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Sample records for nursing profession continues

  1. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. This paper analyses how the use of mobile technology by nurses at point of care is governed. It highlights the existence of a mobile technology paradox: an identified inability of nurses to access mobile technology in a context where it is increasingly recognised that its use in situ can enhance nursing practice while contributing to mobile learning and continuing professional development. While the recent release of the Registered Nurse Standards for Practice and accompanying Standard for Continuing Professional Development provides some direction regarding professional standards to support the use of mobile technology for mobile learning, we argue a more inclusive approach is required if emerging technologies are to be fully embraced. We describe how an implementation framework, underpinned by more detailed standards, guidelines and codes, could enable the nursing profession to be leaders in embedding mobile technology in healthcare environments nationally and globally. The prevalence of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance in healthcare environments. Its limited availability at point of care is hindering nursing practice, mobile learning and continuing professional development. We discuss the emergence of mobile technology and impediments for its use by nurses in situ. We analyse the professional codes governing nursing, outlining potential reforms to enable implementation of mobile technology at point of care by nurses.

  2. Will Nursing Continue as the Most Trusted Profession? An Ethical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2018-01-01

    Trust-mistrust is a paradoxical rhythm found in all healthcare disciplines. The discipline of nursing has traditionally been regarded as the most trusted. What are the ethical obligations for professional nurses in establishing community relationships of trust according to societal needs and desires? Specifically, the author seeks to conceptualize and discern potential implications for fiduciary trust and the future of nursing as a healthcare discipline.

  3. Education Purchasers' Views of Nursing as an All Graduate Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Linda M.; Harris, Debbie

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders involved in commissioning and contracting for nursing education (n=34) were asked whether nursing education in Britain should shift completely to degrees instead of diplomas. Although they identified benefits that degreed nurses brought to the profession, the consensus was to continue a mix of degree- and diploma-educated nurses.…

  4. Promotion or marketing of the nursing profession by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, I; Biran, E; Telem, L; Steinovitz, N; Alboer, D; Ovadia, K L; Melnikov, S

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested all over the world in nurse recruitment and retention. Issues arising in this context are low job satisfaction, the poor public image of nursing and the reluctance of nurses to promote or market their profession. This study aimed to examine factors explaining the marketing of the nursing profession by nurses working at a general tertiary medical centre in Israel. One hundred sixty-nine registered nurses and midwives from five clinical care units completed a structured self-administered questionnaire, measuring (a) professional self-image, (b) job satisfaction, (c) nursing promotional and marketing activity questionnaire, and (d) demographic data. The mean scores for the promotion of nursing were low. Nurses working in an intensive cardiac care unit demonstrated higher levels of promotional behaviour than nurses from other nursing wards in our study. Nurse managers reported higher levels of nursing promotion activity compared with first-line staff nurses. There was a strong significant correlation between job satisfaction and marketing behaviour. Multiple regression analysis shows that 15% of the variance of promoting the nursing profession was explained by job satisfaction and job position. Nurses are not inclined to promote or market their profession to the public or to other professions. The policy on the marketing of nursing is inadequate. A three-level (individual, organizational and national) nursing marketing programme is proposed for implementation by nurse leadership and policy makers. Among proposed steps to improve marketing of the nursing profession are promotion of the image of nursing by the individual nurse in the course of her or his daily activities, formulation and implementation of policies and programmes to promote the image of nursing at the organizational level and drawing up of a long-term programme for promoting or marketing the professional status of nursing at the national level. © 2015

  5. A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses: Developed by the Education Committee on behalf of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the ESC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Felicity; Carroll, Diane L; Ruppar, Todd; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Hinterbuchner, Lynne; Kletsiou, Eleni; Serafin, Agnieszka; Ketchell, Alison

    2015-06-01

    The European Society of Cardiology and the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions share a vision; to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe. Nurses represent the largest sector of the health professional workforce and have a significant contribution to make, which has not yet been fully realised. Recent evidence highlights an association between the level of nurse education and inpatient mortality making this an important topic, particularly as the provision of nurse education in Europe is variable. To develop a core curriculum to inform the education of nurses following initial qualification for work in cardiovascular settings. A syllabus was developed using published literature, policy documents and existing curricula with expert input from service users, specialist nurses, cardiologists, educationalists and academics. The syllabus formed the framework for the development of the core curriculum. Eight key themes characterise the core curriculum which are presented together with an account of the development process. While the curriculum is not intended to cover all aspects of the highly complex role of the cardiovascular nurse, the themes do exemplify the science and art of nursing and are transferable across different levels of clinical practice and settings. The curriculum functions both as a 'map', which identifies key themes to include in nurse education, and as a 'tool' to inform educational provision that bridges' the gap between initial nurse education and advanced specialist practice. Content can be adapted for use to fit the national context and reflects the specific needs, health priorities, legislative and regulatory standards that govern safe nursing practice across different countries. The core curriculum can be used as a learning framework to guide nurse education, in particular the continuing professional education of post-qualifying nurses working in cardiovascular settings. This represents a significant step

  6. Researching Gender Professions: Nurses as Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufiaurre, Benjamin; de Villarreal, Maider Pérez

    2018-01-01

    Nurses as professionals of health, childhood education teachers, social workers and caregivers, join a group of "feminine professions" which grew through policies of a welfare state in postwar constructive period, or in times of postwar accords (Jones, 1983). These professions are under challenge because of neoliberal policies and…

  7. Beyond profession: nursing leadership in contemporary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Roslyn; Iedema, Rick; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-07-01

    To examine nursing leadership in contemporary health care and its potential contribution to health service organization and management. As the nursing profession repositions itself as an equal partner in health care beside medicine and management, its enhanced nursing standards and clinical knowledge are not leading to a commensurate extension of nursing's power and authority in the organization. An ethnographic study of an ICU in Sydney, Australia, comprising: interviews with unit nursing managers (4); focus groups (3) with less experienced, intermediate and experienced nurses (29 in total); and interviews with senior nurse manager (1). Inter- and intra-professional barriers in the workplace, fragmentation of multidisciplinary clinical systems that collectively deliver care, and clinical and administrative disconnection in resolving organizational problems, prevented nurses articulating a model of intensive and end-of-life care. Professional advocacy skills are needed to overcome barriers and to articulate and operationalize new nursing knowledge and standards if nurses are to enact and embed a leadership role. The profession will need to move beyond a reliance on professional clinical models to become skilled multidisciplinary team members and professional advocates for nurses to take their place as equal partners in health care.

  8. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  9. Perception of nursing as a scientific discipline and nurse profession by students of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nurse according to the Supreme Chamber of Nurses and Midwives is a person able to recognize the health condition of an individual or group and can create a care plan and realize it. The nurse should be primarily autonomous in making decisions about nursing care and organizing nursing care. Each competent nurse can make a proper assessment of a given situation, makes decisions efficiently and is able to quickly select the right methods of conduct. The awareness that science is always the foundation of practice is extremely important. This is how the profession of a nurse was shaped over the years. These scientific achievements greatly influence the increase of the professional nurse's prestige. Objective: The aim of the work is to gain knowledge about the perception of nursing, as a scientific discipline and nurses, by students of the nursing field. Material and methods: The study covered 100 people who are students of nursing, finishing the three-year education period. The selection of respondents was random. The study group consisted of 100% women aged 20-35, living in urban areas (51% and rural (49%. The research method used in the work is a diagnostic survey. The research tool used is a self-help questionnaire. Results: Nursing understood 16% of respondents as a profession, 3% considered them as a scientific discipline, 1% as a learning system. The vast majority of respondents (92% stated that nursing is both theoretical and practical science. The nurses' forms of activity, which contribute to the development of nursing, 73% of them reported upgrading professional qualifications, 7% writing scientific papers, 2% participation in scientific research, 1% participation in the preparation of apprentices to the profession and 1% activity in organizations unions. The most important features that should be possessed by a good nurse include: diligence and accuracy of performed procedures (25%, possessing rich knowledge in the field

  10. Physics and radiology for nursing professions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretzki, G.

    1977-01-01

    Since mechanization is progressing more and more in the health service, especially in the hospitals, persons working in medical assisting professions must increase their knowledge and understanding of technical and physical matters. This book aims at showing the physical connections important for the medical sphere and to describe their application in medicine. The topics of the book were selected according to the 'physical profile' of a modern large hospital and to the legally assigned subjects for physics in nursing training. Contents and presentation of the subjects have been proving good for several years in physics taught in nursing schools. (orig./RW) [de

  11. The nursing profession in Sri Lanka: time for policy changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare-Samaranayake, D; Ogilvie, L; Cummings, G G; Gellatly, Ian R

    2017-09-01

    We address issues and challenges in nursing in Sri Lanka with the aim of identifying where and how policy changes need to be made. Increased global interconnectivity calls for professional leadership, research, education, and policy reform in nursing as these are identified as enhancing health workforce performance and professionalization, thereby improving health systems. We draw on first-hand knowledge of health care and nursing in Sri Lanka and a recent survey of nurses at a large urban government hospital in Sri Lanka, followed by discussion and proposed action on themes identified through analysis of published and unpublished literature about the nursing profession. Policy and action are needed to: (a) establish mandatory nurse licensure in the public and private healthcare sectors; (b) implement realistic policies to further develop nursing education; (c) develop a professionalization process to support nursing autonomy and voice; and (d) promote systematic processes for educational accreditation, curriculum revision, continuing professional development, evidence-based practice, research, leadership, and information systems. There is a policy vacuum that requires careful analysis and strategic planning by formal nurse leaders. Implementing change will require political and professional power and strategic, innovative, and evolutionary policy initiatives as well as organizational infrastructure modifications best achieved through committed multidisciplinary collaboration, augmented research capacity, bolstered nursing leadership, and promotion of partnerships with policy makers. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  12. [About the turning point in a nurse's life when giving up the profession. A qualitative-empirical study on the willingness to continue to work and on the conditions for continuing to work in the post-professional phase of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöbel, Jacqueline; Rester, David; Them, Christa; Seeberger, Bernd

    2010-10-01

    Due to the increasing life expectancy and population ageing, the post-professional phase of life is becoming more and more important to the individual and to society as a whole. The perception of the potentials of elderly people and, hence, the call for self-directed and independent activities in the post-professional phase are becoming more intense. The relation between retirement and work in nurses has not been of scientific importance so far. This is primarily due to the assumption that nurses cannot or do not stay in their profession until retirement. However, nurses do manage to pursue their profession continuously and permanently until they reach the age of retirement. The aim of this qualitative research study is to investigate the post-professional phase of life of former nurses within the context of the profession pursued. The guiding research questions in this regard were: How do former nurses spend their retirement period? How do nurses use their nursing-related abilities and experiences in their postprofessional phase of life? What do nurses associate with their former profession in the post-professional phase of life? In one-to-one interviews, these questions were posed to eight retired nurses who had pursued their profession for many years. The assessment instruments used were a socio-demographic questionnaire, a guideline and a record from memory. All data were summarized and evaluated analytically with regard to their content according to Mayring (2008). The present article shows the partial results of the study on retirement and work in the post-professional life of nurses. The results indicate that the transition to retirement is often accompanied by problems, that retired nurses do not fundamentally refuse to continue to work and that the willingness to continue to work is subject to certain conditions. Reasons and conditions for and against profession-based post-professional activities were revealed. Consequentially, concepts for the systematic

  13. Nurses' online behaviour: lessons for the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Social networking is popular online activity; however, like many activities on the internet, there are some privacy risks and concerns associated with its use. Recently, an increasing number of nurses have been censured or asked to appear before regulatory or registering authorities for unprofessional behaviour on social media sites. Problem behaviours identified include: inappropriate content and postings, crossing professional boundaries and breaching patient privacy and confidentiality. This discussion paper aims to give the nursing profession an understanding of how their online behaviour can impact on their professionalism, and how they can avoid problematic situations when using social media (Facebook). This exploratory discussion paper will inform a study researching nurses' online behaviour. Social media is here to stay and nurses need to navigate the complexities of the boundaries between the personal and the professional. Nurses need to learn to balance the growing usefulness of social media, with the legalities and etiquette of the online environment.

  14. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  15. Abstract: The Evolution of the Nursing Profession Post Genocide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: The Evolution of the Nursing Profession Post Genocide. ... Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2015) > ... In 1997, in collaboration with the MoH, Minister of Education, AMREF Health Africa, and the World Health Organization, health ...

  16. Sociopolitical development of the nursing profession in Iran: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Fooladi, Marjaneh; Parvizy, Soroor

    2016-01-01

    Significant sociopolitical changes in recent decades have not only influenced the nursing profession, but also the entire Iranian healthcare system. This study describes the historical evolution of the nursing profession within a sociopolitical context. This historical review of unpublished and published literature endorsed personal accounts of historic events by 14 of the oldest nurses in Iran chosen through purposive sampling method, as they shared their nursing experiences. Individual recollections were collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews and later analyzed through oral history analysis method. From the results, the 3 categories of the White Revolution, the Islamic Revolution, and Iran-Iraq war and 8 subcategories emerged, where participants identified factors that fundamentally changed the Iranian nursing profession. The nursing profession continues to develop and help revise policies to improve the healthcare system and quality of care. The findings of this study facilitate the better understanding of the influence of sociopolitical events on the nursing profession and guide the revision or development of new healthcare policies.

  17. [Commitment at the heart of the nursing profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2017-12-01

    Although it is a free choice and appears paradoxical, the choice to be a nurse is binding. In keeping with its Code of Ethics, the nursing profession demands an ethical, social, political and collective commitment that we cannot shy away from or we will fail to fulfil our obligations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Advancing the nursing profession begins with leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

  19. Quality of Work Life, Nurses' Intention to Leave the Profession, and Nurses Leaving the Profession: A One-Year Prospective Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Mei Yeh; Chang, Yue-Cune; Yao, Kaiping Grace; Liu, Mei-Chun

    2017-07-01

    To examine the associations among quality of work life, nurses' intention to leave the profession, and nurses leaving the profession. A prospective study design was used. Participants were 1,283 hospital nurses with a purposive sampling in Taiwan. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of three questionnaires: the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale, an intention-to-leave profession questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire. Records of nurses leaving the profession were surveyed 1 year later. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. As many as 720 nurses (56.1%) had tendencies to leave their profession. However, only 31 nurses (2.5%) left their profession 1 year later. Nurses' intention to leave the profession mediated the relationship between the milieu of respect and autonomy, quality of work life, and nurses leaving the profession. The milieu of respect and autonomy describing the quality of work life predicts the nurses' intention to leave the profession, and together these predict nurses leaving the profession. This study illustrates that nurse managers could provide effective interventions to ameliorate the milieu of respect and autonomy aspect of quality of work life to prevent nurses from leaving their profession. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Specialists without spirit: crisis in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewa, S; Hetherington, R W

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the crisis in the nursing profession in Western industrial societies in the light of Max Weber's theory of rationalisation. The domination of instrumental rational action in modern industrial societies in evident in the field of modern medicine. The burgeoning mechanistic approach to the human body and health makes modern health care services increasingly devoid of human values. Although the nursing profession has been influenced by various changes that took place in health care during the last few decades (for example greater reliance on technology), the underlying values of the nursing profession still emphasise a broad definition of the well-being of patients. Hence, in recent years the irrational consequences of growing technological medicine in North America has resulted in a serious crisis in the nursing profession. To resolve this crisis the authors propose a reorganisation of modern health care services on the basis of a new paradigm which is compatible with both the health care needs of the people and the main emphasis in education and training of the nursing profession. PMID:2287012

  1. Application in continuing education for the health professions: chapter five of "Andragogy in Action".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, M S

    1985-04-01

    Although the threat of human obsolescence confronts all of humanity, given the accelerating pace of change in our society, it has a particularly strong impact on the professions--especially the health professions. The half-life of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values required by physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, and pharmacists is shrinking with increasing speed. Citizens worry about being treated by health practitioners who have not kept up to date and have reacted by passing laws mandating relicensing and continuing professional education. The health care professions and institutions have responded to the threat by mounting massive programs of continuing professional education; in fact, this is probably the fastest-growing aspect of all of education. And, since the clientele of continuing professional education consists exclusively of adults, these programs have tended increasingly to be based on principles of adult learning. This chapter opens with a description of a pilot project for physicians at the University of Southern California, in which the central theme is self-directed learning. The selection presents the need for and assumptions and goals of the project and the major program components, including needs assessment, individualized learning plans, information brokering, and the use of peer resource groups. Then follow three selections focused on the continuing education of nurses. Selection 2, by the American Nurses' Association, sets forth a policy statement and guidelines for self-directed continuing education in nursing. Its provisions could easily be adapted to other professions. The application of the andragogical model to highly technical training in cardiovascular nursing at Doctors Hospital in Little Rock is presented in selection 3, and selection 4 describes an innovative inservice education program in which primary responsibility is placed on the clinical nursing units at St. Mary's Hospital in Waterbury, Connecticut.

  2. Conflict resolution styles in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa Iglesias, Marta Elena; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Managers, including those in nursing environments, may spend much of their time addressing employee conflicts. If not handled properly, conflict may significantly affect employee morale, increase turnover, and even result in litigation, ultimately affecting the overall well-being of the organization. A clearer understanding of the factors that underlie conflict resolution styles could lead to the promotion of better management strategies. The aim of this research was to identify the predominant conflict resolution styles used by a sample of Spanish nurses in two work settings, academic and clinical, in order to determine differences between these environments. The effects of employment level and demographic variables were explored as well. Descriptive cross-sectional survey study. Our sample consisted of professional nurses in Madrid, Spain, who worked in either a university setting or a clinical care setting. Within each of these environments, nurses worked at one of three levels: full professor, assistant professor, or scholarship professor in the academic setting; and nursing supervisor, registered staff nurse, or nursing assistant in the clinical setting. Conflict resolution style was examined using the standardized Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument, a dual-choice questionnaire that assesses a respondent's predominant style of conflict resolution. Five styles are defined: accommodating, avoiding, collaborating, competing, and compromising. Participants were asked to give answers that characterized their dominant response in a conflict situation involving either a superior or a subordinate. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to examine the relationship between workplace setting and conflict resolution style. The most common style used by nurses overall to resolve workplace conflict was compromising, followed by competing, avoiding, accommodating, and collaborating. There was a significant overall difference in styles between nurses who worked

  3. The Socialization of Men to the Nursing Profession: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Rita E. Mullen

    2009-01-01

    The profession of nursing is composed, primarily of females. Hence, the profession becomes gendered due to the persons who primarily engage in the work and the characteristic that is primarily associated with the profession--caring. When men enter the profession, they are challenging the gendered image of the profession. Those individuals who…

  4. Showcasing a profession: getting nursing on the newsstand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobdell, E F; Slusser, M; Patterson, J; Burgess, E

    1991-01-01

    Interacting with the media is a method of showcasing the nursing profession. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have a variety of opportunities available for these interactions: appearing on television, participating in a radio program or writing to the media. A survey completed by the authors indicated that CNSs had many media interactions, yet overall, only 17% of all nurses surveyed used writing. This paper begins by discussing where to publish and how to prepare and target the audience. General and specific guidelines for publishing feature articles, health tips, letters to the editor, and other publishing possibilities are presented.

  5. [Mobbing--special reference to the nursing profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Prokes, Bela; Gavrilov-Jerkovié, Vesna; Filipović, Danka

    2009-01-01

    Heinz Leymann defined this phenomenon as a hostile and unethical communication. In his definition Leymann points out that the distinction between "conflict" and "mobbing" does not focus on what is done or how it is done, but rather on the frequency and duration of whatever is done. The exposure to the strain of mobbing begins to result in psychiatrically or psychosomatically pathological conditions due to the accumulation of negative emotions. Leyman emphasizes four main factors which cause harrasment in the workplace: lack of clarity of goals in work, inadequate management, victim's social status and low moral standards in the work environment. The epidemiological data in the European Union, indicate great national differences relative to the percentage of those subjected to mobbing, with increasing exposure rates in all professions, the highest being found in education (14%) and health services. Nurses are considered a professional group at a rather high risk for trauma caused by harrasment in the workplace. "Horizontal violence" is a widely used term regarding mobbing aclions in nursing profession even though vertical violence is present both in this profession and all other health services. Horizontal violence is implied due to the traditional assumption that nurses have a subordinate role compared to doctors, which often brings them into conflict with their peers. Mobbing may be prevented by systematic primary prevention, information, education, and training in communication skills. As a result, we could expect to get a higher quality of nursing care and healthier nurses.

  6. Factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Bai, Yangjing; Bai, Yangjuan; Ma, Weiguang; Yang, Xiangyu; Li, Jiping

    2018-03-20

    There is a growing recognition that training is not translated into performance and the 'transfer problem' exists in organization training today. Although factors contributing to training transfer have been identified in business and industry, the factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession remain less clear. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken in two tertiary referral hospitals in China from February 2013 to September 2013. Purposeful sampling of 24 nursing staffs were interviewed about the factors influencing training transfer. Seven themes evolved from the analysis, categorized in 4 main domains, which described the factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession in trainee characteristics, training design, work environment and profession domain. The trainee characteristics domain included attitude and ability. The training design domain included training content and instruction method. The work environment domain included supports as facilitators and opposition as hindrance. The theme pertaining to the profession domain was professional development. Health care managers need to understand the factors influencing training transfer for maximizing the benefits of training. The right beliefs and values about training, the rigorous employee selection for training, the relevance of training content, training instructions facilitating learning and transfer, supports from peer, supervisors and the organization, organizational culture such as change, sharing, learning and support, and professional development are key to successful training transfer. Furthermore, managers should be aware of the opposition from co-workers and find ways to prevent it.

  7. Children's perceptions of the nursing profession in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusarska, Barbara; Krajewska-Kułak, Elzbieta; Zarzycka, Danuta

    2004-10-01

    The drawing, as a kind of artistic language, used by the child-artist to express his or her thoughts and opinions concerning their environment is an immensely interesting form of cognition for the viewers of such artistic creations. The aim of the study was the analysis of the presentation of the image of the nursing profession created by children and the application of these experiences in vocational education of nurses. The objects of the analysis, were 182 artistic creations of children living in eastern Poland. The detailed analysis of the works was carried out by three independent competent judges who grouped the works according to the accepted indicators of evaluation. The young artists created the image of the nurse that presents a detailed range of professional duties, the quality of the child-nurse relationship and the prognostic vision of the new activities that will be put into practice in the future. The rich content of the drawings was complemented by the high artistic value of the composition. The study material collected should be used not only by nurses participating in care of children, but also in vocational education of nurses for more complete preparation of candidates to perform their future profession.

  8. How the nursing profession can contribute to sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David; Shaffer, Franklin

    2016-11-01

    As of 1 January 2016, the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) became the focus of global efforts on a wide range of development agenda. The SDGs have subsumed the work of the UN millennium development goals (MDGs), so it is timely to reflect on the contribution made by nurses and midwives, so that we can optimise the profession's contribution to the 17 SDGs. This article reports the results of a scientometrics analysis of the published literature related to the MDGs and SDGs indexed in CINAHL, which identified the underlying themes addressed by nurses and midwives. It shows how analysis demonstrates that although nursing was slow to engage with the MDG agenda, it has made some progress in contributing to SDG scholarship. So far this contribution has been narrowly focused, but the profession could contribute to all 17 of the SDG goals. Routine updates of the analysis described here could help monitor progress, identify gaps in nursing's contributions to the goals, and provide further impetus to its engagement in this major global policy initiative.

  9. Moral intelligence and its position in nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooneh Yousefi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Moral intelligence is one of the aspects of intelligence which can provide a framework for proper performance of the humans, which is known as a forecaster factor of behavior. MI is a vital intelligence for humans owing to guidance of other shapes of intelligence toward valuable tasks . It is  a combination of knowledge, interest and resolve, also includes the method of thinking, feeding and acting. The role and importance of MI is outstanding because of making balance and improvement in individual's interactions and social terms, especially in occupations related to medical and nursing field which directly deals with people's life. The goal of this study is the definition and identification of MI and its application in medical science, especially nursing. Methods: This research is a retrospective article in which other researchers' study has been investigated and analyzed. Therefore, three main keywords; intelligence, morality, MI, has been searched in different nursing field databases such as SID, CVID, PUBMED, CINAHL, SCIENCE, MAGIRAN DIRECT, GOOGLE SCHOLAR and SCOPUS. Hence, based on these criteria, published articles from 2000  up to the present has been found and abstracted or editors interpretation ones eliminated. Only full text articles have been used. Definitions and applications of MI in nursing, presented in articles has been organized and revised in this article. Results: The results showed that MI education is a revolution and essential requirement in nursing, since changing to a descent nurse not only depends on theoretical knowledge and clinical skills but also needs applying moral knowledge and responsibility. Following moral criterion in nurse's performance is more important than other care issues as moral behavior accompany nurses' responsibility can be an effective factor in patients' remission and recovery. Conclusion: Achievement of MI skills leads to nursing profession advancement by basic changes in nurse

  10. [Centennial retrospective on the evolution and development of the nursing profession in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kwua-Yun; Chang, Shu-Rong

    2014-08-01

    This article explores the evolution and development of the Taiwanese nursing profession. After introducing the origins of nursing, this article proceeds to introduce nursing during various periods in Taiwan, including the early-Qing Dynasty, foreign missionary nursing, the Japanese Colonial Era, and the Nationalist Chinese Era following World War Two up to the present. The authors then present the current situation in the Taiwanese nursing profession in terms of gender issues, high-technology developments, educational issues, the nursing licensing examination, hiring and training, multiple role functions, and the skill-mix care model. Finally, the authors make recommendations for the further development and improvement of the nursing profession in Taiwan.

  11. Characteristics of Nursing Profession in the Spanish Context from the Experience of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Rodrigo Pedrosa; Jordi Caïs Fontanella; Cristina Monforte Royo

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to determine – from the discourse of the former Ayudantes Técnicos Sanitarios (Technical Nursing Assistants) who are pioneers in teaching the subject of "Nursing Fundamentals" – what the characteristics of the nursing profession are in the current Spanish context. The design was qualitative and analytical induction was used as methodological strategy. The sampling was theoretical and in-depth interview was used as a technique for data collection. For...

  12. Marketing nursing as a profession: integrated marketing strategies to address the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Mark John; Finch, Linda; Birnbaum, Dee

    2010-07-01

    The nursing shortage in the United States is at a crisis level characterized by critical shortages of highly trained nurses and of nursing faculty. Key issues in addressing these shortages include awareness and image-building, along with enhanced outreach programs. Although these issues are related to marketing theory, most studies in this area are based on a vocational choice model. This study was grounded in marketing theory and the results offer a new perspective for addressing the nursing shortage. In-depth interviews conducted with 31 first-year nursing students indicated that there were two distinct segments among nursing students: traditionals and instrumentals. Traditionals were attracted to nursing as a helping profession while instrumentals were interested in career-related rewards such as variety, mobility, and compensation. These findings were discussed in terms of building awareness and marketing programs for nursing students that are integrated across schools of nursing, private foundations and public agencies.

  13. Registered nurses' (RNS) perception of the nursing profession and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background A healthy work environment has tremendous benefits on ... by Pfizer to measure Nurses expectations and needs in a 2009 ICN Quadrennial Study. ... 75(45.5%) and an environment of team work and collegiality 71(43.0%).

  14. Socialisation of the student nurse in the nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Bezuidenhout

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available Since Florence Nightingale established a nursing school in conjunction with St Thomas’ Hospital in 1860, society has changed and particularly medical technology has undergone tremendous developments.

  15. Mandate for the Nursing Profession to Address Climate Change Through Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffers, Jeanne; Levy, Ruth McDermott; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sweeney, Casey F

    2017-11-01

    The adverse health effects from climate change demand action from the nursing profession. This article examines the calls to action, the status of climate change in nursing education, and challenges and recommendations for nursing education related to climate change and human health. Discussion paper. The integration of climate change into nursing education is essential so that knowledge, skills, and insights critical for clinical practice in our climate-changing world are incorporated in curricula, practice, research, and policy. Our Ecological Planetary Health Model offers a framework for nursing to integrate relevant climate change education into nursing curricula and professional nursing education. Nursing education can offer a leadership role to address the mitigation, adaptation, and resilience strategies for climate change. An ecological framework is valuable for nursing education regarding climate change through its consideration of political, cultural, economic, and environmental interrelationships on human health and the health of the planet. Knowledge of climate change is important for integration into basic and advanced nursing education, as well as professional education for nurses to address adverse health impacts, climate change responses policy, and advocacy roles. For current and future nurses to provide care within a climate-changing environment, nursing education has a mandate to integrate knowledge about climate change issues across all levels of nursing education. Competence in nursing practice follows from knowledge and skill acquisition gained from integration of climate change content into nursing education. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Relationship between job satisfaction, professional identity and intention to leave the profession among nurses in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanciogullari, Selma; Dogan, Selma

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction, professional identity and intention to leave the profession among nurses in Turkey. Although there are many studies on job satisfaction among nurses in Turkey, there is a gap in the literature in relation to professional identity, particularly for intentions to leave the profession. This cross-sectional, descriptive and correlational study was conducted with 2122 nurses from Turkey. A positive and significant correlation was determined between the nurses' job satisfaction and professional identities. It was found that 15.5% of the nurses intended to leave their profession. Intention to leave the profession was greater among the nurses with inadequate professional identity development and low job satisfaction. Professional identity is a factor affecting job satisfaction. Both professional identity and job satisfaction are important factors affecting nurses' intention leaving the profession. Given that professional identity and job satisfaction affect intention to leave the profession and professional identity affects job satisfaction, nurse managers who are mainly responsible for the quality of nursing care should develop strategies that support nurses' professional identity and increase their job satisfaction if they are to prevent nurses from leaving the profession. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The dignity of the nursing profession: a meta-synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Laura; Stievano, Alessandro; Rocco, Gennaro; Kallio, Hanna; Pietila, Anna-Maija; Kangasniemi, Mari K

    2014-09-01

    Nursing continues to gain legitimation epistemologically and ontologically as a scientific discipline throughout the world. If a profession gains respect as a true autonomous scientific profession, then this recognition has to be put in practice in all environments and geographical areas. Nursing professional dignity, as a self-regarding concept, does not have a clear definition in the literature, and it has only begun to be analyzed in the last 10 years. The purpose of this meta-synthesis was to determine the various factors that constitute the notion of nursing professional dignity. The target was to create a tentative model of the concept. The research design was a meta-synthesis (N = 15 original articles) of nursing professional dignity described in the literature, based on the guidelines by Noblit and Hare. Original studies were sought out from electronic databases and manual searches. The selection of literature was conducted on stages based on titles (n = 2595), abstracts (n = 70), and full-texts (n = 15) according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. From this analysis, a clear definition of nursing professional dignity emerged that underscored two main macro-dimensions constituting this intertwined, multidimensional, and complex notion: characteristics of the human beings and workplace elements. The recognition of nursing professional dignity could have a positive impact on patients because the results clearly showed that nurses are more prone to foster patients' dignity, patients' safety, and a better quality of care if their own dignity is respected. If nurses are uncomfortable, humiliated, or not seen in their professional role, it is difficult to give to others good care, good support, or good relationships. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Community psychiatric nursing in the Netherlands: a survey of a thriving but threatened profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the Dutch community psychiatric nursing profession. In spite of their large numbers, estimated at 2900, Dutch community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) have contributed little to the international literature. The history of the profession reveals a

  19. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Carey F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and

  20. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and... announcing a change to its Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY... Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced Nursing Education Branch Chief, Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health...

  1. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Tobias; Afentakis, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. Methodology To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professiona...

  2. If they do call you a nurse, it is always a "male nurse": experiences of men in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajacich, Dale; Kane, Deborah; Williston, Courtney; Cameron, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Men are underrepresented in nursing, accounting for less than 6% of Canadian nurses. This research explores issues surrounding recruitment, retention, and work life satisfaction for men who are nurses working in acute care settings. Purposive and snowball sampling was used in this descriptive, qualitative study. Sixteen men participated in four focus groups conducted in three communities in southwestern Ontario. The participants revealed that work stress, lack of full-time opportunities, and gender-based stereotypes contributed to job dissatisfaction. Providing care to patients and making a difference were personal rewards that influenced their desire to stay in the profession. To promote nursing as a viable profession, unrestricted by gender, the participants recommended that recruitment strategies begin at an earlier age. Findings are discussed in relation to recruitment and retention issues with implications for education, practice, and management. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Flexible employment and nurses' intention to leave the profession: The role of support at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U; Denton, Margaret; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this paper are to examine (1) the association between flexible employment and nurses' intention to leave the profession, and (2) whether or not support at work mediates the association between flexible employment and nurses' intention to leave the profession. Flexible employment is analyzed objectively using non-permanent contract, part-time employment status, casual employment status, involuntary hours and on-call work, and subjectively using job insecurity. Support at work refers to organizational, supervisor and peer support. Data come from our survey of 1396 nurses employed in three teaching hospitals in Southern Ontario. Descriptive statistics are provided. Bivariate correlations, hierarchical regression analysis and mediation tests are conducted. Compared to those in full-time employment, nurses in part-time employment do not intend to leave the profession. None of the other objective flexible employment factors are associated with intention to leave the profession. Perceived job insecurity is associated with intention to leave the profession. Low support at work contributes to intention to leave the profession and mediates the association between job insecurity and intention to leave the profession. The study provides evidence to health sector managers and policy makers that part-time employment, perceived job security and support at work are important factors to consider in efforts to retain nurses in the profession. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuing Education Preferences, Facilitators, and Barriers for Nursing Home Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Mary J; Kim, Myoung Jin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the continuing education needs for nursing home nurses in rural central Illinois and to determine any potential facilitators or barriers to obtaining continuing education. Data were collected using the Educational Needs Assessment questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were computed to examine continuing education preferences, facilitators, and barriers among nursing home nurses. Independent samples t tests were used to compare preferences between administrative and staff nurses. The sample included 317 nurses from 34 facilities. The five top needs were related to clinical problems. Administrative nurses had greater needs for professional issues, managerial skills, and quality improvement than staff nurses. Barriers included rural settings, need for vacation time for programs, and inadequate staffing. Continuing education needs of nursing home nurses in Illinois are similar to previous studies conducted in Arizona and North Carolina. Continuing education barriers were mostly organizational, rather than personal. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2018;49(1):26-33. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Intention to leave the profession: antecedents and role in nurse turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Julianne

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the relationship between intention to change profession and intention to change employer among newly graduated nurses. Few studies of the worldwide nursing workforce shortage consider the contribution of changing professions to the shortage. Organizational behaviour research has identified that professional commitment and organizational commitment have an important role in organizational turnover and that professional commitment and intention to change professions may have a greater role in organizational turnover than is presently understood. A model of the relationships between affective professional commitment job satisfaction, organizational commitment, intention to change professions and organizational turnover intention was developed through review of the organizational behaviour literature and tested using path analysis. The sample was drawn from all nurses in Queensland, Australia, entering the workforce for the first time in 2005. The model was tested with a final sample size of 131 nurses in the initial period of exposure to the workplace. Affective professional commitment and organizational commitment were statistically significantly related to intention to change professions. Job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to change professions were statistically significantly related to intention to change employer. Turnover research in nursing should include intention to change professions as well as intention to change employer. Policies and practices that enhance the development of affective professional commitment prior to exposure to the workplace and support affective professional commitment, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the workplace are needed to help reduce nurse turnover.

  6. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. Methodology To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professionals was calculated on the basis of empirical information on occupational mobility provided by the German Microcensus 2005 (Labour Force Survey). We also calculated how the supply of full-time equivalents (FTEs) will develop if current employment structures develop in the direction of employment behaviour in nursing professions in eastern and western Germany. We then compared these different supply scenarios with two demand projections ('status quo' and 'compression of morbidity' scenarios) from Germany's Federal Statistical Office. Results Our results show that, even as early as 2005, meeting demand for FTEs in nursing professions was not arithmetically possible when only persons with formal qualification in a nursing profession were taken into account on the supply side. When additional semi-skilled nursing professionals are included in the calculation, a shortage of labour in nursing professions can be expected in 2018 when the employment structure for all nursing professionals remains the same as the employment structure seen in Germany in 2005 (demand: 'status quo scenario'). Furthermore, given an employment structure as in eastern Germany, where more nursing professionals work on a full-time basis with longer working hours, a theoretical shortage of nursing professionals could be delayed until 2024. Conclusions Our analysis of occupational flexibility in the nursing field indicates that additional potential supply could be generated by especially training more young people

  7. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Tobias; Afentakis, Anja

    2013-06-05

    In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professionals was calculated on the basis of empirical information on occupational mobility provided by the German Microcensus 2005 (Labour Force Survey). We also calculated how the supply of full-time equivalents (FTEs) will develop if current employment structures develop in the direction of employment behaviour in nursing professions in eastern and western Germany. We then compared these different supply scenarios with two demand projections ('status quo' and 'compression of morbidity' scenarios) from Germany's Federal Statistical Office. Our results show that, even as early as 2005, meeting demand for FTEs in nursing professions was not arithmetically possible when only persons with formal qualification in a nursing profession were taken into account on the supply side. When additional semi-skilled nursing professionals are included in the calculation, a shortage of labour in nursing professions can be expected in 2018 when the employment structure for all nursing professionals remains the same as the employment structure seen in Germany in 2005 (demand: 'status quo scenario'). Furthermore, given an employment structure as in eastern Germany, where more nursing professionals work on a full-time basis with longer working hours, a theoretical shortage of nursing professionals could be delayed until 2024. Our analysis of occupational flexibility in the nursing field indicates that additional potential supply could be generated by especially training more young people for a nursing profession as they tend to

  8. Cyclical evolution of nursing education and profession in Iran: religious, cultural, and political influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, P; Mura, A

    1995-01-01

    This article was written to gain some insight into the underlying social and/or cultural forces that have, over the centuries, influenced the development of nursing education and the nursing profession in Iran, one of the most ancient civilizations of the world. As a native of Iran deeply involved in the nursing profession and in many aspects of nursing education, I decided to review my many years of experience and observations in these fields in Iran to better understand how the noble profession evolved as it did in my native country. For the years following the Islamic Revolution of 1977 to 1979, I was forced to rely on information gathered from my professional colleagues. An extensive search of the literature yielded a better understanding of the very early years. Analysis of this data seemingly produced a potpourri of such basic issues as modes of education, cultural/religious states of consciousness, and the rights of women. These are not factors generally considered germane to the development of the nursing profession and nursing education, although the latter two have proven to be crucial issues in understanding the development and current status of nursing education and the nursing profession in Iran.

  9. [Nursing: the meaning of this profession to nurses. A first approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchesi, Luciana Barizon; Santos, Claudia Benedita dos

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to understand, tell and, why not, participate a little in the history of Nursing, we proposed to study the prejudices and negative stereotypes that have permeated this profession over time. This is a before-after experimental type of study in a population of adolescents regularly enrolled in the eleventh grade of a Brazilian public school. The intervention took the form of a lecture about the profession and a questionnaire with closed questions which was applied before and after the lecture. Conclusions were based on the results of binomial and McNemar's non-parametric tests for the significance of changes. Although the statistically significant presence of prejudice and negatives stereotypes was not found, the results of the intervention were in line with expectations, since the changes(or tendency towards changes) took place exactly in those subgroups that showed a greater frequency of stereotypes.

  10. Determination of the Concepts "Profession" and "Role" in Relation to "Nurse Educator".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennbrant, Sandra

    The aim of this study was to clarify the meanings and dimensions of the concepts "profession" and "role." The results from the concept determination were discussed in relation to the profession "nurse educator." This study is based on Koort's semantic analysis methods, using select parts of Eriksson's approach for concept determination, using dictionaries published between the years 1948 and 2015. The findings underline the complexity of the professional role of nurse educators. The nurse educator profession is based on society's trust and requires integration of ability, attitudes, norms, reflection, and theoretical knowledge, along with individual, organizational, and social conditions. Nurse educators must achieve a sufficient degree of pedagogical competence, subject competence, social competence and organizational competence in order to develop their professional role. When nurse educators define their function, a professional role takes form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Organizational socialization in the first three years of nursing profession: strategies to decrease turnover intention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomietto, Marco; Rappogliosi, Cristina Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Battistelli, Adalgisa

    2014-01-01

    In the first years of nursing profession, new-graduate nurses' turnover intention is a relevant issue due to both the tangible and intangible costs it generates to health care organizations, such as selection and recruitment costs, ward team burden in the onboarding process and the possibility to enhance ward team stability in order to provide an effective and safe nusing care. Organizational socialization is the main factor involved in these dynamics of turnover intention in the first years of nursing profession. This study aims to identify the main factors involved in the organizational socialization process to reduce turnover intention in the first 3 years of nursing profession. 101 new-graduate nurses have been enrolled within the first three years of nursing profession. They have been stratified looking at tenure and years in nursing. Organizational Socialization Inventory scale has been used to assess the onboarding process and 4 items to assess turnover intention. Turnover intention is of 23% in the first year in nursing, and it's over the 26% starting from the second year. The onboarding process explains over the 26% of the variance in turnover intention, and over the 36% in the sub-sample with a stable tenure. Unstable tenured nurses prefer to acquire those competences useful to perform their work, while stable tenure nurses aim to search for professional growth opportunities and integration in the ward-team, in order to reduce turnover intention. Turnover intention is relevant in the first three years of nursing profession. According to the different tenure, different strategies are necessary to plan an effective onboarding process and enhance nursing retention.

  12. [Contribution to an ethics of care--masculinities and gender in the nursing profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bernard; Holmes, Dave; Chouinard, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Today, the nursing profession is almost exclusively associated to women while men seem to desert this field in which they were, before the nineteenth century, very present. This paper offers a critical look and reflects on the presence of men in nursing. The critical perspective of "genderization" as well as the "ethics of care" constitutes the cornerstone of the reflection developed in this paper. Prejudices against men in the field of nursing are also highlighted, which attest that the future of men in this profession is still not assured. From that point of view, the "degenderization" of nursing and the valorization of men in the history of nursing as well as in the current practice of nursing are presented as potential ways forward.

  13. Applying andragogy in nursing continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, B B

    1989-01-01

    Andragogy, a philosophical orientation for adult education, receives little attention in the nursing continuing education literature. Yet, the tenets of andragogy form the organizing framework for programming. This article defines andragogy and provides selected results of a research study designed to test andragogical concepts in long-term oncology nursing continuing education programs. The results of the study suggest a new way of viewing the goals of nursing continuing education activities.

  14. What Makes Nurses Intend To Leave Their Profession?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background The nurse shortage is an increasing problem worldwide, which has significant impact on quality of care and patient safety. It has been reported that most industrialized countries in America and Europe are or will be facing nursing shortages. However, the nurse shortage happens not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries, such as in China. In addition, the international East-West migration of nurses makes the situation worse in the less develo...

  15. Factors Influencing The Selection Of Dental Nursing As A Profession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To provide a current description of dental nursing students and to assess the reasons for choosing the dental nursing career. Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, a questionnaire survey was administered to 85 dental nursing students from 3 Colleges of Health Technology undergoing external clinical posting in ...

  16. image of nursing profession as viewed by secondary school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    explore factors that deter aspiration to enroll in nursing schools. Methods: The ... included 50 male and 50 female students who were opting for Physics, Chemistry and Biology from form III to ... by nurse education and the general community. .... 9 Nurses work with their hands a lot .... Middle School Students' Perceptions of.

  17. Job involvement and job satisfaction of South African nurses compared with other professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Kaplan

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed primarily to compare the work outcomes of job satisfaction and job involvement of South African nurses with those of members of 13 other professional groups in South Africa and with American nurses where data was available. Secondary aims included identifying areas where job satisfaction was particularly low and demonstrating the relative independence of the job involvement and job satisfaction constructs. A questionnaire incorporating the Kanungo Job Involvement Scale and the Short Form of the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire was mailed to random samples of people between the ages of 29 and 41 drawn from 14 professional registers. There were 114 nurses in the final sample and 1677members of other professions. Differences among professions were tested for significance using one-way analyses of variance and Bonferroni ranges tests. South African Nurses were shown to have extremely low job satisfaction relative to American nurses and to other professional groups in South-Africa. By contrast their job involvement was moderately high. The implications of these findings for the medical profession as a whole and for nurses in particular are discussed. The fear is expressed that wide spread dissatisfaction may lead to fewer people entering the profession and highly trained people leaving.

  18. Investigating Awareness Amount of Nursing Students of Medical Sciences University of Bushehr about Ethic in Nursing Profession -2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Jahanpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Nurses' ethical responsibility in practice and care is required to be aware of the principles of professional ethics. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' knowledge of ethics in nursing of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present analytical-descriptive sectional study, in which the participants are 4-8 semester nursing students of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. The research tools for collecting information were tow-section questionnaires consisting of demographic data and specialized questions about ethic and rules in the nursing profession. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software by using independent t-tests and chi-square. Results: Total awareness of 4-8 semester nursing students about ethic and rules in nursing profession was intermediate (53.78 percent. There was a considerable relation between sexuality and satisfaction (p.436. A considerable relation between students' educational semester and satisfaction amount was not also not observed (p>.927. Conclusions: Students' awareness about professional ethic wasn't very desirable so it is suggested that by holding moral workshops in nursing or settling moral courses in nursing students curriculum will increase the amount of nursing students' awareness about nursing ethics.

  19. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  20. [Nursing between ethic and aesthetic. Profession described by media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradellini, Cinzia; Idamou, Sara; Lusetti, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Nurse's role, according to the media, does not fit the role and evolution that nursing had in these last years: nursing remains unknown to public. Objective of research is to define how nurse's image is described by media. analysis of two newspapers, at national and local level with respect to articles about nurses, taking into account numbers of articles, position, topic (malpractice, frauds/crimes, job/economical cuts, praise). A second part of research has been focused on online newspapers, by using key words. Analysis of television medical dramas about presence of nurse, competences, relationship with physician/patient, social elements, context of work (acute or chronic), impact on patients welfare, and eventually ethical-deontological aspects has been carried out. on three hundred articles related health context, thirty-nine talk about nurse; five of those are in first page. 39% of articles regards frauds/crimes, 19% job/economical cuts, 15% malpractice. With respect to online articles, 66% concerns frauds/crimes. In medical dramas there is small attention to nurse who has generic competence as well as other health professional but doctor. The nurse character is played only by women. a low level of professionalism comes out both from newspaper and television. A specific professional identity is often absent furthermore nurses are relegated to a role of weakness in work and private circumstance.

  1. Leadership in nursing: The importance of recognising inherent values and attributes to secure a positive future for the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Natashia Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic and challenging profession requiring engaging and inspiring role models and leaders. In today's ever changing and demanding healthcare environment, identifying and developing nurse leaders is one of the greatest challenges faced by the nursing profession. The concept of leadership is a complex and multi-dimensional phenomenon; research conducted for over a century concludes that although it is one of the most observed concepts, no universally accepted definition or theory of leadership actually exists. There is increasing clarity surrounding what true nursing leadership is, and how it differs from management. This discussion will outline the nature of nursing leadership and importance of nurse leaders in advancing the profession; clarify definitions and differentiate between nurse managers and nurse leaders; describe the evolution of nurse leadership by identify theories and styles of leadership relevant to nursing practice; and highlight the importance of identifying leaders in the nursing profession. The paper also serves as a caution to recognise, avoid and discourage "negative" leaders in the pursuit of a bright future for the nursing profession. With appropriate identification, support and development of future nurse leaders, an acknowledgement of the shifting paradigm of leadership theory and the context in which future nurse leaders are destined to grow, the ultimate goal of the nursing profession--excellent in person centred care--can be achieved. It is essential to the future success of the nursing profession that informal, negative "leaders" be discouraged and positive leaders, possessing the evidence-based qualities of leadership be identified and nurtured to lead the profession.

  2. What will 2017 hold for the nursing profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    Education and training Nurse education will see huge changes in 2017. Most radical is the controversial end to bursaries for nursing students in England. From September, funding will come through the tuition fees and student loans system instead, a government move that led to mass protests in 2016.

  3. Beyond Baby Steps: Today's Use of Social Networking Sites and the Nursing Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jean Kelso; Hinmon, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' use of online social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, are increasing and with it the controversy surrounding the compatibility of social networking sites within a profession that values privacy and confidentiality. This article draws on case studies, experiments, surveys, and policies from professional organizations, academic research, and nursing education programs spanning the last 5 years to highlight best practices that address 2 critical areas where the values of the nursing profession and those of social media most directly collide: regulatory issues and the blurring of professional and personal online identities. It also suggests ways of using social media to complement patient outcomes and the professional development of nurses while remaining consistent with professional ethics and values.

  4. Engagement of nurses in their profession. Qualitative study on engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sierra, Rosa; Fernández-Castro, Jordi; Martínez-Zaragoza, Fermín

    To identify common issues of nurses with high engagement to enable us to develop the construct as it applies to nursing in more depth. Based on the constructivist paradigm and with a phenomenological approach, a qualitative content analysis was conducted using an inductive approach. Participants were nurses working in direct care in different healthcare areas. The sample size was determined by data saturation and 15 participants were interviewed. The units of meaning were grouped into 11 subcategories, and then into 7 categories termed vigour, dedication, reward, autonomy, social support, conciliation and attributes of nurses. Then these categories were grouped into 3 major themes: job characteristics, characteristics of organizations, and individual characteristics. Having high engagement does not mean ignoring the negative aspects of work and organizations. Nurses who maintain high engagement are also affected by the negative aspects, however the assessment of positive aspects such as enjoying the work, the meaning of being a nurse, reward and autonomy enable the process of depletion of engagement to be overcome. In view of the findings, we propose reconceptualising the construct, taking the features of nursing into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Shaping nursing profession regulation through history - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievano, A; Caruso, R; Pittella, F; Shaffer, F A; Rocco, G; Fairman, J

    2018-03-23

    The aim of this systematic review was to provide a critical synthesis of the factors that historically shaped the advancements of nursing regulators worldwide. An in-depth examination of the different factors that moulded regulatory changes over time is pivotal to comprehend current issues in nursing. In the light of global health scenarios, the researchers explored the factors that historically influenced the socio-contextual circumstances upon which governments made regulatory changes. A systematic search was performed on the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, OpenGrey and ScienceDirect. The review included papers from January 2000 to October 2016 published in English. The authors used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and an inductive thematic approach for synthesis. Two main themes were identified: factors underpinning current challenges and historical and contextual triggers of regulation. The first theme was composed of three aspects: education, migration and internationalization, and policy and regulation; the second theme consisted of four attributes: demographics, economics, history of registration and wars, and historical changes in nursing practice. Factors that shaped nursing regulation were linked to changing demographics and economics, education, history of nursing registration, shifting patterns of migration and internationalization, nursing practice, policy and regulation and significant societal turns often prompted by wars. A deeper understanding of the developments of the nursing regulatory institutions provides the foundation for portable standards that can be applied across an array of jurisdictions to guarantee a better public safety. Understanding factors that socially, legislatively and politically have influenced the development of regulatory bodies over time helps to mould local, national and international policies that have a stronger impact on health worldwide. To achieve this

  6. Genetics education in the nursing profession: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sarah; Kirk, Maggie

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a literature review exploring genetics education for nursing professionals. The aim was to contribute to the debate about the future direction of such education. Advances in genetics science and technology have profound implications for health care and the growing importance and relevance of genetics for everyday nursing practice is increasingly recognized. A search was conducted in February 2005 using the CINAHL and Google Scholar databases and the keywords nurse, midwife, health visitor, education and genetics. Papers were included if they were published in English between 1994 and 2005 and included empirical data about genetics education in nursing. In addition, attempts were made to access the grey literature, with requests for information on research, for example, to members of the Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors and searches of relevant websites. Agreement on the relevance of genetics for nursing practice is extensive. Empirical evidence of the learning needs of practitioners highlights widespread deficits in knowledge and skills, and low confidence levels. Provision of nursing education in genetics is patchy and insubstantial across a number of countries, further hampered by lack of strategic development. Significant progress has been made in the identification of learning outcomes for nurses. Research on the delivery of genetics education is limited, but the role of skills-based training, use of clinical scenarios, and importance of assessment have all been identified as factors that can promote learning. Whilst areas of good performance were revealed, many studies identified gaps in professional competence and/or education. New initiatives are underway to support genetics education and its integration into professional practice, but further research is needed on the most effective forms of educational delivery, and an international collaborative approach to this should be considered.

  7. Job demands-resources, burnout and intention to leave the nursing profession: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Geneviève; Chênevert, Denis

    2010-06-01

    The aims of the paper are to examine the role of burnout in the relationship between stress factors related to nurses' work and social environment and intention to leave the profession and to investigate the nature of the relationship between burnout and intention to leave the nursing profession. A postulate of the job demands-resources model is that two distinct yet related processes contribute to the development of burnout. The energetic process originates from demands and is mainly centered on emotional exhaustion; the motivational process originates from resources and is mainly centered on depersonalization. Moreover, we postulated that the two components of burnout are linked indirectly to intention to leave the profession via psychosomatic complaints, associated with the energetic process, and via professional commitment, associated with the motivational process. The research model was tested on cross-sectional data collected in 2005 from 1636 registered nurses working in hospitals who responded to a self-administrated questionnaire. Demands are the most important determinants of emotional exhaustion and indirectly induce depersonalization via emotional exhaustion, whereas resources mainly predict depersonalization. Moreover, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization are linked to psychosomatic complaints and professional commitment, which are in turn associated with intention to leave the profession. The results suggest that a dual strategy is needed in order to retain nurses within the profession: a decrease in job demands, coupled with an increase in available job resources. In particular, nurses' tasks and role should be restructured to reduce work overload and increase the meaning of their work. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Deontological aspects of the nursing profession: understanding the code of ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Terezinha Nunes da; Freire, Maria Eliane Moreira; Vasconcelos, Monica Ferreira de; Silva Junior, Sergio Vital da; Silva, Wilton José de Carvalho; Araújo, Patrícia da Silva; Eloy, Allan Victor Assis

    2018-01-01

    to investigate nursing professionals' understanding concerning the Code of Ethics; to assess the relevance of the Code of Ethics of the nursing profession and its use in practice; to identify how problem-solving is performed when facing ethical dilemmas in professional practice. exploratory descriptive study, conducted with 34 (thirty-four) nursing professionals from a teaching hospital in João Pessoa, PB - Brazil. four thematic categories emerged: conception of professional ethics in nursing practice; interpretations of ethics in the practice of care; use of the Code of Ethics in the professional practice; strategies for solving ethical issues in the professional practice. some of the nursing professionals comprehend the meaning coherently; others have a limited comprehension, based on jargon. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the text contained in this code is necessary so that it can be applied into practice, aiming to provide a quality care that is, above all, ethical and legal.

  9. Aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, B J; Brevis, T

    2005-05-01

    This article reports on a survey done among nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council. The survey was carried out in the last quarter of 2003. The purpose of the survey was to investigate aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa and to make recommendations on how their working environment could be improved. The important findings were that pay-related issues dominate as the main problem at work. Improving pay scales and being paid according to extra experience, responsibilities and qualifications could improve the nurses' working environment. Furthermore, training opportunities, medical insurance and equal opportunities should be addressed as a matter of urgency. In general, respondents had a positive attitude towards their job, which leaves the impression that nurses still regard their jobs as something they do for the sake of a service to the community and not only for the money they earn.

  10. The Effect of Mentoring on Career Satisfaction of Registered Nurses and Intent to Stay in the Nursing Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Bette

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is important in the career development of novice and experienced nurses. With the anticipated shortage in nursing, it is important to explore factors such as mentoring that may contribute to career satisfaction and intent to stay in the profession. This study explored the effects of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing, and the relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. It was conducted through a mailed survey of RNs 55 years or younger currently in practice, education, administration, or research. Career satisfaction was measured through the use of the newly developed Mariani Nursing Career Satisfaction Scale. Findings revealed no statistically significant effect of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. There was a statistically significant relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. The majority of nurses reported participating in a mentoring relationship. Although the findings related to mentoring, career satisfaction, and intent to stay were not statistically significant, there was a prevalence of mentoring in nursing, thus suggesting the need for future research to identify outcomes of mentoring. In addition, the study contributed a newly developed instrument to measure the concept of career satisfaction in nursing. PMID:22645673

  11. The effect of mentoring on career satisfaction of registered nurses and intent to stay in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Bette

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is important in the career development of novice and experienced nurses. With the anticipated shortage in nursing, it is important to explore factors such as mentoring that may contribute to career satisfaction and intent to stay in the profession. This study explored the effects of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing, and the relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. It was conducted through a mailed survey of RNs 55 years or younger currently in practice, education, administration, or research. Career satisfaction was measured through the use of the newly developed Mariani Nursing Career Satisfaction Scale. Findings revealed no statistically significant effect of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. There was a statistically significant relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. The majority of nurses reported participating in a mentoring relationship. Although the findings related to mentoring, career satisfaction, and intent to stay were not statistically significant, there was a prevalence of mentoring in nursing, thus suggesting the need for future research to identify outcomes of mentoring. In addition, the study contributed a newly developed instrument to measure the concept of career satisfaction in nursing.

  12. Transplant tourism and organ trafficking: Ethical implications for the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfee, Floraidh Ar

    2016-11-01

    Organ availability for transplantation has become an increasingly complex and difficult question in health economics and ethical practice. Advances in technology have seen prolonged life expectancy, and the global push for organs creates an ever-expanding gap between supply and demand, and a significant cost in bridging that gap. This article will examine the ethical implications for the nursing profession in regard to the procurement of organs from an impoverished seller's market, also known as 'Transplant Tourism'. This ethical dilemma concerns itself with resource allocation, informed consent and the concepts of egalitarianism and libertarianism. Transplant Tourism is an unacceptable trespass against human dignity and rights from both a nursing and collective viewpoint. Currently, the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council, the Royal college of Nursing Australia, The Royal College of Nursing (UK) and the American Nurses Association do not have position statements on transplant tourism, and this diminishes us as a force for change. It diminishes our role as advocates for the most marginalised in our world to have access to care and to choice and excludes us from a very contemporary real debate about the mismatch of organ demand and supply in our own communities. As a profession, we must have a voice in health policy and human rights, and according to our Code of Ethics in Australia and around the world, act to promote and protect the fundamental human right to healthcare and dignity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Continuing Professional Development in the Accounting Profession: Practices and Perceptions from the Asia Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, Paul; Jackling, Beverley; Suwardy, Themin

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on research in the sociology of professions as a reference point, this study examines the practices and perceptions of professional accountants towards the requirements of IES7 on continuing professional development (CPD). Responses from 1310 accountants in the Asia Pacific region suggest while increasing globalisation has led to more…

  14. Early career experiences and perceptions - a qualitative exploration of the turnover of young registered nurses and intention to leave the nursing profession in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkman, Mervi; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-11-01

    To describe why young registered nurses (RNs) had previously left an organisation and why they intend to leave the profession. Currently, many young registered nurses, including those in Finland, are considering leaving their job or have an intention to leave the profession. An in-depth, descriptive approach was adopted. Data were collected in 2012 from interviews with 15 registered nurses (under the age of 30 years). The interviews were semi-structured and analysed using conventional content analysis. The main questions addressed were: 'Why had the young registered nurses left their previous organisation?' and 'Why do young registered nurses have an intention to leave the profession?' The findings centre on three themes: poor nursing practice environments; lack of support, orientation and mentoring, and nursing as a 'second best' or serendipitous career choice. The first years of nursing are particularly stressful for newly-graduated and inexperienced registered nurses. An in-depth, qualitative approach reveals more complex reasons behind the turnover of registered nurses and intention to leave the profession than questionnaire surveys. Young registered nurses need social support from nurse managers and experienced colleagues to successfully transition into nursing practice environments. Adequate orientation and mentoring programmes are needed to facilitate this transition. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa: survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BJ Erasmus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a survey done among nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council. The survey was carried out in the last quarter of 2003. The purpose of the survey was to investigate aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa and to make recommendations on how their working environment could be improved. The important findings were that pay-related issues dominate as the main problem at work. Improving pay scales and being paid according to extra experience, responsibilities and qualifications could improve the nurses’ working environment. Furthermore, training opportunities, medical insurance and equal opportunities should be addressed as a matter of urgency. In general, respondents had a positive attitude towards their job, which leaves the impression that nurses still regard their jobs as something they do for the sake of a service to the community and not only for the money they earn.

  16. The national suicide prevention strategy for England: the reality of a national strategy for the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M; Jenkins, R

    2006-12-01

    Suicide is recognized as a global phenomenon and many countries now have national suicide prevention strategies. International guidance on suicide prevention and accepted epidemiological and treatment-based research underpins healthcare policy relating to suicide reduction. There has been an established comprehensive strategy in England since 2002. However, the rate of suicide continues to be a concern and nurses hold a key role in the implementation of national, regional and local policy into practice. The aim of this paper is to consider the current implications of the national suicide prevention strategy in England for nursing. This discussion paper draws upon both empirical evidence-based literature, governmental guidance and policy-related documentation. The national suicide prevention strategy for England currently continues to have a multifaceted impact on the nursing profession. This ranges from clinical practice issues such as risk assessment through to broader public health responsibilities. If nurses and allied health professionals are to be effective in their role within suicide prevention, they will need to be supported in building awareness of the wider context of the national policy. In particular, this will mean working effectively and collaboratively with the voluntary sector, service users and other non-medical agencies.

  17. [The development and current status of men in the nursing profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Che; Kuo, Ying-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Nursing has been a quintessentially female-dominated occupation throughout much of its history. Today, educational developments, changes in healthcare service models and promotion of gender equality in education and employment have opened the doors to males to play increasingly important roles in the healthcare services as nursing professionals. The responsibilities of male nursing staff are expected to continue to increase. It remains difficult for male nurses to escape traditional gender stereotypes in nursing. The impact of personal characteristics, occupational roles, and professional identification in real practice are major issues of concern. This study reviewed relevant literature to identify factors of influence on male nursing staff professional practice. We hope this study can be a reference for future research on male nursing staff development, and that male nurses will increasingly create personal core values in a multi-discipline, cross-professional healthcare team, and exercise their abilities as a complement to female nurses.

  18. Context and the leadership experiences and perceptions of professionals: a review of the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Therese; Klass, Des; Lord, Linley; Nowak, Margaret; Thomas, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Leadership studies which focus on categorising leadership styles have been critiqued for failure to consider the lived experience of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics to explore whether this framework assists understanding of the "how and why" of lived leadership experience within the nursing profession. Themes for a purposeful literature search and review, having regard to the Jepson model, are drawn from the contemporary and dynamic context of nursing. Government reports, coupled with preliminary interviews with a nurseleadership team, guided selection of contextual issues. The contextual interactions arising from managerialism, existing hierarchical models of leadership and increasing knowledge work provided insights into leadership experience in nursing, in the contexts of professional identity and changing educational and generational profiles of nurses. The authors conclude that employing a contextual frame provides insights in studying leadership experience. The author propose additions to the cultural and institutional dimensions of Jepson's model. The findings have implications for structuring and communicating key roles and policies relevant to nursing leadership. These include the need to: address perceptions around the legitimacy of current nursing leaders to provide clinical leadership; modify hierarchical models of nursing leadership; address implications of the role of the knowledge workers. Observing nursing leadership through the lens of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics confirms that this is an important way of exploring how leadership is enacted. The authors found, however, the model also provided a useful frame for considering the experience and understanding of leadership by those to be led.

  19. [Reflections on nursing teaching and students' first contact with the profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Zeyne Alves Pires; Scherer, Edson Arthur; Carvalho, Ana Maria Pimenta

    2006-01-01

    Nursing teaching has been characterized by constant discussions on pedagogical proposals and implementation of curricular changes. The aim of this study was to reflect on nursing students' experience related to their first contacts with the profession, considering traditional perspectives and current tendencies that imprint values and attitudes in learning and practice. Nowadays, the complexity of human beings and the environment they live in is considered within a biopsychosocial, economic and cultural context, constituting resources that allow for the formation of competent professionals in order to deal with the challenges of the XXIst century. Thus, nursing schools have to follow a teaching philosophy to form trained people to attend to local and regional demands and are socially committed to change. What is aimed for is participative learning, in which teacher and student, articulated in the knowledge improvement process, do not forget about humanitarian views.

  20. [Concept analysis of the nursing profession, published from 1994 to 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, A; Dante, A; Gherbezza, S; Venturato, E; Maragnolli, O; Ambrosi, E; Saiani, L

    2012-01-01

    Concept analysis is a research method in which concepts are examined in a logical and systematic fashion to form clear and rigorous conceptual definitions. To describe the concept analyses published between 1994 and 2008 and identify the emerging tendencies in the Nursing discipline, a two-staged study has been developed. In the first stage a systematic review of the literature was conducted: research published in the journals indexed in the MedLine, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were judged eligible, if they reported the theme of 'concept analysis' and 'nursing' in the title or in their key words and were published in English language. In the second stage, the articles that emerged were subjected to a content analysis. Some 158 concept analyses emerged, on average 10/year (range 1-22, median 11, +/- 5.6): these regarded 129 different concepts. Ninety-one (57.6%) concepts were focused on the nursing profession, while 67 (42.4%) were focused on the patients. Although in a few cases the effort made by the researchers moved toward the definition of new concepts, in others it appeared oriented toward including in Nursing some typical concepts from other disciplines, thus tracing an expansion of the domain of the Nursing discipline. Monitoring over time the concepts analysed constitutes an important research area to comprehend, both at a national and international level, the progressive evolution of the Nursing discipline.

  1. Nurses' health, age and the wish to leave the profession--findings from the European NEXT-Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselhorn, H M; Tackenberg, P; Kuemmerling, Angelika

    2006-01-01

    In many industrialised countries the number of workers with low health is expected to increase in the nursing profession. This will have implications for occupational health work in health care. The European NEXT-Study (www. next-study. net, funded by EU) investigates working conditions of nurses...

  2. Promoting Regulatory Reform: The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) for Nursing and Midwifery Year 4 Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Spangler, Sydney A; Tison, Laura I; Johnson, Carla M; Callahan, Tegan L; Iliffe, Jill; Hepburn, Kenneth W; Gross, Jessica M

    2017-10-01

    As countries across sub-Saharan Africa work towards universal health coverage and HIV epidemic control, investments seek to bolster the quality and relevance of the health workforce. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) partnered with 17 countries across East, Central, and Southern Africa to ensure nurses and midwives were authorized and equipped to provide essential HIV services to pregnant women and children with HIV. Through ARC, nursing leadership teams representing each country identify a priority regulatory function and develop a proposal to strengthen that regulation over a 1-year period. Each year culminates with a summative congress meeting, involving all ARC countries, where teams present their projects and share lessons learned with their colleagues. During a recent ARC Summative Congress, a group survey was administered to 11 country teams that received ARC Year 4 grants to measure advancements in regulatory function using the five-stage Regulatory Function Framework, and a group questionnaire was administered to 16 country teams to measure improvements in national nursing capacity (February 2011-2016). In ARC Year 4, eight countries implemented continuing professional development projects, Botswana revised their scope of practice, Mozambique piloted a licensing examination to assess HIV-related competencies, and South Africa developed accreditation standards for HIV/tuberculosis specialty nurses. Countries reported improvements in national nursing leaders' teamwork, collaborations with national organizations, regional networking with nursing leaders, and the ability to garner additional resources. ARC provides an effective, collaborative model to rapidly strengthen national regulatory frameworks, which other health professional cadres or regions may consider using to ensure a relevant health workforce, authorized and equipped to meet the emerging demand for health services.

  3. [Expectations, requirements and limitations of future task sharing between the nursing profession and the medical profession: results from the Care-N Study M-V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Adina; Rogalski, Hagen; Homeyer, Sabine; Oppermann, Roman Frank; Hingst, Peter; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    The aging population causes a sustained increase in demand of medical and nursing care services. At the same time health care professionals are aging, too. This leads to a growing number of health care gaps. Therefore, the health care system needs to be reformed. This includes a reallocation of task between some of the health care professions. This article addresses developments, potentials and limitations in the context of the future allocation of tasks between the nursing and the medical profession. Aim is to specify the future task sharing between nurses and physicians regarding expectations, requirements and limitations. We conducted questionnaire based Delphi interviews with an interdisciplinary group of experts. (type aggregation of ideas). In the future, to expert’s point of view, nurses will take over routine tasks in the medical and nursing health care supply. Task sharing by substitution is regarded with skepticism by experts. It requires a long time perspective and an early involvement of all stakeholders. Germany is at the beginning of the process of the future task sharing between nurses and physicians. The realization requires a comprehensive political support and further development of concepts including scientific implementation and evaluation.

  4. Physiotherapy - a feminine profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, S D

    1986-01-01

    The female-dominated professions in health care are not as powerful as the male-dominated medical profession. This paper suggests that the key factor in shaping the discrepancies in pay, status and power between medicine and the female-dominated professions is gender. It is argued that physiotherapy developed as a profession for middle-class women and that family responsibilities continue to take priority over professional responsibilities for the majority of physiotherapists. Physiotherapy enjoys higher occupational prestige than social work, speech therapy, occupational therapy and nursing and it is suggested that physiotherapy has achieved this status through recruitment of women from middle and upper middle class backgrounds. The history of physiotherapy is the history of a middle class feminine profession. Copyright © 1986 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  5. Climate Change, Climate Justice, and Environmental Health: Implications for the Nursing Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Breakey, Suellen

    2017-11-01

    Climate change is an emerging challenge linked to negative outcomes for the environment and human health. Since the 1960s, there has been a growing recognition of the need to address climate change and the impact of greenhouse gas emissions implicated in the warming of our planet. There are also deleterious health outcomes linked to complex climate changes that are emerging in the 21st century. This article addresses the social justice issues associated with climate change and human health and discussion of climate justice. Discussion paper. A literature search of electronic databases was conducted for articles, texts, and documents related to climate change, climate justice, and human health. The literature suggests that those who contribute least to global warming are those who will disproportionately be affected by the negative health outcomes of climate change. The concept of climate justice and the role of the Mary Robinson Foundation-Climate Justice are discussed within a framework of nursing's professional responsibility and the importance of social justice for the world's people. The nursing profession must take a leadership role in engaging in policy and advocacy discussions in addressing the looming problems associated with climate change. Nursing organizations have adopted resolutions and engaged in leadership roles to address climate change at the local, regional, national, and global level. It is essential that nurses embrace concepts related to social justice and engage in the policy debate regarding the deleterious effects on human health related to global warming and climate change. Nursing's commitment to social justice offers an opportunity to offer significant global leadership in addressing the health implications related to climate change. Recognizing the negative impacts of climate change on well-being and the underlying socioeconomic reasons for their disproportionate and inequitable distribution can expand and optimize the profession's role

  6. Risk factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A; Vargas, Cristina; San Luis, Concepción; García, Inmaculada; Cañadas, Gustavo R; De la Fuente, Emilia I

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is beginning to be regarded as an occupational illness of high prevalence among nursing in Spain. Individuals suffering from the syndrome manifest important health problems. More information about prevalence and risk factors for burnout is needed to prevent the syndrome and to determine the most appropriate clinical interventions when the disorder appears. Burnout levels were evaluated in a group of nurses. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of burnout, to identify the variables related to burnout and to propose a risk profile for this syndrome among the nursing personnel. The study was carried out in public health centers in Andalusia (Spain). The sample consisted of 676 nursing professionals from public health centers. Dependent variables were the three Burnout dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Independent variables were socio-demographic, organizational, personality-related variables. The nurses manifested average to high burnout levels. There were statistically significant differences in burnout levels associated with the following variables: age, gender, marital status, having children, level of healthcare, type of work shift, healthcare service areas and conducting administrative tasks. Burnout was also associated with personality-related variables. The prevalence of burnout among nursing professionals is high. Gender, age, marital status, level of healthcare, work shift and healthcare service areas predicted at least one of the dimensions of the syndrome. Neuroticism, agreeability, extraversion and conscientiousness are personality traits that predict at least two of the dimensions of burnout syndrome in nurses. Therefore, personality factors should be considered in any theory of risk profiles for developing burnout syndrome in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deontological aspects of the nursing profession: understanding the code of ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Nunes da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate nursing professionals' understanding concerning the Code of Ethics; to assess the relevance of the Code of Ethics of the nursing profession and its use in practice; to identify how problem-solving is performed when facing ethical dilemmas in professional practice. Method: exploratory descriptive study, conducted with 34 (thirty-four nursing professionals from a teaching hospital in João Pessoa, PB - Brazil. Results: four thematic categories emerged: conception of professional ethics in nursing practice; interpretations of ethics in the practice of care; use of the Code of Ethics in the professional practice; strategies for solving ethical issues in the professional practice. Final considerations: some of the nursing professionals comprehend the meaning coherently; others have a limited comprehension, based on jargon. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the text contained in this code is necessary so that it can be applied into practice, aiming to provide a quality care that is, above all, ethical and legal.

  8. [Predictors of intention to leave the nursing profession in two Italian hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Claudio Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Nursing shortage is acknowledged as worldwide issue: understanding the factors that foster nurses' intention to leave the profession (ITL) is therefore essential in lessening its impact. The present study aims at providing insight into the factors influencing nurses' ITL, taking into account personal characteristics, context characteristics and job satisfaction factors. The study was conducted in two hospitals of Northern Italy, by a questionnaire administered to all nurses employed; 746 questionnaires were distributed, of which 525 (70.4%) were returned completed. The questionnaire consisted of four sections: personal characteristics, context characteristics, job satisfaction (44 items of Italian adaptation of Stamps' Index of Work Satisfaction), and ITL (single-item). Descriptive statistics, reliability analysis, univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression model were carried using Pasw18. A higher job satisfaction was registered for Interaction with nurses, Professional status, and Autonomy; on the other hand, a perception of dissatisfaction was registered for Pay and Job requirements; 14.6% of respondents reported ITL. Finally, a low job satisfaction for Professional status, Pay, and Work organization policies, age job satisfaction factors, promote organizational integration of newcomers, and prevent the escalation of work-family and work-life conflict.

  9. Ethics of pharmaceutical company relationships with the nursing profession: no free lunch...and no more pens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, Elizabeth

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, nurses have increasingly become recipients of pharmaceutical company gifts, funding and sponsorship. There has been little discussion in the nursing literature, however, of the ethical and professional implications of nurses' acceptance of such sponsorship. This article examines ethical issues related to the issue of nurses' accepting benefits from pharmaceutical companies (and other commercial enterprises). It aims to encourage nurses to look critically at the implications of accepting such gifts/sponsorship, or to enter any form of relationship with commercial companies within the health sector, and to stimulate further discussion of this issue within the profession.

  10. Factors influencing men entering the nursing profession, and understanding the challenges faced by them: Iranian and developed countries' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza; Azadi, Arman

    2013-12-01

    Men entering the nursing profession have been investigated from several different perspectives. Due to male gender characteristics and existing public image, nursing is often not considered as a career choice by men. Whether nursing would benefit from increased number of men is a key question in the literature. The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to identify factors influencing men to enter the nursing profession. In addition, it sought to understand the challenges they are confronted within this profession. A systematic search of the existing literature was performed using an Internet search with broad keywords to access related articles in both Persian and English databases. Finally, 34 studies (written between 2000 and early 2013) were selected and surveyed. Most of the studies were conducted in developed counties. The review identified reasons why males choose nursing, and other challenges facing men entering and working in nursing. Themes that emerged from the literature include educational and societal barriers experienced by men in nursing, recruitment, career choice, and role strain. Regarding men's influences on professional development, and also the importance of gender-based caring, policies for recruitment and retention of men in nursing must be followed hastily. However, there is a need for further research regarding the challenges faced by men entering nursing, in both Iran and other developing countries.

  11. Profession, market and class: nurse migration and the remaking of division and disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pam; Mackintosh, Maureen

    2007-12-01

    play reinforces disadvantage within nursing in ways that are problematic for the profession, patients and clients. The recognition and valuing of their skills is critical to the promotion of their own morale which in turn has an impact on their relationship with colleagues and the delivery of patient and client care.

  12. Young Registered Nurses' Intention to Leave the Profession and Professional Turnover in Early Career: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanterä, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    In a time of global nursing shortages an alarming number of young registered nurses have expressed a willingness to leave the profession. In this qualitative case study we investigate in depth why young nurses leave nursing profession and reeducate themselves for a new career. The study is based on longitudinal interviews of three young registered nurses in Finland. These nurses were first interviewed between December 2006 and May 2007, when they were 29–32 years old and having an intention to leave the profession. The second interview took place four years later, from January 2011 to March 2011 when all of them had made the transition to a new career. Data were analyzed in two stages. In the first stage, comprehensive career story narratives were formed on the basis of the interviews. In the second stage, emerging themes in these stories were compared, contrasted, and interpreted in the context of the overall career histories. Nursing as a second career choice and demanding work content as well as poor practice environment and the inability to identify with the stereotypical images of nurses were main themes that emerged from these career stories. The results of this interpretative qualitative study reflect a shift toward insights into understanding professional turnover as a complex and long-lasting process. PMID:24027640

  13. Young registered nurses' intention to leave the profession and professional turnover in early career: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkman, Mervi; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka; Salanterä, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    In a time of global nursing shortages an alarming number of young registered nurses have expressed a willingness to leave the profession. In this qualitative case study we investigate in depth why young nurses leave nursing profession and reeducate themselves for a new career. The study is based on longitudinal interviews of three young registered nurses in Finland. These nurses were first interviewed between December 2006 and May 2007, when they were 29-32 years old and having an intention to leave the profession. The second interview took place four years later, from January 2011 to March 2011 when all of them had made the transition to a new career. Data were analyzed in two stages. In the first stage, comprehensive career story narratives were formed on the basis of the interviews. In the second stage, emerging themes in these stories were compared, contrasted, and interpreted in the context of the overall career histories. Nursing as a second career choice and demanding work content as well as poor practice environment and the inability to identify with the stereotypical images of nurses were main themes that emerged from these career stories. The results of this interpretative qualitative study reflect a shift toward insights into understanding professional turnover as a complex and long-lasting process.

  14. Clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing curriculum: What the profession has to say about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Crookes, Patrick; Dewing, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade literature, inquiries and reports into the short comings in health services have highlighted the vital role of leadership in clinical practice and the impact on patient care and effective workplace culture. Whilst there is an abundance of literature on leadership and the registered nursing workforce, an international literature review revealed there is very little known on leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes. To identify what the profession's views are on proposed indicative curriculum content suggested for clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing degree in Australia. This is a multi-method research study. This paper presents the development and results of one aspect of the study, a national online survey. Nurses: clinicians, managers and academics. In the absence of a strong evidence base in the literature review, additional pre-requisite curriculum content was augmented from the work of two published frameworks of leadership and management. From this a 67-item survey was designed to ask the profession whether the aggregated content is a reasonable view of what should be included in a pre-registration programme to develop clinical leadership. The survey sought the views of nurses on whether the proposed content was relevant (yes/no) and their opinion on whether it is significant via a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive and chi-square analyses were performed in SPSS v.19. A total of 418 nurses completed the survey; there was consensus amongst the profession on what is considered relevant and important in a pre-registration nursing programme. The content identified could be considered indicative and pre-requisite to include in a pre-registration nursing programme. Members of the nursing profession in Australia have clear views about this. The next step is to design and evaluate a purposeful pedagogical approach and curriculum, leading to the development of clinical leadership knowledge, skills and

  15. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest.

  16. The Social Development Dimension Of The Nursing Profession In Managing HIV Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyuni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study the researcher attempted to understand and explain to explore the social development dimension of the nurse professions in managing HIV cases. Specifically the study sought to answer the following questions 1 what is the profile of the key informants with regards to HIV Patients age gender education and socio economics status Nurses age gender no of years of work experiences specific to HIV social workers age gender and no of years of work experiences specific to HIV. 2 What are lived experiences of key informants on social development dimension of the helping process HIV patients Nurses and Social Workers 3 What social development model can be designed in managing HIV cases 4 What policy recommendations can be developed pertaining to development dimension in managing HIV cases. This study utilized qualitative approach. The phenomenology was used to explore and describe HIV patients through their lived experiences in a selected rehabilitation center in Sukabumi West Java Indonesia the nurses and social workers. The approach developed an understanding of the experiences as perceived by the key informants. Qualitative research aims to collect a deep understanding of human behavior. Survey checklists In-depth interviews repertory grid and dendogram were utilized in the data gathering procedure data presentations and data analyses. The informants of this study were focused on nurses social workers and HIV Patients in the rehabilitation center the Directorate General for Social Rehabilitation Social Ministries of the Republic of Indonesia the school nurses Ministry of Health Community Health Centers that carry out community health care program-specific examination of VCT. Generally the findings of the research conducted by qualitative research methods in a statement obtained significant categories and themes that emerged is significant for the statement is feeling sad angry when patients get HIV diagnosis the process of

  17. Job control, work-family balance and nurses' intention to leave their profession and organization: A comparative cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Inoue, Takahiro; Harada, Hiroko; Oike, Miyako

    2016-12-01

    The shortage of nurses is a problem in many countries. In Japan, the distribution of nurses across different care settings is uneven: the shortage of nurses in home healthcare and nursing homes is more serious than in hospitals. Earlier research has identified numerous factors affecting nurses' intention to leave work (e.g., job control, family-related variables, work-family conflict); however, these factors' levels and effect size may vary between nurses in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes. This study measured job control, family-related variables, and work-family conflict among nurses in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes, and compared these variables' levels and effect size on nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession between these care settings. The research design was cross-sectional. Participating nurses from hospitals, home healthcare facilities, and nursing homes self-administered an anonymous questionnaire survey; nurses were recruited from the Kyushu district of Japan. Nurses from nine hospitals, 86 home healthcare offices, and 107 nursing homes participated. We measured nurses' intention to leave nursing or their organization, perceived job control, family variables and work-family conflict. We analyzed 1461 participants (response rate: 81.7%). The level of job control, family variables, and work-family conflict affecting nurses varied between hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes; additionally, these variables' effect on nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession varied between these care settings. Work-family conflict, family variables, and job control most strongly predicted nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes, respectively. Interventions aiming to increase nurse retention should distinguish between care settings. Regarding hospitals, reducing nurses' work-family conflict will increase nurse retention. Regarding

  18. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  19. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  20. History of Continuing Nursing Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Nursing history since 1853 is presented to identify issues in continuing nursing education, such as the influence of feminism and professionalism, changing constituencies, and philosophies in health care. (SK)

  1. A suitable job?: A qualitative study of becoming a nurse in the context of a globalizing profession in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonali E; Green, Judith; Maben, Jill

    2014-05-01

    Research on Indian nurses has focused on their participation as global migrant workers for whom opportunities abroad act as an incentive for many to migrate overseas. However, little is known about the careers of Indian nurses, or the impact of a globalized health care market on nurses who remain and on the profession itself in India. To explore nurses' accounts of entry into nursing in the context of the globalisation of the nursing profession in India, and the salience of 'migration' for nurses' individual careers. Qualitative interview study (n=56). The study drew on interviews with 56 nurses from six sites in Bangalore, India. These included two government hospitals, two private hospitals, a Christian mission hospital, a private outpatient clinic and two private nursing colleges. Participants were selected purposively to include nurses from Christian and Hindu backgrounds, a range of home States, ages and seniority and to deliberately over-recruit (rare) male nurses. Interviews covered how and why nurses entered nursing, their training and career paths to date, plans for the future, their experiences of providing nursing care and attitudes towards migration. Data analysis drew on grounded theory methods. Nursing is traditionally seen as a viable career particularly for women from Christian communities in India, where it has created inter-generational 'nurse families'. In a globalizing India, nursing is becoming a job 'with prospects' transcending traditional caste, class and gender boundaries. Almost all nurses interviewed who intended seeking overseas employment envisaged migration as a short term option to satisfy career objectives - increased knowledge, skills and economic rewards - that could result in long-term professional and social status gains 'back home' in India. For others, migration was not part of their career plan: yet the increases in status that migration possibilities had brought were crucial to framing nursing as a 'suitable job' for a

  2. Associative organization of nursing: struggles for the social recognition of the profession (1943-1946).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Kyvia Rayssa Bezerra; Queirós, Paulo Joaquim Pina; Pereira, Laís de Araújo; Peres, Maria Angélica de Almeida; Almeida, Antonio José de; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco

    2017-01-01

    To describe the circumstances that determine the creation of the Brazilian Association of Graduate Nurses of the Federal District Section and analyze its implications for the reorganization of the field of nursing. Qualitative, socio-historical, documentary study. The analysis generated the following category: Creation of a new group to guarantee unity: Brazilian Association of Graduate Nurses in the Federal District Section. The economic crisis resulting from the Second World War, the creation of the Paulista Association of Graduate Nurses and the increase in the number of Schools of Nursing in the country were decisive for the Brazilian Association of Graduate Nurses to reformulate its statute as to guarantee its unit. The creation of the Federal District Section consisted of one of the strategies of the Association to reorganize the field of nursing, in order to ensure the recognition of the profession by the society. Descrever as circunstâncias que determinam a criação da Associação Brasileira de Enfermeiras Diplomadas Seção do Distrito Federal e analisar as implicações dessa criação para a reorganização do campo da enfermagem. Estudo qualitativo, sócio-histórico, documental. A análise gerou a seguinte categoria: Criação de um novo grupo para garantir a unidade: Associação Brasileira de Enfermeiras Diplomadas Seção do Distrito Federal. A crise econômica, decorrente da Segunda Guerra Mundial, a criação da Associação Paulista de Enfermeiras Diplomadas e o aumento do número de escolas de enfermagem no país foram determinantes para que a Associação Brasileira de Enfermeiras Diplomadas reformulasse seu estatuto, de modo a garantir sua unidade. A criação da Seção do Distrito Federal consistiu em uma das estratégias da associação para reorganizar o campo da enfermagem, de modo a assegurar o reconhecimento da profissão pela sociedade.

  3. Influence of work-related characteristics and work ability on changing employer or leaving the profession among nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Schouteten, Roel L.J.; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate how work-related characteristics and work ability influence nursing staff decisions to change employer or leave the profession. Background Previous cross-sectional studies have indicated that decreased work ability and unfavourable work-related characteristics are important

  4. Quality of work life as a predictor of nurses' intention to leave units, organisations and the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; McCreary, Linda L

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationships between quality of work life (QWL) and nurses' intention to leave their unit (ITLunit), organisation (ITLorg) and profession (ITLpro). The high turnover rate among nurses presents a major challenge to health care systems across the globe. QWL plays a significant role in nurses' turnover. A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was conducted via purposive sampling of 1283 hospital nurses and administering the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale (C-QNWL), a three-ITL-type scale questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire for individual- and work-related variables. Descriptive data, correlations, and ordinal regression models were analyzed. QWL predicted ITLpro and ITLorg better than ITLunit. Three QWL dimensions (work arrangement and workload, nursing staffing and patient care, and work-home life balance) were significantly predictive of all three ITL measures. However, the dimension of teamwork and communication was only predictive for ITLunit, not for ITLorg and ITLpro. Different patterns of QWL dimensions are predictive of ITLunit, ITLorg, and ITLpro. The study provides important information to nurse administrators about the aspects of QWL that most commonly lead nurses to leave their units, organisations, and even the profession itself. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Using Principles of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses in School Nurse Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Ruth K.; Sprague-McRae, Julie

    2014-01-01

    School nurses require ongoing continuing education in a number of areas. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) framework can be utilized in considering school nurses' roles and developing continuing education. Focusing on neurology continuing education, the QSEN framework is illustrated with the example of concussion management…

  6. Analysis of the Concept Continuing Education in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyepong, Edith Biamah; Okyere, Enoch Danso

    2018-01-01

    The term continuing education is extensively used throughout nursing education literature. This paper sought to re-examine the concept 'continuing education' for its meaning, relevance and appropriateness of application. The authors examined the definitions of continuing education from dictionaries, thesauruses, and current nursing education…

  7. Stepping outside the stereotype. A pilot study of the motivations and experiences of males in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittock, Margaret; Leonard, Laurence

    2003-07-01

    Despite their historical significance to the UK's nursing profession, numbers of registered male nurses here have seldom exceeded 10% of the total. This is not an immutable principle, given that countries such as the Netherlands manage to attract males to the profession in much greater numbers. This paper examines and critiques the available literature on males in nursing from both a historical and present day perspective. In so doing, it discusses factors such as caring, over-performance and career progression, and, notions of masculinity. It then moves on to outline and discuss an on-going pilot study specifically designed to examine the motivations and experiences of a sample of preregistration and postregistration male nurses in the UK, across a range of ages and ethnicities. The ultimate aim of the study is to produce evidence which will advance the recruitment of men to a profession which is currently experiencing severe recruitment difficulties. The paper presents themes emerging from the study to date, examining the implications these may have for the future management of nurse recruitment.

  8. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  9. American Nurses Association Position Statement on guidelines for commercial support of continuing nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The attached guidelines on "Commercial Support of Continuing Nursing Education" have been developed by the American Nurses Association (ANA) to assist/guide nursing continuing educators who wish to utilize the resources of corporations to provide continuing education programs. These guidelines enable the provider to maintain a balance between the need for industry-supported dissemination of scientific information and promotional activities which meet the requirements of law, as well as professional standards of the American Nurses Association.

  10. [Gender and profession in the historical development of community nursing in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu-Mestre, Josep; Carrillo-García, Concepción; Galiana-Sánchez, María Eugenia; García-Paramio, Pilar; Trescastro-López, Eva María

    2013-01-01

    Community and public health is probably the field where nurses have achieved the highest levels of professional independence, and their contribution is most valued. However, there are still major obstacles to full development, some of them linked to gender. It is therefore important to analyse the historical background of this situation in Spain in order to gain a better understanding of the many problems and shortcomings that still persist in Community Nursing today. Community nurses contributed to the development of Public Health in contemporary Spain, starting in the 1920s and culminating in the Second Republic. However, the Franco regime brought a halt to the process of professionalisation. By analysing the public conflict between visiting female nurses and practicantes (professional male medical auxiliary technicians) during the Second Republic and throughout the Franco regime, we examine the impact of gender on the development of nursing in Spain as one of the conditioning factors, and how it continues to influence the structuring of competencies and the distribution of responsibilities and power in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Nursing and Nursing Education: Public Policies and Private Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Results are presented of a study of nursing and nursing education that focused on the need for continued federal support of nursing education, ways to attract nurses to medically underserved areas, and approaches to encourage nurses to stay in the profession. Findings are presented on whether the aggregate supply of generalist nurses will be…

  12. The effect of a career activity on the students' perception of the nursing profession and their career plan: A single-group experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Arzu Akman; Ilce, Arzu; Can Cicek, Saadet; Yuzden, Ganime Esra; Yigit, Ummuhan

    2016-04-01

    Students' conceptualizations of nursing and their reasons for choosing the profession motivate them and affect their education, work performance and career plans. Nursing educators should support them to plan their careers consciously during their education. The study aimed to investigate the effect of career-planning event for nursing students on their conceptualizations of the nursing profession and their career plans. The study was as single-group experimental study using a pre-test and post-test. The career-planning event was held in the conference hall of the university involved in the current study, and was open to the all students of the nursing school. The sample of the study consisted of 105 students who participated in the "Nursing Career Symposium" held on 27 March 2015. Methods At the event, the importance of career planning and the opportunities of the nursing profession was presented. The data were collected using a questionnaire consisted of two sections including descriptive characteristics and the opinions of the students regarding their career plans and Perception of Nursing Profession Scale. The students completed the first section of the questionnaire before the career event began and the second section of the questionnaire and scale both before and after the event. The participants had positive conceptualizations of the profession. Following a career event, the participants' opinions of professional qualities and professional status as measured through the Perception of Nursing Profession Scale showed a significant increase, and that the event had made an important contribution to their career plans. In the light of these results, it is possible to suggest that such events have an important place during education in that they introduce the nursing profession, and they develop the students' positive thoughts regarding the profession in terms of both course content and teaching methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools.

  14. Nurses' perceptions of and participation in continuing nursing education: results from a study of psychiatric hospital nurses in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majid, Sadeeka; Al-Majed, Hashmiya; Rakovski, Cyril S; Otten, Rebecca A

    2012-05-01

    Although many psychiatric hospital nurses in Bahrain attend at least one continuing nursing education (CNE) activity per year, many others do not. This study explored these nurses' perceptions of CNE and factors that promote or hinder participation in CNE activities. A descriptive design was used to gather data from a convenience sample of 200 nurses working at the psychiatric hospital in Bahrain. Nurses believed that CNE improved the quality of patient care and patient outcomes, increased nurses' knowledge and skills, and kept them current with advances in nursing. Participation in CNE was hindered by unavailability of CNE activities related to psychiatric nursing. The majority of nurses had positive perceptions of CNE. Their participation was hindered by unavailability of CNE activities related to psychiatric nursing. Those responsible for planning continuing education in Bahrain should consider these findings when planning future CNE activities. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. An understanding of nurse educators' leadership behaviors in implementing mandatory continuing nursing education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2008-09-01

    Mandatory continuing nursing education is viewed as one way to develop registered nurses' continuing competencies. However, as has been argued internationally, it can also create a paradox in terms of learning to meet study requirements. Such paradox has been discussing in China since the implementation of mandatory continuing nursing education in 1996. Nurse educators, who develop continuing nursing education programs, appear to respond to the paradox differently associated with their leadership styles. This article reports a qualitative study aiming to gain an understanding of nurse educators' leadership behaviors in implementing mandatory continuing nursing education in China. Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics underpins in-depth interviews with five nurse educators and data interpretation. Two categories of nurse educators, described as proactive educator and reactive educator, were identified and compared with two types of leadership styles described as transformational leader and transactional leader in the literature of educational leadership and continuing professional development. Proactive educators shared core attributors of transformational leaders and were able to relieve the paradox in mandatory continuing nursing education. Reactive educators however showed some attributors of transactional leaders and might escalate the paradox. Findings suggest further research in relation to the preparation of nurse educators.

  16. The development and validation of the On-the-job Learning Styles Questionnaire for the Nursing Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berings, Marjolein G M C; Poell, Rob F; Simons, P Robert-Jan; van Veldhoven, Marc J P M

    2007-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study to develop and test the psychometric properties of the On-the-job Learning Style Questionnaire for the Nursing Profession. Although numerous questionnaires measuring learning styles have been developed, none are suitable for working environments. Existing instruments do not meet the requirements for use in workplace settings and tend to ignore the influence of different learning situations. The questionnaire was constructed using a situation-response design, measuring learning activities in different on-the-job learning situations. Content validity was ensured by basing the questionnaire on interview studies. The questionnaire was distributed to 912 Registered Nurses working in different departments of 13 general hospitals in the Netherlands at the end of 2005. The response rate was 41% (372 questionnaires). The internal factor structure of the questionnaire was partly based on the learning activities in which nurses participate and partly on the learning situation in which they are performed. The internal consistency was good. The situation-response design of the questionnaire demonstrated its added value. Construct validity was estimated using intercorrelations between the scales, and criterion validity was estimated based on the relationships of the scales with perceived professional competence. The On-the-job Learning Styles Questionnaire for the Nursing Profession is well suited to describing nurses' learning styles in on-the-job settings and has satisfactory psychometric properties.

  17. [Unconnected, possibly irrelevant for the nursing profession, but mandatory readings not to lose the focus in 2015, and beyond].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoni, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Unconnected, possibly irrelevant for the nursing profession, but mandatory readings not to lose the focus in 2015, and beyond. The recent, and chronologically concomitant publication of two reports - on the specific and dramatic violence against women in war situations; on the experience and results of resilience of cultural, health, academic palestinian institutions under Israeli State repression - has suggested their joint, very synthetic presentation, which explains the somehow henigmatic formulation of the title, and provides the opportunity for possibly relevant comments for the nursing profession and research. Two main points are underlined: a) beyond their clear heterogeneity, in terms of content and format, the two publications have a common, reciprocally complementary objective and message: the importance, and the concrete rarity, of visibility for scenarios which are most of the time left to the fragmentation of the chronicle, though they touch the roots of the interests of those who are working in fields which are close to the rights to life and dignity. b) The specific relevance of becoming aware of strategies contrasting massive violations of fundamental rights could and should be tested by the nursing profession with cultural and field projects targeted to the populations who in many scenarios of care and life are threatened by the violence of marginalization.

  18. Nursing procedures during continuous renal replacement therapies: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Benelli, Sonia; Barbarigo, Fabio; Cocozza, Giulia; Pettinelli, Noemi; Di Luca, Emanuela; Mettifogo, Mariangela; Toniolo, Andrea; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The current role of nurses in the management of critically ill patients needing continuous renal replacement therapies is clearly fundamental. The care of these complex patients is typically shared by critical care and dialysis nurses: their precise duties may vary from country to country. To clarify this issue we conducted a national-level survey at a recent Italian course on nursing practices during continuous renal replacement therapies. A total of 119 questionnaires were analysed. The participants, who were equally divided between critical care and dialysis nurses, came from 44 different hospitals and 35 Italian cities. Overall, 23% of participants answered that "the dialysis staff" were responsible for continuous renal replacement therapies in the Intensive Care Unit, while 39% answered "the critical care nurse", and 38% "a shared organization". Interestingly, less than the half of participants claimed specific continuous renal replacement therapies training was provided to employees before handling an acute dialysis machine. Finally, about 60% of participants had experience of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation machines used in conjunction with continuous renal replacement therapies. Workload coordination and management of critically ill patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapies in Italy is not standardized. At present, the duties of critical care and dialysis nurses vary significantly across the country. They frequently overlap or leave gaps in the assistance received by patients. The role of nurses involved in the care of continuous renal replacement therapies patients in Italy currently requires better organization, possibly starting with intensive standardized training and educational programs.

  19. Nurses' and managers' perceptions of continuing professional development for older and younger nurses : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuing professional development of nurses is increasingly necessary to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Therefore, future strategies for continuing professional development should be directed at both younger and older

  20. Organizational impact of nurse supply and workload on nurses continuing professional development opportunities: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Tracey H; Maslin-Prothero, Sian E; Smith, Gilly

    2015-12-01

    To identify the best evidence on the impact of healthcare organizations' supply of nurses and nursing workload on the continuing professional development opportunities of Registered Nurses in the acute care hospital. To maintain registration and professional competence nurses are expected to participate in continuing professional development. One challenge of recruitment and retention is the Registered Nurse's ability to participate in continuing professional development opportunities. The integrative review method was used to present Registered Nurses perspectives on this area of professional concern. The review was conducted for the period of 2001-February 2015. Keywords were: nurs*, continuing professional development, continuing education, professional development, supply, shortage, staffing, workload, nurse: patient ratio, barrier and deterrent. The integrative review used a structured approach for literature search and data evaluation, analysis and presentation. Eleven international studies met the inclusion criteria. Nurses are reluctant or prevented from leaving clinical settings to attend continuing professional development due to lack of relief cover, obtaining paid or unpaid study leave, use of personal time to undertake mandatory training and organizational culture and leadership issues constraining the implementation of learning to benefit patients. Culture, leadership and workload issues impact nurses' ability to attend continuing professional development. The consequences affect competence to practice, the provision of safe, quality patient care, maintenance of professional registration, job satisfaction, recruitment and retention. Organizational leadership plays an important role in supporting attendance at continuing professional development as an investment for the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  2. [Cross-sectional study on the determinants of work stress for nurses and intention of leaving the profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marina; Festini, Filippo; Bronner, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Occupational stress is one of the main causes of sick leaves among healthcare professionals and it determines high costs to health systems. Monitoring occupational related stress can be an important tool for policy makers. The Italian nursing research gave little attention to nurses' occupational stress. The aims of this study is to estimate the prevalence of occupational stress and evaluate risks factors among Italian nurses in order to evaluate health promotion intervention. Cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of nurses from three Italian public hospitals was carried out. The Nursing Stress Scale was administrated together with socio-demographic data information(age, occupational age, family structure etc). The Nursing Stress Scale includes 34 items with a score from 0 to 3. Seven areas of job related stress are investigate in the scale: conflict with physicians, inadequate training, lack of support, conflict with other nurses, workload, uncertainty about treatments, death and suffering. Scores were calculated for each item and for each area. Associations between stress scores and socio-demographic data were analyzed. 231 nurses participated to the study. The two stress areas with the highest scores were "workload" (1.58) and "death and suffering" (1.39). Among the 13 items that exceed the overall mean stress score (i.e. 1.07), five belong to the "workload" area. "Watching a suffering patient" is the single item with the highest mean score. Demographic data associated to higher stress scores are, female gender (p=0.03) and working with night shifts (p=0.02). Intention to leave the nursing profession is associated to higher stress scores (p=0.002). Age, occupational age, time to commute to work, number of children, having disabled relatives at home, were not correlated to higher stress scores. Our study provides data regarding nurses' occupational stress that was not available before. This data may be useful for policy makers to plan preventive

  3. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always value the skills and competences nurses have acquired through education and innovation. Discussion paper. We identified 1216 relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases in the period 1997-2010. Finally, 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The included studies show that the actual public image of nursing is diverse and incongruous. This image is partly self-created by nurses due to their invisibility and their lack of public discourse. Nurses derive their self-concept and professional identity from their public image, work environment, work values, education and traditional social and cultural values. Nurses should work harder to communicate their professionalism to the public. Social media like the Internet and YouTube can be used to show the public what they really do. To improve their public image and to obtain a stronger position in healthcare organizations, nurses need to increase their visibility. This could be realized by ongoing education and a challenging work environment that encourages nurses to stand up for themselves. Furthermore, nurses should make better use of strategic positions, such as case manager, nurse educator or clinical nurse specialist and use their professionalism to show the public what their work really entails. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A 3-armed randomized controlled trial of nurses' continuing education meetings on adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayani, Amir; Naderi-Behdani, Fahimeh; Hadavand, Naser; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Farsad, Fariborz; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' insufficient knowledge of adverse drug reactions is reported as a barrier to spontaneous reporting. Therefore, CE meetings could be utilized to enhance nurses' competencies. In a 3-armed randomized controlled trial, 496 nurses, working in a tertiary medical center, were randomly allocated to a didactic lecture, brainstorming workshop, or the control group (delayed education). Similar instructors (2 clinical pharmacists) prepared and delivered the educational content to all 3 groups. Outcomes were declarative/procedural knowledge (primary outcome), participation rate, and satisfaction. Knowledge was evaluated using a validated researcher-made questionnaire in 3 time points: immediately before, immediately after, and 3 months after each session. Participants' satisfaction was assessed immediately after each meeting via a standard tool. Data were analyzed using appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests. Rate of participation was 37.7% for the lecture group and 47.5% for the workshop group. The workshop participants were significantly more satisfied in comparison with the lecture group (p techniques. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  5. [Human capital vs. manpower: fostering a greater global perspective within the nursing profession in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Yen; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Nursing today is an occupation greatly influenced and shaped by global standards and internationally recognized standard practices and requirements. Therefore, cultivating nursing capital and ensuring nursing manpower requires an international perspective. Nursing migration is currently a popular approach used by many developed countries to address domestic shortfalls in nursing manpower. These international medical services have had a great impact on nursing education. Being able to communicate in English and to adapt transculturally have thus become increasingly important. Ability to communicate well in English is one effective way both to minimize nurse-patient misunderstandings and to increase the quality of care available to foreign patients. In addition, transcultural communication underscores the value of respecting cultural diversity. Fostering and enhancing these abilities will enhance and expand the role of Taiwanese nurses in the professional global movement and increase their contributions to the internal medical community.

  6. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562 of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6% and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%. The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  7. Standardized nomenclatures: keys to continuity of care, nursing accountability and nursing effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G; Aquilino, M L

    1998-01-01

    Standardized nursing nomenclatures must be included in clinical documentation systems to generate data that more accurately represent nursing practice than outcomes-related measures currently used to support important policy decisions. NANDA, NIC, and NOC--comprehensive nomenclatures for the needed variables of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes--are described. Added benefits of using NANDA, NIC, and NOC in everyday practice are outlined, including facilitation of the continuity of care of patients in integrated health systems.

  8. Paediatric fever management: continuing education for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Edwards, Helen E; Courtney, Mary D; Wilson, Jenny E; Monaghan, Sarah J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the influence of level of practice, additional paediatric education and length of paediatric and current experience on nurses' knowledge of and beliefs about fever and fever management. Fifty-one nurses from medical wards in an Australian metropolitan paediatric hospital completed a self-report descriptive survey. Knowledge of fever management was mediocre (Mean 12.4, SD 2.18 on 20 items). Nurses practicing at a higher level and those with between one and four years paediatric or current experience were more knowledgeable than novices or more experienced nurses. Negative beliefs that would impact nursing practice were identified. Interestingly, beliefs about fever, antipyretic use in fever management and febrile seizures were similar; they were not influenced by nurses' knowledge, experience, education or level of practice. Paediatric nurses are not expert fever managers. Knowledge deficits and negative attitudes influence their practice irrespective of additional paediatric education, paediatric or current experience or level of practice. Continuing education is therefore needed for all paediatric nurses to ensure the latest clear evidence available in the literature for best practice in fever management is applied.

  9. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity: a discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2013-01-01

    Aim To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Background Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  10. The nursing profession : public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    Aim To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Background Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  11. Nurses' intention to leave their profession: a cross sectional observational study in 10 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Schwendimann, R.; Zander, B.; Matthews, A.; Kozka, M.; Ensio, A.; Sjetne, I.S.; Moreno Casbas, T.; Ball, J.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the European population ages, the demand for nursing care increases. Yet, a shortage of nurses at the labour market exists or is predicted for most European countries. There are no adequate solutions for this shortage yet, and recruitment of future nurses is difficult. Therefore,

  12. A qualitative study of continuing education needs of rural nursing unit staff: the nurse administrator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody; Everly, Marcee; Bozarth, Lisa; Bauer, Renee; Walters, Linda; Sample, Marilyn; Anderson, Louise

    2013-04-01

    This study reports perceptions of the continuing education (CE) needs of nursing unit staff in 40 rural healthcare facilities (10 hospitals and 30 long-term care facilities) in a rural Midwestern U.S. region from the perspective of nurse administrators in an effort to promote a community-based academic-practice CE partnership. Qualitative data collection involving naturalistic inquiry methodology was based on key informant interviews with nurse administrators (n=40) working and leading in the participating health care facilities. Major themes based on nurse administrators' perceptions of CE needs of nursing unit staff were in four broad conceptual areas: "Cultural issues", "clinical nursing skills", "patient care", and "patient safety". Major sub-themes for each conceptual area are highlighted and discussed with narrative content as expressed by the participants. Related cultural sub-themes expressed by the nurse administrators included "horizontal violence" (workplace-hospital and LTC nursing unit staff) and "domestic violence" (home-LTC nursing unit staff). The uniqueness of nurses' developmental learning needs from a situational point of view can be equally as important as knowledge-based and/or skill-based learning needs. Psychological self-reflection is discussed and recommended as a guiding concept to promote the development and delivery of relevant, empowering and evidence-based CE offerings for rural nursing unit staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The juxtaposition of ageing and nursing: the challenges and enablers of continuing to work in the latter stages of a nursing career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendon, Jill; Walker, Léonie

    2016-05-01

    To identify why some nurses cope well with continuing to work as they age and others struggle. There is a need to understand better the challenges older nurses face and how they manage them. Secondary analysis of existing data. Data collected in two separate studies were analysed. The first study (2012) was an online, anonymous survey that collected free text (qualitative) and categorical data (n = 3273, 57·6% response rate). The second (2014) was an explorative, descriptive study that collected data through focus groups and interviews (n = 46). Qualitative data from both studies were analysed using David Thomas' () general inductive approach. Research Ethics Committee approval was gained for the 2012 and 2014 studies. Data were categorised in two themes: the challenges of ageing and nursing; and factors that enable nurses to continue to practice. Physical challenges, fatigue, guilt, ageism and demands to complete continuing education were considered challenges. Maintaining personal fitness, self care, flexible working and a strong belief in their ability to contribute to the profession were present in older nurses who continued to practice. While older nurses face growing physical and cognitive challenges as they age, they demonstrate strong resilience in the face of these challenges. It is recommended nurses seek support from their workplaces early to address challenges. Organisations must address ageism in the workplace and provide practical interventions such as supporting changes to work hours, shifting nurses to less physical roles and providing career planning to support resilience in older workers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Practice nurses in general practice: a rapidly growing profession in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Noordman, J.; Korevaar, J.; Dorsman, S.W.; Hingstman, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Bakker, D. de

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 1999, nurse practitioners were introduced. The main objectives were to improve quality of care for chronic ill and to reduce workload of general practitioners. In ten years the number of practice nurses has grown tremendously. Meanwhile there are new tasks as a result of aging.

  15. [Narrative research on the meaning of professional development in the psychiatric nurse profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Chun

    2011-08-01

    The extensive clinical experience of senior nurses is a valuable resource to assist new nurses to prepare for their professional future in the clinical environment. This study employed the professional life narratives of psychiatric nurses in Taiwan to establish professional meaning and create a development image for Taiwan psychiatric nurses. This study used a narrative approach to interview a psychiatric nurse with nearly thirty years of clinical experience. Researchers analyzed findings and constructed a new meaningful vision in light of social and cultural changes. Results identified three periods, namely Enlightenment, Shaping, and Spiritual Care. Enlightenment focuses on the nurse as a helper; Shaping focuses on the fundamental need for nurses; and Transmitting focuses on spiritual care. These periods outline a development image for psychiatric care in which effectiveness of care shifts from "individual" to "professional". The significance of caring for psychiatric patients should be perceived through shaping, which is generated by social interaction. This case study may be applied to enhance psychiatric nursing education.

  16. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity : a discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvonne ten Hoeve; Prof. Dr. Petrie F. Roodbol; Gerard Jansen

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses’ self-concept and professional identity. Background. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  17. Strategies to Produce New Nurses for a Changing Profession: A Policy Brief on Innovation in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For several years leading up to 2008, workforce data painted a picture of an imminent crisis in the healthcare workforce, with demand for registered nurses far exceeding supply. The economic recession has provided a temporary reprieve, as older nurses postponed retirement and hospitals instituted hiring freezes. However, economists believe that as…

  18. What Drives Nurses' Blended e-Learning Continuance Intention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Ming

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to synthesize the user network (including subjective norm and network externality), task-technology fit (TTF), and expectation-confirmation model (ECM) to explain nurses' intention to continue using the blended electronic learning (e-learning) system within medical institutions. A total of 450 questionnaires were…

  19. [Study on empowerment factors for career continuity of hospital nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirosato; Ito, Yukie; Yoshida, Aki; Mizuno, Shizue; Ogoshi, Kumiko; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    The resignation rate of nurses working in hospitals is extremely high. This study aims to identify both the factors related to the resignation of nurses and the empowerment factors supporting their job retention. In 2011 we conducted a Web-based questionnaire survey of nurses with less than 10 years of working experience. There were 25 survey items including the following reasons for choosing the current employment position, intention of continuing work, sense of fulfillment and the presence or absence of problems in the current workplace. In addition, nurses who previously had resigned were asked why they left their last workplace. The reasons why they chose the current workplace were markedly different between the not-resigned (A group) and previously resigned (B group) nurses. As a result of cluster analysis, the reasons for resignation were classified into six clusters; "overwork", "burnout", "bad atmosphere", "work life balance factors", "working conditions" and "marriage". In this study, it is shown that there is a positive correlation between the sense of fulfillment at work and the intention to do research work. It is suggested that encouragement of nurses to undertake research work is one of the empowerment factors supporting their job retention.

  20. COST ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL PRACTICE NURSING PROFESSION STUDENTS WITH ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC METHOD IN Dr. SOEWANDHI HOSPITAL SURABAYA EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hasinuddin

    2017-02-01

    Research result. The results using the ABC method showed that the unit cost to the cost of professional practice nurses in the hospital Dr. Soewandhi Surabaya is Rp. 460,000, - / month / person, while the cost of practice set by the RS Dr. Soewandhi is Rp. 1.200.000, - / month / person. There is a practice of the profession excess costs Rp. 740,000, -. RS Dr. Surabaya Soewandhi practice fees apply without using a standard based on the unit cost accordingly. Some educational institutions felt the cost was very heavy so the impact to the cancellation of the filing of the professional nurses student practice. Conclusions and recommendations. The hospital used a professional students practice nurses should use the standard fees in accordance with needs through precise calculations that the fees charged to students through educational institutions in accordance with the appropriate calculations. Keyword: ABC system - Profession nurses - Fee Practices

  1. Marketing and the Most Trusted Profession: The Invisible Interactions Between Registered Nurses and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn; Bero, Lisa A; Malone, Ruth E

    2016-06-07

    The mainstay for addressing conflicts of interest in health care is disclosure of personal financial ties to industry. However, this approach fails to capture the complexity of industry interactions that are built into clinical practice. Further, the policy climate focuses on physicians and traditional pharmaceutical marketing. To describe industry activities targeted at registered nurses. Qualitative, ethnographic study conducted from January 2012 to October 2014. Four acute care hospitals in a western U.S. city. A purposive sample of 72 participants with direct experience with industry, including staff nurses, administrators, and industry and supply chain professionals. Fieldwork, including observations (102 hours), semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 51), focus groups (n = 4), and documents analysis. Nurses' reported financial relationships with industry were similar to those reported by prescribers. However, nurses reported that their most significant interactions with industry occurred in daily practice. The current policy environment rendered these interactions invisible, leaving nurses with little guidance to ensure that the boundary between service and sales remained intact. This study could not determine the frequency or prevalence of nurse-industry interactions. The sample is not representative. Nurse-industry interactions may be common and influential, but they remain invisible in the current policy climate. Although some aspects of these interactions may be beneficial, others may pose financial risks to hospitals or safety risks to patients. Disclosure strategies alone do not provide health professionals with adequate support to manage day-to-day interactions. Management of industry interactions must include guidance for nurses. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; and University of California, San Francisco.

  2. Evaluation of a Training Program to Reduce Stressful Trunk Postures in the Nursing Professions: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Agnessa; Freitag, Sonja; Nienhaus, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate metrologically the effectiveness of a training program on the reduction of stressful trunk postures in geriatric nursing professions. A training program, consisting of instruction on body postures in nursing, practical ergonomic work methods at the bedside or in the bathroom, reorganization of work equipment, and physical exercises, was conducted in 12 wards of 6 nursing homes in Germany. The Computer-Assisted Recording and Long-Term Analysis of Musculoskeletal Loads (CUELA) measurement system was used to evaluate all movements and trunk postures adopted during work before and 6 months after the training program. In total, 23 shifts were measured. All measurements were supported by video recordings. A specific software program (WIDAAN 2.75) was used to synchronize the measurement data and video footage. The median proportion of time spent in sagittal inclinations at an angle of >20° was significantly reduced (by 29%) 6 months after the intervention [from 35.4% interquartile range (27.6-43.1) to 25.3% (20.7-34.1); P 4 s [4.4% (3.0-6.7) to 3.6% (2.5-4.5); P ergonomic measures were implemented properly, either at the bedside or in the bathroom. Stressful trunk postures could be significantly reduced by raising awareness of the physical strains that frequently occur during a shift, by changes in work practices and by redesigning the work environment. Workplace interventions aimed at preventing or reducing low back pain in nursing personnel would probably benefit from sensitizing employees to their postures during work. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  3. An integrated educational model for continuing nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Beverley; Gardner, Glenn; Osborne, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an integrated clinical learning model to inform ongoing education for surgical nurses. The research aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Respiratory Skills Update (ReSKU) education program, in the context of organisational utility, on improving surgical nurses' practice in the area of respiratory assessment. Continuous development and integration of technological innovations and research in the healthcare environment mandate the need for continuing education for nurses. Despite an increased worldwide emphasis on this, there is scant empirical evidence of program effectiveness. A quasi experimental pre test, post test non-equivalent control group design evaluated the impact of the ReSKU program on surgical nurses' clinical practice. The 2008 study was conducted in a 400 bed regional referral public hospital and was consistent with contemporary educational approaches using multi-modal, interactive teaching strategies. The study demonstrated statistically significant differences between groups regarding reported use of respiratory skills, three months after ReSKU program attendance. Between group data analysis indicated that the intervention group's reported beliefs and attitudes pertaining to subscale descriptors showed statistically significant differences in three of the six subscales. The construct of critical thinking in the clinical context, combined with clinical reasoning and purposeful reflection, was a powerful educational strategy to enhance competency and capability in clinicians. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Imperial nursing: cross-cultural challenges for women in the health professions: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    This essay briefly examines some of the cross-cultural challenges that faced nurses in the Philippines, India, and South Africa in the context of 19th and 20th century imperialism. During this time, nurses from colonizing countries served as agents of empire by helping to establish and reinforce American and European control in colonized societies. In doing so, they sought to instill the racial and gender hierarchies of their home countries in the colonial territories. But once these women moved to the colonies, they frequently found their preconceptions about femininity, sexuality, and race challenged in unexpected ways. The history of nursing in the age of empire is a story of good intentions mixed with cultural chauvinism, of professional rigor mixed with condescension, of devotion and generosity shaped and often distorted by ideas of gendered and racial conventions, and of ambitious reform crushed by an inability to think beyond the bounds of imperialism.

  5. Integral Nursing: An Emerging Framework for Engaging the Evolution of the Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandt, Kathryn; Forman, John; Megel, Mary Erickson; Pakieser, Ruth A.; Burge, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    Proposes the Integral Nursing framework, which combines Wilber's All-Quadrant/All-Level model, a heuristic device to organize human experience, and the Spiral Dynamics model of human development organized around value memes or cultural units of information. Includes commentary by Beth L. Rodgers. (Contains 17 references.) (JOW)

  6. Cyclical Evolution of Nursing Education and Profession in Iran: Religious, Cultural, and Political Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Pari; Mura, Aubin

    1995-01-01

    Nursing education in Iran has been influenced by cycles of religious and political change, including fluctuations in women's status, the modernization attempts of the Pahlavi Dynasty, and the shift from secular science-based education and health care back to a system based on religious and cultural principles in the Islamic Republic of Iran. (SK)

  7. Patterns of Learning in the Accountancy Profession under an Output-Based Continuing Professional Development Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, professional accountancy bodies in membership of the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) have been required to adopt mandatory continuing professional development (CPD) schemes. This research explores the learning activities of members of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) which introduced an…

  8. Cultural Influences on the Professions in European Union Countries and Their Implications for Continuing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Anna; Thomas, Edward

    1996-01-01

    Although the European Union encourages professional mobility, the practice of continuing professional development (CPD) in pharmacy and law in various countries shows that cultural differences may hinder cross-border mobility. It is also surprising that universities are relatively little involved in CPD. (SK)

  9. [Self-images and perceptions of other professions among students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy and their importance for interprofessional cooperation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggatz, Thomas; Altmeppen, Sandra; Unger, Angelika

    2010-07-01

    Interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to provide effective and high quality treatment for clients of the health care system. Interaction between professional groups depends on how their members perceive their self-image and the image of other professions. Within the framework of the project "Quality in the education of health-professionals" a qualitative study with 23 nurses, 24 physiotherapists and 15 occupational therapists in the second or third year of training was conducted. Participants were asked to report their self-image and the image of the other two professions. A qualitative content analysis according to Mayring was used for data analysis. Four categories emerged that allowed describing the self image and the image of the other professions: roles of the respective health professions, relation of the health professionals to their clients, attributes that typically characterized members of a particular profession, and relationship between the health professions. Latent conflicts between professional groups became apparent. Contradicting perceptions are due to subjective bias in favour of the own professional group. Interdisciplinary collaboration requires a new culture of co-operation.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Continuing Education Program for Nursing Technicians at a Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borim, Bruna Cury; Croti, Ulisses A; Silveira, Patricia C; De Marchi, Carlos H; Moscardini, Airton C; Hickey, Patricia; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    The nursing profession faces continuous transformations demonstrating the importance of professional continuing education to extend knowledge following technological development without impairing quality of care. Nursing assistants and technicians account for nearly 80% of nursing professionals in Brazil and are responsible for uninterrupted patient care. Extensive knowledge improvement is needed to achieve excellence in nursing care. The objective was to develop and evaluate a continuing education program for nursing technicians at a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) using a virtual learning environment entitled EDUCATE. From July to September 2015, a total of 24 nursing technicians working at the PCICU at a children's hospital located in the northwestern region of São Paulo state (Brazil) fully participated in the continuing education program developed in a virtual learning environment using Wix platform, allowing access to video classes and pre- and post-training theoretical evaluation questionnaires outside the work environment. The evaluation tools recorded participants' knowledge evolution, technological difficulties, educational, and overall rating. Knowledge development was descriptively presented as positive in more than 66.7%. Content and training were considered "excellent" by most participants and 90% showed an interest in the use of technological resources. Technical difficulties were found and quickly resolved by 40% of participants including Internet access, login, and lack of technical expertise. The continuing education program using a virtual learning environment positively contributed to the improvement in theoretical knowledge of nursing technicians in PCICU.

  11. Knowledge of Food and Drug Interactions among Nurses: Assessment Strategy for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwerem, Nkechi M.; Okunji, Priscilla O.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of medication errors on patient quality care and safety is a critical ongoing concern requiring solutions. Although medication safety has been a concern of all healthcare professions, registered nurses play an important role in medication safety as patients' advocates. A cross sectional study with structured questionnaire on common FDI…

  12. Association between Continuing Education and Job Satisfaction of Nurses Employed in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ethel M.; Higgins, Leslie; Rozmus, Cathy; Robinson, James P.

    1999-01-01

    Continuing-education participation and job satisfaction of 85 licensed practical nurses and 25 registered nurses in long-term care were compared. There were no differences between full- and part-time staff. Nurses with higher family incomes participated more frequently. Registered nurses participated more and had greater job satisfaction. (SK)

  13. Perspectives on Age and Continuing Professional Development for Nurses: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Inge A.; Poell, Rob F.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for nurses to participate in continuing professional development (CPD) is growing to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Ageing leads to changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning. Little is known about the effects of age-related changes on nurses'…

  14. Managerial leadership for research use in nursing and allied health care professions: a narrative synthesis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Wendy A; Holyoke, Paul; Squires, Janet E; Angus, Douglas; Brosseau, Lucie; Egan, Mary; Graham, Ian D; Miller, Carol; Wallin, Lars

    2014-06-05

    Nurses and allied health care professionals (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, dietitians) form more than half of the clinical health care workforce and play a central role in health service delivery. There is a potential to improve the quality of health care if these professionals routinely use research evidence to guide their clinical practice. However, the use of research evidence remains unpredictable and inconsistent. Leadership is consistently described in implementation research as critical to enhancing research use by health care professionals. However, this important literature has not yet been synthesized and there is a lack of clarity on what constitutes effective leadership for research use, or what kinds of intervention effectively develop leadership for the purpose of enabling and enhancing research use in clinical practice. We propose to synthesize the evidence on leadership behaviours amongst front line and senior managers that are associated with research evidence by nurses and allied health care professionals, and then determine the effectiveness of interventions that promote these behaviours. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach that supports a partnership between researchers and knowledge users throughout the research process, we will follow principles of knowledge synthesis using a systematic method to synthesize different types of evidence involving: searching the literature, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment, and analysis. A narrative synthesis will be conducted to explore relationships within and across studies and meta-analysis will be performed if sufficient homogeneity exists across studies employing experimental randomized control trial designs. With the engagement of knowledge users in leadership and practice, we will synthesize the research from a broad range of disciplines to understand the key elements of leadership that supports and enables research use

  15. A Grounded theory study of the intention of nurses to leave the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alilu, Leyla; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Habibzadeh, Hosein; Gillespie, Mark

    2017-06-05

    this study explores the process of the development of an intention to leave bedside nursing. the process was studied from the perspective of 21 nurses using the grounded theory method. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and the constant comparative method of Corbin and Strauss was used for data analysis. according to the participants, the two main categories, "social image of nursing", and "culture and structure of the bedside", were the contextual factors that influence why nurses are leaving bedside care provision. Disappointment with a perceived lack of progress or improvement in the clinical experience formed primary psychosocial concerns for the participants. Competence and a process of self-control were steps taken by the participants. These, associated with interventional conditions produced the outcomes of the loss of professional commitment and desire to leave bedside nursing. "Failure to integrate personal expectations with organizational expectations: in search of escape" was the central category of the study that linked the categories together. the findings of this study provide useful information about the needs of nurses for overcoming the intention to leave bedside care. The identification of this process can help in recognizing emerging problems and providing solutions for them. este estudo explora o processo de desenvolvimento da intenção de deixar a enfermagem de cabeceira. o processo foi estudado desde a perspectiva de 21 enfermeiras utilizando o método da Grounded Theory (Teoria Fundamentada). Os dados foram coletados utilizando entrevistas semi-estruturadas e o método comparativo constante de Corbin e Strauss se utilizou para analisar os dados. segundo os participantes, duas categorias principais, "imagem social da enfermagem" e "cultura e estrutura de cabeceira", foram os fatores contextuais que influenciam as razões para que as enfermeiras estejam deixando o cuidado de cabeceira. A decepção com a percepção de falta

  16. Preliminary psychometric properties of the chinese version of the work-related quality of life scale-2 in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shike; Chaiear, Naesinee; Khiewyoo, Jiraporn; Wu, Bin; Johns, Nutjaree Pratheepawanit

    2013-03-01

    As quality of work-life (QWL) among nurses affects both patient care and institutional standards, assessment regarding QWL for the profession is important. Work-related Quality of Life Scale (WRQOLS) is a reliable QWL assessment tool for the nursing profession. To develop a Chinese version of the WRQOLS-2 and to examine its psychometric properties as an instrument to assess QWL for the nursing profession in China. Forward and back translating procedures were used to develop the Chinese version of WRQOLS-2. Six nursing experts participated in content validity evaluation and 352 registered nurses (RNs) participated in the tests. After a two-week interval, 70 of the RNs were retested. Structural validity was examined by principal components analysis and the Cronbach's alphas calculated. The respective independent sample t-test and intra-class correlation coefficient were used to analyze known-group validity and test-retest reliability. One item was rephrased for adaptation to Chinese organizational cultures. The content validity index of the scale was 0.98. Principal components analysis resulted in a seven-factor model, accounting for 62% of total variance, with Cronbach's alphas for subscales ranging from 0.71 to 0.88. Known-group validity was established in the assessment results of the participants in permanent employment vs. contract employment (t = 2.895, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability was observed (r = 0.88, p < 0.01). The translated Chinese version of the WRQOLS-2 has sufficient validity and reliability so that it can be used to evaluate the QWL among nurses in mainland China.

  17. Nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education: a comparison by level of education and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Tanya K

    2012-01-01

    The education of nurses has an influence on patient safety and outcomes, the nursing shortage, the faculty shortage, and nurses' attitudes and actions. This article reports on a dissertation study designed to examine the attitudes of nurses, initially registered with an associate degree or diploma in nursing, toward continuing formal education. Actively licensed registered nurses in the eastern and western United States (n=535) participated. The main finding of this study was that, although nurses held positive attitudes overall, attitudes ranked barely above neutral. The findings suggest that work needs to be done to improve nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education and research needs to be undertaken to understand what would entice nurses back to school. Implications for nursing practice and education are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

  18. Determinants of changes in nurses' behaviour after continuing education: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Garssen, B.; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nursing continuing-education programmes may differ in the extent to which they affect nursing practice. Differences may be explained by characteristics of the participants' background, the programme itself, teacher(s), relationship between participants, relationship between participants and

  19. Advocating for continuing nursing education in a pediatric hospital: the Prince Scholar and Sabbatical Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhac, A M; Goodwin, L D

    2000-01-01

    As nurses gain more experience, they often question the basis of nursing practice and want to find the most current and accepted methods of providing nursing care. Attending seminars, conferences, and continuing education programs is often difficult because of financial and staffing constraints. The authors describe the design and implementation of two funded programs--the Prince Scholars and Sabbatical Programs--that support continuing nursing education in a pediatric tertiary hospital.

  20. Perspectives on age and continuing professional development for nurses : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for nurses to participate in continuing professional development (CPD) is growing to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Ageing leads to changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning. Little is known about the

  1. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  2. Effect of continuous versus intermittent turning on nursing and non-nursing care time for acute spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaresti, J M; Tator, C H; Szalai, J P

    1991-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether automated, continuous turning beds would reduce the nursing care time for spinal cord injured (SCI) patients by freeing hospital staff from manual turning of patients every 2 hours. Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to continuous or intermittent turning and were observed during the 8 hour shift for 1 to 18 days following injury. Trained observers recorded the time taken for patient contact activities performed by the nursing staff (direct nursing care) and other hospital staff. The mean direct nursing care time per dayshift per patient was 130 +/- 22 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 9 patients managed with continuous turning and 115 +/- 41 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 8 patients managed with intermittent turning. The observed difference in care time between the two treatment groups was not significant (p greater than 0.05). Numerous factors including neurological level, time following injury, and medical complications appeared to affect the direct nursing care time. Although continuous turning did not reduce nursing care time it offered major advantages for the treatment of selected cases of acute SCI. Some major advantages of continuous turning treatment were observed. Spinal alignment was easier to maintain during continuous turning in patients with injuries of the cervical spine. Continuous turning allowed radiological procedures on the spine, chest and abdomen to be more easily performed without having to alter the patients' position in bed. Therapy and nursing staff indicated that the continuous turning bed facilitated patient positioning for such activities as chest physiotherapy. With continuous turning, one nurse was sufficient to provide care for an individual SCI patient without having to rely on the assistance of other nurses on the ward for patient turning every 2 hours.

  3. Continual summing-up, deepening the related researches and improving the interventional nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiufang; Zhang Xiumei; Ding Yue

    2011-01-01

    With the development of the medical technique in the field of clinical interventional radiology, the relevant interventional nursing team has also gradually grown and expanded. At present, there are certain differences in the development situation of interventional nursing between China and foreign countries. The experts in nursing fields in China should learn the matured experience from abroad to open up the features and superiorities of Chinese interventional nursing. Therefore, the nursing workers in China should continually to make summing-up, exert oneself to deepen the related researches and effectively improve the interventional nursing level. (authors)

  4. Feminism and women's health professions in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Tracey L; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Historically, prevailing gender ideologies were an important element in both the exclusionary strategies employed by male occupational groups and the countervailing responses by female groups. The way in which evolving gender ideologies, and feminism in particular, influence the continuing struggle for greater status and recognition by female professions, however, remains to be fully explored. In this paper, we examine the impact and the role of feminism and feminist ideologies within three female professional projects: nursing, dental hygiene and midwifery in Ontario. We argue that feminism provides an ideology of opposition that enables leaders in these professions to battle against professional inequalities by laying bare the gender inequalities that underlie them. Framing their struggles in feminist terms, female professions also seek recognition for the uniquely female contribution they make to the health care division of labour. At the same time, there exists a tension between ideals of feminism and ideals of professionalism, that has the potential to undermine female professional projects.

  5. Assisted suicide: implications for nurses and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B J; Berry, D; Fitzpatrick, J J; Drew, B; Montgomery, K

    1997-01-01

    Assisted suicide is an issue of great importance to nurses. This issue reflects our values and beliefs as a society, calls for a clear and precise response as a profession, and challenges individual nurses to think about their own moral views. The history of the debate and the compelling moral arguments on both sides attest to the complexity of the issue and also suggest that it will not soon be resolved. The current position of the profession, as expressed in the ANA Code for Nurses and a specific position statement, were reviewed. The dilemma faced by the individual nurse who perceives an obligation to adhere to the guidelines specified by his or her profession's code and yet whose conscience dictates an act in violation of this code has been discussed as an instance of conscientious objection. While this analysis has been necessarily brief, it was intended to illustrate the importance of being clear about one's personal moral views and equally clear about one's duty to fulfil the obligations stemming from the profession's public statements. It is essential that the profession continue to explore the moral issues involved in requests for assistance in dying and provide additional guidelines for practicing nurses, with sound rationale for the profession's position.

  6. Continuing professional development across the nursing career : A lifespan perspective on CPD motives and learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that pre-registration nursing education is just the start of learning that continues throughout a nursing career. Within the context of rapidly changing patient care continuing professional development (CPD) is crucial. The increased emphasis on CPD coincides with an

  7. Continued Progression, Work and Teaching as a Profession Progressão Continuada, Trabalho e Profissão Docente.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanise Monfredini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the expansion of basic school is recent. It occurs from mid-twentieth century, and it was intensified in the last three decades. The "neoliberal" educational policies implemented during the years of 1990, had reaffirmed, as their intention, teachers' ideals and efforts, and, among them, "a quality school for all", using the concept of "inclusive school". Considering the sixty years period of expansion of elementary school's attendance, we carried a socio-historical research, analyzing critically the consequences of the continued progression, a program that was implemented during the `neo-liberal´ reform of Brazilian state. We verified the development of the figure of the desisting teacher in actuation, a process mediated by the school culture and by the adoption of the continued progression system without any changes in the precarious working conditions. We begin by presenting the culture of the research site, the first gymnasium founded in the São Paulo city, using the School Plan, which synthesizes different temporalities related to the formation of the current "Second Cycle" and of the teachers that act at this level of education. The analysis, also supported by interviews with sixteen teachers, has showed the consequences and teaching profession. No Brasil a expansão da escola básica é recente. Ocorre a partir de meados do século XX, intensificando-se nas últimas três décadas. As políticas educacionais ?neoliberais?, implementadas nos anos de 1990, tiveram a pretensão de realizar ideais históricos dos professores; dentre eles, o de ?escola de qualidade para todos?, por meio do conceito de ?escola inclusiva?. Considerando o período de 60 anos de ampliação no atendimento no ensino fundamental, realizamos uma pesquisa sócio-histórica, analisando criticamente as conseqüências da progressão continuada, programa implementado no âmbito da reforma ?neoliberal? do Estado brasileiro. Constatamos a formação do

  8. Critical Care Nurses' Reasons for Poor Attendance at a Continuous Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Myra; Coetzee, Isabel; Heyns, Tanya

    2016-12-01

    Society demands competent and safe health care, which obligates professionals to deliver quality patient care using current knowledge and skills. Participation in continuous professional development programs is a way to ensure quality nursing care. Despite the importance of continuous professional development, however, critical care nurse practitioners' attendance rates at these programs is low. To explore critical care nurses' reasons for their unsatisfactory attendance at a continuous professional development program. A nominal group technique was used as a consensus method to involve the critical care nurses and provide them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences and challenges related to the current continuous professional development program for the critical care units. Participants were 14 critical care nurses from 3 critical care units in 1 private hospital. The consensus was that the central theme relating to the unsatisfactory attendance at the continuous professional development program was attitude. In order of importance, the 4 contributing priorities influencing attitude were communication, continuous professional development, time constraints, and financial implications. Attitude relating to attending a continuous professional development program can be changed if critical care nurses are aware of the program's importance and are involved in the planning and implementation of a program that focuses on the nurses' individual learning needs. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Continuing education for primary health care nurse practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela; DiCenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Opsteen, Joanne; Chambers, Tracey

    2013-04-01

    The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing offers a nine-university, consortium-based primary health care nurse practitioner education program and on-line continuing education courses for primary health care nurse practitioners. Our study sought to determine the continuing education needs of primary health care nurse practitioners across Ontario, how best to meet these needs, and the barriers they face in completing continuing education. Surveys were completed by 83 (40%) of 209 learners who had participated in continuing education offered by the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing between 2004 and 2007. While 83% (n=50) of nurse practitioners surveyed indicated that continuing education was extremely important to them, they also identified barriers to engaging in continuing education offerings including; time intensity of the courses, difficulty taking time off work, family obligations, finances and fatigue. The most common reason for withdrawal from a continuing education offering was the difficulty of balancing work and study demands. Continuing education opportunities are important to Ontario primary health care nurse practitioners, and on-line continuing education offerings have been well received, but in order to be taken up by their target audience they must be relevant, readily accessible, flexible, affordable and offered over brief, intense periods of time using technology that is easy to use and Internet sites that are easily navigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Justifying continuous sedation until death: a focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Deliens, Luc; Mortier, Freddy; Bilsen, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Continuous Sedation until Death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a common practice in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Quantitative research has suggested that CSD is not always properly applied. This qualitative study aims to explore and describe the circumstances under which nursing home clinicians consider CSD to be justified. Six focus groups were conducted including 10 physicians, 24 nurses, and 14 care assistants working in either Catholic or non-Catholic nursing homes of varying size. Refractory suffering, limited life expectancy and respecting patient autonomy are considered essential elements in deciding for CSD. However, multiple factors complicate the care of nursing home residents at the end of life, and often hinder clinicians from putting these elements into practice. Nursing home clinicians may benefit from more information and instruction about managing CSD in the complex care situations which typically occur in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  12. Handbook of Health Professions Education. Responding to New Realities in Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, Allied Health, and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Christine H.; And Others

    The evolution, present status, future directions, and external forces affecting health professions education are reviewed in this 25 chapter book. Guidelines are set forth for sound practices and policies for innovative and responsive health care. The authors assess how major economic, social, political, demographic, and technological changes are…

  13. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses: a biographical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Inge A; Poell, Rob F; Berings, Marjolein G M C; ten Cate, Olle

    2015-05-01

    A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age, leading to the expectation that motives for continuing professional development also change. Nevertheless, little is known about nurses' continuing professional development strategies in different age groups. To explore continuing professional development strategies among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, from a biographical perspective. Data were analysed using a vertical process aimed at creating individual learning biographies, and a horizontal process directed at discovering differences and similarities between age groups. Twenty-one nurses in three age groups from general and academic hospitals in the Netherlands. In all age groups, daily work was an important trigger for professional development on the ward. Performing extra or new tasks appeared to be an additional trigger for undertaking learning activities external to the ward. Learning experiences in nurses' private lives also contributed to their continuing professional development. Besides these similarities, the data revealed differences in career stages and private lives, which appeared to be related to differences in continuing professional development strategy; 'gaining experience and building a career' held particularly true among younger nurses, 'work-life balance' and 'keeping work interesting and varied' to middle-aged nurses, and 'consistency at work' to older nurses. Professional development strategies can aim at performing daily patient care, extra tasks and other roles. Age differences in these strategies appear to relate to tenure, perspectives on the future, and situations at home. These insights could help hospitals to orientate continuing

  14. In Search of Educators of Color: If We Make School a More Positive Experience for Students of Color, They'll Be More Likely to Continue with Their Education, and Perhaps Select Teaching as a Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, June A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most common misunderstandings about the composition of the teaching profession, and hence, educational administration, is that it is merely a professional choice: someone chooses to be a teacher rather than a business person, a lawyer, a food service worker, a nurse, a truck driver. In reality, many decisions are made for young people…

  15. Advocating for Continuing Nursing Education in a Pediatric Hospital: The Prince Scholar and Sabbatical Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhac, Arlene M.; Goodwin, Laura D.

    2000-01-01

    A 5-year evaluation revealed positive outcomes of two nursing continuing education programs: a sabbatical program providing funding for completion of education/research projects and a nursing scholar program funding professional development. Knowledge and skills increased and the hospital practice environment was improved. (SK)

  16. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, J.G.J.M.; Bleijerveld, H.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this

  17. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses : A biographical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Inge A.; Poell, Rob F.; Berings, Marjolein G. M. C.; ten Cate, Olle

    Background: A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age,

  18. Factors influencing continuing professional development : A Delphi study among nursing experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, G.B.; Poell, R.F.; van Wijk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to present an inventory of expert opinions on the factors that influence the participation of registered nurses in continuing professional development (CPD) activities. Design/methodology/approach A Delphi study was conducted among 38 Dutch experts (nursing

  19. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses : A biographical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Berings, M.G.M.C.; Ten Cate, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age,

  20. A Multiple Case Study Approach to Explore Generational Theory to Enhance Online Continuing Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foecke, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nurses are expected to participate in ongoing professional development, whether that is higher education to obtain another degree or continuing nursing education (CNE) to enhance knowledge or skills, maintain licensure, and/or maintain certification. Because there are generational differences that can affect adult education, learning preferences…

  1. Testing and extending the triple match principle in the nursing profession: a generational perspective on job demands, job resources and strain at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Trépanier, Sarah-Geneviève; Fernet, Claude; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle

    2014-02-01

    The Triple Match Principle offers insight into the interactive interplay between job demands and job resources in the prediction of work-related strain. The aim of this article was to examine the interplay among job demands, job resources and strain in the nursing profession (the Triple Match Principle) and to gain insight into potential generational differences by investigating generation as a moderator of that interplay. No research has been done to evaluate generational differences in the Triple Match Principle. In a context of nursing shortages, it seems important to examine the relevance of the Triple Match Principle with respect to different generations of nurses. Cross-sectional study. A total of 1254 public healthcare sector nurses in Quebec, Canada, completed a questionnaire in the autumn of 2010. The questionnaire was used to assess cognitive, emotional and physical job demands and resources; psychological distress; psychosomatic complaints; and turnover intention. The results supported the Triple Match Principle and showed that job resources were more likely to buffer the effect of job demands on strain as the degree of match in qualitative dimension among demands, resources and strain increased (33·3% of triple-match interactions, 22·22% of double-match interactions and 16·67% non-match interactions were significant). Moreover, generation played a key role in this interplay, as it increased the number of significant qualitative interactions among job demands, job resources and strain. The results underscore the necessity of providing adequate job resources tailored to the specific job demands nurses face, to counteract the negative effects of those demands. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Continuing pain education in nursing: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Garssen, B.; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve studies on the effects of pain programmes for nurses were reviewed. Most of the programmes focused on aspects of pain, pain medication or pain assessment. Only two programmes (Ferrell et al., 1993, J. Pain Symptom Management, Vol. 8, No. 8, pp. 549-556; Sofaer, 1983, Nurs. Times, Vol. 79, No.

  3. Light at the end of the tunnel: a vision for an empowered nursing profession across the continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingel-Stewart, Sylvia; LaCoste, Janice

    2004-01-01

    Lacking political stewardship, healthcare in America is shaped primarily by rapidly changing market forces seeking to stem the tide of rising healthcare costs. However, nursing's voice in this process is fragmented and unfocused. Staff nurses' focus and commitment are to quality care rendered at the bedside and in interactions with the patient. With this narrow focus, staff nurses are paralyzed by the constant change and unable to move to a broader, more integrative view of healthcare-one that encompasses quality care, policymaking, and healthcare finance. Using the theory of transformative learning, nurse administrators and managers can influence nurses' frames of reference and expand their view to be more inclusive. Nurses who are successful in this transformation process will emerge with a new view of self-visible and empowered. These newly transformed nurses see themselves more as healthcare engineers than as technicians coordinating care across the continuum, and creating fluid working relationships to prevent the dis-continuum of care of patients falling through the cracks of the current healthcare system.

  4. Do nurses wish to continue working for the UK National Health Service? A comparative study of three generations of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Andrew; Robson, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    To identify the combination of variables that explain nurses' continuation intention in the UK National Health Service. This alternative arena has permitted the replication of a private sector Australian study. This study provides understanding about the issues that affect nurse retention in a sector where employee attrition is a key challenge, further exacerbated by an ageing workforce. A quantitative study based on a self-completion survey questionnaire completed in 2010. Nurses employed in two UK National Health Service Foundation Trusts were surveyed and assessed using seven work-related constructs and various demographics including age generation. Through correlation, multiple regression and stepwise regression analysis, the potential combined effect of various explanatory variables on continuation intention was assessed, across the entire nursing cohort and in three age-generation groups. Three variables act in combination to explain continuation intention: work-family conflict, work attachment and importance of work to the individual. This combination of significant explanatory variables was consistent across the three generations of nursing employee. Work attachment was identified as the strongest marginal predictor of continuation intention. Work orientation has a greater impact on continuation intention compared with employer-directed interventions such as leader-member exchange, teamwork and autonomy. UK nurses are homogeneous across the three age-generations regarding explanation of continuation intention, with the significant explanatory measures being recognizably narrower in their focus and more greatly concentrated on the individual. This suggests that differentiated approaches to retention should perhaps not be pursued in this sectoral context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Factors influencing nurse participation in continuing professional development activities : Survey results from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, G.A.; Maassen, S.; Poell, R.F.; Weststrate, J.; Geurdes, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Professionals are individually responsible for planning and carrying out continuing professional development (CPD) activities, ensuring their relevance to current practice and career development. The key factors that encourage nurses to undertake CPD activities are not yet clear. Several

  6. Continuous Deep Sedation Until Death in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Case Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anquinet, L.; Rietjens, J.A.C.; Vandervoort, A.; van der Steen, J.T.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.; Block, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death and the prior decision-making process of nursing home residents dying with dementia and to evaluate this practice according to features reflecting sedation guideline recommendations. Design Epidemiological

  7. Role of Community and Technical Colleges in Producing Nursing Graduates: Rethinking the Pipeline for Guided Pathways. Research Report 17-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Though it is still possible to enter the nursing profession with a Licensed Practical Nursing Certificate (LPN) or an Associate's Degree in Nursing (ADN), it is becoming increasingly necessary to get a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) in order to be assured of continued employment. The Associate in Applied Science-T Nursing Degree prepares…

  8. Perspective for applying traditional and inovative teaching and learning methods to nurses continuing education

    OpenAIRE

    Bendinskaitė, Irmina

    2015-01-01

    Bendinskaitė I. Perspective for applying traditional and innovative teaching and learning methods to nurse’s continuing education, magister thesis / supervisor Assoc. Prof. O. Riklikienė; Departament of Nursing and Care, Faculty of Nursing, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. – Kaunas, 2015, – p. 92 The purpose of this study was to investigate traditional and innovative teaching and learning methods perspective to nurse’s continuing education. Material and methods. In a period fro...

  9. Interprofessionality in the model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany / Interprofessionalität in den Modellstudiengängen der Pflege- und Gesundheitsberufe in Nordrhein-Westfalen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallwaß Anke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional cooperation is attributed a special significance in overcoming new challenges in the health system. For the educational system, this means the development of innovative teaching and learning formats that encourages interaction between students from different professions within healthcare. In Germany in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW, eleven model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions have been developed and evaluated. Evaluation reports do not tell whether social interaction between students of different professions is promoted. The following study investigates to what extent interprofessionality is incorporated into the model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions in NRW and to what extent the courses of study include social interaction between students of different professions. In addition, an analysis is made as to what extent structural and organisational conditions and the course management influence the (further development of the courses with a view to interprofessionality. Structured expert interviews have been carried out with those responsible for the courses of study, for a total of seven model courses. These have then been evaluated using qualitative content analysis. The promotion of interprofessional expertise is incorporated into all model study courses that were considered and is generally governed by international standards. Six of the seven courses of study offer social interaction between students of different professions. Valuable hints for interprofessional education at colleges for health could be achieved.

  10. Continuing the conversation in nursing on race and racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joanne M; Fields, Becky

    2013-01-01

    Nursing values include diversity and a commitment to the elimination of health disparities. However, nursing comprises predominantly white, female nurses. The authors explore structural and interpersonal sources of disparities experienced by black persons, including white privilege. Here, the authors advocate for a continuation of the racism conversation, specifically among white nurses. Racial disadvantages stem from structural inequalities from daily slights, and usually unintended subtle racism toward black people on the part of white people, including white nurses. By raising consciousness on how we propagate subtle racism, nursing can progress faster in eliminating health disparities. Topics include postracialism, colorblindness, institutional racism, white privilege, health disparities, clinical encounters, subtle racism, and racial microaggressions. Suggestions for open dialogue, historical awareness, education, research, and practice are highlighted. Difficulties involved in confronting racism and white privilege are explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-06-01

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Medicalising disability? Regulation and practice around fitness assessment of disabled students and professionals in nursing, social work and teaching professions in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Chih Hoong

    2009-01-01

    The reliance on medical information and on occupational health (OH) professionals in ascertaining fitness of applicants and registrants within the educational and employment contexts may lead to the medicalisation of disability. The Disability Rights Commission's Formal Investigation into the regulation of three public sector professions of nursing, social work and teaching in Britain sheds light on the nature of regulatory fitness requirements and how these are implemented in practice. The multi-pronged investigation included a review of relevant statutory and regulatory frameworks, formal written and oral evidence submitted by key stakeholder organisations and research into formal and informal fitness assessments within the education and employment contexts. There are varied and vague fitness requirements in all three professions. OH professionals figure prominently in formal and informal decision-making around fitness within education and employment settings, regardless of regulatory prescriptions. There is a multitude of approaches. There are, however, particular issues in the deployment of OH expertise within the employment setting. The determination of fitness should not rely solely on medical information. Blanket fitness requirements that are not contextualized against specific competencies for particular jobs are inappropriate. More collaborative and integrated working is necessary, particularly in exploring how reasonable adjustments may be provided to enable safe and effective practice. The positive spirit of the disability equality duty should be embraced.

  13. Multisite Assessment of Nursing Continuing Education Learning Needs Using an Electronic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Susan; Jackson, Stephanie; Cook, Lesley; Reed, Joanne Williams; Blakeney, Keshia; Zimbro, Kathie; Parker, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    A continued education needs assessment and associated education plan are required for organizations on the journey for American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet® designation. Leveraging technology to support the assessment and analysis of continuing education needs was a new venture for a 12-hospital regional health system. The purpose of this performance improvement project was to design and conduct an enhanced process to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of gathering data on nurses' preferences and increase nurse satisfaction with the learner assessment portion of the process. Educators trialed the use of a standardized approach via an electronic survey tool to replace the highly variable processes previously used. Educators were able to view graphical summary of responses by category and setting, which substantially decreased analysis and action planning time for education implementation plans at the system, site, or setting level. Based on these findings, specific continuing education action plans were drafted for each category and classification of nurses. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Organizational strategy for the development of nurses' competences: possibilities of Continuing Education in Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Lemos Mello

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To reflect on Continuing Education in Health as an organizational strategy for the development of nurses' competences. Methods: A theoretical-reflective study was performed, combining concepts from Continuing Education in Health, organizational strategy and professional competence, understood as key elements for the work of nurses in health services. Results: To understand how to live together, individuals need to have knowledge about others, their history and traditions. When "learning how to do", they acquire broader competence to deal with unexpected situations and to facilitate team work. With regard to "learning how to be", they are encouraged to acquire autonomy and discernment on behalf of the group. If the focus is on development rather than control, there is shared interest and an integrated and strategic model for nurses' competences to be improved. Conclusion: The development of competences in nurses is the basis for the Learning Paths as a possible operationalization of Continuing Education in Health.

  15. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Nursing care for patients carrying indwelling catheter in target vessel for continuous chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. Methods: (1)To enhance the propaganda,education and guidance to patients. (2) To standardize the nursing care operations. (3) To establish the reasonable care rules and procedures. (4) The nurses should take the daily nursing care,observations and recording work seriously. Results: Through the analysis of a variety of problems occurred in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy the nursing care experience was summed up. Conclusion: Proper and effective care can reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. (authors)

  17. Doctoring up the Nursing Profession: Several Factors Are Contributing to the National Nursing Shortage, but Initiatives, Perceptions and College Programs Can Nurture Industry's Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2004-01-01

    For all the baby boomers who've embraced and adopted healthier lifestyles, including proper diet and exercise, there may be an even more compelling reason. If you get sick or become hospitalized, you may not have the critically needed services of a well-trained nurse. It's been widely reported that there is a nursing shortage in the United States,…

  18. PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS - A CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR NURSES OF THE AMERICAN NURSES FOUNDATION/ASSOCIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Nurses Association/Foundation will develop online, in print and pre conference continuing education (CE) children's environmental health protection programs to meet the objective of the program. The first CE program is on school environments, the second on home and ...

  19. Nursing doctoral faculty perceptions of factors that affect their continued scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    This focus group study was undertaken as part of a larger investigation of how the demand for increased production of nurses with doctorates affects doctoral faculty's scholarly productivity. This study provided a basis for development of the national survey questionnaire. Two focus groups that included 29 faculty teaching in doctor of philosophy and/or doctor of nursing practice programs took place at one of two national conferences. The focus group interviews were transcribed and content analyzed for the identification of themes; all members of the research team reached consensus. The three major themes were the demands of teaching, the importance of institutional structure and climate, and the sustainability of one's self, the institution, and the discipline. Participants identified strategies for enhancing scholarly productivity. Findings are limited by the small sample size and the voluntary participation of conference attendees. The strength of emotion that participants revealed underscores the need for nursing leaders to address the increasing academic expectations for faculty. If the profession does not address the needs of its current and future faculty, goals explicated by the Institute of Medicine in The Future of Nursing cannot be achieved, and the health of the nation will suffer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benders, Jos; Bleijerveld, Hans; Schouteten, Roel

    2017-10-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this in a nursing department, using the job demands-resources model. We found that two job demands improved, and none of the job resources. Job engagement did not change significantly, while the burnout risk decreased slightly. Overall, the nurses felt the impact to be small yet the changes were in a positive direction. CI can thus be used to improve nurses' working lives and, by restructuring the work processes, the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The effectiveness of interventions to enhance self-management support competencies in the nursing profession: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, Veerle; Vandecasteele, Tina; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Beeckman, Dimitri; Van Hecke, Ann

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness and effective components of training interventions to enhance nurses' competencies in self-management support in chronic care. The growing burden of chronic diseases puts an increasing focus on nurses' self-management support of people living with a chronic illness. The most effective method to train nurses' competencies in self-management support remains unclear. Systematic literature review. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Web of Science, ERIC and PsycARTICLES databases were searched up to August 2015. Eligible studies reported on training interventions to enhance chronic care self-management support competencies in nurses. Outcomes were defined as trainees' reactions to the training (level 1), changes in trainees' competencies (level 2) or changes in trainees' performance in practice (level 3) concerning self-management support. Risk of bias was assessed. Level 1 outcomes were synthesized narratively. Standardized mean differences were calculated per study for level 2 and 3 outcomes. In total, 25 studies were included. Twelve of these studies included level 1 outcomes, eight studies included level 2 outcomes and 10 studies included level 3 outcomes. Effect sizes in favour of training ranged from -0·36 - 1·56 (level 2) and from 0·06 - 5·56 (level 3). Theory-driven training interventions with time to practice, (video) feedback and follow-up generated the most training effects. Caution is needed due to the inconsistent study quality. To date, there is a knowledge gap concerning the most effective method to train nurses' competencies in self-management support. More well-designed, longitudinal studies are needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nurse Continuity and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: A Comparative Analysis Using an Electronic Health Record "Big Data" Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Khokhar, Ashfaq; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M

    2015-01-01

    Little research demonstrating the association between nurse continuity and patient outcomes exists despite an intuitive belief that continuity makes a difference in care outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the association of nurse continuity with the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU). A secondary use of data from the Hands on Automated Nursing Data System (HANDS) was performed for this comparative study. The HANDS is a nursing plan of care data set containing 42,403 episodes documented by 787 nurses, on nine units, in four hospitals and includes nurse staffing and patient characteristics. The HANDS data set resides in a "big data" relational database consisting of 89 tables and 747 columns of data. Via data mining, we created an analytic data set of 840 care episodes, 210 with and 630 without HAPUs, matched by nursing unit, patient age, and patient characteristics. Logistic regression analysis determined the association of nurse continuity and additional nurse-staffing variables on HAPU occurrence. Poor nurse continuity (unit mean continuity index = .21-.42 [1.0 = optimal continuity]) was noted on all nine study units. Nutrition, mobility, perfusion, hydration, and skin problems on admission, as well as patient age, were associated with HAPUs (p data, showing that it offers rich potential for future study of nurse continuity and its effect on patient outcomes.

  3. Distance Learning and the Health Professions: A Synthesis Report of the Literature Investigating Continuing Professional Health Education at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Noseworthy, Tanya

    This synthesis report provides an extensive overview of literature evaluating use and effectiveness of distance learning technologies in delivering continuing education (CE) for health professionals. Chapter 2 discusses advantages and disadvantages of correspondence materials, explores suggestions for improving print-based learning materials, and…

  4. Continuous Improvement in Nursing Education through Total Quality Management (TQM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Wai Mun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM has generally been validated as a crucial revolution in the management field. Many academicians believe that the concept of TQM is applicable to academics and provides guiding principles towards improving education. Therefore, an increasing number of educational institutions such as schools, colleges and universities have started to embrace TQM philosophies to their curricula.Within the context of TQM, this paper would explore the concept of continuous improvement by using the Deming philosophy. Subsequently, this paper would elaborate on the application of TQM to bring about continuous improvement in the current education system.

  5. Continuing connections: the experiences of retired and senior working nurse mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Glenda; Mohan, Shantala; Jackson, Debra; Vickers, Margaret H; Wilkes, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the benefits and challenges of a mentoring programme through which retired and senior nurses continued to support and nurture nurses and midwives currently working in the health system. Nursing has an ageing workforce and faces significant loss of expertise because of retirements. Previously, mentoring programmes have been instituted in a range of nursing contexts and they have been a retention strategy for older nurses and midwives. Mentors and their mentees worked together towards mutually agreed on professional and personal goals. They were asked to meet or speak together a minimum of twice per month for at least six months. As part of a collective case study, 15 mentoring dyads were established. Participants and mentors took part in qualitative, semi-structured interviews about their perceptions and experiences of the mentoring programme. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Mentors reported the mentoring experience to be rewarding experience that enabled them to re-connect with nursing-related activities and brought new challenges in retirement. They perceived the mentees were visibly helped by their support and influence. The mentors studied reinforced a positive self-concept as nurses and midwives in their mentees and assisted their development. Retired nurses and midwives in particular may have several characteristics that make them effective mentors. Potential benefits are demonstrated for nurses and midwives vulnerable to workplace adversity, especially those new to Australia who may have limited professional and social networks. For health organisations, mentoring programmes may be an innovative method of retention that engages both mid-career nurses and midwives and those recently retired. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Examination of ethical practice in nursing continuing education using the Husted model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, J

    1998-01-01

    Beliefs about human nature, adult education, adult learners, and moral commitment are at the heart of the educator-learner agreement. In continuing nursing education, it is the point where professional values, morals, and ethical principles meet. Using Husteds' bioethical decision-making model, the values, beliefs, and actions within the educator-learning agreement are identified and organized by the bioethical standards. By relating the bioethical standards to practice, continuing nurse educators can find their own basis for practice and work toward attaining a consistent professional ethical orientation.

  7. Evaluation of an online continuing education program from the perspective of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Selcuk; Kucuk, Sevda; Aydemir, Melike

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the online continuing education program from the perspectives of new graduate nurses. An evaluation framework includes five factors (program and course structure, course materials, technology, support services and assessment). In this study, descriptive research methods were used. Participants of the study included 2.365 registered nurses enrolled in the first online nursing bachelor completion degree program in the country. Data were collected by survey. The findings indicated that students were mostly satisfied with this program. The results of this study suggest that well designed asynchronous online education methods can be effective and appropriate for registered nurses. However, the provision of effective support and technological infrastructure is as vital as the quality of teaching for online learners. © 2013.

  8. The effects of nursing turnover on continuity of care in isolated First Nation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minore, Bruce; Boone, Margaret; Katt, Mae; Kinch, Peggy; Birch, Stephen; Mushquash, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    Many of Canada's northern First Nation communities experience difficulty recruiting and retaining appropriate nursing staff and must rely on relief nurses for short-term coverage. The latter often are not adequately prepared for the demanding nature of the practice. This study examined the consequences of nursing turnover on the continuity of care provided to residents of three Ojibway communities in northern Ontario. The findings are based on a review of 135 charts of oncology, diabetes, and mental health clients, and on interviews with 30 professional and paraprofessional health-care providers who served the communities. Nursing turnover is shown to detrimentally affect communications, medications management, and the range of services offered; it also results in compromised follow-up, client disengagement, illness exacerbation, and an added burden of care for family and community members.

  9. The design, marketing, and implementation of online continuing education about computers and nursing informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Nancy M; Saarmann, Lembi; Seidman, Robert; Flagg, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Asynchronous online tutorials using PowerPoint slides with accompanying audio to teach practicing nurses about computers and nursing informatics were designed for this project, which awarded free continuing education units to completers. Participants had control over the advancement of slides, with the ability to repeat when desired. Graphics were kept to a minimum; thus, the program ran smoothly on computers using dial-up modems. The tutorials were marketed in live meetings and through e-mail messages on nursing listservs. Findings include that the enrollment process must be automated and instantaneous, the program must work from every type of computer and Internet connection, marketing should be live and electronic, and workshops should be offered to familiarize nurses with the online learning system.

  10. The relationships among nurses' job characteristics and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Fan Chiang, Chih-Yun

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between job characteristics (job demands, job control and social support) and nurses' attitudes toward web-based continuing learning. A total of 221 in-service nurses from hospitals in Taiwan were surveyed. The Attitudes toward Web-based Continuing Learning Survey (AWCL) was employed as the outcome variables, and the Chinese version Job Characteristic Questionnaire (C-JCQ) was administered to assess the predictors for explaining the nurses' attitudes toward web-based continuing learning. To examine the relationships among these variables, hierarchical regression was conducted. The results of the regression analysis revealed that job control and social support positively associated with nurses' attitudes toward web-based continuing learning. However, the relationship of job demands to such learning was not significant. Moreover, a significant demands×job control interaction was found, but the job demands×social support interaction had no significant relationships with attitudes toward web-based continuing learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptions of registered nurses in four state health insititutions on continuing formal education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, L; Potgieter, E

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated registered nurses in four selected state health institutions' perceptions with regard to continuing formal education. The relevance of continuing formal education is being emphasised globally by the increasing quest for quality assurance and quality management systems within an ethos of continuous improvement. According to Tlholoe (2006:5), it is important to be committed to continual learning, as people's knowledge become less relevant because skills gained early in a career are insufficient to avoid costly mistakes made through ignorance. Continuing formal education in nursing is a key element to the maintenance of quality in health care delivery. The study described: registered nurses' views on continuing formal education. Registered nurses' perceived barriers to continuing formal education. A quantitative descriptive survey design was chosen using a questionnaire for data collection. The sample consisted of 40 registered nurses working at four state health institutions in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Convenience sampling was selected to include registered nurses who were on duty on the days during which the researcher visited the health institutions to distribute the questionnaires. The questionnaire contained mainly closed-ended and a few open-ended questions. Content validity of the instrument was ensured by doing a thorough literature review before construction of items and a pretest. Reliability was established by the pretest and providing the same information to all respondents before completion of the questionnaires. The ethical considerations of informed consent, anonymity and confidentiality were adhered to and consent to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Descriptive statistics, based on calculations using the Microsoft (MS) Excel (for Windows 2000) programme, were used to summarise and describe the research results. The research results indicated that most registered nurses perceive continuing

  12. Constructing nurses' professional identity through social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willetts, Georgina; Clarke, David

    2014-04-01

    The profession of nursing continues to struggle with defining and clarifying its professional identity. The definitive recognition of nursing as a profession was the moving of training from the hospital apprentice model to the tertiary sector. However, this is only part of the story of professional identity in nursing. Once training finishes and enculturation into the workplace commences, professional identity becomes a complicated social activity. This paper proposes social identity theory as a valuable research framework to assist with clarifying and describing the professional identity of nurses. The paper outlines the key elements of a profession and then goes on to describe the main concepts of social identity theory. Lastly, a connection is made between the usefulness of using social identity theory in researching professional identity in nursing, recognizing the contextual nature of the social activity of the profession within its workplace environment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. The practice of continuous sedation until death in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate how continuous sedation until death (CSD), the reduction or removal of consciousness of an incurably ill individual until death to relieve refractory suffering, is practiced in nursing homes. Nationwide cross-sectional retrospective survey. Nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. Palliative care nurses (N = 660) in all nursing homes in Flanders. Nurse reports of their most recent patient treated with CSD. The response rate was 65.5%, and 249 nurses reported a case of CSD (57.6%). Most individuals had cancer (33.6%) or dementia (32.8%); lacked competence (65.7%); and had severe pain (71.2%), fatigue (62.3%), loss of dignity (59%), anxiety (58.4%), and longing for death (58.4%). Intractable pain (70.7%) and physical exhaustion (63.9%) were the most decisive symptoms for initiating CSD. Life expectancy was generally limited to 1 week (64.9%), and 88.4% had insufficient nutritional oral intake before the start of CSD. CSD was rarely combined with artificial nutrition or hydration. Benzodiazepines were most frequently used (84.8%). Overall, according to the reporting nurses, CSD provided adequate symptom relief and good quality of dying. In nursing homes, CSD is typically used in residents with cancer or dementia and severe, intractable physical symptoms. Lack of competence prevents most residents from being involved in the decision-making process, which illustrates the importance of advance care planning in nursing homes in Flanders. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational......Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  15. Nurses' knowledge in ethics and their perceptions regarding continuing ethics education: a cross-sectional survey among nurses at three referral hospitals in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osingada, Charles Peter; Nalwadda, Gorrette; Ngabirano, Tom; Wakida, John; Sewankambo, Nelson; Nakanjako, Damalie

    2015-07-29

    High disease burden and scarcity of healthcare resources present complex ethical dilemmas for nurses working in developing countries. We assessed nurses' knowledge in ethics and their perceptions about Continuous Nurses' Ethics Education (CNEE) for in-service nurses. Using an anonymous, pre-tested self-administered questionnaire, we assessed nurses' knowledge in basic ethics concepts at three regional hospitals in Uganda. Adequate knowledge was measured by a score ≥50% in the knowledge assessment test. Nurses' perceptions on CNEE were assessed using a six-point Likert scale. Of 114 nurses, 91% were female; with mean age 44.7 (SD 10) years. Half were diploma, 47 (41%) certificates, 6 (5%) bachelors' degrees and one masters' level training. Overall, 18 (16%) scored ≥50% in the ethics knowledge test. Nurses with diploma or higher level of nursing training were less likely to fail the ethics knowledge than certificate-level nurses (OR 0.14, 95% CI: 0.02-0.7). Only 45% had ever attended at least one CNEE session and up to 93% agreed that CNEE is required to improve nurses' ethics knowledge and practice. Nurses exhibited low knowledge in ethics and positive attitudes towards CNEE. We recommend structured CNEE programs to address basic concepts in nursing ethics and their application in clinical practice.

  16. Justifying continuous sedation until death: A focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Deliens, L.; Mortier, F.; Bilsen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous Sedation until Death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a common practice in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Quantitative research has suggested that CSD is not always properly applied. This qualitative study

  17. Effects of a continuing education program on nurses' pain assessment practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Luiken, J.B.; Schepper, A.M.E. de; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1997-01-01

    Surgical nurses from five Dutch general hospitals participated in a continuing education program on pain assessment and management. A pretest-posttest controlled intervention study revealed that the program led to an increase in the quality of activities relevant to taking pain histories. Although

  18. Web-based learning for continuing nursing education of emergency unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a Web-based continuing education course focusing on patient counseling in an emergency department. Course materials were developed based on data collected from the department's patients and their family members and on earlier findings on counseling. Web-based education is an appropriate method for continuing education in a specific hospital department. This puts special demands for nurse managers in arranging, designing, and implementing the education together with educators.

  19. The facilitators and barriers to nurses' participation in continuing education programs: a mixed method explanatory sequential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2014-11-30

    Since several factors affect nurses' participation in Continuing Education, and that nurses' Continuing Education affects patients' and community health status, it is essential to know facilitators and barriers of participation in Continuing Education programs and plan accordingly. This mixed approach study aimed to investigate the facilitators and barriers of nurses' participation, to explore nurses' perception of the most common facilitators and barriers. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design with follow up explanations variant were used, and it involved collecting quantitative data (361 nurses) first and then explaining the quantitative results with in-depth interviews during a qualitative study. The results showed that the mean score of facilitators to nurses' participation in Continuing Education was significantly higher than the mean score of barriers (61.99 ± 10.85 versus 51.17 ± 12.83; pEducation was related to "Update my knowledge". By reviewing the handwritings in qualitative phase, two main levels of updating information and professional skills were extracted as the most common facilitators and lack of support as the most common barrier to nurses' participation in continuing education program. According to important role Continuing Education on professional skills, nurse managers should facilitate the nurse' participation in the Continues Education.

  20. Access to, interest in and attitude toward e-learning for continuous education among Malaysian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Hmwe, Nant Thin Thin; Sohod, Salina

    2016-01-01

    Continuous nursing education (CNE) courses delivered through e-learning is believed to be an effective mode of learning for nurses. Implementation of e-learning modules requires pre-assessment of infrastructure and learners' characteristics. Understanding the learners' needs and their perspectives would facilitate effective e-learning delivery by addressing the underlying issues and providing necessary support to learners. The aim of this study was to examine access to computer and Internet facilities, interest in and preferences regarding e-learning, and attitudes toward e-learning among nurses in Peninsular Malaysia. The study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive survey. Government hospitals and community clinics in four main regions of Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 300 registered nurses. Data were collected using questionnaires, which consisted of demographic and background items and questions on access to computer and Internet facilities, interest and preferences in e-learning, and attitudes toward e-learning. Descriptive analysis and a chi-squared test were used to identify associations between variables. Most Malaysian nurses had access to a personal or home computer (85.3%, n=256) and computer access at work (85.3%, n=256). The majority had Internet access at home (84%, n=252) and at work (71.8%, n=215); however, average hours of weekly computer use were low. Most nurses (83%, n=249) did not have an e-learning experience but were interested in e-learning activities. Most nurses displayed positive attitudes toward e-learning. Average weekly computer use and interest in e-learning were positively associated with attitudes toward e-learning. Study findings suggest that organizational support is needed to promote accessibility of information and communications technology (ICT) facilities for Malaysian nurses to motivate their involvement in e-learning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. African Journal of Health Professions Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2018). Log in or ... The AJHPE is a journal for health professions educators. ... Transition-to-practice guidelines: Enhancing the quality of nursing education · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  2. Challenging Unjust Authority and Creating a Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doona, Mary Ellen

    2017-05-01

    The emergence of the trained nurse as a new profession for women coincided with the transformation of hospitals from refuges for the sick and poor into treatment facilities. The hospital was an apt setting for learning nursing's fundamentals, but the domestic demands of the setting soon took precedence over nursing education. Nursing superintendents struggled to honor the right of pupil nurses to an education over the might of the hospital's demands. The 20th anniversary of the Trained Nurse Movement in 1893 proved the decisive moment when nursing superintendents created professional associations and gathered the nursing diaspora into a coherent force. Recourse to the law followed with nurses seeking legal validation of their authority over nursing education. Now, as then, a nurse's authority is a right that has to be protected when the might of individuals and institutions, both subtle and blatant, interferes with nurses caring for the well-being of society.

  3. Translating continuing professional development education to nursing practice in Rwanda: Enhancing maternal and newborn health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Kasine

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 99% of the three million neonatal deaths that occur annually are in developing countries. In Rwanda, neonatal asphyxia is the leading cause of neonatal mortality accounting for 38% of all neonatal deaths. The Helping Babies Breathe (HBB© course was initiated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP in 2010 to reduce neonatal mortality in resource limited areas. Despite the provision of HBB© courses to practicing nurses in Rwanda, little is known about nurses’ experiences of applying the knowledge and skills acquired from those courses to practice. This study was conducted in 2014 in five district hospitals (Nyamata, Rwamagana, Gahini, Kiziguro, and Kibungo located in the Eastern Province of Rwanda. Purpose: Explore nurses’ experiences of translating continuing professional development (CPD education utilizing the HBB© course to nursing practice in Rwanda. Methods: Qualitative descriptive design. A purposive sample of 10 nurses participated in individual interviews. NVIVO computer software was used to manage qualitative data. Content analysis was used for generating categories from the data. Findings: Three categories emerged from the analysis: 1 application of competencies acquired from education sessions to practice, 2 benefits of CPD, and 3 facilitators and barriers to the application of competencies into practice. Qualitative interviews revealed that Nurses’ perceived confidence in performing newborn resuscitation improved after taking part in HBB© courses. Nonetheless, nurses voiced the existence of conditions in their work environment that hindered their ability to apply the acquired knowledge and skills including insufficient materials, shortages of nurses, and potential inadequate human resource allocation. Recommendations and conclusion: Regular offerings of newborn resuscitation CPD courses to health professionals in developing countries could increase their knowledge and skills, which could

  4. What influences malaysian nurses to participate in continuing professional education activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mei Chan; Sellick, Kenneth; Francis, Karen; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2011-03-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study, which involved government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia sought to identify the continuing professional education (CPE) needs and their readiness for E-learning. This paper focuses on the first phase of that study that aimed to determine the factors that influence nurses' participation in CPE. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1,000 nurses randomly from 12 hospitals and 24 health clinics from four states in Peninsular Malaysia who agreed to be involved. The respondent rate was 792 (79.2%), of which 562 (80%) had participated in CPE in the last 12 months. Findings suggested that updating knowledge and providing quality care are the most important factors that motivate participation in CPE, with respective means of 4.34 and 4.39. All the mean scores for educational opportunity were less than 3.0. Chi-square tests were used to test the association of demographic data and CPE participation. All demographical data were significantly associated with CPE participation, except marital status. Implementation of mandatory CPE is considered an important measure to increase nurse's participation in CPE. However, effective planning that takes into consideration the learning needs of nurses is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The changing training needs of clinical nurse managers: exploring issues for continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D; Kelly, D; Goldstone, L; Maidwell, A

    2001-04-01

    To identify areas where clinical nurse managers perceived that they would benefit from further training and to make recommendations for planning future programmes to meet their needs. The effectiveness of the clinical nurse manager has traditionally been associated with maintaining standards of care. Continuing professional development (CPD) is essential to ensure this important group feel adequately prepared to perform their role and has been recognized as an important factor in maintaining job satisfaction and reducing wasteful staff turnover. A review of the literature indicated that since the 1980s the CPD needs of clinical nurse managers have tended to be overlooked despite increasing complexity of the tasks expected of them. Thus it appeared that a fresh study to address these needs would be justified and should take into account sources of work-related stress and variables relating to job satisfaction. The study involved clinical nurse managers employed in all four acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts where training needs were served by a major inner city educational consortium. Data collection proceeded in two stages. Initially interviews were undertaken with a random sample of 15 clinical nurse managers to provide in-depth, qualitative data. This information was used to develop a survey questionnaire distributed to the remaining 182 clinical nurse managers in each of the trusts. Data from the interviews indicated that clinical nurse managers appeared to feel clinically competent but generally experienced lack of confidence when dealing with a range of issues, in particular; human resources, managing budgets, deputizing for senior colleagues across the trust ('acting up') and using information technology in everyday practice. Response rate to the survey was good (65%). The results corroborated the interview findings, indicating a need for updating in the same wide range of topics. There were few differences in training needs across all four

  6. Supporting smoking cessation in older patients: a continuing challenge for community nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking continues to pose negative health consequences for smokers and their families, and is the single greatest cause of health inequalities in the UK. Older people are particularly vulnerable to the negative health impacts of smoking and therefore, supporting older smokers to quit remains an important public health goal. Community nurses are required to help patients to lead healthier lifestyles and have ideal opportunities to encourage smoking cessation in older people who are aff...

  7. Perceptions of registered nurses in four state health insititutions on continuing formal education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Richards

    2010-09-01

    • education registered nurses’ perceived barriers to continuing formal education A quantitative descriptive survey design was chosen using a questionnaire for data collection. The sample consisted of 40 registered nurses working at four state health institutions in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Convenience sampling was selected to include registered nurses who were on duty on the days during which there searcher visited the health institutions to distribute the questionnaires. The questionnaire contained mainly closed-ended and a few open-ended questions. Content validity of the instrument was ensured by doing a thorough literature review before construction of items and a pretest. Reliability was established by the pretest and providing the same information to all respondents before completion of the questionnaires.The ethical considerations of informed consent, anonymity and confidentiality were adhered to and consent to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Descriptive statistics, based on calculations using the Microsoft (MSExcel (for Windows 2000 programme, were used to summarise and describe the research results. The research results indicated that most registered nurses perceive continuing formal education as beneficial to their personal and professional growth and that it could lead towards improving the quality of patient/client care, but barrier sexist which prevent or deter them from undertaking continuing formal education programmes. The main structural barriers included lack of funding and lack of coherent staff development planning and physical barriers including job and family responsibilities.

  8. Welfare Professions in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Welfare professions constitute one of the backbones in the development of the Nordic welfare states. Working in the public sector was for decades associated with high status; public sector employees were trusted employees. Through their work, they had important responsibilities for the welfare state and its citizens. To provide job security—through employment as officials—was a part of ensuring the stability of the state (Åkerstrøm, 2001, and we saw the establishment of what could be called a public ethos, a special morality aimed at serving the needs of the citizens and the state (Hoggett, 2005. The term welfare professions is widely used, referring to public sector employees in the field of, for example, health, education, care, and social work. So this term covers professionals who work directly in contact with patients, citizens, clients, students, etc. (Brante, 1990; Järvinen & Mik-Meyer, 2012. Along with the development and modernization of the welfare state, a number of new welfare professions, such as pedagogues, social works, physiotherapists, social care assistants, and auxiliary nurses have joined the existing ones like nurses, teachers, psychologists, and physicians. At the same time, however, the public sector has undergone dramatic changes as part of a neoliberal transformation of the welfare state. With the New Public Management (NPM wave from 1980s and onwards efforts to restructure public institutions and introduce market-like relationships between them, to outsource and privatize public services and to transform citizens to customers in a market have prevailed (Busch, 2005; Christensen & Lægreid, 2007; Greve, 2008. Within this reform strategy, welfare professionals are perceived as part of the problem that NPM is created to solve, namely an uncontrollable and wildly growing bureaucracy (Clarke & Newman, 1997 (...

  9. Shaping and authorising a public health profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Czabanowska

    2015-12-01

    doctors, nurses, lawyers, and architects can enjoy the benefits of the 2005/36/EC Directive amended by 2013/55/EU Directive on the recognition of professional qualifications, public health professionals are left out from these influential (elite professions. Firstly, we use the profession traits theory as a framework in arguing whether public health can be a legitimate profession in itself; secondly, we explain who public health professionals are and what usually is required for shaping the public health profession; and thirdly, we attempt to sketch the road to the authorisation or licensing of public health professionals. Finally, we propose some recommendations.

  10. Effectiveness of different nursing handover styles for ensuring continuity of information in hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeulers, Marian; Lucas, Cees; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-06-24

    An accurate handover of clinical information is of great importance to continuity and safety of care. If clinically relevant information is not shared accurately and in a timely manner it may lead to adverse events, delays in treatment and diagnosis, inappropriate treatment and omission of care. During the last decade the call for interventions to improve handovers has increased. These interventions aim to reduce the risk of miscommunication, misunderstanding and the omission of critical information. To determine the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve hospital nursing handover, specifically:to identify which nursing handover style(s) are associated with improved outcomes for patients in the hospital setting and which nursing handover style(s) are associated with improved nursing process outcomes. We searched the following electronic databases for primary studies: Cochrane EPOC Group specialised register (to 19 September 2012), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (to 1 March 2013), MEDLINE (1950 to 1 March 2013) OvidSP, EMBASE (1947 to 1 March 2013) OvidSP, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) (1980 to 1 March 2013) EbscoHost and ISI Web of Knowledge (Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index) (to 9 July 2012). The Database of Abstracts of Reviews (DARE) was searched for related reviews. We screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) http://www.who.int/ictrp/en/ and Current Controlled Trials www.controlled-trials.com/mrct and we conducted a search of grey literature web sites. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs or cluster-RCTs) evaluating any nursing handover style between nurses in a hospital setting with the aim of preventing adverse events or optimising the transfer of accurate essential information required for continuity of care, or both. Two review authors independently

  11. Virtual Learning Environment in Continuing Education for Nursing in Oncology: an Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Graças Silva Matsubara, Maria; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2016-12-01

    Nurses working in oncology require continuing education and nowadays distance education is a possibility. To compare learning outcomes of the professionals participating in classroom learning versus distance learning; describing the sociodemographic characteristics and digital fluency of participants; comparing learning outcomes with independent variables; assessing the adequacy of educational practices in Virtual Environment Moodle Learning through the constructivist online learning environment survey. An experimental, randomized controlled study; conducted at the A C Camargo Cancer Center, located in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The study included 97 nurses, with average training of 1 to 2 years. A control group (n = 44) had face to face training and the experiment group (n = 53) had training by distance learning, both with identical program content. The dependent variable was the result of learning, measured by applying a pre-assessment questionnaire and post-intervention for both groups. The sociodemographic and digital fluency data were uniform among the groups. The performance of both groups was statistically significant (p 0.005), and the control group had a greater advantage (40.4 %). Distance education has proven to be an effective alternative for training nurses, especially when they have more complex knowledge, more experience in the area and institutional time. Distance Education may be a possibility for the training of nurses for work in oncology. The association of age, training time and the institution, and the experience in Oncology interfered in the performance of both groups.

  12. The National Health Service Knowledge and Skills Framework and its implications for continuing professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Berridge, Emma-Jane; Kelly, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The National Health Service Knowledge and Skills Framework has been introduced as part of the Agenda for Change Reforms in the United Kingdom to link pay and career progression to competency. The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications for nurses, their managers and the impact on university departments delivering continuing professional development for nurses. The new system has the potential to increase the human resources management aspect of the clinical nurse managers' role and could have legal implications, for example if practitioners perceive that their needs for continuing professional development have been overlooked to the detriment of their pay and career aspirations. The new system also has implications for providers of continuing professional development in the universities and is likely to demand closer liaison between education providers and trust staff who commission education and training. The Knowledge and Skills Framework is of interest to nurses and nurse educators internationally because the system, if effective, could be introduced elsewhere.

  13. Intraprofessional relations in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duddle, Maree; Boughton, Maureen

    2007-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore the way in which Registered Nurses relate to and interact with each other in the workplace, and to identify factors that influence nurses' interactions with each other. Intraprofessional relations are an important topic both for nurses and nursing as we face the ongoing challenges of nurse shortages. Poor colleague relationships, together with workplace conflict, cause job dissatisfaction. As a consequence, some nurses leave the profession while others continue working but remain chronically unhappy. An explanatory multiple case study design was adopted. Data were collected from multiple sources on three different wards within one hospital in Australia between July 2005 and January 2006. The workplace can be a difficult place for both very experienced and less experienced nurses, regardless of the clinical environment. Nurses navigate their way in the workplace through a series of complex negotiations with each other and develop skills to assess the potential success of an interaction before approaching another nurse. Some also develop a resilience to conflict in their workplace, accepting it as part of working life. Creation of a more positive work environment requires increased understanding of the way nurses relate to each other and appreciation of the factors in the environment that contribute to conflict and a negative atmosphere. This appreciation is a necessary prerequisite to developing a more satisfying and productive workplace enhancing the recruitment of new nurses and the retention of experienced nurses.

  14. Continuous sedation until death: moral justifications of physicians and nurses-a content analysis of opinion pieces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Deschepper, R.; Battin, M.P.; Bilsen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature

  15. A urinary incontinence continuing education online course for community health nurses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gagne, Jennie C; Park, Sunah; So, Aeyoung; Wu, Bei; Palmer, Mary H; McConnell, Eleanor S

    2015-04-01

    Although urinary incontinence is prevalent among older women living in rural Korea, a lack of awareness and education exists in this population and among health professionals. Geographic isolation and limited resources also contribute to having few educational offerings for rural nurses. The authors' aim was to develop an online continuing education course on continence care for community health nurses and to examine its effectiveness. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to detect changes in knowledge and attitudes after taking the online education course. Participant satisfaction was also measured at the end of the training. A significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes toward continence care was noted. More than 95% of participants responded that they would recommend the online program to other health care providers and indicated the program would be helpful regarding continence care in their practice. The continuing education online course is a feasible strategy to support rural community health nurses' learning to improve knowledge and attitudes toward urinary incontinence management and care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Continuing education in nursing as a factor associated with knowledge on breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Oliveira Fonseca-Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identifying the knowledge about breastfeeding of the nurses of the Family Health Program, and possible associations between the knowledge and personal, professional and self evaluation aspects. Methodology. Observational and cross-sectional study conducted in family health units of a city in Minas Gerais, Brazil, with 85 nursing professionals. Data were collected through a questionnaire. We used the Student t-test for differences between means and Pearson correlation analysis. Results. The mean score of the professionals on the knowledge test was 6.6 and was higher in the group that attended courses on breastfeeding. Conclusion. There is a need for continuing education, providing reflective and critical mobilization, the questioning of reality and identification of users needs.

  17. Do we really understand how to retain nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Duffield, Christine; Hayes, Laureen

    2006-05-01

    To compare views of nurse executives with those of nurses who have left the profession on the importance of retention strategies. Although much has been written about nursing turnover, there continues to be dissonance among decision makers as to why nurses leave the profession and what the most crucial issues are for retention. Factor analysis was undertaken to compare responses of nurse executives with those of nurses employed outside of nursing. Contract requirements represented the greatest discrepancy, 1.07, followed by legal and employer issues, 1.02; worklife/homelife balance, 0.91; external values and beliefs about nursing, 0.75; and professional practice, 0.29. A disparity exists between perceptions of nurse executives and those of nurses who have left the profession as to which issues are most critical in retention. We suggest that nurse executives ensure sufficient organizational support for nursing unit managers who are more likely to understand methods of retaining nurses at the clinical interface.

  18. Continuing nursing education policy in China and its impact on health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mandatory continuing nursing education (MCNE) policy in China and to examine whether or not the policy addresses health equity. MCNE was instituted in 1996 in China to support healthcare reform was to include producing greater equity in health-care. However, the literature increasingly reports inequity in participation in MCNE, which is likely to have had a detrimental effect on the pre-existing discrepancies of education in the nursing workforce, and thereby failing to really address health equity. Despite a growing appeal for change, there is lack of critical reflection on the issues of MCNE policy. Critical ethnography underpinned by Habermas' Communicative Action Theory and Giddens' Structuration Theory were used to guide this study. Findings are presented in four themes: (i) inaccessibility of learning programs for nurses; (ii) undervaluation of workplace-based learning; (iii) inequality of the allocation of resources; and (iv) demands for additional support in MCNE from non-tertiary hospitals. The findings strongly suggest the need for an MCNE policy review based on rational consensus with stakeholders while reflecting the principles of health equity.

  19. Increasing the use of 'smart' pump drug libraries by nurses: a continuous quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    The use of infusion pumps that incorporate "smart" technology (smart pumps) can reduce the risks associated with receiving IV therapies. Smart pump technology incorporates safeguards such as a list of high-alert medications, soft and hard dosage limits, and a drug library that can be tailored to specific patient care areas. Its use can help to improve patient safety and to avoid potentially catastrophic harm associated with medication errors. But when one independent community hospital in Massachusetts switched from older mechanical pumps to smart pumps, it neglected to assign an "owner" to oversee the implementation process. One result was that nurses were using the smart pump library for only 37% of all infusions.To increase pump library usage percentage-thereby reducing the risks associated with infusion and improving patient safety-the hospital undertook a continuous quality improvement project over a four-month period in 2009. With the involvement of direct care nurses, and using quantitative data available from the smart pump software, the nursing quality and pharmacy quality teams identified ways to improve pump and pump library use. A secondary goal was to calculate the hospital's return on investment for the purchase of the smart pumps. Several interventions were developed and, on the first of each month, implemented. By the end of the project, pump library usage had nearly doubled; and the hospital had completely recouped its initial investment.

  20. Implications of early workplace experiences on continuing interprofessional education for physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapen, Kiran; Purkis, Mary Ellen

    2014-05-01

    Formative experiences, identities and collaborative strategies of nurses and physicians need to be appreciated to develop transformative interprofessional education for them. This article develops the collaborative profiles of recently graduated physicians and nurses based on a phenomenological study conducted at tertiary training hospitals in Canada and the United Kingdom. Recent nursing and medical graduates were interviewed to study the impact of undergraduate professional education on their ability to practice collaboratively in the workplace. The impact of undergraduate professional education on teamwork was found to be diluted by internal contradictions and overshadowed by the demands and contingencies of the workplace reported here. Initiation into the workplace was frequently precipitous and for residents the workplace environment was fluid and repeatedly new, as they rotated through various disciplines in the hospital. In busy wards, interdependent but competing priorities led to the development of adversarial uniprofessional identities and derogatory stereotyping of the other. Both groups were overwhelmed by high workload, unpreparedness and responsibility. Cross generational and gender based interactions also provoked resentment. Over time collaborative attitudes became blunted and interprofessional identities were renegotiated. Continuing interprofessional education, for recent graduates that prioritises problem areas, alongside appropriate structural changes could potentially transform the prevalent culture and impact teamwork downstream.

  1. Mindful meditation: healing burnout in critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William Richard

    2008-01-01

    The nursing profession is experiencing a crisis in both manpower and the ability to fend off the deleterious effects of burnout. Nursing professionals face extraordinary stress in our present medical environment, and studies have frequently found moderate-to-high levels of burnout among nurses. Nurses experience burnout for a variety of reasons, some inherent to the profession and others related to our 21st-century values that have necessitated multiple breadwinners within the household. Mindful meditation represents a complementary therapy that has shown promise in the reduction of negative stress and those extraneous factors that lead to burnout. A mindful, meditative practice can be another tool with which critical care nurses can regain the control of their careers and personal lives. The purpose of this article is to describe nurse burnout, identify those factors that contribute to burnout, and offer a solution to a continuing problem for nurses.

  2. Some Thoughts on Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Sapountzi-Krepia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of nursing is care; although caring is a universal concept and a component of the philosophies guiding the practice of all health and caring professions. Human beings learn to care bybeing cared by other people. In primitive societies there was not a clear distinction between healer and carer. However, caring, healing, and curing include a meaning of getting control over and expressing power upon people who are receiving care. That was a crucial point for the separation of caring from healing and curing. Nursing evolved from the mother's role and is frequently identified in people's perception more as a woman's duty than a job. Nursing continues to struggle to overcome the stereotypes held for centuries. However, as nursing is maturing as a science, an emphasis on the meaning of care and the approach of nursing as a purely caring science is apparent in many scientific nursing books and papers. Caring is evolving as a new paradigm for nursing, as the profession seeks its rightful place in the modern societies.

  3. As ocupações supostamente subalternas: o exemplo da enfermagem brasileira The supposedly subaltern professions: the example of Brazilian nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio de Castro Santos

    2008-06-01

    , highlighting the ways through which women professionals were capable of creating their own territory of autonomous action. In Brazil, the configuration of the public health field in the early 1920s was intimately associated with nation-building processes, and demanded new professionals for traditionally female occupations. The training of the young candidates took place at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, in Rio de Janeiro, at São Paulo's Institute of Hygiene, at Medical Schools, in foreign centers such as the Teachers College and the Toronto School of Nursing, as well as by means of on-the-job training. The sociological literature has stressed the (basically male medical dominance, to the detriment of a focus on the new emerging professions. This trend has been clear in Brazil, and it is time that the "sociological gaze" took a close interest in the unique role played by women as health educators and visiting nurses, based in community health centers as early as 1925 in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and other centers, and in rural health units across the nation. Health education was the key element in this new scenario of campaigns against endemic diseases a national practice which Brazilians called "campanhismo" - that stressed non-authoritarian means in place of old schemes of medical policy.

  4. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabella D

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as psychiatric nurses, are impacted by those same biases, limited resources, and complexities in their role. This paper provides a brief history of mental health nursing and a discussion of the current challenges faced within the profession. It will also include how the public's perception of both those who have mental illness and those who treat it is based on the sensationalism of those who are violent, and misunderstanding of current treatments. It is imperative that mental health nurses continue to define and educate other health care professionals as well as the general public of the role of the mental health nurse and those who suffer from mental illness. Unfortunately, some of the same bias that was present in the 1930s remains today, but perhaps with perseverance and education it will not continue into the future. Keywords: mental health, psychiatric nursing, pre- licensure, post-licensure challenges, professional obstacles, public perception

  5. [The importance of longitudinality, comprehensiveness, coordination and continuity of nursing home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Nevado, Dolores; Palomo-Cobos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Home care is essential for dependent persons, in order to support the high levels of morbidity, for the elderly as well as their caregivers, as it enables patients to remain in their familiar environment as long as possible, fulfilling the wish expressed by most of the population. Home care is the activity that best represents the essential attributes (longitudinality, comprehensiveness, continuity, coordination) of the primary, and that suffers most when these attributes are not included in the activities undertaken by primary care teams, or due to cuts in health-care. Home care requires highly skilled, versatile and committed nursing staff, with whom the population identifies as a source of care, and where they are assessed for their relevance and effectiveness. Nurses with wide clinical care skills, with a balanced content of treatment and prevention, and the freedom to develop their work, are needed in order to continuously monitor the health problems of their acute and chronic patients, in the family and community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Early nurse attrition in New Zealand and associated policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L; Clendon, J

    2018-03-01

    To examine the factors contributing to nurses choosing to exit the nursing profession before retirement age. Population growth, ageing and growing demand for health services mean increased demand for nurses. Better retention could help meet this demand, yet little work has been done in New Zealand to understand early attrition. An online survey of registered and enrolled nurses and nurse practitioners who had left nursing was used. This study reports analysis of responses from 285 ex-nurses aged under 55. The primary reasons nurses left the profession were as follows: workplace concerns; personal challenges; career factors; family reasons; lack of confidence; leaving for overseas; unwillingness to complete educational requirements; poor work-life balance; and inability to find suitable nursing work. Most nurses discussed their intentions to leave with a family member or manager and most reported gaining transferrable skills through nursing. Nurses leave for many reasons. Implementing positive practice environments and individualized approaches to retaining staff may help reduce this attrition. Generational changes in the nature of work and careers mean that nurses may continue to leave the profession sooner than anticipated by policymakers. If the nursing workforce is to be able to meet projected need, education, recruitment and retention policies must urgently address issues leading to early attrition. In particular, policies improving the wider environmental context of nursing practice and ensuring that working environments are safe and nurses are well supported must be developed and implemented. Equally, national nursing workforce planning must take into account that nursing is no longer viewed as a career for life. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Attrition of undergraduate nursing students at selected South African universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Roos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The nursing profession forms the backbone of many healthcare systems. It therefore needs a consistent supply of registered nurses to deliver continuous and safe quality healthcare, and to replace the nurses leaving or retiring from the profession. Attrition actively occurs among nursing students in South Africa and threatens the future supply of registered nurses. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the attrition rate at selected South African universities and the factors influencing undergraduate nursing students to discontinue their nursing studies at these universities. Method: A quantitative descriptive design was followed. Heads of the nursing departments at the selected universities captured data with a specifically designed questionnaire. Thereafter their former nursing students provided information via a structured telephonic interview on the reasons why they discontinued the nursing programme. Results: The study revealed that attrition of undergraduate nursing students for three intake years (2007, 2008 and 2009 at the participating universities was between 39.3% and 58.7%. Academic and financial reasons as well as poor wellness and health were the main causes for attrition. Another factor was failure to cope with the demands of the clinical environment. Conclusion: Attrition might not occur immediately when a nursing student is challenged, as the student might exploit the various types of support offered. Although some nursing students do benefit from the offered support, a large number of nursing students still discontinue the undergraduate nursing programme.

  8. Convergence: How Nursing Unions and Magnet are Advancing Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joyce E; Billingsley, Molley

    2014-01-01

    Historically, unions and professional associations such as the American Nurses Association have been adversaries in the fight to represent the best interests of the nursing profession. We reviewed the literature on the evolution of nursing unions, nursing's historical unease about unions, the Magnet designation in nursing, the tensions between the unions and Magnet, the core values and commonalities they share, and the obligations of nursing as a profession. Refocusing on the advancement of our profession provides a positive pathway in which the collective efforts of nursing unions and professional initiatives such as the Magnet designation converge during these turbulent times for our profession. The single, central organizing idea of nursing-where nursing unions and Magnet converge-is the pivotal role of nurses in delivering high-quality patient care. The often-maligned dialectic between unions and Magnet has advanced and not hindered the nursing profession. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajjel-Aghdam, Alireza; Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Khameneh, Saied; Moghaddam, Sara

    2013-09-01

    Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective. A descriptive study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13. Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  10. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  11. [German nurses during the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz

    2014-06-01

    Nurses from several German organisations participated in the First World War. For the most part, they did not work on the frontline but at the rear, in hospital trains, hospitals or refugee camps. They cared forwounded soldiers and faced epidemics of infectious diseases. The journal of the national association of nurses, which continued to be published during the war, provides a snapshot of their concerns and their questioning regarding the profession and its evolution.

  12. REGISTERED NURSES' (RNs) PERCEPTION OF THE NURSING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    health worker performance and patient outcome. In 2009, International ... benefits and incentives for nurses in order to guarantee nurses wellbeing and retention in the profession. ..... Flexibility / demand for work in different areas. 8. 4.8. 23.

  13. Learning Style Differences between Nursing and Teaching Students in Sweden: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Lena; Hallin, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The teaching profession has been continually challenged to provide evidence of the effectiveness of teaching and learning methods. Teacher education, as well as nursing education, is currently undergoing reforms in Sweden. At the university where the research was conducted, teaching and nursing programs are two priority educational programs and…

  14. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the "concerns of becoming a nurse," which itself consisted of three categories: "nurses clinical competency," "nurses as full-scale mirror of the future," and "Monitoring and modeling through clinical education" (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education.

  15. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-12-01

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. A enfermagem não é mais uma profissão submissa La enfermería no es más una profesión sumisa Nursing is no longer a submissive profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia de Carvalho Andrade

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um ensaio que objetiva desmistificar a enfermagem como profissão submissa. Para tanto, é feita uma revisão literária da história da profissão para acompanhamento de sua evolução até a prática atual. Por vezes, enfermagem e medicina seguiram paralelas no desenvolvimento histórico e a enfermagem esteve caracterizada num quadro de dependência/submissão devido à falta de cientificidade em sua prática. Mas, muito se evoluiu e há tempos a enfermagem tem sua prática baseada no conhecimento científico, sendo a sistematização da assistência o ponto essencial na cientificidade da assistência de enfermagem.Se trata de un ensayo cuyo objetivo es terminar con el misticismo de la enfermería como profesion sumisa.Por lo tanto es hecha una revision literaria de la historia de la profesion para dar seguimiento de su evolucion hasta la práctica actual. Algunas veces,enfermería y medicina siguieron paralelas en el desarrollo historico y la enfermería estuvo caracterizada en un cuadro de dependencia/sumisión debido a la falta de proceso cientifico en su práctica. Pero, mucho ha evolucionado y desde hace tiempo la enfermería tiene su práctica basada en el conocimiento cientifico,siendo la sistematización de la asistencia el punto esencial en la ciencia de la asistencia de enfermería.It's an essay aiming to demystify nursing as a submissive profession. For doing so, a literature review on the profession history following its evolution up to the current practice was made. For some times, nursing and medicine went along in their historic development and nursing was featured in a dependence/ submission picture due to the lack of scientism in its practice. But a lot has changed and for a long time nursing has its practice based on the scientific knowledge, being the care delivery systematization the key of the scientism in the nursing care.

  17. A cross-sectional study of facilitators and barriers of Iranian nurses' participation in continuing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2013-12-27

    Continuing education is one of the modern strategies to maintain and elevate knowledge and professional skills of nurses which in turn elevate the health status of society. Since several factors affect nurses' participation in continuing education, it's essential to know promoters and obstacles in this issue and plan accordingly. In this cross-sectional study, 361 Iranian nurses who were recruited by convenience sampling method completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire from October 2012 to April 2013. Topics covered the participants' attitudes towards facilitators and barriers of their participation in continuing education. Mean and standard deviation of participants ' age were 37.14±7.58 years and 93.94% were female. The maximum score of facilitators and barriers to nurses' participation in continuing education were related to "Update my knowledge" and "Work commitments" respectively. The results showed among Iranian nurses, the mean score of personal and structural barriers was significantly higher than the mean score of interpersonal ones (F=2122.66, peducation programs by enforcement of facilitators and reducing barriers focusing on the personal and structural barriers.

  18. Towards a National Discursive Construction of Nurses' Diversity Related Competencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Jæger, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    This paper will explore the premises for developing a national discursive construction of the professional competencies needed by nurses when confronted with cultural difference and intercultural contact. Based on an analysis of the Danish nursing community's articles in the Danish Nursing Union......'s journal, "The Nurse", covering an eight-year period it is concluded that the nursing profession understood as a community of practice continues to encounter the same type of problems related to diversity and that increased knowledge, skills and competencies are needed. The discourse of a new Bachelor...

  19. Student nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards domestic violence: results of survey highlight need for continued attention to undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Frances; Hutchinson, Marie

    2017-08-01

    To gain a comprehensive understanding of undergraduate nursing student attitudes and views towards domestic violence, and employ the findings to inform undergraduate curriculum development. Nurses have an important role in identifying people who are victims of domestic violence through screening and facilitating their access to assistance and support. Undergraduate nursing education is key to shaping attitudes and facilitating the development of a comprehensive understanding of domestic violence. Little research has been undertaken exploring nursing students' attitudes towards domestic violence. A cross-sectional survey of undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a three-year Bachelor of Nursing programme across three campuses of a regional university in NSW, Australia. Students completed a pen and paper survey during class time and descriptive and comparative analysis was undertaken. The majority of respondents were female, first year students females aged 17-26 years. Many students understood the nature and consequences of domestic violence, yet others across the course of the programme demonstrate attitudes that reflect a lack of understanding and misconceptions of domestic violence. Stereotypical and gendered attitudes that normalise violence within intimate partner relationships and sustain victim-blaming attitudes were evident across the cohort. It is important for nurses to understand the relationship between exposure to violence and women's ill health, and be able to respond appropriately. Undergraduate programmes need to highlight the important role of nurses around domestic violence and address stereotypical conceptions about domestic violence. Continued effort is required to address domestic violence in undergraduate nursing education so that nursing graduates understand the association between violence exposure and poor health and are able to assess exposure and respond appropriately in the clinical environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. From vision to reality--managing change in the provision of library and information services to nurses, midwives, health visitors and PAMs: (professions allied to medicine) a case study of the North Thames experience with the Inner London Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbolt, S; Williamson, J; Wilson, A

    1997-06-01

    One of the North Thames' pioneering consortia, the Inner London Consortium (ILC) is a complex body which includes NHS Trusts with teaching hospital university connections, community-based Trusts and general hospital acute Trusts. Within the consortium there are 12,000 trained nurses, midwives, health visitors and other professional staff working in the professions allied to medicine (PAMs), all of whom require access to and provision of appropriate library information services. In 1994, taking into account experiences elsewhere in the Region and nationally, it became clear that library issues were complex and would become acute with the move of nursing libraries from ILC Trust sites over a very short timescale. A report on the issues commissioned by the Consortium recommended that a library project, which built on existing NHS Trust PGMDE funded library resources and moved these to a multidisciplinary base to serve the consortium membership, be implemented. The objective of providing access to library information services for nurses and PAMs was achieved. Successes that emerged from the implementation included: The registration in Trust libraries of almost 12 000 new members within the initial 6-month monitoring period. The development of service level agreements and standards for the delivery of services to these new user groups. This paper describes the processes behind these significant and complex changes.

  1. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1) examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2) examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1) development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2) a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3) a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to facilitate interactions with

  2. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1 examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2 examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1 development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2 a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3 a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to

  3. What Influences Malaysian Nurses to Participate in Continuing Professional Education Activities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong, RN, MSc, SCM

    2011-03-01

    Conclusions: Implementation of mandatory CPE is considered an important measure to increase nurse's participation in CPE. However, effective planning that takes into consideration the learning needs of nurses is recommended.

  4. A enfermagem enquanto disciplina, profissão e trabalho La enfermería como disciplina, profesión y trabajo Nursing as discipline, profession, and labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pires

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ensaio com objetivo de articular aspectos teórico-conceituais de profissão, disciplina e trabalho contribuindo para a reflexão acerca do saber disciplinar e da prática profissional de enfermagem exercida no contexto do trabalho coletivo em saúde. Resgata conceitos da teoria sociológica e da epistemologia para analisar a enfermagem no cenário da ciência, da sociologia das profissões e da teorização sobre processo de trabalho em saúde. Argumenta que a enfermagem tem atributos de uma profissão e de uma disciplina científica, e que os limites da prática precisam ser contextualizados histórica e socialmente. Conclui que a enfermagem, enquanto pratica social e disciplina, enfrenta desafios científicos e políticos demandando um processo permanente de construção.El objetivo del presente ensayo es articular aspectos teórico-conceptuales de la enfermería como profesión, disciplina y trabajo, contribuyendo para la reflexión acerca del saber disciplinar y de la práctica profesional de la enfermería ejercida en el contexto del trabajo colectivo en salud. Rescata conceptos de la teoría sociológica y de la epistemología para analizar la enfermería en el ámbito de la ciencia, de la sociología de las profesiones y de la teoría sobre el proceso del trabajo en salud. Argumenta que la enfermería tiene atributos de una profesión y de una disciplina científica, y que los límites de la práctica deben ser contextualizados histórica y socialmente. Concluye que la enfermería como práctica social y disciplina, enfrenta desafíos científicos y políticos que exigen un proceso permanente de construcción.The objective of this essay is to articulate theoretical-conceptual aspects of nursing as a profession, a scientific discipline, and labour contributing to reflection concerning nursing knowledge and professional practice exercised in the context of collective work in health care. It reviews concepts from sociological theory and

  5. Interprofessional Education in Canadian Nursing Programs and Implications for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Emily; Lightfoot, Nancy; Carter, Lorraine; MacEwan, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, the accrediting body for nursing programs in Canada, became part of the Accreditation of Interprofessional Health Education initiative. In turn, interprofessional education (IPE) is now a requirement in nursing curricula. Although the requirement is formally in place, how it is achieved…

  6. Nursing history: from conformity to challenging practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosser, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Elizabeth Rosser, Deputy Dean (Education and Professional Practice) and Professor of Nursing at Bournemouth University, considers the lessons that the nursing profession has learned since its early days.

  7. Tobacco Use, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, and Training on Cessation Counseling Among Nursing Students: Cross-Country Data from the Global Health Professions Student Survey (GHPSS, 2005–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Jones

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nursing Global Health Professions Student Survey (GHPSS has been conducted in schools in 39 countries and the Gaza Strip/West Bank (identified as “sites” for the remainder of this paper. In half the sites, over 20% of the students currently smoked cigarettes, with males having higher rates than females in 22 sites. Over 60% of students reported having been exposed to secondhand smoke in public places in 23 of 39 sites. The majority of students recognized that they are role models in society, believed they should receive training on counseling patients to quit using tobacco, but few reported receiving any formal training. Tobacco control efforts must discourage tobacco use among health professionals, promote smoke free workplaces, and implement programs that train health professionals in effective cessation-counseling techniques.

  8. [Between obligation and duty--on deontological codes in medical professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowiak, Leszek E

    2006-01-01

    The social role of medical occupations is changing, along with their professional ethics. It could be argued that the role of ethical regulation (ethical codes) in these professions is diminishing. It could be due to ethical standards increasingly taking on character of legal norms. The notion of "moral obligation" is thus subject to transformation, as it progressively denotes legal duty, i.e., coercion. Legal validity of ethical standards is defined by lawyers. The continual tendency of occupational ethics to resemble rules of law may thus question the effect of ethical regulation in medical professions. The latter are performed not only because of official or economical compulsion but also because of moral obligation and the medic's desire to do well. The standing of occupational ethics in the work ofphysician, nurse and pharmacist is a prerequisite for maintaining the high social prestige of these professions.

  9. Medicine an evolving profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of medical practitioners in the developed world has increased but in relative terms their incomes have decreased. Published comments suggest that some doctors are dissatisfied with what they earn. However doctors are still perceived as having a high status in society. Publicly available data suggests that doctors chose to live and work in affluent suburbs where arguably the need for their skills is less than that in neighbouring deprived areas. The gender balance in medicine is also changing with more women entering the workforce and a greater acceptance of parttime working arrangements. In some countries doctors have relinquished the responsibility for emergency out of hours care in general practice and personal continuity of care is no longer on offer. The profession is also challenged by policy makers’ enthusiasm for guidelines while the focus on multidisciplinary teamwork makes it more likely that patients will routinely be able to consult professionals other than medical practitioners. At the same time the internet has changed patient expectations so that health care providers will be expected to deploy information technology to satisfy patients. Medicine still has a great deal to offer. Information may be readily available on the internet, but it is not an independently sufficient, prerequisite for people to contend with the physical and psychological distress associated with disease and disability. We need to understand and promote the crucial role doctors play in society at a time of tremendous change in the attitudes to, and within, the profession.

  10. A Continuing Educational Initiative to Develop Nurses' Mental Health Knowledge and Skills in Rural and Remote Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Esther; Daly, John; Bell, Pamela; Brown, Tracey; Allan, Jan; Hancock, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Australian nurses (n=202) participated in mental health continuing education delivered via distance methods and regional workshops in rural areas. The majority increased content knowledge and thought audio- and videotapes were effective despite technical difficulties; 90% felt the experiential learning workshops and distance modules integrated…

  11. [Critical care nurse learning of continuous renal replacement therapy: the efficacy of a self-learning manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-02-01

    Many nurses have difficulty learning to use the complex, non-traditional, and regularly-updated critical care equipment. Failure to use such equipment properly can seriously compromise treatment and endanger patient health and lives. New self-learning materials for novice nurses are necessary to provide essential and effective guidance as a part of formal nursing training. Such materials can enhance the capabilities of critical care nurses and, thus, improve the general quality of critical care. The purpose of this research was to develop a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT)-themed self-learning manual that would provide easily absorbed and understood knowledge in an easy-to-carry format for ICU nursing staff. This study also investigated CCRT skill learning efficacy. This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with pretests and posttests. Purposive sampling generated a sample of 66 critical care nurses currently working at one hospital in Taipei City. Participants submitted a completed self-assessment survey that rated their command of continuous renal replacement therapy before and after the self-learning manual intervention. Survey data were analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0 for Windows. The two major findings derived from the study included: (1) The mean response score from the self-assessment survey filled out after the intervention was 91.06 and 79.75 (SD = 9.49 and 11.65), respectively, for experimental and control groups. Such demonstrated significant difference. (2) The mean posttest score after the intervention for the experimental group was 91.06 ± 9.49. This represents a significant increase of 10.35 ± 10.35 over their mean pretest score (80.71 ± 11.82). The experimental group showed other significant differences in terms of the CRRT self-assessment survey posttest. Self-learning manuals may be introduced in nursing education as useful aids and catalysts to achieve more effective and satisfying learning experiences.

  12. The Effect of Trust in Leader on Job Satisfaction and Intent to Leave Present Job in the Context of the Nursing Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, William David

    2011-01-01

    Three research questions made up the focus of the study. First, after controlling for demographic variables of age, gender, and tenure in organization, to what extent does trust in leader (nurse manager) relate to job satisfaction? Second, after controlling for demographic variables of age, gender, and tenure in organization, to what extent does…

  13. Effects of e-Learning and m-Learning on Nursing Care in a Continuing Education Context: An Overview of Mixed Method Systematic Reviews (Protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José; Hudson, Emilie; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Bouix-Picasso, Julien; Duboi, Carl-Ardy

    2017-01-01

    Continuing education is an imperative for professional nursing. e-Learning is one modality to support education and it has been extensively examined in a nursing academic context. An overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method systematic reviews were conducted to draw a broad picture of the effects of e-Learning and m-Learning used by registered nurses in a continuing education context.

  14. A comparison of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among students of helping professions in Crete, Greece: the cases of social work, psychology, medicine, and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Vasileia; Plotnikof, Kyriaki; Gioumidou, Meropi; Zisimou, Vasiliki; Papadaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among social work, psychology, medical, and nursing students in Crete, Greece, using Herek's ATLG scale. No respondents held completely heterosexist attitudes; only 1.6% held completely non-heterosexist attitudes. The 44.96 total ATLG score indicates a slightly positive attitude toward lesbians and gay men. Psychology students scored higher than all others on positive attitudes, followed by social work students, medical students, and nursing students. Gender, having lesbian or gay acquaintances or friends, and religiosity were significant factors influencing students' attitudes, while no impact on attitudes due to the effects of higher education could be discerned. Implications for curriculum design and teaching methods are discussed.

  15. "Do You Want Excitement? Don't Join the Army, Be a Nurse!": Identity Work and Advantage among Men in Training for the Female Professions

    OpenAIRE

    LoMascolo, Anna F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the identity work strategies that men students in nursing, elementary education, and social work programs employ in order to manage and assert their masculinity in the face of negative gender assessment, as well as the identity work involved in verifying their professional identities. It also examines the perceived benefits and disadvantages that men experience as numerical minorities in their fields of study. Interviews with 12 men students majoring in these disciplines...

  16. Intermittent auscultation versus continuous fetal monitoring: exploring factors that influence birthing unit nurses' fetal surveillance practice using theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patey, Andrea M; Curran, Janet A; Sprague, Ann E; Francis, Jill J; Driedger, S Michelle; Légaré, France; Lemyre, Louise; Pomey, Marie-Pascale A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2017-09-25

    Intermittent Auscultation (IA) is the recommended method of fetal surveillance for healthy women in labour. However, the majority of women receive continuous electronic monitoring. We used the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to explore the views of Birthing Unit nurses about using IA as their primary method of fetal surveillance for healthy women in labour. Using a semi-structured interview guide, we interviewed a convenience sample of birthing unit nurses throughout Ontario, Canada to elicit their views about fetal surveillance. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were content analysed using the TDF and themes were framed as belief statements. Domains potentially key to changing fetal surveillance behaviour and informing intervention design were identified by noting the frequencies of beliefs, content, and their reported influence on the use of IA. We interviewed 12 birthing unit nurses. Seven of the 12 TDF domains were perceived to be key to changing birthing unit nurses' behaviour The nurses reported that competing tasks, time constraints and the necessity to multitask often limit their ability to perform IA (domains Beliefs about capabilities; Environmental context and resources). Some nurses noted the decision to use IA was something that they consciously thought about with every patient while others stated it their default decision as long as there were no risk factors (Memory, attention and decision processes, Nature of behaviour). They identified positive consequences (e.g. avoid unnecessary interventions, mother-centered care) and negative consequences of using IA (e.g. legal concerns) and reported that the negative consequences can often outweigh positive consequences (Beliefs about consequences). Some reported that hospital policies and varying support from care teams inhibited their use of IA (Social influences), and that support from the entire team and hospital management would likely increase their use (Social

  17. Career planning and development for nurses: the time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, G J; Wheeler, M M

    2001-06-01

    Developments in how the nursing profession is perceived by nurses and by society, along with unparalleled changes in health care systems, have created an environment in which individual nurses must take control of their careers and futures. Educators, employers and professional organizations also have a key role to play in fostering the career planning and development of nurses, usually the largest employee group in most health care organizations. This article provides an overview of what career planning and development is and why it is important for nurses. A career planning and development model is described that provides nurses with a focused strategy to take greater responsibility for engaging in the ongoing planning process that is crucial throughout the major stages of their career. Finally, educators, employers and professional organizations are challenged to collaborate with individual nurses on career-development activities that will enable nurses to continue to provide high-quality care in ever-changing health care systems.

  18. Feminism and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, P L; Wheeler, C E

    1985-01-01

    Feminism provides a personal, philosophic and political means for analyzing the realities of women's lives as lived in patriarchal systems. It is not a single line of thought; multiple approaches have been developed that provide diverse avenues for confronting systematic injustices while learning to value ourselves as women. Jo Ann Ashley, recognizing that new realities must emerge from within nursing rather than from other groups, states: "For many years we have heard that nursing is at the crossroads. Nursing never seems to get over being at a crossroads. Indeed, nursing has been at a crossroads many times, but instead of taking a new road, leaders in the profession always choose to continue bearing the burden of continuing to live out the subservient role under the patriarchal system, rather than taking a new road that can lead beyond patriarchy. Nursing is no longer at a crossroads. It is at a turning point. It needs to turn away from being the "token torturer" of itself and other women. It needs to turn toward the health awaiting women in a woman-defined, woman-created world that lies beyond patriarchal ideas and institutions." Movement in this direction requires becoming familiar with feminist literature and the insights that women scholars have provided. In nursing, a feminist perspective requires an uncompromising questioning of the forces that divide us from one another, the ethics of our actions, and our co-optation into the unhealthy environment of the current health care system.

  19. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  20. The roles of social factor and internet self-efficacy in nurses' web-based continuing learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to explore the relationships among social factor, Internet self-efficacy and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning in a clinical nursing setting. The participants recruited were 244 in-service nurses from hospitals in Taiwan. Three instruments were used to assess their perceptions of social factor, Internet self-efficacy (including basic and advanced Internet self-efficacy) and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning (including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, affection and behavior). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to identify the hypothesized structural model. The results of this study support that social factor is a significant factor correlated to Internet self-efficacy and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning (including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and affection). In addition, nurses' basic Internet self-efficacy plays a key role in attitudes including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and affection. However, advanced self-efficacy was not correlated to any of the attitudes. The behavior dimension was not linked to social factor or Internet self-efficacy, but was linked to perceived ease of use and affection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of the Relationship between the Quality of Working Life and Tendency for Continuing Education in the Nurses working in Selected Hospitals of Isfahan Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Javidmoghadam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past, the main role of nurses was providing care and comfort during nursing duties. However, today due to the changes in the health-related systems, more emphasis is put on the health promotion, disease prevention, and paying attention to the patient as a whole and considering all of his aspects (holistic care. Therefore, in the current societies, the nurses play a more varied roles and professional responsibilities which are expanding in line with the changes in society. The working life quality is among the important and effective factors on the nurses' productivity. Also, regarding the high sensitivity of the health-care fields which are directly related to the human life, their education, knowledge, and working ability for better performing the duties is vital. The current study aimed at evaluation and investigation of the working life quality on the tendency to continue education in the nurses working in Isfahan Medical University. the current study is of descriptive - cross sectional bivariate correlation type conducted on 123 nurses working in four departments as internal medicine, surgery, emergency and intensive care in five hospitals as Al-Zahra, Amin, Ayatollah Kashani, Noor, and Ali Asghar (pbuh, which were under supervision of Isfahan Medical University. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including the demographic information, working life quality, job satisfaction, and tendency to continue education. For data analysis, In addition to the descriptive statistical indicators (mean and standard deviation, the Chi Square test was also used for qualitative variables as well as paired sample t-test for comparison between the means of the two groups. All the analysis were performed in SPSS with the significance level 0.05.there is significant relationship between the nurses' education and their working life quality however there were no relationships between the years in service and marital status with people working

  2. Introduction to the library and information professions

    CERN Document Server

    Greer, Roger; Fowler, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this rapidly changing, knowledge-based society, library and information professionals require a broad understanding of the profession. Introduction to the Library and Information Professions, Second Edition presents a toolbox of models that enable this essential understanding for undergraduate and graduate students in library and information science programs as well as practicing professionals seeking continuing education. The materials in this second edition reflect the latest trends in the library and information profession, including services and issues that stem from new advances in te

  3. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country.

  4. Inside a contested profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann-Jacobsen, Emilie Tinne

    and macro level. Whereas role theory works as both a discursive tool in conversations with journalists and as an analytical tool sensitive to agency processes on a micro level, field theory adds relational aspects and helps to connect the micro level analysis to macro level structures, uncovering the forces...... conditioning the profession. The analysis reveals political forces to be most dominating in structuring and conditioning the journalistic profession in both countries which leads the dissertation to suggest a reconceptualization of Bourdieu’s field model to account for political capital. Though economic...... capital and cultural capital (profession-specific forces) also conditions journalism, political forces structure the profession on a number of levels. The state’s active involvement in the profession in both countries through laws and regulation and with promotion (and to some extent enforcement...

  5. Heroines of lonely outposts or tools of the empire? British nurses in Britain's model colony: Ceylon, 1878-1948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Margaret

    2004-09-01

    In 1878 two 'Nightingale' nurses arrived in the British colony of Ceylon to initiate a training programme for indigenous women in the skills and values of what was then termed 'scientific nursing'. These two women were the first of a succession of British women who went to the colony to nurse in its hospitals and to train Ceylonese women for the profession. Using the official records of the colonial government held in the National Archives, Kew and the records of the Overseas Nursing Association in the Rhodes House Collection, Oxford, this paper explores both the professional and social experiences of these women. This paper also analyses the role that these representatives of the colonial state played in the development of an indigenous nursing profession and concludes that their presence in the colony ultimately left an ambiguous legacy. In their role as trainers of indigenous women, they furthered the development and spread of a Western nursing profession in the colony's hospitals. At the same time, however, their continuing dominance of training and the positions of responsibility was an inhibiting factor in the ability of indigenous nurses to organise and professionalise. Whereas the doctors, trained in the colony's Medical College, achieved registration as early as 1905, the nurses had to wait until 1949, a year after independence, before their qualification was recognised and protected. Nursing remained throughout the colonial period therefore, even more so than at the metropolitan centre, the 'Cinderella' of the medical professions.

  6. Seeking a progressive relationship for learning: A theoretical scheme about the continuity of the student-educator relationship in clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Heydari, Abbas; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab

    2014-01-01

    The student-educator relationship is an educational tool in nursing education and has long-lasting influence on the professional development of nursing students. Currently, this relationship in clinical settings is different from that in the past due to a paradigm shift in nursing education and its emphasis on the centrality of the relationship. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the continuity of the student-educator relationship in the Iranian context of clinical nursing education. Ten bachelor nursing students and 10 clinical educators at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were selected through purposive and theoretical sampling. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data analysis was done through open, axial, and selective coding, using MAXQDA ver. 2007 qualitative data analysis software. The core category emerging from the data analysis was "seeking a progressive relationship for learning". Other major categories linked to and embraced within this core category were: "creating emotional connection", "trying to continue the relationship chain", and "adapting the behaviors". The findings indicated that in the Iranian sociocultural context, students and educators gain some action/interaction strategies for continuity of their relationship. It is obvious that the role of the nursing clinical educators and their relationship skills are critical in the relationship continuity of clinical settings. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  7. Creating Occupational Therapy: The Challenges to Defining a Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2018-05-08

    The creation of a new profession in the early 20th century, such as occupational therapy, required a commitment to certain ideas and a willingness to accept certain challenges. This study examines the commitment to the idea of therapeutic and health supporting occupation by the early leaders and proponents of the profession and the challenges they faced in gaining acceptance of occupational therapy as a profession capable of delivering a valued health care service to society. Six challenges are reviewed as they occurred in the history of the profession and as they continue to challenge the profession into the present era.

  8. Imaginarios de la educación en salud pública en enfermería / The imaginaries of public health education as seen from the standpoint of the nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Arias T.

    2015-09-01

    strategies for strengthening the quality of the nurses' training in the XXI century. Objective: to reveal the imaginaries of public health education existing within the Nursing program of the Southern Colombia University from 1993 to 2013. Methodology: a qualitative study with content analysis in which a purposive sampling was carried out with public health professors and senior nursing students. Data was collected via focus groups interviews and processed with the Atlas Ti software. Results: Three main categories emerged in relation to the studied subject: conception of public health, understanding of public health, professor training, public health in the curriculum, public health education in nursing and the "unseen, unfelt, and unheard". Conclusions: The imaginaries of education in public health of the Nursing training program of the Southern Colombian University are characterized by an epistemological crisis between theories and disciplinary practices in public health. Likewise, the policies proposed by the WHO / PAHO and the laws of the profession point to the need to strengthen curriculum integration, the development of specific skills and student participation in the definition of objectives, methods and learning environments in public health from a holistic and comprehensive viewpoint but with local perspective.

  9. Motivation for the teaching profession

    OpenAIRE

    Křížová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Anotace: The thesis "The motivation for the teaching profession" dealt with fundamental problems of motivation to the teaching profession. In the theoretical part, we have focused on general characteristics of terms that pertain to the teaching profession, particularly the theory of the teaching profession, the choice of the teaching profession, the phase of the teaching profession, teacher typology, the role of teacher training and professionalization of teachers, but also washed into the te...

  10. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession.

  11. Medicine as a profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, John W

    2010-06-01

    Over half a century ago, a Canadian judge defined a profession in a way that resonates still today, not only for lawyers and doctors, but for the current wide variety of professions and professionals. This article is a reflection on this definition. It briefly considers the historical context within which the knowledge base that characterises a profession evolved and what the various component parts of the judge's definition entail. A final consideration goes beyond the terms of the definition proposed--that of our ethical responsibility as professionals to stand up and be counted and, in the context of the disorder around us, to speak out.

  12. An Exploration of Nurse Educators' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Horizontal Violence Measured through Dimensions of Oppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Brenda Berner

    2017-01-01

    There is a paradox in the profession of nursing. Although nursing is known as the caring profession, evidence demonstrates that nurses do not care well for their own. Literature demonstrates that the phenomenon of horizontal violence (HV) is an international problem in the nursing profession that negatively affects the nurse workplace environment.…

  13. The practice of continuous sedation until death in nursing homes in flanders, belgium: a nationwide study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Results The response rate was 65.5%, and 249 nurses reported a case of CSD (57.6%). Most individuals had cancer (33.6%) or dementia (32.8%); lacked competence (65.7%); and had severe pain (71.2%), fatigue (62.3%), loss of dignity (59%), anxiety (58.4%), and longing for death (58.4%). Intractable

  14. Using continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: A qualitative interview study of physicians' and nurses' practice in three European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Seymour (Jane); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); S.M. Bruinsma (Sophie); L. Deliens (Luc); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); F. Mortier (Freddy); J. Brown (Jayne); N. Mathers (Nigel); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Extensive debate surrounds the practice of continuous sedation until death to control refractory symptoms in terminal cancer care. We examined reported practice of United Kingdom, Belgian and Dutch physicians and nurses. Methods: Qualitative case studies using interviews.

  15. Nurses' occupational health as a driver for curriculum change emphasising health promotion: an historical research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2014-05-01

    Reasons stated for curriculum change in nursing education are usually shifts in knowledge, care delivery, roles, regulatory standards and population health needs. In New Zealand in the 1930s, a curriculum change was driven instead by the need to protect and promote nurses' health. Tuberculosis was an international occupational health risk among nurses. Mary Lambie, New Zealand's chief nurse, considered nursing a "hazardous profession". One remedy she instituted was curriculum change in the national nurse training programme to emphasise health promotion among nurses. Global nursing issues today also impact on nurses' health. Curriculum changes again address this by promoting self-care and resilience. To examine how international and national concern for nurses' occupational health drove a curriculum change in New Zealand nurse training in the 1930s. Historical Research International occupational health reports (1930s), Lambie's annual reports (1932-1950), and questions and examiners' comments in a new state examination (1940s-1950s), were analysed to identify the reasons for and direction of the curriculum change. Findings were interpreted within international and national concerns and measures related to occupational health in nursing. Lambie used the political leverage of international and national worry over tuberculosis as a nursing occupational health risk to protect nurses' health more generally. In 1933 she revised the first year of the three-year national nursing curriculum to emphasise personal hygiene and bacteriology related to cross-infection, and in 1938 introduced a State Preliminary Examination at the end of the first year of training to test this knowledge. Analysis of examinations, 1940s-1950s, confirms that the curriculum change driver was a concern to make nursing a less "hazardous profession". Nurse educators today should be aware of the variety of factors that can lead to curriculum change in nursing. In addition, concern for nurses' health

  16. 'It's complicated': Staff nurse perceptions of their influence on nursing students' learning. A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sarah E; MacLeod, Martha L; Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-04-01

    During both teacher-led clinical practica and precepted practica, students interact with, and learn from, staff nurses who work on the clinical units. It is understood that learning in clinical practice is enhanced by positive interactions between staff nurses and nursing students. While much is known about preceptors' experiences of working with nursing students, there is little evidence to date about staff nurses' perspectives of their interactions with students in teacher-led practica. To understand teacher-led clinical practica from the perspective of staff nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach answers the question: How do staff nurses perceive their contributions to nursing students' learning during teacher-led practica? Nine staff Registered Nurses (RNs) working within a regional acute care hospital in western Canada were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using cross case analysis to discover themes and findings were checked by several experienced RNs. Analysis showed that nurses' interactions with nursing students are complicated. Nurses want to "train up" their future colleagues but feel a heavy burden of responsibility for students on the wards. This sense of burden for the staff nurses is influenced by several factors: the practice environment, the clinical instructor, the students themselves, and the nurses' understanding of their own contributions to student learning. Staff nurses remain willing to support student learning despite multiple factors that contribute to a sense of burden during teacher-led practica. Workplace environment, nursing program, and personal supports are needed to support their continuing engagement in student learning. Nurses need to know how important they are as role models, and the impact their casual interactions have on student nurses' socialization into the profession. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Leadership behaviors of frontline staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardellone, Christine; Musil, Carol M; Smith, Elaine; Click, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    A recommendation in the Institute of Medicine's report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, challenges the nursing profession to enhance nursing's leadership role in health care redesign. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study examined the self-perceived leadership behaviors of RNs enrolled in a clinical ladder career pathway. A self-report survey was conducted using the Leadership Practice Inventory and a demographic questionnaire. Significant associations between continuous and categorical demographic factors and ladder levels were reported. Nurses with more experience showed fewer leadership behaviors. Leadership development is necessary for nurses in all areas of practice. The findings from this study provide evidence of the strengths and weaknesses in leadership behaviors of staff clinical RNs who often make frontline decisions for patients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. The context, influences and challenges for undergraduate nurse clinical education: Continuing the dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forber, Jan; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Davidson, Patricia; Carter, Bernie; Jackson, Debra

    2015-11-01

    Approaches to clinical education are highly diverse and becoming increasingly complex to sustain in complex milieu To identify the influences and challenges of providing nurse clinical education in the undergraduate setting and to illustrate emerging solutions. A discursive exploration into the broad and varied body of evidence including peer reviewed and grey literature. Internationally, enabling undergraduate clinical learning opportunities faces a range of challenges. These can be illustrated under two broad themes: (1) legacies from the past and the inherent features of nurse education and (2) challenges of the present, including, population changes, workforce changes, and the disconnection between the health and education sectors. Responses to these challenges are triggering the emergence of novel approaches, such as collaborative models. Ongoing challenges in providing accessible, effective and quality clinical learning experiences are apparent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plato, Nightingale, and Nursing: Can You Hear Me Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Jacqueline Michele; Fitzsimons, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    A historical perspective on how the writings of Plato influenced Florence Nightingale in the formation of nursing as a respected profession for women. Comparing Nightingale's life and legacy to Platonic philosophy demonstrates how philosophy continues to speak to the profession of nursing practice as guardians of society in the 21st century. A review of the literature using EBSCO, SAGEpub, MEDLINE, and CINAHL databases and hand searches of literature were initiated for the years 1990-2014 using the terms "Plato," "Nightingale," and "nursing" restricted to English. Florence Nightingale, known as the mother of modern-day nursing, embodied her life and work after the philosophic tenets of Plato. Plato's Allegory of the Cave influenced Nightingale's attitudes with regard to the value of education, knowledge of the good, and the importance of imparting learned knowledge to others. Plato's work spoke of educating both men and women to seek the truth, affording both sexes to become competent as future leaders in the role of guardians to society. Nightingale's emphasis of education for women as a conduit for their usefulness to society mirrored Plato's philosophy. Over 100 years after her death, the impact Florence Nightingale still has on professional nursing practice remains. Scholarship in nursing education today is infused with a liberal arts background in philosophy, ethics, and the sciences. Nightingale's holistic concepts of person, health, and environment in the practice of nursing coalesced with her statistical analyses in validating nursing actions foreshadowed the development of universal nursing knowledge and language base and meta-paradigm concepts in nursing. Further classification and categorization of Nightingale's concepts of assessing, implementing, and evaluating delivery of care became the linguistic precursors for the identification of nursing process, nursing actions, and nursing diagnoses. Plato's and Nightingale's holistic, scientific, and

  20. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Moghaddam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13.Results: Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. Conclusion: According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  1. Power and confidence in professions: lessons for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence A

    2010-12-01

    Powerful professions have the capacity to obtain leadership positions, advocate successfully in the policy arena, and secure the resources necessary to achieve their professional goals. Within the occupational therapy profession, cultivating power and confidence among our practitioners is essential to realize our full capacity for meeting society's occupational needs. Drawing from a historical analysis of the medical and nursing professions, this paper discusses the implications of power and disempowerment among health professions for their practitioners, clients, and public image. Theoretical perspectives on power from social psychology, politics, organizational management, and post-structuralism are introduced and their relevance to the profession of occupational therapy is examined. The paper concludes with recommendations for occupational therapy practitioners to analyze their individual sources of power and evaluate opportunities to develop confidence and secure power for their professional work--in venues both in and outside the workplace.

  2. New professions in librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Bottazzo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on how information-communication and network computer technology effects changes in library operation and presents new possibilities in the development and differentiation of the librarian profession. At the time of the introduction of the Internet, numerous experts were convinced that the decline of librarianship, as a profession, was only a question of time. According to such opinions, users were supposed to search and obtain information on their own and purchase books through electronic bookstores. The reality turned out to be just the opposite. Nowadays, librarians are required to make more and more complex inquiries, to provide rapid, high-quality and non-stop services, to supply documents directly by computer or onto the working table. Moreover, librarians must follow the rapid development of the profession and participate in permanent and polyvalent training. The introduction of the digitalisation of materials and the future development of libraries require that librarians familiarize themselves with complex hypertext protocols, graphic design, and marketing. Moreover, librarians are obliged to accept any change brought about during the process of technological development. Therefore, in the developed world, new professions are being established and relating to the provision of aggregate information in form of various services and products. Those professions do not only imply universal information providers but trained experts with regard to individual fields of interest.

  3. Dare to be different: transformational leadership may hold the key to reducing the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Genevieve L

    2003-03-01

    Health care leadership continues to run under a transactional style that may be causing nurses to leave the system. Nurses no longer wish to stay in the profession perhaps because they struggle ideologically with the system in which they work. However, nurses may hold the key to transforming health care and dragging it into the 21st century in terms of work practices and reform. This is because nurses are visionary, creative, involved in decision making at patient level and have gender based qualities, and communication strategies that the health care sector needs. In contrast to transaction leadership, transformational leadership and team development has a positive affect on communication and team building. The later style is ideologically suited to nurses and may ensure the future of nurses and nursing in the health care sector. The case study described in this paper was an actual working environment and one that I came across all too often as a registered nurse and clinical educator.

  4. Leadership behaviours, organizational culture and intention to stay amongst Jordanian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuAlRub, R F; Nasrallah, M A

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the impact of leadership behaviours of nurse managers and organizational culture on Jordanian nurses' intention to stay at work in public, private and university hospitals. Leadership behaviours of nurses and organizational culture are considered important factors in enhancing retention of nurses. A correlational design was used in the study. A sample of 285 Jordanian nurses was conveniently selected to complete a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of three measures; Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practise Inventory, Professional Organizational Culture questionnaire and McCain's Intent to Stay Scale. Nurse managers' leadership behaviours and organizational culture were positively associated with the level of intention to stay at work. The study variables explained almost 43% of the variance in nurses' intention to stay at work. The limitation of the study was the use of convenience sampling method. The results asserted that transformational leadership styles of nurse managers enhance positive hospitals' culture as well as the intention of nurses to stay at work. Nurse executives should promote leadership behaviours of nurse managers through training. The regulatory bodies of nursing profession in collaboration with nurse educators and administrators should help in developing competencies for nurse managers that are based on transformational leadership and incorporate such competencies in nursing education programs as well as continuous education programs. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Towards a National Discursive Construction of Nurses' Diversity Related Competencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Jæger, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    's journal, "The Nurse", covering an eight-year period it is concluded that the nursing profession understood as a community of practice continues to encounter the same type of problems related to diversity and that increased knowledge, skills and competencies are needed. The discourse of a new Bachelor......This paper will explore the premises for developing a national discursive construction of the professional competencies needed by nurses when confronted with cultural difference and intercultural contact. Based on an analysis of the Danish nursing community's articles in the Danish Nursing Union...... degree programme in nursing containing a national, standardised curriculum is therefore analysed to uncover how cultural difference and intercultural issues are prioritised in terms of learning goals and resources, and to examine whether the discourse contributes significantly to the understanding...

  6. Workplace bullying in nursing: towards a more critical organisational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Wilkes, Lesley

    2006-06-01

    Workplace bullying is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession. Bullying in nursing is frequently described in terms of 'oppressed group' behaviour or 'horizontal violence'. It is proposed that the use of 'oppressed group' behaviour theory has fostered only a partial understanding of the phenomenon in nursing. It is suggested that the continued use of 'oppressed group' behaviour as the major means for understanding bullying in nursing places a flawed emphasis on bullying as a phenomenon that exists only among nurses, rather than considering it within the broader organisational context. The work of Foucault and the 'circuits of power' model proposed by Clegg are used to provide an alternative understanding of the operation of power within organisations and therefore another way to conceive bullying in the nursing workforce.

  7. Florence Nightingale: nurse and public health pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2010-01-01

    August 2010 marks the centenary of the death of Florence Nightingale, who must be, without doubt, the most famous name in nursing. Most people, even those in the health professions, think of her as 'The Lady with the Lamp'; the heroine of the Crimean War, who tended the sick and wounded soldiers at Scutari. Important though this was, her main contribution, which continued long after Crimea, was in the organization of nursing training, in hospital planning, public and military health, and in effective collection of medical statistics.

  8. Using appreciative inquiry to transform student nurses' image of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Motshedisi E; Van Der Wal, Dirk; Botha, Annalie

    2015-08-19

    Literature provides adequate evidence of a poor perception of nursing within the profession, resulting in high rates of attrition of student nurses and newly qualified nurses. The nursing profession, in particular nurse educators, has an ethical and professional responsibility to find innovative strategies to promote the positive image of nursing amongst student nurses. The purpose of the study was to explore the potential of appreciative inquiry (AI) as an intervention teaching strategy to transform student nurses' image of nursing. A quantitative, quasi-experimental, explorative-descriptive design comprising the pretest, appreciative inquiry as intervention, and the post-test was used. Convenience sampling was used to select third and fourth year college and university student nurses in the Gauteng province of South Africa for the pre- and the post-test respectively. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed by SPSS version 20.0. The pretest results revealed a mix of positive and negative perceptions of the image of nursing amongst student nurses. The negative perceptions of the image of nursing that needed intervention included the working conditions of nurses, and the perception of nursing as a profession that was not respected and appreciated. The post-test results showed a significant and positive change in the student nurses' perception of the image of nursing as a respected and appreciated profession. Although AI resulted in a negative to positive change in some aspects of student nurses' image of nursing, the negative perceptions of the working conditions of nurses remained and became more negative. The positive image of gender in nursing was enhanced following the implementation of AI. Appreciative inquiry demonstrated potential as a teaching strategy to produce a positive nursing image change and positive orientation towards nursing amongst student nurses.

  9. Using continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: A qualitative interview study of physicians’ and nurses' practice in three European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, J.; Rietjens, J.; Bruinsma, S.; Deliens, L.; Sterckx, S.; Mortier, F.; Brown, J.; Mathers, N.; van der Heide, A.; Consortium, UNBIASED

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extensive debate surrounds the practice of continuous sedation until death to control refractory symptoms in terminal cancer care. We examined reported practice of United Kingdom, Belgian and Dutch physicians and nurses.\\ud Methods: Qualitative case studies using interviews.\\ud Setting: Hospitals, the domestic home and hospices or palliative care units.\\ud Participants: In all, 57 Physicians and 73 nurses involved in the care of 84 cancer patients.\\ud Results: UK respondents repor...

  10. Profession and professionalisation in medical radiation science as an emergent profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Jenny; Radloff, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Deregulation, reduced operating costs, new ways of organising the professional workforce, increasing competition within the healthcare sector and increasing consumer expectations are factors that challenge any health profession. This paper, which forms part of the first author's doctoral study on continuing professional development in medical radiation science, details the journey of medical radiation science as a profession in Australia. Specifically, the paper examines the challenges confronting practitioners in their struggle to be recognised as a profession in its own right. Findings: The challenges facing medical radiation science practitioners included low professional self-esteem and apathy, which adversely affects their willingness and ability to continue learning and to assume increasing work responsibilities which are essential attributes of a health professional. Low self-esteem and apathy are also preventing practitioners from venturing beyond their comfort zone of daily workplace practices. This ultimately impacts on their ability to advance clinical practice in response to a constantly changing health care system. Conclusion: Despite the current difficulties confronting the profession, it is possible for practitioners to assume a more proactive role in moving the profession forward. As part of the solution to improving practitioners' low self-esteem and to rekindling their enthusiasm for the profession, the authors propose that continuing professional development programs should go beyond simply assisting practitioners in advancing clinical competence. They should also aim to empower practitioners to develop their reflective skills. Reflection is now widely promoted in healthcare professions as one of the means of enhancing clinical practice and improving healthcare delivery. To this end, educational designers should incorporate reflection into professional development programs as both a learning goal and a strategy. Helping practitioners to

  11. Profession and professionalisation in medical radiation science as an emergent profession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jenny [RMIT University, Medical Radiations, School of Medical Sciences, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.sim@rmit.edu.au; Radloff, Alex [Central Queensland University, Rockhampton Campus, Bruce Highway, North Rockhampton, Queensland 4702 (Australia)], E-mail: pvcas@cqu.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: Deregulation, reduced operating costs, new ways of organising the professional workforce, increasing competition within the healthcare sector and increasing consumer expectations are factors that challenge any health profession. This paper, which forms part of the first author's doctoral study on continuing professional development in medical radiation science, details the journey of medical radiation science as a profession in Australia. Specifically, the paper examines the challenges confronting practitioners in their struggle to be recognised as a profession in its own right. Findings: The challenges facing medical radiation science practitioners included low professional self-esteem and apathy, which adversely affects their willingness and ability to continue learning and to assume increasing work responsibilities which are essential attributes of a health professional. Low self-esteem and apathy are also preventing practitioners from venturing beyond their comfort zone of daily workplace practices. This ultimately impacts on their ability to advance clinical practice in response to a constantly changing health care system. Conclusion: Despite the current difficulties confronting the profession, it is possible for practitioners to assume a more proactive role in moving the profession forward. As part of the solution to improving practitioners' low self-esteem and to rekindling their enthusiasm for the profession, the authors propose that continuing professional development programs should go beyond simply assisting practitioners in advancing clinical competence. They should also aim to empower practitioners to develop their reflective skills. Reflection is now widely promoted in healthcare professions as one of the means of enhancing clinical practice and improving healthcare delivery. To this end, educational designers should incorporate reflection into professional development programs as both a learning goal and a strategy. Helping

  12. A profession termed Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernández Areal, Ph. D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New technologies can foster the impression that journalism, as a profession will become extinct probably in a short term. Anybody can have access to any information sources as well as to transmit – through Internet- all sorts of messages at an unusual speed, and this fact seems to support the idea that no technical training will be needed in the future not even an specific cultural background will be required, much less an university degree or qualification that ensures a responsible and appropriate practice of the modern social communication. The Federation of Journalists Associations in Spain (FAPE in its Draft of the Professional Statute is in favor of a graduated or qualified profession at an university level, and its Commission for Complaints has been developing a successful work regarding the professional self-regulation and self-control for the benefit of society. Therefore, there are good reasons for being optimist. Journalism, as a profession, is not going to disappear, and maybe it is time to consider it, really, as an academic qualified profession.

  13. Professions and their Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John

    2005-01-01

    analytical strategies can frame in sufficiently complex ways what it means to be a professional today. It is assumed that at least four main issues must be dealt with in order to conduct a satisfactory analysis of professions and their identities. Firstly, it is of fundamental strategic importance that one...

  14. Professions, paradoxes and organizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Jacobsen, Alice

    This paper empirically investigates organizational change in the making as it is constructed in the interaction between managers and professions in a school setting. The empirical basis is three Danish upper secondary schools, all in the process of translating a school reform into practice. Using...

  15. Insights on the development of TCM nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-Qiang Zhao; Fen Zhou; Ying Sun; Run-Xi Tian; Je Kan Adler-Collins; Yu-Fang Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Chinese medicine nursing (TCM nursing) is one of the highlights of nursing profession in China, which plays a significant role in Chinese healthcare system. However, bottlenecks exist in TCM nursing development. It’s necessary to explore the discipline connotation and advantages of TCM nursing in nursing education and clinical practice and introduce modern nursing concepts. Methods: We analysis the connotations of TCM nursing, the bottlenecks it faces, and strategie...

  16. How American Nurses Association Code of Ethics informs genetic/genomic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tluczek, Audrey; Twal, Marie E; Beamer, Laura Curr; Burton, Candace W; Darmofal, Leslie; Kracun, Mary; Zanni, Karen L; Turner, Martha

    2018-01-01

    Members of the Ethics and Public Policy Committee of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics prepared this article to assist nurses in interpreting the American Nurses Association (2015) Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code) within the context of genetics/genomics. The Code explicates the nursing profession's norms and responsibilities in managing ethical issues. The nearly ubiquitous application of genetic/genomic technologies in healthcare poses unique ethical challenges for nursing. Therefore, authors conducted literature searches that drew from various professional resources to elucidate implications of the code in genetic/genomic nursing practice, education, research, and public policy. We contend that the revised Code coupled with the application of genomic technologies to healthcare creates moral obligations for nurses to continually refresh their knowledge and capacities to translate genetic/genomic research into evidence-based practice, assure the ethical conduct of scientific inquiry, and continually develop or revise national/international guidelines that protect the rights of individuals and populations within the context of genetics/genomics. Thus, nurses have an ethical responsibility to remain knowledgeable about advances in genetics/genomics and incorporate emergent evidence into their work.

  17. Leadership the challenge for the information profession

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Leadership skills are required at all levels of the profession. Using theoretical concepts and models, coupled with practical tools, this book encourages readers to think about their own leadership and the leadership provided by others around them as the basis for continuing improvement in management and professional practice.

  18. Strategic analyses in nursing schools: attracting, educating, and graduating more nursing students: part I--strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J; Mahesh, Sathiadev; McLendon, Christy L; Henson, Steve W; Jacques, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The shortage of nurses in the United States remains a persistent problem. Faced with this reality, nursing programs in colleges and universities continue to struggle to expand enrollment levels to meet the spiraling demand. This research uses familiar tools in strategic management: the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis and stakeholder analysis as initial steps to draw more students to the profession of nursing. In a 2-round modified Delphi survey, chief administrators of schools of nursing identify the main SWOT of schools of nursing and the important internal and external stakeholders that influence nursing school success. The authors of the research suggest ways to use that knowledge to increase the enrollment level of nursing students. Part I of this research focuses on the SWOT analyses.

  19. Cautious caregivers: gender stereotypes and the sexualization of men nurses' touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joan A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the experience of men nurses and the ways in which gender relations structure different work experiences for women and men in the same profession. Men are now entering the nursing profession in record numbers and challenging the notion that men are inappropriate in caregiver roles or incapable of providing compassionate and sensitive care. A limitation of the current state of knowledge regarding caring and men nurses is that it is primarily focused on men nursing students, not practising nurses. Little is known about men nurses' practices of caring and how such practices reflect the gendered nature of nursing and nurses' caring work. The theme of men nurses as cautious caregivers emerged from data that were collected in two rounds of semi-structured interviews with eight men nurses practising in Nova Scotia, Canada. Thematic analysis, informed by feminist theory and masculinity theory, was used as the method for analysing the data. For men nurses, the stereotype of men as sexual aggressors is compounded by the stereotype that men nurses are gay. These stereotypes sexualize men nurses' touch and create complex and contradictory situations of acceptance, rejection and suspicion of men as nurturers and caregivers. They also situate men nurses in highly stigmatized roles in which they are subject to accusations of inappropriate behaviour. For men nurses, this situation is lived as a heightened sense of vulnerability and the continual need to be cautious while touching and caring for patients. Ultimately, this situation impacts on the ability of men nurses to do the caring work they came into nursing to do.

  20. Developing the profession of radiography: Making use of oral history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, Sola; Iphofen, Ron

    2005-01-01

    This paper is based on ongoing research into the profession of radiography using the oral history method. Knowledge of radiographic practice as a profession has in the past been based on what is written or learnt from other professions both within and beyond the field of health care. The profession has experienced substantial technological and sociological changes both in training and in practice over the past few decades and these look set to continue into the immediate future. Evidence-based practice is invoked as a quality measure on all health professions, and part of the body of knowledge which forms the evidence base of practice development involves an understanding of how the profession has responded to change and what this might mean for the further changes it is likely to meet. This paper explores the potential role of oral history research as a tool for the development of knowledge about the practice of radiography

  1. Effectiveness of different nursing handover styles for ensuring continuity of information in hospitalised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulers, Marian; Lucas, Cees; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    An accurate handover of clinical information is of great importance to continuity and safety of care. If clinically relevant information is not shared accurately and in a timely manner it may lead to adverse events, delays in treatment and diagnosis, inappropriate treatment and omission of care.

  2. Doing Foucault: inquiring into nursing knowledge with Foucauldian discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Rusla Anne; Clinton, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Foucauldian discourse analysis (FDA) is a methodology that is well suited to inquiring into nursing knowledge and its organization. It is a critical analytic approach derived from Foucault's histories of science, madness, medicine, incarceration and sexuality, all of which serve to exteriorize or make visible the 'positive unconscious of knowledge' penetrating bodies and minds. Foucauldian discourse analysis (FDA) holds the potential to reveal who we are today as nurses and as a profession of nursing by facilitating our ability to identify and trace the effects of the discourses that determine the conditions of possibility for nursing practice that are continuously shaping and (re)shaping the knowledge of nursing and the profession of nursing as we know it. In making visible the chain of knowledge that orders the spaces nurses occupy, no less than their subjectivities, FDA is a powerful methodology for inquiring into nursing knowledge based on its provocation of deep critical reflection on the normalizing power of discourse. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Merely a stepping stone? Professional identity and career prospects following postgraduate mental health nurse training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, N; Askey-Jones, S; Laker, C

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated mental health nurse training attracts talented graduates, many with a psychology degree. Our study shows that such trainees feel incompatible with the nursing culture. Consequently, professional identification is inhibited, and on qualifying these nurses may choose to develop their careers elsewhere. Nurse educators and mentors should pay greater attention to nurturing a positive professional identity in trainees. Alongside their attainment of knowledge and skills, nursing trainees are moulded by a professional culture and inculcated to norms of beliefs and behaviour. The process of professional identification may be inhibited by accelerated nurse training and an influx of psychology graduates potentially using mental health nursing qualification as a springboard to other career opportunities. This study explored facilitators and barriers to professional identification in newly qualified nurses of accelerated postgraduate training. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 nurses who had recently completed a postgraduate diploma in mental health nursing at King's College London. Participants identified more with the mental health field than with the broader profession of nursing. They defined their practice in terms of values rather than skills and found difficulty in articulating a distinct role for mental health nursing. Although participants had found experience in training and as a registered practitioner rewarding, they were concerned that nursing may not fulfil their aspirations. Professional identity is likely to be a major factor in satisfaction and retention of nurses. Training and continuing professional development should promote career advancement within clinical nursing practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Vaccinations among students in health care professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lindeman, Katharina; Kugler, Joachim; Klewer, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Incomplete vaccinations among students in health care professions lead to an increased risk for infections. Until now, only few studies related to this issue do exist. Therefore vaccinations and awareness regarding the importance of vaccinations among students in health care professions should be investigated. All 433 students of a regional college for health care professionals were asked to complete a standardized and anonymous questionnaire. Altogether 301 nursing students and 131 students of the other health care professions participated. About 66.1 percent of nursing students and 50.4 percent of students of other health care professions rated vaccination as "absolutely necessary". Different percentages of completed vaccinations were reported for tetanus (79.1 percent versus 64.4 percent), hepatitis B (78.7 percent versus 77.5 percent) and hepatitis A (74.1 percent versus 68.5 percent). 6.3 percent versus 15.4 percent did not know if they were vaccinated against tetanus, hepatitis B (5.3 percent versus 7.7 percent) and hepatitis A (5.6 percent versus 9.2 percent). While approximately half of the students reported "primary vaccination and booster" against mumps (59.5 percent versus 53.5 percent), measles (58.8 percent versus 54.6 percent) and rubella (58.3 percent versus 55.4 percent), this was reported less for pertussis (43.8 percent versus 39.8 percent) and varicella (32.4 percent versus 25.2 percent). The results indicate inadequate vaccination status in the investigated students. In addition, a gap between the awareness of the importance of vaccinations and personal preventive behavior became obvious. Therefore, education of these future health professionals still requires issues related to vaccinations.

  5. South African undergraduate nursing students experience of intra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intra-professional violence is taking its toll on undergraduate nursing students and is ... to leave the profession even before embarking on their new careers. ... The population consisted of undergraduate nursing students registered at nursing ...

  6. An analysis of the writings of Janet Geister and Mary Roberts regarding the problems of private duty nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, L S

    1992-01-01

    Fifty years ago there were two widely circulated nursing journals, each with a unique purpose and style. The Trained Nurse and Hospital Review was the privately owned older journal, and the American Journal of Nursing was the voice of the professional organization. Each journal was edited by a strong nursing leader, Janet Geister and Mary Roberts, respectively. Each editor had many years of service to the nursing profession in varied capacities. Naturally, each had distinctly different interests, visions, and styles of communication. These editors witnessed and commented on the change in the sphere of nursing practice from a private duty and public health orientation to one that eventually became dominated by the hospital. Although their approaches differed, both recognized the need for organization, versatility, and creative problem solving. However, the legacy of these leaders must be considered in view of the gap that continues to exist between practicing nurses and the American Nurses' Association leadership.

  7. A strategy for implementing genomics into nursing practice informed by three behaviour change theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Verity; Tonkin, Emma; Lancastle, Deborah; Kirk, Maggie

    2016-06-01

    Genomics is an ever increasing aspect of nursing practice, with focus being directed towards improving health. The authors present an implementation strategy for the incorporation of genomics into nursing practice within the UK, based on three behaviour change theories and the identification of individuals who are likely to provide support for change. Individuals identified as Opinion Leaders and Adopters of genomics illustrate how changes in behaviour might occur among the nursing profession. The core philosophy of the strategy is that genomic nurse Adopters and Opinion Leaders who have direct interaction with their peers in practice will be best placed to highlight the importance of genomics within the nursing role. The strategy discussed in this paper provides scope for continued nursing education and development of genomics within nursing practice on a larger scale. The recommendations might be of particular relevance for senior staff and management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory analysis were used to develop a theoretical understanding of clinical nurse leader practice that can facilitate systematic and replicable implementation across health-care settings. The core phenomenon of clinical nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership, which involves four fundamental activities: facilitating effective ongoing communication; strengthening intra and interprofessional relationships; building and sustaining teams; and supporting staff engagement. Clinical nurse leaders continuously communicate and develop relationships within and across professions to promote and sustain information exchange, engagement, teamwork and effective care processes at the microsystem level. Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming health-care quality. Managers can use this study's findings to frame an implementation strategy that addresses theoretical domains of clinical nurse leader practice to help ensure practice success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of e-learning in a continuing education context on nursing care: a review of systematic qualitative, quantitative and mixed studies reviews (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Bouix-Picasso, Julien; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2017-10-16

    Continuing education (CE) is imperative to the future of professional nursing. The use of e-learning by registered nurses for CE is spreading. A review of systematic reviews will be conducted to develop a broad picture of the effects of e-learning in a CE context on nursing care. Systematic qualitative, quantitative and mixed studies reviews published in English, French or Spanish from 1 January 2006 will be included. The outcomes of interest will be extracted and analysed inductively and deductively from the Nursing Care Performance Framework; some themes include nursing resources, nurses' practice environment, processes, professional satisfaction, and nursing sensitive outcomes. Three reviewers will independently screen first the title and abstract of the papers, and then the full texts in order to assess eligibility. Two teams of two reviewers will extract the selected reviews' characteristics and data. The results from various types of reviews will be integrated using a data-based convergent synthesis design. We will conduct a thematic synthesis and transform all quantitative and mixed data into qualitative data. Ethics approval is not required for review of systematic reviews. We will summarise evidence concerning the negative, neutral and positive effects of various forms of e-learning on different aspects of nursing care. If we find gaps in the literature, we will highlight them and suggest ideas for further research. We will also focus on positive effects and present, if possible, the components and characteristics of e-learning interventions that were found to be successful. We will present this protocol and results in international conferences in nursing, medical, and health informatics domains. We will also submit the results of our work for peer-review publication in a journal indexed in the international bibliographic database of biomedical information. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  10. The case for renewed investment in the district nursing specialist practitioner qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Fiona

    2013-09-01

    District nursing as a profession has been under significant threat over the last few years due to a lack of foresight and funding, resulting in an undervalued and underinvested workforce. The once-heralded specialist practitioner programme was slowly decommissioned in all but a handful of universities, leaving no alternative but for community trusts to employ staff nurses in team leader roles without the development the added qualification gave them. In light of the renewed focus on the fundamental advancement of district nurses and recent Government publications clearly reinforcing the district nurse's role, this article argues for the need for educational commissioners and workforce planners to commit to continued investment in this vital profession.

  11. Burnout in College Seniors Preparing for the Human Services Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, James G.

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to assess the level and intensity of burnout in 165 California State University at Long Beach college seniors preparing for the human services professions, specifically teaching, nursing, criminal justice, and social welfare. A comparison group of 80 engineering seniors was also assessed. The 40-item…

  12. Functions of Conflict: Perceived Utility in the Emergent Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Alan B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes perceptions of conflict as a utility (functional conflict) among 1,953 department executives in programs of social work, education, and nursing (the emergent professions); and analyzes perceptual data in terms of organizational conflict climate and demographics. Variations in terms of perceived operational utility of organizational…

  13. Intergenerational conflict in nursing preceptorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Vicki; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2013-09-01

    Within the preceptorship model of clinical teaching/learning, the creation of a cohesive relationship between a preceptor and a nursing student highly influences the overall success of the experience. Invariably, preceptors and students tend to be of different generations and as such, there exists within this context the potential for generational misunderstandings and conflict. A phenomenological study guided by van Manen's approach to human science research was conducted. The aim of this study is to explore the phenomenon of preceptorship in the intergenerational context. A purposive sample of seven preceptors and seven nursing students was recruited from an undergraduate nursing program. The collective experience of all participants was illuminated through three key themes: being affirmed, being challenged, and being on a pedagogical journey. In this article we focus on encountering conflict, a key subtheme of being challenged, and one that emerged from the participants' narratives. The study findings suggest that interpersonal conflict continues to be a reality in our profession, owing to which a collective effort must be made by nurse educators, practicing nurses, and nursing students to effect change and create a more cohesive culture. The findings have the potential to enhance generational understanding and foster a more cohesive culture in clinical practice settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An overview of nursing in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Saleh AlYami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving and maintaining a stable nursing workforce is an important issue for the well-being of the rapidly growing population of Saudi Arabia. However, high turnover of expatriate staff and low recruitment of Saudi nationals have led to a serious staff shortage in the professions, particularly of well-qualified and experienced nurses. Nursing leaders need to work to improve the image of nurses and facilitate the recruitment of women into the nursing profession. Reduced working hours and part-time contracts with increased salaries and benefits could attract more young women to the profession, as might the provision of facilities such as private transportation and on-site childcare. Furthermore, establishing a national association for nurses would advance the nursing profession and help to ensure that all nurses undertake fully comprehensive training before entering the workforce.

  15. The Need and Curricula for Health Professions Education Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Daley, Barbara J.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the emerging social and organizational contexts for health professions education and the rationale for foundational adult and continuing education concepts to be included in the curricula of HPE graduate programs.

  16. Organizational learning and continuous quality improvement: examining the impact on nursing home performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Kent V; Wagar, Terry H

    2002-01-01

    Interest is growing in learning more about the ability of total quality management and continuous quality improvement (TQM/CQI) initiatives to contribute to the performance of healthcare organizations. A major factor in the successful implementation of TQM/CQI is the seminal contribution of an organization's culture. Many implementation efforts have not succeeded because of a corporate culture that failed to stress broader organizational learning. This may help to explain why some TQM/CQI programs have been unsuccessful in improving healthcare organization performance. Organizational performance variables and organizational learning orientation were assessed in a sample of 181 Canadian long-term care organizations that had implemented a formal TQM/CQI program. Categorical regression analysis shows that, in the absence of a strong corporAte culture that stresses organizational learning and employee development, few performance enhancements are reported. The results of the assessment suggest that a TQM/CQI program without the backing of a strong organizational learning culture may be insufficient to achieve augmented organizational performance.

  17. Feeling like a nurse: re-calling the spirit of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deborah; Smythe, Elizabeth

    2008-12-01

    To explore the essential meaning of being a nurse. Nine registered nurses were each asked to write a story of a time when they felt like a nurse. Analysis was informed by Heideggerian hermeneutic philosophy, seeking to reveal the phenomenon of "feeling like a nurse." As part of a workshop on phenomenological methodology, participants were invited to reflect on a personal experience of feeling like a nurse. These documents were analyzed according to the method of van Manen. Participants were kept informed throughout each phase. Feelings announce primordial meaning of feeling like a nurse. Nurses experience the call as mood attuned by an anxiety that creates possibilities for authentic caring. It is a way of being that encompasses watching and acting, doing to and caring for, and taking over and giving back. Moreover, it is after the encounter that the essential meaning is more clearly revealed. We argue that there is value in continuing to question the meaning of "being a nurse." Amid a complex and increasingly technological world, this calls the profession to remember the human encounter at the heart of all nursing.

  18. Continuous Sedation Until Death With or Without the Intention to Hasten Death-A Nationwide Study in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the removal of consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a controversial practice. Some consider CSD a palliative treatment, whereas others claim that CSD is frequently used with the intention to hasten death. In nursing

  19. Bridging the Gap Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: A Focus Group Study in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a

  20. Mellem bureaukrati og profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niels; Nielsen, Ulla Søbjerg; Nielsen, Iben Husted

    2015-01-01

    Forhold mellem profession og bureaukrati undersøges med afsæt i to cases, sygeplejersker på hospital og sygehussocialrådgivere. Det empiriske materiale er fokusgruppeinterviews med to grupper af sygeplejersker og to grupper af socialrådgivere. Perspektivet er mikrosociologisk og der trækkes på an....... Et markant fund er, at mens socialrådgiverne fremstår som overvejende loyale overfor klienter, så udtrykker sygeplejerskerne en højere grad af loyalitet med organisatoriske mål og logikker....

  1. Bullying in a caring profession: reasons, results, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Barbara S; Williams-Evans, Shiphrah

    2011-10-01

    The theories of Florence Nightingale and Jean Watson provide a framework for the caring work of nurses. Ironically, this caring profession struggles with bullying. Bullying has both physiological and psychological ramifications for the person being bullied and a negative impact on the organization and patient care. Strategies to address bullying include education, developing codes of acceptable conduct for the workplace, and a zero-tolerance policy. Mental health nurses have a vital role in helping nurses return to roles of caring. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Why do student nurses want to be nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Paula; Perkinton, Louise; Davies, Fiona

    Nursing became an all graduate entry profession in September 2013; this move and the publication of the Francis report have brought the debate around nurse education and nurses' capacity to care into sharper focus. There is much debate over what makes a good nurse and whether graduate nurses lack care and compassion. We asked a cohort of pre-registration student nurses on the first day of their course about their motivations to join the profession, what being a nurse meant to them and which aspects of nursing they valued most. The demographics of the degree student group were similar to those of diploma students. Reasons cited for entering the profession and views on the nurse's role showed that students' motivations and perceptions focused on nursing as a caring rather than a technical profession. The characteristics of the degree students, their strong motivation to care and perception of nursing in altruistic terms contradict the media image of student nurses as being primarily academically, technically and career driven.

  3. Migrating for a Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2015-01-01

    a strong sense of agency and self-empowerment. In the post-WWII period, numerous Caribbean women trained in nursing at British hospitals that have been described as marred by race and gender related inequality and associated forms of exploitation. Yet, the nurses interviewed about this training emphasised......Youths from the Global South migrating for further education often face various forms of discrimination. This Caribbean case study discusses how conditions in the home country can provide a foundation for educational migration that helps the migrants overcome such obstacles and even develop...... in which it enabled these Caribbean women to stake out a new life for themselves....

  4. Nurse migration from India: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L; Conroy, Shelley F; Bader, Susan Gerding

    2015-12-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India where nurses are increasingly outmigrating to practice nursing in surrounding countries and abroad. This is important globally because countries with the lowest nursing and healthcare workforce capacities have the poorest health outcomes. This review sought to synthesize and unify the evidence about nurse migration from India and includes a look at nurse retention within India. A comprehensive literature review was performed to synthesize and unify both qualitative and quantitative research. Bibliographic databases searched included CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EconLit using associated keywords for empirical and descriptive literature published between January 2004 and May 2014. Hand searches of the Nursing Journal of India from 2004 to February 2014 and the Journal of Nursing Research Society of India from its inception in 2007-February 2014 were also completed. 29 studies were selected and analyzed for the review. Data were appraised for quality; reduced through sub-categorization; extracted; and coded into a framework. Thematic interpretation occurred through comparing and contrasting performed by multiple reviewers. Findings included an exponential growth in nurse recruitment efforts, nurse migration, and a concomitant growth in educational institutions within India with regional variations in nurse migration patterns. Decision-making factors for migration were based on working conditions, salience of family, and the desire for knowledge, skill, technology, adventure and personal enrichment. Challenges associated with migration included questionable recruiting practices, differing scopes of practice encountered after migration and experiences of racism and cultural differences. A shift toward a positive transformation of nursing status in India has resulted in an increased respect for individual nurses and the profession of nursing. This was attributed to the increased globalization of nursing. Results from this

  5. Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Judie

    2010-07-01

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and recruitment issues, and workforce diversity.

  6. Career choices in health care: is nursing a special case? A content analysis of survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miers, Margaret E; Rickaby, Caroline E; Pollard, Katherine C

    2007-09-01

    As demand for nurses and other health professionals continues to outstrip supply it is important to understand what motivates individuals to join a non-medical health profession. The objectives of this study were to investigate students' reasons for choosing a particular nursing specialism, midwifery or other non-medical health profession, and to compare motivation factors across professions, gender, age, level of award, prior qualifications, prior experience and over time. A prospective follow-up study collected survey responses at the beginning and end of pre-qualifying professional programmes. The study took place in one large United Kingdom faculty. The study participants were 775 first-year students undertaking non-medical health professional programmes and 393 qualifying students. An open-ended question was included in a self-completed questionnaire administered at entry and at qualification. Content analysis identified themes. Altruism was the most frequently cited reason for wishing to join a non-medical health profession, followed by personal interest/abilities, professional values/rewards, and prior experience of the area. Students entering nursing were less likely to cite an altruistic motivation than those entering other non-medical health professions (chi(2)=21.61, df=1, pvalues/rewards (chi(2)=20.38, df=8, p=0.009). Students on degree level programmes were more likely to report altruism than those on diploma level courses (chi(2)=17.37, df=1, pvalues/rewards (chi(2)=6.67, p=0.010) decreased over time. Findings suggest that although a service orientation remains a key factor in choosing nursing, students also look for a career which matches their interests and attributes, as well as offering professional values and rewards. Nursing may be in danger of losing service orientated recruits to other non-medical health professions.

  7. Conflict management styles in the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Susan; Hamilton, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine prevalent conflict management styles chosen by students in nursing and to contrast these styles with those chosen by students in allied health professions. The associations among the level of professional health care education and the style chosen were also determined. A convenience sample of 126 students in a comprehensive university completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which requires respondents to choose behaviors most characteristic of their response to conflict and classifies these behaviors as one of five styles. There was no significant difference between the prevalent conflict management styles chosen by graduate and undergraduate nursing students and those in allied health. Some of the students were already licensed in their discipline; others had not yet taken a licensing exam. Licensure and educational level were not associated with choice of styles. Women and men had similar preferences. The prevalent style for nursing students was compromise, followed by avoidance. In contrast, avoidance, followed by compromise and accommodation, was the prevalent style for allied health students. When compared to the TKI norms, slightly more than one half of all participants chose two or more conflict management styles, commonly avoidance and accommodation at the 75th percentile or above. Only 9.8% of the participants chose collaboration at that level. Implications for nurse educators, researchers, and administrators are discussed.

  8. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  9. Monitoring the newly qualified nurses in Sweden: the Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education (LANE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallin Lars

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education (LANE study was initiated in 2002, with the aim of longitudinally examining a wide variety of individual and work-related variables related to psychological and physical health, as well as rates of employee and occupational turnover, and professional development among nursing students in the process of becoming registered nurses and entering working life. The aim of this paper is to present the LANE study, to estimate representativeness and analyse response rates over time, and also to describe common career pathways and life transitions during the first years of working life. Methods Three Swedish national cohorts of nursing students on university degree programmes were recruited to constitute the cohorts. Of 6138 students who were eligible for participation, a total of 4316 consented to participate and responded at baseline (response rate 70%. The cohorts will be followed prospectively for at least three years of their working life. Results Sociodemographic data in the cohorts were found to be close to population data, as point estimates only differed by 0-3% from population values. Response rates were found to decline somewhat across time, and this decrease was present in all analysed subgroups. During the first year after graduation, nearly all participants had qualified as nurses and had later also held nursing positions. The most common reason for not working was due to maternity leave. About 10% of the cohorts who graduated in 2002 and 2004 intended to leave the profession one year after graduating, and among those who graduated in 2006 the figure was almost twice as high. Intention to leave the profession was more common among young nurses. In the cohort who graduated in 2002, nearly every fifth registered nurse continued to further higher educational training within the health professions. Moreover, in this cohort, about 2% of the participants had left the nursing

  10. [Reflections on Occupational Health Nursing in Taiwan: Challenges and Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Ling; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Liou, Yiing-Mei; Chou, Yen-Fang; Chang, Tsai-Hsiu; Shiao, Shu-Chu Judith

    2018-04-01

    The development of the occupational health nursing profession has promoted stable and healthy human resources in Taiwan. In order to improve the occupational safety, health, and healthcare of workers, the professional core competencies and role functions of occupational health nursing is of utmost importance. This article investigated the current status of occupational health nursing education, role functions, practice scope, and the development and responsibilities of professional associations and proposed the challenges to and the future prospects of the development of occupational health nursing in Taiwan. The key findings include: (1) the role functions and practice scope of occupational health nursing; (2) occupational health nursing courses should be included in the required credits of Department of Nursing and master and doctor programs in occupational health nursing should be established; (3) a certification system of occupational health nursing should be established as soon as possible; (4) the professional associations for occupational health nursing should take responsibility for continuing education and training; and (5) interdisciplinary collaborations among relevant occupational health professionals should be strengthened.

  11. A moral profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, Roger; Terry, Louise; Atherley, Siobhan; Hahessy, Sinead; Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Evans, Marilyn; Ferguson, Karen; Carr, Graham; Cedar, S H

    2017-01-01

    Lack of compassion is claimed to result in poor and sometimes harmful nursing care. Developing strategies to encourage compassionate caring behaviours are important because there is evidence to suggest a connection between having a moral orientation such as compassion and resulting caring behaviour in practice. This study aimed to articulate a clearer understanding of compassionate caring via nurse educators' selection and use of published texts and film. This study employed discourse analysis. Participants and research context: A total of 41 nurse educators working in universities in the United Kingdom (n = 3), Ireland (n = 1) and Canada (n = 1) completed questionnaires on the narratives that shaped their understanding of care and compassion. The desire to understand others and how to care compassionately characterised educators' choices. Most narratives were examples of kindness and compassion. A total of 17 emphasised the importance of connecting with others as a central component of compassionate caring, 10 identified the burden of caring, 24 identified themes of abandonment and of failure to see the suffering person and 15 narratives showed a discourse of only showing compassion to those 'deserving' often understood as the suffering person doing enough to help themselves. These findings are mostly consistent with work in moral philosophy emphasising the particular or context and perception or vision as well as the necessity of emotions. The narratives themselves are used by nurse educators to help explicate examples of caring and compassion (or its lack). To feel cared about people need to feel 'visible' as though they matter. Nurses need to be alert to problems that may arise if their 'moral vision' is influenced by ideas of desert and how much the patient is doing to help himself or herself.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Nursing Education and Other Forms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper was to highlight points that are necessary to bridge the gaps, where they exist, in relation to the structures, process and outcome of nursing education when compared with those of other professions. As a profession, nursing is broad in scope, and nurse practitioners are expected to possess a body ...

  13. Risky Professions? Risk of Disability in Professions in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Arne Tufte

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern professions provide important and essential services like engineering, financial services, and welfare state services. Sustaining a sufficient supply of these services requires professionals to remain in the workforce as long as possible. This article examines variation in the risk of disability pension among individuals with different professional education backgrounds according to the status of the profession and its primary task (i.e., caring for others, “life” professions; or providing other kinds of services, “thing” professions. Event history analy-sis was employed to examine register data for the Norwegian population from 1992 through 2008, with gender, age at completed education, birth year, and social status as control variables. The results indicate that individuals in low-status life professions were exposed to a greater risk of disability pension than individuals with other professional education backgrounds. Possible explanations are mechanisms related to selection effects, physical and mental job strain, and professional ethics.

  14. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Nurses and nephrology in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pietro, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    An acceleration in the professionalization of Italian nurses has taken place in recent years. This pattern, together with the increasing prevalence of kidney diseases and the decreasing number of active nephrologists, makes a new collaborative structure between nurses and nephrologists both possible and welcome. This article describes the recent changes and future prospects of the Italian nursing profession. Observations about nephrology are based on interviews conducted with key opinion leaders of nursing in nephrology and dialysis. Italian nurses have recently acquired a status of professional autonomy. Nursing training is now fully integrated in the university system and nurses have obtained more responsibilities and a higher status within healthcare organizations. Future developments may be related to the internal articulation of the profession, supported by master courses and specialist training. Another possible evolution refers to the ongoing restructuring of the healthcare system with an emphasis on nursing activities and skills rather than medical specialties, which will lead to new and stronger managerial roles for nurses. The increase in the prevalence of kidney diseases and the declining number of nephrologists will result in a change in the distribution and utilization of nephrology services. The professionalization of nurses allows a new work division with a task shift from doctors to nurses. Italian nephrologists should seek a preferential relationship with the nursing profession, also considering the nursing shortage in several regions. Possible means to accomplish this preferential relationship could be, in addition to task shifting, nurses' involvement in research, and support for postgraduate training.

  16. [Nursing care perspectives and foresights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecordier, Didier; Jovic, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    As a continuation of its work and of the seminar on nursing sciences education in 2014, the “Association de recherche en soins infirmiers” (Arsi) organized a seminar on the 3rd and-4th of June 2016 in Nantes entitled : “nursing : perspectives and foresights”. More than fifty participants from the francophone area representing various sectors of practice : clinical, teaching, management and students gathered to debate and produce benchmarks to support the development of nursing sciences in France and to draw future directions for clinical practice and training. The successive sessions made it possible to reflect, to confront opinions, to make proposals and to identify the terms of the problematic of care and nursing knowledge today and the methodological elements relating to foresight. At the end of this very creative seminar, new avenues of reflection emerged shifting our usual look at the nurse profession. Orientations for training and practice have been defined with different stakes depending on the level of training and professional commitment. The strong links between professional, scientific and academic discipline have also been clarified, highlighting the importance to hold a high theoretical and scientific requirement, rigorous clinical practice, strong professional commitment and effective leadership.

  17. Shaping the midwifery profession in Nepal - Uncovering actors' connections using a Complex Adaptive Systems framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogren, Malin Upper; Berg, Marie; Edgren, Lars; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Wigert, Helena

    2016-12-01

    To explore how actors connect in a system aiming at promoting the establishment of a midwifery profession in Nepal. A qualitative explorative study based on the framework of Complex Adaptive Systems. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 key people representing eight different organisations (actors) promoting the development of the midwifery profession. The actors' connections can be described with a complex set of facilitators for and barriers to promoting the establishment of a midwifery profession. The identified facilitators for this establishment in Nepal are (1) a common goal and (2) a desire to collaborate, whilst the barriers are (1) different political interests and priorities, (2) competing interests of the nursing profession and societal views, (3) divergent academic opinions on a midwifery profession, and (4) insufficient communication. The results also showed that Nepalese society cannot distinguish between nursing and midwifery and that the public support for a midwifery profession was hence minimal. The move of midwifery from an occupation to a profession in Nepal is an on-going, challenging process. The study indicates the importance of understanding the motivations of, and barriers perceived by, actors that can promote or obstruct the establishment of the midwifery profession. It also points to the importance of informing the wider public about the role and responsibility of an autonomous midwifery profession. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  19. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy: Metaphors and Paradoxes

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, G; Affonso, D; Mayberry, L; Stievano, A; Alvaro, R; Sabatino, L

    2014-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms ...

  20. Gender and Perception of Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Fatma; Tarhan, Sinem; Köksal, Eda Çürükvelioglu

    2018-01-01

    There are negative impacts of gender stereotypes particularly on the education of girls and women. The purpose of this study is to examine pre-service teachers' profession perceptions within the context of gender using word association test technique and to identify the definition of the concept of "profession" depending on sex. This…

  1. Creating a New Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan, Ed.; Hannaway, Jane, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Considering that having a quality teacher is the foremost in-school predictor of students' success, ensuring teacher excellence is vital to the nation's educational system. In "Creating a New Teaching Profession," diverse scholars assess the state of human capital development in the teaching profession today and how to progress.

  2. Nurses with disabilities: can changing our educational system keep them in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie J; Guillett, Sharron E

    2008-01-01

    A recent qualitative study revealed that registered nurses with physical disabilities experience discrimination in the workplace and frequently leave their jobs and the profession. In light of these findings, it is vital that nursing faculty begin to inculcate students with an appreciation for collegial support before they enter the workplace as registered nurses. The familiar refrain "nurses eat their young" is apparently also true of nurses who have physical limitations. This article will discuss the findings from a qualitative study and offer recommendations for how nurse educators can educate students to help prevent the loss of nurses with disabilities from the profession.

  3. Sibling rivalry in nursing and the role of nurse psychotherapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, K A

    1998-01-01

    The burgeoning role of the analytically prepared nurse psychotherapist in Great Britain. To describe the struggles of nurses in this role and ways this struggle might be lessened. Observations of the author, an analytically prepared nurse psychotherapist-in-training in Great Britain. The role of the nurse psychotherapist with psychoanalytic training is in its infancy in Great Britain. Barriers to the development are both external, from outside the nursing profession, and internal, in the form of sibling rivalry or envy from less prepared nurses. Increased communication among nurses is encouraged so that a shared understanding and mutual respect may result.

  4. [Evolution of education in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo Chamorro, María Zoraida; Romero de Julián, Francisco Javier; Paniagua Vivas, María Sandra

    2016-07-26

    This study focuses on investigating the evolution of nursing studies in order to know how much this transformation has contributed to the development of the nursing profession. Literature review with data sources from different national and international databases. These sources provide an update on the ongoing evolution of nursing studies and the progress of this profession as a result of change. The competencies and skills that add value to the nursing profession are: an evidence-based practice; empathic communication; and other broad-range skills such as critical thinking. All are necessary in order to develop the profession alongside the constant changes in the health systems and the improvement of quality care. These competencies and skills should be evaluated and their achievement is being reached through the "portfolio". Innovations that enable the development of these skills can be found in education, strategies and tools used by educators and institutions.

  5. Nurses' perceptions of the organizational attributes of their practice environment in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinno, Saima; Partanen, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Aaviksoo, Ain

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine Estonian nurses' thinking with regard to how they perceive their autonomy, control over practice, teamwork and organizational support in regional, central and general hospitals. BACKGROUND; Despite the well-documented fact that there is a need to improve nurses' working environments in hospitals to promote safe patient care, in Europe broader studies on this topic have not received priority thus far. A nationally representative stratified random sample of 478 acute care hospital nurses was surveyed using the Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) instrument in 2005/2006. Nurses perceived their autonomy, control over practice and organizational support remarkably lower than nurse-physician relationships. Age and tenure were highly related to the nurses' perceptions. The Estonian nurses' ambivalent perceptions of the organizational attributes reflected the effects ascribed to hospital reforms. There is an urgent need for nurse managers to be particularly alert and attentive with regard to nurses who have been practising the profession for more than a decade. Support for their practice should be provided with the long-term goal of assuring the retention of those experienced nurses. Continuous monitoring of nurses' perceptions should be used systematically as a tool for staffing decisions at the hospital level.

  6. Una mirada de la rehabilitación desde la perspectiva de la profesión de enfermería Um olhar para a reabilitação desde a perspectiva da profissão de enfermagem A look at rehabilitation from the nursing profession's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTHA LUCÍA ALZATE POSADA

    2010-06-01

    reflexões obtidas a partir da experiência e dos resultados da pesquisa realizada pelas autoras, sobre o desenho e avaliação de um modelo de cuidado cultural da saúde para pessoas idosas em situação de discapacidade e pobreza em zonas urbano-marginais e rurais vizinhas a Bogotá, D.C., durante três anos consecutivos contados a partir de 2004. Espera-se que este artigo seja fonte de motivação para continuar indagando, aprofundando e estabelecendo práticas de enfermagem culturalmente adaptadas e voltadas para as pessoas em situação de discapacidade.A definition is presented on what rehabilitation is and entails for nursing professionals, especially when they are faced with the care of the disabled or the elderly. It begins with a literature review on the conceptualization of rehabilitation from the nursing profession's perspective and its historical development to continue with some aspects related with legislation on this subject matter, followed by a brief illustration on the rehabilitation approach given by the different authors. A definition that enables us to state what this topic is and means for the nursing professionals based on reflections about experiences as well as on the results of the study conducted by the authors, on the design and in the assessment of a culture based care model for the elderly in a situation of disability and poverty in urban and in rural deprived areas in the outskirts of Bogotá D. C., during three consecutive years as of 2004. This article is expected to become a source of motivation to continue researching, studying in depth and establishing nursing practices culturally adapted and geared towards the rehabilitation of people in a condition of disability.

  7. Continuous sedation until death: the everyday moral reasoning of physicians, nurses and family caregivers in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raus, Kasper; Brown, Jayne; Seale, Clive; Rietjens, Judith A C; Janssens, Rien; Bruinsma, Sophie; Mortier, Freddy; Payne, Sheila; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2014-02-20

    Continuous sedation is increasingly used as a way to relieve symptoms at the end of life. Current research indicates that some physicians, nurses, and relatives involved in this practice experience emotional and/or moral distress. This study aims to provide insight into what may influence how professional and/or family carers cope with such distress. This study is an international qualitative interview study involving interviews with physicians, nurses, and relatives of deceased patients in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium (the UNBIASED study) about a case of continuous sedation at the end of life they were recently involved in. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by staying close to the data using open coding. Next, codes were combined into larger themes and categories of codes resulting in a four point scheme that captured all of the data. Finally, our findings were compared with others and explored in relation to theories in ethics and sociology. The participants' responses can be captured as different dimensions of 'closeness', i.e. the degree to which one feels connected or 'close' to a certain decision or event. We distinguished four types of 'closeness', namely emotional, physical, decisional, and causal. Using these four dimensions of 'closeness' it became possible to describe how physicians, nurses, and relatives experience their involvement in cases of continuous sedation until death. More specifically, it shined a light on the everyday moral reasoning employed by care providers and relatives in the context of continuous sedation, and how this affected the emotional impact of being involved in sedation, as well as the perception of their own moral responsibility. Findings from this study demonstrate that various factors are reported to influence the degree of closeness to continuous sedation (and thus the extent to which carers feel morally responsible), and that some of these factors help care providers and relatives to distinguish

  8. Continuous sedation until death: the everyday moral reasoning of physicians, nurses and family caregivers in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous sedation is increasingly used as a way to relieve symptoms at the end of life. Current research indicates that some physicians, nurses, and relatives involved in this practice experience emotional and/or moral distress. This study aims to provide insight into what may influence how professional and/or family carers cope with such distress. Methods This study is an international qualitative interview study involving interviews with physicians, nurses, and relatives of deceased patients in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium (the UNBIASED study) about a case of continuous sedation at the end of life they were recently involved in. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by staying close to the data using open coding. Next, codes were combined into larger themes and categories of codes resulting in a four point scheme that captured all of the data. Finally, our findings were compared with others and explored in relation to theories in ethics and sociology. Results The participants’ responses can be captured as different dimensions of ‘closeness’, i.e. the degree to which one feels connected or ‘close’ to a certain decision or event. We distinguished four types of ‘closeness’, namely emotional, physical, decisional, and causal. Using these four dimensions of ‘closeness’ it became possible to describe how physicians, nurses, and relatives experience their involvement in cases of continuous sedation until death. More specifically, it shined a light on the everyday moral reasoning employed by care providers and relatives in the context of continuous sedation, and how this affected the emotional impact of being involved in sedation, as well as the perception of their own moral responsibility. Conclusion Findings from this study demonstrate that various factors are reported to influence the degree of closeness to continuous sedation (and thus the extent to which carers feel morally responsible), and that some of these

  9. Using social media to engage nurses in health policy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan

    2017-11-01

    To explore nurses' views on future priorities for the profession and to examine social media as an engagement tool to aid policy discussion and development. Nurses are often not directly involved in policy creation and some feel it is a process they cannot easily influence. A descriptive mixed methods study of a Twitter chat hosted by the Chief Nursing Officer for Scotland was undertaken. Data were gathered using an analytics platform and NCapture software. The framework approach aided thematic analysis to draw out themes. Sixty-four people took part in the Twitter chat (#CNOScot) and posted 444 tweets. Nurses called for investment in technology, nursing research, education and mental health. Primary care and advanced practice roles to support older adults with complex health and social care needs were also seen as vital to develop further. Social media can help reach and engage nurses in policy discussion and ensure there is better continuity between policy and practice but some groups risk being excluded using this digital medium. Nursing leaders should consider social media as one of many engagement strategies to ensure nurses and other stakeholders participate in policy debate that informs health strategy development. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

  11. A review of graduate nurse transition programs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; FitzGerald, Mary

    Despite nearly two decades of experience with graduate transition programs in Australia little evidence exists regarding the effectiveness of these programs as interventions that enhance the transition from nursing student to professional practitioner. There is general acknowledgement that this is a crucial time for people entering the profession and yet there is little agreement on what constitutes best practice for nurses' transition to the workforce. This paper challenges the status quo through a review of current programs and questions whether primacy should be given to formal transition programs or to the development of educationally supportive clinical learning environments. There is sufficient doubt in the efficacy of formal transition programs to at least investigate potential alternatives such as concentration on the development of a supportive practice culture conducive to learning. Indeed, the type of learning environment suitable for graduate nurses is likely to be one that will also facilitate the continued development and enhanced job satisfaction of the rest of the nursing team.

  12. Job stressors and coping in health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, E

    1991-01-01

    In spite of their knowledge about stressors, health hazards and coping, health professionals are in general not aware of their own health risks. In an attempt to clarify the issue results of our own studies are compared to the relevant literature. A survey on 1,248 Swiss nurses confirmed the major stressors known: ethical conflicts about appropriate patient care, team conflicts, role ambiguity, workload and organizational deficits. In doctors workload and shortage of time, combined with specific responsibility in decision making, are most prominent. Nevertheless, job satisfaction is still high in both professions. Health hazards in doctors are considerable, although life expectancy has improved and is comparable to the general public, but still lower as compared to other professionals. Depression and substance abuse are related to higher suicide rates. The specific role strain of female doctors is responsible for health risks with an alarming 10 years lower life expectancy than in the general population. Little is known about specific health hazards in nurses, except for burnout. A lack of coping research in the field makes conclusions difficult. Our own studies show limited coping skills in nurses, but good buffering effect in 1,700 Swiss dentists.

  13. Will the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Eliza LY; Wong, Samuel YS; Kung, Kenny; Cheung, Annie WL; Gao, Tiffany T; Griffiths, Sian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare workers have been identified as one of the high risk groups for being infected with influenza during influenza pandemic. Potential levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers in hospital settings are high. However, there was no study to explore the attitudes of healthcare workers in community setting towards the preparedness to the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. The aim of this study was to explore the willingness of community nurses in Hong Kong to work duri...

  14. A enfermagem na Alemanha: algumas reflexões sobre sua constituição histórica e o processo atual de profissionalização La enfermería en Alemania: algunas reflexiones sobre su constitución histórica y el proceso actual de profesionalización Nursing in Germany: some reflection about its history and actual nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisabeth Kleba

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo busco resgatar raízes da institucionalização da assistência à doença na Alemanha e da constituição da enfermagem como categoria profissional. Descrevo características do modelo assistencial alemão, situando a enfermagem enquanto profissão que sofre atualmente um processo de revisão em sua formação e em suas concepções para a prática. A abertura de cursos em nível universitário e a introdução de concepções como holísmo e instrumentalização dos pacientes para seu auto-cuidado, abre novas perspectivas para a enfermagem alemã, ao mesmo tempo em que soma esforços na construção de novos caminhos para a enfermagem internacional.Con este artículo busco rescatar raíces de la institucionalización de la asistencia a la enfermedad en Alemania y la constitución de la enfermería como categoría profesional. Describió características del modelo asistencial Aleman, situando la enfermería en cuanto a la profesión que sufre en la actualidad un proceso de revisión en su formación y de sus conceptos para la práctica. La apertura de cursos en el nivel universitario y la introducción de conceptos como holismo y instrumentalización de los pacientes para su auto-cuidado, abre nuevas perspectivas para la enfermería Alemana, al mismo tiempo suma esfuerzos en la construcción de nuevos caminos para la enfermería internacional.In this article I outline some roots of the institutionalization of the assistance for illness in Germany and the arise of nursing as a profession. I describe characteristics of the German assistance model and situate nursing as a profession, specially its formation and conceptions of its practice. The opening of university courses and the introduction of concepts like holism enabled patients to take care of themselves opening new perspectives for German nursing and stimulating the creation of new ways for nursing in the world.

  15. The Role of Nursing History in Preparing Nursing for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Arlene W.; Ramos, Mary Carol

    1995-01-01

    The development of curricula for nursing education has been a concern of nurse scholars since the genesis of the Standard Curriculum in 1917. The challenge is to build on this knowledge using traditional and nontraditional methods. If doctorally prepared nurses are to lead their profession, nursing history cannot be merely an elective. (Author/JOW)

  16. Quality engineering as a profession.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Rachel R.; Hoover, Marcey L.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of time, the profession of quality engineering has witnessed significant change, from its original emphasis on quality control and inspection to a more contemporary focus on upholding quality processes throughout the organization and its product realization activities. This paper describes the profession of quality engineering, exploring how todays quality engineers and quality professionals are certified individuals committed to upholding quality processes and principles while working with different dimensions of product development. It also discusses the future of the quality engineering profession and the future of the quality movement as a whole.

  17. Can the Institute of Medicine trump the dominant logic of nursing? Leading change in advanced practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Melanie C; Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM; 2010) has called for a transformation of the nursing profession to lead the redesign of health care in the United States. It acknowledges the need for profound change in nursing education, particularly advanced practice education, to produce the next generation of leaders in sufficient quantity to expand access, improve quality, and reduce cost. Although the IOM provides welcome validation of nursing's significant role, most of the recommendations are not new and have been advocated by nurse educators for decades. What has prevented us from creating the nimble and responsive educational programs that would ensure a sufficient corpus of advanced practice nurses with the relevant knowledge and skill to transform our ailing health system? Conceptualizing nursing as a complex, adaptive system (J.W. Begun and K. White, 1997), this article explores three examples of the dominant logic, grounded in a historical legacy that has kept the nursing profession from realizing its promise as a potent force: (a) the continuing preference for experience over education, (b) the belief that only nurses can teach nurses, and (c) the hegemony of the research doctorate. © 2014.

  18. The effects of hazardous working conditions on burnout in Macau nurses

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    Sydney X. Hu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Workplace environmental hazards increased the risk of burnout amongst clinical nurses in Macau. Better management of these factors may help to protect nursing staff and reduce the risk of burnout and attrition from the nursing profession.

  19. Do you agree with the doctor's decision to continue treatment?: A scenario-based study of hospital nurses in Italy

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    Francesca Ingravallo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A lack of social consensus on the duty to comply with a patient's request to forgo treatment was reported in Italy, but little is known about the nurses' attitudes regarding this issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Questionnaire including two clinical scenarios regarding doctor's decision to not comply with a competent patient's request to forgo treatment was administered to all nurses (n = 487 of an Italian medium-sized hospital. RESULTS: Eighty-five percent of nurses completed the study. Although 83% of participants supported a general right to self-determination, around 40% of them agreed with the doctor's decision in both scenarios. The multivariate analyses adjusted for gender, age, length of professional experience, and care setting showed that the agreement with the doctor's decision was significantly associated with nurses' personal background beliefs about self-determination and quality of life. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Many nurses have difficulty in accepting a patient's request to forgo treatment. Increasing ethical reflection and discussion at both educational and professional level, and introducing ethical consultation services would be essential to develop a consistent approach to end-of-life decisions in Italian hospitals.

  20. Using evidence-integrated e-learning to enhance case management continuing education for psychiatric nurses: a randomised controlled trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-I; Rong, Jiin-Ru; Liu, Chieh-Yu

    2014-11-01

    E-learning is a flexible strategy to improve nurses' knowledge of case management, but there are methodological limitations in previous research into the effectiveness of such programs. To describe the development and effectiveness of an evidence-integrated e-learning program in case management continuing education for Taiwanese psychiatric nurses. Multiple methods were adopted to develop the program and a randomised controlled trial with repeated measures was employed to evaluate it. The e-learning program was developed in four stages: (1) systematic review of literature; (2) needs assessment through a national survey and focus group; (3) development of learning materials; and (4) pilot test. Following program development, psychiatric nurses were recruited and randomly allocated into an experimental or comparison group. The experimental group participated in an e-learning continuing education program. The case management knowledge index with sufficient reliability and validity and a satisfaction survey were used to determine the outcomes. A generalised estimating equation was used to assess the difference between the 2 groups before, after, and at 3 months follow-up. The learning material comprised 5 simulated learning modules, self-assessment questions, learning cases, sharing experiences, and learning resources. A total of 200 participants completed the 3 measurements. Knowledge scores in the experimental group significantly exceeded those in the comparison group after the program and at the 3-month follow-up. Participants reported positive learning perceptions. The program provides an evidence-based educational resource for nursing continuing education in case management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Florence Nightingale: The queen of nurses

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    Asha P Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Florence Nightingale, who was called as “the lady with the lamp,” by the sick and injured at Crimean war, has laid down strong foundational principles in nursing. Her multitasked role contributed significantly toward the development of nursing profession into structured institution. As an administrator, educator, researcher Nightingale's contributions moved nursing from disrespectable profession into replacing more of autonomy and evidence-based practice.

  2. Florence Nightingale: The queen of nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Asha P Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Florence Nightingale, who was called as “the lady with the lamp,” by the sick and injured at Crimean war, has laid down strong foundational principles in nursing. Her multitasked role contributed significantly toward the development of nursing profession into structured institution. As an administrator, educator, researcher Nightingale's contributions moved nursing from disrespectable profession into replacing more of autonomy and evidence-based practice.

  3. Enfermagem: o que esta profissão significa para adolescentes. Uma primeira abordagem Enfermería: el significado de la profesión para adolescentes. Un primer abordaje Nursing: the meaning of this profession to nurses. A first approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barizon Luchesi

    2005-04-01

    ón presentó un resultado esperado, visto que los cambios o (tendencias para cambios ocurrieron justamente dentro de los subgrupos que presentaron mayor frecuencia de los estereotipos.In an attempt to understand, tell and, why not, participate a little in the history of Nursing, we proposed to study the prejudices and negative stereotypes that have permeated this profession over time. This is a before-after experimental type of study in a population of adolescents regularly enrolled in the eleventh grade of a Brazilian public school. The intervention took the form of a lecture about the profession and a questionnaire with closed questions which was applied before and after the lecture. Conclusions were based on the results of binomial and McNemar's non-parametric tests for the significance of changes. Although the statistically significant presence of prejudice and negatives stereotypes was not found, the results of the intervention were in line with expectations, since the changes(or tendency towards changes took place exactly in those subgroups that showed a greater frequency of stereotypes.

  4. Marketing alternatives for hospitals to the nursing crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, R L; Bates, D P; Bradbury, M; Breaux, D K; Caron, M; Gerardo, C; Copoulos, S; Hansen, L L; Oien, S M; Semones, C

    1990-01-01

    The current nursing shortage problem as defined in this article, is the result of a supply and demand imbalance. The demand for nurses is growing at a faster rate than the supply. If strategies are not implemented to correct this imbalance the demand for nurses will continue to surpass the supply, negatively affecting access to and delivery of quality patient care. Factors contributing to the increased demand for nurses and the dwindling supply must be examined if solutions to the problem are to be found and implemented. Factors contributing to the growing demand for nurses include the decreasing use of ancillary personnel by hospitals in an effort to tighten their budgets; the impact of Medicare's prospective payment system on hospital lengths of stay; the increase in patient acuity with advances in medical technology; and alternative health care opportunities pulling nurses away from the hospital setting. The supply of RNs is shrinking in relation to demand because of low retention rates; declining nursing school enrollment; non-competitive wages; poor working conditions; alternative career opportunities for women; and the lack of power and support within the nursing profession. An active marketing approach that relies on this assessment of contributing factors has been formulated in an attempt to resolve the problem and meet the increasing demand. Recommendations have been made and ranked in the order of their priority and pros and cons established for each. The strategies developed have been divided into four basic marketing categories of product, price, place, and promotion. If the problem is to be resolved these strategies must be marketed to hospitals, their administrators, nurses, other allied health professionals, third party payors, educators, and the general public. The nursing profession itself must find the unity and strength within its own group of professionals to build political and economic powers to enhance their product. Nursing is at a crossroad

  5. Insights on compassion and patient-centred nursing in intensive care: A constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-04-01

    To explore patient-centred nursing, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue from intensive care nurses' perspectives. Compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue can influence critical care nurses' decisions to either continue or leave the profession, and could impact the compassionate patient-centred nursing care patients receive during their ICU admission. This qualitative research design was informed by Charmaz's Grounded Theory Constructivist methodology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 critical care nurses of two ICUs in Australia during 2016. Interview data were analysed using grounded theory processes. Findings reflected positive and negative impacts on critical care nurses' ability to deal compassionately with their patients. Effects on patient-centred nursing and critical care nurses' own well-being were revealed. A core category of "Expectations" emerged, explaining the tension between critical care nurses' biomedical, clinical skills and knowledge versus compassionate, patient-centred nursing care. This tension was clarified and expanded in subcategories of "Life in the Balance," "Passion and Pressure," "Understanding and Advocacy" and "Tenacity and Fragility". Providing patient-centred nursing may enhance critical care nurses' experience of compassion satisfaction, in turn impacting delivery of compassionate patient-centred nursing to generate a virtuous circle. Critical care nurses who feel respected and supported by their management team and colleagues experience feelings of compassion satisfaction, leading to greater engagement and care towards their patient. Systematically addressing critical care nurses' needs to successfully balance biomedical with compassionate nursing care may lead to greater well-being in the critical care nursing workforce and improve patient experience of intensive care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sexology as a profession in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giami, Alain; de Colomby, Patrick

    2003-08-01

    A national survey of sexologists was carried out in France in 1998-1999, among the individuals listed in the professional directories and the telephone book as "sexologists." It described the sociodemographic characteristics of sexologists, their initial profession and training in sexology, sex therapy and psychotherapeutic techniques, and how they practice sexology. A total of 959 individuals were identified and surveyed. The response rate was 63%. Two thirds of the sexologists were physicians and 60% were men. French sexologists appeared to be segmented into three subgroups: (1) one-third were general practitioners, trained in sexology and psychotherapeutic approaches, recognized themselves as sexologists, and devoted 40% of their professional activity to sexology. Men were about two thirds of this group; (2) one-third were nonphysicians (including psychologists and other health professionals, such as social workers and nurses), recognized themselves as sex therapists and devoted one third of their time to sexology. Men and women were equally represented in this group; (3) one-third were specialists, with less training in sexology and psychotherapeutic techniques, and did not generally recognize themselves as sexologists. They devoted a lesser part of their time to sexology and had academic and hospital practice. Men comprised more than 75% of this group. This study raised the issue of the diversity of primary professions involved in the field of sexology and showed that sexology is a secondary professional choice for the majority of sexologists.

  7. Nursing education in Turkey: from past to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçecik, Nefise; Alpar, Sule Ecevit

    2009-10-01

    Nursing education in Turkey first began in 1912 with the introduction of a 6-month course to train voluntary medical attendants, with Dr. Besim Omer Pasha's advice to the Red Crescent Association regarding the inadequacy of healthcare services, as a crucial need for nursing services resulted due to significant losses given during Tripoli (1911) and the Balkan (1912) wars. Carrying out their duties in battlefields and hospitals with great devotion, the first nurses graduated from the course played a significant role in promoting the nursing profession and its importance. Nursing education which used to continue at the secondary and high-school levels increased to bachelor's level in 1955. Master's program in nursing was opened in 1968, and Ph.D. programs was opened in 1972. Professional members of the practice, well-equipped in accordance with the requirements of the age, who conduct their studies at the national and international levels, are trained as the consequence of the recent developments in nursing education. The number of nurses at the universities who offered higher levels of academic degree, and especially the number of nurses who gained 'science expert' title at the inpatient medical establishments has increased. This situation and globalization, which ensures an easier access to nursing literature through internet, enable a more systematic and of a better quality healthcare. This article explains the nursing education in Turkey from past to present. The developments in nursing education which have taken place in Turkey are expressed in a chronological order, starting from the Ottoman Empire, until the present. Compared with other countries, nursing education is given on different levels in Turkey. Recently, however, the obstacles regarding the differences especially at the bachelor's degree level were overcome, appropriate changes were made, and education melioration efforts gained speed.

  8. [Clinical trials in nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Paola; Campagna, Sara; Dimonte, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are pivotal for the development of nursing knowledge. To describe the clinical trials published in nursing journals in the last two years and propose some general reflections on nursing research. A search with the key-word trial was done on PubMed (2009-2013) on Cancer Nursing, European Journal of Oncology Nursing, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Nursing Research. Of 228 trials identified, 104 (45.8%) were published in the last 2 years. Nurses from Asian countries published the larger number of trials. Educational and supportive interventions were the most studied (61/104 trials), followed by clinical interventions (33/104). Samples were limited and most trials are monocentric. A growing number of trials is published, on issues relevant for the nursing profession, however larger samples and multicentric studies would be necessary.

  9. Will the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Wong, Samuel Y S; Kung, Kenny; Cheung, Annie W L; Gao, Tiffany T; Griffiths, Sian

    2010-04-30

    Healthcare workers have been identified as one of the high risk groups for being infected with influenza during influenza pandemic. Potential levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers in hospital settings are high. However, there was no study to explore the attitudes of healthcare workers in community setting towards the preparedness to the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. The aim of this study was to explore the willingness of community nurses in Hong Kong to work during H1N1 influenza pandemic. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all 401 community nurses employed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong when the WHO pandemic alert level was 6. The response rate of this study was 66.6%. 76.9% participants reported being "not willing" (33.3%) or "not sure" (43.6%) to take care of patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic. The self-reported reasons for being unwilling to report to duty during H1N1 influenza pandemic were psychological stress (55.0%) and fear of being infected H1N1 influenza (29.2%). The reported unwillingness to report to duty was marginally significantly associated with the request for further training of using infection control clinical guideline (OR: 0.057; CI: 0.25-1.02). Those who reported unwillingness or not being sure about taking care of the patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic were more depressed (p work more emotionally stressful (p < 0.001). Interventions to provide infection control training and address community nurses' psychological needs might increase their willingness to provide care to patients in the community during H1N1 influenza pandemic. This would help to ensure an effective and appropriate health system response during the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

  10. Will the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Tiffany T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare workers have been identified as one of the high risk groups for being infected with influenza during influenza pandemic. Potential levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers in hospital settings are high. However, there was no study to explore the attitudes of healthcare workers in community setting towards the preparedness to the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. The aim of this study was to explore the willingness of community nurses in Hong Kong to work during H1N1 influenza pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all 401 community nurses employed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong when the WHO pandemic alert level was 6. Results The response rate of this study was 66.6%. 76.9% participants reported being "not willing" (33.3% or "not sure" (43.6% to take care of patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic. The self-reported reasons for being unwilling to report to duty during H1N1 influenza pandemic were psychological stress (55.0% and fear of being infected H1N1 influenza (29.2%. The reported unwillingness to report to duty was marginally significantly associated with the request for further training of using infection control clinical guideline (OR: 0.057; CI: 0.25-1.02. Those who reported unwillingness or not being sure about taking care of the patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic were more depressed (p Conclusions Interventions to provide infection control training and address community nurses' psychological needs might increase their willingness to provide care to patients in the community during H1N1 influenza pandemic. This would help to ensure an effective and appropriate health system response during the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

  11. Ogres and Angels in the madhouse. Mental health nursing identities in film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carlo, Keri

    2007-10-01

    This project applied ethnographic content analysis to examine 19 American films made during the period 1942-2005. The purpose of this examination is to consider how the medium of American film portrays psychiatric mental health nursing and its world within the hospital. It critiques the way film frames mental health nursing and the profession's interactions with other disciplines, such as psychiatry, that might reveal a disposition that is peculiar to this group. It concludes that Hollywood film genre continues to perpetuate the notion that mental health nursing occupies an aberrant, secret, and dangerous world and that its role remains one of custodial companionship. If Chiari, Pinel, and Tuke, the founders of moral therapy during the Age of Reason observed these films, they could be forgiven if they wondered whether psychiatric mental nursing remained trapped in the Middle Ages While some of the films reviewed may be considered vacuous nonsense, its discourses reflect how society views people with serious mental illness and those who nurse them. This critique is a challenge for the profession to educate society regarding the profession's true work, reclaiming its commitment to affirming the dignity and human rights of those with mental illness by instigating political strategies that will destabilize the subversive and dividing practices that film merely manipulates.

  12. Development and psychometric pilot-testing of a questionnaire for the evaluation of satisfaction with continuing education in infection control nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Michael; Peter, Daniel; Mattner, Frauke; Igel, Christoph; Kugler, Christiane

    2018-05-16

    Satisfaction with continuing education can be defined as positive attitudes towards educational programs, which has potential to strengthen learning outcomes. A multi-dimensional construct may enhance continuing education program evaluation processes. The objective is to describe the development and psychometric testing of the 'affective - behavioral - cognitive - satisfaction questionnaire' (ABC-SAT) for assessing participants' satisfaction with a continuing education program for nurses in infection control. The multi-staged development of a satisfaction questionnaire comprised of three subscales. The pilot tool was administered to a nationwide sample of 126 infection control nurses to assess satisfaction after participating in a continuing education program. Satisfaction scores were calculated and psychometric testing was performed to determine reliability, using Cronbach's alpha, face validity, objectivity, and economy. A principle component analysis using varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization was performed. The analysis led to a three-factor solution of the questionnaire with 11 items, explaining 61.4% of the variance. Internal consistency of three scales using Cronbach's alpha was 0.83, 0.60, and 0.66, respectively. Selectivity coefficients varied between 0.39 and 0.70. Participants needed approximately three minutes to complete the questionnaire. Initial findings refer to a satisfying scale structure and internal consistency of the 3-dimensional ABC-SAT questionnaire. Further research is required to confirm the questionnaires' psychometric properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Different Places, Different Ideas: Reimagining Practice in American Psychiatric Nursing After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M

    2018-01-01

    In 1952, Hildegard Peplau published her textbook Interpersonal Relations in Nursing: A Conceptual Frame of Reference for Psychodynamic Nursing. This was the same year the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (1st ed.; DSM-I; APA). These events occurred in the context of a rapidly changing policy and practice environment in the United States after World War II, where the passing of the National Mental Health Act in 1946 released vast amounts of funding for the establishment of the National Institute of Mental Health and the development of advanced educational programs for the mental health professions including nursing. This article explores the work of two nurse leaders, Hildegard Peplau and Dorothy Mereness, as they developed their respective graduate psychiatric nursing programs and sought to create new knowledge for psychiatric nursing that would facilitate the development of advanced nursing practice. Both nurses had strong ideas about what they felt this practice should look like and developed distinct and particular approaches to their respective programs. This reflected a common belief that it was only through nurse-led education that psychiatric nursing could shape its own practice and control its own future. At the same time, there are similarities in the thinking of Peplau and Mereness that demonstrate the link between the specific social context of mental health immediately after World War II and the development of modern psychiatric nursing. Psychiatric nurses were able to gain significant control of their own education and practice after the war, but this was not without a struggle and some limitations, which continue to impact on the profession today.

  14. Bridging the gap between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted death: a focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a form of euthanasia. Another group situates CSD between pain relief and ending life. Arguments for these perspectives refer to the following themes: intention, dosage of sedative drugs, unconsciousness, and the pace of the dying process. Generally, CSD is considered emotionally easier to deal with since it entails a gradual dying process. Nursing home clinicians have diverging perceptions of the relation between CSD and PAD; some consider CSD to be more than a purely palliative measure, that is, also as a means to hasten death. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. The influence of Masters education on the professional lives of British and German nurses and the further professionalization of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Dianne

    2011-12-01

     This article reports on findings from a qualitative study which explored the influence of a Masters in Nursing on the professional lives of British and German nurses and its role in further professionalizing nursing. A collaborative Masters programme was delivered in the United Kingdom and Germany. This provided an opportunity to study the influence of the programme on the professionalization of nursing in different country contexts. Continuing education is thought to contribute to furthering professionalization. Evidence to support this in the field of nursing is limited. An interpretive research design was used and data were collected via semi-structured interviews with ten German nurses and nine British nurses. Data were collected in the United Kingdom and Germany from August 2006 to February 2007. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data were analysed using a template approach with further immersion and crystalization of the data. Nurses' personal and professional confidence improved; research-based evidence was used to underpin changes made to practice; new roles and careers emerged; multi-professional working was enhanced; and nurses rediscovered nursing and championed the profession. A diagram is presented based on the findings. Masters education is at the centre as the catalyst with four interconnecting circles, which depict elements that contribute to professionalization. The diagram highlights overlap and interplay between nurses' increased personal confidence, improved cognitive functioning, evidence-based practice development and enhanced professionalism. Findings support the theory that this Masters in Nursing programme enhanced practice and further professionalization of nursing in both countries. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The work engagement of nurses in multiple hospital sectors in Saudi Arabia: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat A; Zakari, Nazik M A

    2016-05-01

    To examine the differences in work engagement among nurses in Saudi Arabia and its relationship with personal characteristics across different hospital affiliations. Quality care requires an adequate supply of engaged nurses who are dedicated, energised and absorbed in their work. In the nursing profession, work engagement is of considerable importance, owing to the shortage of nurses and the continuing reduction in healthcare costs. An analytic comparative cross-sectional design was used. Eight hospitals from three provinces and different affiliation types participated in the study. The Utrecht work engagement scale (UWES) was used to measure 980 nurses' work engagement. The findings indicate that nurses' total engagement scores were closer to the higher end of the Likert scale. The findings indicate generally high levels of work engagement, particularly regarding the element of dedication. Furthermore, the study shows significant differences in nurses' engagement among the various work settings and in nurses' age and experience. A number of nurses' personal characteristics have independent influences on their work engagement. Nurse leaders should acknowledge that a statement of professional nursing scope of practice is a necessity to encourage and fulfil engagement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Why nurses chose to remain in the workforce: Portraits of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Vicki; Jones, Bronwyn; Hendricks, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    This study explored why nurses chose to remain in the Western Australian workforce and to develop insights into the role of resilience of nurses and to identify the key characteristics of resilience displayed by these nurses. Nursing is a stressful profession. Prolific quantitative research which measures job stress and resilience has been implemented; however, there is a dearth of qualitative studies which hear the personal narratives as to why nurses remain and thrive in a stressful workplace. Vignettes of nursing resilience reveal underlying themes of resilience where personal stories and events are presented as narrative. Portraiture recognises the inherent value of the nurses' stories giving attention to the nature of their resilience. Interpretation illuminates the portraits or verbal canvasses of the told experience, reflecting success and positivity despite disarray in healthcare settings. Eight themes were identified. The portraits highlight a sometimes imperceptible theme of resilience within nursing. Nurses are resilient; they rely on the social support of colleagues, family and friends to continue to bear their mantle of responsibility. They take pride in their work and accomplishments and give to others altruistically. They laugh, they love nursing and they keep the needs of their patients, clients, residents or students foremost. This paper describes the hallmarks of resilience demonstrated by nurses. Resilience and its relationship to coping in times of adversity are captured within the portraits presented.

  18. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The nursing shortage ... will we become an endangered species or near extinction in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanford, A; Hardesty, P

    1998-12-01

    In conclusion, it is obvious to each of us that the nursing shortage issue is complex. There are no simple solutions. In the acute care arena we can expect to see the usual recruitment wars using sign-on bonuses, increased salaries for per diem staff, internship programs and all sorts of methods used in the past to recruit needed staff. It is that sort of crisis management and short term thinking that has plagued the profession in the past. These are bandaid efforts especially in light of the factors of supply vs demand with short-term quick fixes. There must be, however, more efforts towards addressing the long-term issues such as wage compression, differentiated practice and pay, effective models of care delivery, educating the public about nursing, and public/government funding more nursing education and research at all levels. There may need to be a federal subsidy for nursing education and recruitment included to affect the magnitude of this potential societal problem. The profession is at a crossroads. One thing is certain however, this nursing shortage is different and will get worse before it gets better. Let's not let the demand for nurses become so large and supply become so small that we are an endangered species or near extinction in the new millennium. What will be the scenario for nurses in 2050? Are we, as the largest healthcare profession, so complacent about our continued existence that we are at a point of paralysis? Are we in such a state of deep depression in response to current changing environment that we will allow ourselves to be devoured by our predators. Are we cannibalistic as we eat our young and chew on our own unresolved internal issues with a lack of action? Are we septic as a result of our own self-inflicted professional wounds? Our profession must become immediately aware of our possibly tenuous future. We must work together as a community of nurses to strategically address the areas of recruitment, education, retention and

  20. The valuation of nursing begins with identifying value drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2010-03-01

    Adequate investment in a profession links to its ability to define and document its value. This requires identifying those elements or value drivers that demonstrate its worth. To completely identify nursing's value drivers requires meshing the economic, technical, and caring aspects of its profession. Nursing's valuation includes assessing nursing's tangible and intangible assets and documenting these assets. This information communicates nursing's worth and ensures adequate economic investment in its services.

  1. Expanding leadership capacity: educational levels for nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Scott, Elaine S; Sullivan, Dori Taylor

    2013-06-01

    A master's degree in nursing administration prepares the nurse to lead nursing and interprofessional teams, to create new and innovative approaches to improve care processes and outcomes, as well as traditional management responsibilities related to budgets, human resources, quality and safety, and a healthy work environment. Are we not at a critical juncture in our profession when we should challenge the profession to require a master's degree education for all levels of nursing administration?

  2. Changes in leadership styles as a function of a four-day leadership training institute for nurse managers: a perspective on continuing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M S

    1996-01-01

    This study measured changes in knowledge acquisition and application of the Hersey and Blanchard model of leadership styles and leadership style adaptability among 144 registered nurses who participated in a four-day management institute. A pre- and post-institute administration of the LEAD-Self instrument was conducted. Although the findings demonstrated a significant change in the participants' leadership styles, the data revealed that outcomes were not as positive as had been assumed based on participants' self-reports. The discussion of findings reveals the complexity and the necessity of measuring learning outcomes for continuing education program improvement.

  3. Art, science, or both? Keeping the care in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine, Tayray

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is widely considered as an art and a science, wherein caring forms the theoretical framework of nursing. Nursing and caring are grounded in a relational understanding, unity, and connection between the professional nurse and the patient. Task-oriented approaches challenge nurses in keeping care in nursing. This challenge is ongoing as professional nurses strive to maintain the concept, art, and act of caring as the moral center of the nursing profession. Keeping the care in nursing involves the application of art and science through theoretical concepts, scientific research, conscious commitment to the art of caring as an identity of nursing, and purposeful efforts to include caring behaviors during each nurse-patient interaction. This article discusses the profession of nursing as an art and a science, and it explores the challenges associated with keeping the care in nursing.

  4. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  5. On becoming a Nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Lars

    their 6th semester, following clinical internship at a somatic hospital (Part I), and again a half-year into their new roles as Registered Nurses (Part II). Fieldwork and interviews focuses on the interaction and collaboration between participants and other health personnel as well as the Expectations......  Ph.D. Student: Mlp. Lars Thrysøe   Enrolment: 1 September 2006   Project Title: "On becoming a nurse. A Study on the Expectations of Final Nursing Student And Their Experiences on Becoming Registered Nurses"   Supervisors: Professor Lis Wagner Dr.PH, RN, and Associate Professor Lise Hounsgaard...... in number and marginalization of nurses.  National and international studies show that both final year nursing students and new Registered Nurses are unsure about the extent to which they can live up to the expectations set for them by the profession and to those expectations that they have set...

  6. Career identity in the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Jones, S; Abbey, G

    2015-04-25

    This research investigates vet and vet nurse career identity through the qualitative methodology of narrative enquiry. It derives learning and understanding from these empirical data to assist the veterinary profession to adjust to the changing industry landscape. Through a case series of 20 vets and vet nurses' career stories, this paper seeks understanding about career identity and its impact on individuals and organisations in the light of industry consolidation. Findings suggest that career is central to identity for many veterinary professionals who tend to have a strong sense of self; this is particularly evident around self as learner and technically competent, teacher and educator, ethical and moral and dedicated and resilient. Consequently, mismatches between 'who I am' and 'what I do' tend not to lead to identity customisation (to fit self into role or organisation) but to the search for alternative, more identity-compatible employment. This study offers a valuable insight for employers, veterinary professionals and universities. It suggests that businesses can gain competitive advantage and employees achieve validation and enrichment by working towards organisational and individual identity congruence and that teaching veterinary professionals with contemporary business in mind may develop graduates with a more sustainable identity. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Iranian nurses self-perception -- factors influencing nursing image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaei, Shokoh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perspectives of Iranian nurses regarding factors influencing nursing image. Nursing image is closely tied to the nurse's role and identity, influencing clinical performance, job satisfaction and quality of care. Images of nursing and nurses are closely linked to the cultural context in which nursing is practised, hence, this study explores how Iranian nurses perceive the factors that influence their own image. A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted with 220 baccalaureate qualified nurses working in four teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. A Nursing Image Questionnaire was used and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. In the domains of 'characteristics required for entry to work', 'social role characteristics of nursing' and 'prestige, economic and social status, and self image' the nurses had negative images. 'Reward' and 'opportunity for creativity and originality' were factors that least influenced choosing nursing as a career. The presence of a nurse in the family and working in the hospital had the greatest impact on the establishment of nurses' nursing image. Improving the nursing profession's prestige and social position as well as providing the opportunity for creativity and originality in nursing practice will change the self-image of Iranian nurses, facilitating effective and lasting changes in nursing's image. Nurse managers are well-placed to influence nurses' perceptions of nursing's image. Given the finding that thinking about leaving a job positively correlates with holding a negative nursing image, nurse managers need to consider how they can work effectively with their staff to enhance morale and nurses' experience of their job. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Eugenics in the community: gendered professions and eugenic sterilization in Alberta, 1928-1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Scholarship on Alberta's Sexual Sterilization Act (1928-1972) has focused on the high-level politics behind the legislation, its main administrative body, the Eugenics Board, and its legal legacy, overlooking the largely female-dominated professions that were responsible for operating the program outside of the provincial mental health institutions. This paper investigates the relationship between eugenics and the professions of teaching, public health nursing, and social work. It argues that the Canadian mental hygiene and eugenics movements, which were fundamentally connected, provided these professions with an opportunity to maintain and extend their professional authority.

  9. Service-Learning Initiatives in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Eileen; Planas, Jessica; Quan, Melissa; Greiner, Lydia; Kazer, Meredith; Babington, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In response to the changing demands of the U.S. healthcare system and the needs of the nursing profession, the Institute of Medicine, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, spearheaded a two-year initiative to develop recommendations for the future of nursing. Discussions of these recommendations within nursing education led to…

  10. Continuous sedation until death with or without the intention to hasten death--a nationwide study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the removal of consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a controversial practice. Some consider CSD a palliative treatment, whereas others claim that CSD is frequently used with the intention to hasten death. In nursing homes in Flanders, the rate of CSD has tripled over the past decade, whereas legal euthanasia remains a rare practice. This study wants to investigate to what extent CSD is used to hasten death (CSD+) and to identify possible associated factors. Nationwide cross-sectional retrospective survey, conducted in 2012. Nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. Coordinating and advisory physicians of all nursing homes in Flanders (n = 660). Physician reports of their most recent patient treated with CSD. The response rate was 57.3%, and 159 of the 378 responding physicians reported a case of CSD (42.1%). According to the reported intentions involved, 62.2% of these cases were considered CSD- cases (no life-shortening pursued), whereas 37.8% were labeled CSD+ (life-shortening pursued). Physician factors such as experience in end-of-life care, palliative care training, training in sedation, or knowledge of sedation guidelines did not affect the outcome distribution (CSD- or CSD+). In CSD+, the patient has a longer life expectancy, is more competent, is clearly longing for death, and requests for euthanasia more frequently. In nursing homes in Flanders, CSD is frequently used to hasten the patient's death. In some cases, CSD can even be considered a substitute for legal euthanasia. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Survey of viewpoints of nurses employed in treatment and teaching centers of Kashan and suburb about continuing medical education (CME Priorities in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Behrouzifar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Needs’ assessment is the first stage in designing Continuing Medical Education (CME Programs. To obtain clients’ satisfaction with services of nurses as the largest group providing health and treatment services, designing and executing educational programs related to their needs is necessary. This study was conducted to determine CME priorities of nursing graduates employed in treatment and teaching centers of Kashan and suburb. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 238 nurses. Separate questionnaires were designed for different hospital wards. Every educational subject was scored on a Likert scale ranging from zero to ten. Data were extracted, classified and analyzed in SPSS using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: In general (9.18±1.44, surgical (9.40±1.63 and emergency wards (9.32±1.79, the most important need identified was cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In intensive care units (ICU, dialysis units and pediatrics and neonatal ICU wards, identified items included deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (9.02±1.53, bone metabolic diseases (9.91±0.28, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (9.29±0.91 and asphyxia (9.78±0.41, respectively with the greatest mean scores. Conclusion: From viewpoint of studied nurses, the most important CME priorities were learning clinical skills about managing patients with unstable conditions and correct utilization of medical equipments which are related to their everyday practice. It is necessary that CME planners and policy makers to pay attention to nurses’ CME needs which are different across various wards.

  12. [The evolution of national health and the development of the nursing practice in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Teresa J C

    2014-08-01

    Nursing is an applied science. While there is a wide range of nursing theories and nursing care models, resolving the health problems and meeting the health needs of clients is the common objective of all in the nursing profession. The nursing profession may be subdivided into hospital clinical nursing and community health nursing (CHN). CHN is further subdivided into public health nursing, school health nursing, and industrial health nursing. The past 60 years has been a period of significant growth and improvement in Taiwan that has enhanced the nation's socioeconomic condition, general living standards, and general public health. The nursing profession has seen profound progress as well, not only in terms of content but also in terms of nursing care models, which are increasingly framed around core public health needs and take into consideration different health perspectives. Nursing in Taiwan has gradually established its own professional function and autonomy.

  13. Samarbejde mellem profession og uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2011-01-01

    Review af resultater fra 10 års publikationer i Teaching and Teacher Education i relation til samarbejde mellem profession og uddannelse i partnerskaber og forsøgsskoleregi viser, at der er bred konsensus om, at det centrale formål er alle aktørers læring gennem bedre praktik i den primære...... konkrete samarbejder mellem profession og uddannelse; FoU, der både undersøger de resultater, der opnås gennem sådanne samarbejder, og de fremmende og hæmmende faktorer for udvikling af selve samarbejdet....

  14. Burnout for Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lískovcová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor thesis has theoretical as well as empirical character. Its content focuses on the issue of burnout syndrome in nurses. The theoretical part of the thesis focuses on personality profile of a general nurse. I first characterize her personality, characters, psychological problems related to the profession. The next chapter focused on burnout syndrome deals with the causes of burnout syndrome, its symptoms in the individual phases of burning out and the results of burnout together wi...

  15. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  16. The Phenomenon of Learning: The Lived Experience of Distance Education Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Vecchia, Elaine T.

    2010-01-01

    The complex profession of nursing requires the practitioner to be knowledgeable, skilled, and autonomous. It is estimated that only 34.2% of today's nurses hold degrees at the baccalaureate level and above. Growing evidence indicating baccalaureate-degreed nurses are better prepared to meet the demands of this complex profession has led to…

  17. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  18. ICRP: Engaging with the RP profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Just as the ICRP system of radiological protection must adapt to changes in scientific understanding, social and ethical values, and practical experience, ICRP itself continues to adapt as an organisation. One aspect of the continual modernisation of ICRP is a greater emphasis on engaging with the radiological protection profession.Ten years ago, on August 8, 2004, ICRP formally began open consultation on what was then referred to as the draft “2005 Recommendations of ICRP”. As most readers will know, this was published in due course as ICRP Publication 103, “The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection” (ICRP, 2007).Being managed through the ICRP website, it opened up the possibility for anyone, anywhere, with an internet connection and an interest in radiological protection, to review the draft document and submit comments directly to ICRP.Open consultation on draft publications is but one aspect of ICRP’s efforts to become a more open and transparent organisation, and to increase engagement with the radiological protection profession. A modern arrangement for formal relations with other international organisations was established in 2012 with the objective of being more inclusive, effective, and efficient. In addition, there are efforts underway to seek the support needed to enable ICRP to broaden awareness of our recommendations, particularly in the medical field, and to increase engagement through social media and at relevant conferences, symposia, meetings, etc

  19. Strengthening the Uganda nurses' and midwives' association for a motivated workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuyderduin, A; Obuni, J D; McQuide, P A

    2010-12-01

    The Ugandan Association of Nurses and Midwives (UNANM) is a dynamic proactive community. This survey of nurses, both members and non-members of the association, was implemented in April 2007. It was the first phase of a programme-funded Capacity Project/USAID to strengthen professional associations as part of a strategy to retain nurses. To better understand the needs and strengths of the association and to develop policy recommendations on how to strengthen the UNANM to retain nurses in the health sector. Three hundred self-completion questionnaires were distributed, of which 217 (72%) were returned. The participants were 126 non-members and 91 members of the UNANM. Just over a third of the 91 members rated the UNANM to be very effective in promoting nursing (35%) and information sharing (36%). Non-members want to receive nursing information from the UNANM (89%) and were less critical of the UNANM than members. Respondents were interested in counselling training (83%), research capacity building (80%) and sharing best practice (74%). Nurses under 30 years (12%) look to more experienced peers for guidance on coping in a stressful profession. The nurses lack continuing professional development, mentoring and networking opportunities. Tangible support for communication, nurse education and research is needed and will stimulate the development of nursing in Uganda. Most nurses do not have the means to pay for training, research or travel to attend professional meetings. Motivation to stay in nursing and quality of care can increase through investing in nursing, and this support can be channelled through associations such as the UNANM. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  20. A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to enhance medication adherence using the plan-do-check-act cycle for continuous self-improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia L

    2010-01-01

    A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to improve medication adherence in chronically ill adults using renal transplant recipients as an exemplar population is proposed. Meta-analyses and systematic reviews of chronically ill and transplant patients indicate that patient-specific characteristics not only are poor and inconsistent predictors for medication nonadherence but also are not amenable to intervention. Adherence has not meaningfully improved, despite meta-analyses and systematic narrative reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) dealing with medication nonadherence in acutely and chronically ill persons and RCTs dealing with transplant patients. Interventions with a superior potential to enhance medication adherence must be developed. Use of a clinical nurse specialist-led continuous self-improvement intervention with adult renal transplant recipients is proposed. Continuous self-improvement focuses on improving personal systems thinking and behavior using the plan-do-check-act process. Electronic medication monitoring reports, one of several objective measures of medication adherence, are used by the clinician to provide patient feedback during the check process on medication-taking patterns. Continuous self-improvement as an intervention holds promise in supporting patient self-management and diminishing the blame that clinicians place on patients for medication nonadherence. Using an objective measure of medication adherence such as an electronic monitoring report fosters collaborative patient-clinician discussions of daily medication-taking patterns. Through collaboration, ideas for improving medication taking can be explored. Changes can be followed and evaluated for effectiveness through the continuous self-improvement process. Future studies should include RCTs comparing educational and/or behavioral interventions to improve medication adherence.

  1. Teen camp: a unique approach to recruit future nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Donna A; Riech, Sandy; Prater, Marsha A

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative and unique approach to interest high school students in nursing. To inform educators and nursing departments about an innovative approach to recruit future nurses. Professional literature and authors' experience. All students related positive experiences. The initial camp evaluation produced innovative input from the students, and each camp met its goal of creating career interest in the nursing profession.

  2. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Burnout and exhaustion is a frequent problem in oncology nursing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the aspects of oncology nurses about their profession in order to enhance the standards of oncology nursing. Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted with 70 oncology nurses working at ...

  3. Opening Doors to Nursing Degrees: A Proposal from Ontario's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleges Ontario, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Ontario needs to expand nursing education options to improve access to the nursing profession, create better pathways amongst all nursing occupations, and build Ontario's capacity to meet the province's long-term nursing needs. Ontario's colleges are capable of playing a larger role within a long-term provincial strategy for sustaining and…

  4. Distance Technology in Nursing Education. AACN White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Careful use of technology in education may enhance the ability of the nursing education profession to educate nurses for practice, prepare future nurse educators, and advance nursing science. To take full advantage of technology, several factors must be addressed. Superior distance education programs require substantial institutional financial…

  5. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gennaro; Affonso, Dyanne D.; Mayberry, Linda J.; Stievano, Alessandro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Sabatino, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms for nursing. In this study, focus groups—involving 66 nurse participants from various educational, clinical, and administrative backgrounds—were utilized to better ascertain how the profession has changed. Six themes, three of them metaphors—“vortex,” “leopard spots,” and “deductive jungle”—explain nurses’ experiences of professional change in Italy between 2001 and 2011 and the multiple dimensions that characterize their professional identity and autonomy. PMID:28462290

  6. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Rocco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms for nursing. In this study, focus groups—involving 66 nurse participants from various educational, clinical, and administrative backgrounds—were utilized to better ascertain how the profession has changed. Six themes, three of them metaphors—“vortex,” “leopard spots,” and “deductive jungle”—explain nurses’ experiences of professional change in Italy between 2001 and 2011 and the multiple dimensions that characterize their professional identity and autonomy.

  7. Technologcal Literacy in welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch-Jensen, Peter; Kondrup, Sissel

    to be ‘welfare technological literate’ – both generally as well as within specific welfare professions. Secondly to support the development of a helpful educational framework that enables students to develop welfare technological literacy. This paper discusses some difficulties and preliminary findings...

  8. 'Genericism' in Danish welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    and skills in the basic disciplines of the professions also termed as disciplinary and procedural knowledge '. Thus the main research question for this paper is: What consequences do recent reform actions in Danish welfare education concerning generic competence have on developing professional knowledge...

  9. Male Nurses in Israel: Barriers, Motivation, and How They Are Perceived by Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Liat; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Romem, Pnina; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    The current worldwide nursing shortage remains a challenge for the nursing profession. Encouraging men to become nurses and, thereby, increasing the number of practitioners are crucial factors in facing this challenge. The historiography of nursing presents nursing as "women's work," based on the assumption that it is inherently appropriate for women only. Although men were employed as nurses even before nursing was recognized as a profession, male nurses were always a minority in the field. Over the years, the proportion of male nurses has increased, but they still comprise only 5 to 10% of the nursing workforce in the western world. This study examined men's motives for a career choice of nursing, how male nurses are perceived, and the barriers that they face. The study was conducted among 336 nursing students studying in a co-educational program in various academic tracks at a public, nonsectarian university in the south of Israel. Participants completed the following questionnaires in one study session: sociodemographic questionnaire; Attitudes Towards Men in Nursing Scale; motives for career choice questionnaire; and the questionnaire of the perceptions of the professional status of nursing. Study findings revealed that men tended to choose nursing because of financial constraints significantly more frequently than women (P=.001). Among the participants, there was no significant between-sex difference in the perception nursing as women's work (P=.002) or in perception of male nurses as homosexuals. Results of the study showed that the status of the nursing profession is considered low, and the low status deters men from choosing nursing as a career. The motivation for men's career choice must be understood, and men must be empowered to improve their work conditions and financial remuneration in order to recruit men to the field and to improve the perception of the profession and its public status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Florence Nightingale: creator of modern nursing and public health pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2008-09-01

    In starting this series of articles on distinguished women in nursing, medicine and the related healthcare professions, the choice of the first name is obvious. Florence Nightingale is, I suggest, the most famous female in the long history of medicine and is a name that is known and revered throughout the world. Most people--even those in 'the trade'--think of her as 'the lady with the lamp', the heroine who went out to the Crimean War and nursed the sick and wounded at Scutari. Important though this was, her main contribution was her continued work, long after the war, in nursing organisation and training, hospital planning, public and military health and her pioneering work in the efficient gathering of medical statistics.

  11. Survey of advanced practice registered nurses disciplinary action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Randall

    2007-04-02

    The nursing profession continues to struggle to find the most appropriate approach to credentialing Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). One early step in addressing this struggle is determining the incidence of APRN disciplinary actions by boards of nursing. This article presents data from 2003 and 2004 describing the incidence of APRN disciplinary actions by United States boards of nursing. Fifty-one boards of nursing, all members of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, were asked to report the numbers of APRN discipline cases for 2003 and 2004 which had been resolved, using a tool that differentiated disciplinary cases into four data categories: chemical impairment, exceeding scope of practice, unprofessional conduct, and safety or abuse of patients. Thirty-eight (74.5%) of 51 boards of nursing reported discipline data for a total of 125,882 APRNs showing 688 disciplinary actions were taken during 2003 and 2004. This indicates that APRNs experience a low incidence of discipline related to chemical impairment, exceeding scope of practice, unprofessional conduct, and safety or abuse of patients.

  12. Women in the Legal Profession: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Donna

    1981-01-01

    The modern women's movement and the exigencies of the Vietnam War combined to produce a dramatic change in the composition of law school student bodies in only a few years. The speed with which women continue to be incorporated into the legal profession will be affected by many factors. (MLW)

  13. [Hollywood movies and the production of meanings about nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambor, Angélica; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2007-03-01

    This article discusses the production of meanings on nurses in Hollywood films. It aimed at studying how these films have depicted nurses, and meanings are built by the stories told. The body of analysis consisted of' Hollywood films, and data were collected according to Rose. The following discourse analysis categories were identified: the nurse as the hospital normalizer, the nurse as a subordinate and low-rank professional, the nurse as villain or hero, and nursing as a feminine profession.

  14. Promoting Racial Equality in the Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolchand, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Equality in nursing education and the profession can be promoted in the following ways: a working policy on racism and equal opportunities; curriculum content that explores stereotypes, values, attitudes, and prejudices; and multicultural health research, education, and promotion. (SK)

  15. O enfermeiro na vigilância epidemiológica no município de Ribeirão Preto 1988-1996 El enfermero en la vigilancia epidemiológica en Ribeirão Preto (1988-1996 Nursing profession in epidemiologic surveillance (ES at Ribeirão Preto (1988-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Eduardo Pedersoli

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available O enfermeiro é inserido nas equipes de Vigilância Epidemiológica (VE da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Ribeirão Preto no processo de municipalização da saúde de 1988 a 1996. A abordagem qualitativa é utilizada sendo os dados obtidos através de fontes documentais e bibliográficas e entrevistas semi-estruturadas. O profissional que predomina na equipe da VE é o enfermeiro, fundamentando sua prática na epidemiologia e na gerência, e suas ações se voltam para o controle representado pelas notificações e visitas e para a prevenção, representada pela imunização.El enfermero es considerado en los equipos de vigilancia epidemiológica de la Secretaría Municipal de Salud de Ribeirão Preto en el proceso de municipalización de salud. Con un abordaje cualitativo se obtienen los datos a través de fuentes documentales, bibliográficas y 8 entrevistas semi-estructuradas. El profesional que predomina en el equipo de trabajo es el enfermero, el mismo fundamenta su práctica en la epidemiología y en la gerencia, orientado para el control representado por las notificaciones y visitas y para la prevención representada por la inmunización.The insertion of the nursing profession in Epidemiologic Surveillance (ES at Ribeirão Preto from 1988 to 1996 has been identified in the process of health care decentralization. The qualitative methodology is used based in bibliographic and documentation sources and by 8 semi-structured interviews. Nurses are in greater number than all other health profissionals and their practice are based on the Epidemiology and management of control side, represented by notifications and visits, and the prevention side, represented by immunization.

  16. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  17. Geriatric nursing: an idea whose time has gone? A polemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, M

    1994-12-01

    The future role of the nursing profession in providing health care for older people is considered. It is argued that, despite claims to holism, nursing has maintained a narrow focus, concentrating mainly on acute hospital care. The concepts of professional protectionism and professional reductionism are used to explain the manifest failure of nursing and other professions working with older people and their carers to place the needs of their clients at the top of their agendas. A reorientation of nursing practice is advocated in order that the profession fulfils its potential with respect to older people.

  18. Furthering the sceptical case against virtue ethics in nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    In a recent article in this journal I presented a sceptical argument about the current prominence of virtue ethics in nursing ethics. Daniel Putman has responded with a defence of the relevance of virtue in nursing. The present article continues this discussion by clarifying, defending, and expanding the sceptical argument. I start by emphasizing some features of the sceptical case, including assumptions about the nature of sceptical arguments, and about the character of both virtue ethics and nursing ethics. Then I respond to objections of Putman's such as that, according to virtue ethics, virtue is relevant to the whole of a human life, including one's behaviour in a professional context; and that eudaimonia should be central in explaining and motivating a nurse's decision to enter the profession. Having argued that these objections are not compelling, I go on to discuss an interesting recent attempt to reassert the role of virtue ethics in the ethics of professions, including nursing. This centres on whether role-specific obligations - e.g. the obligations that arise for a moral agent qua lawyer or mother - can be accommodated in a virtue ethics approach. Sean Cordell has argued that the difficulty of accommodating role-specific obligations results in an 'institution-shaped gap' in virtue ethics. He suggests a way of meeting this difficulty that appeals to the ergon of institutions. I endorse the negative point that role-specific obligations elude virtue ethics, but argue that the appeal to the ergon of institutions is unsuccessful. The upshot is further support for scepticism about the virtue ethics approach to nursing ethics. I end by gesturing to some of the advantages of a sceptical view of virtue ethics in nursing ethics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. A Comprehensive Review of Serious Games in Health Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ricciardi

    2014-01-01

    learner oriented approach and providing a stealth mode of teaching. In some fields it represents an ideal instrument for continuous health professions education also in terms of costs because it is cheaper than traditional training methods that use cadavers or mannequins. In this paper we make a scoping review of serious games developed for health professions and health related fields in order to understand if they are useful tools for health related fields training. Many papers confirmed that serious gaming is a useful technology that improves learning and skills development for health professionals.

  20. The perceived roles of nurse educators in the context of a provincial nursing college / Buyisile Maureen Duma

    OpenAIRE

    Duma, Buyisile Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Nurse educators play a crucial role in the nursing profession, as they are concerned with the important task of preparing responsible, efficient, competent and knowledgeable nurses; and also with the task of strengthening nurses as independent and critical thinkers not just for now, but for the future. Within the South African educational environment, and more specifically, a nursing college in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, the roles expected of nurse educators are numerous, and in some case...

  1. Plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in Sweden in 2025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Björkman, B.; Fridell, K.; Tavakol Olofsson, P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography is a healthcare speciality with many technical challenges. Advances in engineering and information technology applications may continue to drive and be driven by radiographers. The world of diagnostic imaging is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. To ensure sustainable development, organisations have to identify future opportunities and threats in a timely manner and incorporate them into their strategic planning. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse and describe plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in 2025. Method: The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach based on focus group interviews. The interviews were inspired by the Scenario-Planning method. Results: Of the seven trends identified in a previous study, the radiographers considered two as the most uncertain scenarios that would have the greatest impact on the profession should they occur. These trends, labelled “Access to career advancement” and “A sufficient number of radiographers”, were inserted into the scenario cross. The resulting four plausible future scenarios were: The happy radiographer, the specialist radiographer, the dying profession and the assembly line. Conclusion: It is suggested that “The dying profession” scenario could probably be turned in the opposite direction by facilitating career development opportunities for radiographers within the profession. Changing the direction would probably lead to a profession composed of “happy radiographers” who are specialists, proud of their profession and competent to carry out advanced tasks, in contrast to being solely occupied by “the assembly line”. - Highlights: • The world of radiography is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. • Future opportunities and threats should be identified and incorporated into the strategic planning. • Appropriate actions can probably change the

  2. The 'greying' of the United Kingdom nursing workforce: implications for employment policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, J

    1999-10-01

    One in five nurses on the United Kingdom (UK) professional register is aged 50 years or older. Over the next few years, the profession will lose, through retirement, many of its most experienced practitioners. The significance for policy makers and for employers of this age-shift is two-fold. Firstly it is clear that greater numbers of nurses and midwives are reaching, or soon will reach, potential retirement age. Secondly many more nurses are now reaching their middle years and they are likely to have different requirements and attitudes to nursing work. This paper examines the employment policy and practice of the ageing of the UK nursing population. The paper examines data from official sources, and information from attitudinal surveys and case studies with employing organizations to assess the major effects of the ageing of the nursing workforce. Key findings are that the age profile of those nurses working in the National Health Service appears to be 'younger' than that of the total population, with the age profile of nurses working in nursing homes and as practice nurses being older than that of the NHS nursing workforce. However, the overall age profile of NHS nurses masks considerable variation between specialties and trusts, and the 'pool' of potential nurse returners from which the NHS and other employers attempts to recruit, is declining in numbers, as it too ages. Other major issues requiring policy attention are the provision of appropriate flexible hours to older nurses who have caring responsibilities, improving access to continuing professional development, and reducing pension provision inflexibility.

  3. Regulation and registration as drivers of continuous professional competence for Irish pre-hospital practitioners: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S; Dunne, S S; Hughes, M; Cheeseman, S; Dunne, C P

    2016-05-01

    The regulatory body responsible for the registration of Irish pre-hospital practitioners, the Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council (PHECC), identified the need to implement a continuing professional competence (CPC) framework. The first cycle of CPC (focused on emergency medical technicians) commenced in November 2013 creating for the first time a formal relationship between continuing competence and registration to practice. To review current literature and to describe benefits and challenges relevant to CPC, regulation, registration and their respective contributions to professionalism of pre-hospital practitioners: advanced paramedics, paramedics and emergency medical technicians. Online search of cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature (CINAHL Plus with Full Text), Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED) and 'Pubmed' databases using: 'Continuous Professional Development'; 'Continuous Professional Development'; 'emergency medical technician'; 'paramedic'; 'registration'; 'regulation'; and "profession' for relevant articles published since 2004. Additional policy documents, discussion papers, and guidance documents were identified from bibliographies of papers found. Reports, governmental policies for other healthcare professions, and professional developments internationally for allied professions (e.g., nursing, physiotherapy and medicine) link maintenance of competence with requirements for registration to practice. We suggest that evolving professionalisation of Irish paramedics should be affirmed through behaviours and competencies that incorporate adherence to professional codes of conduct, reflective practice, and commitment to continuing professional development. While the need for ambulance practitioner CPD was identified in Ireland almost a decade ago, PHECC now has the opportunity to introduce a model of CPD for paramedics linking competence and professionalism to annual registration.

  4. The medical profession and changing attitudes towards advertising and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J D; Fay, M T

    1991-02-27

    This paper examines the attitudes of general medical practitioners towards competition and advertising and the changes that have occurred between 1985 and 1988. The data was derived from a self completion questionnaire, 1500 of which were evenly distributed among the members of five professions; doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants and veterinarians. General practitioners are now favourably disposed towards advertising by the profession as a whole in an effort to increase awareness of medical services (70% in favour in 1988 compared to only 53% in 1985), but the perceived need for increased business efficiency has lessened (70% in 1988 compared to 78% in 1985). Collegiality continues to be the dominant ideology but this position has weakened slightly. In 1988 only 65% of general practitioners regarded other members of the profession as colleagues rather than competitors, compared to 73% in 1985.

  5. Internet images of the speech pathology profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2017-06-05

    Objective The Internet provides the general public with information about speech pathology services, including client groups and service delivery models, as well as the professionals providing the services. Although this information assists the general public and other professionals to both access and understand speech pathology services, it also potentially provides information about speech pathology as a prospective career, including the types of people who are speech pathologists (i.e. demographics). The aim of the present study was to collect baseline data on how the speech pathology profession was presented via images on the Internet. Methods A pilot prospective observational study using content analysis methodology was conducted to analyse publicly available Internet images related to the speech pathology profession. The terms 'Speech Pathology' and 'speech pathologist' to represent both the profession and the professional were used, resulting in the identification of 200 images. These images were considered across a range of areas, including who was in the image (e.g. professional, client, significant other), the technology used and the types of intervention. Results The majority of images showed both a client and a professional (i.e. speech pathologist). While the professional was predominantly presented as female, the gender of the client was more evenly distributed. The clients were more likely to be preschool or school aged, however male speech pathologists were presented as providing therapy to selected age groups (i.e. school aged and younger adults). Images were predominantly of individual therapy and the few group images that were presented were all paediatric. Conclusion Current images of speech pathology continue to portray narrow professional demographics and client groups (e.g. paediatrics). Promoting images of wider scope to fully represent the depth and breadth of speech pathology professional practice may assist in attracting a more diverse

  6. Assessment of Job satisfaction of group of nurses in ava salamat entrepreneurs institute in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzabeigi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Global Health systems encounter increasing challenges, spread of health needs and economic constraints. Approximately, nurses are the major part of human resources working in health systems in all countries. Job dissatisfaction is one of the effective factors in nursing career exit. This study has been accomplished with purpose of determining nurses' job satisfaction in Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute. This cross-sectional and descriptive research was performed in 2017. A random group of 533 nurses contributed in the study. A questionnaire was used for data collection, which included personal and career attributes, and level of job satisfaction as inputs. Data was collected over a period of three months. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS v22 software and descriptive statistical tests were utilized for the analysis. According to results, nurses job security was increased impressively, more than before they were employed in Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute (about 62%, and they feel satisfied about their position more than before (77.1% and have a desire to continue working for Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute (75.4%. The results show that 62.9% of nurses were pleased for their prompt payment, and about 67% were dissatisfied with the proportion of their tasks and career hardship. Among those, 55.6% of nurses were satisfied by the professional support received from their managers and 51.4% of the nurses were satisfied with their image in the social profession. Keywords: Job satisfaction, Ava salamat, Nurses

  7. [Nurses' image perceived by academic and vocational high school teachers in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hae-Young; Go, Mi-Hye; Yang, Jin-Ju; Kim, Sun-Mi

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nurses' image and its related factors to make nurses' image among academic and vocational high school teachers in Korea. Study samples were composed of 470 teachers who were from 12 high schools in G and J city located in southwestern part of Korea. Data were collected from August 26 to October 4, 2002. The internal consistency of the total scale was Cronbach's a =.940. In order to make nurses' image, 76.4% of respondents were influenced by the experience of their hospitalization in visiting hospitals. The mean score of nurses' image in general was 3.19+/-0.55; in four subcategories, 3.46+/-0.60 for professional image, 3.28+/-0.69 for traditional image, 2.93+/-0.70 for social image, and 2.91+/-0.64 for vision of nursing career. The mean score of nurses' image in general was more positive significantly in the 50's age group (F=6.43, p=.002) and in male groups (t=2.92, p=.002). On the basis of these findings, nursing professionals need to improve their working conditions, aspiration in job, and autonomy of nurses in their practice fields, monitor the mass media and other publishing materials continuously, and share the appropriate information on nursing profession to the school teachers and the public.

  8. [Ethical dilemma for nurses who manage marital violence in clinical setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Li; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2008-06-01

    Marital violence or intimate partner violence is a serious and recurring public health issue. In the clinical setting, battered women often seek medical advice, because of the health problems that result from marital violence. Thus, nursing staff are the first persons to come into contact with the battered women. Can nurses execute their notify responsibility to prevent continued injury before obtained the woman's agreement? Will this action violate the principle of autonomy or not? Nurses would face an ethical dilemma when they care for battered women. The purpose of this article is to use Aroskar's ethical decision making model to analyze and clarify the ethical dilemmas involved in managing marital violence, including: under the value systems of the person, the profession, and time to illustrate the basic information, decision theory dimensions, and ethical theories or positions. It is hoped that this article provides an ethical decision making model for the ethical dilemmas facing nurses who manage marital violence in the clinical setting.

  9. Medicine as business and profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agich, G J

    1990-12-01

    This paper analyzes one dimension of the frequently alleged contradiction between treating medicine as a business and as a profession, namely the incompatibility between viewing the physician patient relationship in economic and moral terms. The paper explores the utilitarian foundations of economics and the deontological foundations of professional medical ethics as one source for the business/medicine conflict that influences beliefs about the proper understanding of the therapeutic relationship. It then, focuses on the contrast and distinction between medicine as business and profession by critically analyzing the classic economic view of the moral status of medicine articulated by Kenneth Arrow. The paper concludes with a discussion of some advantages associated with regarding medicine as a business.

  10. Collaborations in leadership: the nurse case management and nursing administration connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Dana Deravin

    2009-01-01

    With a multiple decade's long surge in managed care and the growth of case management as a profession, there is increasing recognition of the leadership role that case managers employ daily as they coordinate and facilitate patient-centered initiatives. Now, more than ever, case managers are being called upon to further expand their leadership capabilities and take a more active role in professional partnering to ensure the continued attainment of clinical, fiscal, and quality outcomes. All settings, particularly acute care hospitals and integrated delivery systems. The collaboration between nurse case managers and nursing administration provides a framework for the establishment of a collegial and supportive working relationship: one that is built on the strength of mutual goals, shared leadership abilities, respect, and professional loyalty.

  11. A Predominately Female Accounting Profession: Lessons from the Past and Other Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the accounting profession is in the process of transitioning from a male dominated profession to a predominantly female one. Other professions that have undergone this switch experienced declines in the status of the profession and the salaries. So, although women have not yet gained equal access to all levels of the accounting…

  12. LOYALTY AND THE MILITARY PROFESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    required to suppress competing emotions of right and wrong in battle. Since loyalty motivates Soldiers to act in a particular way, Connor also provides...given. Therefore, a sound understanding of loyalty is essential to understanding its role in the profession of arms. Ten readings from various...sound understanding of loyalty is essential. This research paper presents an approach by offering 10 readings to provide a substantial

  13. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  14. Treatment of presumed acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema in an ambulance system by nurses using Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Weelink, E. E. M.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; de Vos, R.; Jaarsma, T.; Aarts, L. P. H. J.; Zijlstra, F.; Nijsten, M. W. N.

    Background: Early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied by face mask benefits patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE). The simple disposable Boussignac CPAP (BCPAP) has been used in ambulances by physicians. In the Netherlands, ambulances are manned by

  15. Nurses' visibility according to the perceptions of the communication professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmer, Ligia Fahl; Paes da Silva, Maria Júlia

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to further our understanding of the social representations of nurses and the nursing profession by communication professionals, since they are intermediates in the decoding of imaging and written representations about society. this is a qualitative study, based on the social representation theory of Moscovici. Five communication professionals working on radio, television, written press, advertising and events were interviewed. Results suggest 1) ignorance about the nurse's field of work, job market and nursing profession categorization. 2) nurses' invisibility before the media and society and 3) nurse's own responsibility to obtain professional recognition and visibility. Participants in this study pointed two essential processes for building a more coherent image of nursing and nurses: 1) exposing the profession primarily before the media, which ignores its potentialities, and 2) through the media in order to reach the population in general.

  16. Angels and swingers, matrons and sinners: nursing stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Terry; Chojnacka, Irena

    Media sexual stereotyping of the nursing profession is a well-recognized phenomenon; however the sexual stereotyping of the image of the nurse by the sex/pornography industry is a much less publicized or discussed phenomenon within the nursing profession. This paper aims to examine the presentation of the sexual stereotyping of nurses by newspapers and the sex/pornography industry. Both national and local newspapers in the UK frequently use derogatory terminology to depict the sexual stereotyping of nurses. Images and sexual stereotyping of nursing by the sex industry is also noted. The media was found to emphasize both positive and negative nursing stereotypes and in comparison with other occupations and professions sexual stereotyping was prevalent. The utilization of nursing imagery is also significantly visible across a wide range of pornographic and sex industry material.

  17. Social circumstances and teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beara Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers, as an element of the educational system, are considered to be the most important factor for improving the quality of work in schools. At the same time, schools and teachers, as well as the entire educational system, are functioning in the framework of broader social conditions that may be perceived as favorable and unfavorable for particular aspects of their job and profession. The paper examined teachers' perceptions of the social circumstances in which they work and professionally develop, as well as their temporal satisfaction of their profession and professional development. Temporal satisfaction involves cognitive evaluation of professional area of life through the prism of time (past, present, future. Examined was the interrelationship between these factors, as well as correlations with certain socio-demographic variables: length of employment, age, gender, initial education and type of school in which they are employed. Results indicate that teachers generally perceive social conditions as unfavorable to their professional development, being more satisfied with the past, than with the present and future professional aspects of life. Professional satisfaction was significantly correlated with the perception of social circumstances. Significant differences were established in the temporal satisfaction and perception of social conditions in relation to sex. Teachers in secondary vocational schools are more satisfied with their profession compared to teachers in gymnasiums and primary schools.

  18. [Validation of knowledge acquired from experience: opportunity or threat for nurses working in operating theatres?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvat-Bouëdec, Cécile

    2005-06-01

    The law n 2002-73, dated 17 January 2002, of social modernisation, as it is called, reformed continuing professional training in France. It established a new system of professional certification, the validation of the knowledge acquired from experience (VAE in French). Since 2003, the Health Ministry has been studying a project to set up the VAE for health professions, among which, in particular, the profession of the state registered nurse working in operating theatres (IBODES in French). A state diploma sanctions the training enabling to practise this profession. In the future, the VAE will open a new access way to this diploma. Does this evolution constitute a threat for the profession, and a risk or an opportunity for individual people? The aim of this thesis is to characterise the impacts of the VAE on the IBODE profession and its current system of training. Two sociological and educational approaches are comforted by a field survey. A historical background of the IBODE profession develops the evolution of the caring practices, and presents the evolution of the training systems. A sociological approach enables to analyse the vocational focus of the IBODE on looking at functionalist theories. Therefore, the study enables to think that the VAE will have no consequences on the vocational focus of the IBODE. The VAE is then the object of an educational approach within the context of continuing professional training. The topics on which it could apply and the resistances it causes are studied. Some examples are taken within other Ministries. This study shows that the VAE involves an adaptation of training centres. The VAE constitutes a genuine opportunity for the IBODE profession. However, to manage its setting up in a delicate human context, the field professionals should be involved as early as possible in the reflection initiated by the Ministry.

  19. Perceptions of teacher candidates concerning ethically suitable behaviours for teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balcı Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the perceptions of teacher candidates regarding effective teacher charactheristics and teaching is necessary for knowing their program experiences to consider the appropriateness of those perceptions in terms of professional purposes and practices. Moreover, professional ethics determined for teaching profession enable teachers to make decisions easily at any difficult situations in education. Purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of teacher candidates working for secondary schools concerning ethically suitable behaviors for teaching profession. Participants of this study includes graduates of Mathematics, Nursing, Sociology, Turkish Language Literature Departments. Of those participants (n=163, 42 are graduates of Mathematics, 35 are Nursing, 45 are Sociology, 41 are Turkish Language Literature Departments and completed preservice teacher education curriculum (pedagogical education program at Education Faculty of Kırıkkale University in 2014–2015 academic calender. According to the results of this study most of the participants are aware of ethically suitable behaviors for teaching profession.

  20. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER SELECTED PROFESSIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLINARI, RALPH G.; AND OTHERS

    COMPARISON OF THE COMPOSITION, CHARACTERISTICS, AND CURRENT LICENSING PRACTICES OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION WITH LICENSING PROGRAMS FOR SEVEN OTHER PROFESSIONS, (ACCOUNTANCY, ARCHITECTURE, DENTISTRY, ENGINEERING, LAW, MEDICINE, AND NURSING) WAS THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONWIDE STUDY. THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES WERE DIVIDED…

  1. Continuing education and professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Edwina

    2002-01-01

    The success of a profession will be determined upon its education and training. A profession is required to encompass: a core body of knowledge; a set of ethical codes of practice; and have practitioners with humanistic qualities. In order to maintain the success of a profession it is necessary to have continuing education, which enhances professional development. Continuing professional education includes a form of self-regulation, which ensures the maintenance of a minimum standard of practice in this ever-changing workplace, and by regulating this standard, the discipline becomes more accountable to the client and the profession as a whole. In Australia, the Nuclear Medicine society's continuing education programs and Universities offering postgraduate programs promote continuing education. If technologists are to successfully keep up with developments in instrumentation, protocols and changing health care requirements, we must ensure that the education of practitioners does not cease at certification of entry to the workplace (Au)

  2. Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L A; McInerney, P A

    2006-11-01

    Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the hospital workplace experiences that had contributed to the resignations of Registered Nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The broad perspective governing this research is qualitative in nature. The researcher employed a phenomenological approach specifically because the researcher was interested in identifying, describing and understanding the subjective experiences of individual nurses at the two Private and two Provincial health care institutions selected to participate in the study - in respect of their decision (s) to resign from their employment, and/or to leave the nursing profession. Two semistructured interviews were conducted with each participant by the researcher. The researcher applied the principle of theoretical saturation and a total of fifteen participants were interviewed and thirty interviews were conducted. Experiential themes and subthemes in the data were identified by a process of meaning condensation, and the data were managed by means of a qualitative software package - NVIVO (QSR - NUD*IST). The resignations of registered nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area were found to be linked to their respective hospital workplace experiences. These experiences related to their physical working conditions and environment and included the following: unsupportive management structures, autocratic and dehumanizing management styles, negative stereotypy of nurses and the nursing profession, lack of autonomy in the workplace, professional jealousies and fractures within the profession, sub-optimal physical working conditions and shortage of staff, equipment and lack of appropriate surgical supplies, concerns regarding occupational safety e.g. the increasing exposure of health care personnel to HIV and AIDS; lack of opportunities for promotion or continuing one

  3. A conceptual framework for teaching research in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCD Wright

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Though research is often referred to the lifeblood, hallmark or cornerstone in the development of a profession (Brink, 1996:2, teaching research in Nursing is a challenge. The challenge does not just lie in teaching the subject, but in resistance and unwillingness of students to engage in the subject. In the experience of the researcher, registered nurses identify themselves with being a nurse and a caregiver; the role of researcher has never been internalised. The challenge is to achieve the outcome envisaged, namely, nurses who are knowledgeable consumers of research as well as continuous productive scholars in their application of nursing. Research generates knowledge and knowledge is the basis of caring with excellence. Nursing is an art and a science and the science must produce the knowledge upon which the art is based. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual framework of how to teach research in order to achieve such a successful outcome. The conceptual framework proposed in this article is based on four pillars, theoretical knowledge of research, scientific writing, psychological support and experiential learning. The importance of the research facilitator, not just as a teacher but also as a positive role model, is also described.

  4. Using appreciative inquiry to transform student nurses’ image of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motshedisi E. Chauke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Literature provides adequate evidence of a poor perception of nursing within the profession, resulting in high rates of attrition of student nurses and newly qualified nurses. The nursing profession, in particular nurse educators, has an ethical and professional responsibility to find innovative strategies to promote the positive image of nursing amongst student nurses. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore the potential of appreciative inquiry (AI as an intervention teaching strategy to transform student nurses’ image of nursing. Design: A quantitative, quasi-experimental, explorative-descriptive design comprising the pretest, appreciative inquiry as intervention, and the post-test was used. Methods: Convenience sampling was used to select third and fourthyear college and university student nurses in the Gauteng province of South Africa for the pre- and the post-test respectively. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed by SPSS version 20.0. Findings: The pretest results revealed a mix of positive and negative perceptions of the image of nursing amongst student nurses. The negative perceptions of the image of nursing that needed intervention included the working conditions of nurses, and the perception of nursing as a profession that was not respected and appreciated. The post-test results showed a significant and positive change in the student nurses’ perception of the image of nursing as a respected and appreciated profession. Although AI resulted in a negative to positive change in some aspects of student nurses’ image of nursing, the negative perceptions of the working conditions of nurses remained and became more negative. The positive image of gender in nursing was enhanced following the implementation of AI. Conclusion: Appreciative inquiry demonstrated potential as a teaching strategy to produce a positive nursing image change and positive orientation towards nursing amongst student

  5. An integrative review of Albertina Sisulu and ubuntu: Relevance to caring and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Downing

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Ubuntu and Sisulu's approach to caring have much to offer for the nursing profession in terms of developing of new directions for nursing pedagogy, curriculum, practice patterns, and policies that emphasise caring constructs.

  6. Adaptation of Questionnaire Measuring Working Conditions and Health Problems Among Iranian Nursing Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Arsalani, RN, MSc

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: The findings show that the adapted questionnaire has an acceptable conceptual structure and provides reliable information from the nursing profession. Consequently, the questionnaire is applicable to work situation studies among nurses and other health care workers.

  7. Title: A Comparative Analysis of Nursing Education and other forms of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MRS. AKPABIO

    A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF NURSING EDUCATION. AND OTHER ... As a dynamic service oriented profession .... Technology, in line with nursing had come a long way from the .... prominence in future deliberations aimed at improving ...

  8. STRESS IN THE TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Wengel-Woźny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Teaching profession dates back to ancient times, when formulation of an ideal of a man with comprehensively developed personality was primarily based on such values as wisdom and knowledge. The profession of a teacher/master was influenced by many factors and underwent numerous transformations over the centuries. Aim. The aim is to assess the impact of stress and burnout at work and functioning of the teachers. Material and methods. The survey was conducted using a proprietary questionnaire consisting of 21 questions, in which the respondent select one of the following answers. The study assured full anonymity. The survey was conducted among a group of randomly selected teacher of primary, middle and secondary schools operating in the province of Opole. Results. As a result of conducted research it appeared that 54% of respondents many times a week feel stress related to their work. There are 28% of surveyed to sense nervous tension due to their professional occupation. 10% among them admit to experience this kind of stress up to twice a week whereas 8% of them tend to feel stressed once a week or less often. Conclusions. It is obvious that stress cannot be totally eliminated out of teacher profession. However we can reduce its size by applying a number of tools. These can be following: Implementation of educational programs dedicated for teachers- programs which aim at minimizing consequences of stress on teacher’s health and life as well as on their environment. Organizing of workshops of “coping with stress” and with difficult situations; education of behaving in situations of “overload”. The change of system of educating teachers and gaining professional competences.

  9. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy: Metaphors and Paradoxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gennaro; Affonso, Dyanne D; Mayberry, Linda J; Stievano, Alessandro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Sabatino, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms for nursing. In this study, focus groups-involving 66 nurse participants from various educational, clinical, and administrative backgrounds-were utilized to better ascertain how the profession has changed. Six themes, three of them metaphors-"vortex," "leopard spots," and "deductive jungle"-explain nurses' experiences of professional change in Italy between 2001 and 2011 and the multiple dimensions that characterize their professional identity and autonomy.

  10. Educational achievement of nurses who completed the nursing education and the nursing administration certificate courses of the Department of Nursing Studies, University of Edinburgh, 1958-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, H C; Hardy, L K; Hughes, J

    1984-11-01

    This paper describes the educational activity of a group of 149 nurse teachers and administrators following completion of the nursing education and nursing administration certificate courses of the University of Edinburgh (1958-1975). The data were obtained by a postal questionnaire and three particular types of courses reported by the respondents are discussed. Emphasis is given to the analysis involving degree courses as this was a prominent educational activity, especially among nurse teachers. The conclusion discusses the potential of an all graduate nurse teacher group and suggests some implications for the nursing profession.

  11. N²E: Envisioning a process to support transition from nurse to educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Oprescu, Florin; Jones, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Rising health inequities, continuing nursing shortages, and overlooked professional development needs of nurse educators are three important issues facing nursing in Australia. This paper argues for an innovative and proactive strategy that could transform the nurse education workforce into one that is repopulated, reinvigorated and refocused. The problem facing nurse educators, and subsequently affecting nurses' preparation for practice and longevity in the profession, was identified by drawing on findings from the literature, extensive educational experience, and an exploratory study of nurse educators working in universities, colleges and health services. A solution has been devised by drawing together the tenets of critical social theory, transformative learning, communities of practice and social media. Nursing educators, refocused around a social justice agenda, may be the remedy that the Australian Health Care System requires to embark on effective action that can benefit everyone, from the health service staff to our most vulnerable groups in society. This refocusing can be achieved in a structured and strategic process that builds confidence and professional capabilities.

  12. N2E: Envisioning a process to support transition from nurse to educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Oprescu, Florin; Jones, Christian

    2013-11-21

    Abstract Rising health inequities, continuing nursing shortages, and overlooked professional development needs of nurse educators are three important issues facing nursing in Australia. This paper argues for an innovative and proactive strategy that could transform the nurse education workforce into one that is repopulated, reinvigorated and refocused. The problem facing nurse educators, and subsequently affecting nurses' preparation for practice and longevity in the profession, was identified by drawing on findings from the literature, extensive educational experience, and an exploratory study of nurse educators working in universities, colleges and health services. A solution has been devised by drawing together the tenets of critical social theory, transformative learning, communities of practice and social media. Nursing educators, refocused around a social justice agenda, may be the remedy that the Australian Health Care System requires to embark on effective action that can benefit everyone, from the health service staff to our most vulnerable groups in society. This refocusing can be achieved in a structured and strategic process that builds confidence and professional capabilities.

  13. Towards a conceptual framework for preceptorship in the clinical education of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilembo, Melanie; Monterosso, Leanne

    2008-08-01

    A recent study undertaken by the authors (2007) highlighted that undergraduate nursing students were subjected to varying experiences in clinical practice, which were mediated by a number of factors. Mediating factors included continuity of preceptors, student attitudes, the clinical setting environment, student and preceptor expectations of the clinical practice experience and interactions between the student and preceptor. Of note, interactions with preceptors were seen to 'make or break' the practical experience. Therefore, the relationship that is forged between preceptor and student is vital in shaping the student's experience of the clinical area and of the real world of nursing work. Early positive socialisation experiences have been shown to improve retention rates of new nurses (Greene & Puetzer 2002), which are issues of prime concern in an era of worsening nursing shortages at all levels of the profession. A conceptual framework designed to guide preceptorship may help alleviate some of the difficulties experienced by undergraduate nurses in building relationships within the complex interactions of the nursing environment. The framework proposed in this paper offers a conceptual model that links positive preceptor leadership qualities (such as compassion, care and empathy) with student characteristics. This model proposes that synergistic interactions between nursing students and preceptors results in positive implications for the nursing workforce. This framework also has the potential for further development to fill the void created by a lack of conceptual guidance for supervisory interactions within the undergraduate clinical context.

  14. Assessment of Job satisfaction of group of nurses in ava salamat entrepreneurs institute in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabeigi, Mohammad; Fardi, Ali; Yousofi, H Raza; Norouzian, Mahdi; Pariav, Mahdi; Lak, Saeid; Radfard, Majid; Ebadi, Abbas

    2018-06-01

    Global Health systems encounter increasing challenges, spread of health needs and economic constraints. Approximately, nurses are the major part of human resources working in health systems in all countries. Job dissatisfaction is one of the effective factors in nursing career exit. This study has been accomplished with purpose of determining nurses' job satisfaction in Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute. This cross-sectional and descriptive research was performed in 2017. A random group of 533 nurses contributed in the study. A questionnaire was used for data collection, which included personal and career attributes, and level of job satisfaction as inputs. Data was collected over a period of three months. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS v22) software and descriptive statistical tests were utilized for the analysis. According to results, nurses job security was increased impressively, more than before they were employed in Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute (about 62%), and they feel satisfied about their position more than before (77.1%) and have a desire to continue working for Ava Salamat Entrepreneurs Institute (75.4%). The results show that 62.9% of nurses were pleased for their prompt payment, and about 67% were dissatisfied with the proportion of their tasks and career hardship. Among those, 55.6% of nurses were satisfied by the professional support received from their managers and 51.4% of the nurses were satisfied with their image in the social profession.

  15. Bringing nursing to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Expectations of becoming a nurse and experiences on being a nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Thrysøe, L.; Dohn, N. B.

    2011-01-01

    It is well documented that, in the transition from student to registered nurse, problematic experiences can occur (1, 2, 3). Quite a number of new nursing graduates change job after a short duration of employment (4) or leave the profession within the first years of their career (5). This paper...... is based on a Danish study of the transition from being a nearly graduated nursing student (NGNS) to being a new nursing graduate (NG)....

  17. Transformational leadership model for nursing education leaders in nursing education institutions / Sipho Wellington Mkhize

    OpenAIRE

    Mkhize, Sipho Wellington

    2009-01-01

    The nursing education leader provides visionary leadership to his/her organisation, as well as to the profession of nursing, and must have t he authority and resources necessary to ensure nursing education and training standards are met. This link between professional practice and operational activity of the organisation leads to greater involvement in decision making and fosters collaboration within nursing education and training and interdisciplinary teams. A collabora...

  18. Martin Continues His Homeland Security Profession with New UASI Position

    OpenAIRE

    Issvoran, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Bruce Martin has found a second act in homeland security. The fire services veteran and college educator is now Project Manager of the Bay Area Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI), overseeing its Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Explosives (CBRNE) program. Martin is a 2010 master’s degree graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security.

  19. Concealing emotions: nurses' experiences with induced abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Fang; Che, Hui-Lian; Hsieh, Hsin-Wan; Wu, Shu-Mei

    2016-05-01

    To explore the experiences of nurses involved with induced abortion care in the delivery room in Taiwan. Induced abortion has emotional, ethical and legal facets. In Taiwan, several studies have addressed the ethical issues, abortion methods and women's experiences with abortion care. Although abortion rates have increased, there has been insufficient attention on the views and experiences of nurses working in the delivery room who are involved with induced abortion care. Qualitative, semistructured interviews. This study used a purposive sampling method. In total, 22 nurses involved with induced abortion care were selected. Semistructured interviews with guidelines were conducted, and the content analysis method was used to analyse the data. Our study identified one main theme and five associated subthemes: concealing emotions, which included the inability to refuse, contradictory emotions, mental unease, respect for life and self-protection. This is the first specific qualitative study performed in Taiwan to explore nurses' experiences, and this study also sought to address the concealing of emotions by nurses when they perform induced abortion care, which causes moral distress and creates ethical dilemmas. The findings of this study showed that social-cultural beliefs profoundly influence nurses' values and that the rights of nurses are neglected. The profession should promote small-group and case-study discussions, the clarification of values and reflective thinking among nurses. Continued professional education that provides stress relief will allow nurses to develop self-healing and self-care behaviours, which will enable them to overcome the fear of death while strengthening pregnancy termination counselling, leading to better quality professional care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Is medicine still a profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galton, D J

    2015-09-14

    The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) defines a profession as 'a vocation or calling especially one that involves some branch of advanced learning or science (the Medical Profession)'. A vocation in this sense means work in a field that requires dedication. Other distinguishing features include work that deals with vital issues such as matters of life-or-death for medicine, freedom-or-internment for the law, war-or-peace for politicians, defence-or-attack for the military, etc. Such professionals have a certain amount of autonomy to decide what needs doing. They are never on holiday; doctors are expected to treat patients in an emergency whatever the time or place; politicians interrupt their holidays to debate matters of war or peace. They consider the value of their work to be above disputes about salary or pensions and do not go on strike for such issues. In return, they earn a certain amount of respect and trust from the public they serve. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. American Nurses Association. position statement on assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Nurses, individually and collectively, have an obligation to provide comprehensive and compassionate end-of-life care which includes the promotion of comfort and the relief of pain and, at times, forgoing life-sustaining treatments. The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes that the nurse should not participate in assisted suicide. Such an act is in violation of the Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code for Nurses) and the ethical traditions of the profession.

  2. (Invisibilidade do cuidado e da profissão de enfermagem no espaço de relações La (invisibilidad del cuidado y de la profesión de enfermería en el espacio de relaciones The (invisibility of caring and of the profession of nursing in the relations space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Baggio

    2010-01-01

    espacios organizacionales del cuidado y de la práctica de la profesión en sus interconexiones e intercambios, son visibles e invisibles. CONCLUSIÓN: La visibilidad del cuidar de otro y de la profesión de enfermería se procesa en las interacciones e intercambios que suceden en las relaciones con los seres en sus múltiples dimensiones y complejidad organizacional.OBJECTIVE: To understand how the nursing professionals, in a unity of surgical admission of a University Hospital, give meaning to the visibility of caring for others and to the profession of nursing, in their relations space. METHODS: Is a qualitative and interpretative study. The data were collected by means of workshops with the participation of ten professionals of nursing; and the statements were subjected to the content analysis interpreted under the theoretical frame of the complex thought. RESULTS: Were found the following categories: the invisible and visible care of others in the working dimension; the invisible and visible care of others in the familiar dimension; and, the nursing invisibility in his professional category. The relations, interactions and human associations, in the organizational spaces, where the care and the professional practice are performed, remain visible and invisible in his interconnections and exchanges. CONCLUSION: The visibility of caring for others and of the nursing profession is processed in the interactions and exchanges that happen with the beings of relation in his multiple dimensions and in the organizational complexity.

  3. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This “gaps methodology” can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists. PMID:24646823

  4. Risk of power in helping professions.

    OpenAIRE

    BÁRTEK, Lukáš

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses aspects of helping professions that could represent a certain ?risk? of using power; it especially focuses on a social work sphere. In the first part, the thesis deals with basic terms that are essential for this issue. It pays attention to power itself and its specifications and connections to the helping professions. Further, it focuses on characteristics of terms that apply to the helping professions and social work or on a formulation of aspects which represent a ris...

  5. Registered Nurses' personal rights vs. professional responsibility in caring for members of underserved and disenfranchised populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Claire D Martino

    2005-05-01

    Health disparities exist and refer to the chasms in health status between the advantaged and disadvantaged. Intense multiculturalism will require different approaches and moral obligations to work with these groups and urgency exists to develop nursing caring strategies when dealing with these populations. Development of nursing curricula which identify prejudicial thinking and intolerance for marginalized groups will help to decrease fears and increase nurses' willingness to provide culturally competent health care for underserved and disenfranchised populations. Caring for members of disenfranchised groups instills fear at some level in nurses who are working with these individuals. This fear may be due, in part, to the potential harm nurses perceive the patient may cause them, or perhaps it is because they feel they could possibly be in the individual's situation at some point in their lives. Prejudice and discrimination continue to exist in society and have adversely affected the health care system and the nursing profession. Discrimination may be based on differences due to age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any characteristics by which people differ. Registered Nurses are accountable for nursing decisions and actions regardless of personal preferences. Due to the rapidly changing healthcare system the nurse faces increasing ethical dilemmas and human rights issues. Nurses are individually accountable for caring for each patient and the right to refuse an assignment should be carefully interpreted to avoid patient abandonment. Nurses' objections can be based on moral, ethical, or religious beliefs not on personal preferences and in an emergency the nurse must provide treatment regardless of any personal objections.

  6. Korean nurses' ethical dilemmas, professional values and professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-06-01

    In the changing medical environment, professional stress continuously increases as the individual's quality of life suffers. Of all the healthcare professions, nursing is especially prone to burnout, compassion fatigue and reduced compassion satisfaction, due to the tensions resulting from the physical and psychological stress of caring for extremely ill patients. This study examined the professional quality of life of clinical nurses in Korea and the relationship between their experiences in ethical dilemmas and professional values. This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample consisting of 488 clinical nurses. We used four questionnaires to measure the participants' demographic characteristics, experiences in ethical dilemmas, professional nursing values and professional quality of life (ProQOL assessment, Version 5). Ethical considerations: This study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Bronco Memorial Hospital. Written informed consent was given by all participants. The nurses' professional quality of life was affected by ethical dilemmas and professional nursing values. The factors influencing compassion satisfaction were age, client domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness, professionalism of nursing and the roles of nursing services in professional values. The factors influencing burnout were marital status (married), religion (yes), human life domain, professional work domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness and the role of nursing services in nursing professional values. The factors influencing secondary traumatic stress were human life domain, client domain and the professional work domain of ethical dilemmas. Intervention to help nurses increase their professional quality of life will have a greater chance of success if they are based on the nurses' values and beliefs about the ethical dilemmas they face and foster the establishment of positive professional values. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Comparison of Student Outcomes before and after Introduction of High-Fidelity Simulation in a Nursing School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Teresa Frances O'Hara

    2014-01-01

    Nursing profession accrediting agencies and associations, including the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and the Institute of Medicine, have called for the implementation and evaluation of educational innovations. Many nursing schools have attempted to be…

  8. [Why are we the way we are? Discourses and power relations in nurses' professional identity in Spain (1956-1976)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bonet, Margalida; Gastaldo, Denise; Gallego-Camineroa, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    To explore the continuities, transformations and ruptures in the discourses building the social identity of nurses in Spain between 1956 and 1976. From a poststructuralist and postfeminist perspective, we carried out a genealogical discourse analysis of the manuals of professional morals used during the training of nurses. Analysis of the manuals revealed that the professional identity of nurses was constituted by a discoursive matrix and power relations, in which a residual Christian moral discourse and other dominant gender, technical and biomedical discourses can be identified. These discourses fundamentally highlight power relations of a disciplinary and pastoral nature. Some of these discourses have brought about a symbolic matrix which remains in the foundations of professional practice, health policies, social image, etc. The hegemony of these discourses for 20 years and the observation of current reality allow us to infer that nurses in Spain have managed to transform and break many of these elements and to propose other ways of viewing the profession.

  9. Joinng the ranks: nurses as role models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The average age of today's nurse is 45. The average age of today's nurse educator is 55. Not only is the mean age of nurses increasing, but the United States is also facing a national nursing shortage crisis--with fewer and fewer nurses both in the field and entering the profession. Massive advertising campaigns highlighting flexible nursing opportunities, increased incentives from health care agencies in need of nurses, and newly created flexible shift opportunities for nurses include strategies aimed at addressing this shortage. Fortunately, nursing education programs are seeing an increase in applicants, and many schools of nursing are filling their slots for new students to capacity. But this problem will not be solved by solely tempting new recruits.

  10. [The development of a nursing sciences discipline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnet, Sylvie

    2013-03-01

    Intellectual curiosity has guided the career of Michel Poisson, for the benefit of the gaze and clinical special approach of nurses and quality of care. He is also a historian. He questions the profession with regard to its identity and its desire to construct a discipline in nursing sciences.

  11. A Simulation Method Measuring Psychomotor Nursing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Helena; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The development of a simulation technique to evaluate performance of psychomotor skills in an undergraduate nursing program is described. This method is used as one admission requirement to an alternate route nursing program. With modifications, any health profession could use this technique where psychomotor skills performance is important.…

  12. Strengthening health professions regulation in Cambodia: a rapid assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Duke, Jan; Wuliji, Tana; Smith, Alyson; Phuong, Keat; San, Un

    2016-03-10

    This paper describes a rapid assessment of Cambodia's current system for regulating its health professions. The assessment forms part of a co-design process to set strategic priorities for strengthening health profession regulation to improve the quality and safety of health services. A health system approach for strengthening health professions' regulation is underway and aims to support the Government of Cambodia's plans for scaling up its health workforce, improving health services' safety and quality, and meeting its Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) obligations to facilitate trade in health care services. The assessment used a mixed methods approach including: A desktop review of key laws, plans, reports and other documents relating to the regulation of the health professions in Cambodia (medicine, dentistry, midwifery, nursing and pharmacy); Key informant interviews with stakeholders in Cambodia (The term "stakeholders" refers to government officials, people working on health professional regulation, people working for the various health worker training institutions and health workers at the national and provincial level); Surveys and questionnaires to assess Cambodian stakeholder knowledge of regulation; Self-assessments by members of the five Cambodian regulatory councils regarding key capacities and activities of high-performing regulatory bodies; and A rapid literature review to identify: The key functions of health professional regulation; The key issues affecting the Cambodian health sector (including relevant developments in the wider ASEAN region); and "Smart" health profession regulation practices of possible relevance to Cambodia. We found that the current regulatory system only partially meets Cambodia's needs. A number of key regulatory functions are being performed, but overall, the current system was not designed with Cambodia's specific needs in mind. The existing system is also overly complex, with considerable duplication and

  13. Student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, S L; Raj, L; Prater, L S; Putturaj, M

    2014-09-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India. Increasingly nursing students in India are opting to migrate to practise nursing abroad upon graduation. Perceptions and attitudes about nursing are shaped during student experiences. The purpose in conducting this research was to illuminate student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India. This study took place at a hospital-based, private mission non-profit school of nursing in Bengaluru, India. Purposive sampling of nursing students yielded 14 participants. Photovoice, a qualitative participatory action research methodology, was used. Data were collected between August 2013 and January 2014. A strong international collaboration between researchers resulted in qualitative thematic interpretation of photographs, critical group dialogue transcripts, individual journal entries and detailed field notes. Two main themes were identified including the perceived challenges of a hierarchal system and challenges related to limited nursing workforce capacity. Subcategories of a hierarchal system included challenges related to image, safety, salary and balance. Subcategories of limited workforce capacity were migration, work overload, physical demand, incongruence between theory and practice, and knowledge. Nursing as a profession in India is still in its infancy when measured against standard criteria. Change in health policy is needed to improve salary, safety for nurses, and nurse to patient ratios to address hierarchal and workforce capacity challenges in India. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Research in Nursing Education: Yesterday--Today--Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Dorothy E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the development of research in nursing education from Florence Nightingale as statistician to the effects of doctor-nurse relations to the acceleration produced by various wars to the special nurses who make research a natural process for the profession. (Author/JOW)

  15. Choosing nursing as a career: a narrative analysis of Millennial nurses' career choice of virtue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sheri Lynn; McGillis Hall, Linda; Angus, Jan E; Peter, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    The growth and sustainability of the nursing profession depends on the ability to recruit and retain the upcoming generation of professionals. Understanding the career choice experiences and professional expectations of Millennial nurses (born 1980 or after) is a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies. This study utilized Polkinghorne's interpretive, narrative approach to understand how Millennial nurses explain, account for and make sense of their choice of nursing as a career. The positioning of nursing as a virtuous choice was both temporally and contextually influenced. The decision to enter the profession was initially emplotted around a traditional understanding of nursing as a virtuous profession: altruistic, noble, caring and compassionate. The centricity of virtues depicts one-dimensional understanding of the nursing profession that alone could prove dissatisfying to a generation of professionals who have many career choices available to them. The narratives reveal how participants' perceptions and expectations remain influenced by a stereotypical understanding of nursing, an image that remains prevalent in society and which holds implications for the future recruitment, socialization and retention strategies for upcoming and future generations of nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Entry into Nursing: An Ethnographic Study of Newly Qualified Nurses Taking on the Nursing Role in a Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Skancke Bjerknes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition from student to working nurse has long been recognized as challenging. This paper presents the findings of research into the opportunities and limitations encountered by newly qualified nurses when taking on the nursing role. The study had an ethnographic design. Observation, interviews, and document analysis were used to gain insight into nurses' daily work from the perspective of recently graduated nurses. Thirteen nurses were monitored closely during their first year in a hospital setting in Norway. These new nurses generally entered the field with empathy for their patients, enthusiasm for the profession, and readiness to learn more about being a good nurse. However, their more experienced colleagues seemed to neither respect nor nurture this attitude. The new nurses experienced heavier responsibilities than expected, fragmentation of patient care, and stressful interactions with colleagues. The lack of a supportive work environment and role models increased the new nurses' experience of overwhelming responsibility in their daily work situations. The nurses learned to cope the hard way, despite the organizational culture, not because of it. Adjusting the profession's expectations of new nurses, and offering good role models and more comprehensive support programmes, would markedly ease the transition for new nurses.

  17. Policy, Profession and Public Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kann-Christensen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    Policy, Profession and Public Management: Conflict or Coherence? By Gitte Balling, Assistant Professor, PhD. Email gb@iva.dk Nanna Kann-Christensen, Associate Professor, PhD. Email: nkc@iva.dk Royal School of Library and Information Science Birketinget 6 DK-2300 Copenhagen S T +45 32 58 60 66...... Introduction The aim of this paper is to contribute to the establishment of a theoretically based understanding of the role that cultural policy plays in the way literature promotion is practiced in Danish public libraries. More specifically we aim at refining a model that integrates different issues which...... interconnected concerns that relates to literature promotion. Besides cultural policy we regard the logics of New Public Management (NPM) and professional logics in the field of public libraries. Cultural policy along with the identification of underlying logics present among politicians, government officials...

  18. Gender bias and discrimination in nursing education: can we change it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Ann Strong

    2004-01-01

    Gender bias in nursing education impedes recruitment and retention of males into the profession. Nurse educators who are unaware of men's historical contributions to the profession may unknowingly perpetuate gender bias. The author describes how traditional stereotypes can be challenged and teaching/learning strategies can be customized to gender-driven learning styles.

  19. Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

    Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses.

  20. [Developing knowledge and a profession: 70 years of the Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Raimunda Medeiros

    2002-01-01

    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem-REBEn (Brazilian Journal of Nursing) is now 70 years old. It was created in 1932, and was initially called Anais de Enfermagem. Its main purpose was to be a communication link among Brazilian professionals of nursing. REBEn, which is directly linked to ABEn (Brazilian Association of Nursing), also has as its objective the publicizing of scientific production in different fields of knowledge which can be of interest for the nursing profession. The journal went through many difficulties before achieving the current status of most important publishing in the field of nursing in Brazil. The periodical was developed along many generations and has now achieved intellectual maturity which guaranteed its inclusion in the international indexation of scientific periodicals.