitalised with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The retrospective cohort study was conducted by contacting all the patients admitted with PID or tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) during January 2004 and December 2011. Those who were sexually active and aged 14-40 years were included. The exclusion criteria were no intention to conceive or undergoing hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, bilateral complete or partial salpingectomy. At a follow-up duration of 69 [IQR 51-93] months, of 94 eligible participants, 24 (25.5%) met the criteria of infertility, 15 (16.0%) had recurrent PID and 13 (13.8%) reported chronic pelvic pain. Less than half had subsequent pregnancies including 30 live births, seven miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy. There was no association between the adverse reproductive outcomes and length of hospital stay >6 days, surgical treatment and recurrent PID. After adjusting for age, parity, abortion, hospital stay, surgical treatment, TOA was the only negative predictive factor for live birth (aOR 0.23, 95%CI 0.07-0.79, p = .019). The high prevalence of adverse outcomes following PID or TOA should alert clinicians for proper long-term care.

  14. Outcome in patients with blunt chest trauma and pulmonary contusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh T

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Severe pulmonary contusions occur in blunt chest trauma, especially with high velocity injuries. Pulmonary contusions following trauma may result in significant hypoxemia and decreased compliance which may progress over several days. Extensive contusions may result in respiratory difficulty or progress to adult respiratory distress syndrome, which increases mortality. We decided to review the cases of polytrauma with associated pulmonary contusions to determine the factors which influence outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all cases of trauma with pulmonary contusions on X-ray or CT scan. The cases were examined for age, type of injuries, admission APACHE II, SAPS II and SOFA scores, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, presence or absence of rib fractures, average positive fluid balance, average sedation dose, pulmonary haemorrhage, ventilator days, ICU days and hospital outcome. RESULTS: There were 18 cases of pulmonary contusions. All had associated injuries. 6 patients died, 4 in the ICU and 2 patients died 1 week after transfer to a high dependency unit, one due to sepsis and the other due to massive haemothorax. There was a significant difference in PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission and throughout the ICU course, fluid balance and sedation dose, but not in ventilator days and ICU days between survivors and nonsurvivors. The incidence, frequency and amount of pulmonary haemorrhage were higher in the nonsurvivors. CONCLUSIONS: Close attention to improving gas exchange, and early management of hemoptysis might improve outcome in pulmonary contusions

  15. High intensity exercise or conventional exercise for patients with rheumatoid arthritis?: outcome expectations of patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Ronday, H.K.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcome expectations of RA patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists regarding high intensity exercise programmes compared with conventional exercise programmes. METHODS: An exercise outcome expectations questionnaire was administered to 807 RA patients, 153 rheumatol

  16. High intensity exercise or conventional exercise for patients with rheumatoid arthritis?: outcome expectations of patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Ronday, H.K.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcome expectations of RA patients, rheumatologists, and physiotherapists regarding high intensity exercise programmes compared with conventional exercise programmes. METHODS: An exercise outcome expectations questionnaire was administered to 807 RA patients, 153

  17. Outcome of tonsillectomy in selected patients with PFAPA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, Lorenzo; Torretta, Sara; Pietrogrande, Maria Cristina; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Pavesi, Paola; Bossi, Anna; Drago, Lorenzo; Capaccio, Pasquale

    2009-06-01

    To assess the practicability of integrated medical and surgical management and the effectiveness of tonsillectomy in children with PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical lymphadenopathy). A prospective study. Secondary pediatric and otolaryngological university center. Of 30 patients evaluated for periodic fever, 18 children with PFAPA syndrome were included in the study. Patients underwent long-term pediatric and otolaryngological assessments, and their parents were asked to keep monthly diaries with reports of any subsequent episodes, symptom, and related sign. Patients received traditional medical therapies, and 9 patients underwent tonsillectomy for the lack of lasting recovery. The association between postoperative outcomes and age at tonsillectomy and the differences in the patients' condition before and after tonsillectomy were statistically tested. In addition, the removed tonsillar tissue was analyzed molecularly to evaluate concomitant infections. All of the surgical patients reported a symptomatic improvement, with complete clinical recovery in 5 cases (56%) and significant reduction in number (P = .005) and duration (P = .03) of recurrences in the remaining 4 (44%). Results of molecular analysis of tonsillar specimens were negative for bacteria in all but 1 patient. Otolaryngologists should be trained to recognize PFAPA syndrome, for which management consists of a regular and prolonged second-level pediatric and otolaryngological follow-up, with surgery only after the failure of traditional medical therapy.

  18. Intralesional Bleomycin for Warts: Patient Satisfaction and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruter, Laura; Saggar, Vishal; Akhavan, Alaleh; Patel, Parth; Umanoff, Nicole; Viola, Kate V; Stebbins, William; Smith, Elizabeth; Akhavan, Arash; Cohen, Justine V; Cohen, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of warts is challenging with regards to both tolerability and efficacy. Ascertain the efficacy, tolerability, and patient satisfaction of intralesional bleomycin in the treatment of warts. Retrospective chart review followed by telephone interviews with patients from university-based dermatology referral centers. Seventy-four percent (34/46) of patients had complete resolution (CR) of all warts. Of 34 patients who experienced CR, an average of 1.7 treatments were required. Pain experienced during the procedure and recovery, irrespective of outcome, was rated 5.8 out of 10 (range, 1-10; SD, 2.72; SEM, 0.40). Approximately 70% of patients had pain that lasted less than 2 days after treatment. Seventy-eight percent (36/46) of patients in the study were satisfied with treatment and would recommend it to others. Patients felt bleomycin to be an effective treatment modality for warts, offering high rates of CR in lesions resistant to more traditional therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  20. Patient Outcomes of an International Telepediatric Cardiac Critical Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Andrea Victoria; Welchering, Nils; Bermon, Anderson; Castillo, Victor; Duran, Álvaro; Castro, Javier; Muñoz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An optimal model for telemedicine use in the international care setting has not been established. Our objective was to describe variables associated with patient outcome during the implementation of an international pediatric cardiac critical care (PCCC) telemedicine program. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of clinical records and a telemedicine database of patients admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Fundacion Cardiovascular de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia, during the initial 10 months of our program, compared with patients admitted during a previous period. Information collected included demographic data, cardiac diagnosis and associated factors, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 classification, and perioperative events. Primary outcome was composed of CICU and hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were CICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: Of the 553 patients who were included, teleconsultation was done for 71 (12.4%), with a total of 156 encounters, including 19 for patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Three hundred twenty-one recommendations were given, and 42 real-time interventions were documented. RACHS-1 distribution was similar between study periods (p=0.427). Teleconsulted patients were significantly younger (44 versus 24 months; p=0.03) and had higher surgical complexity than nonteleconsulted patients (p=0.01). RACHS-1 adjusted hospital survival was similar between study periods. CICU and hospital LOS intervals were significantly shorter in the telemedicine period (10 versus 17 days [p=0.02] and 22 versus 28 days [p<0.001]). In surgical cases, preoperative CICU LOS was significantly shorter (3 versus 6 days; p<0.001). Variables associated with hospital mortality were higher RACHS-1 categories, lower weight, bypass time longer than 150 min, and use of circulatory arrest, as well as the presence of sepsis or necrotizing enterocolitis

  1. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  2. Qualitative Methods in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermause, Roxanne; Barg, Frances K; Esmail, Laura; Edmundson, Lauren; Girard, Samantha; Perfetti, A Ross

    2017-02-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created to fund research guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, offers a new research venue. Many (41 of 50) first funded projects involved qualitative research methods. This study was completed to examine the current state of the science of qualitative methodologies used in PCORI-funded research. Principal investigators participated in phenomenological interviews to learn (a) how do researchers using qualitative methods experience seeking funding for, implementing and disseminating their work; and (b) how may qualitative methods advance the quality and relevance of evidence for patients? Results showed the experience of doing qualitative research in the current research climate as "Being a bona fide qualitative researcher: Staying true to research aims while negotiating challenges," with overlapping patterns: (a) researching the elemental, (b) expecting surprise, and (c) pushing boundaries. The nature of qualitative work today was explicitly described and is rendered in this article.

  3. Transplantation outcome in patients on PD and HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancarini, Giovanni C; Sandrini, Silvio; Setti, Gisella; Bossini, Nicola; Cassamali, Silvia; Pertica, Nicoletta; Maiorca, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    In the past, peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been considered a second choice dialysis modality for many aspects and that negative attitude has been extended also to possible negative effects on renal transplantation. In the last years, many papers have faced the question whether PD could attain similar results in renal transplantation as hemodialysis and there is sufficient evidence to answer that question. On the short time after transplantation, patients coming PD have lower prevalence of delayed graft function than hemodialysis patients, but higher prevalence of renal vascular thrombosis, above all in children. Incidence of acute graft rejection is not different between the two dialysis modalities. The long-term outcome of renal transplantation is similar in patients coming from either PD or hemodialysis.

  4. Analysis on care outcome of patients with polytrauma and coma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-ji; KONG Ling-wen; DU Ding-yuan; SU Hong-jie

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To make further improvement of outcome of patients with polytrauma and coma. Methods:The data of 3 361 patients (2 378 males and 983 females,aged from 5-95 years,38.2 years on average) with severe polytrauma and coma admitted to Chongqing Emergency Medical Center (Level I Trauma Center), Chongqing,China, from November 1978 to December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively in this study.Results:The overall survival rate and mortality were 93.2 % (3 133/3 361 ) and 6.8 % ( 228/3 361 ),respectively.The mortalities in patients with coma duration < 1 hour and combined with neural dysfunction and in patients with coma duration ≥ 1 hour and combined with or without neural dysfunction were significantly higher than that of those with coma duration < 1 hour but without neural dysfunction[39.5 % (136/344) vs 3.0 % ( 92/3 017 ),P < 0.01 ].There existed significant differences in GCS,ISS,and revised trauma score (RTS) between the death group and the survival group (P <0.01). RTS was in good correspondence with patient's pathophysiological status and outcome in patients with multiple trauma and coma for different groups of systolic blood pressure (SBP).The mortality in patients with SBP < 90 mm Hg was significantly higher than that of those with SBP ≥ 90 mm Hg [33.3 %(68/204) vs 5.1%(160/3 157),P <0.01].The mortality in polytrauma patients combined with serious head injury (AIS≥3) was 8.2%,among which,76.5% died from lung complications.The morbidity rate of lung complications and mortality rate increased in patients with head injury complicated with chest or abdomen injury (23.9 %,61.1%vs 27.3%,50.0%).The mortality reached up to 61.9% in patients complicated with severe head,chest and abdomen injuries simultaneously. Conclusions:It plays a key role to establish a fast and effective trauma care system and prompt and definite surgical procedures and to strengthen the management of complications for improving the survival rate of patients with severe

  5. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  6. Maternal outcomes in critically ill obstetrics patients: A unique challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Bhadade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pregnant woman is usually young and in good health until she suffers from some acute injury. Her prognosis will hopefully be better if she receives timely intensive care. Materials and Methods: The aims of this study were to study the indications of medical intensive care unit (MICU transfers for critically ill pregnant and postpartum females, biochemical and hematological profile, organ failure, ICU interventions, outcome of mother/fetus, APACHE II score and its correlation with mortality. Study Design and Setting: It is a prospective observational study, carried out in the MICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. One hundred and twenty-two pregnant and postpartum females (up to 42 days after delivery were studied. Results and Conclusion: Maternal age >30 years was associated with high mortality (68.2%. Majority of the females were admitted in the third trimester (50 patients and postpartum period (41 patients, and mortality was highest in the postpartum period (39%. Increasing parity and gravida was associated with significantly high mortality (59.5%. Acute viral hepatitis E (45 patients was most common indication for MICU transfer, followed by malaria and pregnancy-induced hypertension. The mortality rate was 30.3%. The most common cause of death was acute viral hepatitis E (24 patients, with hepatic failure (53 patients being the most common organ failure. Majority of the females (88 patients were ANC registered. Low Glasgow coma score and high APACHE II score on admission were associated with significantly high mortality (85.2%. Prompt treatment with oseltamivir in H1N1 infection was associated with good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  7. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  8. Clinical features and outcome in a Danish cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, P R; Zak, M; Herlin, Troels

    2010-01-01

    To assess disease characteristics and outcome in Danish juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) patients (1977-2007).......To assess disease characteristics and outcome in Danish juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) patients (1977-2007)....

  9. THE OUTCOME OF PREGNANCY IN PATIENTS WITH THREATENED ABORTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathap

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the Outcome of pregnancy in patients with threatened abortion. METHODS: A Prospective observational study was done on 106 pregnant women with threatened abortion. Out comes in the form of antenatal complications, mode of delivery and postnatal co mplications were noted. Analysis of the data was done using SPSS version 13. RESULTS: In the study of 106 patients 18% had spontaneous abortion. Pre - labour rupture of membranes were seen in 20% of patients and 21% had preterm labour. Threatened abortion di d not affect mode of delivery. PPROM, preterm births were more in women presenting with first trimester bleeding; PIH, PROM, and postpartum complications were more in women presenting beyond 20 weeks gestation though statistically not significant. 13.2% of women had heavy bleeding at admission out of which 50% aborted subsequently – significantly higher than the light bleeding group. CONCLUSION: The overall maternal and perinatal outcome in women with threatened abortion is suboptimal. Women with heavy blee ding are more likely to abort than women with light bleeding. Among the prognostic factors, only the amount of bleeding had significant prognostic accuracy

  10. Fracture liaison services: improving outcomes for patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Samuel; Khan, Tanvir; Ong, Terence; Sahota, Opinder

    2017-01-01

    Fragility fractures are sentinels of osteoporosis, and as such all patients with low-trauma fractures should be considered for further investigation for osteoporosis and, if confirmed, started on osteoporosis medication. Fracture liaison services (FLSs) with varying models of care are in place to take responsibility for this investigative and treatment process. This review aims to describe outcomes for patients with osteoporotic fragility fractures as part of FLSs. The most intensive service that includes identification, assessment and treatment of patients appears to deliver the best outcomes. This FLS model is associated with reduction in re-fracture risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.18-0.67 over 2-4 years), reduced mortality (HR 0.65 over 2 years), increased assessment of bone mineral density (relative risk [RR] 2-3), increased treatment initiation (RR 1.5-4.25) and adherence to treatment (65%-88% at 1 year) and is cost-effective. In response to this evidence, key organizations and stakeholders have published guidance and framework to ensure that best practice in FLSs is delivered.

  11. Fracture liaison services: improving outcomes for patients with osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Samuel; Khan, Tanvir; Ong, Terence; Sahota, Opinder

    2017-01-01

    Fragility fractures are sentinels of osteoporosis, and as such all patients with low-trauma fractures should be considered for further investigation for osteoporosis and, if confirmed, started on osteoporosis medication. Fracture liaison services (FLSs) with varying models of care are in place to take responsibility for this investigative and treatment process. This review aims to describe outcomes for patients with osteoporotic fragility fractures as part of FLSs. The most intensive service that includes identification, assessment and treatment of patients appears to deliver the best outcomes. This FLS model is associated with reduction in re-fracture risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.18–0.67 over 2–4 years), reduced mortality (HR 0.65 over 2 years), increased assessment of bone mineral density (relative risk [RR] 2–3), increased treatment initiation (RR 1.5–4.25) and adherence to treatment (65%–88% at 1 year) and is cost-effective. In response to this evidence, key organizations and stakeholders have published guidance and framework to ensure that best practice in FLSs is delivered. PMID:28138228

  12. Seizure frequency and patient-centered outcome assessment in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunmi; Hamberger, Marla J; Munger Clary, Heidi; Loeb, Rebecca; Onchiri, Frankline M; Baker, Gus; Hauser, W Allen; Wong, John B

    2014-08-01

    Seizure frequency represents a commonly assessed epilepsy status, but in the context of the growing trend toward patient-centered care, we examined the adequacy of seizure frequency as a measure of epilepsy status as perceived by the patient. Between 2006 and 2008, we assessed seizure frequency, mood, and preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measured with the visual analog scale metric in 182 adult patients sampled consecutively. Using nonparametric tests and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we analyzed the relationship between preference-based HRQOL and seizure frequency, and using regression analyses, we tested for significant predictors of preference-based HRQOL. Only patients who had been seizure-free for >1 year had significantly higher preference-based HRQOL (p seizure, regardless of their seizure frequency. Among patients with recurrent seizures, preference-based HRQOL and seizure frequency were not monotonically, linearly related. For patients with similar seizure frequency, preference-based HRQOL varied substantially with large overlaps in preference-based HRQOL across different seizure frequency categories. The Monte Carlo simulation found that seizure frequency was a poor predictor of preference-based HRQOL about one third of the time. The presence of depressive symptoms was an independent predictor of preference-based HRQOL measure, accounting for 33.5% of the variation in scores between patients. Our findings highlight the importance of attaining complete seizure freedom and the substantial variation in preference-based HRQOL among patients with similar seizure frequencies. To improve assessment of patient-centered outcomes in epilepsy, we encourage adding direct measurement of preference-based HRQOL into clinical care. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Do pulmonary artery catheters alter outcome in trauma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, O C; Civetta, J M

    1997-08-01

    To review the literature addressing the use of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in victims of blunt and penetrating trauma and examine the available evidence that supports or refutes the claim that PAC use alters outcome in this patient population. Furthermore, to determine what additional research should be done in this area. All pertinent English language articles dealing with pulmonary artery catheterization in trauma patients were retrieved from 1979 through 1996. Clinical studies were considered if PACs were used to establish a cardiopulmonary diagnosis, optimize or achieve endpoints of oxygen transport and utilization indices, or guide and/or determine response to therapy. Emphasis was placed on prospective, randomized, controlled trials. However, descriptive case series and retrospectively-analyzed, uncontrolled reviews comprise the majority of available literature. From these selective studies, information was obtained regarding patient demographics, therapeutic endpoints, and achieved outcome. Insufficient evidence exists to support a true survival benefit. However, recommendations for indications can be proposed where a reduction in morbidity or improvement in functional outcome is suggested. Hemodynamic data obtained from the PAC appear to be beneficial for the following indications: a) to ascertain the status of underlying cardiovascular performance and/or the need for improvement; b) to direct therapy when noninvasive monitoring may be inadequate, misleading, or the endpoints of resuscitation difficult to define; c) to assess response to resuscitation; d) to potentially decrease secondary injury when severe closed-head or acute spinal cord injuries are components of multisystem trauma; e) to augment clinical decision-making when major trauma is complicated by severe adult respiratory distress syndrome, progressive oliguria/anuria, myocardial ischemia, congestive heart failure, or major thermal injury; and f) to establish futility of care.

  14. Predictors of patient relevant outcome after total hip replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A-K; Petersson, I F; Roos, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate prospectively long term patient relevant outcomes after unilateral total hip replacement (THR) for osteoarthritis (OA). To identify non-responders to this intervention and patient related predictors of unsatisfactory outcome.......To investigate prospectively long term patient relevant outcomes after unilateral total hip replacement (THR) for osteoarthritis (OA). To identify non-responders to this intervention and patient related predictors of unsatisfactory outcome....

  15. Psychometric properties of patient-reported outcome measures for hip arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Joanne L; Collins, Natalie J; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown.......Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown....

  16. Using patient management as a surrogate for patient health outcomes in diagnostic test evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Lukas P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Before a new test is introduced in clinical practice, evidence is needed to demonstrate that its use will lead to improvements in patient health outcomes. Studies reporting test accuracy may not be sufficient, and clinical trials of tests that measure patient health outcomes are rarely feasible. Therefore, the consequences of testing on patient management are often investigated as an intermediate step in the pathway. There is a lack of guidance on the interpretation of this evidence, and patient management studies often neglect a discussion of the limitations of measuring patient management as a surrogate for health outcomes. Methods We discuss the rationale for measuring patient management, describe the common study designs and provide guidance about how this evidence should be reported. Results Interpretation of patient management studies relies on the condition that patient management is a valid surrogate for downstream patient benefits. This condition presupposes two critical assumptions: the test improves diagnostic accuracy; and the measured changes in patient management improve patient health outcomes. The validity of this evidence depends on the certainty around these critical assumptions and the ability of the study design to minimise bias. Three common designs are test RCTs that measure patient management as a primary endpoint, diagnostic before-after studies that compare planned patient management before and after testing, and accuracy studies that are extended to report on the actual treatment or further tests received following a positive and negative test result. Conclusions Patient management can be measured as a surrogate outcome for test evaluation if its limitations are recognised. The potential consequences of a positive and negative test result on patient management should be pre-specified and the potential patient benefits of these management changes clearly stated. Randomised comparisons will provide

  17. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy: outcomes in obese and morbidly obese patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallo, Taryn; Kashani, Shabnam; Patel, Divya A; Elsahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    To describe patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes among women undergoing roboticassisted laparoscopic hysterectomy and to evaluate the characteristics of nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese patients...

  18. Medication Review and Patient Outcomes in an Orthopedic Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Marianne; Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the health-related effect of systematic medication review performed by a clinical pharmacist and a clinical pharmacologist on nonelective elderly orthopedic patients. METHODS: This is a nonblinded randomized controlled study of 108 patients 65 years or older treated...... with at least 4 drugs. For the intervention, the clinical pharmacist reviewed the participants' medication after completion of the usual medication routine. Information was collected from medical charts, interviews with participants, and database registrations of drug purchase. Results were conferred...... with the clinical pharmacologist, and recommendations were delivered directly to the ward physicians. The control was usual medication routine, that is, physicians prescribing admitting orders. The primary outcome was time to the first unplanned contact to a physician after discharge (i.e., general practitioner...

  19. Short-term outcome of patients with preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koual M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Meriem Koual, Hind Abbou, Marie Carbonnel, Olivier Picone, Jean-Marc Ayoubi Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Hôpital Foch, Suresnes, France Introduction: Preeclampsia constitutes a cause of increased mortality in mothers and fetuses. Screening for promoting factors is essential for adequate prevention in the event of any subsequent pregnancy, and for the adequate follow-up of concerned patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short-term outcome of patients with preeclampsia and to identify possible new factors predisposing them to the disease. Methods: One hundred fifty-five patients having experienced preeclampsia between 2005 and 2010 from the Gynecology and Obstetrics Department of the Foch Hospital (Suresnes, France were included in the study. All patients had undergone close clinical and standard biological follow-up immediately postpartum and then 3 months later with a reference practitioner. In severe cases, further investigation was carried out by full etiological examination with an assessment of both autoimmune and thrombophilic status. Results: Obesity and gestational diabetes were observed to be major risk factors for preeclampsia, which were found in 46% and 15% of the cases, respectively. The etiological assessment showed abnormalities in 11% of the patients. Impaired thrombophilia was found in 3% of the patients, impaired autoimmune status in 4%, a combination of both abnormalities in only 1% of the patients, and detection of renal abnormalities in 3% of the patients were observed. In the immediate postpartum period, 66% of patients had maintained elevated blood pressure levels, and 66% had proteinuria > 0.3 g/24 hours. At the 3-month postpartum assessment, persisting arterial hypertension was found in 16% of the patients, requiring continuation of antihypertensive therapy, and 22% of the patients had proteinuria over the accepted threshold (0.15 g/24 hours. Conclusion: Patients with preeclampsia have

  20. Medication adherence: the critical step towards better patient outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Desai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is defined as patient's adherence to take their medications as prescribed and continue to take the prescribed medication for stipulated time frame. Medication non-adherence is a growing concern to physicians, healthcare systems, and other stakeholders (e.g., payers and there is an increasing evidence of its prevalence and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes eventually resulting into higher costs of care. The cost of non-adherence has been estimated at $100 billion to $300 billion annually, including costs from avoidable hospitalizations, nursing home admissions, and premature deaths. Improving adherence to medication is critical to improve the quality of health care, to encourage better chronic care management, and promote better health outcomes. Reasons for non-adherence are multiple and complex. Studies have reported that poor adherence to drug dosage is due to patient perception that the disease is non-significant, adverse drug effects, lack of treatment effectiveness, and the patient's poor or incomplete knowledge of the disease and (cost. A multifactorial approach is required to tackle this complex problem as a single approach will be ineffective for all patients. The most effective intervention is to use a combination of approaches and address literacy, behavior, and organizational issues. There are challenges as well as opportunities in addressing the public health issue of medication adherence. Changing healthcare reforms, advances in digital health media, social media and modern technologies can now provide alternatives to tackle this issue. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 748-754

  1. Pulmonary outcome prediction (POP) tools for cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Pasta, David J; Elkin, Eric; Jacobs, Joan R; Morgan, Wayne J; Konstan, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    Loss of lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with increased mortality and varies between individuals and over time. Predicting this decline could improve patient management. To develop simple pulmonary outcome prediction (POP) tools to estimate lung function at age 6 in patients aged 2-5 years (POP(2-5)) and lung function change over a 4-year period in patients aged 6-17 years (POP(6-17)). Analyses were conducted using patients from the Epidemiologic Study of CF (ESCF). To be included in any analysis, patients had to have 1 year of clinical history recorded in ESCF prior to a clinically stable routine Index Clinic Visit (ICV). In addition to this criterion, for the POP(2-5) tool patients had to be between 2 and 5 years old at ICV and have a second clinically stable visit with spirometric measures at age 6. For the POP(6-17) tool, patients had to be between the ages of 6 and 17 years old at an ICV that included spirometric measures and had to have a second clinically stable visit with spirometric measures from 3 to 5 years after ICV. All patients enrolled in ESCF who met these inclusion criteria were studied. POP(2-5) and POP(6-17) populations were further divided into development groups (with ICV before January 1, 1998) and validation groups (with ICV after that date). Development groups were used to model forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) percent predicted at age 6 years (for POP(2-5)) and annualized FEV(1) % predicted change from ICV to the second visit (for POP(6-17)) by multivariable linear regression using age, sex, weight-for-age percentile, cough, sputum production, clubbing, crackles, wheeze, sinusitis, number of exacerbations requiring intravenous antibiotics in the past year, elevated liver enzymes, pancreatic enzyme use, and respiratory tract culture status, plus height-for-age percentile (POP(2-5)) and index FEV(1) (POP(6-17)). Integer-based POP(2-5) and POP(6-17) tools created from selected variables were

  2. Outcomes of moderate sedation in paediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, B; Malamed, S F; Cetiner, S; Özalp, N; Özer, L; Altun, C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of moderate sedation with nitrous oxide/oxygen (N(2) O/O(2)) alone or combined with different dosages and administration routes of midazolam in uncooperative paediatric dental patients using the Bispectral Index System (BIS). This one-year clinical study examined first-visit moderate sedation performed in 240 healthy children aged 4-6 years. Subjects were randomly divided into four groups according to drug, route and dosage, as follows: Group 1 - 0.20 mg/kg midazolam (40 mg/ml) delivered intranasally; Group 2 - 0.75 mg/kg midazolam (15 mg/3 ml) delivered orally; Group 3 - 0.50 mg/kg midazolam (15 mg/3 ml) delivered orally. All children in these three groups also received inhalation sedation with 50%-50% N(2) O/O(2), whereas children in Group 4 received inhalation sedation with 50%-50% N(2) O/O(2) only. The outcome of sedation was evaluated as either 'successful', 'failed' or 'not accepted'. The highest success rate was found in Group 1 (0.20 mg/kg intranasally, 87%), followed by Group 2 (0.75 mg/kg orally, 79%). The overall mean success rate for all groups was 73%. Moderate sedation can be successfully used in the clinical management of paediatric dental patients, with both intranasal and oral sedation using midazolam in conjunction with nitrous oxide found to be effective methods. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  3. The pregnancy outcome in patients with minor β-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Karimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: β-thalassemia is the most common hereditary disease in Iran and more than 2 million carriers of the β-thalassemia mutant gene are living in this country.Objective: To determine pregnancy outcome of women with β-thalassemia minor.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, case-control study in two universities affiliated hospitals in Shiraz, all pregnancies occurred between 2006 and 2008 were included. Patients were divided in two groups regarding the presence of β-thalassemia minor. Patients in case and control groups were matched according to maternal age, gestational age and number of previous pregnancies. Cesarean delivery, hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes mellitus, premature rupture of membranes and preterm labor were recorded in each group and were compared using the χ2 or Fisher exact tests. Results: Overall 510 β-thalassemia minor subjects and 512 healthy controls were studied. Cases with β-thalassemia minor had significantly higher prevalence of oligohydramnios (p<0.001 and cesarean section delivery (p=0.001. There was no significant difference regarding Apgar score in 1st (p=0.65 and 5th minute (p=0.25, IUGR (p=0.073, gestational diabetes mellitus (DM (p=0.443 and preeclampsia (p=0.116 between two study groups. Conclusion: β-thalassemia minor does not significantly influence the pregnancy outcome in the negative way.

  4. Patient-reported Outcome Measurement for Patients With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Stephen; Yin, Kaitlyn L

    2017-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a large contributor to Medicare costs. In an effort to lower costs and improve outcomes, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services has implemented the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model, which incentivizes surgeons to submit both general health and joint-specific patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). However, in addition to using PROMs for reporting purposes, surgeons should also consider incorporating PROMs into clinical practice. Currently, PROMs are not widely implemented in the clinical setting despite their value in measuring factors such as patients' expectations and mental state, which impact outcomes. Furthermore, as technology improves, PROM collection will become faster and more efficient. The information collected by PROMs can inform treatment decisions and facilitate communication between the surgeon and the patient.

  5. Clinical outcomes and mortality in elderly peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Sakacı

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and identify the predictors of mortality in elderly patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study including all incident peritoneal dialysis cases in patients ≥65 years of age treated from 2001 to 2014. Demographic and clinical data on the initiation of peritoneal dialysis and the clinical events during the study period were collected. Infectious complications were recorded. Overall and technique survival rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients who began peritoneal dialysis during the study period were considered for analysis, and 50 of these patients were included in the final analysis. Peritoneal dialysis exchanges were performed by another person for 65% of the patients, whereas 79.9% of patients preferred to perform the peritoneal dialysis themselves. Peritonitis and catheter exit site/tunnel infection incidences were 20.4±16.3 and 24.6±17.4 patient-months, respectively. During the follow-up period, 40 patients were withdrawn from peritoneal dialysis. Causes of death included peritonitis and/or sepsis (50% and cardiovascular events (30%. The mean patient survival time was 38.9±4.3 months, and the survival rates were 78.8%, 66.8%, 50.9% and 19.5% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after peritoneal dialysis initiation, respectively. Advanced age, the presence of additional diseases, increased episodes of peritonitis, the use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, and low albumin levels and daily urine volumes (<100 ml at the initiation of peritoneal dialysis were predictors of mortality. The mean technique survival duration was 61.7±5.2 months. The technique survival rates were 97.9%, 90.6%, 81.5% and 71% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years, respectively. None of the factors analyzed were predictors of technique survival. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was higher in elderly patients. Factors affecting mortality in elderly patients included advanced age, the presence of

  6. Outcome of tetanus patients admitted in Rangpur Medical College Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ismail Hossain

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetanus remains one of the major public health hazards of the developing world. Mortality is much lower in the developed world because of the availability of facilities, unlike in most developing countries' Objectives: This study was aimed to determine the outcome of tetanus patients admitted in infectious disease unit of Rangpur Medical College Hospital. Methods: A total of 91 cases of tetanus patients were seen in the 18 month period with a mean of 5 cases per month; they are diagnosed and managed for tetanus in the medical wards from January 2011 to June 2012. The data were retrieved from their case records and analyzed. Results: There were thirty one deaths, accounting for an overall mortality of 34.16o.Total fifty six patients were cured among which sixteen (17.67% were cured with complication and four (4.4% patient were absconded. Mortality was high 45.84% (11 patients out of 24 ≥40 years age, whereas low 29.85 (20 patient out of 87 in <40 yea15 age (45.84% vs 29.85%. Mortality rate was also higher among female than male patients (34.66% vs 33.85%. Farmers experienced more death than non-farmer (4l.l8% vs 29-82%, P<0.05. Mortality was higher in patients who had not received any medical treatment for their wound than in patients who had received it for their wound (52.78% vs 21.81%, p<0.05. Patients with short incubation period of less than one week had higher mortality in comparison with those who had incubation period more than one week (53.33% vs 23.25%, P<0'05. Of the 91 patients, fifty six (64.34% were alive, though four remained in a persistent vegetative state due to tetanus toxin-induced brain damage and another two required a below knee amputation of the left leg. Hence, 40 were discharged well and 16 were discharged with permanent disabilities. Conclusion: The case fatality rate of tetanus has remained consistently high in the medical college. Factors that were significantly associated with high mortality included

  7. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  8. Speech outcomes following pharyngeal flap in patients with velocardiofacial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Edward W; Sullivan, Stephen R; Ridgway, Emily B; Marrinan, Eileen M; Mulliken, John B

    2011-05-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is the most common defined disorder associated with palatal insufficiency. The authors' purpose is to evaluate one surgeon's experience with correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency in velocardiofacial syndrome using a tailored pharyngeal flap. The authors reviewed the records of all children with velocardiofacial syndrome and velopharyngeal insufficiency who were managed with a pharyngeal flap between 1983 and 2009. Data collected included age at operation, preoperative videofluoroscopic findings, speech outcomes, complications, and need for a secondary operation. The authors identified 33 patients with velocardiofacial syndrome and velopharyngeal insufficiency who had postoperative speech evaluations. Velopharyngeal insufficiency was diagnosed at a median age of 5 years. Palatal findings were: Veau type I (n = 4), overt submucous (n = 6), or occult submucous (n = 23). Median preoperative lateral pharyngeal wall movement was 22 percent (range, 0 to 90 percent). Successful correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency was achieved in 29 of 33 patients (88 percent). One patient had a medially displaced right internal carotid artery, and evidenced intraoperative bleeding and required a blood transfusion. One patient developed obstructive sleep apnea. A tailored pharyngeal flap is highly effective for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency in velocardiofacial syndrome with few complications.

  9. Patient assessment: preparing for a predictable aesthetic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Aulakh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The flux of patients seeking to make changes to the appearance of their smile zone appears to be on a pathway of continual increase. This is possibly due to an increase in awareness towards oral health, and perhaps social, peer and media pressures, respectively. Cohorts of dental practitioners have thus responded to the latter demands by attending a plethora of educational courses, often focusing on either restorative techniques or other disciplines, notably orthodontics and clear aligners in particular. Consequently, treatment planning and thus treatment provision may carry the risk of being biased or indeed 'outcome driven' whereby the skills and knowledge of any clinician towards a particular faculty may significantly influence the ultimate treatment plan, with the unfortunate tendency sometimes to overlook the role of the interdisciplinary approach of concomitant restorative and contemporary techniques. The role of orthodontics to facilitate the provision of such treatment, along with predictable enamel bonding, has the distinct advantage of providing an acceptable aesthetic result with minimal biological intervention. However, to achieve an optimal result in such cases requires meticulous treatment planning and patient selection to avoid pitfalls with regards to long-term stability and function. This article suggests a standardized approach to patient assessment, with an interdisciplinary perspective in mind. Clinical Relevance: With the growth of patient demand for improving the appearance of the smile, a meticulous assessment protocol is required along with effective interdisciplinary communication. This enables a comprehensive treatment plan to be developed with the correct priorities.

  10. Management and outcome of mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Peñuelas, Oscar; Muriel, Alfonso; Vargas, Maria; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Brunetti, Iole; Raymondos, Konstantinos; D'Antini, Davide; Nielsen, Niklas; Ferguson, Niall D; Böttiger, Bernd W; Thille, Arnaud W; Davies, Andrew R; Hurtado, Javier; Rios, Fernando; Apezteguía, Carlos; Violi, Damian A; Cakar, Nahit; González, Marco; Du, Bin; Kuiper, Michael A; Soares, Marco Antonio; Koh, Younsuck; Moreno, Rui P; Amin, Pravin; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; Bülow, Hans-Henrik; Anzueto, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-05-08

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the changes in ventilator management and complications over time, as well as variables associated with 28-day hospital mortality in patients receiving mechanical ventilation (MV) after cardiac arrest. We performed a secondary analysis of three prospective, observational multicenter studies conducted in 1998, 2004 and 2010 in 927 ICUs from 40 countries. We screened 18,302 patients receiving MV for more than 12 hours during a one-month-period. We included 812 patients receiving MV after cardiac arrest. We collected data on demographics, daily ventilator settings, complications during ventilation and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios, determining which variables within 24 hours of hospital admission were associated with 28-day hospital mortality and occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay at 48 hours after admission. Among 812 patients, 100 were included from 1998, 239 from 2004 and 473 from 2010. Ventilatory management changed over time, with decreased tidal volumes (VT) (1998: mean 8.9 (standard deviation (SD) 2) ml/kg actual body weight (ABW), 2010: 6.7 (SD 2) ml/kg ABW; 2004: 9 (SD 2.3) ml/kg predicted body weight (PBW), 2010: 7.95 (SD 1.7) ml/kg PBW) and increased positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (1998: mean 3.5 (SD 3), 2010: 6.5 (SD 3); P <0.001). Patients included from 2010 had more sepsis, cardiovascular dysfunction and neurological failure, but 28-day hospital mortality was similar over time (52% in 1998, 57% in 2004 and 52% in 2010). Variables independently associated with 28-day hospital mortality were: older age, PaO2 <60 mmHg, cardiovascular dysfunction and less use of sedative agents. Higher VT, and plateau pressure with lower PEEP were associated with occurrence of ARDS and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay. Protective mechanical ventilation with lower VT and higher PEEP is more

  11. Outcomes of arterial vascular extremity trauma in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkilas, Mary; Notrica, David M; Langlais, Crystal S; Muenzer, Jared T; Zoldos, Jozef; Graziano, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Vascular trauma in children, although rare, carries significant risk for repair. Here we report outcomes from a single trauma center for children with extremity vascular trauma, proximal to the digits. Retrospective chart review of patients less than age 18years with an acute, non-iatrogenic traumatic arterial vascular injury of the upper and/or lower extremity between January 2008 and December 2013. Abstracted patient demographics, injury characteristics, surgical management, and disposition were summarized and compared with nonparametric methods. 23 children comprised the study cohort: median age of 8years (IQR: 4.6-12), 61% (n=14) males, 100% survival. Penetrating injuries were the predominate mechanism (n=17, 74%). The median time to presentation was 154min (IQR: 65-330). Acute operations for revascularization included a primary repair (n=15, 65%) or reversed vein graft (n=7, 30%). Fasciotomies were done for 3 (13%) patients. Three amputations were done for failed revascularization. Upper extremity vascular injury (n=15, 65%) was more common. The rate of associated extremity fracture was similar between upper (21%) and lower (33%) extremities (p=0.643). Eight (35%) patients required additional surgery most commonly for debridement, washouts and dressing changes. Three patients' hospital stays were complicated by infection. Impaired function was the most common short- and long-term complication (60%, 75%). Pediatric vascular injuries are commonly associated with penetrating injuries and male gender and occurred more frequently in the upper extremities. Overall patency rates after repair were 87%. Fasciotomies were done in 13% of patients, and the overall surgical amputation rate was 13%. There was no mortality in this cohort; however, multiple operations are commonly required, including the return to OR for washouts, debridements and dressing changes. The most common short- and long-term complication was impaired function. Overall good results are achievable in

  12. Fracture liaison services: improving outcomes for patients with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Samuel Walters,1 Tanvir Khan,2 Terence Ong,3,4 Opinder Sahota3 1East Midlands Major Trauma Centre, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, 3Department for Healthcare of Older People, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, 4Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abstract: Fragility fractures are sentinels of osteoporosis, and as such all patients with low-trauma fractures should be considered for further investigation for osteoporosis and, if confirmed, started on osteoporosis medication. Fracture liaison services (FLSs with varying models of care are in place to take responsibility for this investigative and treatment process. This review aims to describe outcomes for patients with osteoporotic fragility fractures as part of FLSs. The most intensive service that includes identification, assessment and treatment of patients appears to deliver the best outcomes. This FLS model is associated with reduction in re-fracture risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.18–0.67 over 2–4 years, reduced mortality (HR 0.65 over 2 years, increased assessment of bone mineral density (relative risk [RR] 2–3, increased treatment initiation (RR 1.5–4.25 and adherence to treatment (65%–88% at 1 year and is cost-effective. In response to this evidence, key organizations and stakeholders have published guidance and framework to ensure that best practice in FLSs is delivered. Keywords: fracture liaison service, fractures, fall, osteoporosis, aged

  13. Preoperative Patient-Recorded Outcome Measures Predict Patient Discharge Location Following Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alfonso E; Lawson, Kevin A; Gruessner, Angelika C; Dohm, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Advantages of unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) over total knee arthroplasty include rapid recovery and shorter lengths of stay following surgery. Patients requiring extended postoperative care fail to recognize these benefits. Patient-reported outcome measures have proved useful in predicting outcomes following joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify and report preoperative patient-reported outcome measures and clinical variables that predict discharge to skilled nursing facilities following UKA. A prospective cohort of 174 patients was used to collect 36-Item Short Form scores and objective clinical data. Univariate and multivariate analysis with backward elimination were conducted to find a predictive risk model. The predictive model reported (78.7% concordance, receiver operating characteristic curve c-statistic 0.719, P = .0016) demonstrates that risk factors for discharge to skilled nursing facilities are: older age (odds ratio 4.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.256-13.911, P = .019), bilateral UKA procedures (odds ratio 1.887; 95% CI 1.054-3.378, P = .0326) and lower patient-reported preoperative 36-Item Short Form physical function scores (odds ratio 0.968; CI 0.938-1, P = .0488). The information presented here regarding possible patient disposition following UKA could aid informed decision-making regarding patients' short-term needs following surgery and help streamline preoperative planning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Visual outcomes in patients with open globe injuries compared to predicted outcomes using the Ocular Trauma Scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Nagib; Mustak, Hamza; Cook, Colin

    2015-01-01

    To determine the visual outcomes in adult patients who sustained open globe injuries and to determine whether the visual prognosis following an eye injury in an African setting differs from the predicted outcomes according to the Ocular Trauma Score (OTS) study. A secondary aim was to establish the evisceration rate for these injuries and assess how this form of intervention affected outcomes in comparison to the OTS. A prospective case series of all patients admitted with open globe injuries over a two-year (July 2009 to June 2011) period. Injuries were scored using the OTS and the surgical intervention was recorded. The best corrected visual acuity at three months was regarded as visual outcome. There were 249 open globe injuries, of which 169 patients (169 eyes) completed the 3-month follow-up. All patients underwent primary surgery, 175 (70.3%) repairs, 61 (24.5%) eviscerations and 13 (5.2%) other procedures. Globe eviscerations were mainly done on OTS Category 1 cases, but outcomes in this category were not found to be different from OTS outcomes. Outcomes were significantly worse in Category 2, but when the entire distribution was tested, the differences were not statistically significant. The overall association between OTS outcomes and the final visual outcomes in this study was found to be a strong (P<0.005). Reliable information regarding the expected outcomes of eye injuries will influence management decisions and patient expectations. The OTS is a valuable tool, the use of which has been validated in many parts of the world-it may also be a valid predictor in an African setting.

  15. Retrograde femoral nailing in elderly patients: outcome and functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Thomas; Krawany, Manfred; Leitner, Lukas; Karlbauer, Alois; Wagner, Michael; Plecko, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Functional outcome after retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing was investigated in 35 patients older than 60 years (mean, 86 years) with 36 fractures, comprising 15 (41.7%) shaft and 21 (58.3%) distal fractures; overall, 7 (19.4%) periprosthetic fractures occured. Twenty-two (62.9%) of 35 patients were evaluated at a mean 16.5-month follow-up with the Lyshom-Gillquist score and the SF-8 questionaire. Primary union rate was 97.8%, with no significant differences in duration of surgery, bone healing, mobilization, and weight bearing among different fracture types; periprosthetic fractures revealed a significantly delayed mobilization (P=.03). Complications occured significantly more often among distal femoral fractures (P=.009), including all revision surgeries. The most frequently encountered complication was loosening of distal locking bolts (n=3). Lysholm score results were mainly influenced by age-related entities and revealed fair results in all fractures (mean in the femoral shaft fracture group, 78.1 vs mean in the distal femoral fracture group, 74.9; P=.69), except in the periprosthetic subgroup, which had good results (mean, 84.8; P=.23). This group also had increased physical parameters according to SF-8 score (P=.026). No correlation existed between SF-8 physical parameters and patient age or surgery delay, whereas a negative correlation existed between patient age and SF-8 mental parameters (P=.012). Retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing is commonly used in elderly patients due to reliable bone healing, minimal soft tissue damage, and immediate full weight bearing. It also offers a valid alternative to antegrade nailing in femoral shaft fractures.

  16. Number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups in patient reported outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patient reported outcome-measures (PROs) are increasingly used in orthopedics. Information on number of patients needed in different settings is warranted. Aim: To assess the number of patients needed for different PROs to discriminate between subgroups of age, gender, and diagnosis...... with sample size calculations or by power calculations and simulated ANOVA F tests, depending on the number of groups. Results: To discriminate between gender, the least number needed to find a statistically significant difference in mean sum score in each group was 298 (OHS) while HOOS QoL required the most....... Methods: 5777 primary THA patients, operated 1‐2, 5‐6, and 10‐11 years ago. SF‐12 Health Survey (SF-12), EQ-5D, Oxford 12‐item Hip Score (OHS), and Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) were included. The different PRO subscales abilities to discriminate between groups were studied using...

  17. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aniruddha Agarwal, Mohamed K Soliman, Yasir J Sepah, Diana V Do, Quan Dong Nguyen Ocular Imaging Research and Reading Center, Stanley M. Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, USA Abstract: Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. Keywords: personalized medicine, therapeutic variation, genomic markers, genotype, phenotype, VEGF mutation, polymorphism, linkage, mutation, responder

  18. Machine learning landscapes and predictions for patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritankar; Wales, David J.

    2017-07-01

    The theory and computational tools developed to interpret and explore energy landscapes in molecular science are applied to the landscapes defined by local minima for neural networks. These machine learning landscapes correspond to fits of training data, where the inputs are vital signs and laboratory measurements for a database of patients, and the objective is to predict a clinical outcome. In this contribution, we test the predictions obtained by fitting to single measurements, and then to combinations of between 2 and 10 different patient medical data items. The effect of including measurements over different time intervals from the 48 h period in question is analysed, and the most recent values are found to be the most important. We also compare results obtained for neural networks as a function of the number of hidden nodes, and for different values of a regularization parameter. The predictions are compared with an alternative convex fitting function, and a strong correlation is observed. The dependence of these results on the patients randomly selected for training and testing decreases systematically with the size of the database available. The machine learning landscapes defined by neural network fits in this investigation have single-funnel character, which probably explains why it is relatively straightforward to obtain the global minimum solution, or a fit that behaves similarly to this optimal parameterization.

  19. Protocol guided bleeding management improves cardiac surgery patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, B L; Smith, I; Faulke, D; Wall, D; Fraser, J F; Ryan, E G; Drake, L; Rapchuk, I L; Tesar, P; Ziegenfuss, M; Fung, Y L

    2015-10-01

    Excessive bleeding is a risk associated with cardiac surgery. Treatment invariably requires transfusion of blood products; however, the transfusion itself may contribute to postoperative sequelae. Our objective was to analyse a quality initiative designed to provide an evidenced-based approach to bleeding management. A retrospective analysis compared blood product transfusion and patient outcomes 15 months before and after implementation of a bleeding management protocol. The protocol incorporated point-of-care coagulation testing (POCCT) with ROTEM and Multiplate to diagnose the cause of bleeding and monitor treatment. Use of the protocol led to decreases in the incidence of transfusion of PRBCs (47·3% vs. 32·4%; P bleeding (5·6% vs. 3·4; P = 0·01), superficial chest wound (3·3% vs. 1·4%; P = 0·002), leg wound infection (4·6% vs. 2·0%; P bleeding management protocol supported by POCCT in a cardiac surgery programme was associated with significant reductions in the transfusion of allogeneic blood products, improved outcomes and reduced cost. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Association of patient-rated severity with other outcomes in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor-Stokes G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gavin Taylor-Stokes1, James Pike1, Alesia Sadosky2, Arthi Chandran2, Thomas Toelle31Adelphi Real World, Adelphi Mill, Bollington, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK; 2Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, Munich, GermanyObjective: To evaluate the association of patient-reported severity of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN with other outcomes in a European population of patients using the Adelphi Disease Specific Programme for pDPN (DSP III, 2008.Methods: The severity of patients' pDPN (mild, moderate, or severe was rated independently by both patients and physicians. Relationships were evaluated between patient-reported pDPN severity and other patient-reported outcomes including pain, sleep, function, and work productivity. Physicians rated the severity of patients’ pDPN (1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe and sleep interference.Results: Patient-reported data were available from 634 individuals (56.2% male, mean age 63 years from France, Germany, Italy, and the UK, of whom only 22.2% reported that they were currently employed. pDPN severity was rated as mild, moderate, and severe by 22.2%, 60.9%, and 16.9% of the patients, respectively. There was a significant association between patient-rated and physician-rated pDPN severity (P < 0.0001, although there were discrepancies in agreement (kappa = 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31, 0.43; weighted kappa = 0.43, 95% CI 0.37, 0.48 among physician and patient ratings in a substantial proportion of patients across severity categories. Higher pDPN severity was associated with greater interference of daily function including sleep (P < 0.0001 for all pairwise comparisons. Among employed patients, percent of pDPN-related impairment while at work (presenteeism and overall work impairment increased with greater pDPN severity, resulting in indirect costs that increased significantly with pDPN severity; $8266, $15,449, and $24,300 for mild

  1. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  2. Differences in cognitive and emotional outcomes between patients with perimesencephalic and aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Boerboom (Wendy); M.H. Heijenbrok-Kal (Majanka); L. Khajeh (Ladbon); F. van Kooten (Fop); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To compare cognitive and emotional outcomes between patients with aneurysmal and perimesencephalic subarachnoid haemorrhage and norm scores. Design: First measurement in prospective cohort study. Patients: Sixty-seven patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, were divided into

  3. Patient-reported outcome and risk of revision after shoulder replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Polk, Anne; Brorson, Stig;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We used patient-reported outcome and risk of revision to compare hemiarthroplasty (HA) with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and stemmed hemiarthroplasty (SHA) with resurfacing hemiarthroplasty (RHA) in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all pat...

  4. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althof, Stanley E

    2016-08-01

    The term 'Patient Reported Outcome', abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner's related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy intervention, and quality of life issues related to a specific condition. This article reviews the essential psychometric and regulatory agency requirements in the development of PROs. The constructs of reliability, various forms of validity, sensitivity, and specificity as well as concerns with translating a PRO into a different language are reviewed. Three PROs, the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP), the Index of Premature Ejaculation (IPE) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) all used in the assessment of premature ejaculation (PE) are discussed. These questionnaires meet or exceed all the psychometric requirements and have been employed in clinical trials and observational studies of men with PE. The article concludes on discussing some of the limitations of PRO use and recommendations for the future.

  5. Choroid plexus carcinomas in children: MRI features and patient outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Steven P. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 601 Elmwood Avenue, P.O. Box 648, Rochester, NY (United States); Khademian, Zarir P.; Zimmerman, Robert A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chuang, Sylvester H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pollack, Ian F. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Korones, David N. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPC) are rare malignant intracranial neoplasms usually occurring in young children. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preoperative MRI features of CPC, determine the frequency of disseminated disease in the CNS at diagnosis, and assess patient outcomes. The preoperative cranial MR images of 11 patients with CPC were retrospectively reviewed for lesion location, lesion size, un-enhanced and enhanced MRI signal characteristics, and presence of disseminated intracranial tumor. Postoperative cranial and spinal MRI images were reviewed for residual, recurrent, and/or disseminated tumor. The study group included six male and five female patients ranging in age from 5 months to 5.3 years (median=1.8 years). CPC were located in the lateral (n=8), fourth (n=1), and third (n=1) ventricles, and foramen of Luschka (n=1). Mean tumor size was 5.2cm x 4.9cm x 5.0 cm. On short-TR images, CPC had heterogeneous, predominantly intermediate signal with foci of high signal in 45% of lesions from areas of hemorrhage. On long-TR/long-TE images, solid portions of CPC typically had heterogeneous, intermediate-to-slightly-high signal. Small zones of low signal on long-TR/long-TE images were seen in 55% of the lesions secondary to areas of hemorrhage and/or calcifications. Tubular flow voids representing blood vessels were seen in 55% of the lesions. Zones of high signal comparable to CSF were seen in 64% of CPC secondary to cystic/necrotic zones. All CPC showed prominent contrast enhancement. Irregular enhancing margins suggesting subependymal invasion were seen in 73% of the lesions. Findings consistent with edema in the brain adjacent to the enhancing lesions were seen in 73% of CPC. CPC caused hydrocephalus in 82% of patients at diagnosis. Two patients died from hemorrhagic complications from surgical biopsies. Disseminated tumor in the leptomeninges was present in 45% of patients at diagnosis and was associated with a poor prognosis. The 1

  6. Long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of 100 patients with lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Starklint, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of Danish patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and to identify outcome predictors among findings registered at the time of the first renal biopsy.......To evaluate the long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of Danish patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and to identify outcome predictors among findings registered at the time of the first renal biopsy....

  7. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Maintenance Dialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospitalized patients with ESRD requiring maintenance dialysis are unknown. Outcomes of in-hospital CPR in these patients were compared with outcomes in the general population using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 2005–2011). The study population included all adults (≥18years old) from the general population and those with a history of ESRD. Baseline characteristics, in-hospital complications, and discharge outcomes were compa...

  8. Surgical Outcomes for Mastectomy Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Megan E.; Mone, Mary C.; Buys, Saundra S.; Sheng, Xiaoming; Nelson, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the risk of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for surgical morbidity after mastectomy with or without reconstruction using 1:1 matching. Background: Postoperative surgical complications remain a potentially preventable event for breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is among variables identified as contributory to risk, but it has not been rigorously evaluated as a principal causal influence. Methods: Data from American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2006–2012) were used to identify females with invasive breast cancer undergoing planned mastectomy. Surgical cases categorized as clean and undergoing no secondary procedures unrelated to mastectomy were included. A 1:1 matched propensity analysis was performed using neoadjuvant chemotherapy within 30 days of surgery as treatment. A total of 12 preoperative variables were used with additional procedure matching: bilateral mastectomy, nodal surgery, tissue, and/or implant. Outcomes examined were 4 wound occurrences, sepsis, and unplanned return to the operating room. Results: We identified 31,130 patient procedures with 2488 (7.5%) receiving chemotherapy. We matched 2411 cases, with probability of treatment being 0.005 to 0.470 in both cohorts. Superficial wound complication was the most common wound event, 2.24% in neoadjuvant-treated versus 2.45% in those that were not (P = 0.627). The rate of return to the operating room was 5.7% in the neoadjuvant group versus 5.2% in those that were not (P = 0.445). The rate of sepsis was 0.37% in the neoadjuvant group versus 0.46% in those that were not (P = 0.654). Conclusions: This large, matched cohort study, controlled for preoperative risk factors and most importantly for the surgical procedure performed, demonstrates that breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy have no increased risk for surgical morbidity. PMID:27280515

  9. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert John Adams

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Robert John AdamsThe Health Observatory, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus, The University of Adelaide, Woodville, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual’s competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly

  10. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  11. Do Magnet®-accredited hospitals show improvements in nurse and patient outcomes compared to non-Magnet hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit Dit Dariel, Odessa; Regnaux, Jean-Phillipe

    2015-07-17

    absenteeism, as measured by the actual turnover rate if available, or the Anticipated Turnover Scale, the Revised Nursing Work Index or the Maslach Burnout Inventory, as well as nursing-sensitive patient outcomes (such as fall rates and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers) as measured by retrospective patient records, discharge abstracts, incident reports and reimbursement forms. Both published and unpublished literature between 1994 and 2014 were searched. The electronic databases searched were the following: CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Academic Search Complete and Web of Science. Other resources included ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database /Dissertation Abstracts Online and OpenGrey, the American Hospital Association and the American Nurses Credentialing Center websites, and the Sigma Theta Tau International library of abstracts. In April 2015, a search update was conducted including the years 2014-2015 in the databases listed above. No cut-off point for the Joanna Briggs Institute appraisal tool criteria was selected for inclusion of studies. Data from included studies were extracted using the Joanna Briggs Institute Data Extraction Form for experimental/observational studies. Two reviewers extracted the data independently and results were compared for accuracy and categorized according to nurse and patient outcomes. All the studies analyzed retrospective data obtained from either combined databases or from questionnaires. The methodological heterogeneity and poor quality of the designs did not make it possible to pool quantitative results in a statistical meta-analysis. Results are presented in descriptive narrative form. From the 141 screened studies, ten met the inclusion criteria. Nine of these studies were retrospective analyses of data extracted from existing databases, one study collected original data. Of the seven studies examining patient outcomes, three found clear statistically significant improvements related to lower pressure ulcers, patient falls, failure to

  12. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  13. No Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcome in Stroke Patients Treated with IV Thrombolysis BMI and IV Thrombolysis Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Juliane; Michel, Patrik; Eskioglou, Elissavet; Kaegi, Georg; Stark, Robert; Fischer, Urs; Jung, Simon; Arnold, Marcel; Wertli, Maria; Held, Ulrike; Wegener, Susanne; Luft, Andreas; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The impact of excess body weight on prognosis after stroke is controversial. Many studies report higher survival rates in obese patients (“obesity paradox”). Recently, obesity has been linked to worse outcomes after intravenous (IV) thrombolysis, but the number and sample size of these studies were small. Here, we aimed to assess the relationship between body weight and stroke outcome after IV thrombolysis in a large cohort study. Methods In a prospective observational multicenter study, we analyzed baseline and outcome data of 896 ischemic stroke patients who underwent IV thrombolysis. Patients were categorized according to body mass index (BMI) as underweight (35 kg/m2). Using uni- and multivariate modeling, we assessed the relationship of BMI with favorable outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale 0 or 1) and mortality 3 months after stroke as well as the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages (sICH). We also measured the incidence of patients that had an early neurological improvement of >40% on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) after 24 hours. Results Among 896 patients, 321 were normal weight (35.8%), 22 underweight (2.5%), 378 overweight (42.2%), 123 obese (13.7%) and 52 severely obese (5.8%). Three-month mortality was comparable in obese vs. non-obese patients (8.1% vs. 8.3%) and did not differ significantly among different BMI groups. This was also true for favorable clinical outcome, risk of sICH and early neurological improvement on NIHSS at 24 hours. These results remained unchanged after adjusting for potential confounding factors in the multivariate analyses. Conclusion BMI was not related to clinical outcomes in stroke patients treated with IVT. Our data suggest that the current weight-adapted dosage scheme of IV alteplase is appropriate for different body weight groups, and challenge the existence of the obesity paradox after stroke. PMID:27727305

  14. Shock as a determinant of poor patient-centered outcomes in implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Van Den Broek, Krista C; Van Den Berg, Martha

    2010-01-01

    as an outcome, and compare the influence of ICD shock with other factors (e.g., heart failure and psychological factors) as determinants of outcomes, with a view to providing recommendations for clinical practice and future research. Based on the large-scale primary and secondary prevention trials (i.e., CABG......-PATCH, CIDS, AVID, AMIOVIRT, SCD-HeFT, MADIT-II, and DEFINITE), evidence for an association between ICD shocks and quality of life is mixed, with some indication that the influence of shocks may depend largely on the interval between shocks and assessment of quality of life. In order to improve the clinical...... management of ICD patients, we need to adopt a more rigorous and standardized methodology in future studies in order to be able to draw firm conclusions about the impact of ICD shocks on individual patients. We also need to acknowledge that the impact of shocks on psychological functioning and quality...

  15. Factors Affecting the Outcome of Bronchiectasis in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Bilan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bronchiectasis is a common problem in children and early diagnosis can lead to early treatment and prevent of its complications. This study was aimed to evaluate factors effective on outcome of bronchiectasis in children. Methods: In an analytical cross-sectional study, 347 children with bronchiectasis Underwent the study. the patients were diagnosed based on chronic suppurative cough and CT scan findings. . Results: Disease etiology was asthma in 55.6%, Gastroesophagial reflux (GERD in 7.8%, Cystic fibrosis (CF in 4.8%, other causes in 11.2% and idiopathic in 20.6%. All cases complained of chronic cough. The most common sign was daily sputum production (79.1% and common symptoms were ral/crackle in 47.1% and wheezing in 25.4%. Mean treatment period was 32.82±11.56 months. At the end of follow-up, complete improvement occurred in 35.6%, partial improvement in 40.9% and no improvement in 23.5%. Conclusion: In children with chronic cough and crackle in physical examination, consideration of bronchiectasis could be helpful in early diagnosis and complementary evaluations and treatment initiation. Treating the underlying disease could prevent the occurrence and increase the response to treatment of bronchiectasis.

  16. CLINICAL PROFILE AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Naidu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis belongs to a group of diseases known as Spondyloarthritides characterized by inflammatory low backache. It is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, mostly associated with HLA B27 positivity affecting skeletal (both axial and extra - axial and extra skeletal system. In general population Ankylosing spondylitis is likely to develop in about 1% to 2% of HLA - B27+ who have a disease - associated B27 subtype and is much more common among HLA - B27+ first degree relatives of HLA - B27+ AS Patients. Positive family history is a strong risk factor for the development of the disease. Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease which mostly affects young males and working population. It is a chronic illness with exacerbations and remissions and leads to debility and significant morbidity and hence affects the quality of life significantly. This study has been carried out in Medicine department of Ra ngaraya medical college GGH Kakinada, Sraddha Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra medical college, KGH, Visakhapatnam, GEMS College and Hospital, Srikakulam with an aim to study the articular and extra articular manifestations of Ankylosing Spondylitis, factor s affecting exacerbations and remissions. Correlation between disease activity and acute phase reactants, familial association, and to study the short term treatment outcomes.

  17. [Causes, signs and outcome of 30 patients with pulmonary embolus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diall, Ib; Coulibaly, S; Minta, I; Ba, Ho; Diakite, M; Sidibe, N; Sangare, I; Diakite, S; Sanogo, K; Diallo, Ba

    2011-01-01

    Authors studied 30 cases of pulmonary emboli in BAMAKO in the departments of Cardiology at Point G hospital. The purpose of this work was to determine the pulmonary emboli's frequency, their signs and symptoms and to observe their outcome. Was eligible to study every patient hospitalised for pulmonary emboli confirmed by clinical signs and D- dimere test, with ECG and echocardiogram in most cases. The pulmonary emboli' frequency was 1,7%, with an average age of 51 years ± 16,9. Among causes the most frequent were hypertension (50%), phlebitis (40%), chronic cor pulmonale (30%), and heart failure (40%). Signs were respiratory distress (80%), haemoptysis (43%), syncope (20%), and circulatory collapse (15%). ECG show mostly right ventricular hypertrophy (93,3%) and x ray sometimes a characteristic aspect. Cardiac echography show essentially ventricular and auricular dilatation with a thrombus in 6,7% of the cases. The treatment was by heparin, AVK and analgesic. Mortality in study was 11, 3 %. So pulmonary embolus is always at high risk and sometimes it's diagnostic is difficult.

  18. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  19. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  20. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta...

  1. Below knee angioplasty in elderly patients: Predictors of major adverse clinical outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2011-03-01

    To determine predictors of clinical outcome following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in elderly patients with below knee atherosclerotic lesions causing intermittent claudication (IC) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI).

  2. Can shared care deliver better outcomes for patients undergoing total hip replacement? A prospective assessment of patient outcomes and associated service use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendal, H.; Beekum, W.T. van; Nijhof, P.; Witte, L.P. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether shared care for patients undergoing total hip replacement delivers better outcomes compared to care as usual. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two regions in the Netherlands where different organisational health care models have been

  3. Real world clinical outcomes and patient characteristics for canagliflozin treated patients in a specialty diabetes clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, June Felice; Parsa, Rahul; Bailey, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To examine characteristics and outcomes of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients prescribed canagliflozin (CANA) and managed in the real-world setting of a diabetes clinic. Primary outcome was change in A1c, and secondary outcomes were change in weight and blood pressure. Study was an electronic health record (EHR) review of CANA prescribed at the diabetes clinic from June 2013 to June 2015. Patients were included in the study if they were adults with T2DM, received routine follow-up diabetes care at the diabetes clinic, received an initial prescription for CANA from a diabetes clinic prescriber, and returned for at least one follow-up office visit (OV) after initial CANA prescribing. Paired t-tests were performed on the primary and secondary outcomes, and p CANA) 3.58. Men comprised 60% of patients. At baseline, 54% of patients were prescribed insulin. A1c decreased by 1.06% and 1.09% (p < .0001), weight decreased by 2.01% and 1.83% (p < .001), systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased by 3.2% and 2.4% (p < .0001), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased by 2.59% and 2.16% (p = .0002) from baseline to first and second follow-up OV, respectively. Study limitations included retrospective design, inability to control for confounding factors (e.g. changes in nutrition, exercise, medical care plan, medications), missing information in the EHR, potential lack of generalizability of results to those in a non-specialty diabetes clinic, inability to assess adherence, and inability to assess reliable adverse event data. ANA was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in A1c, weight, and blood pressure when added to multiple diabetes medication regimens by prescribers in a diabetes clinic.

  4. Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIntroduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks.Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use.Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials

  5. Improving a newly developed patient-reported outcome for thyroid patients, using cognitive interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    was within the set of problems involving attribution. Conclusion The cognitive interview methodology was effective in identifying and reducing problems within the questionnaire responding process. Patients tended to selectively report problems they considered to be caused by their thyroid disease even when......Objective To improve a newly developed patient-reported outcome measure for thyroid patients using cognitive interviewing. Methods Thirty-one interviews using immediate retrospective and expansive probing were conducted among patients with non-toxic goiter (n = 4), nodular toxic goiter (n = 5.......e. whether or not to report only issues considered of thyroid causality. Within each round of interviews, the number of problems declined from an initial average of six per interview to two, mainly due to a reduction in the number of problems associated with comprehension. The least amount of reduction...

  6. Predictors of outcome in neck pain patients undergoing chiropractic care: comparison of acute and chronic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Cynthia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a common complaint in patients presenting for chiropractic treatment. The few studies on predictors for improvement in patients while undergoing treatment identify duration of symptoms, neck stiffness and number of previous episodes as the strong predictor variables. The purpose of this study is to continue the research for predictors of a positive outcome in neck pain patients undergoing chiropractic treatment. Methods Acute ( 3 months (n = 255 neck pain patients with no chiropractic or manual therapy in the prior 3 months were included. Patients completed the numerical pain rating scale (NRS and Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ at baseline prior to treatment. At 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after start of treatment the NRS and BQ were completed along with the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC scale. Demographic information was provided by the clinician. Improvement at each of the follow up points was categorized using the PGIC. Multivariate regression analyses were done to determine significant independent predictors of improvement. Results Baseline mean neck pain and total disability scores were significantly (p  Conclusions The most consistent predictor of clinically relevant improvement at both 1 and 3 months after the start of chiropractic treatment for both acute and chronic patients is if they report improvement early in the course of treatment. The co-existence of either radiculopathy or dizziness however do not imply poorer prognosis in these patients.

  7. Long-term physical outcome in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J B; Møller, K; Kehlet, H

    2009-01-01

    Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock.......Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock....

  8. Outcome of pregnancy in patients after repair of aortic coarctation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, JWJ; Drenthen, W; Pieper, PG; Roos-Hesselink, JW; Zwinderman, AH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Mulder, BJM

    2005-01-01

    Aims Nowadays, most women born with aortic coarctation reach childbearing age. However, data on outcome of pregnancy in women after repair of aortic coarctation are scarce. The aim of this study was to report on maternal and neonatal outcome of pregnancy in women after aortic coarctation repair. Met

  9. The Assessment of Patient Clinical Outcome: Advantages, Models, Features of an Ideal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou’ath Hourani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of patient clinical outcome focuses on measuring various aspects of the health status of a patient who is under healthcare intervention. Patient clinical outcome assessment is a very significant process in the clinical field as it allows health care professionals to better understand the effectiveness of their health care programs and thus for enhancing the health care quality in general. It is thus vital that a high quality, informative review of current issues regarding the assessment of patient clinical outcome should be conducted. Aims & Objectives: 1 Summarizes the advantages of the assessment of patient clinical outcome; 2 reviews some of the existing patient clinical outcome assessment models namely: Simulation, Markov, Bayesian belief networks, Bayesian statistics and Conventional statistics, and Kaplan-Meier analysis models; and 3 demonstrates the desired features that should be fulfilled by a well-established ideal patient clinical outcome assessment model. Material & Methods: An integrative review of the literature has been performed using the Google Scholar to explore the field of patient clinical outcome assessment. Conclusion: This paper will directly support researchers, clinicians and health care professionals in their understanding of developments in the domain of the assessment of patient clinical outcome, thus enabling them to propose ideal assessment models.

  10. Outcome of orbital decompression for disfiguring proptosis in patients with Graves' orbitopathy using various surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. P.; Bijl, H.; Altea, M. A.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Curro, N.; Dickinson, A. J.; Eckstein, A.; Freidel, M.; Guastella, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Kalmann, R.; Krassas, G. E.; Lane, C. M.; Lareida, J.; Marcocci, C.; Marino, M.; Nardi, M.; Mohr, Ch; Neoh, C.; Pinchera, A.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pitz, S.; Saeed, P.; Salvi, M.; Sellari-Franceschini, S.; Stahl, M.; von Arx, G.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare the outcome of various surgical approaches of orbital decompression in patients with Graves' orbitopathy (GO) receiving surgery for disfiguring proptosis. Method: Data forms and questionnaires from consecutive, euthyroid patients with inactive GO who had undergone orbital decompressi

  11. Deteriorated clinical outcome in coronary artery disease patients with a high prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Tezuka

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: P. gingivalis was identified by sensitive detection in patients with CAD, diagnosed by coronary CTA. P. gingivalis in oral saliva can be a potential marker which is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with CAD.

  12. Comparison of IVF/ICSI outcome in patients with polycystic ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... outcome of treatment in such patients compared with their counterparts with tubal factor infertility. ... elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) levels with subsequent elevation ... controlled patients with tubal factor infertility diagnosed.

  13. Predictors of multidisciplinary treatment outcome in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Waaksma, Berend R.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica; Stewart, Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to identify predictors of rehabilitation outcome for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) and psychological problems. Methods: A retrospective cohort study including 230 adult patients with CMP admitted for multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation. Potential

  14. Sharing Health Data for Better Outcomes on PatientsLikeMe

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background PatientsLikeMe is an online quantitative personal research platform for patients with life-changing illnesses to share their experience using patient-reported outcomes, find other patients like them matched on demographic and clinical characteristics, and learn from the aggregated data reports of others to improve their outcomes. The goal of the website is to help patients answer the question: “Given my status, what is the best outcome I can hope to achieve, and how do I get there?...

  15. Mediation analysis of severity of needs, service performance and outcomes for patients with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Paul; Passerieux, Christine; Fleury, Marie-Josée

    2016-12-01

    Needs and service performance assessment are key components in improving recovery among individuals with mental disorders. To test the role of service performance as a mediating factor between severity of patients' needs and outcomes. A total of 339 adults with mental disorders were interviewed. A mediation analysis between severity of needs, service performance (adequacy of help, continuity of care and recovery orientation of services) and outcomes (personal recovery and quality of life) was carried out using structural equation modelling. The structural equation model provided a good fit with the data. An increase in needs was associated with lower service performance and worse outcomes, whereas higher service performance was associated with better outcomes. Service performance partially mediated the effect of patient needs on outcomes. Poorer service performance has a negative impact on outcomes for patients with the highest needs. Ensuring more efficient services for patients with high needs may help improve their recovery and quality of life. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  16. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Furtado; Najma Ahmed; Sylviane Forget; Ana Sant’Anna

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010–2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007–2009). Results. Twenty-...

  17. Critical Outcomes in Longitudinal Observational Studies and Registries in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora, Natalia V; Christensen, Robin; Goel, Niti

    2017-01-01

    for which outcome domains should be considered. Our overarching goal is to identify critical longterm outcome domains for patients with rheumatic diseases, and to develop a conceptual framework to measure and classify them within the scope of OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: The steps of this initiative...... of outcome domains; (3) conducting focus groups to identify domains considered critical by patients with RA; and (4) surveying patients, providers, and researchers to identify critical outcomes that can be evaluated through the OMERACT filter. RESULTS: In our initial evaluation of databases and registries...

  18. Establishing construct validity for the thyroid-specific patient reported outcome measure (ThyPRO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2009-01-01

    To establish a reliable and valid scale structure of a patient-reported outcome measuring thyroid-specific quality of life.......To establish a reliable and valid scale structure of a patient-reported outcome measuring thyroid-specific quality of life....

  19. Characteristics, Correlates and Outcomes of Perceived Stigmatization in Bipolar Disorder Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Kristine Kahr; Kugathasan, Pirathiv; Nielsen Straarup, Krista

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, correlates and outcomes of perceived stigmatization in patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD).......The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, correlates and outcomes of perceived stigmatization in patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD)....

  20. Phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large cohort of diabetes patients: visual acuity outcomes and prognostic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit;

    2011-01-01

    To assess visual acuity outcomes after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large population of diabetic patients with all degrees of diabetic retinopathy.......To assess visual acuity outcomes after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large population of diabetic patients with all degrees of diabetic retinopathy....

  1. The impact of the therapeutic alliance on treatment outcome in patients with dissociative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Elisabeth; Brand, Bethany L.; Mattanah, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that the therapeutic alliance plays an important role in enhancing treatment outcome among individuals with a variety of disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome has not yet been studied in dissociative disorders (DD). Objectives The current study sought to investigate the impact of alliance on treatment outcome for DD patients. Methods Data from a naturalistic, longitudinal international treatment study of DD patients and their therapists were analyzed to determine if the alliance, as reported by patients and therapists, was associated with treatment outcome. Results Patients with higher self-rated alliance had fewer symptoms of dissociation, PTSD, and general distress, as well as higher levels of therapist-rated adaptive functioning. Over time, self-rated alliance scores predicted better outcomes, after controlling for patient adaptive capacities including symptom management at the time when the alliance ratings were made. Patient-rated alliance was more strongly associated with outcome than therapist-rated alliance. Conclusion Therapists who work with DD patients should understand the importance of the alliance on treatment outcome. These findings are consistent with previous literature demonstrating the importance of developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic alliance, although the effect sizes of individuals with DD were stronger than what has been found in many other patient groups. A greater understanding of the impact of the alliance in traumatized individuals may contribute to better outcomes for these individuals. PMID:24616755

  2. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) AGENCY... appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the...

  3. Disease burden and patient reported outcomes among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: an ethnography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siva Narayanan,1 Victoria Guyatt,2 Alessandra Franceschetti,3 Emily L Hautamaki1 1Ipsos Healthcare, Columbia, MD, USA; 2Ipsos Ethnography Centre of Excellence (ECE, London, UK; 3Ipsos Healthcare, London, UK Objectives: To assess the impact of psoriasis on health-related quality of life (HRQoL.Methods: An ethnographic study of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis was conducted in the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Brazil, and Canada to explore patients' views on treatment and the impact of psoriasis on HRQoL. Anthropologists and ethnographers spent a minimum of 5.5 hours with each consented patient and filmed their behaviors in everyday situations. Visual data and notes were analyzed to identify HRQoL-related themes.Results: The study included 50 adult patients. Patients described their appearance with disgust and self-loathing. Frustration was expressed due to a perceived lack of control of their lives. Prior to initiation of biologic treatment, daily rituals absorbed a good part of their day, including applying creams, checking one's appearance, and covering the body. Due to a lack of cultural discourse and patient's difficulty in articulating the impact of psoriasis, partners and family did not know how to react nor did they realize the full extent of the problem, and many patients experienced perceived social discrimination due to psoriasis, leaving them with feelings of isolation. Patients established on biologic treatment noticed a significant physical improvement and regained confidence, but psychosocial impacts, including social isolation, remained.Conclusion: This ethnographic study vividly depicted the unarticulated and emotional impact of psoriasis on the everyday lives of patients and presents an effective method of assessing HRQoL in chronic diseases.Keywords: psoriasis, health-related quality of life, ethnography, patient reported outcomes, conceptual model

  4. CLINICAL HISTORY AND OUTCOME OF 59 PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC HYPERPROLACTINEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLUIJMER, AV; LAPPOHN, RE

    1992-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical course of hyperprolactinemia without demonstrable cause. Design: Prospective study of all patients with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia first seen between 1974 and 1985. Setting: Outpatient Department of University Hospital. Patients: Fifty-nine patients followed

  5. Patient-reported outcome after total hip arthroplasty: comparison between lateral and posterior approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Broeng, Leif; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    2017-01-01

    . In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the hypothesis that patient-reported outcomes are better in patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) with PA than in those who have undergone THA with LA, 12 months postoperatively. Patients and methods — 80 patients with hip osteoarthritis (mean age 61......Background and purpose — Criticism of the lateral approach (LA) for hip arthroplasty is mainly based on the risk of poor patient-reported outcomes compared to the posterior approach (PA). However, there have been no controlled studies comparing patient-reported outcomes between them......-Pain, HOOS-Quality-Of-Life, EQ-5D, UCLA Activity Score, and limping. Results — We found no statistically signifi cant difference in the improvements in HOOS-PS between the treatment groups at 12-month follow-up. All secondary outcomes showed similar results except for limping, where PA patients improved...

  6. Cochlear implant outcomes in patients with superior canal dehiscence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Roberts, Daniel S.; Niesten, Marlien E F; Dilger, Amanda E.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether adult cochlear implant (CI) users with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) or asymptomatic superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) have different surgical, vestibular, and audiologic outcomes when compared to CI users with normal temporal bone anatomy. Meth

  7. Patient Care Outcomes: Implications for the Military Health Services Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-05

    because of reports in the media. For example, in an article in Time it was stated, "Treatment patterns can vary among communities because doctors in...Outcome assessment. (1987). New England Journal of Medicine, 317(4), 251-252. 177. Partridge, C. J. (1982). The outcome of physiotherapy and its...measurement. Physiotherapy , 68(11), 362-363. 178. Penckofer, S. H., & Holm, K. (1984). Early appraisal of coronary revascularization on quality of life

  8. Complications and short-term patient outcomes of periacetabular osteotomy for symptomatic mild hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Fields, Kara G; Wentzel, Catherine; Nawabi, Danyal H; Kelly, Bryan T; Sink, Ernest L

    2017-02-21

    The purpose of our study is to identify complications and early functional outcome scores in patients treated with periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for mild acetabular dysplasia. The study population consisted of patients from a single centre prospective hip registry undergoing PAO with mild acetabular dysplasia (LCEA ≥18° and ≤25°; n = 27 patients; Mild Dysplasia group). A comparison group of patients undergoing PAO with more severe acetabular dysplasia (lateral centre-edge angle [LCEA] ≤17°; n = 50 patients; Severe Dysplasia group) were included as a comparison cohort. Demographics, radiographic findings, complications, and functional outcome scores were recorded at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively (mean 15 months [range 6-30]). Demographic characteristics were similar in patients with mild dysplasia undergoing PAO compared with more severe dysplasia. Achievement of radiological correction and complication rates were not different between the 2 groups. Functional outcome scores showed similar improvements in modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), hip outcome score (HOS) activities of daily living (ADL), HOS Sport, and the international Hip Outcome Tool-33 (iHOT-33) at all time points between the 2 groups with over 90% of patients in the mild dysplasia group achieving a minimum important change (MIC) in functional outcome scores at final follow-up. Patients with symptomatic mild acetabular dysplasia undergoing PAO have similar complication rates and functional outcomes as a cohort of patients with more severe dysplasia.

  9. Agreement between touch-screen and paper-based patient-reported outcomes for patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, E E; Amris, K; Bartels, E M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare data based on computerized and paper versions of health status questionnaires (HSQs) for sampling patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). In addition, to examine associations between patient characteristics (age, education, computer experience......) and differences between versions. Finally, to evaluate the acceptability of computer-based questionnaires among patients with FM. METHOD: The study population comprised female patients diagnosed with FM. All patients completed six HSQs: the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the Major Depression Inventory...

  10. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  11. A viewpoint on the impact of device advisories on patient-centered outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; van den Berg, Martha; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2009-01-01

    Device advisories due to potential hardware failure comprise one of the downsides of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. The impact of advisories on patient-centered outcomes has largely been overlooked. We examined the impact of ICD advisories on patient-centered outcomes via....... The sample size across studies varied between 30 and 86 patients subject to an advisory; four of six studies used a case-control design and two of six a prospective study design. There was considerable variability between notification of the advisory and assessment of the patient-centered outcomes, ranging...

  12. Practical considerations for the implementation of health outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Robin S

    2009-01-01

    The collection of health outcomes information is important for effective management of the health care system. The Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) program is implementing a set of nurse-sensitive health outcome measures across the province of Ontario. This paper examines some of the opportunities and challenges of implementing measures across multiple organizations and multiple sectors of the health care system.

  13. Systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions frequently consider patient-important outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameur, Hayet; Ravaud, Philippe; Fayard, Florence; Riveros, Carolina; Dechartres, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether recently published and ongoing systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions assess patient-important outcomes. For this methodological review, we searched MEDLINE via PubMed for recently published systematic reviews and online registry of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) for ongoing systematic reviews. We selected systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. We extracted all outcomes defined in the methods section and categorized them. Mortality, other clinical events, pain, quality of life, function, and therapeutic decisions were considered patient-important outcomes. We included 420 systematic reviews: 90 Cochrane reviews, 200 other published reviews, and 130 registered ongoing reviews. Primary outcomes were defined in 85 Cochrane reviews (95%), 98 (49%) other published reviews and all ongoing reviews. At least one patient-important outcome was defined as a primary outcome in 81/85 Cochrane reviews (95%), 78/98 other published reviews (80%), and 117/130 ongoing reviews (90%). Considering all outcomes assessed, at least one patient-important outcome was evaluated in 90/90 Cochrane reviews (100%), 189/200 other published reviews (95%), and 121/130 ongoing reviews (93%). Most recent systematic reviews aim to assess patient-important outcomes, which contrasts with RCTs. These results suggest some important gaps between primary and secondary research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Liu, Yu; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Stock, Ronald; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-04-01

    A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P = 0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P tai chi, patient-reported improvement in the PDQ-8 and VPS was significantly correlated with their clinical outcomes of UPDRS-ME and a 50-foot walk, but these correlations were not statistically different from those shown for resistance training or stretching. However, patient-reported outcomes from tai chi training were associated with greater probability of continued exercise behavior than were either clinical outcomes or patient-reported outcomes from resistance training or stretching. Tai chi improved patient-reported perceptions of health-related benefits, which were found to be associated with a greater probability of exercise adherence. The findings indicate the potential of patient perceptions to drive exercise

  15. Outcome Measures in Functional Urology : Towards evaluation through patient reported outcome measures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. 't Hoen (Lisette)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Pelvic floor disorders are characterized by four domains: urinary symptoms, anorectal symptoms, pelvic organ prolapse and sexual dysfunction. The symptoms of the different domains have a significant impact on patient’s quality of life. Traditional outcome measures, such a

  16. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-07

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. The Aliskiren Trial to Minimize OutcomeS in Patients with HEart failure trial (ATMOSPHERE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V; Abraham, William T;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND METHODS: To: (i) describe the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSPHERE and the changes in the planned analysis of ATMOSPHERE resulting from the mandated discontinuation of study treatment in patients with diabetes; (ii) compare the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSP......AIMS AND METHODS: To: (i) describe the baseline characteristics of patients in ATMOSPHERE and the changes in the planned analysis of ATMOSPHERE resulting from the mandated discontinuation of study treatment in patients with diabetes; (ii) compare the baseline characteristics of patients...... body mass index and more co-morbidity, especially hypertension and coronary heart disease. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was slightly lower in those with diabetes compared with those without. CONCLUSION: ATMOSPHERE will determine whether patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction...

  18. Age Related Incidence and Early Outcomes of Hip Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study of 1177 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Ravikiran; Eranki Vivek; Pillai Anand; Hadidi Mahar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Methods Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64), group B ...

  19. The Promise of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Turning Theory into Reality: A Uniform Approach to Patient-Reported Outcomes Across Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, James P

    2016-05-01

    PROMIS, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, is opening new possibilities to explore and learn how patient (or proxy) self-report of core symptoms and health-related quality of life can meaningfully advance clinical research and patient care. PROMIS leverages Item Response Theory to agnostically assess, across diseases and conditions or clinical settings, numerous universally applicable core "domains" of health (symptoms and functioning) from the patient perspective. Importantly, PROMIS is enabling the testing and adoption of computerized adaptive testing, which holds great potential to minimize patient burden while maximizing accuracy.

  20. Assessment of patient-reported outcome measures in the surgical treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straatman, Jennifer; van der Wielen, Nicole; Joosten, Pieter J; Terwee, Caroline B; Cuesta, Miguel A; Jansma, Elise P; van der Peet, Donald L

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is responsible for 10 % of all cancer-related deaths worldwide. With improved operative techniques and neo-adjuvant therapy, survival rates are increasing. Outcomes of interest are shifting to quality of life (QOL), with many different tools available. The aim of this study was to assess which patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used to measure QOL after a gastrectomy for cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted for original articles investigating QOL after gastrectomy. Two authors independently selected relevant articles, conducted clinical appraisal and extracted data (P.J. and J.S.). Out of 3414 articles, 26 studies were included, including a total of 4690 patients. These studies included ten different PROMs, which could be divided into generic, symptom-specific and disease-specific questionnaires. The EORTC and the FACT questionnaires use an oncological overall QOL module and an organ-specific module. Only one validation study regarding the use of the EORTC after surgery for gastric cancer was available, demonstrating good psychometric properties and clinical validity. A great variety of PROMs are being used in the measurement of QOL after surgery for gastric cancer. A questionnaire with a general module along with a disease-specific module for the assessment of QOL seems most desirable, such as the EORTC and the FACT with their specific modules. Both are developed in different treatment modalities, such as in surgical patients. EORTC is the most widely used questionnaire and therefore allows for comparison of new studies to existing data. Future studies are needed to assess content validity in surgical gastric cancer patients.

  1. pregnancy outcome among patients with sickle cell disease in jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    Conclusion: Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients is associated with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and ... presentation was 19.3 +/- 7.7 weeks with only ... *Some patients had multiple complications. ... Intrauterine fetal death. 7. 20.0.

  2. Practice based evidence: incorporating clinical heterogeneity and patient-reported outcomes for comparative effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Gassaway, Julie

    2010-06-01

    Comparative effectiveness research analyzes groups of patients and looks for associations between medical treatments and patient outcomes. To make meaningful comparisons of medical interventions, one must consider clinical heterogeneity of patient populations, intervention combinations, and outcomes. To explain how practice-based evidence (PBE) study methodology measures and controls for heterogeneity of patients, treatments, and outcomes seen in real-world clinical settings. Overview of PBE methodology. PBE study designs address comparative effectiveness by creating a comprehensive set of patient, treatment, and outcome variables, and analyzing them to identify treatments associated with better outcomes for specific types of patients. PBE studies are an alternative to randomized controlled trials, well suited to determine what works best for specific patient types, and provide clinicians with a rational basis for treatment recommendations for individual patients. They provide a holistic picture of patients, treatments, and outcomes, with no preset limits to the number of variables that can be included. Such an approach is needed for high quality comparative effectiveness research.

  3. Predicting Outcome in Comatose Patients: The Role of EEG Reactivity to Quantifiable Electrical Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the value of quantifiable electrical stimuli as a reliable method to assess electroencephalogram reactivity (EEG-R for the early prognostication of outcome in comatose patients. Methods. EEG was recorded in consecutive adults in coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR or stroke. EEG-R to standard electrical stimuli was tested. Each patient received a 3-month follow-up by the Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories (CPC or modified Rankin scale (mRS score. Results. Twenty-two patients met the inclusion criteria. In the CPR group, 6 of 7 patients with EEG-R had good outcomes (positive predictive value (PPV, 85.7% and 4 of 5 patients without EEG-R had poor outcomes (negative predictive value (NPV, 80%. The sensitivity and specificity were 85.7% and 80%, respectively. In the stroke group, 6 of 7 patients with EEG-R had good outcomes (PPV, 85.7%; all of the 3 patients without EEG-R had poor outcomes (NPV, 100%. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 75%, respectively. Of all patients, the presence of EEG-R showed 92.3% sensitivity, 77.7% specificity, 85.7% PPV, and 87.5% NPV. Conclusion. EEG-R to quantifiable electrical stimuli might be a good positive predictive factor for the prognosis of outcome in comatose patients after CPR or stroke.

  4. Effect of nonoperative treatment on the outcome of patients with posttraumatic hydrocephalus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伏林山; 汤云海; 王世余

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcome of non-operative treatment with the outcome of surgical intraventricular drainage for patients with posttraumatic hydrocephalus including complications, mortality and favorable outcome.   Methods: Thirty-nine patients were assigned to a nonoperative treatment group and 38 patents to a surgical intraventricular drainage group. Each patients outcome was evaluated 3 years after treatment by using Glasgow Outcome Scale.   Results: In the nonoperative treatment group the rate of favorable outcome (good recovery or mild disability) was 89.74% (35 of 39 patients) and the mortality was 2.56% (1 of 39 patients). In the surgical intraventricular drainage group the rate of favorable outcome was 71.05% (27 of 38 patients) and the mortality was 13.16% (5 of 38 patients; P<0.05). Mortality was not significantly different between the two groups.   Conclusions:  Nonoperative treatment may be better than surgical intraventricular drainage for patients with posttraumatic hydrocephalus.

  5. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus. METHODS: A prospective observational pilot study of patients (n = 39) was performed. Quantitative sensory testing, visual analogue scales for anxiety and pain, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HADS) Scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were completed, and serum nitric oxide metabolites were measured perioperatively. Excised disc tissue was examined histologically, and immunohistochemistry for phospholipase A2 was performed. RESULTS: Ten patients (26%) had an unsatisfactory outcome. Those with a satisfactory outcome had greater preoperative pain perception thresholds over the affected dermatome, which decreased by 2 months postoperatively. These patients also demonstrated a decrease in nitric oxide metabolites from preoperatively to 18 h postoperatively. Greater preoperative HADS scores, and greater pain intensity 4 h and 24 h postoperatively were associated with an unsatisfactory outcome. CONCLUSION: Patients with a satisfactory outcome demonstrate a decrease in pain perception thresholds and plasma concentration of stable nitric oxide metabolites during the perioperative period. Patients with an unsatisfactory outcome following lumbar discectomy experience greater preoperative anxiety and greater pain during the early postoperative period. These findings justify a larger prospective observational study.

  6. Exercise adherence improving long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence within the prescribed physical therapy treatment period and after physical therapy discharge on patients' outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or kn

  7. Subjective Quality Information: Effects of Patient Experience Outcomes and Display Formats on Evaluation and Choice Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Martin; Renner, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of subjective quality information in the form of aggregate patient experience outcomes on respondent evaluation and intended choice of hospitals. We compared clinical performance-based quality measures (i.e., wound infection rates) with participant evaluations and choice intentions when they were additionally provided with subjective quality information (i.e., patient experience outcomes in different display formats). Results suggest that patient experience outcomes significantly affected the evaluations and choice intentions. Additionally, we found significant effects of subjective information display formats. Limitations, directions for future research, and implications for publishing subjective quality information in health care markets are discussed.

  8. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nashmia Qamar1,*, Andrea A Pappalardo2,*, Vineet M Arora3, Valerie G Press41Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Internal Medicine-Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Section of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA *Drs Qamar and Pappalardo contributed equally to this paperAbstract: Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results; none showed true harm (0; “negative”; and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”. Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and

  9. Linking outcomes management and practice improvement. Structured care methodologies: evolution and use in patient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, L; Houston, S

    1999-01-01

    Structured care methodologies are tools that provide a comprehensive approach to patient care delivery. These tools have evolved in their application and purpose over the years. In many situations, multiple tools are needed to obtain the best outcomes for a patient. The presence of a SCM does not preclude clinical judgment. On the contrary, the fundamental purpose of any SCM is to assist practitioners in implementing practice patterns associated with good clinical judgment, research-based interventions, and improved patient outcomes. These tools support smooth operation and appropriate use of resources, establish a means of patient management across the continuum of care, facilitate collaboration among disciplines, reflect patient outcomes, and provide outcomes data. Data from SCMs permit benchmarking, comparison of pre-implementation and post-implementation outcomes, development of action plans for quality enhancement, identification of high-risk patients, identification of issues and problems in the system that require interventions, and the development of research protocols and studies. Structured care methodology development and implementation can be challenging, rewarding, and at times frustrating. When used appropriately, these tools can have a major impact on the standardization of care and the achievement of desired outcomes. However, individual patient needs may supersede adherence to a tool. The challenge then becomes one of balancing the unique needs of each patient and appropriate use of SCMs. Change comes slowly, but persistence pays off.

  10. Treatment options and outcomes for glioblastoma in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvold ND

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nils D Arvold,1 David A Reardon2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Age remains the most powerful prognostic factor among glioblastoma (GBM patients. Half of all patients with GBM are aged 65 years or older at the time of diagnosis, and the incidence rate of GBM in patients aged over 65 years is increasing rapidly. Median survival for elderly GBM patients is less than 6 months and reflects less favorable tumor biologic factors, receipt of less aggressive care, and comorbid disease. The standard of care for elderly GBM patients remains controversial. Based on limited data, extensive resection appears to be more beneficial than biopsy. For patients with favorable Karnofsky performance status (KPS, adjuvant radiotherapy (RT has a demonstrated survival benefit with no observed decrement in quality of life. Concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ along with RT to 60 Gy have not been prospectively studied among patients aged over 70 years but should be considered for patients aged 65–70 years with excellent KPS. Based on the recent NOA-08 and Nordic randomized trials, testing for O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation should be performed routinely immediately after surgery to aid in adjuvant treatment decisions. Patients aged over 70 years with favorable KPS, or patients aged 60–70 years with borderline KPS, should be considered for monotherapy utilizing standard TMZ dosing for patients with MGMT-methylated tumors, and hypofractionated RT (34 Gy in ten fractions or 40 Gy in 15 fractions for patients with MGMT-unmethylated tumors. The ongoing European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/National Cancer Institute of Canada trial will help clarify the role for concurrent TMZ with hypofractionated RT. For elderly patients with poor KPS, reasonable

  11. Association Between Medicare Summary Star Ratings for Patient Experience and Clinical Outcomes in US Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Trzeciak MD, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS released new summary star ratings for US hospitals based on patient experience. We aimed to test the association between CMS patient experience star ratings and clinical outcomes. Methods: We analyzed risk-adjusted data for more than 3000 US hospitals from CMS Hospital Compare using linear regression. Results: We found that better patient experience was associated with favorable clinical outcomes. Specifically, a higher number of stars for patient experience had a statistically significant association with lower rates of many in-hospital complications. A higher patient experience star rating also had a statistically significant association with lower rates of unplanned readmissions to the hospital within 30 days. Conclusion: Better patient experience according to the CMS star ratings is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. These results support the inclusion of patient experience data in the framework of how hospitals are paid for services.

  12. What impact does nursing care left undone have on patient outcomes? Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Maruotti, Antonello; Ball, Jane; Briggs, Jim; Meredith, Paul; Redfern, Oliver C; Kovacs, Caroline; Prytherch, David; Smith, Gary B; Griffiths, Peter

    2017-08-31

    Systematic review of the impact of missed nursing care on outcomes in adults, on acute hospital wards and in nursing homes. A considerable body of evidence support the hypothesis that lower levels of registered nurses on duty increases the likelihood of patients dying on hospital wards, and the risk of many aspects of care being either delayed or left undone (missed). However, the direct consequence of missed care remains unclear. Systematic review. We searched Medline (via Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) and Scopus for studies examining the association of missed nursing care and at least one patient outcome. Studies regarding registered nurses, healthcare assistants/support workers/nurses' aides were retained. Only adult settings were included. Because of the nature of the review, qualitative studies, editorials, letters and commentaries were excluded. PRISMA guidelines were followed in reporting the review. Fourteen studies reported associations between missed care and patient outcomes. Some studies were secondary analyses of a large parent study. Most of the studies used nurse or patient reports to capture outcomes, with some using administrative data. Four studies found significantly decreased patient satisfaction associated with missed care. Seven studies reported associations with one or more patient outcomes including medication errors, urinary-tract infections (UTIs), patient falls, pressure ulcers, critical incidents, quality of care, and patient readmissions. Three studies investigated whether there was a link between missed care and mortality and from these results no clear associations emerged. The review shows the modest evidence base of studies exploring missed care and patient outcomes generated mostly from nurse and patient self-reported data. In order to support the assertion that nurse staffing levels and skill mix are associated with adverse outcomes as a result of missed care. More research that uses objective staffing and outcome measures is required

  13. Outcome of patients treated with automated peritoneal dialysis: Effects of selection of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Karkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of selection of peritoneal dialysis patients who used auto-mated PD (APD as a first renal replacement therapy (RRT option, we studied two groups of adult chronic kidney disease (CKD patients treated with APD over a period of 4 years: group 1 included 30 patients in whom APD was the first choice for RRT and group 2 included 40 patients transferred from failed hemodialysis (HD treatment. Both groups were matched for the original causes of CKD and comorbid conditions. However, group 1 had significantly higher residual renal function (RRF than group 2 [glomerular filtration rate (GFR 11.85 ± 4 mL/min and urine output 995 ± 465 mL/day vs. 3.69 ± 3.7 mL/min and 340 ± 447 mL/day, respectively, P = 0.0001] and Kt/v (2.7 ± 0.7 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, respectively, P = 0.006. Most of the patients were compliant with their APD prescription, performed ideal PD techniques, achieved adequate dialysis and fluid ultra-filtration, and experienced much less than average infectious and non-infectious complications. However, group 1 achieved better clinical outcome than group 2, including relatively higher sur-vival rate and kidney transplantation, significantly fewer episodes of peritonitis per year (0.09 vs. 0.14, respectively, P = 0.0001, higher serum albumin (2.95 ± 0.3 vs. 2.7 ± 0.27 g/dL, respectively, P = 0.035, hemoglobin (11.5 ± 0.9 vs. 10.6 ± 0.7 g/dL, respectively, P = 0.022 and lower para-thormone levels (283 ± 117 vs. 389 ± 269 pg/mL, respectively, P = 0.02. They also maintained significantly higher total fluid removal compared to group 2 (1120 ± 330 vs. 560 ± 300 mL/day, respectively, P = 0.004, higher RRF (GFR 8 ± 2.6 mL/min vs. 1.8 ± 2.4 mL/min, respectively, P = 0.0001, and urine output (556 ± 447 mL/day vs. 240 ± 347 mL/day, respectively, P = 0.004, and significantly higher Kt/v (2.8 ± 0.7 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, respectively, P = 0.2. In conclusion, in CKD patients, PD is a viable initial modality of RRT, and with better

  14. [Psychometric properties of Q-DIO, an instrument to measure the quality of documented nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Staub, Maria; Lunney, Margaret; Lavin, Mary Ann; Needham, Ian; Odenbreit, Matthias; van Achterberg, Theo

    2010-04-01

    The instrument Q-DIO was developed in the years 2005 till 2006 to measure the quality of documented nursing diagnoses, interventions, and nursing sensitive patient outcomes. Testing psychometric properties of the Q-DIO (Quality of nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes.) was the study aim. Instrument testing included internal consistency, test-retest reliability, interrater reliability, item analyses, and an assessment of the objectivity. To render variation in scores, a random strata sample of 60 nursing documentations was drawn. The strata represented 30 nursing documentations with and 30 without application of theory based, standardised nursing language. Internal consistency of the subscale nursing diagnoses as process showed Cronbach's Alpha 0.83 [0.78, 0.88]; nursing diagnoses as product 0.98 [0.94, 0.99]; nursing interventions 0.90 [0.85, 0.94]; and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes 0.99 [0.95, 0.99]. With Cohen's Kappa of 0.95, the intrarater reliability was good. The interrater reliability showed a Kappa of 0.94 [0.90, 0.96]. Item analyses confirmed the fulfilment of criteria for degree of difficulty and discriminative validity of the items. In this study, Q-DIO has shown to be a reliable instrument. It allows measuring the documented quality of nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes with and without implementation of theory based, standardised nursing languages. Studies for further testing of Q-DIO in other settings are recommended. The results implicitly support the use of nursing classifications such as NANDA, NIC and NOC.

  15. Engaging patients and stakeholders in research proposal review: the patient-centered outcomes research institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Forsythe, Laura P; Lauer, Michael; Rotter, Jason; Ioannidis, John P A; Beal, Anne; Frank, Lori; Selby, Joseph V

    2014-07-15

    The inaugural round of merit review for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in November 2012 included patients and other stakeholders, as well as scientists. This article examines relationships among scores of the 3 reviewer types, changes in scoring after in-person discussion, and the effect of inclusion of patient and stakeholder reviewers on the review process. In the first phase, 363 scientists scored 480 applications. In the second phase, 59 scientists, 21 patients, and 31 stakeholders provided a "prediscussion" score and a final "postdiscussion" score after an in-person meeting for applications. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize levels of agreement among and within reviewer types before and after discussion. Before discussion, there was little agreement among average scores given by the 4 lead scientific reviewers and patient and stakeholder reviewers. After discussion, the 4 primary reviewers showed mild convergence in their scores, and the 21-member panel came to a much stronger agreement. Of the 25 awards with the best (and lowest) scores after phase 2, only 13 had ranked in the top 25 after the phase 1 review by scientists. Five percent of the 480 proposals submitted were funded. The authors conclude that patient and stakeholder reviewers brought different perspectives to the review process but that in-person discussion led to closer agreement among reviewer types. It is not yet known whether these conclusions are generalizable to future rounds of peer review. Future work would benefit from additional data collection for evaluation purposes and from long-term evaluation of the effect on the funded research.

  16. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Wiltink

    Full Text Available Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT. No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder.In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions.Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent, while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not.We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research.Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394.

  17. Serum magnesium levels and clinical outcome of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study in 60 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Z

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypomagnesemia is commonly encountered in patients with a wide variety of diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, cardiovascular emergencies, head trauma, migraine attacks, seizure and preeclampsia. It seems to be associated with a poor clinical outcome. This study considers the prevalence and temporal distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal SAH and its correlation with the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI as well as the neurological outcome after a period of three months.Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, 60 patients were admitted to the emergency ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital with acute SAH. Serum magnesium levels were measured during the first 72 hours, days 4-7, and second and third weeks after SAH. The three-month outcome was assessed according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Clinical SAH grading was performed according to the criteria of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS and the patients were allocated to "Good" (GOS = 4, 5 and "Poor" (GOS= 1-3 outcome groups. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia was assessed in both patient groups. Fisher exact test was used to analyze data.Results: Hypomagnesemia occurred in 22% of patients during the first 72 hours after SAH. It was associated with more prevalent DCI (p<0.05, whereas low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 17% of patients and the second week (22% of patients after SAH were correlated with poor clinical outcome (p<0.05. No correlation was found between first 72 hour-hypomagnesemia and poor clinical outcome at three months.Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia occurs after aneurysmal SAH and it may predict the occurrence of DCI, while low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 and within the second week of event predict poor clinical outcome at three months. Treatment of this electrolyte disturbance may have a favourable effect on the clinical outcome of patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  18. Enduring improvement in Oswestry Disability Index outcomes following lumbar microscopic interlaminar decompression: An appraisal of prospectively collected patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Babar Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our present study aims to assess the short and long-term postoperative outcome of microscopic interlaminar decompression from a neurosurgical center in a developing country and also aims to further determine any predictors of functional outcome. Materials and Methods: All patients with moderate to severe symptomatic stenosis undergoing elective posterior lumbar spinal decompression were prospectively enrolled in a database. Preoperative, 2 weeks and 2 years postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores were determined for all patients. These scores were retrospectively compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Further, linear regression modelling was applied to determine the effect of preoperative ODI, body mass index, age, prior physiotherapy, duration of symptoms, and single or multiple level decompression on the change in ODI at 2 weeks and 2 years follow-up respectively. Results: A total of 60 consecutive patients (40 males, 20 females were included for statistical analysis. The percentage of patients with a minimum clinically important difference (MCID, using an ODI threshold value of 10, was 86.7% (n = 52 at the 2 weeks postoperative follow-up. At the 2 years follow-up assessment, 3.3% (n = 2 patients who had earlier not achieved MCID did so, 78.3% (n = 47 of patients were found to have a change in ODI score of <10 or no change, while 18.3% (n = 11 reported a deterioration in their ODI scores. The preoperative ODI score was an independent predictor of change in ODI score at 2 weeks and 2 years respectively (P < 0.0005. The duration of symptoms prior to surgery was found to predict the change in ODI at 2 years follow-up (P = 0.04. Conclusion: The evidence regarding the long-term and short-term efficacy of microscopic interlaminar decompression in symptomatic lumbar stenosis is overwhelming. Preoperative ODI scores and duration of symptoms prior to surgery can predict postoperative outcomes.

  19. Can audio recording of outpatient consultations improve patient outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolderslund, Maiken; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Axboe, Mette

    different departments: Orthopedics, Urology, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. A total of 5,460 patients will be included from the outpatient clinics. All patients randomized to an intervention group are offered audio recording of their consultation. An Interactive Voice Response platform enables an audio......Introduction Information provided in an outpatient consultation concerns medication, diagnostic tests, treatment and rehabilitation which is crucial knowledge in regards of patient compliance, decision making and general patient satisfaction. Despite good communication skills among clinicians...... the communication is challenged by the fact that patients tend to forget or misunderstand a great deal of the information given. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of providing patients with an audio recording of the consultation. Methods A randomized controlled trial involving four...

  20. Improving outcomes for patients receiving transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a cancer with increasing incidence in the veteran population. This type of cancer can be treated with transarterial chemoembolization, an invasive procedure performed by specially trained interventional radiologists. The most common serious complications are liver failure, sepsis secondary to ischemic cholecystitis or liver abscess, gastrointestinal bleeding, and death. However, nursing staff and physicians often have little or no experience in caring for patients in the hospital who have had this procedure. Patient safety can be threatened by this lack of knowledge. Sources of threat to patient safety are described by the Institute of Medicine as falling into 4 categories: management, workforce, work processes, and organizational culture. To promote patient safety, defenses need to be deployed to address each category. In this article, the author provides a case example, describes threats to the patient's safety, and describes a plan to improve the care of all patients undergoing this procedure.

  1. Clinical applicability of nursing outcomes in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Barragan da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: to evaluate the clinical applicability of outcomes, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical MobilityMETHOD: longitudinal study conducted in 2012 in a university hospital, with 21 patients undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty, evaluated daily by pairs of trained data collectors. Data were collected using an instrument containing five Nursing Outcomes, 16 clinical indicators and a five point Likert scale, and statistically analyzed.RESULTS: The outcomes Body Positioning: self-initiated, Mobility, Knowledge: prescribed activity, and Fall Prevention Behavior presented significant increases in mean scores when comparing the first and final evaluations (p<0.001 and (p=0.035.CONCLUSION: the use of the NOC outcomes makes it possible to demonstrate the clinical progression of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility, as well as its applicability in this context.

  2. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  3. Connectivity-based predictions of hand motor outcome for patients at the subacute stage after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eLindow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Connectivity-based predictions of hand motor outcome have been proposed to be useful in stroke patients. We intended to assess the prognostic value of different imaging methods on short-term (3 months and long-term (6 months motor outcome after stroke. Methods. We measured resting state functional connectivity (rsFC, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI and grip strength in 19 stroke patients within the first days (5-9 days after stroke. Outcome measurements for short-term (3 months and long-term (6 months motor function was assessed by the Motricity Index (MI of the upper limb and the Box and Block test (BB. Patients were predominantly mildly affected since signed consent was necessary at inclusion. We performed a multiple stepwise regression analysis to compare the predictive value of rsFC, DWI and clinical measurements. Results. Patients showed relevant improvement in both motor outcome tests. As expected grip strength at inclusion was a predictor for short- and long-term motor outcome as assessed by MI. Diffusion-based tract volume (DTV of the tracts between ipsilesional primary motor cortex and contralesional anterior cerebellar hemisphere showed a strong trend (p=0.05 for a predictive power for long-term motor outcome as measured by MI. DTV of the interhemispheric tracts between both primary motor cortices was predictive for both short - and long-term motor outcome in BB. rsFC was not associated with motor outcome. Conclusions. Grip strength is a good predictor of hand motor outcome concerning strength-related measurements (MI for mildly affected subacute patients. Therefore additional connectivity measurements seem to be redundant in this group. Using more complex movement recruiting bilateral motor areas as an outcome parameter, DTV and in particular interhemispheric pathways might enhance predictive value of hand motor outcome.

  4. Improving outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Bewick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of adult morbidity and mortality worldwide despite decades of effective antibiotics and vaccination initiatives. There have been no recent significant improvements in outcomes, including 30-day mortality. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most prevalent causative pathogen in CAP, being found in up to half of cases. In September 2006 a childhood pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-7) was introduced, leading to reductions in vaccine-type (...

  5. Long-term outcome of electrical cardioversion in patients with chronic atrial flutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, HJGM; VanGelder, IC; Tieleman, RG; Brugemann, J; DeKam, PJ; Gosselink, ATM; BinkBoelkens, MTE; Lie, KI

    1997-01-01

    Objective-To determine she long-term outcome of serial electrical cardioversion therapy in patients with chronic atrial flutter. Design-Prospective study, case series. Setting-University hospital. Patients-50 consecutive patients with chronic (> 24 hours) atrial flutter without a previous relapse on

  6. Clinical Factors and Outcomes in Patients with Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Hao Huang

    2005-07-01

    Conclusion: A high index of suspicion and aggressive diagnostic imaging can facilitate early diagnosis and improve outcomes for patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. Risk stratification showed that elderly patients with metabolic acidosis, bandemia, or elevated AST and BUN had a poor prognosis. Greater therapeutic intervention is advocated to reduce mortality in high-risk patients with acute mesenteric ischemia.

  7. A cohort study on the outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝晓晖

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical curative effect and outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis(MDRTB)in elderly patients.Methods Fifty-nine elderly patients with MDR-TB were enrolled from Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital from January 2007 to January 2010,and80 younger patients with MDR-TB during the same period served as the control group.Clinical characteristics,out-

  8. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured? Evidence from Heart Attack Patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome - the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-200

  9. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured? Evidence from Heart Attack Patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome - the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-200

  10. Characteristics, therapy and outcome in an unselected and prospectively registered cohort of pancreatic cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, J K; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Schønnemann, K R;

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is associated with a dismal prognosis. Few studies have examined characteristics and outcome in an unselected population-based cohort of PC patients. Therefore, we investigated patient baseline characteristics, therapy choices and survival in a complete cohort of patients...

  11. Treatment outcome in performance status 2 advanced NSCLC patients administered platinum-based combination chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Aasebø, Ulf; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding chemotherapy to patients with advanced NSCLC (ANSCLC) and performance status (PS) 2. Using data from a national multicenter study comparing two third-generation carboplatin-based regimens in ANSCLC patients, we evaluated the outcome of PS 2 patients...

  12. Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Juul Mylam, Karen;

    Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions......Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions...

  13. Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Juul Mylam, Karen

    Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions......Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions...

  14. Proteomic Analysis Identifies Outcome-Predictive Clusters in Patients with Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not otherwise specified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Maja; Pedersen, Martin Bjerregård; Poulsen, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic Analysis Identifies Outcome-Predictive Clusters in Patients with Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not otherwise specified......Proteomic Analysis Identifies Outcome-Predictive Clusters in Patients with Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not otherwise specified...

  15. Clinical outcomes after posterolateral lumbar fusion in workers' compensation patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Kantamneni, Neha R; Mugavin, Mark O; Djurasovic, Mladen

    2010-09-01

    Case-control propensity matched. To compare clinical outcomes after lumbar fusion in patients receiving workers' compensation with a case-matched control group who are not on workers' compensation. Previous studies have demonstrated poor outcomes in patients receiving workers' compensation after lumbar fusion. However, a case-control study where patients are matched for covariates known to affect outcomes after lumbar fusion, including baseline clinical outcome measures, has not been done. From 783 patients who underwent posterolateral fusion with complete preoperative and 2-year postoperative outcome measures, 60 patients who were receiving workers' compensation were identified. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and back and leg pain numerical rating scales. Propensity scoring technique was used to match these patients with a control group not receiving workers' compensation using sex, age, smoking status, body mass index, diagnosis, number of levels fused, preoperative ODI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), SF-36 Mental Component Summary, and back and leg pain scores, producing 58 matched pairs. There were no significant differences between the demographics, job classification, and preoperative outcome scores in the two groups. At 2 years after operation, patients not receiving workers' compensation had a significantly greater improvement in ODI (P=0.009) and SF-36 PCS (P=0.007) compared with those receiving workers' compensation. Although patients not receiving workers' compensation had greater improvements in back and leg pain compared with those receiving workers' compensation, this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.079). The mean 2-year ODI, SF-36 PCS, and back pain raw scores of patients receiving workers' compensation were significantly lower than those not receiving workers' compensation. Only 19% of workers' compensation patients achieved minimum clinically important difference in terms

  16. Outcomes in patients tested for Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R.; Chin, David L.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Tang, Jevon; Cohen, Stuart H.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile testing is shifting from toxin detection to C. difficile detection. Yet, up to 60% of patients with C. difficile by culture test negative for toxins and it is unclear if they are infected or carriers. We reviewed medical records for 7,046 inpatients with a C. difficile toxin test from 2005–2009 to determine the duration of diarrhea and rate of complications and mortality among toxin-positive (toxin+) and toxin− patients. Overall, toxin− patients had less severe diarrhea, fewer diarrhea days and lower mortality (P<0.001, all comparisons) than toxin+ patients. One toxin− patient (n=1/6,121; 0.02%) was diagnosed with pseudomembranous colitis but there were no complications such as megacolon or colectomy for fulminant CDI among toxin− patients. These data suggest that C. difficile-attributable complications are rare among patients testing negative for C. difficile toxins and more studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of C. difficile detection in toxin− patients. PMID:23009731

  17. Microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among dialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and aims Dialysis patients appear to be at special risk for exposure to cyanobacteria toxins; episodes of microcystin (MCYST) exposure via dialysate during 1996 and 2001 have been previously reported. During 2001, as many as 44 dialysis patients were exposed to contam...

  18. Discrepancies between patient-reported outcome measures when assessing urinary incontinence or pelvic-prolapse surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Lose, Gunnar; Guldberg, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: In order to assess the outcome following surgery for urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) the importance of patient-reported outcome measures, in addition to the clinical objective measures, has been recognised. The International Consultation...

  19. Patient Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes for African American, Hispanic, and White Adolescents in DATOS-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds-Bryant, Jennifer L.; Staab, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Compared background, pre-treatment characteristics, and post-treatment outcomes of African American, Hispanic, and white adolescent substance abusers participating in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies for Adolescents (DATOS-A). Found that patients were similar with respect to basic pre-treatment demographics. Compared to white adolescents,…

  20. Gender differences in health status and adverse outcomes among patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyer, R.P.; van Zitteren, M.; Beltrame, J.F.; Fitridge, R.; Denollet, J.; Spertus, J.A.; Smolderen, K.G.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined gender differences in health status and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study assessed (1) self‐reported health status at PAD diagnosis and 12‐months later, and explored (2) whether outcomes in women with PAD differ

  1. Computed tomography and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Maud; Koskinen, Lars-Owe D; Jonasson, Per; Levi, Richard; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2017-01-01

    To study: (i) acute computed tomography (CT) characteristics and clinical outcome; (ii) clinical course and (iii) Corticosteroid Randomisation after Significant Head Injury acute calculator protocol (CRASH) model and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Initial CT (CTi) and CT 24 hours post-trauma (CT24) were evaluated according to Marshall and Rotterdam classifications. Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) were assessed at three months and one year post-trauma. The prognostic value of the CRASH model was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included. Marshall CTi and CT24 were significantly correlated with RLAS-R at three months. Rotterdam CT24 was significantly correlated with GOSE at three months. RLAS-R and the GOSE improved significantly from three months to one year. CRASH predicted unfavourable outcome at six months for 81% of patients with bad outcome and for 85% of patients with favourable outcome according to GOSE at one year. Neither CT nor CRASH yielded clinically useful predictions of outcome at one year post-injury. The study showed encouragingly many instances of significant recovery in this population of sTBI. The combination of lack of reliable prognostic indicators and favourable outcomes supports the case for intensive acute management and rehabilitation as the default protocol in the cases of sTBI.

  2. Defining a standard set of patient-centered outcomes for men with localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.E. Martin (Neil E.); L. Massey (Laura); C. Stowell (Caleb); C.H. Bangma (Chris); A. Briganti (Alberto); A. Bill-Axelson (Anna); M. Blute (Michael); J.W.F. Catto (James); R.C. Chen (Ronald C.); A.V. D'Amico (Anthony V.); G. Feick (Günter); J.M. Fitzpatrick (John); S.J. Frank (Steven J.); M. Froehner (Michael); M. Frydenberg (Mark); A. Glaser (Adam); M. Graefen (Markus); D. Hamstra (Daniel); A. Kibel (Adam); N. Mendenhall (Nancy); K. Moretti (Kim); J. Ramon (Jacob); I. Roos (Ian); H. Sandler (Howard); F.J. Sullivan (Francis J.); D. Swanson (David); A. Tewari (Ashutosh); A.J. Vickers (Andrew); T. Wiegel (Thomas); H. Huland (Hartwig)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Value-based health care has been proposed as a unifying force to drive improved outcomes and cost containment. Objective To develop a standard set of multidimensional patient-centered health outcomes for tracking, comparing, and improving localized prostate cancer (PCa)

  3. Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement : Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langguth, B.; Goodey, R.; Azevedo, A.; Bjorne, A.; Cacace, A.; Crocetti, A.; Del Bo, L.; De Ridder, D.; Diges, I.; Elbert, T.; Flor, H.; Herraiz, C.; Ganz Sanchez, T.; Eichhammer, P.; Figueiredo, R.; Hajak, G.; Kleinjung, T.; Landgrebe, M.; Londero, A.; Lainez, M. J. A.; Mazzoli, M.; Meikle, M. B.; Melcher, J.; Rauschecker, J. P.; Sand, P. G.; Struve, M.; Van de Heyning, P.; Van Dijk, P.; Vergara, R.; Langguth, B; Hajak, G; Kleinjung, T; Cacace, A; Moller, AR

    2007-01-01

    There is widespread recognition that consistency between research centres in the ways that patients with tinnitus are assessed and outcomes following interventions are measured would facilitate more effective co-operation and more meaningful evaluations and comparisons of outcomes. At the first Tinn

  4. Predictors of poor neurologic outcome in patients after cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Alfen, N. van; Bons, S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Outcome studies in patients with anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy focus on the early and reliable prediction of an outcome no better than a vegetative state or severe disability. We determined the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia on the validity of the currently used clinical pract

  5. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  6. Validation of two generic patient-reported outcome measures in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boye Kristina S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to using a generic patient-reported outcome measure (PRO, the measure should be validated within the target population. The purpose of the current study was to validate two generic measures in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes in Scotland and England completed two generic measures: EQ-5D and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB. Two diabetes-specific measures were administered: ADS and DSC-R. Analyses assessed reliability and validity. Results There were 130 participants (53 Scotland; 77 England; 64% male; mean age = 55.7 years. Responses on the EQ-5D and PGWB reflected moderate impairment consistent with previous diabetes samples: mean EQ-5D Index score, 0.75; EQ-5D VAS, 68.8; PGWB global score, 67.9. All scales of the PGWB demonstrated good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.77 to 0.97. The EQ-5D and PGWB demonstrated convergent validity through significant correlations with the ADS (r = 0.48 to 0.61, DSC-R scales (r = 0.33 to 0.81 except ophthalmology subscale, and Body Mass Index (r = 0.15 to 0.38. The EQ-5D and PGWB discriminated between groups of patients known to differ in diabetes-related characteristics (e.g., history of hypoglycemia. Conclusion Results support the use of the EQ-5D and PGWB among patients with type 2 diabetes, possibly in combination with condition-specific measures.

  7. Measuring the value of treatment to patients: patient-reported outcomes in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Richard J

    2008-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) can be important measures of the impact and value of new drug treatments to patients. Recently, both multisector stakeholder groups and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have carefully considered and issued guidance on best practices for the use of PROs in measuring treatment impact. When best practices are followed and PRO data are appropriately included in drug development strategy and clinical trials, these data can be part of the evidence submitted for drug approval and included in drug labeling. One study showed that PRO data were included in 30% of a sample of new drug labels and were more concentrated in certain therapeutic areas, such as anti-inflammatory agents, vaccines, gastrointestinal agents, and respiratory and urologic agents. PRO data included in labeling, or generated in a similar scientific manner, may often then be used in other communication vehicles, such as formulary submission dossiers, journal or direct-to-consumer advertisements, publications, or continuing medical education. Meaningful and reliable PRO results regarding the effects of new treatments on how patients feel and function provide useful information to those who must make decisions about the availability and utilization of such treatments.

  8. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta......-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in high impact factor journals. Eligible were randomized controlled trials, using two or more PROs measuring pain or disability. A prioritized list was developed based on the capacity to discriminate between intervention...

  9. Management and clinical outcomes in patients treated with apixaban vs warfarin undergoing procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, D.; Alexander, J.H.; Wallentin, L.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Thomas, L.; Hanna, M.; Al-Khatib, S.M.; Dorian, P.; Ansell, J.; Commerford, P.; Flaker, G.; Lanas, F.; Vinereanu, D.; Xavier, D.; Hylek, E.M.; Held, C.; Verheugt, F.W.; Granger, C.B.; Lopes, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from ARISTOTLE, we describe the periprocedural management of anticoagulation and rates of subsequent clinical outcomes among patients chronically anticoagulated with warfarin or apixaban. We recorded whether (and for how long) anticoagulant therapy was interrupted preprocedure, whether br

  10. Patients’ Outcome Expectations Matter in Psychological Interventions for Patients with Diabetes and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Evelien; Schroevers, Maya J.; Tovote, K. Annika; Sanderman, R.; Emmelkamp, Paul M.G.; Fleer, Joke

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether patients’ expectations of treatment outcome predict treatment completion, homework compliance, and depressive symptom improvement in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Study participants were patients with diabetes and comorbi

  11. Heterogeneity in outcomes of treated HIV-positive patients in Europe and North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret T; Hogg, Robert S; Justice, Amy C

    2012-01-01

    HIV cohort collaborations, which pool data from diverse patient cohorts, have provided key insights into outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, the extent of, and reasons for, between-cohort heterogeneity in rates of AIDS and mortality are unclear....

  12. Primary Metastatic Osteosarcoma: Presentation and Outcome of Patients Treated on Neoadjuvant Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group Protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leo Kager; Andreas Zoubek; Ulrike Pötschger; Ulrike Kastner; Silke Flege; Beate Kempf-Bielack; Detlev Branscheid; Rainer Kotz; Mechthild Salzer-Kuntschik; Winfried Winkelmann; Gernot Jundt; Hartmut Kabisch; Peter Reichardt; Heribert Jürgens; Helmut Gadner; Stefan S. Bielack; for the Cooperative German-Austrian-Swiss Osteosarcoma Study Group

    2003-01-01

    To determine demographic data and define prognostic factors for long-term outcome in patients presenting with high-grade osteosarcoma of bone with clinically detectable metastases at initial presentation...

  13. Clinical outcomes of patients living with HIV visiting ART centre at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical outcomes of patients living with HIV visiting ART centre at a tertiary care ... at the antiretroviral therapy (ART) centre atMahatma Gandhi Memorial Hospital ... and 79 (0.61%) were males, females, children and transgender, respectively.

  14. Can shared care deliver better outcomes for patients undergoing total hip replacement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendal, H.; Beekum, W.T. van; Nijhof, P.; Witte, L.P. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether shared care for patients undergoing total hip replacement delivers better outcomes compared to care as usual. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two regions in the Netherlands where different organisational health care models have been

  15. Outcome after emergency surgery without angiography in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage after aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdal, Ove; Springborg, Jacob; Hauerberg, John;

    2009-01-01

    and aneurysm occlusion without preoperative angiography. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 13 consecutive patients. We recorded clinical data and evaluated mortality and morbidity with the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (TICS). FINDINGS: At follow up seven...

  16. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members.

  17. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  18. Using acute kidney injury severity and scoring systems to predict outcome in patients with burn injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kuo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed that AKI stage has considerable discriminative power for predicting mortality. Compared with other prognostic models, AKI stage is easier to use to assess outcome in patients with severe burn injury.

  19. Treatment outcomes after intraluminal brachytherapy following definitive chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: ILRT boost following concurrent chemoradiotherapy is well tolerated and potentially improves outcomes. It might be beneficial in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma. Further studies are required to identify its role in definitive treatment.

  20. Patient-reported outcomes after acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bager, Palle; Dahlerup, Jens F

    2014-08-01

    Nonvariceal acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is often associated with significant blood loss and anemia. Both the bleeding episode itself and the subsequent anemia are likely to significantly impact a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Treating the anemia is essential to increase the hemoglobin levels. The HRQoL impact has not been investigated. This longitudinal study aimed to determine the relationship between anemia, HRQoL, and fatigue in patients after nonvariceal AUGIB. A total of 97 patients (51 males and 46 females; mean age 70 years) were followed in a longitudinal study with a 6-month follow-up. All patients had AUGIB and were anemic at inclusion. Anemia, HRQoL (EQ-5D-3L), and fatigue (using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) were assessed at baseline, and at 1, 3, and 6 months. The patients were initially included in an iron supplementation study. The patients' HRQoL increased and their fatigue levels decreased from baseline to month 3 and month 6. Approximately half of the patients had full health at month 3; similar results were observed in the general population. Three and six months after the bleeding episodes, neither the HRQoL nor fatigue was affected by the anemia. This study did not uncover relationships between anemia and HRQoL or anemia and fatigue after nonvariceal AUGIB.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications.......We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  2. The Effect of Technical Performance on Patient Outcomes in Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecso, Andras B; Szasz, Peter; Kerezov, Georgi; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-03-01

    Systematic review of the effect of intraoperative technical performance on patient outcomes. The operating room is a high-stakes, high-risk environment. As a result, the quality of surgical interventions affecting patient outcomes has been the subject of discussion and research for years. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane databases were searched. All surgical specialties were eligible for inclusion. Data were reviewed in regards to the methods by which technical performance was measured, what patient outcomes were assessed, and how intraoperative technical performance affected patient outcomes. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Of the 12,758 studies initially identified, 24 articles (7775 total participants) were ultimately included in this review. Seventeen studies assessed the performance of the faculty alone, 2 assessed both the faculty and trainees, 1 assessed trainees alone, and in 4 studies, the level of the operating surgeon was not specified. In 18 studies, a performance assessment tool was used. Patient outcomes were evaluated using intraoperative complications, short-term morbidity, long-term morbidity, short-term mortality, and long-term mortality. The average MERSQI score was 11.67 (range 9.5-14.5). Twenty-one studies demonstrated that superior technical performance was related to improved patient outcomes. The results of this systematic review demonstrated that superior technical performance positively affects patient outcomes. Despite this initial evidence, more robust research is needed to directly assess intraoperative technical performance and its effect on postoperative patient outcomes using meaningful assessment instruments and reliable processes.

  3. The effect of hospital organisational structure on patient and nurse outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Altallal, Saleh Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    A great body of international research has been undertaken to examine the impact of the organisational structure and process on outcomes. However, the effect of hospital organisational structure on patient and nurse outcomes in Saudi Arabia has never been investigated. In general, organisational structure is the most important means of protecting and promoting the quality of patient care. Structure for health services includes the characteristics of resources in the work environment, includin...

  4. A 5 year prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A-K; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively describe self-reported outcomes up to 5 years after total knee replacement (TKR) in Osteoarthritis (OA) and to study which patient-relevant factors may predict outcomes for pain and physical function (PF). METHODS: 102 consecutive patients with knee OA, 63 women and 39...... postoperatively. RESULTS: Response rate at 5 years was 86%. At 6 months significant improvement was seen in all KOOS and SF-36 scores (P

  5. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2010-08-01

    One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus.

  6. No association between anxiety and depression and adverse clinical outcome among patients with cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Henriette; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety and depression have been linked to adverse prognostic outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) with mixed results. The timing of anxiety and depression measurement has received little attention so far.......Anxiety and depression have been linked to adverse prognostic outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) with mixed results. The timing of anxiety and depression measurement has received little attention so far....

  7. An exploration of patients' expectation of and satisfaction with surgical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, A.H.; Doré, C J; Morris, T. P.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of studies of surgical outcome focus on measures of function and pain. Increasingly, however, the desire to include domains such as patients' satisfaction and expectations had led to the development of simple measures and their inclusion into clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to determine patients' pre-operative expectations of and post-operative satisfaction with the outcome of their spinal surgery.

  8. Original Research Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stroke admitted to three tertiary hospitals in Zimbabwe: A retrospective .... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for confirming in case there is any doubt with the ..... patients may stay in hospital until they are more functional. Acknowledgements.

  9. Factors Influencing the Outcomes in Extradural Haematoma Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at evaluating the current management and factors that ... patients who were admitted to the neurosurgical unit at the Kenyatta National Hospital and ... abnormalities and those older than age 61 are poor prognostic indicators.

  10. Improving Patient Outcomes With Oral Heart Failure Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Melissa M; Cheek, Dennis J; Seale, Ashlie

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are under immense pressure to reduce heart failure readmissions that occur within 30 days of discharge, and to improve the quality of care for these patients. Penalties mandated by the Affordable Care Act decrease hospital reimbursement and ultimately the overall cost of caring for these patients increases if they are not well managed. Approximately 25% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are at high risk for readmission and these rates have not changed over the past decade. As a result of an aging population, the incidence of heart failure is expected to increase to one in five Americans over the age of 65. Pharmacologic management can reduce the risk of death and help prevent unnecessary hospitalizations. Healthcare providers who have knowledge of heart failure medications and drug interactions and share this information with their patients contribute to improved long-term survival and physical functioning as well as fewer hospitalizations and a delay of progressive worsening of heart failure.

  11. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  12. Baseline patient profiling and three-year outcome data after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the components of metabolic syndrome was demonstrated ... The morbidity data were separated into medical and surgical morbidity. Major medical .... 4.0–6.0% (Roche® Integra 400), with the patient not requiring medication.

  13. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Seru...

  14. Speech Outcomes after Tonsillectomy in Patients with Known Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Paulson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Controversy exists over whether tonsillectomy will affect speech in patients with known velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI, particularly in those with cleft palate. Methods. All patients seen at the OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital VPI clinic between 1997 and 2010 with VPI who underwent tonsillectomy were reviewed. Speech parameters were assessed before and after tonsillectomy. Wilcoxon rank-sum testing was used to evaluate for significance. Results. A total of 46 patients with VPI underwent tonsillectomy during this period. Twenty-three had pre- and postoperative speech evaluation sufficient for analysis. The majority (87% had a history of cleft palate. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea in 11 (48% and staged tonsillectomy prior to pharyngoplasty in 10 (43%. There was no significant difference between pre- and postoperative speech intelligibility or velopharyngeal competency in this population. Conclusion. In this study, tonsillectomy in patients with VPI did not significantly alter speech intelligibility or velopharyngeal competence.

  15. management and outcome of patients with wilms' tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-06

    Dec 6, 2013 ... of Medicine, P. A. Were, Dip, MSC (Palliative Care), Nursing Officer, Oncology Department, Moi Teaching and Referral .... average of seven new patients enrolled each year. .... technology transfer and research activities is also.

  16. Outcome of patients undergoing open heart surgery at the Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training of the superspecialties abroad is largely limited to observation with little or no opportunity ... Results: A total of 124 patients underwent open heart surgery during the study period. ..... The experience at the Uganda heart institute shows.

  17. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphna Y. [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B. [Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary

  18. Surgical outcome after spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brilakis Emmanuel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a rheumatic disease in which spinal and sacroiliac joints are mainly affected. There is a gradual bone formation in the spinal ligaments and ankylosis of the spinal diarthroses which lead to stiffness of the spine. The diffuse paraspinal ossification and inflammatory osteitis of advanced Ankylosing spondylitis creates a fused, brittle spine that is susceptible to fracture. The aim of this study is to present the surgical experience of spinal fractures occurring in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and to highlight the difficulties that exist as far as both diagnosis and surgical management are concerned. Methods Twenty patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis were operated due to a spinal fracture. The fracture was located at the cervical spine in 7 cases, at the thoracic spine in 9, at the thoracolumbar junction in 3 and at the lumbar spine in one case. Neurological defects were revealed in 10 patients. In four of them, neurological signs were progressively developed after a time period of 4 to 15 days. The initial radiological study was negative for a spinal fracture in twelve patients. Every patient was assessed at the time of admission and daily until the day of surgery, then postoperatively upon discharge. Results Combined anterior and posterior approaches were performed in three patients with only posterior approaches performed on the rest. Spinal fusion was seen in 100% of the cases. No intra-operative complications occurred. There was one case in which superficial wound inflammation occurred. Loosening of posterior screws without loss of stability appeared in two patients with cervical injuries. Frankel neurological classification was used in order to evaluate the neurological status of the patients. There was statistically significant improvement of Frankel neurological classification between the preoperative and postoperative evaluation. 35% of patients showed improvement

  19. Perioperative Outcome of Dyssomnia Patients on Chronic Methylphenidate Use

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta Stoicea MD, PhD; Thomas Ellis MD; Kenneth Moran MD; Wiebke Ackermann MD; Thomas Wilson; Eduardo Quevedo MD; Sergio Bergese MD

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate is frequently prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, and other sleep disorders requiring psychostimulants. Our report is based on 2 different clinical experiences of patients with chronic methylphenidate use, undergoing general anesthesia. These cases contrast different strategies of taking versus withholding the drug treatment on the day of surgery. From the standpoint of anesthetic management and patient safety, the concerns for perioperative me...

  20. Perioperative Outcome of Dyssomnia Patients on Chronic Methylphenidate Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Stoicea MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate is frequently prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, and other sleep disorders requiring psychostimulants. Our report is based on 2 different clinical experiences of patients with chronic methylphenidate use, undergoing general anesthesia. These cases contrast different strategies of taking versus withholding the drug treatment on the day of surgery. From the standpoint of anesthetic management and patient safety, the concerns for perioperative methylphenidate use are mainly related to cardiovascular stability and possible counteraction of sedatives and anesthetics.

  1. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley E. Althof

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘Patient Reported Outcome’, abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner’s related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy i...

  2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with empyematous cholecystitis: an outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Constantinos; Botaitis, Sotirios; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Trypsianis, Grigorios; Perente, Sebachedin; Pitiakoudis, Michail

    2009-10-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), the procedure of choice for elective cholelithiasis, is now also used in the management of acute cholecystitis. Empyema of the gallbladder is unexpectedly encountered in a proportion of these patients. This paper describes our experience with LC in the treatment of patients with empyema of the gallbladder. From May 1992 to July 2007, 315 patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute cholecystitis underwent LC. Operative and histopathology reports were used to identify patients with empyema of the gallbladder, to which retrospective chart reviews were applied. Factors associated with conversion and complications were assessed to determine their predictive power. Being male and having high levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and white blood cells significantly influenced the prediction of empyema. The conversion rate was significantly higher for empyema and acute cholecystitis, but the complication rate did not differ significantly between these conditions. Previous abdominal surgery was an independent risk factor for conversion and complications. Also, temperature >37.5°C, AST >60 IU/l, and ALT >60 IU/l were associated with higher conversion rates. The hospital stay was longer in patients with empyema, while the operation time did not differ between the two groups. Empyema of the gallbladder can be encountered in patients with presumed acute cholecystitis. Preoperatively differentiating between simple acute cholecystitis and empyema is difficult, if not impossible. The conversion rate is expected to be higher when empyema is approached laparoscopically than for simple acute cholecystitis or symptomatic cholelithiasis.

  3. The impact of in-hospital nutritional status deterioration on treatment outcome of adult gastroenterological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roganović Branka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In the current literature, data on impact of intrahospital changes in patients’ nutritional status on the treatment outcome are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nutritional status deterioration and the treatment outcome among hospitalized gastroenterological patients. Methods. In 650 adult gastroenterological patients nutritional status on admission and at discharge was evaluated using the 6 nutritional status assessment parameters: body mass index, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper arm muscle circumference, serum albumin concentration, lymphocyte count and unintentional weight loss. The influence on treatment outcome was tested for the nutritional status on admission, nutritional status at discharge and intrahospital nutritional status deterioration. Results. The incidence of favorable outcome in the non-undernourished and undernourished patients on admission was in the range 93.4-97.3% and 81.2- 91.2%, respectively. The incidence of favorable outcome in the non-undernourished and undernourished patients at discharge was in the range 94-97.4% and 80.8-88.1%, respectively. Favorable outcomes were obtained in 95.6-98.9% of the patients without nutritional status deterioration and in 87.1-90.3% of the patients with nutritional status deterioration. Intrahospital nutritional status deterioration significantly influenced the outcome, no matter what assessment parameter had been used (p < 0.001 for all the applied parameters. Furthermore, only the deterioration of nutritional status was found to be an independent predictor of treatment outcome (multivariate analysis Forwald Wald, p £ 0.001; relative risk (RR = 0.104-0.350; confidence intervals (CI = 0.037-0.186/0.297-0.657. Conclusion. Deterioration of nutritional status is an independent predictor of adverse outcome.

  4. Neuropsychological outcomes of pediatric burn patients who sustained hypoxic episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Marta; Robertson, Carrie; Murphy, Kevin D; Rosenberg, Laura; Mlcak, Ronald; Robert, Rhonda S; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2005-11-01

    The neuropsychological outcomes of children who suffered hypoxic episodes following their burns are not completely understood and vary depending on the nature and severity of the episode. A retrospective review of youth that were admitted to this acute burn care facility over the past 20 years was conducted to identify the extent of cognitive and affective difficulties. Thirty-nine children who sustained hypoxic injuries related to their burns were compared with 21 controls that were matched for age, TBSA, and time of injury. Approximately a third of the children who survived from the hypoxia group continued to have long-term cognitive and emotional difficulties. For those who recovered reasonably well, no differences were found from the matched burned controls. These results probably underestimate the true extent of neuropsychological difficulties experienced by these youth given that detailed cognitive testing was not routinely performed. Prospective studies are needed to further characterize the full nature of difficulties and outcomes associated with burn related hypoxic injuries.

  5. Editorial Commentary: Role of Synovial Biomarkers in Patient Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    Humans are notably poor at predicting event outcomes. In "Correlation of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers With Cartilage Pathology and Associated Outcomes in Knee Arthroscopy," Cuellar, Cuellar, Kirsch, and Strauss show that some synovial fluid biomarkers (20 were sampled for the investigation) may predict operative findings at the time of arthroscopy and patient-reported outcome measures at follow-up. Further research will clarify the role of synovial biomarkers in knee pathology and, hopefully, narrow the choices to one or two pertinent markers that can be used to improve our ability to predict outcomes from arthroscopic knee surgery.

  6. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo John

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome measures that were used in the trials – the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA Scale, and two itch measures, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF itch measure. Methods Subjects aged 18 to 70 years with moderate to severe psoriasis for at least 6 months were recruited into the two clinical trials (n = 1095. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated for all patient reported outcomes at baseline and at 12 weeks. Construct validity was evaluated by relations among the different patient reported outcomes and between the patient reported outcomes and the clinical assessments (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; Overall Lesion Severity Scale; Physician's Global Assessment of Change assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks, as was the change over the course of the 12 week portion of the trial. Results Internal consistency reliability ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 for the patient reported outcome measures. The patient reported outcome measures were all shown to have significant construct validity with respect to each other and with respect to the clinical assessments. The four measures also demonstrated significant responsiveness to change in underlying clinical status of the patients over the course of the trial, as measured by the independently assessed clinical outcomes. Conclusions The DLQI, the PSA, VAS, and the NPF are considered useful tools for the measurement of dermatology

  7. HERPETIC KERATITIS OUTCOMES DEPENDING ON IMMUNE STATUS OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Aksenova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Herpetic keratitis with the formation frequency of several million patients a year occupy an important place in infectious pathology of the eye and remain one of actual problems of ophthalmology. The lack of reliable ways of dealing with ophthalmic herpes dictates the necessity of finding optimal ways to treat patients, what prompted us to conduct this research. Purpose of the study. To evaluate the effect of the standard treatment regimen herpetic keratitis on the parameters of the immune status of the patient. Materials and Methods. We examined and treated 15 patients (15 eyes with herpetic keratouveitis. The control group consisted of 20 healthy people of similar age (20 eyes. Comparative evaluation of clinical and immunological status of patients conducted before and after standard therapy. Results. In the study of these immunological parameters of examinees were detected increase in the number leucocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils absorbency, HCT-activity of neutrophils, the CIC in patients with herpetic keratitis during exacerbation of the disease, however, a decrease amount of TFR and TFS cells with helper and suppressor activity. During treat-ment immunological parameters have normalized somewhat, but were higher than the reference value. Discussion and Conclusions. The research showed that the base therapy does not provide normalization of cellular immune status even when clinical recovery, with the result that retained the ability of cells to maintain local inflammatory focus, complicate the regeneration process, promote chronicity and recurrence of the herpetic keratitis. These facts make it necessary to change the program of treatment of patients with this pathology and introduce the recommended range of products such as antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities.

  8. PROGRESSION AND OUTCOMES OF UVEITIS IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDILITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Godzenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveitis is a common extraskeletal manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS occurring in 20–40% of patients. Mostauthors underline a favorable prognosis for AS-associated uveitis.Objective: to study features of clinical picture and progression of AS-associated uveitis and to estimate the occurrence of its complications.Subjects and methods. Across-sectional study of 140 patients (98 males and 42 females with AS, who had at least one uveitis attack over the period of disease and was followed up at V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology during 2008–2012. In addition to standard rheumatologic examination all patients were examined by ophthalmologist. Biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, tonometry, computer-assisted perimetry, ultrasonography (B-scanning of eyes and, if needed, fluorescein angiography and electrophysiological examination of retina were performed. Localization of uveitis, presence of complications affecting vision, total number of uveitis attacks by the moment of examination, mean number of uveitis attacks per year, correlation between the frequency of attacks and complications, presence of other extraskeletal manifestations and peripheral arthritis were assessed. The total number of uveitis attacks was defined from patients' interviews and respective medical documentation. Mean number of uveitis attacks was calculated as ratio of total number of uveitis attacks to the duration of disease for each patient. In the case of more than two attacks per year uveitis progression was consideredrefractory.Results.Mean duration of the disease was 17.7±11.03 years. In 19 patients (14% AS manifested before and in 121 (86% – after the age of 16 years. HLA-B27 was revealed in 135 (96% patients, peripheral arthritis – in 43 (30%, whereas other extraskeletal manifestations – in 46 (32%. Early onset of uveitis in first 10 years of the disease was recorded in 81 (58% patients, after10 years – in 21 (15%. Uveitis was the

  9. Conventional MRI features for predicting the clinical outcome of patients with invasive placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Shi, Hai-Bin; Yang, Zheng-Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate whether morphologic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features could help to predict the maternal outcome after uterine artery embolization (UAE)-assisted cesarean section (CS) in patients with invasive placenta previa. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the MRI data of 40 pregnant women who have undergone UAE-assisted cesarean section due to suspected high risk of massive hemorrhage caused by invasive placenta previa. Patients were divided into two groups based on the maternal outcome (good-outcome group: minor hemorrhage and uterus preserved; poor-outcome group: significant hemorrhage or emergency hysterectomy). Morphologic MRI features were compared between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the most valuable variables, and predictive value of the identified risk factor was determined. RESULTS Low signal intensity bands on T2-weighted imaging (P placenta percreta (P = 0.011), and placental cervical protrusion sign (P = 0.002) were more frequently observed in patients with poor outcome. Low signal intensity bands on T2-weighted imaging was the only significant predictor of poor maternal outcome in multivariate analysis (P = 0.020; odds ratio, 14.79), with 81.3% sensitivity and 84.3% specificity. CONCLUSION Low signal intensity bands on T2-weighted imaging might be a predictor of poor maternal outcome after UAE-assisted cesarean section in patients with invasive placenta previa. PMID:28345524

  10. Alternative outcome measures in young total hip arthroplasty patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob; Jacobsen, Steffen; Schmiegelow, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In this prospective multicentre cohort study we studied subjects younger than 60 years of age scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). The study assessed patients' overall satisfaction, fulfillment of preoperative expectations, the effect on socioeconomic parameters, and quality of sex......-life. Questionnaires including Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and SF-36 were evaluated preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. OHS and SF-36 showed significant improvements (ppatients' socioeconomic status. Increased frequency of intercourse or better...... abilities in intercourse positions were experienced by 18 of 39 females due to reduced pain and increased range of motion. Patients sexually active before THA surgery remained active. These findings constitute important new information to young patients and surgeons during the decision making process....

  11. Regional lumbar motion and patient-rated outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune M; Bronfort, Gert; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship in change scores between regional lumbar motion and patient-rated pain of the previous week and back-related function in chronic low back pain patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial and treated with either exercise...... therapy or spinal manipulation using 6 different motion parameters. METHODS: Regional lumbar motions were sampled using a 6 degrees of freedom instrumented spatial linkage system in 199 participants at baseline and 12-week follow-up. The regional lumbar motion data were analyzed as a total cohort as well...... as relative to subgroup stratifications; back pain only vs back and leg pain, and treatment modality. For identifying clinically meaningful improvements in the measurements of back pain and back-related function, we used a 30% threshold. RESULTS: The relationship between change scores in patient...

  12. Obese patients have similar short-term outcomes to nonobese in laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manish; Chand; Henry; D; De’Ath; Muhammed; Siddiqui; Chetanya; Mehta; Shahnawaz; Rasheed; James; Bromilow; Tahseen; Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether obese patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery within an enhanced recovery program had worse short-term outcomes.METHODS: A prospective study of consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection was carried out between 2008 and 2011 in a single institution. Patients were divided in groups based on body mass index(BMI). Short-term outcomes including operative data, length of stay, complications and readmission rates were recorded and compared between the groups. Continuous data were analysed using t-test or oneway Analysis of Variance. χ2 test was used to compare categorical data.RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty four patients were included over the study period. The majority of individuals(41.7%) recruited were of a healthy weight(BMI 25) does not lead to worse short-term outcomes in laparoscopic colorectal surgery and therefore such patients should not be precluded from laparoscopic surgery.

  13. Prognostic value of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients upon admission and its outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Hamed Elbaih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is the main leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycemia on admission was associated with a worse outcome for all patients admitted with ACS. Aim: To correlate the relationship between hyperglycemia with acute coronary syndrome and poor outcome. Methodology: Clinical evaluation of the patients were carried out on arrival to Emergency Department regarding: Initial assessment of patient general condition either stable or not through; ABCDE (air way and cervical spine control, breathing, circulation, neurological dysfunction and exposure. Then determine the characters and types of chest pain. Assess the condition of the patients either stable or unstable which will determine the needed investigations and plane of management. Results: the mortality was higher in patients with RBG more than 300 mg/dl (68.4 %, (10.5 % of the patients had ranged from 250 ─ < 300 mg/dl, and the patients had ranged from 200 ─ < 250 mg/dl were (10.5 %. The patients had ranged from 160 ─ < 200 mg/dl were (5.3 and there were (5.3 of the patients had ranged from 70 ─ < 160mg/dl. Conclusions: The data from this study have shown that hyperglycemia on admission was associated with a worse outcome for all patients admitted with ACS.

  14. Influence of preoperative diastolic dysfunction on hemodynamics and outcomes of patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is receiving more attention in patients with end-stage liver diseases. The importance of diastolic dysfunction observed before orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and its adverse effects on hemodynamics and outcomes of OLT patients, have not been fully explored. We carried a retrospective study to investigate the influence of diastolic dysfunction on OLT patients. Methods: Included in this retrospective study were 330 consecutive patients s...

  15. Relationship of patient-reported outcomes with MRI measures in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed whether MRI measures of synovitis, osteitis and bone erosion were associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a longitudinal clinical trial setting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: This longitudinal cohort of 291 patients with RA was derived from...... across treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: MRI measures of inflammation and structural damage correlate independently with physical function, pain and patient global assessments. These observations support the validity of MRI biomarkers. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00264537; Post-results....

  16. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Patients with Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Formby, Peter M.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.; Wagner, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To compare clinical outcomes after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with and patients without osteoporosis. Methods We reviewed all patients with 6-month postoperative radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans for evaluation of the interbody cage. CT Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of the instrumented vertebral body were used to determine whether patients had osteoporosis. Radiographs and CT scans were evaluated for ...

  17. Outcome of Patients With Pilocytic Astrocytoma and Leptomeningeal Dissemination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazloom, Ali; Hodges, Joseph C.; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics of patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language studies pertaining to PA with LMD was performed using a combination of keywords that included juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, low-grade astrocytoma, low-grade glioma, leptomeningeal dissemination, neuraxis spread, and radiotherapy. We found 26 studies with 58 patients between 1976 and 2005 that met these criteria. Results: The median survival for PA patients with LMD was 65 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 81.1%, 75.7%, and 55.5%. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 69.3%, 66.5%, and 34.6%, respectively. Age, gender, primary site location, timing of LMD presentation (synchronous vs. metachronous), and LMD location did not significantly influence OS or PFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS or PFS between the chemotherapy and radiotherapy groups. Likewise, no difference was found in OS or PFS according to the use of craniospinal irradiation vs. less extensive RT fields. Conclusions: Approximately one-half of PA patients were alive 5 years after the diagnosis of LMD. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have efficacy against LMD. Although the use of craniospinal irradiation did not have an effect on PFS, the patient numbers were small and a larger number treated with craniospinal irradiation is needed to determine its efficacy.

  18. Myocarditis in Patients With Antisynthetase Syndrome: Prevalence, Presentation, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieval, Céline; Deligny, Christophe; Meyer, Alain; Cluzel, Philippe; Champtiaux, Nicolas; Lefevre, Guillaume; Saadoun, David; Sibilia, Jean; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Hachulla, Eric; Benveniste, Olivier; Hervier, Baptiste

    2015-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome (aSS) corresponds to an overlapping inflammatory myopathy identified by various myositis-specific autoantibodies (directed against tRNA-synthetases). Myocardial involvement in this condition is poorly described.From a registry of 352 aSS patients, 12 cases of myocarditis were retrospectively identified on the basis of an unexplained increase in troponin T/I levels associated with either suggestive cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, nonsignificant coronary artery abnormalities or positive endomyocardial biopsy.The prevalence of myocarditis in aSS is 3.4% and was not linked to any autoantibody specificity: anti-Jo1 (n = 8), anti-PL7 (n = 3), and anti-PL12 (n = 1). Myocarditis was a part of the first aSS manifestations in 42% of the cases and was asymptomatic (n = 2) or revealed by an acute (n = 4) or a subacute (n = 6) cardiac failure. It should be noted that myocarditis was always associated with an active myositis. When performed (n = 11), cardiac MRI revealed a late hypersignal in the T1-images in 73% of the cases (n = 8). Half of the patients required intensive care. Ten patients (83%) received dedicated cardiotropic drugs. Steroids and at least 1 immunosuppressive drug were given in all cases. After a median follow-up of 11 months (range 0-84) 9 (75%) patients recovered whereas 3 (25%) developed a chronic cardiac insufficiency. No patient died.The prevalence of myocarditis in aSS is similar to that of other inflammatory myopathies. Although the prognosis is relatively good, myocarditis is a severe condition and should be carefully considered as a possible manifestation in active aSS patients.

  19. Outcome of whole-brain irradiation for breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Roar (Dept. of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)); Lundgren, Steinar; Westin, Andreas A. (Dept. of Oncology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)); Bofin, Anna M. (Dept. of Pathology and Medical genetics, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway))

    2008-02-15

    Purpose. To determine the overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients treated by Whole Brain Radiation Therapy (WBRT) and possible important prognostic factors for OS. Material and methods. The study population comprised 99 patients with brain metastases (BM) treated with WBRT in the period 1988 to 2004 at St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. Prognostic factors as age, performance status, axillary lymph node involvement and extent of BM were evaluated. Results. Median survival (range) of the total population from start of irradiation was 5.3 (0.3-157) months. For patients >60 years, 40-60 years and <40 years median survival (range) were 4.5 (0.3-92), 6.8 (0.3-157) and 8.5 (0.8-11) months, respectively (NS, p=0.5), and for Karnofsky performance status (KPS) < or >70, were 3.7 (0.3-92) and 6.8 (1.0-157) months, respectively (NS, p=0.17). One,three, 12 and 24 month survival rate were 90, 64, 29 and 11%, respectively. Grouping patients according to Recursive Partitioning Analyses (RPA) classes, the median survival (range) were 8.0 (1.0-157), 6.5 (1.3-92) and 3.5 (0.3-92) months for RPA class 1, 2 and 3, respectively (NS, p=0.6). Conclusion. KPS and in particular the extent of BM were the most important prognostic factors. Grouping patients into RPA classes may be important when deciding whether breast cancer patients should be aggressively treated for their BM

  20. Reproductive System Outcome Among Patients with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmina, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may present with different clinical patterns and the anovulatory phenotype may not be the most common. Data suggest that anovulation in PCOS is not the consequence of increased androgen ovarian secretion but rather of a severe derangement of early follicle development. Other mechanisms may be operative in subgroups of patients and may contribute to the arrest of follicle growth and anovulation. At least 50% of anovulatory patients with PCOS become ovulatory in their late reproductive age. There is also evidence that menopause may occur later in women with PCOS. Finally, a strategy for treatment of infertility in PCOS is presented.

  1. What is the value of the routine use of patient-reported outcome measures toward improvement of patient outcomes, processes of care, and health service outcomes in cancer care? A systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Kearney, Nora; Maguire, Roma; Harrow, Alison; Di Domenico, David; Croy, Suzanne; MacGillivray, Stephen

    2014-05-10

    The systematic use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) has been advocated as an effective way to standardize cancer practice. Yet, the question of whether PROMs can lead to actual improvements in the quality of patient care remains under debate. This review examined whether inclusion of PROM in routine clinical practice is associated with improvements in patient outcomes, processes of care, and health service outcomes during active anticancer treatment. A systematic review of five electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL [Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature], PsycINFO, and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection [PBSC]) was conducted from database inception to May 2012 to locate randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials of patients receiving active anticancer treatment or supportive care irrespective of type of cancer. Based on prespecified eligibility criteria, we included 26 articles that reported on 24 unique controlled trials. Wide variability in the design and use of interventions delivered, outcomes evaluated, and cancer- and modality-specific context was apparent. Health service outcomes were only scarcely included as end points. Overall, the number of statistically significant findings were limited and PROMs' intervention effect sizes were predominantly small-to-moderate. The routine use of PROMs increases the frequency of discussion of patient outcomes during consultations. In some studies, PROMs are associated with improved symptom control, increased supportive care measures, and patient satisfaction. Additional effort is required to ensure patient adherence, as well as additional support to clinicians who will respond to patient concerns and issues, with clear system guidelines in place to guide their responses. More research is required to support PROM cost-benefit in terms of patient safety, clinician burden, and health services usage.

  2. Motor outcomes of patients with a complete middle cerebral artery territory infarct*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Ho Jang; Min Cheol Chang

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of motor outcomes enables to establish proper goals and rehabilitation strate-gies for stroke patients. Several previous studies have reported functional or motor outcomes in patients with a middle cerebral artery territory infarct. However, little is known about motor outcome in patients with a complete middle cerebral artery territory infarct. In this study, we investigated the motor outcomes in 23 patients with a complete middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Al of these patients received comprehensive rehabilitative management, including movement therapy and neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the affected finger extensors and ankle dorsiflexors, for more than 3 months. Motor outcomes were measured at 6 months after stroke onset using the Medical Research Council, Motricity Index, the modified Brunnstrom Classification, and Functional Ambula-tion Category scores. The motor function of the lower extremities was found to be better than that of the upper extremities. After receiving rehabilitation treatments for 3-6 months, about 70%of these patients were able to walk independently (Functional Ambulation Category scores>3), but no pa-tient achieved functional hand recovery.

  3. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-yan Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

  4. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Maintenance Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Fahad; Adil, Malik M; Malik, Ahmed A; Schold, Jesse D; Holley, Jean L

    2015-12-01

    Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospitalized patients with ESRD requiring maintenance dialysis are unknown. Outcomes of in-hospital CPR in these patients were compared with outcomes in the general population using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 2005-2011). The study population included all adults (≥ 18 years old) from the general population and those with a history of ESRD. Baseline characteristics, in-hospital complications, and discharge outcomes were compared between the two groups. The effects of in-hospital CPR on mortality, length of stay, hospitalization charges, and discharge destination were analyzed. Yearly national trends in survival, discharge to home, and length of stay were also examined using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. During the study period, 56,069 patients with ESRD underwent in-hospital CPR compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with ESRD (73.9% versus 71.8%, PCPR improved in the year 2011 compared with 2005 (31% versus 21%, PCPR are improving in patients with ESRD but remain worse than outcomes in the general population. Patients with ESRD who survive are more likely to be discharged to nursing homes.

  5. Clinical outcomes of osteomyelitis patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA-300 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrani, P; Allen, M; Seligson, D; Roberts, C; Chen, A; Haque, N; Zervos, M; Wiemken, T; Harting, J; Christensen, D; Ramirez, R

    2012-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA-300 strains have emerged as an important cause of community-acquired infections. These strains have been recognized as an etiology of osteomyelitis but data on their incidence and outcomes are limited. We retrospectively studied the incidence and clinical outcomes of MRSA USA-300 osteomyelitis in patients at the University of Louisville Hospital and the Henry Ford Health System between January 2007 and March 2008. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine USA type. Clinical outcomes were defined as management success versus failure at 12 months. Chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests, and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare patient characteristics on the basis of clinical outcomes and USA type. Of the 50 patients with MRSA osteomyelitis, 27 (54%) had the USA-300 strain. Clinical failure was identified in 22% (6/27) of the patients with MRSA USA-300 and in 30% (7/23) of the patients with MRSA non-USA-300 osteomyelitis (P = .509). Our results showed that MRSA USA-300 is a significant etiology of MRSA osteomyelitis. With current surgical and medical management, outcomes of patients with MRSA USA-300 osteomyelitis are similar to those of patients with MRSA non-USA-300 osteomyelitis.

  6. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-yan Sun; Qiang Li; Xi-ping Chen; Lu-yang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocogni-tion with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, re-spectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most signiifcant positive correlations were found be-tween mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most signiifcant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positive-ly associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental ifndings suggest that mismatch negativity might efifciently relfect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

  7. Clinical outcomes of rehabilitation for patients following lateral patellar dislocation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh; Chester, Rachel; Clark, Allan; Donell, Simon T

    2010-12-01

    Little has been published about which physiotherapy interventions are used to treat patients with instability of the patella. The purpose of this study was to review the literature systematically to determine the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation for patients following a lateral patellar dislocation. AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro and Scopus database searches were performed from their inception to August 2009. A search of unpublished and grey literature databases was undertaken, in addition to contacting all authors of included publications. All publications presenting the outcomes of patients following a conservatively managed lateral patellar dislocation were included. All eligible articles were appraised critically using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme appraisal tool. Data on interventions, cohort characteristics, outcome measures and results were extracted. A narrative research synthesis method approach was adopted. In total, 29 publications were eligible for inclusion in this review. Although a proportion of patients experienced recurrent instability and dislocation episodes after rehabilitation, a large proportion of patients reported acceptable outcomes following physiotherapy. No randomised controlled clinical trials were identified assessing different physiotherapy interventions. The evidence base included a number of under-powered studies which poorly described the specific physiotherapy interventions prescribed. Further, well-designed randomised controlled trials assessing different conservative management strategies with specific patient groups, to provide pre-intervention as well as follow-up data, are required to determine the optimal clinical outcomes of physiotherapy for patients following a lateral patellar dislocation. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating complementary and alternative medicine interventions: in search of appropriate patient-centered outcome measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Devon

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to the development of a sound evidence base for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM interventions is the need for valid, reliable and relevant outcome measures to assess whether the interventions work. We assessed the specific needs for a database that would cover a wide range of outcomes measures for CAM research and considered a framework for such a database. Methods The study was a survey of CAM researchers, practitioners and students. An online questionnaire was emailed to the members of the Canadian Interdisciplinary Network for CAM Research (IN-CAM and the CAM Education and Research Network of Alberta (CAMera. The majority of survey questions were open-ended and asked about outcome measures currently used, outcome measures' assessment criteria, sources of information, perceived barriers to finding outcome measures and outcome domains of importance. Descriptive quantitative analysis and qualitative content analysis were used. Results One hundred and sixty-four completed surveys were received. Of these, 62 respondents reported using outcome measures in their CAM research and identified 92 different specific outcomes. The most important barriers were the fact that, for many health concepts, outcome measures do not yet exist, as well as issues related to accessibility of instruments. Important outcome domains identified included physical, psychological, social, spiritual, quality of life and holistic measures. Participants also mentioned the importance of individualized measures that assess unique patient-centered outcomes for each research participant, and measures to assess the context of healing and the process of healing. Conclusion We have developed a preliminary framework that includes all components of health-related outcomes. The framework provides a foundation for a larger, comprehensive collection of CAM outcomes. It fits very well in a whole systems perspective, which requires an expanded set of

  9. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Older Patients: Management Strategies to Improve Patient Care and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J. Avelino-Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospital malnutrition is estimated to affect as many as one in two patients at admission, while many others develop malnutrition throughout hospitalization. Despite being a common and long-standing problem among older adults, it is often unrecognized and associated with increased use of resources and negative outcomes such as increased complications, length of stay and mortality. Nutritional screening and assessment are readily available and inexpensive procedures that provide crucial information to develop nutrition care plans. These plans should determine the need for dietary modifications, enteral or parenteral nutrition, strategies for monitoring adverse events and therapeutic success, and parameters for therapy termination. Peculiarities of the geriatric context also need to be addressed, including the level of feeding assistance that will be required and the existence of conditions such as dementia, delirium and dysphagia. Providers should remain vigilant to potential adverse events that might result from nutritional interventions, working to prevent and correct them. Refeeding syndrome is of particular concern as a life-threatening condition. Finally, successful transition of care and adequate nutrition after discharge should also be a standing part of the nutrition care plan, and include patient/caregiver education.

  10. Long-term treatment outcome of two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy caused by ALDH7A1 mutations: normal neurocognitive outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Enas; Mamak, Eva; Feigenbaum, Anette; Donner, Elizabeth J; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-04-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of lysine catabolism caused by mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene. We report 2 patients with normal neurocognitive outcome (full-scale IQ of 108 and 74) and their more than 10 years' treatment outcome on pyridoxine monotherapy. Both patients had specific borderline impairments in visual processing speed. More long-term treatment outcome reports will increase our knowledge about the natural history of the disease.

  11. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The p

  12. Patient-reported outcomes in Danish implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients with a Sprint Fidelis lead advisory notification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Versteeg, Henneke; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the association between implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and lead advisory notifications and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). We examined (i) whether the mode used to inform patients about a device advisory is associated with PROs, and (ii) whether pat...

  13. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The

  14. Nursing interventions for improving nutritional status and outcomes of stroke patients: descriptive reviews of processes and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Lin; Hamilton, Sharon; Williams, Jane; Jones, Susan

    2013-02-01

    Stroke produces many effects that impact eating. Nutrition is fundamental for recovery and rehabilitation, but the nursing nutritional role and associated outcomes have not been delineated. (1) To identify nursing interventions intended to improve nutritional status and related outcomes of stroke survivors, and (2) To examine the outcomes of identified nursing interventions on nutrition-related outcomes, including dietary intake, functional status, complications, activities of daily living, mortality, and quality of life for stroke survivors. A modified version of Cochrane literature searching and review methods was used to identify studies that described and evaluated nursing nutritional interventions for adult stroke patients in hospital and community settings. A minimum of 10 years content of seven databases and nine journals was searched to March 2011. Findings were presented descriptively. In total 27 papers from 26 studies were included: 5 randomized controlled trials, 5 clinical trials, 6 quasi-experiments, 4 case studies, and 6 qualitative/observational studies. Stroke nursing nutritional care encompassed screening of nutritional status and swallowing function; assessment of nutritional characteristics and preferences; referral; mealtime organization, supervision and monitoring; mealtime assistance and feeding skills. Nurses individualized care, coordinated or managed meal delivery and enteral feeding systems, were responsible for the dining environment and conduct of mealtimes; they taught staff, patients, and carers. There was little indication of integrated or psychosocial nursing nutritional care, or concepts, theories or models of nursing nutritional care. Many interventions were described but not evaluated. Little high quality evidence was of available. This review indicated the parameters of nursing nutritional care, and provided a framework for future research. A functional, supportive, and educational nursing nutritional role was described but

  15. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Muhammad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Ali, Irfhan; Asif, Muhammad; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2014-07-19

    According to the World Health Organization's recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB included high-grade sputum and presence

  16. Comparative effectiveness studies to improve clinical outcomes in end stage renal disease: the DEcIDE patient outcomes in end stage renal disease study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulware Ebony L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is lacking to inform providers’ and patients’ decisions about many common treatment strategies for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. Methods/design The DEcIDE Patient Outcomes in ESRD Study is funded by the United States (US Agency for Health Care Research and Quality to study the comparative effectiveness of: 1 antihypertensive therapies, 2 early versus later initiation of dialysis, and 3 intravenous iron therapies on clinical outcomes in patients with ESRD. Ongoing studies utilize four existing, nationally representative cohorts of patients with ESRD, including (1 the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD study (1041 incident dialysis patients recruited from October 1995 to June 1999 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2009, (2 the Dialysis Clinic Inc (45,124 incident dialysis patients initiating and receiving their care from 2003–2010 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2010, (3 the United States Renal Data System (333,308 incident dialysis patients from 2006–2009 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2010, and (4 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Chronic Kidney Disease Registry (53,399 patients with chronic kidney disease with outcome ascertainment from 2005 through 2009. We ascertain patient reported outcomes (i.e., health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality using clinical and administrative data, and data obtained from national death indices. We use advanced statistical methods (e.g., propensity scoring and marginal structural modeling to account for potential biases of our study designs. All data are de-identified for analyses. The conduct of studies and dissemination of findings are guided by input from Stakeholders in the ESRD community. Discussion The DEcIDE Patient Outcomes in ESRD Study will provide needed evidence regarding the effectiveness of common treatments employed for dialysis patients. Carefully planned dissemination strategies to the

  17. Improving outcomes: understanding the psychosocial aspects of the orthopaedic trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Paul E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J; Greenhouse, Pamela K

    2014-01-01

    The care of orthopaedic trauma patients with multiple injuries has dramatically improved in the past 25 years. The understanding of the physiology of trauma has evolved, new surgical approaches have been developed, and technologic advances have created better implants. New methods of treating fractures include fluoroscopic and computer-assisted imaging. Surgical interventions have changed from extensive and prolonged dissections to more limited and effective percutaneous and minimally invasive techniques. The lives of patients are being saved, and radiographic outcomes are improving; however, medical and surgical advances that achieve better radiographic and anatomic outcomes do not always improve functional outcomes. Understanding and optimizing the management of the psychosocial factors that affect trauma patients can improve outcomes.

  18. High serum ferritin is associated with worse outcome of patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Theodora; Goulis, Ioannis; Soulaidopoulos, Stergios; Karasmani, Areti; Doumtsis, Petros; Tsioni, Konstantina; Mandala, Eudokia; Akriviadis, Evangelos; Cholongitas, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies in patients with decompensated cirrhosis showed a correlation between serum ferritin levels and patients’ prognosis. Besides, red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) have been associated with the severity of hepatic function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of serum ferritin and RDW/MPV in the outcome [survival, death, or liver transplantation (LT)] of patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis. Methods Consecutive adult patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis admitted to our department between September 2010 and February 2016 were included. Serum ferritin, RDW and MPV were recorded in every patient. They were followed up and their outcome (alive, death, or LT) was evaluated. Results 192 consecutive patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis (142 men, age 54.2±12 years); at the end of follow up [12 (range: 1-64) months] 62 patients remained alive and 130 died or underwent LT. In multivariate analysis, serum ferritin (HR 1.001, 95%CI 1.00-1.002, P=0.005) and GFR (HR 0.96, 95%CI 0.92-0.99, P=0.035) were the only independent factors significantly associated with the outcome. Ferritin had low discriminative ability (AUC: 0.61) to the outcome yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 85.3% and 44.2%, respectively, at the best cut-off point (>55 ng/mL), while patients with ferritin >55 ng/mL (n=145) had a worse outcome compared to those with ferritin ≤55 ng/mL (n=47) (log rank P=0.001). RDW and MPV were not associated with the outcome. Conclusion High serum ferritin, but not RDW/MPV, is associated with worse outcome in patients with established decompensated cirrhosis. However, further studies are needed to elucidate better this issue. PMID:28243043

  19. Reconstructive surgery for hypospadias: A systematic review of long-term patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie; Bracka, Aivar

    2016-01-01

    Research on long-term results of hypospadias has focused on surgical techniques and functional outcomes, and it is only recently that patient satisfaction with appearance and psychosocial outcomes have been considered. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based systematic review of adolescent and adult patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes following childhood surgery for hypospadias. A systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA and PICO guidelines, and studies assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1974 to 2014 for clinical studies containing patient perceptions of appearance, deformity, and social embarrassment following hypospadias surgery. A total of 495 publications were retrieved, of which 28 met the inclusion criteria. Due to study design/outcome measure, heterogeneity data were synthesized narratively. Results indicate (i) patient perceptions of penile size do not differ greatly from the norm; (ii) perceptions of appearance findings are inconsistent, partially due to improving surgical techniques; (iii) patients who are approaching, or have reached, sexual maturity hold more negative perceptions and are more critical about the cosmetic outcomes of surgery than their prepubertal counterparts; (iv) patients report high levels of perceptions of deformity and social embarrassment; and (v) there is a lack of data using validated measurement tools assessing long-term patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes, particularly with patients who have reached genital maturity. Protocols for clinical postpuberty follow-up and methodologically sound studies, using validated assessment tools, are required for the accurate assessment of cosmetic and psychological outcomes of hypospadias surgery.

  20. Reconstructive surgery for hypospadias: A systematic review of long-term patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie; Bracka, Aivar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Research on long-term results of hypospadias has focused on surgical techniques and functional outcomes, and it is only recently that patient satisfaction with appearance and psychosocial outcomes have been considered. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based systematic review of adolescent and adult patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes following childhood surgery for hypospadias. Methods: A systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA and PICO guidelines, and studies assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1974 to 2014 for clinical studies containing patient perceptions of appearance, deformity, and social embarrassment following hypospadias surgery. Results: A total of 495 publications were retrieved, of which 28 met the inclusion criteria. Due to study design/outcome measure, heterogeneity data were synthesized narratively. Results indicate (i) patient perceptions of penile size do not differ greatly from the norm; (ii) perceptions of appearance findings are inconsistent, partially due to improving surgical techniques; (iii) patients who are approaching, or have reached, sexual maturity hold more negative perceptions and are more critical about the cosmetic outcomes of surgery than their prepubertal counterparts; (iv) patients report high levels of perceptions of deformity and social embarrassment; and (v) there is a lack of data using validated measurement tools assessing long-term patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes, particularly with patients who have reached genital maturity. Conclusions: Protocols for clinical postpuberty follow-up and methodologically sound studies, using validated assessment tools, are required for the accurate assessment of cosmetic and psychological outcomes of hypospadias surgery. PMID:27127350

  1. Does Prolonged Length of Stay in the Emergency Department Affect Outcome for Stroke Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Jain

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conflicting data exist regarding the association between the length of stay (LOS of critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED and their subsequent outcome. However, such patients are an overall heterogeneous group, and we therefore sought to study the association between EDLOS and outcomes in a specific subgroup of critically ill patients, namely those with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (AIS/TIA. Methods: This was a retrospective review of adult patients with a discharge diagnosis of AIS/TIA presenting to an ED between July 2009 and February 2010. We collected demographics, EDLOS, arrival stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale - NIHSS, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA use, functional outcome at discharge, discharge destination and hospital-LOS. We analyzed relationship between EDLOS, outcomes and discharge destination after controlling for confounders. Results: 190 patients were included in the cohort. Median EDLOS was 332 minutes (Inter-Quartile Range -IQR: 250.3-557.8. There was a significant inverse linear association between EDLOS and hospital-LOS (p=0.049. Patients who received IV tPA had a shorter median EDLOS (238 minutes, IQR: 194-299 than patients who did not (median: 387 minutes, IQR: 285-588 minutes; p<0.0001. There was no significant association between EDLOS and poor outcome (p=0.40, discharge destination (p=0.20, or death (p=0.44. This remained true even after controlling for IV tPA use, NIHSS and hospital-LOS; and did not change even when analysis was restricted to AIS patients alone. Conclusion: There was no significant association between prolonged EDLOS and outcome for AIS/TIA patients at our institution. We therefore suggest that EDLOS alone is an insufficient indicator of stroke care in the ED, and that the ED can provide appropriate acute care for AIS/TIA patients.

  2. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Culos-Reed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies.

  3. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  4. Renal outcomes in hypertensive Black patients at high cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Matthew R; Bakris, George L; Weber, Michael A; Dahlof, Bjorn; Devereux, Richard B; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Pitt, Bertram; Wright, Jackson T; Kelly, Roxzana Y; Hua, Tsushung A; Hester, R Allen; Velazquez, Eric; Jamerson, Kenneth A

    2012-03-01

    The ACCOMPLISH trial (Avoiding Cardiovascular events through Combination therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension) was a 3-year multicenter, event-driven trial involving patients with high cardiovascular risk who were randomized in a double-blinded manner to benazepril plus either hydrochlorothiazide or amlodipine and titrated in parallel to reach recommended blood pressure goals. Of the 8125 participants in the United States, 1414 were of self-described Black ethnicity. The composite kidney disease end point, defined as a doubling in serum creatinine, end-stage renal disease, or death was not different between Black and non-Black patients, although the Blacks were significantly more likely to develop a greater than 50% increase in serum creatinine to a level above 2.6 mg/dl. We found important early differences in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) due to acute hemodynamic effects, indicating that benazepril plus amlodipine was more effective in stabilizing eGFR compared to benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide in non-Blacks. There was no difference in the mean eGFR loss in Blacks between therapies. Thus, benazepril coupled to amlodipine was a more effective antihypertensive treatment than when coupled to hydrochlorothiazide in non-Black patients to reduced kidney disease progression. Blacks have a modestly higher increased risk for more advanced increases in serum creatinine than non-Blacks.

  5. Long-term outcome in children of patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Visser-Meily, Anne M. A.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Lindeman, Eline

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the long-term effects on children of parental stroke, with respect to care-giving tasks, children's behavioural problems and stress, and to study the relationship between stress and child, patient and partner characteristics. Subjects: A total of 44 children (age range 10-2

  6. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer pati

  7. Malnutrition in hospitalised patients; a real concern in surgical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar C. Mahakalkar

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: The change in various parameter of nutritional status was observed in hospitalized patients. The treatment should be aimed at treating specific disorders along with nutritional correction. It is recommended to have dietary plans at the time of admission in consultation with the dietician. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 250-257

  8. Long-term outcome in children of patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Visser-Meily, Anne M. A.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Lindeman, Eline

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the long-term effects on children of parental stroke, with respect to care-giving tasks, children's behavioural problems and stress, and to study the relationship between stress and child, patient and partner characteristics. Subjects: A total of 44 children (age range 10-2

  9. Modeling Outcome of Patients on Renal Replacement Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.S. Liem (Ylian Serina)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe incidence of end-stage renal disease is increasing and therefore, the number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT), renal dialysis or renal transplantation (RTx), has been rising. The various forms of RRT are associated with differences in survival and quality of life

  10. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosk, C.A. (Christina A.); Mus, M. (Marnix); Vroemen, J.P.A.M. (Jos P. A. M.); T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); D.I. Vos (Dagmar); Elmans, L.H.G.J. (Leon H. G. J.); L. van der Laan (Lyckle)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to

  11. Effects of a nursing pain programme on patient outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Garssen, B.; Luiken, J.B.; Schepper, A.M.E. de; Grypdonck, M.; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of a continuing pain education program, directed to surgical cancer nurses, was investigated in a pretest posttest controlled intervention study. ANCOVA for repeated measures revealed that the programme resulted in a lower pain intensity of surgical colon and breast cancer patients

  12. Clinical outcome in patients with venous thromboembolism receiving concomitant anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Sakharov, Gleb; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Lorenzo, Alicia; Madridano, Olga; López-Sáez, Juan Bosco; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Patients with arterial disease receiving antiplatelet agents may develop venous thromboembolism (VTE) and need anticoagulant therapy, although concomitant use of these drugs may increase bleeding risk. We analyzed RIETE data and compared clinical outcomes depending on decision to discontinue or maintain antiplatelet therapy at VTE diagnosis. Consecutive patients with acute VTE were enrolled in RIETE. Only patients receiving antiplatelet therapy at baseline were included in this analysis. Primary outcomes were: rate of subsequent ischemic events, major bleeding or death during anticoagulation course. 1178 patients who received antiplatelet drugs at VTE diagnosis were included. Antiplatelet therapy was discontinued in 62% of patients. During anticoagulation course, patients also receiving antiplatelet therapy had higher rates of lower limb amputations (2.28 vs. 0.21 events per 100 patients-years; pantiplatelet therapy were found to have a significantly higher rate of limb amputations (odds ratio: 15.3; 95% CI: 1.02-229) and an increased number of composite outcomes including all-cause deaths, arterial and VTE events (odds ratio: 1.46; CI: 1.03-2.06), with no differences in major bleeding rate. Concomitant anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy in patients with VTE and arterial disease is not associated with increased risk for bleeding, recurrent VTE or death. The worse outcome observed in patients who continued antiplatelet therapy requires further investigations. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The modified Latarjet procedure in female patients: clinical outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Jean-Pierre; Dachs, Robert P; Vrettos, Basil C; Maasdorp, David; Oliver, Joseph M A; Curtis, Saralee C; Roche, Stephen J L

    2017-09-21

    The aim of this study was to assess the short- and medium-term complications and clinical outcomes of female patients after a modified Latarjet procedure. A review of the literature was also conducted for outcomes of the modified Latarjet procedure in female patients and differences reported between male and female patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of all female patients who had modified Latarjet procedures from 2001 with at least 1 year of follow-up. Patients were interviewed for an Oxford Shoulder Score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score, and subjective shoulder value. A literature review was performed of the electronic database PubMed; 343 papers were assessed for clinical outcomes based on gender. Twenty-nine patients were available for inclusion in the study. There were 13 complications in 11 patients (34%). The median postoperative Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score was 433; Oxford Shoulder Score, 42; and Oxford Shoulder Instability Score, 36. The median subjective shoulder value was 87%. Of these patients, 37.5% returned to sport. The reoperation rate was 13.8%. We found no literature reporting the outcomes of the modified Latarjet procedure in female patients. There are no published data comparing outcomes of the modified Latarjet procedure in male and female patients. Female patients had a lower postoperative return to sport and shoulder scores after the modified Latarjet procedure compared with literature reports. Whereas female gender should not be a contraindication to the Latarjet procedure, selection of patients in this group may need to be more stringent. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early outcome after intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke

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    Pornpatr A Dharmasaroja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Patients with acute ischemic stroke who had early neurological improvement had better functional outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with early clinical improvement and early worsening in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. Patients and Methods : Patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA between August 2008 and November 2010 were the subjects of this study. Early improvement was defined by marked, clinical improvement or complete recovery at 24 h (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS 0-4 at 24 h. Early worsening was defined by an increase in NIHSS ≥1 from baseline. The baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without outcome of interest. Results : Of the 203 patients studied, 19 (9.4% patients had complete recovery and 68 (33.5% patients had marked clinical improvement (NIHSS 1-4 at 24 h. Most patients with early clinical improvement (86% had favorable outcome at three months. Of the 22 (10.8% patients who had early clinical worsening, only three (14% patients achieved favorable outcome at three months and six (29% patients died. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age (≥70 years old (odd ratio (OR 0.498, P = 0.049, severe stroke (NIHSS ≥15 (OR 0.154, P < 0.0001 and having intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH (OR 0.364, P = 0.032 were inversely associated with early improvement. History of transient ischemic attack (TIA (OR 7.724, P = 0.043 and ICH (OR 4.477, P = 0.008 were related to early worsening. Conclusions : The presence of early clinical improvement or worsening within 24 h after treatment with rtPA had major impact on the outcome at three months.

  15. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement for Patients With Borderline Hip Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawabi, Danyal H; Degen, Ryan M; Fields, Kara G; McLawhorn, Alexander; Ranawat, Anil S; Sink, Ernest L; Kelly, Bryan T

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of hip arthroscopy in the treatment of dysplasia are variable. Historically, arthroscopic treatment of severe dysplasia (lateral center-edge angle [LCEA] dysplasia, favorable outcomes have been reported. To compare outcomes after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in borderline dysplastic (BD) patients compared with a control group of nondysplastic patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3 METHODS: Between March 2009 and July 2012, a BD group (LCEA, 18°-25°) of 46 patients (55 hips) was identified. An age- and sex-matched control group of 131 patients (152 hips) was also identified (LCEA, 25°-40°). Patient-reported outcome scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), were collected preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. The mean LCEA was 22.4° ± 2.0° (range, 18.4°-24.9°) in the BD group and 31.0° ± 3.1° (range, 25.4°-38.7°) in the control group (P dysplasia when labral refixation and capsular closure are performed, with comparable outcomes to nondysplastic patients. Further follow-up in larger cohorts is necessary to prove the durability and safety of hip arthroscopy in this challenging group and to further explore potential sex-related differences in outcome. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Comparison of length of stay and outcomes of patients with positive versus negative blood culture results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Briley, Danielle; Hozhabri, Neda S T; Armstrong, Kris; Puthottile, Jason; Benavides, Raul; Beal, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. The fatality rate for severe sepsis is about 40%, and treatment costs over $16 billion annually. It is critical to identify and treat the source of sepsis. While there are varying guidelines determining when to draw blood for culture, at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, blood cultures are ordered for patients with new onset of fever, immunosuppression, or a suspicion of an underlying infectious etiology. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who had blood cultures after hospital admission or in the emergency department in December 2013. We compared length of stay and outcomes of patients with positive versus negative blood cultures. There was no significant difference for length of stay or outcomes among patients with positive and negative blood cultures. For patients admitted from the emergency department, there was a longer length of stay for patients with positive cultures; however, the overall prognosis was not worse.

  17. Prediction of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Chaudhary

    2016-05-01

    Results: Antiphospholipid antibodies in patients of obstetric and fetal complications were abnormally high. IgG antibody was found in pre-eclampsia (62%, prematurity (54%, recurrent fetal loss (44% and intrauterine growth retardation (54%, IgM antibody was also found in pre-eclampsia (54%, prematurity (32%, recurrent fetal loss (30% and intrauterine growth retardation (40%. Presence of IgG antiphospholipid antibody in comparison with controls is statistically significant in patient of preeclampsia and recurrent fetal loss. Conclusions: Early autoimmune screening for antiphospholipid antibodies (IgM, IgG of pregnant ladies was found to be effective tool in predilection of obstetric and fetal complications. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1613-1616

  18. Maternal and perinatal outcomes in critically ill obstetric patients

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    Arati Appinabhavi

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: Pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders and hemorrhage were the major risk factors apart from pneumonia and hepatitis that continue to take toll in obstetric patients. Adequate antenatal care, increased vigilance of women during pregnancy for subtle signs and symptoms, early transfer to tertiary centre and aggressive management to prevent complications can bring about the desired reduction in maternal-perinatal morbidity and mortality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(1.000: 189-194

  19. Long-term outcomes of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Takahashi, Kazuya; Sato, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Takeuchi, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Yokoyama, Junji; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2017-04-01

    The safety and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in elderly patients remain unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify the short- and long-term outcomes of colorectal ESD in elderly patients. A total of 482 consecutive patients with 501 colorectal lesions treated with ESD from February 2005 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: an elderly group (≥ 75 years of age) and a non-elderly group (Short-term outcomes of interest were procedure time, complication rate, hospital stay, en bloc resection rate, and non-curative resection rate. Long-term outcomes of interest were disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates in the elderly group (51 patients) and non-elderly group (92 patients) were also analyzed. No significant differences were observed between the groups with respect to short-term outcomes. Two patients in each group required emergency surgery. Of the patients who underwent non-curative resection, 7/12 (58%) in the elderly group and 15/23 (65%) in the non-elderly group underwent additional surgery. The 5-year disease-specific survival rates in the elderly and non-elderly groups were both 100%, and the corresponding 5-year overall survival rates were 86.3 and 93.5%, respectively (p = 0.026). Short-term outcomes after colorectal ESD were equivalent in both groups, and all patients showed favorable long-term outcomes. Considering the benign prognosis of lesions resected with ESD, preoperative screening of comorbidities is essential to improve overall survival.

  20. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aparna Swaminathan,1 Sreekanth Vemulapalli,1,2 Manesh R Patel,1,2 W Schuyler Jones1,2 1Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE amputation (LEA, although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. Keywords: peripheral artery disease, lower extremity amputation, mortality

  1. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Aparna; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Patel, Manesh R; Jones, W Schuyler

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE) amputation (LEA), although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing) in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. PMID:25075192

  2. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb  10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge.

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy for suicidal behaviors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mewton L

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise Mewton,1 Gavin Andrews2 1National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, 2Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression (CRUfAD, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: This systematic review provides an overview of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in reducing suicidal cognitions and behavior in the adult population. We identified 15 randomized controlled trials of CBT for adults (aged 18 years and older that included suicide-related cognitions or behaviors as an outcome measure. The studies were identified from PsycINFO searches, reference lists, and a publicly available database of psychosocial interventions for suicidal behaviors. This review identified some evidence of the use of CBT in the reduction of both suicidal cognitions and behaviors. There was not enough evidence from clinical trials to suggest that CBT focusing on mental illness reduces suicidal cognitions and behaviors. On the other hand, CBT focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors was found to be effective. Given the current evidence, clinicians should be trained in CBT techniques focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors that are independent of the treatment of mental illness. Keywords: suicidal behaviors, suicidal cognitions, CBT

  4. A comparison of functional outcome in patients sustaining major trauma: a multicentre, prospective, international study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H Rainer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare 6 month and 12 month health status and functional outcomes between regional major trauma registries in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Multicentres from trauma registries in Hong Kong and the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR. METHODS: Multicentre, prospective cohort study. Major trauma patients and aged ≥18 years were included. The main outcome measures were Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE functional outcome and risk-adjusted Short-Form 12 (SF-12 health status at 6 and 12 months after injury. RESULTS: 261 cases from Hong Kong and 1955 cases from VSTR were included. Adjusting for age, sex, ISS, comorbid status, injury mechanism and GCS group, the odds of a better functional outcome for Hong Kong patients relative to Victorian patients at six months was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.17, and at 12 months was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12. Adjusting for age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, Hong Kong patients demonstrated comparable mean PCS-12 scores at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.2, 95% CI: -1.2, 3.6 and 12-months (adjusted mean difference: -0.4, 95% CI: -3.2, 2.4 compared to Victorian patients. Keeping age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, there was no difference in the MCS-12 scores of Hong Kong patients compared to Victorian patients at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 0.4, 95% CI: -2.1, 2.8 or 12-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.8, 95% CI: -0.8, 4.5. CONCLUSION: The unadjusted analyses showed better outcomes for Victorian cases compared to Hong Kong but after adjusting for key confounders, there was no difference in 6-month or 12-month functional outcomes between the jurisdictions.

  5. Pruritus in hemodialysis patients: Results from the Japanese Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (JDOPPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Naoki; Fuller, Douglas S; Saito, Akira; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Pisoni, Ronald L; Robinson, Bruce M; Akiba, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Pruritus affects many patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this study, pruritus and its relationship to morbidity, quality of life (QoL), sleep quality, and patient laboratory measures were analyzed in a large sample of Japanese patients undergoing HD. Severity of patient-reported pruritus symptoms experienced during a 4-week period was collected from 6480 Japanese patients undergoing HD in three phases of the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS; 1996-2008; 60-65 study facilities/phase). Adjusted linear and logistic regressions were used to identify associations of pruritus with treatment parameters and QoL outcomes. Adjusted Cox regressions examined the influence of pruritus severity on mortality. Moderate to extreme pruritus was experienced by 44% of prevalent patients undergoing HD in the Japanese Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Many patient characteristics were significantly associated with pruritus, but this did not explain the large differences in pruritus among facilities (20-70%). Pruritus was slightly less common in patients starting HD than in patients on dialysis >1 year. Patients with moderate to extreme pruritus were more likely to feel drained (adjusted odds ratio = 2.2-5.8, P quality (adjusted odds ratio = 1.9-3.7, P < 0.0001), and have QoL mental and physical composite scores 2.3-6.7 points lower (P < 0.0001) than patients with no/mild pruritus. Pruritus in patients undergoing HD was associated with a 23% higher mortality risk (P = 0.09). The many poor outcomes associated with pruritus underscore the need for better therapeutic agents to provide relief for the 40-50% of prevalent patients undergoing HD substantially affected by pruritus. Pruritus in new patients with end-stage renal disease likely results from uremia or pre-existing conditions (not HD per se), indicating the need to understand development of pruritus before end-stage renal disease.

  6. Adverse events and outcomes of procedural sedation and analgesia in major trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Green

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Trauma patients requiring procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA may have increased risk of adverse events (AEs and poor outcomes. Aims: To determine the incidence of AEs in adult major trauma patients who received PSA and to evaluate their postprocedural outcomes. Settings and Design: Retrospective analysis of adult patients (age >16 who received PSA between 2006 and 2014 at a Canadian academic tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: We compared the incidence of PSA-related AEs in trauma patients with nontrauma patients. Postprocedural outcomes including Intensive Care Unit admission, length of hospital stay, and mortality were compared between trauma patients who did or did not receive PSA. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results: Overall, 4324 patients received PSA during their procedure, of which 101 were trauma patients (107 procedures. The majority (77% of these 101 trauma patients were male, relatively healthy (78% with American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status [ASA-PS] 1, and most (85% of the 107 procedures were orthopedic manipulations. PSA-related AEs were experienced by 45.5% of the trauma group and 45.9% of the nontrauma group. In the trauma group, the most common AEs were tachypnea (23% and hypotension (20%. After controlling for age, gender, and ASA-PS, trauma patients were more likely than nontrauma patients to develop hypotension (odds ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.11-2.89. Conclusion: Although trauma patients were more likely than nontrauma patients to develop hypotension during PSA, their outcomes were not worse compared to trauma patients who did not have PSA.

  7. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas, J. (Joel); Sprinkhuizen, S.M. (Sara M.); Ackerson, T. (Teri); Bernhardt, J. (Julie); Davie, C. (Charlie); George, M.G. (Mary G.); Gething, S. (Stephanie); Kelly, A.G. (Adam G.); Lindsay, P. (Patrice); Liu, L. (Liping); Martins, S.C.O. (Sheila C.O.); Morgan, L. (Louise); B. Norrving (Bo); Ribbers, G.M. (Gerard M.); Silver, F.L. (Frank L.); Smith, E.E. (Eric E.); Williams, L.S. (Linda S.); Schwamm, L.H. (Lee H.)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:__ Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures

  8. ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, Paul W; Siha, Hany; Fu, Yuling;

    2012-01-01

    Ticagrelor, when compared with clopidogrel, reduced the 12-month risk of vascular death/myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes intended to undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) tr...

  9. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable

  10. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable instrumen

  11. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, P.J.; Werkhoven, E. van; Bartelink, H.; Fourquet, A.; Lemanski, C.; Loon, J. van; Maduro, J.H.; Russell, N.S.; Scheijmans, L.J.; Schinagl, D.A.X.; Westenberg, A.H.; Poortmans, P.; Boersma, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. METHODS: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sco

  12. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Patricia J. A. M.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bartelink, Harry; Fourquet, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; van Loon, Judith; Maduro, John H.; Russell, Nicola S.; Scheijmans, Luc J. E. E.; Schinagl, Dominic A. X.; Westenberg, Antonia H.; Poortmans, Philip; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26 Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sc

  13. Adverse outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation and peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proietti, Marco; Raparelli, Valeria; Laroche, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is highly prevalent in general population. Data on the prevalence of symptomatic PAD in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are limited, and the impact of PAD on adverse outcomes in AF patients is controversial. Our aims were: (i) to define the prevalenc...

  14. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depressed Cancer Patients: Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome and Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, D. R.; Robertson, S. M. C.; Colman, L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased focus on evaluating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Among the several limitations inherent to these programs of research, few studies have targeted patients with well-diagnosed clinical depression and little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome and…

  15. The distressed (Type D) personality. A risk marker for poor health outcomes in ICD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, A A

    2011-01-01

    The distressed (Type D) personality is an emerging risk marker for poor health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. Patients with this personality disposition are typified by a general propensity to experience psychological distress. The contribution focuses on the impact of Type D p...

  16. Relationship of time to presentation after onset of upper GI bleeding with patient characteristics and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laine, Loren; Laursen, Stig B; Dalton, Harry R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We performed a prospective multi-national study of patients presenting to the emergency department with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and assessed the relationship of time to presentation after onset of UGIB symptoms with patient characteristics and outcomes. METHODS: ...

  17. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  18. Outcome of strategy training in stroke patients with apraxia: a phase II study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heugten, C.M. van; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.G.; Dijk, A.J. van; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Kinebanian, A.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of a therapy programme for srorke patients with apraxia. The programme is based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. This programme was designed for assessment and treatment by occupational therapists. Design: The outcome was studied in de

  19. Impaired microcirculation predicts poor outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. den Uil; W.K. Lagrand; M. van der Ent; L.S.D. Jewbali; J.M. Cheng; P.E. Spronk; M.L. Simoons

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between sublingual perfused capillary density (PCD) as a measure of tissue perfusion and outcome (i.e. occurrence of organ failure and mortality) in patients with cardiogenic shock from acute myocardial infarction. We performed a prospective study in 68 patients. Usi

  20. Association between right ventricular lead position and clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Mads Brix; Johansen, Jens Brock; Riahi, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the association between an apical vs. non-apical right ventricular lead position (RV-LP) and clinical outcome in a large nationwide cohort of patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results: We included consecutive Danish patients receiving a CRT...

  1. Can the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence be predicted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Terra; M. Deutekom (Marije); A.C. Dobben (Annette); C.G.M.I. Baeten; L.W.M. Janssen (Lucas); G.E. Boeckxstaens (Guy); A.F. Engel (Alexander); R.J.F. Felt-Bersma; J.F.W. Slors; M.F. Gerhards (Michael); A.B. Bijnen (Bart); E. Everhardt; W.R. Schouten (Ruud); B. Berghmans; P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); J. Stoker (Jacob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pelvic-floor rehabilitation does not provide the same degree of relief in all fecal incontinent patients. We aimed at studying prospectively the ability of tests to predict the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence. Materials and methods: Two

  2. Effect of perioperative blood transfusions on long term graft outcomes in renal transplant patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    It is established that blood transfusions will promote sensitization to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens, increase time spent waiting for transplantation and may lead to higher rates of rejection. Less is known about how perioperative blood transfusion influence patient and graft outcome. This study aims to establish if there is an association between perioperative blood transfusion and graft or patient survival.

  3. Cancer during pregnancy: an analysis of 215 patients emphasizing the obstetrical and the neonatal outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, K. van; Heyns, L.; Smet, F. De; Eycken, L. Van; Gziri, M.M.; Gemert, W. Van; Halaska, M.; Vergote, I.; Ottevanger, N.; Amant, F.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the management and the obstetrical and neonatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In an international collaborative setting, patients with invasive cancer diagnosed during pregnancy between 1998 and 2008 were identified.

  4. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  5. Patient-centered outcomes on quality of life and anthroposophic healthcare : A qualitative triangulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.B.; Baars, Erik W; Delnoij, D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide a qualitative investigation of aspects that matter to patients regarding quality of life (QOL) and other perceived treatment effects of anthroposophic healthcare (AH). It is a first step in the development of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for AH. Hence, it will contrib

  6. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Patricia J. A. M.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bartelink, Harry; Fourquet, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; van Loon, Judith; Maduro, John H.; Russell, Nicola S.; Scheijmans, Luc J. E. E.; Schinagl, Dominic A. X.; Westenberg, Antonia H.; Poortmans, Philip; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26 Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sc

  7. Patient reported outcomes in chronic skin diseases: eHealth applications for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, O.D.

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to examine and integrate patient reported outcomes (PROs) in dermatological care. In part I, we specifically examined health-related quality of life (HRQoL), treatment satisfaction, and experiences with care in patients with chronic skin diseases. Our results

  8. Presentations and outcome analysis of 205 adult patients with Henoch-Schnlein purpura nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical,pathological data and outcomes of the adult patients with HenochSchnlein purpura nephritis(HSPN).Methods The data of 205 HSPN patients who were diagnosed in Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University betwee Jan 2004 and May 2013 were collected and analyzed in different groups.Results The average

  9. Outcome of strategy training in stroke patients with apraxia: a phase II study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heugten, C.M. van; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.G.; Dijk, A.J. van; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Kinebanian, A.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of a therapy programme for srorke patients with apraxia. The programme is based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. This programme was designed for assessment and treatment by occupational therapists. Design: The outcome was studied in de

  10. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  11. Functional outcomes and quality of life in patients with subtalar arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, Ernest J; van der Vliet, Quirine M J; Alexandridis, Georgios; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke P H

    2017-07-01

    Subtalar arthrodesis is a common salvage operation for posttraumatic subtalar arthritis, a condition frequently seen in patients who suffered major trauma. Functional outcomes in trauma patients may be influenced by concomitant injuries and the severity of the initial trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of life and functional outcomes of subtalar arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis in patients with severe or complex foot injuries. This is a retrospective single center study with prospective follow-up. Patients who underwent subtalar arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis between 2000 and 2016 were included and invited to complete a Maryland Foot Score (MFS), a EuroQol five-dimensional (EQ-5D™) and Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS™) questionnaire, and four additional questions. Forty patients were included in the study, functional outcome scores were available for 30 patients (response rate 75%). Additional surgery of the fused foot was performed in 29 patients and 15 suffered multiple lower extremity injuries. Six patients were polytraumatized. Ninety percent of all patients would recommend the procedure to others, walking abilities improved in 69% and less pain was experienced in 76%. Median MFS score was 61 (IQR 53-72). Quality of life was significantly lower when compared to a reference population (p<0.001). Satisfaction was high, as 90% of all patients would recommend subtalar fusion to others, even though the relatively poor outcome measures would suggest differently. Existing functional outcomes measures were influenced by concomitant injuries and additional procedures. This demands development of instruments suitable for severely injured patients with multiple or complex injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient and Family Member Factors Influencing Outcomes of Poststroke Inpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yunhua; Tao, Qian; Zhou, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Shanjia; Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yingping; Wu, Yi; Chen, Lidian; Tao, Jing; Chan, Chetwyn C

    2017-02-01

    To investigate how family members' attitudes toward functional regain, and patients' knowledge and intention of independence influence poststroke rehabilitation. Cross-sectional study. Three rehabilitation inpatient settings. Younger (n=79) and older (n=84) poststroke patients, along with their family members (spouses, n=104; children, n=59). Not applicable. Custom-designed questionnaires were used to tap into the patients' knowledge about rehabilitation (Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Knowledge About Rehabilitation) and intention of independence (Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence), and family members' attitudes toward patients in performing basic activities of daily living (BADL) (Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-BADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-instrumental activities of daily living). The rehabilitation outcomes included gains in motor, cognitive, and emotional functions, and self-care independence, measured with common clinical instruments. The Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-BADL predicted cognitive outcome and the Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence predicted motor outcome for both groups. Differential age-related effects were revealed for the Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence in predicting emotional outcome only for the younger group, and self-care independence only for the older group. Patients' intention of independence positively affected motor recovery, while family members' positive attitudes promoted cognitive regain. The findings suggested plausible age-related differences in how patients' intentions affect emotion versus self-care independence outcomes. Future studies should explore strategies for promoting positive attitudes toward independence among patients and family members during poststroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  13. Outcome of bacteraemia in patients admitted to the adult medical wards of the UKM hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, P; Kong, N C T; Nordiah, A J; Cheong, I K S; Tamil, M A

    2007-10-01

    The clinical outcome of bacteraemic patients is influenced by many factors. It is vital to know one's own local hospital epidemiological data so as to provide optimal care to the affected patients. This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the said patient population over a period of four months in the year 2005. One hundred and ninety one patients presented with bacteraemia over the study period. Fifty-two (27%) of the patients died. Mechanical ventilation, inappropriate empirical antibiotic usage, Chinese ethnicity and low serum albumin levels independently affected prognosis. These factors should alert physicians to those patients who require more intensive monitoring and care.

  14. Decreased uric acid levels correlate with poor outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients, but not in cerebral hemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongliang; Jia, Qian; Liu, Gaifen; Liu, Liping; Pu, Yuehua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between uric acid and stroke prognosis is ambiguous. Some studies have explored this relationship in acute stroke but have different results. In this study, we explored the relationship between uric acid levels and 1-year outcomes and vascular events of acute ischemic stroke patients and cerebral hemorrhage patients. In all, 1452 continued first, acute ischemic stroke patients and 380 continued cerebral hemorrhage patients were admitted to our hospitals. Serum uric acid concentrations were measured in 1351 ischemic stroke patients and 380 cerebral hemorrhage patients at admission. We evaluated the relationship between uric acid levels and outcomes (modified Rankin scale [mRS] > 2, all-cause death, vascular events, stroke recurrent) at 14 days, 90 days, and 1 year after stroke onset. The median uric acid concentration was 303.0 μmol/L in ischemic stroke patients and 269 μmol/L in cerebral hemorrhage patients. In univariate analysis, uric acid levels were not correlated with outcomes in cerebral hemorrhage patients. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to show that lower serum uric acid levels independently predicted poor functional outcomes (mRS >2) at 1 year after ischemic stroke onset (odds ratio [OR] = .335, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .164-.684, P = .003). Also, lower serum uric acid levels were independently correlated with vascular events in the first year in ischemic stroke patients. By multiple cox proportional hazards analysis, we obtained data which reveal that serum uric acid levels were not correlated with all-cause death (OR = .992, 95% CI: .683-1.443, P = .969) in ischemic stroke patients. Serum uric acid may be neuroprotective in acute ischemic stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impact of Simulated Nature on Patient Outcomes: A Study of Photographic Sky Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Freier, Patricia; O'Boyle, Michael; Amor, Cherif; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether incorporation of simulated nature, in the form of ceiling mounted photographic sky compositions, influences patient outcomes. Previous studies have shown that most forms of nature exposure have a positive influence on patients. However, earlier studies have mostly focused on wall-hung nature representations. The emergence of simulated nature products has raised the question regarding the effects of the new product on patient outcomes. A between-subject experimental design was adopted, where outcomes from five inpatient rooms with sky composition ceiling fixture were compared to corresponding outcomes in five identical rooms without the intervention. Data were collected from a total of 181 subjects on 11 outcomes. Independent sample tests were performed to identify differences in mean outcomes. Significant positive outcomes were observed in environmental satisfaction and diastolic blood pressure (BP). Environmental satisfaction in the experimental group was 12.4% higher than the control group. Direction of association for diastolic BP, nausea/indigestion medication, acute stress, anxiety, pain, and environmental satisfaction were consistent with a priori hypothesis. A post hoc exploratory assessment involving patients who did not self-request additional pain and sleep medication demonstrated confirmatory directions for all outcomes except Systolic BP, and statistically significant outcomes for Acute Stress and Anxiety-Acute Stress and Anxiety levels of the experimental group subjects was 53.4% and 34.79% lower, respectively, than that of the control group subjects. Salutogenic benefits of photographic sky compositions render them better than traditional ceiling tiles and offer an alternative to other nature interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Outcomes of patients with altered level of consciousness and abnormal electroencephalogram: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Paula Rodrigues; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Naves, Pedro Vicente Ferreira; Ladeia-Frota, Carol; Caboclo, Luís Otávio

    2017-01-01

    Nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) are frequent in hospitalized patients and may further aggravate injury in the already damaged brain, potentially worsening outcomes in encephalopathic patients. Therefore, both early seizure recognition and treatment have been advocated to prevent further neurological damage. Evaluate the main EEG patterns seen in patients with impaired consciousness and address the effect of treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), continuous intravenous anesthetic drugs (IVADs), or the combination of both, on outcomes. This was a single center retrospective cohort study conducted in a private, tertiary care hospital. Consecutive adult patients with altered consciousness submitted to a routine EEG between January 2008 and February 2011 were included in this study. Based on EEG pattern, patients were assigned to one of three groups: Group Interictal Patterns (IP; EEG showing only interictal epileptiform discharges or triphasic waves), Group Rhythmic and Periodic Patterns (RPP; at least one EEG with rhythmic or periodic patterns), and Group Ictal (Ictal; at least one EEG showing ictal pattern). Groups were compared in terms of administered antiepileptic treatment and frequency of unfavorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale ≥3 and in-hospital mortality). Two hundred and six patients (475 EEGs) were included in this analysis. Interictal pattern was observed in 35.4% (73/206) of patients, RPP in 53.4% (110/206) and ictal in 11.2% (23/206) of patients. Treatment with AEDs, IVADs or a combination of both was administered in half of the patients. While all Ictal group patients received treatment (AEDs or IVADs), only 24/73 (32.9%) IP group patients and 55/108 (50.9%) RPP group patients were treated (p<0.001). Hospital length of stay (LOS) and frequency of unfavorable outcomes did not differ among the groups. In-hospital mortality was higher in IVADs treated RPP patients compared to AEDs treated RPP patients [11/19 (57.9%) vs. 11/36 (30.6%) patients

  17. Patient-reported outcomes: state-of-the-art hand surgery and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Joy C

    2014-08-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PRO) can provide reliable and valid estimates of patient status and response to interventions to complete the final step in an evidence-based patient interaction. A variety of PRO are relevant to upper extremity surgery and rehabilitation outcomes. PRO provide feasible tools for clinical research or practice, although use in clinical decision making lags behind research applications. Recent trends in clinical measurement include better integration of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in content validation, more modern methods of evaluating scaling properties (Rasch analysis), consensus exercise on establishing core measures, electronic data collection, and computer-adaptive testing.

  18. Outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Minners, Jan; Holme, Ingar

    2011-01-01

    surgery. We therefore evaluated the outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" stenosis (defined as aortic valve area Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Methods and Results—Outcome in patients with low-gradient “severe......” aortic stenosis was compared with outcome in patients with moderate stenosis (aortic valve area 1.0 to 1.5 cm2; mean gradient 25 to 40 mm Hg). The primary end point of aortic valve events included death from cardiovascular causes, aortic valve replacement, and heart failure due to aortic stenosis...... was lower in patients with low-gradient severe stenosis than in those with moderate stenosis (18264 versus 21268 g; P0.01). During 46 months of follow-up, aortic valve events occurred in 48.5% versus 44.6%, respectively (P0.37; major cardiovascular events, 50.9% versus 48.5%, P0.58; cardiovascular death, 7...

  19. Radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroid disease: poorer outcome in patients with high 24 hours radioiodine uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Hesse, Birger; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the importance of 24 h radioiodine uptake (24 h RIU) for the outcome of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 72 patients who underwent radioiodine treatment for toxic goiter at our outpatient clinic [29 diffuse goiters (DG), 30 toxic...... multinodular goiters (TMG) and 13 toxic adenomas (TA)]. Thyroid status was determined by TSH, fT3 and fT4 levels, and outcome was rendered successful when hyperthyroidism was absent. Relation between low 24 h RIU (below median) or high 24 h RIU (above or equal to median) and outcome was evaluated. RESULTS......: Of patients with DG and low 24 h RIU, 15% remained hyperthyroid, as opposed to 56% of patients with DG and high 24 h RIU (Phyperthyroid, as opposed to 44% of patients with TMG and high 24 h RIU (P

  20. [Sociodemographic/clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to the National Burn Center of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Claudia R; Villegas, Jorge; Peña, Verónica; Whittle, Sandra

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 150 subjects per year suffer severe burns in Chile. To analyze sociodemographic/clinical features and outcomes of severely burned patients. Retrospective cohort study of 936 patients aged 47 ± 20 years (66% males), admitted to the National Burn Center of Chile between 2006 and 2010. Sociodemographic/clinical and burn variables and outcomes were studied. Mean total percentage of body surface area burned was 27 + 20%. A quarter of the patients had social features that could jeopardize rehabilitation. Fire was the burning agent in 73%, which along with electricity presented greater lethality (p Chile are mainly males at working age. Fire is the main agent and 28% had impaired consciousness, which was associated with an increase in the severity of burns. Knowledge of the characteristics and outcomes of the patients is important to implement prevention and treatment strategies adjusted to the national reality.

  1. Low back pain patients in Sweden, Denmark and the UK share similar characteristics and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Davies, Laura; Axén, Iben

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is the world's leading cause of disability and yet poorly understood. Cross-national comparisons may motivate hypotheses about outcomes being condition-specific or related to cultural differences and can inform whether observations from one country may be generalised...... to another. This analysis of data from three cohort studies explored whether characteristics and outcomes differed between LBP patients visiting chiropractors in Sweden, Denmark and the UK. METHODS: LBP patients completed a baseline questionnaire and were followed up after 3, 5, 12 and 26 weeks. Outcomes...... and nations tested if strength of prognostic factors differed across countries. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 262, 947 and 453 patients from Sweden, Denmark and the UK respectively. Patient characteristics were largely similar across cohorts although some statistically significant differences were...

  2. Does a multidisciplinary diabetes group education visit improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Kristi J; O'Dell, Michael L; Taylor, James L

    2009-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant and growing public health concern, and patient education is the primary approach for self-management. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of a single session diabetes group education intervention. The design is a one-group pretest/posttest evaluation. Participants were adult outpatients with diabetes who attended a single session group education visit and volunteered to participate in the study. Survey questions include the Single Item Literacy Screener and diabetes knowledge questions. The survey was mailed and collected before the group visit. Diabetes knowledge was collected immediately after the group visit and again by telephone one to four months later. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), lipids, and blood pressure were collected from the patient electronic medical record before and, where available, three months after the group visit. Data analysis includes descriptive statistics and Students t-testing to determine pre- and posttest differences of diabetes knowledge and physiological markers. Thirty-eight adult outpatients participated in the study. Nearly half responded that they never needed to have someone help with written medical materials. There was a significant increase from pretest to immediate posttest diabetes knowledge scores (N = 3; M = 5.58 to M = 7.53 out of 10), t(38) = -5.217, p = education (M = 9.16 to M = 8.52), t(27) = 2.185, p = .038. A single session diabetes group education visit is effective in increasing patients' diabetes knowledge and decreasing HbA1c levels.

  3. Incidence and outcome of tube thoracostomy positioning in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybauer, Marc O; Geisser, Wolfgang; Wolff, Holger; Maybauer, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of use, placement site, success and misplacement rates, and need for intervention for tube thoracostomies (TTs), and the complications with endotracheal intubation associated with TT in the prehospital setting. We performed a five-year, retrospective study using the records of 1,065 patients who were admitted to the trauma emergency room at a university hospital and who had received chest radiographs or computed tomography (CT) scans within 30 minutes after admission. Seven percent of all patients received a TT (5% unilateral, 2% bilateral). Ninety-seven percent of all patients with a TT were endotracheally intubated. The success rate for correctly placed chest tubes was 78%. Twenty-two percent of the chest tubes were misplaced (i.e., too far in the chest, twisted, or bent); half of those had to be corrected, with one needing to be replaced. There were no statistical differences in the frequency of Monaldi or Bülau positions, or the frequency of left or right chest TT. In addition, the two positions did not differ in misplacement rates or the need for intervention. Helicopter emergency medical services physicians used the Monaldi position significantly more frequently than the Bülau position. In-hospital physicians performing interhospital transfer used the Bülau position significantly more frequently, whereas ground emergency medical physicians had a more balanced relationship between the two positions. Tube thoracostomy had no influence on endotracheal tube misplacement rates, and vice versa. Tube thoracostomy positioning mostly depends on the discretion of the physician on scene. The Monaldi and Bülau positions do not differ in misplacement or complication rates.

  4. Outcomes of Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering in Older Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Chirag; Bangalore, Sripal; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-02-07

    The 2014 Eighth Joint National Committee panel recommended a therapeutic target of systolic blood pressure (BP) safety of intensive BP-lowering strategies in older (age ≥65 years) hypertensive patients. The MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched for all relevant randomized controlled trials from 1965 through July 1, 2016. Cardiovascular (major adverse cardiovascular events [MACE], cardiovascular mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure), and safety (serious adverse events and renal failure) were evaluated. Random and fixed effects analysis were used to calculate pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified 4 high-quality trials involving 10,857 older hypertensive patients with a mean follow-up of 3.1 years. Intensive BP lowering was associated with a 29% reduction in MACE (RR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.60 to 0.84), 33% in cardiovascular mortality (RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.45 to 0.98), and 37% in heart failure (RR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43 to 0.99) compared with standard BP lowering. Rates of myocardial infarction and stroke did not differ between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of serious adverse events (RR: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.09) or renal failure (RR: 1.81; 95% CI: 0.86 to 3.80) between the 2 groups. The fixed effects model yielded largely similar results, except for an increase in the risk of renal failure (RR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.30 to 3.18) with intensive BP-lowering therapy. In older hypertensive patients, intensive BP control (systolic BP risk of renal failure. When considering intensive BP control, clinicians should carefully weigh benefits against potential risks. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pretreatment organ function in patients with advanced head and neck cancer: clinical outcome measures and patients' views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Coen RN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study is to thoroughly assess pretreatment organ function in advanced head and neck cancer through various clinical outcome measures and patients' views. Methods A comprehensive, multidimensional assessment was used, that included quality of life, swallowing, mouth opening, and weight changes. Fifty-five patients with stage III-IV disease were entered in this study prior to organ preserving (chemoradiation treatment. Results All patients showed pretreatment abnormalities or problems, identified by one or more of the outcome measures. Most frequent problems concerned swallowing, pain, and weight loss. Interestingly, clinical outcome measures and patients' perception did no always concur. E.g. videofluoroscopy identified aspiration and laryngeal penetration in 18% of the patients, whereas only 7 patients (13% perceived this as problematic; only 2 out of 7 patients with objective trismus actually perceived trismus. Conclusion The assessment identified several problems already pre-treatment, in this patient population. A thorough assessment of both clinical measures and patients' views appears to be necessary to gain insight in all (perceived pre-existing functional and quality of life problems.

  6. Clinical review: impact of statin substitution policies on patient outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, Dan; Carmena, Rafael; Clemmensen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , the consequences for primary care are under-researched. Our objective was to review data on intensive statin therapy and generic substitution in patients at high cardiovascular risk. RESULTS: Current treatment guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease are consistent in their recommendations regarding...... and recommended therapeutic targets. CONCLUSIONS: Substitution of generic statins may be cost-saving, particularly at the primary prevention level. However, statin substitution policies have not been adequately studied on a population level. Data raise concern that mandated statin substitution may lead...

  7. Exenatide once weekly: clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Jose1

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Biju Jose1, Abd A Tahrani1,2, Milan K Piya1,2, Anthony H Barnett1,21Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; 2School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKBackground: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a complex disorder in which interactions between environmental and genetic factors result in the development of insulin resistance (in most cases and progressive pancreatic β-cell failure. The currently available oral anti-diabetes treatments are effective as monotherapy; however, due to the progressive decline in β-cell function, most patients will require the use of combination therapy and eventually insulin to reach glycemic targets. These therapeutic options are not without undesirable side effects such as weight gain and hypoglycemia. Furthermore, T2DM is associated with impaired quality of life (QOL and poor compliance with treatment. Hence, there is a need for anti-diabetes agents that result in sustained improvements in glycemic control without hypoglycemia or weight gain and have a positive impact on patients QOL and thereby hopefully improve compliance. Incretin-based therapy is the latest addition to anti-diabetes treatments which addresses some of the shortcomings of older treatments.Aims: To review the evidence for the use of exenatide once-weekly.Methods: We have searched Medline using the terms “exenatide”, “exenatide once-weekly”, and “exenatide LA”.Results: Exenatide once-weekly is an incretin mimetic that is currently undergoing phase 3 clinical trials, and has been shown to improve glycemic parameters (HbA1c and fasting and postprandial glucose levels, with low risk of hypoglycemia, causes weight loss, and use was associated with improvements in patient satisfaction which might have a positive impact on treatment compliance.Conclusions: Exenatide once-weekly is effective, well tolerated in patients with T2DM and should

  8. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  9. Outcomes of CAG Regimen for Refractory Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng He; Xiang Zhang; De-pei Wu; Ai-ning Sun; Zheng-ming Jin; Hui-ying Qiu; Miao Miao; Xiao-wen Tang; Zheng-zheng Fu; Yue Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the efficiency of low-dose cytosine arabinoside plus aclarubicin with concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(CAG)regimen for refractory biphenotypic acute leukemia(BAL).Methods We treated 5 refractory BAL patients by CAG regimen(10 mg·m 2 cytosine arabinoside subcutaneously administrated every 12 hours,day 1-14;5-7 mg·m2 aclarubicin intravenously administrated daily,day 1-8;and concurrently used 200 μg.m-2·d-1 granulocyte colony-stimulating factor subcutaneously)from November 2002 to April 2007.The efficacy of the regimen was evaluated by response rate,and the side effects were also measured.Results The complete remission rate was 80% ,median duration of absolute neutrophil count<5.0×108/L and platelet count<2.0×1010/L was day 13 and day 1,respectively;and the infection rate was low(Ⅲ-Ⅳ infection rate,20.00% ).Conclusion CAG regimen as remission induction chemotherapy for BAL patients is effective with a high remission rate and low toxicity.

  10. Clinical outcomes of lung metastasectomy in patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omer Fatih Olmez; Erdem Cubukcu; Ahmet Sami Bayram; Unsal Akcali; Turkkan Evrensel; Cengiz Gebitekin

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate prognostic factors of survival following curative,non-palliative surgical removal of lung metastases secondary to colorectal cancer (CRC).METHODS:Between 1999 and 2009,a radical metastasectomy with curative intent was performed on lung metastases in 21 patients with CRC (15 male and 6 female; mean age:57.4 ± 11.8 years; age range:29-74years) who had already undergone primary tumour resection.RESULTS:The mean number of lung metastases ranged from one to five.The mean overall survival was 71 ±35 mo (median:25 mo).After adjusting for potential confounders,multivariable Cox regression analyses predicted only the number of lung metastases (1 vs ≥ 2;hazard ratio:7.60,95% confidence interval:1.18-17.2,P =0.03) as an independent predictor of poor survival following lung resection for metastatic CRC.CONCLUSION:Resection of lung metastases is a safe and effective treatment in selected CRC patients with single lung metastases.

  11. Migration Phenotype of Brain-Cancer Cells Predicts Patient Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is a heterogeneous and infiltrative cancer with dismal prognosis. Studying the migratory behavior of tumor-derived cell populations can be informative, but it places a high premium on the precision of in vitro methods and the relevance of in vivo conditions. In particular, the analysis of 2D cell migration may not reflect invasion into 3D extracellular matrices in vivo. Here, we describe a method that allows time-resolved studies of primary cell migration with single-cell resolution on a fibrillar surface that closely mimics in vivo 3D migration. We used this platform to screen 14 patient-derived glioblastoma samples. We observed that the migratory phenotype of a subset of cells in response to platelet-derived growth factor was highly predictive of tumor location and recurrence in the clinic. Therefore, migratory phenotypic classifiers analyzed at the single-cell level in a patient-specific way can provide high diagnostic and prognostic value for invasive cancers.

  12. The Evolution of Cardiovascular Surgery in Elderly Patient: A Review of Current Options and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Nicolini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increase in average life expectancy and the higher incidence of cardiovascular disease with advancing age, more elderly patients present for cardiac surgery nowadays. Advances in pre- and postoperative care have led to the possibility that an increasing number of elderly patients can be operated on safely and with a satisfactory outcome. Currently, coronary artery bypass surgery, aortic and mitral valve surgery, and major surgery of the aorta are performed in elderly patients. The data available show that most cardiac surgical procedures can be performed in elderly patients with a satisfactory outcome. Nevertheless, the risk for these patients is only acceptable in the absence of comorbidities. In particular, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular disease, and poor clinical state are associated with a worse outcome in elderly patients. Careful patient selection, flawless surgery, meticulous hemostasis, perfect anesthesia, and adequate myocardial protection are basic requirements for the success of cardiac surgery in elderly patients. The care of elderly cardiac surgical patients can be improved only through the strict collaboration of geriatricians, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, and cardiac surgeons, in order to obtain a tailored treatment for each individual patient.

  13. Outcomes in Patients With Hemophilia and von Willebrand Disease Undergoing Invasive or Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Bamme, Jaqueline; Hsu, Fraustina; Christos, Paul; DeSancho, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Adults with hemophilia A (HA), hemophilia B (HB), and von Willebrand disease (VWD) frequently require surgery and invasive procedures. However, there is variability in perioperative management guidelines. We describe our periprocedural outcomes in this setting. A retrospective chart review from January 2006 to December 2012 of patients with HA, HB, and VWD undergoing surgery or invasive procedures was conducted. Type of procedures, management including the use of continuous factor infusion, and administration of antifibrinolytics were reviewed. Adverse outcomes were defined as acute bleeding (patients with HA and HB. In all, 24 patients had severe hemophilia and 12 had mild/moderate hemophilia. Twelve patients had inhibitors. There were also 5 female carriers of HA and 6 patients with VWD. There were 34 major surgeries (26 orthopedic, 8 nonorthopedic) and 129 minor surgeries. Continuous infusion was used in 55.9% of major surgeries versus 8.5% of minor surgeries. Antifibrinolytics were administered in 14.7% of major surgeries versus 23.2% of minor surgeries. In all, 4 patients developed acute bleeding and 10 patients developed delayed bleeding. Delayed bleeding occurred in 28.6% of genitourinary procedures and in 16.1% of dental procedures. Five patients acquired an inhibitor and 2 had thrombosis. In conclusion, patients with HA, HB, or VWD had similar rates of adverse outcomes when undergoing minor surgeries or major surgeries. This finding underscores the importance of an interdisciplinary management and procedure-specific guidelines for patients with hemophilia and VWD prior to even minor invasive procedures.

  14. Age Related Incidence and Early Outcomes of Hip Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study of 1177 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Ravikiran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Methods Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64, group B (patients between 65 and 84 years of age, and group C (patients over the age of 85. Results Of the 1177 patients included in the study, there were 90 patients in group A, 702 patients in group B and 385 patients in group C. There was a female preponderance across all age groups, and this increased as age advanced (p Conclusions Hip fractures are more common among females irrespective of age group. Older patients have a higher mortality and a greater deterioration of walking ability after such injuries. Internal fixation of intracapsular fractures have demonstrated satisfactory early outcome in the immediate period. This could be attributed to retention of native bone, better propioception and shorter operation time.

  15. Stroke warning campaigns: delivering better patient outcomes? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellon L

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lisa Mellon,1 Frank Doyle,1 Daniela Rohde,1 David Williams,2 Anne Hickey1 1Department of Psychology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Geriatric and Stroke Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland Background: Patient delay in presenting to hospital with stroke symptoms remains one of the major barriers to thrombolysis treatment, leading to its suboptimal use internationally. Educational interventions such as mass media campaigns and community initiatives aim to reduce patient delays by promoting the signs and symptoms of a stroke, but no consistent evidence exists to show that such interventions result in appropriate behavioral responses to stroke symptoms. Methods: A systematic literature search and narrative synthesis were conducted to examine whether public educational interventions were successful in the reduction of patient delay to hospital presentation with stroke symptoms. Three databases, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, were searched to identify quantitative studies with measurable behavioral end points, including time to hospital presentation, thrombolysis rates, ambulance use, and emergency department (ED presentations with stroke. Results: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria: one randomized controlled trial, two time series analyses, three controlled before and after studies, five uncontrolled before and after studies, two retrospective observational studies, and two prospective observational studies. Studies were heterogeneous in quality; thus, meta-analysis was not feasible. Thirteen studies examined prehospital delay, with ten studies reporting a significant reduction in delay times, with a varied magnitude of effect. Eight studies examined thrombolysis rates, with only three studies reporting a statistically significant increase in thrombolysis administration. Five studies examined ambulance usage, and four reported a statistically significant increase in ambulance

  16. Change of Patient Selection Strategy and Improved Surgical Outcome in MRI-negative Neocortical Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Chun-Kee; Shin, Jung-won; Moon, Jangsup; Kang, Bong Su; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Jung, Ki-Young; Cho, Yong Won; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is crucial to make selection strategy to identify surgical candidates among medically refractory MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients. In our previous study, we suggested two or more concordance between noninvasive studies (EEG, ictal scalp EEG, interictal FDG-PET, and SPECT) as a new patient selection strategy for MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients before and after the implementation of a new selection strategy. Methods From 1995 to 2011, we included 153 consecutive MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients who received focal resection and had a follow-up period of at least 2 years. These patients were divided into two groups according to their date of surgery (before and after July 2002). The old group consisted of 89 patients and the new one consisted of 53 patients. Clinical characteristics, presurgical evaluations, and pathology were reviewed. Results The new patient selection strategy led to a significant increase in the concordance between two or more modalities. The improvement in surgical outcome after 2002 was significant (seizure-free outcome, 47.2% vs. 75.5%; p = 0.001). Concordance between two or more presurgical evaluations and localizing PET were related to a seizure-free outcome in a multivariate analysis. Conclusions After a change in surgical strategy to select patients with two or more concordance between noninvasive studies, the seizure-free outcome improved up to 75.5%. MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients with two or more concordance between noninvasive studies seem to be good candidates for epilepsy surgery. PMID:28101477

  17. Predictors of Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mild Stroke Scale Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Hammer, Maxim; Jovin, Tudor; Reddy, Vivek; Wechsler, Lawrence; Jadhav, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a known predictor of outcome in acute ischemic stroke, there are other factors like age, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow that may be predictors of outcome but are not assessed by the traditional NIHSS. The aim of this retrospective review was to identify predictors of outcome in mild ischemic stroke. Discharge outcomes from patients who presented to our large academic stroke center with acute ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 7189 patients reviewed, 2597 had initial NIHSS less than 5. Outcome measures were modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score 0-1 and discharge to home. In all, 65% of patients with NIHSS 0-4 were discharged directly home independent of treatment. Of those patients discharged to home, 74% were able to ambulate independently and 98% passed their dysphagia screen. Of patients not discharged directly home, 66% were unable to ambulate independently and 21% did not pass their dysphagia screen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of dysphagia screen (P = .001), ability to ambulate independently (P = .002), age (P = .016), and NIHSS (P = .005) on discharge to home but not MRS of 0-1 (P = .564). In patients with mild stroke scale scores defined as NIHSS 0-4, several factors including age, NIHSS, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow may be independent predictors of functional outcome and discharge home. These data support the development of a modified grading system for assessing functional outcome in mild stroke that considers these factors. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of patient factors, surgeons, and surgeon teams in immediate implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Mattos, David; Mastroianni, Melissa; Weng, Qing Y; Ricci, Joseph A; Heath, Martha P; Lin, Alex; Specht, Michelle C; Haynes, Alex B; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Outcome studies of immediate implant-based breast reconstruction have focused largely on patient factors, whereas the relative impact of the surgeon as a contributing variable is not known. As the procedure requires collaboration of both a surgical oncologist and a plastic surgeon, the effect of the surgeon team interaction can have a significant impact on outcome. This study examines outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction and the association with patient characteristics, surgeon, and surgeon team familiarity. A retrospective review of 3142 consecutive implant-based breast reconstruction mastectomy procedures at one institution was performed. Infection and skin necrosis rates were measured. Predictors of outcomes were identified by unadjusted logistic regression followed by multivariate logistic regression. Surgeon teams were grouped according to number of cases performed together. Patient characteristics remain the most important predictors for outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, with odds ratios above those of surgeon variables. The authors observed significant differences in the rate of skin necrosis between surgical oncologists with an approximately two-fold difference between surgeons with the highest and lowest rates. Surgeon teams that worked together on fewer than 150 procedures had higher rates of infection. Patient characteristics are the most important predictors for surgical outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, but surgeons and surgeon teams are also important variables. High-volume surgeon teams achieve lower rates of infection. This study highlights the need to examine modifiable risk factors associated with optimum implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes, which include patient and provider characteristics and the surgical team treating the patient. Risk, III.

  19. Impact of early postoperative enteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Liu, H Y; Guo, S H; Sun, P; Gong, F M; Jia, B Q

    2015-06-29

    The impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients was investigated. Three hundred pa-tients undergoing gastric cancer surgery from July 2010 to May 2014 were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 150/group). Experimental group patients received enteral nutrition in water during the early postoperative period. Control group patients received conventional perioperative treatment. Patients' clinical outcomes, post-operative immune function, and nutritional statuses were compared, which revealed that the postoperative fever duration (80.2 ± 6.0 vs 88.1 ± 8.1 h, P 0.05]. At postoperative days 3 and 7, the CD3(+), CD4(+), natural killer cell, albumin, and prealbumin levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ra-tio were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (all P nutritional status and immune function and promote early recovery of intestinal function in patients with gastric cancer.

  20. Mild to moderate hypothermia: the hope for improving outcome of severe head injured patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem throughout the worl d. More than 400000 patients with TBI in the United States of America and more than a million patients with TBI in China are admitted to hospital every ye ar. Head trauma is also No.1 killer of young people in the developed countries as well a s in some developing countries. Unfortunately, the outcome of patients with seve re TBI is still poor all over the world. The mortality of severe TBI patients (G CS 3-8) in majority of hospitals is over 30% and very severe TBI patients (GCS 3-5) is over 80% with only 15% functional recovery.1,2 However, recent ad vance in cerebral protection by mild (35-33℃) to moderate hypothermia (32-30 ℃) is certainly encouraging, which brings neurosurgeons the hope to improve the outcome of severe head injured patients.

  1. Patient-Reported Outcome questionnaires for hip arthroscopy: a systematic review of the psychometric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip arthroscopies are often used in the treatment of intra-articular hip injuries. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are an important parameter in evaluating treatment. It is unclear which PRO questionnaires are specifically available for hip arthroscopy patients. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate which PRO questionnaires are valid and reliable in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Methods A search was conducted in Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Pedro, EMBASE and Web of Science from 1931 to October 2010. Studies assessing the quality of PRO questionnaires in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were included. The quality of the questionnaires was evaluated by the psychometric properties of the outcome measures. The quality of the articles investigating the questionnaires was assessed by the COSMIN list. Results Five articles identified three questionnaires; the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS). The NAHS scored best on the content validity, whereas the HOS scored best on agreement, internal consistency, reliability and responsiveness. The quality of the articles describing the HOS scored highest. The NAHS is the best quality questionnaire. The articles describing the HOS are the best quality articles. Conclusions This systematic review shows that there is no conclusive evidence for the use of a single patient-reported outcome questionnaire in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Based on available psychometric evidence we recommend using a combination of the NAHS and the HOS for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:21619610

  2. Short- and long-term outcomes of AL amyloidosis patients admitted into intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinault, Damien; Canet, Emmanuel; Huart, Antoine; Jaccard, Arnaud; Ribes, David; Lavayssiere, Laurence; Venot, Marion; Cointault, Olivier; Roussel, Murielle; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Pichereau, Claire; Lemiale, Virginie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Attal, Michel; Chauveau, Dominique; Azoulay, Elie; Faguer, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare and threatening condition that may require intensive care because of amyloid deposit-related organ dysfunction or therapy-related adverse events. Although new multiple myeloma drugs have dramatically improved outcomes in AL amyloidosis, the outcomes of AL patients admitted into intensive care units (ICUs) remain largely unknown. Admission has been often restricted to patients with low Mayo Clinic staging and/or with a complete or very good immunological response at admission. In a retrospective multicentre cohort of 66 adult AL (n = 52) or AA (n = 14) amyloidosis patients, with similar causes of admission to an ICU, the 28-d and 6-month survival rates of AA patients were significantly higher compared to AL patients (93% vs. 60%, P = 0·03; 71% vs. 45%, P = 0·02, respectively). In AL patients, the simplified Index of Gravity Score (IGS2) was the only independent predictive factor for death by day 28, whereas the Mayo-Clinic classification stage had no influence. In Cox's multivariate regression model, only cardiac arrest and on-going chemotherapy at ICU admission significantly predicted death at 6 months. Short-term outcomes of AL patients admitted into an ICU were mainly related to the severity of the acute medical condition, whereas on-going chemotherapy for active amyloidosis impacted on long-term outcomes.

  3. Using publicly reported nursing-sensitive screening indicators to measure hospital performance : the Netherlands experience in 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; Van Der Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deliberate screening allows detection of health risks that are otherwise not noticeable and allows expedient intervention to minimize complications and optimize outcomes, especially during critical events like hospitalization. Little research has evaluated the usefulness of screening per

  4. ASSESSMENT OF TREATMENT OUTCOME OF TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS UNDER REVISED NATIONAL TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL PROGRAMME IN NANDED, MAHARASHTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varthi Mahendra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB remains a world-wide public health problem despite the fact that the causative organism was discovered more than 100 years ago and highly effective drugs and vaccine are available making TB a preventable and curable disease. OBJECTIVE: To assess the treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients under Revised National Tuberculosis control Programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present record based study was conducted during July 2013-September 2013. The treatment outcome of all tuberculosis patients were assessed from the RNTCP treatment cards that were on DOTS during 1st Jan 2011 to 30th June 2012 at City Tuberculosis Center, Nanded-Waghala Municipal Corporation, Jangamwadi, Nanded. Before starting the study, the ethical approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee of the college. The data was directly entered on the Microsoft Excel regarding epidemiological variables and outcome of tuberculosis patients. The data was tabulated and analyzed by using statistical software Open Epi Version 2.3 by maintaining confidentiality. RESULTS: Thus we had included 442 TB patients. The findings of treatment outcome of TB patients were Cured 104 (23.53%, treatment completed 289 (65.38%, defaulters 20 (4.52%, treatment failures 1 (0.23%, deaths 25 (5.66% and transferred out 3 (0.68%. CONCLUSION: Our study showed the treatment outcome rates as per the expected norms RNTCP.

  5. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubukata S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiho Ubukata,1,2 Rumi Tanemura,2 Miho Yoshizumi,1 Genichi Sugihara,1 Toshiya Murai,1 Keita Ueda1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 2Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan Abstract: Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. Keywords: Eyes test, social emotion perception, social function, social participation, theory of mind

  6. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A combination of serum iron, ferritin and transferrin predicts outcome in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Chao; Qian, Christopher; Luo, Qian-Qian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya; Feng, Hua; Qian, Zhong-Ming

    2016-02-22

    Association of a high-serum ferritin with poor outcome showed that iron might play a detrimental role in the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, we investigated changes in serum iron, ferritin, transferrin (Tf) and ceruloplasmin (CP) in patients with ICH (n = 100) at day 1 (admission), 3, 7, 14 and 21 and those in control subjects (n = 75). The hematoma and edema volumes were also determined in ICH-patients on admission and at day 3. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 59 patients was ≥3 (poor outcome) and 41 Serum ferritin was significantly higher and serum iron and Tf markedly lower in patients with poor-outcome than the corresponding values in patients with good-outcome at day 1 to 7 and those in the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between serum ferritin and relative edema volume or ratio at day 1 and 3 and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 28), and a negative correlation between serum iron or Tf and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 100). We concluded that not only increased serum ferritin but also reduced serum iron and Tf are associated with outcome as well as hematoma volume.

  8. Applicability of nursing outcomes in patients with heart failure and fluid volume excessive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Joelza Celesilvia Chisté; Orlandin, Letícia; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the clinical applicability of the Nursing Outcomes Classification in patients with decompensated heart failure and the nursing diagnosis of fluid volume excess. This is a longitudinal study conducted in two stages at a university hospital, in 2013. During the first stage the consensus of experts was used to select the nursing outcomes and the indicators related to diagnosing fluid volume excess. The longitudinal study was conducted in the second stage to clinically evaluate the patients using the instrument containing the results and indicators produced in the consensus. A total of 17 patients were assessed. The nursing outcomes were measured during the clinical evaluation by analysing their indicators. The scores increased in six of the results, in comparison with the average results of the first and last assessment. The Nursing Outcomes Classification during medical practice revealed a clinical improvement among the patient who were admitted following decompensated heart failure. The Nursing Outcomes Classification managed to detect changes in the clinical status of patients.

  9. Comparing a tablet computer and paper forms for assessing patient-reported outcomes in edentulous patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Thais Angelina; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Della Vecchia, Maria Paula; Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether two methods of documentation, print and electronic forms, for the assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in complete denture wearers provide comparable results. The study also quantified the time needed for filling the forms by each method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty participants enrolled in a university clinic answered two forms (a questionnaire for denture satisfaction and OHIP-EDENT). They provided answers with two application methods in a random order, with a one-month interval between them: (1) electronic forms on a tablet computer; and (2) print forms. The methods were compared in terms of mean results, correlation/agreement, internal consistency, and spent time. RESULTS Mean results for both methods were similar for each denture satisfaction item (100-mm VAS) and OHIP-EDENT summary score. Both questionnaires presented good internal consistency regardless of the application method (Cronbach's α=0.86 or higher). Correlation and agreement between the methods regarding specific items was at least moderate for the majority of cases. Mean time for the electronic and print forms were 9.2 and 8.5 minutes, respectively (paired t test, P=.06, non-significant). CONCLUSION The electronic method is comparable to print forms for the assessment of important PRO of prosthetic treatment for edentulism, considering the results and time needed. Findings suggest the viability of replacing print forms with a tablet for applying the tested inventories in clinical trials. PMID:28018563

  10. Long-term Outcome of Lupus Nephritis Class II in Argentine Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Victoria; Dorado, Enrique; Rausch, Silvia; Gomez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Zazzetti, Federico; Gargiulo, María; Suarez, Lorena; Chaparro, Rafael; Paira, Sergio; Galvan, Laura; Juarez, Vicente; Pisoni, Cecilia; Garcia, Mercedes; Martinez, Liliana; Alvarez, Analia; Alvarez, Clarisa; Barreira, Juan; Sarano, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background There is controversy in medical literature over the outcome of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) class II. The aim of this study was to explore the risk of histological transformation (HT) and possible factors related to negative response to treatment in patients with mesangial LN class II. Methods A retrospective and multicenter study was carried out that includes patients who had received a diagnosis of LN class II on their first renal biopsy. Creatinine, urine sediment, and proteinuria were recorded at the time of the first biopsy, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 5 years after the first biopsy. Response to treatment, HT, and long-term outcome were evaluated. Results Forty-one patients were included. The manifestation at first biopsy was proteinuria greater than 0.5 g/d in 28 patients (68.29%; 8 [28.57%] of 28 patients had nephrotic syndrome), hematuria in 18 patients (43.90%), and deterioration of renal function in 3 patients (7.31%). During the follow-up (median, 8 years; range, 1–35 years), a new biopsy was performed in 18 patients (43.90%), and in 17 patients (17/18 [94.44%]), there was HT. Median time at rebiopsy was 32 months (range, 11–305 months). Of the 18 patients who had a second biopsy, 10 (55.55%) were on hydroxychloroquine versus 100% (19/19) of patients who did not undergo the procedure (P = 0.001). A year after the first renal biopsy, there are data available from 34 patients; of them, 24 patients (70.58%) had achieved response, and 10 patients (29.41%) had no response (NR) (missing data in 7). A higher 24-hour urinary protein at 6 months was predictor of worse outcome at 1 year, with statistical significance difference for the nonresponder group (median proteinuria, 2.3 g/d [range, 0–4.7 g/d]) compared with responders (median proteinuria, 0.28 g/d [range, 0–1.7 g/d]) (P = 0.0133). In the long-term follow-up (5 years), HT was the main cause of unfavorable outcome and was measured in 78.57% of patients (11/14 patients). Conclusions This

  11. Outcome of Anesthesia and Open Heart Surgery in Pregnant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golamali Mollasadeghi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular disease is an important non-obstetric cause of maternal and fetal /neonatal morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. For a pregnant woman with cardiac disease, the potential inability of the maternal cardiovascular system to contend with normal pregnancy-induced physiologic changes may produce deleterious effects on both mother and fetus. To determine the most frequent surgical indications of maternal and fetal mortality, we studied 15 cases of severe cardiac disease in pregnant women who required cardiac surgical procedures. Methods: In this descriptive study, fifteen pregnant women who underwent cardiac surgery were studied. Maternal age ranged from 27 to 36 years, and gestational age varied from 4 to 22 weeks. Most of the patients were in New York Heart Association Classes II and III. Opioid- based anesthesia with fentanyl citrate (50µ/kg or sufentanil (5µ/kg plus low dose of thiopental were used for the induction of anesthesia. During non-pulsatile cardio-pulmonary bypass, core temperature was between 28-36 °C, average CBP time was 61.2±22 min, average aortic cross-clamp time was 34.13±14 min, and mean pump pressure was maintained between 65-80 mmHg. Results: Ten patients had severe mitral valve disease (66.6%, three had aortic valve disease (20%, one had subvalvular aortic stenosis (6.7%, and the remaining one had left atrial myxoma (6.7%. There were five fetal deaths (33.3% and one maternal death (6.7%. Conclusion: It seems that open heart surgery in the first trimester is very hazardous for the fetus and may lead to fetal death. If possible, surgery should be carried out in the second trimester of pregnancy. The recommendations are simply guidelines because research data and clinical experience in this area are limited.

  12. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR: Its relation to neurological outcome in patients with survived cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaida R. Rana

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: SuPAR serum levels in patients with poor neurological outcome were significantly higher as compared to patients with good neurological outcome. However, the prognostic value was low and inadequate because of a substantial overlap of serum suPAR levels between the outcome groups.

  13. Process- and patient-reported outcomes of a multifaceted medication adherence intervention for hypertensive patients in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Hallas, Jesper; Ravn-Nielsen, Lene Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    potential adherence problems. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate process outcomes and patient- and pharmacist-reported outcomes of a pharmacist adherence intervention for hypertensive patients treated in hospital outpatient clinics. Secondly, to determine the agreement between two different adherence metrics...... calls. Two tools were used to identify adherence problems: The Drug Adherence Work-up (DRAW) tool and an adherence questionnaire. Process data included drug-related problems (DRPs) with recommendations to the physicians, medication- and lifestyle problems identified at the patient interview, actions......-related and 40% lifestyle-related. In connection with the interview, 528 actions were taken within 8 different categories. MI was a central technique applicable for most problems and was employed in nearly all patients (94%). About half of the patients reported increased focus on lifestyle change, and 21...

  14. Superior Vena Cava Obstruction in Hemodialysis Patients: Symptoms, Clinical Presentation and Outcomes Compared to Other Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Yoel; Kuker, Russ

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction associated with non-malignant diseases is on the rise, and a large percentage of these patients are on hemodialysis (HD). The objective was to characterize the presentation, symptoms and outcomes of HD patients with SVC obstruction identified on computerized tomography (CT) compared to patients with other etiologies such as neoplasm. A search was performed through the PACS system using key words to identify patients with SVC obstruction. The CT scans and charts were reviewed for degree of obstruction, signs, symptoms and outcomes. Thirty-six patients were included in the study. Thirteen were on HD and of these, five had symptoms associated with SVC obstruction and one had concordant findings on physical exam. In comparison, thirteen patients with a chest neoplasm had symptoms and four had concordant findings on physical exam. On follow up, 31% of the HD patients died and of these 60% were symptomatic and died within 2 years. 29% of lung cancer patients died within 16 months. The majority of the HD patients had complete SVC obstruction (85%) as opposed to those with a chest neoplasm who mostly had partial SVC occlusion (67%). In conclusion, patients on HD with SVC obstruction are less often symptomatic than those with a neoplasm. However, these HD patients had a death rate similar to the patients with cancer. This risk seems to increase in those who are symptomatic. Diagnosis of SVC obstruction by CT in HD patients may help identify those with less favorable prognosis.

  15. Factors associated with outcomes of patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: a 5-year cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Aubron, Cecile; Cheng, Allen C.; Pilcher, David; Leong, Tim; Magrin, Geoff; Cooper, D Jamie; Scheinkestel, Carlos; Pellegrino, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mortality of patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) remains high. The objectives of this study were to assess the factors associated with outcome of patients undergoing ECMO in a large ECMO referral centre and to compare veno-arterial ECMO (VA ECMO) with veno-venous ECMO (VV