WorldWideScience

Sample records for nursing doctoral education

  1. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  2. Issues and challenges in international doctoral education in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketefian, Shaké; Davidson, Patricia; Daly, John; Chang, Esther; Srisuphan, Wichit

    2005-09-01

    Education is a driving force in improving the health and welfare of communities globally. Doctoral education of nurses has been identified as a critical factor for provision of leadership in practice, scholarship, research, policy and education. Since the genesis of doctoral education in nursing in the USA in the 1930s, this movement has burgeoned to over 273 doctoral programs in over 30 countries globally. The present article seeks to identify the issues and challenges in nursing doctoral education globally, and those encountered by doctoral program graduates in meeting the challenges of contemporary health care systems. Information was derived from a comprehensive literature review. Electronic databases and the Internet, using the Google search engine, were searched using the key words "doctoral education"; "nursing"; "International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing"; "global health"; "international research collaboration". Doctoral education has been a critical force in developing nurse leaders in education, management, policy and research domains. An absence of consensus in terminology and of accurate minimum data sets precludes comparison and debate across programs. The complexity and dynamism of contemporary globalized communities render significant challenges in the conduct of doctoral programs. Addressing funding issues and faculty shortages are key issues for doctoral programs, especially those in developing countries, to achieve an identity uniquely their own. These challenges can also afford considerable opportunities for discussion, debate and the formulation of innovative and collaborative solutions to advance nursing knowledge and scholarship. In spite of discrete differences between countries and regions, the similarities in the issues facing the development of doctoral programs internationally are more striking than the differences. The harnessing of a global collective to address these issues will likely serve to not only forge the future

  3. International doctoral education partnership: the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Marie T; Liu, Huaping; Li, Zheng; Lu, Chongmei; Hill, Martha N

    2011-01-01

    In July 2008, five nurses graduated from the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in China at Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) in Beijing. The purpose of this article is to describe the doctoral program partnership between the Schools of Nursing at PUMC and Johns Hopkins University (Hopkins) in the United States that led to this historic event. The planning, implementation, evaluation, and early outcomes of the program are described to provide a model for rapidly increasing capacity for doctoral education in nursing in countries without sufficient or any doctoral education in nursing. One of the main objectives of this doctoral program partnership was to transition the Chinese University to an independent doctoral program as rapidly as possible. Lessons learned are presented as well as the next steps for this program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Leadership Competence Educational Model for a Twenty-First Century Nursing Doctoral Education in Contemporary Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes a nursing education model about leadership that can be used to improve the leadership skills of nursing doctoral students. This model is developed at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. In developing this model, the author had the opportunity to observe the University of Michigan, School of Nursing…

  5. Doctors and nurses benefit from interprofessional online education in dermatology.

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    Schopf, Thomas; Flytkjær, Vibeke

    2011-10-14

    Benefits of online learning in the health sector have been demonstrated in previous studies. We examined the potential benefits of a joint web-based curriculum on atopic eczema for health personnel. Enrolled doctors and nurses had access to the curriculum for 8 weeks. After the course learners completed a questionnaire. Two dermatologists rated the quality of the submitted homework assignments. Based on data from the project's budget and the Norwegian Medical Association, we estimated the saved travel expenses. Eighty-eight learners (46 doctors) registered for the course. We received 55 questionnaires (response rate 63%). Twenty-seven learners (31%; 16 doctors, 11 nurses; χ2 = 0.03; P = 0.87) used the discussion forum. We found no significant differences in the total questionnaire scores between doctors and nurses. The homework assignments were given an average score of 3.6 for doctors and 3.5 for nurses (P = 0.8) by rater 1. Rater 2 scored 3.9 and 3.6 for doctors and nurses respectively (P = 0.2). The break-even between travel/hotel expenses and course development costs occurred at 135 saved travel refund applications. Doctors and nurses were equally satisfied with a joint web-based course on atopic eczema. The use of an online discussion forum was limited but similar between doctors and nurses. There were no significant differences in the quality of submitted homework assignments. The cost of developing the course was 716 841 NOK and the first 86 learners saved 455 198 NOK in travel expenses.

  6. Doctors and nurses benefit from interprofessional online education in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flytkjær Vibeke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benefits of online learning in the health sector have been demonstrated in previous studies. We examined the potential benefits of a joint web-based curriculum on atopic eczema for health personnel. Methods Enrolled doctors and nurses had access to the curriculum for 8 weeks. After the course learners completed a questionnaire. Two dermatologists rated the quality of the submitted homework assignments. Based on data from the project's budget and the Norwegian Medical Association, we estimated the saved travel expenses. Results Eighty-eight learners (46 doctors registered for the course. We received 55 questionnaires (response rate 63%. Twenty-seven learners (31%; 16 doctors, 11 nurses; χ2 = 0.03; P = 0.87 used the discussion forum. We found no significant differences in the total questionnaire scores between doctors and nurses. The homework assignments were given an average score of 3.6 for doctors and 3.5 for nurses (P = 0.8 by rater 1. Rater 2 scored 3.9 and 3.6 for doctors and nurses respectively (P = 0.2. The break-even between travel/hotel expenses and course development costs occurred at 135 saved travel refund applications. Conclusions Doctors and nurses were equally satisfied with a joint web-based course on atopic eczema. The use of an online discussion forum was limited but similar between doctors and nurses. There were no significant differences in the quality of submitted homework assignments. The cost of developing the course was 716 841 NOK and the first 86 learners saved 455 198 NOK in travel expenses.

  7. Strategic Planning and Doctor Of Nursing Practice Education: Developing Today's and Tomorrow's Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L; Garrison, Kenneth F; Brown, Mary-Michael; Pintz, Christine; Bocchino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Strategic planning and thinking skills are essential for today's nurse leaders. Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs provide an opportunity for developing effective nurse strategists. A well-designed strategy course can stimulate intellectual growth at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Discussion forums in online education provide new opportunities for rich interaction among peers en route to development of well-informed strategic plans. An interprofessional perspective adds a rich and vital aspect to doctoral nursing education and it serves to inform strategic plan development. A roadmap for teaching strategic planning to current and future nursing leaders will guide the integration of essential content into DNP programs.

  8. Toward a Consensus in Ethics Education for the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

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    Laabs, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to develop a consensus as to the essential content and methods of ethics education for advanced practice nurses. An online Delphi technique was used to survey ethics experts to determine whether items were essential, desirable, or unnecessary to ethics education for students in doctor of nursing practice programs. Only the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and ethics terminology were deemed essential foundational knowledge.

  9. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A critical examination of developments in nursing doctoral education in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaké Ketefian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Graduate nursing education in the United States is undergoing major transformations, as a result of factors both within nursing and in the larger society.OBJECTIVE: In this paper the authors examine the trends and factors that are influencing the changes, especially in doctoral education, for both nurse scientist and advanced practice preparation.CONCLUSION: The paper provides a background that serves as context, it gives an overview of the PhD and the DNP degrees, focusing on the recent changes and identifying the most compelling issues and concerns, ending with a series of recommendations.

  12. [Doctor-nurse cooperation in a therapeutic education pathway at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovenko, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    A therapeutic education programme comprising individual sessions in the patient's home has been tried out with patients with diabetes. It enables them to gain a better understanding of the disease and become players in their own health care. This initiative strengthens the doctor-nurse partnership within a coordinated care pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. To what extent has doctoral (PhD) education supported academic nurse educators in their teaching roles: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullin, Carol

    2018-01-01

    A doctoral degree, either a PhD or equivalent, is the academic credential required for an academic nurse educator position in a university setting; however, the lack of formal teaching courses in doctoral programs contradict the belief that these graduates are proficient in teaching. As a result, many PhD prepared individuals are not ready to meet the demands of teaching. An integrative literature review was undertaken. Four electronic databases were searched including the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and ProQuest. Date range and type of peer-reviewed literature was not specified. Conditions and factors that influenced or impacted on academic nurse educators' roles and continue to perpetuate insufficient pedagogical preparation include the requirement of a research focused PhD, lack of mentorship in doctoral programs and the influence of epistemic cultures (including institutional emphasis and reward system). Other factors that have impacted the academic nurse educator's role are society's demand for highly educated nurses that have increased the required credential, the assumption that all nurses are considered natural teachers, and a lack of consensus on the practice of the scholarship of teaching. Despite recommendations from nursing licensing bodies and a major US national nursing education study, little has been done to address the issue of formal pedagogical preparation in doctoral (PhD) nursing programs. There is an expectation of academic nurse educators to deliver quality nursing education yet, have very little or no formal pedagogical preparation for this role. While PhD programs remain research-intensive, the PhD degree remains a requirement for a role in which teaching is the major responsibility.

  14. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research, but invol......, multicultural identity and the ongoing and emerging needs of a discipline. The book is an unparalleled resource for academic advisors, prospective and current educators, clinical supervisors, clinicians and students of music therapy.......Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...

  15. The Sexual Development and Education of Preschool Children: Knowledge and Opinions from Doctors and Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuncu, Meltem; Akhan, Latife Utas; Tanir, İbrahim Murat; Yildiz, Hicran

    This descriptive study was carried out in order to determine the knowledge levels and attitudes of doctors and nurses regarding children's sexual development and sex education. The study was conducted with doctors and nurses who work at various clinics of two state hospitals located in the province of Istanbul. The data collection tool consisted of 58 questions. The Statistical Program for the Social Sciences, version 18.0 (SPSS 18.0) was used for data analysis. It was determined that females comprised the majority of the respondents (61 %) and were over 36 years of age (54.1 %) (37.81 ± 8.82). Of the participants in the study, 63.5 % had bachelor's degrees and 62.1 % were medical doctors. It was determined that the number of correct responses given by the respondents regarding some behaviors observed in children aged between 3 and 6 years and children's sexual development and sex education showed significant differences according to age group ( p  = 0.007), marital status ( p  = 0.004), the status of having children ( p  = 0.004), educational status ( p  = 0.005) and occupation ( p  = 0.000). However, in a review of the study findings, it was observed that culture had an important impact on sex-related approaches and that embarrassment and shyness is very common.

  16. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  17. Quality of nursing doctoral education and scholarly performance in U.S. schools of nursing: strategic areas for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi; Park, So Hyun; Khan, Shaheen; Ketefian, Shaké

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of quality of nursing doctoral education (QNDE) in research-intensive universities has not been reported since 1980s. This study aimed to examine the QNDE from the perspectives of faculty and students/graduates and their relations to school characteristics, identify factors of the four domains of the QNDE that influence the QNDE, and analyze the relationship of QNDE to scholarly performance of nursing schools in the Unites States. Seventy-two nursing schools offering research-focused nursing doctoral programs with National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding during 2004-2007 participated, and they responded to the questionnaire (see http://gknf.or.kr/research/). Twenty-nine deans/schools, 179 faculties, and 461 students/graduates responded. Both faculty and students/graduates groups rated quality positively. Schools in the top quartile group per NIH funding amounts showed significant differences in QNDE from the bottom quartile group. Program and faculty domains were identified as most important by the top quartile group, and items that were significantly associated with the quality were supportive environment for students' learning, faculty mentorship, and assistance to students in understanding the value of programs of research and scholarship. Percentage of faculty member with research grants was significant predictors for all domains of QNDE, and time to degree was significant in explaining overall quality. © 2014.

  18. A Call for Educational Reform: Colorado Nursing Doctorate Model as Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean; Phillips, Sally

    1992-01-01

    Describes the nursing professional doctorate degree program at the University of Colorado, which has been selected as a national model. The program prepares advanced nursing experts with a range of professional competencies so they can practice across clinical care specialties and function in all settings. (JOW)

  19. Multimethod teaching strategies to integrate selected QSEN competencies in a Doctor of Nursing Practice distance education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mary Lou; Frisby, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative identified 6 competencies for the education of nurses (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics) and the related knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency. The initial QSEN focus was on competency development during prelicensure nursing education, with subsequent attention on adapting the KSAs for graduate programs that prepare advanced practice nurses for clinical roles. Description of successful QSEN competency integration in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs is limited. Although the ultimate goal is executing DNP programs where quality and safety is thoroughly integrated throughout the curricula, the focus of this article is on multimethod teaching strategies to integrate selected QSEN KSAs into an existing online post-master's DNP quality and safety course. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Women Doctors and Lady Nurses: Class, Education, and the Professional Victorian Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The lives of the first women doctors in Britain have been well studied by historians, as have the many debates about the right of women to train and practice as doctors. Yet the relationship between these women and their most obvious comparators and competitors-the newly professionalized hospital nurses-has not been explored. This article makes use of a wide range of sources to explore the ways in which the first lady doctors created "clear water" between themselves and the nurses with whom they worked and trained. In doing so, it reveals an identity that may seem at odds with some of the clichés of Victorian femininity, namely that of the intelligent and ambitious lady doctor.

  1. The experience of international doctoral education in nursing: an exploratory survey of staff and international nursing students in a British university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin

    2007-07-01

    As part of the internationalization of higher education, increasing numbers of international doctoral students are coming to study in British nursing schools. This paper reports on a small-scale exploratory survey that sought to investigate the educational experiences of these students and their supervisors in one British School of Nursing. Both staff and students saw great value in international education. However both groups identified the need for greater support to facilitate adjustment in a number of areas, including: understanding the PhD process, studying in a second language, working within a different academic culture, managing the supervision relationship, and finding a sense of community. This was a small study, but the findings confirm key issues identified in the limited available literature. Recommendations include staff training and the development of additional in-puts for students. Future research should include qualitative, longitudinal and multi-site studies to more thoroughly assess the process and outcomes of international doctoral education in nursing.

  2. Career opportunities for doctoral-prepared nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, L C; Satkowski, T C; Ganchorre, C

    1998-04-01

    As we face the 21st century, transitions fare occurring in all of society's major institutions. Nowhere is this transition more evident than in education and the health care industry. There is an explosion of information and the use of educational technology is now opening doors never entered before. In health care, greater influence by third-party players and consumers can be seen as major factors in a new and more highly competitive health care system. With the advent of managed health care, clearly more money must be spent in nursing research since in mos instances, nursing is a big ticket item in any health care agency's budget. Determining best practice models and testing them, participating in outcomes research that looks in multidisciplinary practice, and developing new knowledge to serve the needs of our rapidly changing and diverse population requires more and better prepared nurse researchers. The 21st century will also bring unprecedented numbers of nursing faculty who are part of the baby boomer generation face-to face with retirement. The retirement of these doctoral-prepared faculty will create a huge vacuum that will demand to be filled. Clearly, given the demographics in our country, as these doctoral-prepared nurses reach retirement age, they and their peers will begin to experience the chronic illnesses that are characteristic of our older citizens. More, not less, professional nurses will be needed to meet the demand for health promotion, disease prevention, and care of the acute and chronically ill. More, not less, nursing faculty will be needed to produce the require number of professional nurses and to replace their retiring colleagues. A doctoral degree in nursing will be the key to many opportunities and will bring greater rewards than those who hold the same degree today. For the next generation of graduates, the doctor degree in nursing will truly be a "hot ticket item".

  3. The future shortage of doctoral prepared nurses and the impact on the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Deb; Somera, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Nursing remains at the top of the job growth market and has the potential to positively or negatively impact changes in the delivery of health care today. Professional nurses play a crucial role in the prevention of medication errors, decreasing infection rates, and facilitating a patient's safe transition from acute care into the home environment. Nurses must make critical life-saving decisions associated with caring for the more acutely ill patient. Doctoral prepared nurses have the unique position to assist the direct care nurse because of their advanced education. The doctor in nursing practice concentrates on direct care, specifically research utilization for improved delivery of care, patient outcomes, and clinical systems management There is a future shortage of doctoral prepared nurses, and a resolution is needed. Doctoral prepared nurses with advanced degrees play an important role in mentoring the bedside nurse to promote an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship. The doctor in nursing practice has the ability to effect change in health care systems, organizations, and policy through focusing on the essence of nursing-the care.

  4. Overview of the doctoral education in nursing Panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería Panorama da formação doutoral em enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEJÍA ROJAS MARÍA ELENA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The level of education in nursing has evolved as a response to the need of educating human capital capable of developing personal knowledge and promoting innovative change strategies in the domains of science and technology.

    Objectives: describe the overview of the doctoral education in nursing in Latin America, Colombia and the world, and ponder over its contributions to the discipline and the Colombian society.

    Methodology: the methodology is divided into three segments: worldwide overview of the doctoral education in nursing, current situation of doctoral programs in Colombia and pertinence of nursing doctors in Colombia.

    Results and discussion: findings show differences among the progress made regarding the doctoral education in nursing in the World, Latin America and Colombia. It is worth highlighting the growth of programs in Europe, Asia and Latin America, which is positive to achieve further development of the discipline.

    El nivel de la educación en enfermería ha evolucionado a través del tiempo, como respuesta a la necesidad de formar capital humano capaz de desarrollar conocimiento propio y de promover estrategias innovadoras de cambio en las áreas de ciencia y tecnología.

    Objetivos: describir el panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería a escala mundial, latinoamericana y nacional, y reflexionar sobre sus aportes para la disciplina y la sociedad colombiana.

    Metodología: se desarrolla en tres partes: panorama mundial de la formación doctoral en enfermería, situación actual de los doctorados en Colombia y pertinencia de los doctores de enfermería en Colombia.

    Resultados y discusión: los hallazgos muestran diferencias entre los desarrollos de la formaci

  5. Panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería Panorama da formação doutoral em enfermagem Overview of the doctoral education in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ STELLA BUENO ROBLES

    2010-12-01

    education in nursing has evolved as a response to the need of educating human capital capable of developing personal knowledge and promoting innovative change strategies in the domains of science and technology. Objectives: describe the overview of the doctoral education in nursing in Latin America, Colombia and the world, and ponder over its contributions to the discipline and the Colombian society. Methodology: the methodology is divided into three segments: worldwide overview of the doctoral education in nursing, current situation of doctoral programs in Colombia and pertinence of nursing doctors in Colombia. Results and discussion: findings show differences among the progress made regarding the doctoral education in nursing in the World, Latin America and Colombia. It is worth highlighting the growth of programs in Europe, Asia and Latin America, which is positive to achieve further development of the discipline.

  6. Doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice as complementary degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Sandra R

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) has raised serious concerns about the discipline's continuing ability to build its body of knowledge at an appropriate rate. After noting the various concerns that have been raised that the DNP siphons off prospective doctor of philosophy (PhD) students and compromises the standing of schools of nursing in universities, the distinct but complementary roles of nurses with the two preparations are described. Rather than worry about the DNP distracting from the PhD, the argument is made that these two degrees support one another and together can help to advance the creation and translation of knowledge into the practice of the discipline. Similar discussions about the distinction between practice and research in the field of education are noted.

  7. Chief nursing officers' perceptions of the Doctorate of Nursing Practice degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michelle L; Stanton, Marietta P

    2013-01-01

    Nurse executives practice in a business environment, which requires a skill set that has traditionally not been included in advanced nursing curriculum. The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) essentials are designed to address this gap in education while maintaining the focus on advanced nursing practice and executive management competency. Current literature supports the appropriateness of the DNP with practice focus areas of advanced practice specialties and nursing leadership. Although certification and educational bodies, and some professional nursing organizations, have embraced the DNP as the terminal degree for non-research-focused nurses, there remains a gap in the literature in regards to the perceptions of validity of the DNP for nurse executives. The purpose of this capstone project was to investigate the perceptions of practicing chief nursing officers (CNOs) in the acute care setting regarding the application of the DNP degree for nurse leaders. Utilizing an online survey, specific perceptions investigated included application and appropriateness of the DNP in a business-based practice model and managing daily nursing operations. CNOs practicing in the acute care setting differed on their responses regarding whether the DNP should be the recommended or the required degree in CNO development programs. CNOs with tenure responded more positively to the perception that the DNP curricula contains advanced nursing knowledge content appropriate to nurse executive practice. Practicing CNOs in the acute care setting do perceive the DNP as an appropriate degree option for nurse executive roles at aggregate, system, and organizational levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Perceptions of nurse practitioners by emergency department doctors in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Weiland, Tracey J.; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Australian Medical Association is strongly opposed to the nurse practitioner (NP) role with concerns that NPs may become doctor substitutes without the requisite training and education that the medical role demands. Despite this, NPs have been heralded by some as a potential solution to the access block, workforce shortage and increased demand affecting emergency departments (EDs). Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of NPs by medical staff working in...

  9. The learning experiences of international doctoral students with particular reference to nursing students: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin; Stevenson, Keith

    2010-02-01

    One of the key challenges for the advancement of nursing globally is the development of doctorally prepared educators and leaders in a context where there is a shortage of provision of doctoral nursing programmes. For the short term future, many nurses wishing to undertake a doctorate will need to complete this education in the USA, the UK or Australia. Very little is known however about the nature of their learning experiences in these countries. This paper presents a literature review on the international doctoral student experience, with specific reference to nursing. A thorough review of the literature from 1990 to 2009 was undertaken which yielded only three empirical studies related to nursing. The review was then expanded to include subjects other than nursing which yielded 16 studies in total. This paper presents key themes that appear to be generic to international doctoral students, and draws out specific implications for nursing. The review found that international doctoral students' learning experiences were strongly influenced by the extent to which they could engage with three key elements of doctoral programmes: The first months represented a critical time of transition and most international students seemed to want and expect considerable support and structured in-put during this period. Most studies concluded that there was a need for greater institutional support and supervisor training. The three nursing-specific papers were entirely consistent with these themes. The existing evidence is extremely heterogeneous and of variable methodological quality. In order to ensure that doctoral nursing students are getting a high quality and appropriate PhD experience, there is a need for more research specifically with this group. There is also a need to investigate the different stages of the doctoral process in nursing, including, for example, writing up and examination processes and post-doctoral career outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. A concordance-based study to assess doctors' and nurses' mental models in Internal Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Blondon

    Full Text Available Interprofessional collaboration between doctors and nurses is based on team mental models, in particular for each professional's roles. Our objective was to identify factors influencing concordance on the expectations of doctors' and nurses' roles and responsibilities in an Internal Medicine ward. Using a dataset of 196 doctor-nurse pairs (14x14 = 196, we analyzed choices and prioritized management actions of 14 doctors and 14 nurses in six clinical nurse role scenarios, and in five doctor role scenarios (6 options per scenario. In logistic regression models with a non-nested correlation structure, we evaluated concordance among doctors and nurses, and adjusted for potential confounders (including prior experience in Internal Medicine, acuteness of case and gender. Concordance was associated with number of female professionals (adjusted OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.73, for acute situations (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.62, and in doctor role scenarios (adjusted OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.65. Prior experience and country of training were not significant predictors of concordance. In conclusion, our concordance-based approach helped us identify areas of lower concordance in expected doctor-nurse roles and responsibilities, particularly in non-acute situations, which can be targeted by future interprofessional, educational interventions.

  11. Perceptions of nurse practitioners by emergency department doctors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A

    2010-08-26

    The Australian Medical Association is strongly opposed to the nurse practitioner (NP) role with concerns that NPs may become doctor substitutes without the requisite training and education that the medical role demands. Despite this, NPs have been heralded by some as a potential solution to the access block, workforce shortage and increased demand affecting emergency departments (EDs). The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of NPs by medical staff working in Australian EDs. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with closed and open-ended questions. Participants were drawn from a representative stratified sample of two city, two metropolitan and two provincial hospitals of each State/Territory. A total of 95 doctors from 35 EDs participated in this study including 36 Departmental Directors; 36% of participating Directors indicated having an NP on staff. Doctors were strongly opposed to the statement that NPs could replace either nurses or other prevocational doctors; 71 interviewees commented on the role of NPs in the ED. Thematic analyses revealed polarised views held by doctors. Eight major themes were identified, the most common being that there is a lack of clarity of the NP role definition, their scope of practice and differentiation from the medical role. Although ED NPs represent a highly skilled professional group their role is poorly understood by ED doctors. Opposition to the NP role is a significant barrier to the introduction of great numbers of ED NPs as a strategy to overcome the medical workforce shortage. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12245-010-0214-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  12. The European Donor Hospital Education Programme (EDHEP): addressing the training needs of doctors and nurses who break bad news, care for the bereaved, and request donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, G. A.; van Dalen, J.; Jager, K. J.; Ryan, M.; Wijnen, R. M.; Wight, C.; Morton, J. M.; Morley, M.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    The competence of critical care staff when it comes to death and organ donation can make the difference between a family's agreeing to or refusing the latter. Doctors and nurses often feel uncomfortable approaching relatives about donation and attribute this to a lack of training. Bereaved relatives

  13. Medication communication between nurses and doctors for paediatric acute care: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrott, Narelle; Kinney, Sharon; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine how communication between nurses and doctors occurred for managing medications in inpatient paediatric settings. Communication between health professionals influences medication incidents' occurrence and safe care. An ethnographic study was undertaken. Semi-structured interviews, observations and focus groups were conducted in three clinical areas of an Australian tertiary paediatric hospital. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using the Medication Communication Model. The actual communication act revealed health professionals' commitment to effective medication management and the influence of professional identities on medication communication. Nurses and doctors were dedicated to providing safe, effective medication therapy for children, within their scope of practice and perceived role responsibilities. Most nurses and junior doctors used tentative language in their communication while senior doctors tended to use direct language. Irrespective of language style, nurses actively engaged with doctors to promote patients' needs. Yet, the medical hierarchical structure, staffing and attendant expectations influenced communication for medication management, causing frustration among nurses and doctors. Doctors' lack of verbal communication of documented changes to medication orders particularly troubled nurses. Nurses persisted in their efforts to acquire appropriate orders for safe medication administration to paediatric patients. Collaborative practice between nurses and doctors involved complex, symbiotic relationships. Their dedication to providing safe medication therapy to paediatric patients facilitated effective medication management. At times, shortcomings in interdisciplinary communication impacted on potential and actual medication incidents. Understanding of the complexities affecting medication communication between nurses and doctors helps to ensure interprofessional respect for each other's roles and inherent demands

  14. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  15. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...

  16. [Nurse-doctor relationships, reflection of our society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothier Bautzer, Eliane

    Relations between nurses and doctors are a paradigmatic example of the tensions produced by the process of empowerment over the course of the 20th century. The techniques, health policies, organisation of care and the place of the patient within the health system together contribute to the reconfiguration of the partnership relationship between nurses and doctors. These relationships help to define those that these professionals establish with their patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-31

    Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

  18. Doctoral education in Europe: trends and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitusikova, A

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces latest trends in doctoral education in Europe, based on results of numerous conferences, seminars, workshops, debates and interviews with European universities' representatives. It focuses on the impact of the Bologna Process and the EU research strategies on the reform of doctoral education in Europe. It challenges some trends such as the focus on coursework and credits, and emphasizes the core component of doctoral education--original research that should remain the crucial feature of training of young researchers. The paper examines key changes in European doctoral education related to organization and structure, supervision, skills training, and internationalization.

  19. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation in Doctor of Nursing Practice Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Joanne K

    2017-10-01

    Doctors of Nursing Practice focus on leadership in evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is influenced by one's beliefs in and implementation of EBP. Little is known to date about the EBP beliefs and implementation of Doctor of Nursing Practice students and outcomes of Doctor of Nursing Practice education. Guided by the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model, the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs (EBPB) and Implementation (EBPI) tools were used to assess the impact of EBP as a program pillar, curricular thread, and content area on EBPB and EBPI of Doctor of Nursing Practice-Family Nurse Practitioner students. Five cohorts who completed the same curriculum were studied. Fifty-four of the 89 students across the five cohorts began and completed the study. Paired t-test for group effects showed statistical significance from pre- to post-measure in students overall EBPB, t = 4.4 (52), p students who are educated to be EBP leaders must have a curriculum that supports them in the knowledge and skill-set needed to translate evidence into practice. The ARCC Model can guide faculty in EBP curriculum development. EBPB and EBPI are valid and reliable measures to assess for gains across a curriculum. Through educational outcomes, educators can assess desired student outcomes for EBP across a curriculum and can build an evidence base for ongoing curriculum development. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Human Caring as Moral Context for Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean

    1988-01-01

    Argues for moral context in nursing education. Discusses steps taken at the University of Colorado School of Nursing to emphasize human caregiving in the curriculum. Also argues that the preferred future for nursing education is a postbaccalaureate program in human caring, health, and healing that leads to the nursing doctorate. (CH)

  2. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  3. Corruption in Russia’s Doctoral Education

    OpenAIRE

    Osipian, Ararat

    2008-01-01

    Doctorates have long attracted attention of those aspiring to scholarship and research, but also those seeking verbal distinctions and a documented knowledge. Doctoral degrees are considered as signs of a high level expertise and authority in a given filed. The growing number of dissertation defenses does not necessarily translate into a higher quality of dissertations or qualifications of newly produced doctorates. Such a trend may in part be a result of the growing corruption in higher educ...

  4. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  5. Exploring the experiences of nurses studying professional doctorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Sharin

    Recently there has been a rapid increase in the number of professional doctorates being undertaken in the UK. Nursing doctorates in particular are relatively new to the UK and therefore little is known about nurses' experiences of them, especially from a qualitative perspective. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses studying professional doctorates in health care, and in particular to determine what factors influence nurses in undertaking the programme, and to identity any challenges they encounter. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and a purposeful sample of five was selected from a total of 24. Data were analysed using a grounded theory method. The desire to enhance professional and personal identity was the core influential factor, while challenges included the balance between family, social, work and academic responsibilities. Nurses created a system through the use of a range of coping mechanisms to overcome these challenges. Findings from this study could be informative for prospective students, academic staff and practitioners involved with doctorate students. This study could also be used as a preliminary analysis to form the basis for theoretical sampling in a larger scale study.

  6. Meeting the nursing faculty shortage challenge: an accelerated doctoral program in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Teresa; Stotts, Nancy A; Fontaine, Dorrie

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation partnered with a major west coast school of nursing to create an accelerated doctoral program in nursing. The program's chief aim was to address the nursing shortage by increasing the number of nurse faculty by funding 42 doctoral students in five cohorts. Students accepted into the accelerated program receive a generous stipend and commit to earn their doctorate in 3 years and teach for 3 years after graduation at 1 of 17 area nursing programs. Two cohorts have graduated from the accelerated program and are currently in faculty positions. This article describes the accelerated doctoral program and the academic progression and postgraduation employment of the first two cohorts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A qualitative study on the relationship between doctors and nurses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lack of teamwork in the relationship resulted from different expectations and a confusion of roles. Both professions have however demonstrated a willingness to promote teamwork in hospitals. A journal review on interventions to promote collaboration between nurses and doctors showed positive gains once collaboration ...

  8. HIV management by nurse prescribers compared with doctors at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV management by nurse prescribers compared with doctors at a paediatric centre in Gaborone, Botswana. ... Task shifting remains a promising strategy to scale up and sustain adult and paediatric ART more effectively, particularly where provider shortages threaten ART rollout. Policies guiding ART services in southern ...

  9. Nurses' and doctors perceptions regarding the implementation of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Triage assessment of patients on arrival at an emergency unit is an essential function in quality emergency care provision, and is a cost-effective and time saving venture. This study investigated nurses' and doctors' perceptions about the implementation of the Cape Triage Score in one emergency unit. The challenges ...

  10. Doctoral Student Socialization: Educating Stewards of the Physical Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jared; Gaudreault, Karen Lux; Richards, K. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In preparing the future stewards of the physical education profession, the occupational socialization and professional development of physical education doctoral students is important to consider. To date, there has been scant scholarly inquiry into doctoral education in physical education. However, there is an abundance of research related to…

  11. Formação de especialistas, mestres e doutores em enfermagem: avanços e perspectivas Formación de especialistas, maestros y doctores en enfermería: avances y perspectivas Education of specialists, masters, and doctorates in nursing: progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto tece algumas considerações sobre a área da enfermagem e os avanços e perspectivas para a formação de especialistas, mestres e doutores em enfermagem. A construção de conhecimentos resulta de recursos humanos competentes no processo investigativo para um cuidado mais qualificado. Sua produção é uma importante estratégia para o fortalecimento da Enfermagem como ciência e profissão comprometida em promover melhor saúde à sociedade. A pós-graduação lato e stricto sensu em enfermagem empenha-se em formar especialistas, mestres e doutores com competência e qualificação que contribuem para o avanço da ciência e tecnologia da enfermagem brasileira.El presente artículo teje algunas consideraciones sobre el área de la enfermería y los avances y perspectivas para la formación de especialistas, maestros y doctores en enfermería. La construcción de conocimientos resulta de recursos humanos competentes en el proceso investigativo para un cuidado más calificado. Su producción es una estrategia importante para el fortalecimiento de la Enfermería como ciencia y profesión comprometida en promover una mejor salud para la sociedad. El postgrado lato y stricto sensu en enfermería se empeña en formar especialistas, maestros y doctores con competencia y calificación que contribuyen al avance de la ciencia y tecnología de la enfermería brasileña.This paper discusses the progress and prospects of the education of specialists, masters, and doctorates in nursing. The development of knowledge results from competent human resources in the research process to promote quality nursing care. Their scientific production is an important strategy for strengthening nursing as a science and a profession committed to promoting quality health care services to society. The "strict sensu" and "lato sensu" graduate programs in nursing are committed to educate nurse specialists, masters, and doctorates with the expertise and

  12. Research support by doctoral-granting colleges/schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Saun-Joo Lee; Wolfe, Sandra; Yucha, Carolyn B; Tsai, Peishan

    2002-01-01

    Colleges and schools of nursing with doctoral programs focus on developing quality research programs. One effective way of managing and nurturing a research program is through the implementation of a nursing research office or center. The purpose of this study is to describe the resources provided by the colleges/schools of nursing with doctoral programs for research development. A self-report questionnaire, developed by the research team, was mailed to all schools of nursing offering doctoral programs. The response rate was 79 per cent (65/82 schools). Results indicated that 56 schools (86.2 per cent) have designated research support offices. The main goals of nursing research offices are to increase the amount of extramural funding and to promote dissemination of scholarly work via publications and presentations. The majority of research offices provide assistance with grants and the research process and offer educational programs. Most doctoral-granting schools are providing some support for research activities. However, the degree of investment in research support varied widely among the responding schools. This study suggests that it takes both time and institutional commitment to build a successful research environment. Although necessary for research development, support services are not sufficient by themselves. Instead, they need to be considered in the light of individual (e.g., faculty interest and motivation) and group (e.g., culture of scholarship) factors within each school. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company

  13. Violence Against Doctors and Nurses in Hospitals in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Sidika; Bilgin Demir, İpek; Karsavuran, Seda; Ürek, Duygu; İlgün, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    This study shows the rates of violence experienced by doctors and nurses and their ensuing responses including reporting rates and any effects experienced because of the violence. The Survey for Investigating the Violence on Medical Employees was administered to 254 doctors and nurses. Data were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression analysis. Of the participants, 74.4% had been exposed to some form of violence. Most of the participants, 87.3%, experienced verbal violence; 12.2% experienced physical violence; and 0.5% experienced sexual violence. Logistic regression analysis indicated that married doctors and nurses are at risk of experiencing violence 0.5 times greater when compared with unmarried or widowed doctors and nurses (p = 0.026). The experience of violence differs by hospital type (p = 0.038) and years working in the healthcare industry (p = 0.042). Differences were also found regarding exposure to violence between doctors and nurses in terms of time of day (p = 0.031) and the work being performed (p violence (50.8%) was the healthcare system. Verbal response was the most frequent reaction to violence (24.4%), with loss of occupational performance (58.2%) being the most cited negative outcome. Approximately 9.3% of the victims reported the violence to judicial authorities. A lengthy judicial proceeding was chosen as the most significant hindrance to reporting the violence (45.8%). This study reveals the effects of violence and reporting rates at two hospitals in Turkey, and it implies that underreporting of violence is an important issue. Therefore, hospital management should take measures to increase reporting and take necessary actions when violence is reported.

  14. Improving transfusion education for junior doctors; exploring UK experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J E; Narayan, S; Pendry, K

    2017-04-01

    To provide evidence-based guidance on how transfusion education should be delivered to junior doctors by employing established qualitative research methodology. There is a global call for increased transfusion education for doctors to support the delivery of evidence-based practice. Education is reported as an effective measure to improve transfusion practice, although there is a paucity of research evaluating how this should be effectively delivered. Serial focus groups with junior doctors and relevant healthcare professionals explored experiences of, and reactions to, education and competency assessments in transfusion, which were audio-recorded and transcribed. Temporal and final analysis, performed by two independent assessors, informed subsequent recruitment, analysis and challenging of emerging theories - until saturation was reached. Eight focus groups were held involving 53 personnel, 77% of whom were junior doctors. Current transfusion education for doctors in the UK is reliant on e-learning and 'cascade training' (on-the-job from senior clinicians/nursing staff). E-learning is viewed as a 'tick box exercise'. There is a call for relevant and practical continuing education delivered face to face by good educators in an environment away from clinical practice. Preferred methods include small group and simulation learning based on real-life cases. In contrast to practical competency, the assessment of clinical competency is deemed unfeasible. Current methods of transfusion education employed in the UK are unsatisfactory to ensure safe transfusion practice. Ongoing education is deemed necessary throughout career progression, and suggested improvements include increased emphasis on face-to-face teaching and simulation training. Employed educational methods and decision support tools require appropriate evaluation. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. [Nurses and doctors turnover: an impasse in the implementation of the Family Health Strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Cássia Regina Gotler; Junqueira, Alvaro Gustavo Wagner; Schwingel, Glademir; Carreno, Ioná; Jungles, Lúcia Adriana Pereira; Saldanha, Olinda Maria de Fátima Lechmann

    2010-06-01

    The research analyzed the causes for turnover rate of doctors and nurses in family health strategy teams with at least two years of implementation on March 2006 in Vale do Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul State. It is a quantitative and qualitative study identifying 31 teams in 25 towns, and the turnover rate was established by year from 1999 to 2005 by professional category. There was no turnover for doctors and nurses in 1999 and 2000. Doctor turnover was 5.9% in 2002; 32.1% in 2003; 25.8% in 2004; and 64.5% in 2005. Regarding nurses, it was 27.7% in 2001; 47% in 2002; 17.8% in 2003; 41.9% in 2004; and 22.6% in 2005. The analysis of semi-structured interviews with 7 doctors and 7 nurses appointed as main causes for turnover: poor work links, fragmented education, authoritarian way of managing, no links with the community, and poor work conditions. Thus, it is necessary to make changes regarding labor links, work conditions, and education for health workers and managers, seeking for the integrality in health practices.

  16. Nurse migration: the effects on nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P K

    2008-09-01

    This paper is an opinion piece based on experience and supported where possible with literature, which addresses an issue of both national and international interest. It focuses on one aspect of the multifaceted social phenomenon of nurse migration, i.e. nurse education. Much has been written about the direct effects of nurse migration on the nurse migrant, the delivery of health care in the countries that supply the nurses, and the countries that receive them. However, there is little information regarding the direct effects of migration on nurse education within the literature. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the positive and negative effects of nurse migration on nurse education both in the countries that supply nurses and those which receive them. Both scholarly and 'grey' literature is used to support the discussion on the 'real' challenges faced by nurse educators and clinical nurses in those countries that supply or receive nurses. In addition, practical recommendations for nurse educators are presented. Furthermore, the nursing profession is challenged to become politically active, to become involved and to take responsibility for the decisions made about nurse education in order to protect the integrity of nurse education and patient safety. The quality of nurse education in many countries has been undermined as a result of rapid, mass migration. There is an urgent need to take practical steps to maintain the integrity of nurse education and the nurse's preparation for practice in order to protect patients' safety.

  17. Nursing education in telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gerri S; Shea, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Many nurses around the world provide expert nursing care through distance technologies but few undergraduate programmes expose nursing students to the full range of technologies available. Nursing education in telehealth needs to reflect the roles, responsibilities and capacity for knowledge building and innovation of the various constituencies within the profession. Registered nurses and advanced practice nurses will need complementary but different knowledge and skills than nurse administrators. The former will need technical proficiency in using common telehealth modalities and the ability to integrate telehealth in their practices.

  18. Knowledge of Pharmacists, Doctors and Nurses Towards Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of Pharmacists, Doctors and Nurses Towards Diabetes. ... Les trois professions de la santé a étudié semblent avoir des problèmes similaires dans des domaines spécifiques tels que, l'alimentation, la gestion de l'hypoglycémie ainsi que des symptômes d'identification de l'acidocétose. Programmes de formation ...

  19. Scholarly work products of the doctor of nursing practice: one approach to evaluating scholarship, rigour, impact and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhaar, Mary F; Sylvia, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate, monitor and manage the quality of projects conducted and work produced as evidence of scholarship upon completion of Doctor of Nursing Practice education. The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a relatively new degree which prepares nurses for high impact careers in diverse practice settings around the globe. Considerable variation characterises curricula across schools preparing Doctors of Nursing Practice. Accreditation assures curricula are focused on attainment of the Doctor of Nursing Practice essentials, yet outcomes have not been reported to help educators engage in programme improvement. This work has implications for nursing globally because translating strong evidence into practice is key to improving outcomes in direct care, leadership, management and education. The Doctor of Nursing Practice student learns to accomplish translation through the conduct of projects. Evaluating the rigour and results of these projects is essential to improving the quality, safety and efficacy of translation, improvements in care and overall system performance. A descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the scholarly products of Doctor of Nursing Practice education in one programme across four graduating classes. A total of 80 projects, conducted across the USA and around the globe, are described using a modification of the Uncertainty, Pace, Complexity Model. The per cent of students considered to have produced high quality work in relation to target expectations as well as the per cent that conducted means testing increased over the four study years. Evaluation of scope, complexity and rigour of scholarly work products has driven improvements in the curriculum and informed the work of faculty and advisors. Methods, evaluation and outcomes conformed around a set of expectations for scholarship and rigour have resulted in measurable outcomes, and quality publications have increased over time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  1. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  2. Personality traits of Australian nurses and doctors: challenging stereotypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Eley, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    This study compared temperament and character traits of Australian registered nurses and general practitioners. A cross-sectional quantitative design used the Temperament and Character Inventory. Total sample size was 426. Only main effects were detected. Nurses were higher in the temperament traits of Novelty Seeking and Reward Dependence, lower in the character traits of Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness but higher in Self-Transcendence compared with the sample of doctors. Differences in personality profiles between registered nurses and general practitioners might challenge existing stereotypes between these professions. Further exploration of traits exclusive to and shared among health professions would supplement a broad conceptualization of specialities and support the enhancement of appropriate training and career counselling. Awareness of one's temperament and character can lead to a clearer understanding of how they function in the workplace and might encourage reflection on and insight into the implications of their personality and career plans. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses at a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, A I; Ademola, S A; Olawoye, O A; Iyun, A O; Oluwatosin, O M

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to determine the awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses in a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking, and to identify needs for personnel educational programmes. A cross sectional survey on doctors and nurses was carried out using a 44-item questionnaire that included a Likert scale on attitudes. Predictors of favourable attitudes were determined. Eighty (49.7%) doctors and 81 (50.3%) nurses participated in the study. Many participants, 126 (78.3%), knew that skin could be donated, but only 96 (59.6%) participants were aware of skin banking. The main source of information was during professional training (17.4%). Only 41 (25.5%) participants were willing to donate skin after death. Body disfigurement was the major reason (20.5%) against skin donation. Participants who were doctors, were aware of skin banking, and who were previous blood donors had higher attitudes scores (pbanking were predictors of favourable attitudes to skin donation and banking. Knowledge transfer during health professional training on the usefulness of banked skin in patients with major burns may lead to improved attitude of health professionals and acceptance of this modality of burn management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Work-life balance of nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2015-01-01

    The growing shortage of nursing faculty and the need for faculty to teach doctoral students to address the shortage call for examination of factors that may contribute to the shortage, including those that are potentially modifiable, including work-life balance.This descriptive study examined work-life balance of a national sample of nursing faculty teaching in research-focused and practice-focused doctoral programs. Data were collected through an online survey of 554 doctoral program faculty members to identify their perceptions of work-life balance and predictors of work-life balance. Work-life balance scores indicated better work-life balance than expected. Factors associated with good work-life balance included higher academic rank, having tenure, older age, years in education, current faculty position, and no involvement in clinical practice. Current faculty position was the best predictor of work-life balance. Although work-life balance was viewed positively by study participants, efforts are needed to strengthen factors related to positive work/life in view of the increasing workload of doctoral faculty as the numbers of doctoral students increase and the number of seasoned faculty decrease with anticipated waves of retirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Critical Thinking Dispositions in Online Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine Mary

    2008-01-01

    As part of a doctoral study, the critical thinking dispositions of post-RN (post-diploma) nurses continuing their education at a mid-sized university were measured before and after the intervention of a three-credit online course. The tool used to measure the changes in critical thinking disposition was the California Critical Thinking…

  6. Doctorate of Nursing Practice Students' Impressions of Uses for Visual Thinking Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Desiree; Moorman, Margaret

    2017-08-01

    Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a structured art-viewing technique designed to teach critical thinking and aesthetic appreciation. Literature on how VTS might be used in nursing is just emerging. This qualitative descriptive study examined written responses to how 14 doctorate of nursing practice students thought they might use VTS in their practice after engaging in a classroom session. Three themes emerged for how nurses might use VTS: Facilitating Interpersonal Relationships, Changing Thinking in Practice, and As a Teaching Tool. This study contributes to the growing body of literature that suggests that art and VTS and can be used in nursing with practitioners of all levels to promote conversations that involve listening intently and considering other possibilities. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):365-368. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes.

  8. Doctors and nurses in outback Australia: living with bush initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, G; Cheers, B

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative in-depth study investigates the work and life experiences of 18 female doctors and nurses in remote Australia. The study begins to unravel some of the events and relationships in the women's lives that keep them working and living in remote areas. The study also examines social and working conditions that cause the women to leave, and concludes that action must be taken at both government and local levels to support female health professionals who work in remote locations. This may be achieved by the means of a health promotion action model to underpin such initiatives as the 1999 Commonwealth Government 'fly-in-fly-out' initiative, in which sessional female doctors provide women's health services in remote areas.

  9. Understanding Physical Education Doctoral Students' Perspectives of Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; McLoughlin, Gabriella M.; Ivy, Victoria Nicole; Gaudreault, Karen Lux

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Despite an abundance of research on doctoral student socialization in higher education, little attention has been paid to physical education doctoral students. This study sought to understand physical education doctoral students' perceptions of their socialization as preparation for faculty roles. Method: Participants included 32 physical…

  10. Research on doctoral education in South Africa against the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to survey the international literature on doctoral education from a South African perspective. A colossal amount of published research on doctoral education abroad has accumulated in recent years, dwarfing the minuscule number of publications on doctoral education in South Africa. Three major ...

  11. Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: Perceptions of Nurses and Doctors Working in an Australian Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Rose; Watkins, Rochelle; Bushby, Angela; Combs, Shane

    2012-01-01

    Inconsistencies abound in the literature regarding staff attitudes and perceptions toward family-witnessed resuscitation. Our study builds on previous research by using a validated tool to investigate emergency department staff perceptions of family-witnessed resuscitation. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 221 emergency department doctors' and nurses'. We found few differences between doctors and nurses perceptions toward family-witnessed resuscitation. Both nurses and doctors who ...

  12. Stress in emergency departments: experiences of nurses and doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Sonya

    2012-01-31

    The effects of stressful incidents on emergency department (ED) staff can be profound. Witnessing aggression, violence or the death of patients, or participating in resuscitation, can be emotionally and physically demanding. Despite the frequency of these events, ED staff do not become immune to the stress they cause, and are often ill prepared and under supported to cope with them. This article reports on a study of nurses\\' and doctors\\' attitudes to, and experiences of, workplace stress in three EDs in Ireland, and offers some suggestions on how stress among ED staff can be reduced.

  13. Nursing education and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild Stølen, Karen Marie

    Background: Learning professional skills in the clinic is central to the acquisition of professional competences for future nurses. There are no clear vision of how learning takes place in the clinic and the question is how education in the clinic may lead to the professional skills that enable...... future nurses to take care for patients. Design and setting: The project Learning in Practice was accomplished from 2011 to early 2013, in collaboration between educations of nursing and educational theory educations at UCC North Zealand. The results in this paper is related to the examination...... of the nurse education only. The examination is based on four non-participating observations, four participating observations and three focus group interviews, respectively, four students, four clinical supervisors and four teachers . The clinical context was local hospitals. The data were analyzed...

  14. Films and nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María GABRIELA FELIPPA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide some ideas about the importance of film, with it’s audiovisual narrative, in the nursing education. The use of films during teaching gives the posibility to increase the construction of a professional view.The nursing carreer of Isalud University of Argentina is founded a sistematic work with cinematographic support. In this case are presented different ways of work with cinematographic support in a curricular space of Fundamentals of Nursing of the career of a professional Nurse of the Isalud University.

  15. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. How much teamwork exists between nurses and junior doctors in the intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Brian H; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Blonaisz, Elaine R; Doubleday, Nancy D; Lusardi, Paula; Jodka, Paul G

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the degree of similarity of attitudes on collaboration between nurses and junior doctors (known as residents in the United States) in the ICU. Existing research shows that nurses and physicians view the amount of teamwork they experience in the ICU differently though the attitudes of junior doctors and critical care nurses on collaboration remain unknown. Thirty-one nurses and 46 junior doctors completed a modified version of the Baggs Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions instrument during 2006-2007 in a 24 bed medical/surgical ICU in the northeastern United States. Score responses of nurses and junior doctors were compared with the Wilcoxon (Mann-Whitney) rank-sum test. Nurses consistently gave more negative responses on every survey question than junior doctors. While nurses said that the amount of collaboration was inadequate, junior doctors were satisfied and views between groups were most divergent (P teamwork that occurs in the ICU. Junior doctors' views are similar to those of more experienced physicians observed in previous studies. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  18. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbimi, Roseline I; Adebamowo, Clement A

    2006-02-21

    Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH) in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  19. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebamowo Clement A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  20. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  1. E-Mentoring for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robin; Birk, Stefanie B; Sherman, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The growing number of online Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs, steady attrition rates, and shortage of faculty created an opportunity to explore the use of distance-mediated mentoring. Twenty first-year DNP Nursing Leadership students were matched with DNP-prepared mentors in a formalized e-mentoring program. The Ideal Mentor Scale was used to determine what students desired most from the mentoring relationship in addition to midpoint and end-of-program surveys. Quantitative analysis revealed mentors and mentees found the relationship to be beneficial (p mentors (92%) noted the program supplied adequate resources, and the majority of students would recommend the program. Having a mentor leads to both mentor- and mentee-perceived benefits. Recommendations include continuing to seek ways to improve the communication and commitment between the mentor and mentee in order to receive reciprocal program benefits. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(8):458-462.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. A Failure to Communicate? Doctors and Nurses in American Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Lucie

    2017-08-01

    This article showcases the realities and challenges of teamwork in American hospitals based on the in situ comparison with France. Drawing on observation of nurse-physician interactions in hospitals in the two nations, this article highlights a troubling conflict between teamwork rhetoric and realities on the ward. Although the use of informatics systems such as electronic health records is supposed to increase cooperation, the observations presented here show that on the contrary, it inhibits communication that is becoming mainly virtual. While the nursing profession is more developed and provides stronger education in the United States, this story highlights the challenges in creating a shared environment of work and suggests the importance of balancing professional autonomy and effective teamwork. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  3. Nursing education in Iran: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari Khomeiran, Rasoul; Deans, Cecil

    2007-10-01

    Nursing education in Iran has undergone significant change since its genesis with foreign missionaries over one hundred years ago. More recently, following the 1979 Islamic revolution, nurse education has followed the direction taken by most other countries in moving from an apprenticeship model of training to an academic model. A series of transformative changes to nursing education specifically-and across the higher education system generally-has resulted in nurses now being able to undertake study across all university-based programs up to and including doctoral level. Contemporary nursing students have access to full-text professional journals through the internet, and they may pursue their doctoral studies in other countries. Although these improvements in nursing education in Iran are to be applauded, much more needs to be accomplished to ensure that highly competent nurse practitioners continue to be produced in this country. This article presents an historical overview of the development of nursing education in Iran, within its economic and sociopolitical contexts. Recommendations based upon lessons learned from historical and contemporary realities are presented in order to advance nursing education in this part of world.

  4. Health-related doctoral distance education programmes: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctoral distance education programmes enable students to obtain their qualifications without leaving their homes, jobs or countries. There is an increasing demand for health-related distance education doctoral programmes. The objective of this paper is to consider ethical scholarship issues that might impact on the quality ...

  5. Transnational Education: A Case Study of One Professional Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a Doctor of Education program in a transnational setting is contextualized in Australian national policies for international higher education and influences of regionalization and globalization. The doctorate was designed to meet aspirations of professional practitioners in Australia and South East Asia where the School had…

  6. Drivers and Interpretations of Doctoral Education Today: National Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Lesley; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Castano, Liliana Del Pilar Gallego

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, doctoral education has undergone a sea change with several global trends increasingly apparent. Drivers of change include massification and professionalization of doctoral education and the introduction of quality assurance systems. The impact of these drivers, and the forms...

  7. Signature Pedagogy in California State University Educational Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Charles; Brown-Welty, Sharon; Cohn, Kathleen; Rodriguez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine signature pedagogies for the education doctorate. Three California State University campuses that have started new Ed.D. programs examine practices that distinguish the education doctoral experience from other professions. Embedded field work, the professional seminar, and the research and writing support…

  8. Knowledge Management in Doctoral Education toward Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Adamantia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role and the scope of knowledge management (KM) in doctoral education, in the emerging knowledge economy (KE) context, and the recommendation of a framework for KM in doctoral education. Design/Methodology/Approach: An extended literature analysis was contacted to elaborate the role and the…

  9. Student mobility and doctoral education in South Africa | Sehoole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses doctoral education programmes in South Africa with a particular focus on student mobility. It investigates pull and push factors as a conceptual framework, arguing that the patterns of student mobility in doctoral education programmes in South Africa follow the patterns of international student mobility ...

  10. Distinguishing the preparation and roles of Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Nursing Practice graduates: national implications for academic curricula and health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2013-08-01

    Although the American Association of Colleges of Nursing was clear in defining the role of individuals with the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree when it endorsed the DNP as the single-entry degree for advanced practice nurses in 2004, confusion about educational curricula to prepare DNPs continues to exist in academic programs throughout the United States. Further, health care systems are unsure about the role DNP graduates should fulfill in comparison with PhD-prepared individuals. This article discusses the importance of DNP- and PhD-prepared individuals in improving the quality of health care and the health of Americans, how best to resolve the confusion in preparation of DNP and PhD students, and the various roles DNP and PhD graduates should fulfill in real-world settings. A national call to action and future implications for research, academia, and health care settings are highlighted. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Awareness of basic life support among medical, dental, nursing students and doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta Chandrasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the awareness of Basic Life Support (BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. A cross-sectional study was conducted by assessing responses to 20 selected basic questions regarding BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges. After excluding the incomplete response forms the data was analysed on 1,054 responders. The results were analysed using an answer key prepared with the use of the Advanced Cardiac Life Support manual. Out of 1,054 responders 345 were medical students, 75 were medical interns, 19 were dental students, 59 were dental interns, 105 were homeopathy interns, 319 were nursing students, 72 were doctors, 29 were dentists, 25 were nursing faculty and six were homeopathy doctors. No one among them had complete knowledge of BLS. Only two out of 1054 (0.19% had secured 80 - 89% marks, 10 out of 1054 (0.95% had secured 70 - 79% marks, 40 of 1054 (4.08% had secured 60 - 69% marks and 105 of 1054 (9.96% had secured 50 - 59% marks. A majority of them, that is, 894 (84.82% had secured less than 50% marks. Awareness of BLS among students, doctors and nurses of medical, dental, homeopathy and nursing colleges is very poor.

  12. Migration of doctors for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, James A; McKinley, Danette W; Boulet, John R

    2007-03-01

    Global shortages of healthcare workers in both developed and developing countries are of great concern. Research on physician migration typically focuses on medical school graduates, most often those seeking postgraduate training opportunities elsewhere. An overview of medical school migration patterns is presented in this paper. To put this phenomenon into the broader context of global physician migration, data is also presented on the distribution of medical schools, physician density, the flow of international medical graduates to the US, and the present composition of the US physician workforce. Results of the study indicate that many individuals leave their home country for undergraduate medical education. Given the movement of students and physicians, both for medical school and for advanced training opportunities, it is evident that some medical schools in the world are training doctors for their home country as well as for the international labor market. Overall, given the internationalization of medical education, collaborative efforts will be needed to develop an adequate, balanced, and well-trained global physician workforce.

  13. Do you agree with the doctor's decision to continue treatment?: A scenario-based study of hospital nurses in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ingravallo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A lack of social consensus on the duty to comply with a patient's request to forgo treatment was reported in Italy, but little is known about the nurses' attitudes regarding this issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Questionnaire including two clinical scenarios regarding doctor's decision to not comply with a competent patient's request to forgo treatment was administered to all nurses (n = 487 of an Italian medium-sized hospital. RESULTS: Eighty-five percent of nurses completed the study. Although 83% of participants supported a general right to self-determination, around 40% of them agreed with the doctor's decision in both scenarios. The multivariate analyses adjusted for gender, age, length of professional experience, and care setting showed that the agreement with the doctor's decision was significantly associated with nurses' personal background beliefs about self-determination and quality of life. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Many nurses have difficulty in accepting a patient's request to forgo treatment. Increasing ethical reflection and discussion at both educational and professional level, and introducing ethical consultation services would be essential to develop a consistent approach to end-of-life decisions in Italian hospitals.

  14. Using Simulation in a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calohan, Jess; Pauli, Eric; Combs, Teresa; Creel, Andrea; Convoy, Sean; Owen, Regina

    The use and effectiveness of simulation with standardized patients in undergraduate and graduate nursing education programs is well documented. Simulation has been primarily used to develop health assessment skills. Evidence supports using simulation and standardized patients in psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) programs is useful in developing psychosocial assessment skills. These interactions provide individualized and instantaneous clinical feedback to the student from faculty, peers, and standardized patients. Incorporating simulation into advanced practice psychiatric-mental health nursing curriculum allows students to develop the necessary requisite skills and principles needed to safely and effectively provide care to patients. There are no documented standardized processes for using simulation throughout a doctor of nursing practice PMHNP curriculum. The purpose of this article is to describe a framework for using simulation with standardized patients in a PMHNP curriculum. Students report high levels of satisfaction with the simulation experience and believe that they are more prepared for clinical rotations. Faculty feedback indicates that simulated clinical scenarios are a method to ensure that each student experiences demonstrate a minimum standard of competency ahead of clinical rotations with live patients. Initial preceptor feedback indicates that students are more prepared for clinical practice and function more independently than students that did not experience this standardized clinical simulation framework. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Just Care: Learning from and with Graduate Students in a Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquet, Elizabeth; Kazer, Meredith; Manister, Nancy; Lucas, Owen; Shaw, Michael; Madaffari, Valerie; Gannett, Cinthia

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Fairfield University, a Jesuit Carnegie Masters Level 1 University located in the Northeast, established its first doctoral-level program: the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP). In a developing program such as the DNP, some of the most pressing concerns of current rhetoric and writing in the disciplines align and interact with the…

  16. Rationalisation of nursing education in Limpopo province : nurse educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhuvha, T R; Davhana-Maselesele, M; Netshandama, V O

    2007-12-01

    Nursing education institutions are facing a challenge of realigning its functioning according to the changes that are taking place within the country. The intention of the government post apartheid was to correct the imbalances which were brought about by the apartheid government and the following regulations and policies influenced the change in nursing education, that is, Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), White Paper on Higher Education (WPHE), and the National Qualification Framework (NQF) (South Africa, 1995:6). In 1996 the government introduced the first democratic constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) according toAct 108 of 1996. In the light of those increasing changes in nursing education, led by political change, the experiences of nurse educators is a critical issue facing nursing campuses. The purpose of this study was two-fold; namely: to explore and describe the experiences of nurse educators with regard to the rationalisation of nursing education and to use information obtained to describe guidelines for the effective rationalisation of a nursing college in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse educators who worked in nursing colleges before and after 1994. Measures to ensure trustworthiness were applied and ethical issues were adhered to throughout the research process. Data was analysed following Tesch's method (Creswell 1994:154-155). The research established that nurse educators experienced dissatisfaction in several areas relating to the rationalization of nursing education. Support was also expected from bureaucracy at higher level. This study developed guidelines to policy makers and nurse educators to ensure effective rationalisation process.

  17. Analysis of a government policy to address nursing shortage and nursing education quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhicharttibutra, K; Kunaviktikul, W; Turale, S; Wichaikhum, O-A; Srisuphan, W

    2017-03-01

    A well-educated, sufficient nursing workforce improves population health and standards of nursing care. Analysing workforce policies assists nurses to learn from the past and develop better future policies. Describe policy-making processes in the first Thai government plan to increase nursing capacity and improve nursing education quality. A qualitative study employing Longest's model to examine policy-making processes. Data were obtained from 28 in-depth interviews with key informants, who had been committee members and former deans of nursing involved with the policy processes in the 1990s. Both qualitative and quantitative data were extracted from relevant documents, and content analysis employed with all data. Three policy phases were identified. Policy formulation, where three streams of problems, politics and policy resulted in identification of nursing shortage, changes of government incumbents and needing to increase nurse production; Policy implementation included creating methods of implementation, appointing responsible people and committees, creating operational plans, producing more nurses and faculty development projects and Policy modification which incorporated implementing the first Thai international doctoral degree in English, a collaborative programme between universities. Not all key informants could be accessed due to the passage of time. Findings are unique to Thailand but inform internationally of nurses' abilities and need to be involved in policy. Nurses were involved in all policy phases. While the policy produced positive developments in growing nursing capacity and education in the past, nursing shortages remained and are now acute in Thailand. Lessons learned from this policy analysis help explain why the nursing education and nursing shortage policy was legislated through the government agenda, and the active involvement of Thai nurses in this process. Nurses globally need to be at the policy-making table to try to reduce nursing

  18. Furthering caring through nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D van der Wal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The nursing students’ main quest is for self actualization by attributing meaning to life through caring. To assist student nurses in this quest, the nurse educator needs to plan educational interventions according to an anthropological model that posits care and caring as innate human attributes. Further, the structural essence of what professional nursing caring entails should also be posited as a point of departure for curriculum planning. The author proposes such models. The main implications include that the nursing curriculum must increasingly attend to the emotional needs of nursing students. Curricular content and teaching strategies toward this goal are suggested.

  19. Professional and Personal Development in Contemporary Gerontology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Rowles, Graham D.; Watkins, John F.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the Gerontology Doctoral Student Assessment Model (GDSAM), a comprehensive web-based system premised on developing an evaluation mechanism attuned to the special requirements of advanced graduate education at the doctoral level. The system focuses on longitudinal tracking of selected dimensions of intellectual,…

  20. Intentionality of Preparation: Systematic Mentorship in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Audra K.; Schneider, Jenifer Jasinski; Berson, Ilene R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic mentorship framework comprised of professional development courses, residency experiences, and an annual review to support the acculturation of doctoral students into higher education. By making the culture of academia explicit, our doctoral students scholarly activity increased, and improved their readiness for positions…

  1. Demystifying PhDs: a review of doctorate programs designed to fulfil the needs of the next generation of nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Jackson, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Commonly, the expression 'PhD' evokes a level of trepidation amongst potential candidates from both the clinical and academic spheres. In contemporary settings, a Doctor of Philosophy is highly regarded and increasingly necessary for a successful academic nursing career. The aim of this paper is to explore the options for doctoral education for nurses, and consider the role of the doctorate in career planning for nursing, and in the attainment of career goals. Here we discuss some key issues and practicalities including career planning, selecting a doctoral program, choosing a university, supervision, committees and panels, achieving a work-life balance and dealing with conflict. The PhD process should be an enriching and satisfying experience which may lead to enhanced professional and personal growth; however, there are potential pitfalls that nurses should be aware of before embarking on doctoral training. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the different doctorates offered to see if, in fact, they are advancing nursing practice and research endeavours.

  2. The Experience of Teaching Online in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Online education has become a key instructional delivery method in nursing education; however, limited understanding exists about what it is like to teach online. The aim of this study was to uncover the experience of teaching online in nursing education. The sample for this phenomenological study included 14 nursing faculty who completed at least 50% of their teaching workload assignment in fully online courses in baccalaureate, master's, or doctoral nursing programs. Data were collected through the use of a demographic questionnaire and personal interviews. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) Looking at a Lot of Moving Parts, (b) Always Learning New Things, (c) Going Back and Forth, and (d) Time Is a Blessing and a Curse. Online teaching in nursing education differs from traditional classroom teaching in a variety of ways. Policies and guidelines that govern faculty teaching should encompass the identified intricacies of online teaching. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(6):343-349.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Doctoral Theses from Nursing Postgraduate Programs in Brazil and their Association with the Millennium Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Fernandes, Josicélia Dumet; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Millennium Development Goals are centered around combatting poverty and other social evils all over the world. Thus, this study seeks to identify the Millennium Development Goals as an object of study in theses from Postgraduate Nursing Programs in Brazil scoring 5 (national excellence) and 6 or 7 (international excellence), and evaluate the association between the score for the program and achieving the Millennium Development Goals. METHOD: Exploratory descriptive document research. Data were collected from the Notes on Indicators/Coordination for Higher Education Personnel Improvement for the 15 Postgraduate Nursing Courses scoring between 5 and 7 in the three-year-period of 2010/2012. RESULTS: of the 8 Millennium Development Objectives, 6 were dealt with in the theses. There was an association (Fisher's exact test p-value=0.0059) between the distribution of the theses and the program scores in relation to the Millennium Development Objectives (p-valor=0.0347) CONCLUSION: the doctoral theses were slightly related to the Millennium Development Objectives, covering the population's economic development, health conditions and quality of life. It is recommended that Postgraduate Programs in Nursing pay closer attention to the Millennium Development Objectives.. PMID:26312631

  4. Doctoral Theses from Nursing Postgraduate Programs in Brazil and their Association with the Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Fernandes, Josicélia Dumet; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza

    2015-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals are centered around combatting poverty and other social evils all over the world. Thus, this study seeks to identify the Millennium Development Goals as an object of study in theses from Postgraduate Nursing Programs in Brazil scoring 5 (national excellence) and 6 or 7 (international excellence), and evaluate the association between the score for the program and achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Exploratory descriptive document research. Data were collected from the Notes on Indicators/Coordination for Higher Education Personnel Improvement for the 15 Postgraduate Nursing Courses scoring between 5 and 7 in the three-year-period of 2010/2012. of the 8 Millennium Development Objectives, 6 were dealt with in the theses. There was an association (Fisher's exact test p-value=0.0059) between the distribution of the theses and the program scores in relation to the Millennium Development Objectives (p-valor=0.0347)CONCLUSION: the doctoral theses were slightly related to the Millennium Development Objectives, covering the population's economic development, health conditions and quality of life. It is recommended that Postgraduate Programs in Nursing pay closer attention to the Millennium Development Objectives.

  5. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  6. Ethical theory, ethnography, and differences between doctors and nurses in approaches to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study empirically whether ethical theory (from the mainstream principles-based, virtue-based, and feminist schools) usefully describes the approaches doctors and nurses take in everyday patient care. DESIGN: Ethnographic methods: participant observation and interviews, the transcripts of which were analysed to identify themes in ethical approaches. SETTING: A British old-age psychiatry ward. PARTICIPANTS: The more than 20 doctors and nurses on the ward. RESULTS: Doctors and nurses on the ward differed in their conceptions of the principles of beneficence and respect for patient autonomy. Nurses shared with doctors a commitment to liberal and utilitarian conceptions of these principles, but also placed much greater weight on relationships and character virtues when expressing the same principles. Nurses also emphasised patient autonomy, while doctors were more likely to advocate beneficence, when the two principles conflicted. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that ethical theory can, contrary to the charges of certain critics, be relevant to everyday health care-if it (a) attends to social context and (b) is flexible enough to draw on various schools of theory. PMID:8910782

  7. Family focused nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. E. Thompson

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the majority of nurse education programmes are firmly tied to the perspectives of curative medicine within hospitals - they are disease and hospital oriented. This model, which indicates a 'sickness’ concept of nursing is entirely inappropriate if contemporary and future health care needs are to be met. The shift in education should be towards a health, family and whole person centered approach. The family is the most fundamental and dynamic unit in society with a profound influence upon its members. Besides performing a variety of other functions, the family has a central role in promoting and maintaining the health of its members. Because the family unit is the microcosm of society and accurately reflects the needs of society at large it is appropriate that this should be a key area of experience. Family attachments during training provide opportunities for close and committed contact with people in their everyday world and for learning what is really important to them.

  8. The self-construal of nurses and doctors: beliefs on interdependence and independence in the care of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Benjamin G; Reader, Tom

    2013-12-01

    To compare the self-construal of nurses and doctors and establish whether their roles affect perceptions of independence and interdependence. Previous research has identified that errors in patient care occur when health professionals do not work cohesively as a team and have divergent beliefs about collaboration. Thus, it is important to understand factors shaping these beliefs. Although these are usually explained by aspects of group norms, the concept of self-construal may serve as an underlying explanation. A quasi-experimental design was used. One hundred and two nurses and doctors working in three nursing homes in Belgium took part in this study in 2009. Nurses' and doctors' self-construal was measured at their workplace, using Singelis' self-construal scale. Statistical differences between nurses and doctors were investigated using analysis of covariance. Results showed statistically significant differences between doctors' and nurses' self-construal. Doctors reported higher and dominant levels of 'independent self-construal' compared with nurses. There were no differences between nurses and doctors for interdependence. However, gender differences emerged with male doctors reporting lower levels of interdependent self-construal than male nurses. Conversely, female doctors reported higher levels of interdependent self-construal than female nurses. Differences in the roles and training of nurses and doctors and in knowledge of their interdependencies may explain differences in self-construal. This might be useful for understanding why nurses and doctors develop divergent attitudes towards teamwork. Training that focuses on sharing knowledge on team interdependencies may positively influence teamwork attitudes and behaviour. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Is ‘friendship’ educationally relevant in doctoral pedagogy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    pedagogies: To what extent does the personal and social relation between doctoral supervisors and students influence the learning outcome of the PhD, and how do doctoral supervisors reflect this pedagogical element? During my research stay at the Oxford Learning Institute, University of Oxford, in the spring...... 2015, I tried to answer that question by conducting a series of video- and audio recorded semi-structured qualitative interviews with 10 doctoral supervisors from the Humanities and Social Sciences Divisions at the University of Oxford. The doctoral supervisors were all professors with affiliation...... to the Faculty of English, the Faculty of Music, the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Art History, and the Department of Education. Each interview lasted between 45-60 minutes and was performed at the individual doctoral supervisor’s office in college or in the department. I designed and conducted...

  10. [Investigation of doctors' and nurses' perceptions and implementation of delirium management in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H B; Wang, X T; Tang, B; Zhu, Z N; Guo, H L; Li, Z Z; Sun, J H; Liu, D W

    2017-12-01

    Objective: To investigate doctors' and nurses' perceptions and implementation of delirium management in intensive care unit. Methods: A total of 197 doctors and nurses in 2 general ICUs and 3 special ICUs at Peking Union Medical College Hospital finished a self-designed questionnaire of delirium management. Results: There were 47 males and 150 females, 43 doctors and 154 nurses who participated in the survey.One hundred and twenty five participators were from general ICU and the others from special ICU. The ICU staff had a significant difference on the perceptions and implementation of delirium management( P delirium assessment" ( P delirium management,especially in special ICUs. Delirium management should be included as a routine care in ICU to improve patients' outcome.

  11. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  12. Use of the Iowa Model of Research in Practice as a Curriculum Framework for Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Project Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Susan T; D'Errico, Ellen; Bristol, Shirley T

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral education requires academic motivation and persistence on the part of nursing students; commitment to the process is essential and should be linked to programmatic structure. Programmatic issues in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs may be barriers to completion of the final project and lead to attrition. A large, private health care university developed an infrastructure for the DNP curriculum and final project utilizing the Iowa Model of Research in Practice. The purpose was to ensure competency fulfillment, retention and timely completion, and implementation of evidence-based practice and translation science utilizing a leadership approach. The program has experienced a high completion rate to date.

  13. Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Shin, Eun Hee; Mather, Carey; Hovenga, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the rapid rise in the adoption of electronic health records and the use of technology to support nursing processes, there is a requirement for nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing educators to embrace nursing informatics. Whilst nursing informatics has been taught at post graduate levels for many years, the integration of it into undergraduate studies for entry level nurses has been slow. This is made more complex by the lack of explicit nursing informatics competencies in many countries. Australia has now mandated the inclusion of nursing informatics into all undergraduate nursing curricula but there continues to be an absence of a relevant set of agreed nursing competencies. There is a resulting lack of consistency in nursing curricula content nationally. This paper describes the process used by one Australian university to integrate nursing informatics throughout the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum to ensure entry level nurses have a basic level of skills in the use of informatics.

  14. Simulation and Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Dawn I.

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study compared changes in level of confidence resulting from participation in simulation or traditional instructional methods for BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) to DNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice) students in a nurse practitioner course when they entered the clinical practicum. Simulation has been used in many disciplines…

  15. The migration of doctors and nurses from South Pacific Island Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard P C; Connell, John

    2004-06-01

    Little is known of the structure of the international migration of skilled health professionals. Accelerated migration of doctors and nurses from the Pacific island states of Fiji, Samoa and Tonga to the Pacific periphery is part of the globalization of health care. The findings from a recent survey of 251 doctors and nurses from the three island countries are reported here. Key determinants of both present migration status and future migration intentions were analyzed using econometric methods. Nurses' and doctors' propensities to migrate are influenced by both income and non-income factors, including ownership of businesses and houses. Migrants also tend to have more close relatives overseas, to have trained there, and so experienced superior working conditions. Migration propensities vary between countries, and between nurses and doctors within countries. Tongan nurses have a higher propensity to migrate, mainly because of greater relative earnings differentials, but are also more likely to return home. The role of kinship ties, relative income differentials and working conditions is evident in other developing country contexts. Remittances and return migration, alongside business investment, bring some benefits to compensate for the skill drain. National development policies should focus on encouraging return migration, alongside retention and recruitment, but are unlikely to prevent out migration.

  16. Coteaching in Counselor Education: Preparing Doctoral Students for Future Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrinic, Eric R.; Jencius, Marty; McGlothlin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored 10 counselor education doctoral students' coteaching experiences with faculty members. Three coteaching structures identified from the data were relational, operational, and developmental. A definition of coteaching supported by the findings is presented. Implications for counselor education programs,…

  17. Counselor Education Doctoral Students' Experiences with Multiple Roles and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Kristen N.; Ebrahim, Christine H.; Herlihy, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to explore 10 counselor education doctoral students' lived experiences with multiple roles and relationships. Four superordinate themes were found: power differential, need for education, transformation, and learning from experiences. Findings revealed that multiple roles and relationships offer…

  18. When may doctors give nurses telephonic treatment instructions?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    legal proxy cannot give consent, emergency treatment may be given without consent – provided it is not against a previous directive issued by a patient refusing treatment, e.g. a refusal to accept a blood transfusion for religious reasons.[8]. Before issuing telephonic instructions doctors should consider whether telephone ...

  19. Title: A Comparative Analysis of Nursing Education and other forms of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MRS. AKPABIO

    they exist, in relation to the structures, process and outcome of nursing education when compared with those of other professions. As a profession .... organization, education or social status unlike what was obtainable in the medical ... image of nurses as doctors' handmaiden. This image evolved when women had yet to ...

  20. Knowledge and awareness of medical doctors, medical students and nurses about dentistry in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetola, Elijah Olufemi; Oyewole, Taiwo; Adedigba, Micheal; Aregbesola, Stephen Tunde; Umezudike, Kehinde; Adewale, Adedotun

    2016-01-01

    Various studies have reported poor awareness and knowledge of dentistry in the Nigerian population. There is, however, paucity of information assessing the knowledge and awareness of medical doctors/students and nurses about dentistry. The present study is aimed at determining the knowledge and awareness of medical doctors/students and nurses about dentistry. Self-administered questionnaires were randomly distributed among medical doctors/students, and nurses of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals' Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information collected using the questionnaire included participants' biodata, questions evaluating dental awareness, knowledge of systemic and oral health connections as well as referral practices. The data analysis was done with STATA version 11 software. A total of 300 questionnaires were randomly distributed among doctors/students and nurses, 206 were returned (response rate of 69%). Of the returned questionnaires, 129(63%) were males and 77(37%) were females. There were 42 medical doctors, 49 nurses and 115 medical students. The mean age of the participants was 26.7 years (SD 5.2). Majority (99.5%) was aware of dental profession, but 92% had never referred patients for dental consultation. One third (31%) of medical doctors believed that Ludwig angina was a cardiac disease. A large proportion of the respondents (61%) see no need for routine dental visit while 27% would want to visit the dentist only when they had a dental complaint. Although a large percentage of the participants claimed to be aware of dentistry, our findings revealed low level of knowledge and attitude to Dentistry. Efforts should be made towards closing this knowledge gap to achieve efficient oral health.

  1. Future-Proofing Nursing Education

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Ralph; Melanie Birks; Ysanne Chapman; Karen Francis

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of pre-registration programs of nursing education to current and emerging trends in healthcare and society could have a significant future impact on the nursing profession. In this article, we use a PESTEL (politics, economics, society, technology, environment, and law) framework to identify significant current and future priorities in Australian healthcare. Following the PESTEL analysis, we conduct a rev...

  2. Reconceptualizing the core of nurse practitioner education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Mary E; Hart, Ann Marie; Conley, Virginia; Brown, Julie; Sherard, Pat; Clarke, Pamela N

    2009-01-01

    The movement to the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) is progressing rapidly with new programs emerging and curricular documents being developed. We argue that the implementation of the DNP is a good move for nursing, provided that we use the opportunity to reconceptualize the core of advanced practice nursing, especially nurse practitioner (NP) practice. Theory and research articles from nursing focused on advanced practice nursing, NPs, and doctoral education. The foundation of NP education is currently based essentially on borrowed or shared content in assessment, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. We argue that the heart and soul of nursing is in health promotion, both in healthy persons and in those dealing with chronic illness. Current master's programs do not prepare NPs to assume high-level practice focused on health promotion and disease management using the latest theoretical developments in health behavior change, behavioral sciences, exercise physiology, nutrition, and medical anthropology. Although these are touched upon in most NP programs, they do not represent the core science of NP education and need to be a critical part of any DNP program. Ultimately, our vision is for NP care to be consistently "different," yet just as essential as physician care, leading to positive outcomes in health promotion and disease management.

  3. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Procedural skills practice and training needs of doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics in rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David; Shepherd, Irwyn; McGrail, Matthew; Kassell, Lisa; Connolly, Marnie; Williams, Brett; Nestel, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Procedural skills are a significant component of clinical practice. Doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics are trained to use a variety of procedural skills. Rural clinicians in particular are often required to maintain competence in some procedural skills that are used infrequently, and which may require regular and repeated rehearsal. This paper reports on a research project conducted in Gippsland, Victoria, to ascertain the frequency of use, and relevance to clinical practice, of a range of skills in the fields of medicine, nursing, midwifery, and paramedic practice. The project also gathered data on the attitudes of clinicians regarding how frequently and by what means they thought they needed to practice these skills with a particular focus on the use of simulation as an educational method. The research was conducted following identification of a specific set of procedural skills for each professional group. Skills were identified by an expert steering committee. We developed online questionnaires that consisted of two parts: 1) demographic and professional characteristics, and 2) experience of procedural skills and perceived training needs. We sought to invite all practicing clinicians (doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics) working in Gippsland. Online surveys were distributed between November 2011 and April 2012 with three follow-up attempts. The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Valid responses were received from 58 doctors, 94 nurses, 46 midwives, and 30 paramedics, whom we estimate to represent not more than 20% of current clinicians within these professions. This response rate reflected some of the difficulties experienced in the conduct of the research. Results were tabulated for each professional group across the range of skills. There was significant correlation between the frequency of certain skills and confidence with maintenance of these skills. This did not necessarily correlate with perceptions of

  5. Nursing doctoral faculty perceptions of factors that affect their continued scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    This focus group study was undertaken as part of a larger investigation of how the demand for increased production of nurses with doctorates affects doctoral faculty's scholarly productivity. This study provided a basis for development of the national survey questionnaire. Two focus groups that included 29 faculty teaching in doctor of philosophy and/or doctor of nursing practice programs took place at one of two national conferences. The focus group interviews were transcribed and content analyzed for the identification of themes; all members of the research team reached consensus. The three major themes were the demands of teaching, the importance of institutional structure and climate, and the sustainability of one's self, the institution, and the discipline. Participants identified strategies for enhancing scholarly productivity. Findings are limited by the small sample size and the voluntary participation of conference attendees. The strength of emotion that participants revealed underscores the need for nursing leaders to address the increasing academic expectations for faculty. If the profession does not address the needs of its current and future faculty, goals explicated by the Institute of Medicine in The Future of Nursing cannot be achieved, and the health of the nation will suffer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners' Perceptions of Their Relationship with Doctors, Rape Victim Advocates, Police, and Prosecutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Shana L.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the negative and inefficient treatment of rape victims by emergency room personnel, the first Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs began in the late 1970s. While SANEs, doctors, rape victim advocates, police officers and prosecutors work together to ensure the most comprehensive and sensitive care of rape victims, they all…

  7. An example of a statistics course in a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauver, Lori; Phalen, Ann Gibbons

    2012-01-01

    The current healthcare environment requires RNs and advanced practice nurses (APNs) to be proficient in critique and utilization of healthcare research to inform an evidence base for practice. Many practicing RNs and APNs lack competency in statistical analysis and interpretation, and knowledge in the conduct of nursing research. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students need this knowledge to address researchable problems found in their own practice environments and, as leaders in practice, to mentor colleagues and other members of the healthcare team. The authors describe a DNP statistics course including its design and composition and demonstrate how using traditional, data-oriented, and student project approaches yields positive learning outcomes.

  8. [Educational needs assessment on research ethics among nursing researchers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ihn Sook; Gu, Mee Ock; Kim, Keum Soon; Lee, Kwang Ja; Yang, Soo

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the educational needs of research ethics among nursing researchers. Convenience sample of 161 nursing professors and 262 master or doctoral nursing students participated in the study. Data was collected with self-reported questionnaire from June to August 2009, and analyzed with descriptive statistics using SPSS WIN (version 14.0). Among 161 nursing professors, about 31.7% has educated nursing ethics in the postgraduate course. The most common course was nursing research or methodology (62.7%), and median education time was 2 hr. Areas that showed difficulty in understanding was the conflict of interest and plagiarism for professors and falsification and fabrication for graduate students. Average knowledge on the research ethics was 75.4 points for professors and 61.6 points for students based on the 100 points. Educational needs of research ethics among nursing professors and students in the postgraduate course was high. We recommend both basic and advanced research ethics educational programs for the nursing researchers. The basic course should be at least 6 hr and include various cases and something to discuss.

  9. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurul Haizam; Teo, Rufinah; Izaham, Azarinah; Tang, Shereen; Mohamad Yusof, Aliza; Abdul Manap, Norsidah

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p=0.001). However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively) and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively). The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p=0.03). There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haizam Yahaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. METHODS: Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. RESULTS: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p = 0.001. However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively. The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p = 0.03. There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. CONCLUSION: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure.

  11. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An advanced practice nursing program for foreign medical doctors: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Patricia T; Yucha, Carolyn B; Atienza, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This article articulates lessons learned about an accelerated family nurse practitioner course offered to foreign medical doctors who also held baccalaureate nursing degrees (BSN). In the last decade, many physicians in the Philippines returned to school to obtain BSN degrees and licensure as registered nurses (referred to as nurse-medics) to emigrate to the United States in the hope of a better life. Once in the United States, many remain in nursing even though they prefer the practice of medicine. This fast-track master's degree program began in fall 2006 at a university in the southwestern United States in collaboration with St. Jude College in the Philippines. By the end of this program (2010), 76 students had graduated. All who sat for the FNP national certification exam passed on the first attempt. Due to a decrease in qualified applicants, the program eventually closed, but a number of important lessons were learned. Nursing programs planning to undertake accelerated programs to transition medical doctors to nurse practitioners should consider they retake courses such as physical assessment, pharmacology and pathophysiology.

  13. Doctor or Nurse: Children's Perceptions of Sex Typed Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordua, Glenn D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines children's relabeling of roles when confronted with counter-stereotypical occupational portrayals. A total of 128 children between the ages of five and six years were shown four films depicting all possible combinations of female and male physicians and nurses. They were then questioned with regard to the sex and occupational roles of the…

  14. Organizing urban planning doctoral education in a global context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Ionuţ Petrişor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting in 2005, Romanian education started its true reform in a globalizing context. Universities were assessed based on their performance; as a result, the doctoral education, meant to provide for the future trainers at Bachelor’s and Master’s levels, had to re-focus on research. The process was slower in the case of urban planning, due to the fact that publications and citations are not characteristic research outputs of the field. The paper discusses the process of creating the first Romanian doctoral school of urban planning starting from the hypothesis that its new focus required a positivist systemic understanding of urban planning research. The results show that the new approach was productive and well received by the doctoral students, and has a beneficial influence on urban planning in general, increasing its international visibility.

  15. Nursing education in humanized care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Esperanza Hernández Terrazas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention for the adequate use of the Dignified Treatment indicator by the nursing staff before the care of hospitalized patients. Methods: Pre-experimental analysis performed from February to March of 2017 in a public hospital in San Luis Potosí Mexico, with 37 nurses. In the first stage, a diagnostic evaluation of knowledge was elaborated. In the second, an education program was implemented for the proper use of the decent treatment indicator. In the third, nursing knowledge was evaluated and the before and after tests were compared by the t-Student parametric test. Results: For the diagnostic stage, 97% of nursing staff had a low level of knowledge. After implementing the program, 80% of the team increased their level. Conclusions: The educational intervention increased the knowledge about the use of the Dignified Treatment indicator.

  16. Policies, Agendas, and Practices Influencing Doctoral Education in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    If teaching physical education is a moral activity, it follows that there is a moral component to the preparation of teachers of physical education and thus a moral component to the preparation of teacher educators. In this article, I examine the major policies, agendas, and practices that influence doctoral preparation in physical education…

  17. How do future nursing educators perceive informatics? Advancing the nursing informatics agenda through dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Newlon, Christine M

    2010-03-01

    Informatics is a popular topic in literature, in media, and in education. However, nursing professionals and even nursing faculty may not have a clear understanding of informatics. The authors conducted a small simulation study to examine how nursing students enrolled in a doctor of philosophy program-future nursing educators-perceived informatics and its core elements. Using an online collaboration tool, the students were asked to create a plan for integrating informatics into a simulated undergraduate nursing program. The results of the study provide lessons for nursing professionals and educators. Students identified only a handful of competencies believed important by informatics initiatives led by the American Nurses Association and the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform. Although most students believed an undergraduate curriculum should teach computer skills, only a few participants identified information literacy skills, such as privacy and security of health information, as important for beginning nurses. Although limited, findings articulate the need for a universally accepted definition of informatics and a shared understanding of an informatics core curriculum.

  18. Mexican American Women Pursuing Counselor Education Doctorates: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Tamara J.; Carney, JoLynn V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors used narrative inquiry and Anzaldúa's (1999) bordlerlands theory to understand the cultural experiences of 5 Mexican American women in doctoral programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Results indicated that participants navigated multiple cultural spheres and that the…

  19. Leadership in Doctoral Dissertations of Educational Sciences in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardibi, Nursel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine tendencies in educational sciences doctoral dissertations according to divisions, research methods and desings, data collection tools, data analysis techniques, and leadership levels in Turkey. This content analysis study has been desinged with qualitative research methods. This research has been limited by…

  20. Reflecting on Research for Doctoral Students in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Responds to a theme issue, "Research for Doctoral Students in Education (vol.30, 5), " asserting that the continua presented in the articles fail to legitimize research done by school practitioners on site. Discusses issues related to differences in rigor, status, and purpose between practitioner and other research. Recommends that education…

  1. Economics of Corruption in Doctoral Education: The Dissertations Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of "dissertations for sale" in Russia. The tasks of this anthropological study include establishing the problem of corruption in doctoral education, identification of the dissertations suppliers, study of the specific services they offer, analysis of their prices on different services, and generalizations…

  2. Experiences of doctors and nurses implementing nurse-delivered cardiovascular prevention in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogdt-Pruis, Helene R; Beusmans, George H M I; Gorgels, Anton P M; van Ree, Jan W

    2011-08-01

    This paper reports on a study of the experiences of general practitioners and practice nurses implementing nurse-delivered cardiovascular prevention to high risk patients in primary care. Difficulties may arise when innovations are introduced into routine daily practice. Whether or not implementation is successful is determined by different factors related to caregivers, patients, type of innovation and context. A qualitative study nested in a randomized trial (2006-2008) to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-delivered cardiovascular prevention. Six primary health care centres in the Netherlands (25 general practitioners, 6 practice nurses) participated in the trial. Interviews were held on two occasions: at 3 and at 18 months after commencement of consultation. The first occasion was a group interview with six practice nurses. The second consisted of semi-structured interviews with one general practitioner and one practice nurse from each centre. Main barriers to the implementation included: lack of knowledge about the guideline, attitudes towards treatment targets, lack of communication, insufficient coaching by doctors, content of life style advice. At the start of the consultation project, practice nurses expressed concern of losing nursing tasks. Other barriers were related to patients (lack of motivation), the guideline (target population) and organizational issues (insufficient patient recording and computer systems). Both general practitioners and practice nurses were positive about nurse-delivered cardiovascular prevention in primary care. Nurses could play an important role in successive removal of barriers to implementation of cardiovascular prevention. Mutual confidence between care providers in the healthcare team is necessary. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Are doctors and nurses associated with coverage of essential health services in developing countries? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Pinho Helen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is broad policy consensus that a shortage of doctors and nurses is a key constraint to increasing utilization of essential health services important for achieving the health Millennium Development Goals. However there is limited research on the quantitative links between health workers and service coverage rates. We examined the relationship between doctor and nurse concentrations and utilization rates of five essential health services in developing countries. Methods We performed cross-national analyses of low- and middle-income countries by means of ordinary least squares regression with coverage rates of antenatal care, attended delivery, caesarean section, measles immunization, tuberculosis case diagnosis and care for acute respiratory infection as outcomes. Doctor, nurse and aggregate health worker (sum of doctors and nurses concentrations were the main explanatory variables. Results Nurses were associated with utilization of skilled birth attendants (P = 0.02 and doctors were associated with measles immunization rates (P = 0.01 in separate adjusted analyses. Aggregate health workers were associated with the utilization of skilled birth attendants (P Conclusion A range of health system and population-level factors aside from health workers influences coverage of health services in developing countries. However, it is also plausible that health workers who are neither doctors nor nurses, such as clinical officers and community health workers, may be providing a substantial proportion of health services. The human resources for health research agenda should be expanded beyond doctors and nurses.

  4. Interruptions and multitasking in surgery: a multicentre observational study of the daily work patterns of doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellandi, Tommaso; Cerri, Alessandro; Carreras, Giulia; Walter, Scott; Mengozzi, Cipriana; Albolino, Sara; Mastrominico, Eleonora; Renzetti, Fernando; Tartaglia, Riccardo; Westbrook, Johanna

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain baseline data on doctors' and nurses' work activities and rates of interruptions and multitasking to improve work organisation and processes. Data were collected in six surgical units with the WOMBAT (Work Observation Method by Activity Timing) tool. Results show that doctors and nurses received approximately 13 interruptions per hour, or one interruption every 4.5 min. Compared to doctors, nurses were more prone to interruptions in most activities, while doctors performed multitasking (33.47% of their time, 95% CI 31.84-35.17%) more than nurses (15.23%, 95% CI 14.24-16.25%). Overall, the time dedicated to patient care is relatively limited for both professions (37.21%, 95% CI 34.95-39.60% for doctors, 27.22%, 95% CI 25.18-29.60% for nurses) compared to the time spent for registration of data and professional communication, that accounts for two-thirds of doctors' time and nearly half of nurses' time. Further investigation is needed on strategies to manage job demands and professional communications. Practitioner Summary: This study offers further findings on the characteristics and frequency of multitasking and interruptions in surgery, with a comparison of how they affect doctors and nurses. Further investigation is needed to improve the management of job demands and communications according to the results.

  5. Health needs in rural areas and the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Ioannis M; Mpatistakis, Antonios G; Gkouskou, Kalliopi K

    2005-12-01

    Because of a lack of GPs in rural areas of Greece it is mandatory for junior doctors to offer medical service in those areas for a year. The aim of this study is to determine the possibility of replacement of internships with nurses and to suggest the most cost-effective way of covering health needs in remote areas. Regional survey. Patients of primary care offices in two remote areas of Crete, Greece within a year. Comparative analysis of the level of preventive medicine (estimated by questionnaires) and health needs in the two areas. The reasons for visiting medical offices, references rates, percentages of glucose and blood pressure regulation are also studied. Prescription of drugs for chronic diseases and blood pressure counting were the main reasons for office visits (2868/4594). Respiratory track infections (364/4594) follow. Apart from the high percentages of uncontrolled patients with blood pressure (34%) and diabetes mellitus (14%) there is a high percentage of ignorance or wrong opinions concerning preventive medicine, for example only 63% knew the value of a pap test. More than two-thirds of "medical" visits in rural areas were for acts that nurses could easily do. The easy access to a junior doctor did not promote preventive medicine. Replacement of junior doctors with properly trained nurses cooperating with GPs responsible for greater regions would be more cost-effective than junior doctors improving health in rural areas. Legislation should change, mainly with regard to repeat prescriptions, in order to reduce house visits.

  6. THE IMPORTANCE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN NURSING

    OpenAIRE

    YUKSEKDAG, Belgin BOZ

    2015-01-01

    Nursing that the reason of its essence arises from social requirements is a practical discipline. It requires knowledge and skills. This knowledge and skills must be updated with developments in the health field. However, because of their living conditions, nurses cannot continue the formal education. Distance nursing programs provide flexibility to them. In this study will be handed the importance of distance education for nursing and the attitudes of nurses towards distance nursing programs.

  7. Towards a Marketing Communication Recruitment Plan for the Rowan University Educational Leadership Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyi, Titus Kamau

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral studies are at the apex of the education system. Attracting, recruiting, enrolling, and graduating the best suited students in doctoral education is, therefore, critical in ensuring the highest academic standards and service to society. Focusing on Rowan University's Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership program, this…

  8. General and professional values of student nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Karosas, Laima; Kaseliene, Snieguole

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and compare the self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators in Lithuania. Contemporary nursing requires strong moral motivation and clear values as nurses confront many ethical dilemas in their practice. Students acquire essential values of the nursing profession through the appropriate role modelling of their educators. Nursing students seek to become capable in providing ethical and professional patient care while their educators attempt to model desired behaviours. A national cross-sectional comparative study was carried out in March 2011. Four-hundred eight respondents participated: 316 undergraduate nursing students and 92 nurse educators. A 57-item questionnaire was delivered to nursing programs at three universities and six colleges. Permission to conduct the study was granted by The Center on Bioethics. Student nurses and their educators rated the general value of altruism equally. Educators, in comparison with students, ranked honesty and intellectualism significantly higher and more often admired truth-telling in any circumstance. Students were more likely to avoid intellectual challenges in reading and placed lower importance on academic qualifications for career advancement. The professional nursing values of honesty, intellectualism and authority were ranked significantly higher by nurse educators than student nurses. The study revealed differences in self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators. The values of nurse educators were not always stronger than those of students. Positive relationships between particular general and professional values in both students and educators confirmed the link between professional and personal values. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Is there a Core Curriculum across Higher Education Doctoral Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Freeman Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the study of higher education has been referred to as a multidisciplinary field. Consensus is continuing to evolve regarding both what is considered the appropriate coursework and the foundational knowledgebase of this field. The study of higher education is maturing and has the potential to transition from being seen as a field to being respected as an academic discipline. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the status of the core curriculum in higher education doctoral programs from the perspective of program directors with programs that required the completion of standardized coursework prior to beginning a dissertation. We used online survey analytic techniques to query program directors about their EdD and PhD programs in higher education, credit hours, and curricular content. Our study confirms previous work finding that there is common agreement in the subject matter areas of organization, leadership, administration, and history. What our work adds is that there is a growing consensus among higher education doctoral programs about the position of higher education law and finance in the curricular core. In addition, we find there is a growing interest in public policy and community colleges over time, with a majority of EdD programs including instruction in these areas. Nevertheless, majoritarian agreement does not meet at a level wherein consensus can be inferred, especially within PhD programs where requirements are more varied across programs. In addition, while there is an increasing trend in the inclusion of multiculturalism in higher education doctoral programming, multiculturalism is not currently part of higher education’s core. We conclude with research and practice implications for doctoral programs in higher education as a field of study.

  10. Changes in Students' Orientations to Nursing during Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhansen, Liisa; Janhonen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    At the beginning and end of their studies, 19 Finnish student nurses were interviewed about their orientations to nursing (caring, nursing expertise, or life-career). Pre-education orientations typically remained the same. Contradictions between theory and practice were revealed. The educational system did not give much support for managing life…

  11. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  12. Nursing Educator Retention: The Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Intent to Stay among Nursing Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an increasingly worsening shortage of registered nurses, due, in part, to the nursing educator shortage. Further, nursing programs nationwide are turning away qualified applicants because of a lack of nursing educators. Unfortunately, the nursing educator shortage is not a problem that will be easily fixed. As…

  13. Knowledge creation in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanian, Zahra Marzieh; Ahanchian, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadi, Suleiman; Hossein Gholizadeh, Rezvan; Karimi-Moonaghi, Hossein

    2014-09-28

    In today's society, knowledge is recognized as a valuable social asset and the educational system is in search of a new strategy that allows them to construct their knowledge and experience. The purpose of this study was to explore the process of knowledge creation in nursing education. In the present study, the grounded theory approach was used. This method provides a comprehensive approach to collecting, organizing, and analyzing data. Data were obtained through 17 semi-structured interviews with nursing faculties and nursing students. Purposeful and theoretical sampling was conducted. Based on the method of Strauss and Corbin, the data were analyzed using fragmented, deep, and constant-comparative methods. The main categories included striving for growth and reduction of ambiguity, use of knowledge resources, dynamism of mind and social factors, converting knowledge, and creating knowledge. Knowledge was converted through mind processes, individual and group reflection, praxis and research, and resulted in the creation of nursing knowledge. Discrete nursing knowledge is gained through disconformity research in order to gain more individual advantages. The consequence of this analysis was gaining new knowledge. Knowledge management must be included in the mission and strategic planning of nursing education, and it should be planned through operational planning in order to create applicable knowledge.

  14. An approach to clinical data management for the doctor of nursing practice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Martha; Terhaar, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Strong data management skills are essential to doctor of nursing practice (DNP) education and necessary for DNP practice. Completion of the DNP scholarly project requires application of these skills to understand and address a complex practice, process, or systems problem; develop, implement, and monitor an innovative evidence-based intervention to address that problem; and evaluate the outcomes. The purposes of this paper were to describe the demand and context for clinical data management (CDM) within the DNP curriculum; provide an overview of CDM content; describe the process for content delivery; propose a set of course objectives; and describe initial successes and challenges. A two-pronged approach of consultation and a CDM course were developed. Students who participated in this approach were more likely to create and implement an evaluation plan; apply techniques for data cleansing and manipulation; apply concepts of sample size determination using power analysis; use exploratory data analysis techniques to understand population attributes and sampling bias; apply techniques to adjust for bias; apply statistical significance testing; and present project results in a meaningful way. On the basis of this evaluation, CDM has evolved from an elective to a required course integrated in a thread that crosses the entire curriculum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A study on the use of abbreviations among doctors and nurses in the medical department of a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, K C; Lau, K M; Yusof, S A M; Mohamad, A I; Shahabuddin, F S A; Ahmat, N H; Teh, P C

    2015-12-01

    Misinterpretation of abbreviations by healthcare professionals has been reported to compromise patient safety. This study was done to determine the prevalence of abbreviations usage among medical doctors and nurses and their ability to interpret commonly used abbreviations in medical practice. Seventy-seven medical doctors and eighty nurses answered a self-administered questionnaire designed to capture demographic data and information regarding abbreviation use in medical practice. Comparisons were made between doctors and nurses with regards to frequency and reasons for using abbreviations; from where abbreviations were learned; frequency of encountering abbreviations in medical practice; prevalence of medical errors due to misinterpretation of abbreviations; and their ability to correctly interpret commonly used abbreviations. The use of abbreviations was highly prevalent among doctors and nurses. Time saving, avoidance of writing sentences in full and convenience, were the main reasons for using abbreviations. Doctors learned abbreviations from fellow doctors while nurses learned from fellow nurses and doctors. More doctors than nurses reported encountering abbreviations. Both groups reported no difficulties in interpreting abbreviations although nurses reported often resorting to guesswork. Both groups felt abbreviations were necessary and an acceptable part of work. Doctors outperformed nurses in correctly interpreting commonly used standard and non-standard abbreviations. The use of standard and non-standard abbreviation in clinical practice by doctors and nurses was highly prevalent. Significant variability in interpretation of abbreviations exists between doctors and nurses.

  16. Blended Shore Education: Civic Engagement and Competencies in 21st-Century Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohschen, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the implication of Blended Shore Education to doctoral program design and delivery as it synthesizes adult education principles of Freire and Stanage with findings of Strohschen's international action research on design and delivery practices.

  17. Assessing Nursing Students’ Need to Improve Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sharif

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Undergraduate education presents a period of transition and growth and requires the ability to adapt to many life changes. Many applicants admitted to a nursing program, but high rates of attrition have been experienced. This study is an attempt to assess the nursing students’ need on their nursing education.Methods: Focus groups were used to investigate nursing student’s perceptions and views on nursing education. The sample consisted of 120 nursing students selected randomly. They were arranged in 12 groups of 10 students. The data analysis of recorded and observed data reached five major themes.Results: Five major themes emerged from data. The quality of clinical nursing instruction, confidence development in nursing practice and training, Iranian social perception of nursing profession, professional socialization through role development and improved clinical expectation and improved study skills.Conclusion: The result of this study helped to identify nursing students’ perception and determined their educational needs.Key words: NURSING EDUCATION, CLINICAL NURSING, NURSING PROFESSION, SOCIAL PERCEPTION

  18. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  19. Pedagogical Posters in Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Hélène; Bagger, Bettan

    2009-01-01

    education away from focusing upon formal qualifications towards the concept of developing nurse competences. These recommendations have resulted in challenges to traditional pedagogical approaches away from the teacher’s role as the disseminator of knowledge towards the role of facilitator of learning...... was integrated in a Nordic network’s intensive course held in the autumn of 2008. The network received funding for a research project with the goal of making recommendations with respect to best practice curriculum guidelines in prevention and health promotion education for students of nursing in the Nordic...

  20. Future-Proofing Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of pre-registration programs of nursing education to current and emerging trends in healthcare and society could have a significant future impact on the nursing profession. In this article, we use a PESTEL (politics, economics, society, technology, environment, and law framework to identify significant current and future priorities in Australian healthcare. Following the PESTEL analysis, we conduct a review of the curriculum content of current Australian undergraduate pre-registration nursing curricula. The data were analyzed to determine how nursing curricula were aligned with the priorities identified in the PESTEL analysis. Findings suggest that preparation–practice gaps are evident in nursing curricula as the broad priorities identified were poorly reflected in undergraduate pre-registration programs. The study recommended (a the establishment of a nationally consistent mechanism to identify current and emerging trends in healthcare and higher education, and (b an evidence-based framework that enhances forward planning in the design of undergraduate pre-registration nursing curricula.

  1. Rationalisation of Nursing Education in Limpopo province: Nurse educators’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Makhuvha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nursing education institutions are facing a challenge of realigning its functioning according to the changes that are taking place within the country. The intention of the government post apartheid was to correct the imbalances which were brought about by the apartheid government and the following regulations and policies influenced the change in nursing education, that is, Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP, White Paper on Higher Education (WPHE, and the National Qualification Framework (NQF (South Africa, 1995:6. In 1996 the government introduced the first democratic constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RS A according to Act 108 of 1996. In the light of those increasing changes in nursing education, led by political change, the experiences of nurse educators is a critical issue facing nursing campuses. The purpose of this study was two-fold; namely: to explore and describe the experiences of nurse educators with regard to the rationalisation of nursing education and to use information obtained to describe guidelines for the effective rationalisation of a nursing college in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse educators who worked in nursing colleges before and after 1994. Measures to ensure trustworthiness were applied and ethical issues were adhered to throughout the research process. Data was analysed following Tesch’s method (Creswell 1994:154-155. The research established that nurse educators experienced dissatisfaction in several areas relating to the rationalization of nursing education. Support was also expected from bureaucracy at higher level. This study developed guidelines to policy makers and nurse educators to ensure effective rationalisation process.

  2. Exporting doctoral education: experience of a state-supported university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoskopf, Carleen H; Xirasagar, Sudha; Han, Whiejong M; Snowdon, Sonja

    2007-01-01

    There is a demand for non-traditional doctoral education in healthcare management and policy among many countries in support of their health system reform efforts. Healthcare professionals need retooling to provide stewardship to complex new health financing systems. Most health service leaders are mid career professionals and cannot transplant themselves to study on American university campuses. They demand high quality programs, designed to enable most coursework to be completed overseas. Aided by recent distance education technology, the University of South Carolina's Department of Health Services Policy and Management developed and provides doctoral programs for working professionals in Taiwan and South Korea with a minimal and convenient campus attendance requirement. This paper presents the experience of setting up the programs, management, quality control, and benefits for both students overseas and for our Department's mission and on-campus programs. Our experience is that there are many challenges, but it is also rewarding from academic, scholarly, and financial perspectives.

  3. Human simulators in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, Alsacia L

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and explore the historical perspectives, capacities, and usage of human patient simulators (HPS) in clinical simulations and propose future uses for HPS in nursing education. The use of HPS at all levels of nursing education appears promising because research suggests that the use of HPS facilitates the development of students' physical assessment and critical thinking skills in a user-friendly environment (Spunt, Foster, & Adams, 2004). By combining HPS scenarios with lectures and actual clinical experiences, students become actively engaged and confident in their competency of the nursing process in multiple clinical arenas. The use of this technology addresses patient safety because the student is able to refine skills and develop competency in a simulated environment.

  4. Students' perspectives on basic nursing care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Feo, Rebecca; Vermeulen, Hester; Heinen, Maud

    2018-02-05

    The aim of the study is to explore the perspectives of nursing students on their education concerning basic nursing care, learned either during theoretical education or clinical placement, with a specific focus on nutrition and communication. Basic care activities lie at the core of nursing, but are ill-informed by evidence and often poorly delivered. Nursing students' education on basic care might be lacking, and the question remains how they learn to deliver basic care in clinical practice. Descriptive study, using an online questionnaire. Nursing students at the vocational and bachelor level of six nursing schools in the Netherlands were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their perception of basic nursing care education in general (both theoretical education and clinical placement), and specifically in relation to nutrition and communication. Nursing students (n=226 bachelor students, n=30 vocational students) completed the questionnaire. Most students reported that they learned more about basic nursing care during clinical placement than during theoretical education. Vocational students also reported learning more about basic nursing care in both theoretical education and clinical practice than bachelor students. In terms of nutrition, low numbers of students from both education levels reported learning about nutrition protocols and guidelines during theoretical education. In terms of communication, vocational students indicated that they learned more about different aspects of communication during clinical practice than theoretical education, and were also more likely to learn about communication (in both theoretical education and clinical practice) than were bachelor students. Basic nursing care seems to be largely invisible in nursing education, especially at the bachelor level and during theoretical education. Improved basic nursing care will enhance nurse sensitive outcomes and patient satisfaction and will contribute to lower healthcare

  5. PhD Education Outcomes: Results of a National Survey of Nursing PhD Alumni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Nwosu, Chizoba; Zhang, Yuqing; Leveille, Suzanne

    A national survey was conducted to examine the relationship between individual students' experiences and nursing PhD program characteristics and program outcomes. In light of the shortage of doctorally prepared nurse scientists and a growth in nursing PhD programs, an examination of the PhD nursing education experience in relation to educational outcomes is timely. Data were collected from graduates of a 50 percent random sample of nursing PhD programs in the United States. Graduates who had worked as research assistants, attended classroom-based programs, and worked as a nurse no more than 12 hours per week during their PhD education were more likely to have successful publication records and receive external research grant funding than graduates who did not have these experiences. On the basis of traditionally accepted measures of research productivity, our results indicate that nursing PhD programs have limited success in producing nurse researchers.

  6. Education for nurses working abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, B

    1995-08-01

    Studying abroad poses unique challenges. These relate to the course content, materials, study activities and support, as well as assessment and evaluation. Making a careful assessment of needs, study stamina and support can help students make the right choice. As education is often culturally biased, familiarity with the nursing culture from which the course comes may be the most important prerequisite for success.

  7. Marketing Continuing Education for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide presents an overview of marketing and its potential value in continuing education programs for nurses. The first portion of the guide briefly discusses the concept of marketing. It contains definitions of key marketing concepts (product, place, price, and promotion), discussion of the basic tenets of marketing (consumer needs…

  8. DISTANCE NURSE EDUCATION (UZAKTAN HEMSIRELIK EGITIMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsun KURUBACAK

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Distance Nurse Education is the first book in the Turkish literature. The main purpose of this book is to introduce and discuss the dimensions, components and characteristics of Distance Nurse Education. The unique approach of this publication brings together 1 Distance Education, 2 Nurse Education, and 3 ALINE (Active Learning in Nursing Education Model (Fay, Selz, and Johnson, 2005 together at the same time. This book focuses on the learning activities, learner-centered approach, interactions, nursing competency oriented skills and feedback of distance nurse education and its applications. Besides, this book considers on how planning, designing, delivering and managing distance resources to bring about the successful completion of the goals and objectives of distance nurse education; and also discusses the design and its models from a progressive and transformative viewpoint in the area. Thus, the publication attempts to build a better understanding on how distance educators, designers, tutors and learners in nurse education can talk about the methodical approaches to planning and guiding processes to design distance nurse education from start to finish. This is also important to scrutinize the distance nurse education model how to bring a global and multicultural partnership of faculty, administrators, professionals, teachers, community activists and researchers in distance education as well as nurse education.

  9. Assessment of the Impact of Teaching Demands on Research Productivity Among Doctoral Nursing Program Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study that examined the research and scholarship productivity of doctorally prepared nursing faculty teaching and mentoring doctoral students and the conflicting demands on them to maintain programs of research and scholarship. The specific aims were to (a) examine the research productivity and scholarship of faculty members teaching in doctoral programs and mentoring doctoral students to examine the perceived effectiveness of existing institutional mechanisms to support scholarship, (b) explore institutional features and personal practices used by doctoral program faculty to develop and maintain research and scholarship productivity, and (c) analyze predictors of scholarship productivity. Data were collected via an on-line researcher-developed survey that examined doctoral faculty roles/responsibilities and their relationship to their scholarly productivity, overall research productivity, and institutional features and personal practices to support research/scholarship activities. Survey respondents reported spending a large amount of time engaged in research-related activities with 58.9% (n = 326) spending anywhere from 6 to 20 hours per week conducting research, writing research-based papers, giving presentations, grant writing, or conducting evidence-based improvement projects. Scholar productivity among the respondents was robust. Personal practices that most strongly supported faculty members' scholarship productivity were the belief that engaging in scholarship made them better teachers and the personal gratification in experiencing doctoral students' successes. A multiple regression analysis conducted to determine predictors of productivity indicated that the strongest predictor was the average number of hours spent on research/scholarship-related activities, followed by time bought out from teaching and other responsibilities of the faculty role for research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Education for entrepreneurship in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, Jennifer; Porter, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    The different types of entrepreneurship, including social entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, and the importance of social entrepreneurship skills in the changing world of health care are discussed. The term social intrapreneurship is introduced to characterise the many nurses introducing change and enhancing care working within the NHS. The strategy for development of entrepreneurship education within one region of the UK is presented and its integration into a pre-registration nursing programme is the main focus of this paper. The process of integration of skills in the changing world of health care is discussed. The strategy for development of entrepreneurship is presented under the headings of the NICENT (Northern Ireland Centre for Entrepreneurship) @ Ulster Integration Model: Awareness and Understanding; Interpretation; Contextualisation; Integration (Theoretical Content); Integration (Assessment); Validation/Revalidation; Implementation; and Review and Reflection. The most important stages were the first two in which nursing academic staff came to realise the relevance of the topic to nursing and the interpretation and translation into 'nurse-speak' of the business terminology to alleviate the initial rejection of entrepreneurship as of no relevance to nursing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Doctor role modelling in medical education: BEME Guide No. 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Vimmi; Johnson, Samantha; Peile, Ed; Wright, Scott; Hafferty, Fred; Johnson, Neil

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this review is to summarise the evidence currently available on role modelling by doctors in medical education. A systematic search of electronic databases was conducted (PubMed, Psyc- Info, Embase, Education Research Complete, Web of Knowledge, ERIC and British Education Index) from January 1990 to February 2012. Data extraction was completed by two independent reviewers and included a quality assessment of each paper. A thematic analysis was conducted on all the included papers. Thirty-nine studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the review. Six main themes emerged from the content of high and medium quality papers: 1) the attributes of positive doctor role models; 2) the personality profiles of positive role models; 3) the influence of positive role models on students' career choice; 4) the process of positive role modelling; 5) the influence of negative role modelling; 6) the influence of culture, diversity and gender in the choice of role model. This systematic review highlights role modelling as an important process for the professional development of learners. Excellence in role modelling involves demonstration of high standards of clinical competence, excellence in clinical teaching skills and humanistic personal qualities. Positive role models not only help to shape the professional development of our future physicians, they also influence their career choices. This review has highlighted two main challenges in doctor role modelling: the first challenge lies in our lack of understanding of the complex phenomenon of role modelling. Second, the literature draws attention to negative role modelling and this negative influence requires deeper exploration to identify ways to mitigate adverse effects. This BEME review offers a preliminary guide to future discovery and progress in the area of doctor role modelling.

  12. Contracting for nurse education: nurse leader experiences and future visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, P

    1999-02-01

    The integration of nurse education into higher education establishments following Working for Patients, Working Paper 10 (DOH 1989a) has seen changes to the funding and delivery of nurse education. The introduction of contracting for education initiated a business culture which subsumed previous relationships, affecting collaborative partnerships and shared understanding. Discourse between the providers and purchasers of nurse education is vital to achieve proactive curriculum planning, which supports the development of nursing practitioners who are fit for award and fit for purpose. Research employed philosophical hermeneutics to guide the interviewing of seven nurse leaders within one region. Data analysis occurred within a hermeneutic circle and was refined using NUDIST. Two key themes were seen as impacting on the development of an effective educational strategy. Firstly, the development of collaborative working was thought to have been impeded by communication difficulties between the Trusts and higher education provider. Secondly, there was concern that curriculum developments would support the future evolution of nursing, acknowledging the professional issues impacting on nursing roles. The research findings suggest purchasers and providers of nurse education must move towards achieving mutual understanding and collaborate in developing a curriculum which will prepare nurses for practice and for award.

  13. ['Mercenary wet-nurses': the discourse of medical doctors and portraits of the wet-nurses--Brazil in the second half of the 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukos, Sandra Sofia Machado

    2009-01-01

    The article explores the theme of wet-nurses using photographs and theses of medical doctors during the second half of the 19th century. The doctors at that time condemned the indiscriminate use of wet-nurses and tried to encourage construction of the 'new mother' image, one who ought to breast feed her own children. They approached the complexity of the feeding subject (by mother, wet-nurse, animal or object) at that time and the problems arising from it for the parties involved: the white baby, the black baby, the wet-nurse, the mother of the white baby, the seignorial family involved and medical doctors. Photos are highlighted of wet-nurses with children in an attitude that was intended to be 'positive' to demonstrate harmony and affection and, apparently, contradicting the debates regarding them.

  14. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Values Changes in Baccalaureate Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenda, Skip

    2012-01-01

    Values education in nursing can be a highly emotional topic. Values in nursing education can be linked to general societal values at any given point in time. Values are transmitted by nursing educators and institutions not only consciously in the nursing curriculum, but also unconsciously in the hidden curriculum. Each year many registered nurses…

  15. Interprofessional collaboration among junior doctors and nurses in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Jennifer M; Barrow, Mark; Gasquoine, Sue

    2011-05-01

    Evidence suggests that doctors and nurses do not always work collaboratively in health care settings and that this contributes to suboptimal patient care. However, there is little information on interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among new medical and nursing graduates working together for the first time in a multidisciplinary health care team. Our aim was to understand the nature of the interactions, activities and issues affecting these new graduates in order to inform interventions to improve IPC in this context. We interviewed 25 junior doctors and nurses and explored their experiences of working together. Interviews were transcribed, entered into a qualitative analysis software package and data were coded against a theoretical framework for health care team function. Although interviewees expressed mutual respect, organisational structures often limited the extent to which they could establish professional relationships. Sharing information and agreeing goals were considered fundamental to good decision making, but the working environment and differing perspectives could make this difficult to achieve. Our data suggest that junior doctors and nurses see themselves as having complementary and non-competitive roles in patient care. The establishing of an interprofessional team was seen to require leadership, which was not always apparent. Without leadership, new members were not always well oriented to the team. The need to maintain an environment in which open communication could take place was acknowledged as important for patient safety, but there were some barriers to achieving this. Our data highlight the professionalism, respect and adaptability of these junior health professionals. We document the types of collaborative activities and tensions relevant in this context and, based on our findings, provide some strategies for improving IPC. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  16. Special Education Doctoral Programs: A 10-Year Comparison of the Suppliers of Leadership Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Montrosse, Bianca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The first article in this special issue is about the doctoral programs, the suppliers of new doctoral graduates in special education. It focuses on one component of a larger effort, the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment (SEFNA) project, which investigated many aspects of the supply of new doctoral graduates as well as the demand for new…

  17. Working With Arts in Danish Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2011-01-01

    The article outlines ideas and a number of results of a design-for-learning experiment, involving nurse students working with arts in the nurse education in Denmark. The findings show that learning in practice in nurse education can involve creativity as a dimension of building personal knowledge...

  18. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, L D; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-08-01

    With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. The mean difference in FEV(1) was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval -1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference pound 1497, 95% confidence interval pound 688 to pound 2674, pNurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources.

  19. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  20. Caregivers' role in breaking bad news: patients, doctors, and nurses' points of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Levy, Orna; Schwartz, Tirza; Silner, Dina

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research was to identify the caregivers' response patterns when breaking bad news at the first time of cancer diagnosis and their affect on the patient. These issues were examined from 3 points of view: patients, doctors, and nurses. A total of 152 Israelis subjects participated in the research: 51 patients with cancer, 51 nurses, and 50 doctors. They filled out a questionnaire developed for the research that included 35 items. Support patterns identified as effective were as follows: allowing for the expression of emotions, empathetic silence, support through touch, and the use of participatory, commendation, and encouragement statements. The research findings indicate the crucial need in the involvement of a family member and a nurse in the process and in supplying written information for the receiver of the news. Significant differences (P < .05) between patients and caregivers were found in the type of information given, in the timing and quantity, and in the support and communication patterns. The principal emotions professional caregivers experienced were identification and helplessness. Most of them were not trained in this field. The research findings could bridge the gap between what patients want and what caregivers do and would benefit in designing guidelines for breaking bad news and formulating a workshop program for furthering the team skills.

  1. [Caregivers' role in breaking bad news: patients, doctors, and nurses' points of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Levy, Orna; Schwartz, Tirza; Silner, Dina

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the research was to identify the behavioral patterns employed by caregivers when breaking bad news, and their affect on the patient. These issues were examined from three points of view: patients, doctors, and nurses. A total of 152 interviewees participated in the research: 51 patients, 51 nurses, and 50 doctors. They completed a constructed questionnaire that included 35 items developed for the research. Support patterns identified as effective were: allowing for the expression of emotions, empathic silence, support through touch, and the use of participatory, commendation, and encouragement statements. The research findings point to the crucial need for the involvement of a family-member and a nurse in the process, and providing written information for the receiver of the news. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between patients and caregivers were found in the type of information given, the timing and quantity, as well as in the support and communication patterns. The principal emotions caregivers experienced were identification and helplessness, and most of them were not trained in this field. The research findings could bridge the gap between what patients want and what caregivers actually do, and would be beneficial in designing guidelines for breaking bad news, as well as formulating a workshop program for furthering the team skills.

  2. Dissemination of Scholarship Across Eight Cohorts of Doctor of Nursing Practice Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kathleen D; Johnson, Shania; Rucker, Denise; Finnell, Deborah S

    2017-12-23

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the publication record across eight cohorts of post-master's Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) graduates. Dissemination of findings from evidence-based practice is described in the American Association of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN), Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Essential III. Students in DNP programs are expected to generate deliverables (e.g., a manuscript) of evidence to improve practice or patient outcomes. A descriptive study was conducted to determine whether two key manuscripts (i.e., integrative review and an evidence-based quality improvement [EBQI] project) were disseminated in peer reviewed journals, and if so, the length of time from graduation to publication. Co-authorship with faculty advisors and contributors was also examined. The number of EBQI publications outpaces the number of integrative reviews over this span of time. Time to publication from graduation has decreased in recent years. Expecting, rather than encouraging a publishable-ready manuscript as a course deliverable would further student's motivation to disseminate their scholarship. Focused attention on faculty co-authorship may help increase the number of successful student publications for both integrative reviews and EBQI projects and decrease the time from graduation for those publications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Barriers to effective, safe communication and workflow between nurses and non-consultant hospital doctors during out-of-hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Anne-Marie; Byrne, Gobnait; Quirke, Mary Brigid; Lynch, Aine; Ennis, Shauna; Bhangu, Jaspreet; Prendergast, Meabh

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the nature and type of communication and workflow arrangements between nurses and doctors out-of-hours (OOH). Effective communication and workflow arrangements between nurses and doctors are essential to minimize risk in hospital settings, particularly in the out-of-hour's period. Timely patient flow is a priority for all healthcare organizations and the quality of communication and workflow arrangements influences patient safety. Qualitative descriptive design and data collection methods included focus groups and individual interviews. A 500 bed tertiary referral acute hospital in Ireland. Junior and senior Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors, staff nurses and nurse managers. Both nurses and doctors acknowledged the importance of good interdisciplinary communication and collaborative working, in sustaining effective workflow and enabling a supportive working environment and patient safety. Indeed, issues of safety and missed care OOH were found to be primarily due to difficulties of communication and workflow. Medical workflow OOH is often dependent on cues and communication to/from nursing. However, communication systems and, in particular the bleep system, considered central to the process of communication between doctors and nurses OOH, can contribute to workflow challenges and increased staff stress. It was reported as commonplace for routine work, that should be completed during normal hours, to fall into OOH when resources were most limited, further compounding risk to patient safety. Enhancement of communication strategies between nurses and doctors has the potential to remove barriers to effective decision-making and patient flow. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Using Principles of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses in School Nurse Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Ruth K.; Sprague-McRae, Julie

    2014-01-01

    School nurses require ongoing continuing education in a number of areas. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) framework can be utilized in considering school nurses' roles and developing continuing education. Focusing on neurology continuing education, the QSEN framework is illustrated with the example of concussion management…

  5. The ‘torn curriculum’ in globalised doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    Qualifications Framework (EQF), it is possible to compare educational systems, increase mobility across borders, and more convincingly develop international profiles in higher education programmes. This is seen reflected in the development of a generic doctoral curriculum (Green 2009) and a “transdisciplinary...... doctorate” (Willetts, Mitcell, Abeysuriya, & Fam, 2012). However, besides aligning higher education programmes across national contexts the EQF can be said to increase competition among universities, which becomes visible through the benchmarking systems and the global ranking systems in relation to which...... individual universities navigate. Thus, the term ‘global’ should be understood with a few reservations. Despite the many similar strategies globally, a lot of policy engineering takes place on regional and national levels still. As Fortes, Kehm and Mayekiso (2014) point out, the tendency towards increase...

  6. Simulation gaming in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulione, M S

    1983-10-01

    Simulation games can be used in nursing education to promote problem solving or to impart information. Most games focus upon one of the two areas: cognitive knowledge or affective knowledge. We call these types of games content games and process games, respectively. Simulation games of both types are used in nursing education. Since simulation gaming in nursing education is a relatively new teaching strategy much of its use has been haphazard. In order for a simulation game to be an effective teaching strategy; there must be a "fit" between the game and the instructional objectives. The game operator should analyze the components of each game used prior to playing the game, so he will be able to use the game appropriately. One disadvantage of gaming is that there is a risk of experiencing untoward reactions in the gaming experience. For this reason, the operator should support all the participants throughout the game. Finally, the game operator should assess the effectiveness of the gaming process through the debriefing session and through research. To extend our knowledge of the effects of simulation games, game operators can research the effect of simulation gaming on student motivation, cognitive learning, and affective learning.

  7. Enhancing cancer nursing education through school of nursing partnerships: the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Carla P; Conner, April L; Mundt, Mary H

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program, an innovative program designed to provide nurse educators with state-of-the-art cancer knowledge to enhance their ability to teach cancer content. The Faculty Fellows Program was developed at the University of Louisville School of Nursing and was part of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve cancer nursing education. This intervention included comprehensive curriculum reviews, conferences with national consultants, cancer-specific faculty seminars, and funded instructional projects. The Faculty Fellows Program consisted of a mentored experience attending the Oncology Nursing Society Congress and a month-long intensive program to provide faculty with exposure to cancer experts, researchers, and clinical and community resources. By providing a forum for nurse educators to obtain this knowledge and provide the resources they need to change the way they educate nursing students, the program can significantly affect cancer-related nursing education and, ultimately, the care of patients with cancer and survivors.

  8. Implementation Science: New Approaches to Integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses Competencies in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolansky, Mary A; Schexnayder, Julie; Patrician, Patricia A; Sales, Anne

    Although quality and safety competencies were developed and disseminated nearly a decade ago by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project, the uptake in schools of nursing has been slow. The use of implementation science methods may be useful to accelerate quality and safety competency integration in nursing education. The article includes a definition and description of implementation science methods and practical implementation strategies for nurse educators to consider when integrating the QSEN competencies into nursing curriculum.

  9. Teaching Teachers: Methods and Experiences Used in Educating Doctoral Students to Prepare Preservice Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.; VanWeelden, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    This investigation addressed methods and experiences used to educate doctoral music education students to work as university college professors. Selected faculty representing every institution offering a Ph.D. in music education in the United States and Canada (N = 46) were sent an online questionnaire concerning (1) the extent respondents…

  10. Nurse Education and the Assessment of Nurse Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Takahashi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The issue in which I am interested is the assessment of nurse knowledge, skills and competence, and ways in which formative assessment can promote more effective learning. In this critical review of the relevant literature I consider some of the changes in nurse education, first in the UK in general, and then in the particular context of the University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil. I will then relate these changes to broader issues of professional education, and in particular developments in assessment in higher education. Finally, I will consider some of the challenges faced by nurses in the current time and how the new curriculum for nurse education and models of assessment within it can enhance the learning and development of newly qualified nurses.

  11. THE LIFESPAN OF NURSING EDUCATION IN CAMBODIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virya Koy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explain the lifespan of nursing education in Cambodia, which has been up and down for over 66 years. The journey of Cambodian nursing education is fulfilled by many challenges faced by nursing leaders in the country, including the challenges caused by the decades of civil war devastated Cambodian society. It takes high responsibility and needs more powers, skills, and commitments to produce competent professional nurses to fulfill the tasks in the clinical settings through nursing education, and it is characterized by the progress in responding societal needs of the society.

  12. Academic and Institutional Review Board Collaboration to Ensure Ethical Conduct of Doctor of Nursing Practice Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jan M; Conley, Virginia; Williams, Janet K; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Countryman, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Navigating the regulations to protect human subjects and private health information for Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) projects can be a formidable task for students, faculty, and the institutional review board (IRB). Key stakeholders from the University of Iowa College of Nursing and the Human Subjects Office developed a standardized process for DNP students to follow, using a decision algorithm, a student orientation to the human subjects review process conducted by faculty and IRB chairs and staff, and a brief Human Subjects Research Determination form. Over 2 years, 109 students completed the process, and 96.3% of their projects were deemed not to be human subjects research. Every student submitted documentation of adherence to the standardized process. Less time was spent by students, faculty, and the IRB in preparing and processing review requests. The interprofessional collaboration resulted in a streamlined process for the timely review of DNP projects. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Understanding Doctoral Nursing Students' Experiences of Blended Learning: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhossein Emami Sigaroudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of blended learning in the field of nursing and medicine has been accepted. Blended learning has been extensively used thanks to the development of communication technologies and the availability of Internet services. Meanwhile, experiences-based research, by all accounts, can help the expansion of such a learning modality. Therefore, this study was designed to explain nursing doctoral students’ experiences of blended learning. To attain this goal, a descriptive phenomenology method was used to illustrate experiences as they are experienced by the participants in the study. With regard to the nature of the investigated phenomena and the existing methods for the inductive analysis, Colaizzi’s method of data analysis was used. The findings of the study led to the discovery of three main themes: "failure", "synergy" and "specific interaction". Each of the themes has been further divided into some sub-themes.

  14. Nursing education and the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, S.

    1989-01-01

    As reflected in the nursing literature, nurses have only recently begun discussing professional responsibilities for avoidance of nuclear war. The literature of the 1950s and 1960s focused on issues of civil defense. The 1970s were mostly silent, but with the onset of the 1980s a few articles identified the need for the nursing profession to recognize the importance of nuclear war prevention. The responsibility of nursing education for including content about nuclear issues has not been discussed in the professional literature. The author surveyed baccalaureate programs of nursing education to determine whether this lack of discussion was reflected in nursing curricula. Responses indicated that the literature does not adequately reflect the level of activity and interest occurring within nursing education about nuclear issues. Nevertheless, because there is so little discussion in the professional literature, an implicit message is sent that nuclear issues are not of importance and that nurses should not openly address them.24 references

  15. The internet and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasbrenn, Martin; Raustøl, Anne; Bingen, Hanne Maria

    2017-09-01

    Participation in a community of practice through asynchronous writing is useful for learning in higher education. We argue that such computer-mediated communication via the internet is valuable in nurse education, but that it often should take place at sites protected from search with access restricted to a limited group to make the students confident and enable learning. We further argue why we think discussion of patient stories in educational settings often should be done without computers. Reflection around patient stories is a fundamental part of the education of a clinician, but should be done either with fictional cases or as face-to-face activities to protect patient confidentiality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PhD versus DSW: A Critique of Trends in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Tyriesa

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are in a phase of reintroducing the doctor of social work (DSW) degree and refining distinctions between PhD and DSW doctoral programs. This article examines how the two options have been prey to a noticeable "seesaw of precedence", resulting in a debatable history of social work's approach to doctoral education…

  17. Sharing the Stories of Racism in Doctoral Education: The Anti-Racism Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ashley; Livingstone, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    Across-racial group of social work doctoral students engaged in an Anti-Racism Project. Through shared journaling and group discussions, participants explored and interrogated experiences of racism related to doctoral education. A thematic analysis of qualitative data surfaced several themes: experiences with racism as a doctoral student, noticing…

  18. Unequal Socialization: Interrogating the Chicano/Latino(a) Doctoral Education Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Elvia

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of Chicano/Latino(a) doctoral students at a research-intensive doctorate-granting institution. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 24 Chicano/Latino(a) doctoral students across social science, humanities, education, and science disciplines, this qualitative investigation analyzed how disciplinary…

  19. Team Teaching in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Susan; Davidson, Lynda

    2018-04-01

    Team teaching is used to describe a broad array of teaching configurations that offer benefits to students that cannot be duplicated by a single educator. Although articles and books have been written to describe team teaching in other fields, little has been written about team teaching in nursing. In a field with clinical application, team teaching offers more richness in perspective when there are two complimentary educators teaching the content. The opportunity to learn from a colleague, while guiding students, is an added benefit of team teaching. We are in an era of competition for employees and students, so institutions with a reputation for creating a commitment to learning have an advantage. Students who have the benefit of a strong team to guide their learning are more often positive ambassadors for their institution. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of team teaching as experienced by two nurse educators. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(4):186-192. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  1. Fairness and respect in nurse educators' work- nursing students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Rinne, Jenni; Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-03-01

    This study describes how the ethical principles of fairness and respect come true in the work of nurse educators from the perspective of nursing students. Nurse educators' competence of professional ethics is important in providing an ethical role model to nursing students and to professionals in the field of health care. The descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. The data were collected from graduating nursing students (n = 202) in Finland with an internet-based questionnaire consisting of 22 structured questions with 5-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed that educators' fairness and respect towards others (colleagues, superiors, mentors, nursing leaders) was good but towards students their fairness did not achieve as good a level. Also, according to the students' assessment, the educators did not respect the students' individual opinions in all cases. Educators' fairness and respect towards their colleagues was satisfactory. The appreciation of educators in the society was reasonably good, but in the opinion of the students the views of educators were not respected very much. As a conclusion, can be said that educators need to put more emphasis on their action. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A template-based computerized instruction entry system helps the comunication between doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki; Nakagawa, Rie; Manabe, Shiro; Shimai, Yoshie; Teramoto, Kei; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In a hospital, doctors and nurses shares roles in treating admitted patients. Communication between them is necessary and communication errors become the problem in medical safety. In Japan, verbal instruction is prohibited and doctors write their instruction on paper instruction slips. However, because it is difficult to ascertain revision history and the active instructions on instruction slips, human errors can occur. We developed template-based computerized instruction entry system to reduce ward workloads and contribute to medical safety. Templates enable us to input the instructions easily and standardize the descriptions of instructions. By standardizing and combine the instruction into one template for one instruction item, the systems could prevent instructions overlap. We created sets of templates (e.g., admission set, preoperative set), so that doctors could enter their instructions easily. Instructions entered via any of the sets can be subdivided into separate items by the system before being submitted, and can also be changed on a per-item basis. The instructions were displayed as calendar form. Calendar form represents the instruction shift and current active instructions. We prepared 382 standardized instruction templates. In our system, 66% of instructions were entered via templates, and 34% were entered as free-text comments. Our system prevents communication errors between medical staff.

  3. Re-visioning the doctoral research degree in nursing in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher R; Duxbury, Joy; French, Beverley; Monks, Rob; Carter, Bernie

    2009-05-01

    In the light of concerns about the wider social and economic value of the PhD training programme, this article discusses the challenges being directed primarily at the traditional doctoral programme of study. While the PhD is primarily concerned with the student making an original contribution to knowledge, the value-added component of the doctoral research degree needs to respond to the needs of a wider market of purchasers, and to meet practice and policy requirements for research leadership. The United Kingdom Research Councils (UK GRAD, 2001. Joint Skills Statement of Skills Training Requirements. Available at http://www.grad.ac.uk/downloads/documents/general/Joint%20Skills%20Statementpdf. (last accessed 1st April 2008.) suggest a range of seven skill domains over and above research design and management that should be offered to students. The seven domains are research skills and techniques, participation in the research environment, research management, personal effectiveness, communication, networking and team working, and career management. This article develops and extends these skill domains for the current healthcare context and considers how these should guide the development and evaluation of the value-added components of doctoral research degree programmes in nursing. The challenges that these issues present to academic departments are also discussed. Our conclusion is that PhD research training needs re-visioning and broadening so that the students' experience includes these value-added components.

  4. Barriers to integrating information technology content in doctor of nursing practice curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Kezia; Fitzpatrick, Joyce; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no benchmark data available on the measurement of program outcomes in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to integration of IT content in the curriculum in DNP programs, perceived IT competencies taught, and DNP faculty perception of competencies. The study location was DNP programs in the United States, and focus was on doctorate-prepared faculty with a DNP or PhD. A descriptive design using an Internet-based survey was done with 113 DNP programs administrators and faculty across the United States. Limitation of the study was that few DNP administrators forwarded the study to faculty, limiting the sample size. For the purpose of this study, the results were limited to responses from DNP administrators, and some comparative data of the faculty were used. Barriers measured included lack of qualified faculty, faculty's limited knowledge or skills in IT, lack of interest, age, lack of time to learn IT, lack of time to use IT, too many work demands, lack of administrative vision, unclear expectations of faculty, lack of technical support to faculty, or lack of resources. Leading barriers to IT implementation were lack of time of faculty, too many other work demands of faculty, lack of resources dedicated to IT, and lack of qualified faculty to teach IT. Further research is necessary on doctorate-prepared faculty and on interventions to overcome these barriers is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Mapping the literature of nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Margaret (Peg); Allison, Melody M.; Stevens, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: As part of a project to map the literature of nursing, sponsored by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association, this study identifies core journals cited in nursing education journals and the indexing services that cover the cited journals.

  6. Educational preparation to strengthen nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine S

    2011-01-01

    Two of the 8 recommendations in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies report on the future of nursing call for increased leadership by nurses. While nurses alone cannot transform health care, they do need a stronger voice in health care systems, and they need better educational preparation as members of the health care leadership team.

  7. Nurse educators and student nurse neophytes' perceptions of good ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first session of interaction in the classroom often sets an atmosphere for the entire period of learning. In terms of nurse educator and student nurse neophyte relations, good interaction is essential in helping students to recognise their own responsibilities and to respond positively during the learning process.

  8. Nurse educators and student nurse neophytes' perceptions of good ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-03

    Jun 3, 2013 ... Original Research http://www.hsag.co.za doi:10.4102/hsag.v18i1.669. Nurse educators and student nurse neophytes' perceptions of good interaction in the classroom setting .... social stress experienced by college freshmen contributed to .... inappropriate teaching strategies and having to adapt to a.

  9. Gaming in Nursing Education: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pront, Leeanne; Müller, Amanda; Koschade, Adam; Hutton, Alison

    The aim of this research was to investigate videogame-based learning in nursing education and establish how videogames are currently employed and how they link to the development of decision-making, motivation, and other benefits. Although digital game-based learning potentially offers a safe and convenient environment that can support nursing students developing essential skills, nurse educators are typically slow to adopt such resources. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was conducted, followed by a thematic analysis of the literature. Evaluations of identified games found generally positive results regarding usability and effectiveness of videogames in nursing education. Analysis of advantages of videogames in nursing education identified potential benefits for decision-making, motivation, repeated exposure, logistical, and financial value. Despite the paucity of games available and the methodological limitations identified, findings provide evidence to support the potential effectiveness of videogames as a learning resource in nursing education.

  10. [Transition in nursing education and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuchika, H

    1997-09-01

    Health needs of the people of Japan are diversified and today's nursing is required to display expert functions which exceed the borders of health prevention, medical service, and welfare. Nursing education, which has recently become a four-year university course, has as its purpose the development of its specialties and science, and a systematization of them. Most nursing researchers attempt to develop nursing models from the traditional medical model, and intend to apply the nursing model to their social responsibilities and practices of nursing.

  11. mHealth: Knowledge and use among doctors and nurses in public secondary health-care facilities of Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukola Samuel Owolabi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mobile health (mHealth is gaining importance worldwide, changing and improving the way healthcare and services are provided, but its role is just emerging in Nigeria. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and use of mHealth among health workers and the provisions for its use in public secondary health-care facilities of Lagos State, Nigeria. Methods: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out among 65 doctors and 135 nurses selected using a two-staged sampling method. Data were collected with pretested self-administered questionnaires and analyzed with EpiInfo™ 7. Results: Majority (doctors 84.6%, nurses 91.1% had not heard of the term “mHealth,” but most (doctors 96.9%, nurses 87.4% were aware of the use of mobile phones in health-care delivery. Only three (27.3% (health call centers/health-care telephone helpline, appointment reminders, and mobile telemedicine out of 11 mHealth components listed were mostly known. Most doctors simply used patient monitoring/surveillance and mobile telemedicine, while nurses mainly used treatment compliance and appointment reminder services. Majority were willing to use more mHealth services if available in their hospital. All the doctors and 97% of nurses had mobile phones. However, only about one-quarter (27.5% had smartphones with applications used for mHealth purposes. Conclusions: Knowledge, awareness, and use of mHealth services were low. Doctors and nurses should be enlightened and trained on ways to use mHealth services to improve health-care delivery, mHealth services should be made available in the hospitals, and use of smartphones encouraged as they portend better adaptability for mHealth use.

  12. The Role of Health Care Professionals in Breaking Bad News about Death: the Perspectives of Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rassin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way a death is notified to family members has a long-term effect on their coping with their loss. The words caregivers use and the sentiments they express can stay with their hearers for the rest of theirlife. Aims: To study the views of three caregivers groups—doctors, nurses and social workers—as to their role in breaking a death news in an ED.Methods: One hundred and fifteen health care professionals participated in the research (51 nurses, 38 doctors and 26 social workers. They completed a 72-item questionnaire comprising behaviour descriptions, attitudes and statements. Content validation of the questionnaire was conducted by the help of experts group, and the internal reliability, measures in all its parts was 0.78 on average (α = 0.78.Results: Doctors gave a higher score than the other groups to their responsibility for breaking bad news (p<0.005 and to the content of the information they provide. Social workers scored the mental support given the family significantly higher than doctors and nurses did (p<0.000. Nurses scored the instrumental support given(tissues, water to drink significantly higher than doctors and social workers (p<0.000. Breaking bad news caused social workers more mental distress than it did either doctors or nurses. All three groups gave a high score to the emotional exhaustion, sadness and identification this task caused them. Nurses felt more fear at theprospect of a notifying a death and made more effort to escape the task.Conclusions: The findings of the study will help develop performance guidelines for notifying a death and provide input for simulation and other training workshops.

  13. A mixed-methods study of the causes and impact of poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connor, Paul; O'dea, Angela; Lydon, Sinéad; Offiah, Gozie; Scott, Jennifer; Flannery, Antoinette; Lang, Bronagh; Hoban, Anthony; Armstrong, Catherine; Byrne, Dara

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect and analyse examples of poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses; identify the teamwork failures contributing to poor team function; and ascertain if particular teamwork failures are associated with higher levels of risk to patients. Critical Incident Technique interviews were carried out with junior doctors and nurses. Two teaching hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Junior doctors (n = 28) and nurses (n = 8) provided descriptions of scenarios of poor teamwork. The interviews were coded against a theoretical framework of healthcare team function by three psychologists and were also rated for risk to patients by four doctors and three nurses. A total of 33 of the scenarios met the inclusion criteria for analysis. A total of 63.6% (21/33) of the scenarios were attributed to 'poor quality of collaboration', 42.4% (14/33) to 'poor leadership' and 48.5% (16/33) to a 'lack of coordination'. A total of 16 scenarios were classified as high risk and 17 scenarios were classified as medium risk. Significantly more of the high-risk scenarios were associated with a 'lack of a shared mental model' (62.5%, 10/16) and 'poor communication' (50.0%, 8/16) than the medium-risk scenarios (17.6%, 3/17 and 11.8%, 2/17, respectively). Poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses is common and places patients at considerable risk. Addressing this problem requires a well-designed complex intervention to develop the team skills of doctors and nurses and foster a clinical environment in which teamwork is supported. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  14. Doctoral Students in Music Education: Occupational Identity, Career Intent and Commitment, and Confidence for Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music education doctoral students' shifting occupational identity beliefs, career intent and commitment, and overall confidence for teaching in higher education. A total of 124 music education doctoral students, enrolled at 29 institutions of higher education in the United States, completed a onetime,…

  15. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  16. General beliefs about medicines among doctors and nurses in out-patient care: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedenrud Tove

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doctors and nurses are two natural partners in the healthcare team, but they usually differ in their perspectives on how to work for increased health. These professions may also have different beliefs about medicines, a factor important for adherence to medicines. The aim was to explore general beliefs about medicines among doctors and nurses. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 306 private practitioners (PPs, 298 general practitioners (GPs and 303 nurses in the county of Västra Götaland, Sweden. The questionnaire included sociodemographic questions and the general part of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ, which measures the beliefs people have about medicines in general. General beliefs about medicines in relation to background variables were explored with independent t-tests and ANOVA analyses. Differences between occupations and influences of interaction variables were analysed with multiple linear regression models for general beliefs about medicines. Results The data collection resulted in 616 questionnaires (62.1% PPs; 61.6% GPs; 80.5% nurses. The majority of the PPs and 40% of the GPs were male but most of the nurses were female. The GPs' mean age was 47 years, PPs' 60 years and nurses' 52 years. Few nurses originated from non-Nordic countries while 15% of the PPs and 25% of the GPs did. Nurses saw medicines as more harmful and less beneficial than did PPs and GPs. These differences could not be explained by the included interaction variables. GPs with a Nordic background saw medicines as more beneficial and less harmful than did GPs with a non-Nordic background. Furthermore, GPs of non-Nordic origin were most likely to believe that medicines were overprescribed by doctors. Conclusion Doctors were more positive about medicines than nurses. The differences in beliefs about medicines found between doctors and nurses could not be explained by any of the included interaction variables. These differences in

  17. The Role of Health Care Professionals in Breaking Bad News about Death: the Perspectives of Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Rassin; Keren Paz Dado; Miri Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Background: The way a death is notified to family members has a long-term effect on their coping with their loss. The words caregivers use and the sentiments they express can stay with their hearers for the rest of theirlife. Aims: To study the views of three caregivers groups—doctors, nurses and social workers—as to their role in breaking a death news in an ED.Methods: One hundred and fifteen health care professionals participated in the research (51 nurses, 38 doctors and 26 social workers)...

  18. The effect of training in communication skills on medical doctors' and nurses' self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Sabroe, Svend; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2007-01-01

    as a randomized trial. Clinicians in the intervention group received a 5 day communication course and the control group received no intervention. The impact of the intervention was evaluated by means of questionnaires measuring the effect of communication courses on changes in doctors' and nurses' self......: Communication skills training can improve clinicians' evaluation of his or her ability to perform a specific communication task - measured as self-efficacy. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Communication courses can be used to improve doctors' and nurses' ability to perform some of the essential communicative demands...

  19. Implementation of a nurse education programme in paediatric oncology using appreciative inquiry: a single center experience in Belgrade, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Jelena; Radenovic, Magdalena; Arnfield, Alison; Janic, Dragana

    2011-12-01

    The nursing staff in our center are very committed to the patients but have not had the opportunity for systematic clinical education, since there is no formal education for paediatric hematology and oncology nursing in our country. We joint a project, developed to explore and develop collaborative working between nurses and doctors in paediatric oncology under the auspices of The European Cancer Organization (ECCO), The International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) and The European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). The Appreciative Inquiry (AI) approach to change management was chosen as it looks at what works in an organization and builds on that to make improvements. Using AI we chose to develop a programme of education for nursing staff, as a project of local interest, to enhance their skills and knowledge of the specialty with the main aim of providing high quality care and ensuring best practice. We found that collaboration profoundly influenced the working environment and resulted in staff being receptive to new challenges. With improved knowledge, nurses are actually more involved in best practice which, in turn, motivates the doctors and improves professional relationships and the patient's treatment and care. We have stressed the importance of collaborative working throughout and used this model of nurse/doctor collaboration to improve the quality of care in our center. We are very hopeful that this model of collaboration and education will last longer than the project itself and be followed by future generations of doctors and nurses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gendered nursing education and practice in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooladi, Marjaneh M

    2003-01-01

    Through qualitative ethnographic methods, the researcher gendered nursing education and practice among human nursing students and faculty. Interaction with nursing students and faculty occurred in a familiar turf using the native language in interviews and on field observations. Settings included classrooms, skills laboratory, faculty offices, clinical areas, and informants' homes. Formal and informal interviews, observations, and printed materials provided useful data to reach consistent common patterns. Thematic analysis and triangulation of data identified gender variations in care and compassion, spirituality, economic motives, and practice preference. Integrated experiences of pre-Islamic period were used to describe the current developments of gendered nursing education and practice in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Study of gendered nursing education and practice brings attention to the cultural significance of gender issues. This body of knowledge will benefit American nurses and educators by increasing their cultural understanding of gender.

  1. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    OpenAIRE

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage o...

  2. Transformational leadership model for nursing education leaders in nursing education institutions / Sipho Wellington Mkhize

    OpenAIRE

    Mkhize, Sipho Wellington

    2009-01-01

    The nursing education leader provides visionary leadership to his/her organisation, as well as to the profession of nursing, and must have t he authority and resources necessary to ensure nursing education and training standards are met. This link between professional practice and operational activity of the organisation leads to greater involvement in decision making and fosters collaboration within nursing education and training and interdisciplinary teams. A collabora...

  3. Biogeography as critical nursing pedagogy: Breathing life into nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Richard G; Atherton, Iain M

    2016-09-01

    Insights from the social sciences, including geography, sociology, and anthropology, have long been incorporated into pre-registration nursing programmes. However, scholars have suggested that their inclusion has been sporadic and lacks clear theoretical rationale. In this paper we argue anew that the social sciences - and particularly, human geography - could be central to nurse education. Specifically, we recast the concept of 'biogeography' drawn from human geography that emphasises the interplay between life (bio) and place (geo) to propose pedagogy that theoretically justifies and practically enables the inclusion of the social sciences in nurse education. Biogeography can breathe new life into nursing curricula by animating our students through the cultivation of three 'spirits of nursing'. First, a 'spirit of empathy' that can shatter patient-professional dualisms by facilitating person-centred and place-sensitive care. Second, a 'spirit of engagement' that situates practice in social structures awakening a desire to effect change by fomenting an acute sense of social justice. Third, a 'spirit of enquiry' that holds in critical tension the theory-practice gap by fostering continual questioning and pursuit of evidence. In so doing, biogeographical pedagogy releases the latent potential of the social sciences to revitalise nurse education, reinvigorate our students, and renew ourselves as nurse educators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gamification of Nursing Education With Digital Badges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Meagan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    Digital badges (DBs) serve as an innovative approach to gamifying nursing education by engaging socially connected, technologically savvy nursing students in learning. Because assessment and credentialing mechanisms are housed and managed online, DBs are designed as visible indicators of accomplishment and skill. This article describes important considerations for faculty when incorporating game-based pedagogies such as DB into nursing education and identifies potential pitfalls with DB use that faculty should consider.

  5. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  6. Service user involvement in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremayne, Penny; Russell, Pip; Allman, Helen

    Service user involvement is now recognised as an integral component of nurse education. This article describes the involvement of one service user, who experienced a traumatic limb amputation, in an educational session for second-year nursing students at De Montfort University. The aim of the initiative was to use the patient's experience to improve care delivery.

  7. History of Higher Education: Educational Reform and the Emergence of the Nursing Professorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Jane

    1999-01-01

    In the late 19th century, visionary leaders pursued liberal education for nurses, moving nursing education from hospitals to universities. The nursing professorate might never have developed had nursing education remained under the jurisdiction of hospitals. (SK)

  8. Transforming Nursing Education and the Formation of Students: Using the Humanbecoming Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue-Porter, Patricia; Forbes, Maryann O; White, Jane H; Baumann, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    Transforming nursing education is a current focus across the country, the result of recent national reports that have made significant contributions for evaluating and changing curricula and ways students are taught. However, the need to ground these strategies for change within our discipline's ontological foundation through nursing theory must be addressed. The purpose of this article is to use Parse's Humanbecoming Paradigm to provide educators with exemplars of discipline-specific theory-based changes across educational levels. The exemplars are situated within the important tensions that educators face today in undergraduate, advanced practice, and doctoral programs. Conclusions are drawn regarding continuing efforts to ensure that nurse educators incorporate discipline-relevant theories when transforming nursing education.

  9. The future of Turkish nursing 2050: perceptions of nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodur, G; Kaya, H

    2017-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of nurses and nurse educators regarding the future of nursing by the year 2050 in Turkey. Social changes, rapid population growth, globalization and worldwide environmental problems will cause greater changes in the field of health and health care in the near future than they have in the past. Undoubtedly, these changes will directly affect nursing. It is important that nurses and nurse educators forecast and direct the future and nursing to benefit from the effects of the changes that will occur in the future. A qualitative descriptive study which employed the use of individual in-depth interviews. The study's sample participants were 21 hospital nurses and 16 nurse educators from universities in Istanbul, Turkey. They undertook individual in-depth interviews during July 2013-July 2014. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. The study revealed that the participants' perceptions were based on the ideas that the future of nursing will be shaped in accordance with changes in humanity, environment and healthcare system, as well as worldwide future trends. Results indicated that participants were aware of the factors that will affect future of nursing and nursing education. Research showed that participants had focused on the near future; they were not forecasting distance future. Also research found that not only future scenarios are needed for nurses, but also three kinds of scenarios are required related to factor such as humanity, environment and healthcare system those effect nurses. Futurists, health policymakers and nurse educators should work collaboratively with each other. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  10. The Lived Experience of Counselor Education Doctoral Students in the Cohort Model at Duquesne University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    This was a phenomenologically-oriented inquiry of the lived experiences of counselor education doctoral students in a cohort model. This inquiry sought to explore, describe, and understand students' "everyday" lived experiences in a cohort model in the Executive Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES) at Duquesne…

  11. Advancing Doctoral Social Work Education: An Application of the Social-Ecological Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Cynthia; Fields, Noelle L.; Schuman, Donna

    2017-01-01

    Graduates of social work doctoral programs are an integral part of social work education and, as faculty, training of BSW and MSW students. Missing from the literature are theoretical frameworks that advance the study of "what works and for whom" in social work doctoral education. Building upon the existing literature, this article…

  12. From Product to Process. The Reform of Doctoral Education in Europe and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanhua; Kehm, Barbara M.; Ma, Yonghong

    2018-01-01

    This contribution is based on an analysis of recent changes in doctoral education that can be observed in Europe and China. It traces the policies having led to these changes and discusses related policy transfer. The contribution is divided into five parts. It begins by sketching recent changes in doctoral education in the framework of the…

  13. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Impact of Doctoral Study on Educational Leaders' Work for Students' Participation in Education Systems and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines ways educational leaders engaging with doctoral research have worked for students' participation in education systems. Twenty-four interviews were conducted with educational leaders of schools, colleges, and districts in England and the US doing doctoral research. The findings reveal that the leaders identify US and English…

  15. The Impact of Supply and Demand on Doctorates in Physical Education Teacher Education: The Future of the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Barbara Ann; Lund, Jackie; O'Neil, Kason

    2016-01-01

    Quality preparation of doctoral students is a key to the survival of physical education teacher education. Past research has revealed a shortage of students graduating with a doctoral degree in physical education and a general reluctance of teachers to leave their jobs to pursue an advanced degree. As the number of universities preparing new…

  16. Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role......, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs-was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. RESULTS: The majority (93...... and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses' work...

  17. A comparison of the impact of CPOE implementation and organizational determinants on doctor-nurse communications and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, Sylvia; Anceaux, Françoise; Rogalski, Janine; Elkin, Peter; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

    2013-12-01

    To compare the impact of CPOE implementation and of the workplace organizational determinants on the doctor-nurse cooperation and communication processes. A first study was undertaken in eight different wards aimed to identify the different workplace organizations that support doctor-nurse communications'. A second study compared the impact of these organizations and of a CPOE on medication-related doctor-nurse communications. The doctor-nurse communications could be structured into three typical workplace organizations: the common round, the briefing and the opportunistic exchange organizations. The results (i) confirmed the impact of the organizational determinants on the cooperative activities and (ii) demonstrated the CPOE system has no significant impact within a given workplace organization. The success of the implementation of HIT applications relies partly on the identification of the actual (and sometimes hidden) structuring variables of teamwork and ultimately on their control at the time of implementation to ensure the quality and safety of the patient care provided. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Barthel Index: comparing inter-rater reliability between nurses and doctors in an older adult rehabilitation unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hartigan, Irene

    2011-02-01

    To ensure accuracy in recording the Barthel Index (BI) in older people, it is essential to determine who is best placed to administer the index. The aim of this study was to compare doctors\\' and nurses\\' reliability in scoring the BI.

  19. The continuing quest for parity: HBCU nursing students' perspectives on nursing and nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Costellia; Talley, Henry; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2016-08-01

    The benefits of a diverse nursing workforce are well-recognized, yet, the attainment of a sustainable, competent and diverse nursing workforce continues to be a global challenge. In this qualitative study, we describe nursing students' perceptions on nursing and nursing education at a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Focus groups were conducted with 16 graduate and undergraduate nursing students. Four themes emerged: communication, lack of resources, support systems and professional socialization. Mentoring and civility were identified as factors important to enhance a diverse workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality and marketing issues in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K

    Two important issues in nursing education are quality and marketing. These issues both complement and support each other. The aim of this article is to highlight the concepts of quality and marketing as a valuable partnership in nursing education, a partnership that is capable of improving the quality of education provision and potentially of increasing student numbers. Major themes include an analysis of the reluctance by institutions to implement marketing strategies, the image of the institution, and customer satisfaction. The article concludes by suggesting that nurse educators need to know who their customers are, who they could be, and what those customers want and need, in order to run successful and valued courses.

  1. Diet, exercise and mental-wellbeing of healthcare professionals (doctors, dentists and nurses in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. “Health is wealth” is a time tested adage. Health becomes more relevant when it comes to professionals whose job is to provide people with services that maintain an optimum state of mental, physical and social well-being. Healthcare professionals (HCP differ from general population in regards to the nature of their work, stress, burnout etc. which begs the need to have a robust state of health for the ones who provide it to others. We initiated this study to see if healthcare professionals “practice what they preach others.”Methods. We employed a cross-sectional study design with convenience-sampling technique. Questionnaires were administered directly to the three groups of healthcare professionals (Doctors, Dentists and Nurses across the province Punjab after their consent. 1,319 healthcare professionals took part in the study (response rate of 87.35. Warwick Edinburg Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS was used to assess mental wellbeing. USDA Dietary Guidelines-2010 were employed to quantify diet. American Heart Association (AHA guidelines were employed for the analysis of exercise.Results. A total of 1,190 healthcare professionals formed the final sample with doctors and nurses forming the major proportion. Out of 1,190 participants only one healthcare professional was found to eat according to USDA Dietary Guidelines; others ate more of protein group and less of fruits, dairy and vegetable groups. 76% did not perform any exercise. 71.5% worked >48 h/week. More than 50% of healthcare professionals were sleeping <7 h/day. WEMWBS score of the entire sample was 47.97 ± 9.53 S.D.Conclusion. Our findings suggest that healthcare professionals do not practice what they preach. Their mental wellbeing, diet and exercise habits are not up to the mark and should be improved to foster the whole healthcare system for individual and community benefits.

  2. Diet, exercise and mental-wellbeing of healthcare professionals (doctors, dentists and nurses) in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waqas; Taggart, Frances; Shafique, Muhammad Shoaib; Muzafar, Yumna; Abidi, Shehnam; Ghani, Noor; Malik, Zahra; Zahid, Tehmina; Waqas, Ahmed; Ghaffar, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Background. "Health is wealth" is a time tested adage. Health becomes more relevant when it comes to professionals whose job is to provide people with services that maintain an optimum state of mental, physical and social well-being. Healthcare professionals (HCP) differ from general population in regards to the nature of their work, stress, burnout etc. which begs the need to have a robust state of health for the ones who provide it to others. We initiated this study to see if healthcare professionals "practice what they preach others." Methods. We employed a cross-sectional study design with convenience-sampling technique. Questionnaires were administered directly to the three groups of healthcare professionals (Doctors, Dentists and Nurses) across the province Punjab after their consent. 1,319 healthcare professionals took part in the study (response rate of 87.35). Warwick Edinburg Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) was used to assess mental wellbeing. USDA Dietary Guidelines-2010 were employed to quantify diet. American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines were employed for the analysis of exercise. Results. A total of 1,190 healthcare professionals formed the final sample with doctors and nurses forming the major proportion. Out of 1,190 participants only one healthcare professional was found to eat according to USDA Dietary Guidelines; others ate more of protein group and less of fruits, dairy and vegetable groups. 76% did not perform any exercise. 71.5% worked >48 h/week. More than 50% of healthcare professionals were sleeping mental wellbeing, diet and exercise habits are not up to the mark and should be improved to foster the whole healthcare system for individual and community benefits.

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute ( ...

  4. Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Nielsen, Mette Elisabeth

    Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education Hanne Selberg1, Mette Elisabeth Nielsen1, Mette Wenzel Horsted2, Karen Bertelsen2, Marianne Linnet Rasmussen2,Rikke Lohmann Panton3, Copenhagen, Mette Kjeldal Jensen4 Background Changes in nursing education in Denmark towards an academic approach...... with more theory and less practical training have resulted in discussions regarding the lack of practical skills amongst novice nurses. A Danish study of students’ drop-out from the nursing education indicates that difficulties in combining theory and practice are one of the motivating factors behind...... the students’ decision to drop out (Jensen et al. 2008). Within the past year our faculty has conducted several projects with the aim of integrating simulation into the curriculum. Furthermore, voluntary simulation workshop has been carried out as an additional offer in the nursing education. The purpose has...

  5. Attitudes among nurse educators toward homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Theodora

    2013-04-01

    Homosexual populations have unique and specific cultures, psychosocial characteristics, health issues, and health care disparities that are currently ignored or insufficiently addressed in nursing education. To understand the reasons for these omissions, this descriptive study explores the attitudes of nurse educators (N = 1,282) toward homosexuality and the extent to which demographic, educational, and occupational factors are related to their attitudes. Responding to a direct online survey solicitation, self-selected participants completed the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG) and a supplementary data questionnaire. Results indicate that the majority of participants have positive attitudes toward homosexuality, which is consistent with prior findings. Most participants believe it is important to teach nursing students about homosexuality, but they consider themselves unprepared to teach this content. Effects of various demographic and occupational factors on participants' ATLG scores and implications of the findings for nursing education and nursing health care policy are discussed. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Art Images in Holistic Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl V. Elhammoumi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing research has concentrated on empirical knowing with little focus on aesthetic knowing. Evidence from the literature suggests that using visual art in nursing education enhances both clinical observation skills and interpersonal skills. The purpose of this review was to explore how visual art has been used in baccalaureate nursing education. Methods: Of 712 records, 13 studies met the criteria of art, nursing and education among baccalaureate nursing students published in English. Results: Three quantitative studies demonstrated statistical significance between nursing students who participated in arts-based learning compared to nursing students who received traditional learning. Findings included improved recall, increased critical thinking and enhanced emotional investment. Themes identified in 10 qualitative studies included spirituality as role enhancement, empathy, and creativity. Conclusion: Visual arts-based learning in pre-licensure curriculum complements traditional content. It supports spirituality as role enhancement in nurse training. Visual art has been successfully used to enhance both critical thinking and interpersonal relations. Nursing students may experience a greater intra-connectedness that results in better inter-connectedness with patients and colleagues. Incorporating visual arts into pre-licensure curriculums is necessary to nurture holistic nursing practice.

  7. Curricula challenges and informatics competencies for nurse educators

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnunen, Ulla-Mari; Rajalahti, Elina; Cummings, Elizabeth; M., Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Nursing informatics competencies are fundamental to nursing practice in all areas of nursing work, including direct patient care, administration and education. The recent activity relating to the development of nursing informatics competencies for beginning level nurses has exposed a paucity of understanding of the requirements for nursing informatics competencies for nurse educators. So, whilst the challenge of educating faculty to teach informatics has been limited, research into such compe...

  8. Developing future nurse educators through peer mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenau PA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Rosenau, Rita F Lisella, Tracey L Clancy, Lorelli S NowellFaculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaBackground: The nursing workforce and nursing education demographic trends reinforce the urgency to cultivate future nursing leaders, educators, and mentors. The changing realities of health care environments, involving crowded student placements, overtaxed clinical mentors and preceptors, and inexperienced staff, hamper student learning and professional development. Peer mentoring has been used successfully in nursing education to enhance student engagement and the quality of the student learning experience. Although various terms like peer mentor have been used to describe the role of senior students facilitating junior student learning, the literature is silent about how peer mentoring fosters the development of future nursing education leaders.Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand how peer mentorship fosters the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an elective undergraduate peer-mentoring credit course, Introductory Concepts in Nursing Education and Leadership Through Peer-Led Learning.Design and method: This phenomenological study explored the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate students through the analysis of critical reflections of individual senior students and online discussions between triads of senior students teaching/learning across diverse junior-level theory and practice courses.Participants: Seventeen senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in the elective course participated in the study.Results: From the critical reflections and online discussions, four themes emerged: "developing teaching philosophies and pedagogies", "learning teaching strategies", "supportive peer relationship", and "benefits of the peer mentorship program".Conclusion: The creation and promotion of peer leadership

  9. A comparison of the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses: implications for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Yang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2016-11-01

    To compare the respective views of nursing students and registered nurses on caring behaviours. Research has indicated that nursing includes not only technical skills and professional knowledge but also the expression of care. In addition to nursing care, nurses demonstrate the acts of supporting, negotiating, reinforcing and transforming. However, little research simultaneously investigates the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 657 subjects participated in this study. The research tool was a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, t-test and chi-square test. The results showed that the most important caring behaviour is 'knowing the patient', while the least is 'advocating for the patient', which includes caring behaviours to respect the patient's and family's best interests, and voicing for them, possibly because this behaviour is more difficult for nurses to practice in the Taiwanese culture. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the caring behaviours between nursing students and registered nurses. However, age was found to be a significant difference in the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. Caring behaviour is essential in clinical practice. Based on the results, this study suggested that role models should be provided to nursing students to develop proper caring behaviours. Nursing faculty can boost nursing students' interests in learning caring behaviours by incorporating diverse teaching strategies to enhance the effectiveness of caring behaviours. Much attention should be focused on education about awareness of caring behaviour for both nursing students and nursing staff. This study addressed that nursing administrators and faculty members should emphasise the importance of the essence of caring. Consequently, nursing curricula and training of nurses need to be

  10. TRENDS TOWARDS DISTANCE EDUCATION OF NURSING EDUCATION IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine SENYUVA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary world, developments, changes, transformations, globalization, information and communication technologies developments, diversification of the educational environment and life-long education to become compulsory in education, learning-teaching process efficiency and effectiveness in their discussion raises, while the educational technology, the concept was put forward. With the concept of educational technology and communication technologies bigi be used effectively in the field of education has become compulsory. Next to this case, the individual's formal education at any time and anywhere access to educational programs that allow participation distance education has led to the need to. In today’s world rapidly changing, evolving and increasingly complex area of a state health care services, nursing education from the issuing institution, advanced human and professional members of the advanced characteristics and has adopted the lifelong development of nurses are required to have graduated. Resources in this direction was examined, the distance education of nurses after graduation various vocational courses, certificate programs until completion and graduate degree (master and PhD education in maintaining the successful results to indicate. Therefore, distance education, nursing education to university level upgrade accelerated nursing education experienced in the quality-quantity to the solution of the problem, the continuity of nursing education and contribute to the professional will provide a large group of educational opportunities will be taken into consideration must be considered and appropriate studies, arrangements should be made.

  11. Fostering Ethical Integrity in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Ruth A; Hartley, Patricia Lynn; Hodges, Patricia J; Hoffpauir, Rebecca Baldwin

    Nursing students bring an array of morals, values, and ethics that may be inconsistent with ethical integrity. This study explored nurse educator perceptions of student ethical integrity and how educators can foster an ethical foundation in students and novice educators. Four major themes influencing ethical integrity emerged: the learning environment, behaviors, ethical principles, and a toolbox of strategies. Strategies for fostering ethical integrity included: modeling ethical integrity, effective communication, grading accuracy, faculty perceptions, and faculty peer mentoring.

  12. Massive open online courses in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Karen; Greene-Ryan, Jane

    2014-01-01

    MOOCs are changing the face of higher education. Online programs provide nurses with access to technologies, networking with other professionals, and opportunities reflect on their practice. The changing climate of online, higher education provides access and flexibility to students balancing work, family, and financial responsibilities. Offering free courses may provide nursing students ambivalent about online learning the chance to experience otherwise unavailable educational opportunities including the chance to earn a BSN degree.

  13. Gender Bias in Higher Education: Spanish Doctoral Dissertations in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Mónica; Torralbo, Manuel; Fernández-Cano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a quantitative study that provides evidence of gender biases in relation to women in the field of Spanish mathematics education. For this purpose, doctoral dissertations produced in Spain and defended in Spanish universities between 1970 and 2014 were subjected to exhaustive analysis. Focusing on gender, the…

  14. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.

  15. Nursing leadership: interprofessional education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Pamela N; Hassmiller, Susan

    2013-10-01

    The column presents a scholarly dialogue about nursing's role in interprofessional education, practice, and collaboration. Susan Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) senior adviser for nursing. In this role, she shapes and leads the foundation's strategies to address nurse and nurse faculty shortages and ensures that RWJF's commitments in nursing have a broad and lasting national impact. In partnership with AARP, Hassmiller directs the foundation's Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. This effort, active in 50 states plus the District of Columbia, strives to implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's 2011 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, for which Hassmiller served as the study director.

  16. The End of Life Nursing Education Nursing Consortium project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2015-04-01

    In 2000, the City of Hope Medical Center and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) developed the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)-Core curriculum to educate nurses and other healthcare professionals on end of life care, so that attention to the dying could be improved and their unique needs addressed. Since its inception, over 19,500 nurses and other professionals have attended the ELNEC train-the-trainer courses. Upon course completion, the participants, often nurse educators, returned to their schools, healthcare systems, and communities and introduced the ELNEC content into nursing curricula, annual competencies, and new employee orientation. In 2005, the national ELNEC Project Team concluded that an international curriculum should be developed. The first ELNEC International course was launched in 2006 in Salzburg, Austria. Since that time, trainers have come from 85 countries world-wide, and the curriculum has been translated into eight languages. In 2015, three international courses will be presented: in Beijing, China, Kipkaren, Kenya, and Salzburg, Austria.

  17. Nurses' knowledge and educational needs regarding genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Memnun; Akyüz, Aygül; Elbüken, Burcu; Skirton, Heather; Öztürk, Hatice

    2015-03-01

    Nurses now require a basic knowledge of genetics to provide patient care in a range of settings. To determine Turkish registered nurses' current knowledge and educational needs in relation to genetics. A descriptive, cross-sectional study. Turkish registered nurses working in a university hospital in Turkey were recruited. All registered nurses were invited to participate and 175 completed the study. The survey instrument, basic knowledge of health genetics, confidence in knowledge and the nurses' need for genetics education were used to collect data. The majority (81.1%, n=142) of participants indicated that genetics was not taught during their degree program, although 53.1% to 96% of respondents felt confident in defining different genetic concepts. The average genetics knowledge score was 6.89±1.99 of a possible 11 (range 0-11). The majority (70.3%) expressed a strong wish to attend a continuing nursing education program in genetics. The study shows that although Turkish nurses are not sufficiently knowledgeable to apply genetics in practice, they are willing to have more education to support their care of patients. Nurses need to have more education related to genetics in accordance with advances in human genetics to optimize health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges for nursing education in Angola: the perception of nurse leaders affiliated with professional education institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria; Ventura, Carla A Arena; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mazzo, Alessandra; de Godoy, Simone; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2013-07-17

    Angola is one of the African countries with the highest morbidity and mortality rates and a devastating lack of human resources for health, including nursing. The World Health Organization stimulates and takes technical cooperation initiatives for human resource education and training in health and education, with a view to the development of countries in the region. The aim in this study was to identify how nurses affiliated with nursing education institutions perceive the challenges nursing education is facing in Angola. After consulting the National Directory of Human Resources in Angola, the nurse leaders affiliated with professional nursing education institutions in Angola were invited to participate in the study by email. Data were collected in February 2009 through the focus group technique. The group of participants was focused on the central question: what are the challenges faced for nursing education in your country? To register and understand the information, besides the use of a recorder, the reporters elaborated an interpretative report. Data were coded using content analysis. Fourteen nurses participated in the meeting, most of whom were affiliated with technical nursing education institutions. It was verified that the nurse leaders at technical and higher nursing education institutions in Angola face many challenges, mainly related to the lack of infrastructure, absence of trained human resources,bureaucratic problems to regularize the schools and lack of material resources. On the opposite, the solutions they present are predominantly centered on the valuation of nursing professionals, which implies cultural and attitude changes. Public health education policies need to be established in Angola, including action guidelines that permit effective nursing activities. Professional education institutions need further regularizations and nurses need to be acknowledged as key elements for the qualitative enhancement of health services in the country.

  19. Human rights education for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, M

    2001-05-01

    This article is based largely on a research study undertaken by the author into the teaching of human rights in nursing courses in the UK on behalf of the national section of the human rights organization Amnesty International. It attempts to provide a baseline estimate of human rights education in nursing curricula in the UK while making suggestions on how the teaching of human rights issues could be more clearly incorporated into nursing curricula, ending with some recommendations for further research.

  20. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  1. Using blogs for facilitating and connecting nurse educator candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Hamari, Lotta; Fuster, Pilar; Istomina, Natalja; Salminen, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social media includes blog applications, which can be used as online journals or diaries that encourages interaction and collaboration within an online community. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the use of blog writing as learning journals during a short course for nurse educator candidates about social media. A qualitative descriptive design was used. The participants were nurses, Bachelor, Master's and Doctoral students who intended to follow a career in education (N=24, female n=21, male n=3, Mean age 37) from four different countries of the European Union. The blogs written during the course were used as a data collection method and the data was analyzed with qualitative content analysis. A total of 260 blogger posts and 372 peer comments were analyzed. Four main categories emerged from the analysis: 1) Course content, new knowledge, and changed views, 2) Reflection and critical thinking, 3) Encouraging and peer support and 4) Expressing feelings, experiences, and expectations. Blogs are potential learning spaces in short courses in nurse educator education, especially in sharing feelings and experiences, enhancing an encouraging atmosphere, critical thinking, and reflection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring clinical wisdom in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKie, Andrew; Baguley, Fiona; Guthrie, Caitrian; Jackson, Carol; Kirkpatrick, Pamela; Laing, Adele; O'Brien, Stephen; Taylor, Ruth; Wimpenny, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The recent interest in wisdom in professional health care practice is explored in this article. Key features of wisdom are identified via consideration of certain classical, ancient and modern sources. Common themes are discussed in terms of their contribution to 'clinical wisdom' itself and this is reviewed against the nature of contemporary nursing education. The distinctive features of wisdom (recognition of contextual factors, the place of the person and timeliness) may enable their significance for practice to be promoted in more coherent ways in nursing education. Wisdom as practical knowledge (phronesis) is offered as a complementary perspective within the educational preparation and practice of students of nursing. Certain limitations within contemporary UK nursing education are identified that may inhibit development of clinical wisdom. These are: the modularization of programmes in higher education institutions, the division of pastoral and academic support and the relationship between theory and practice.

  3. [Panorama of nursing distance education in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Priscila Tagliaferro; Vieira, Sheila de Souza; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena; Sandor, Elisane Regina; Vieira, Carla Roberta Sola de Paula

    2011-12-01

    The development of distance education is associated with the popularization and democratization of the accessibility to information and communication technologies. Nursing has been using this modality of education in both undergraduate and graduate courses, which has provided knowledge about other technologies, an easier accessibility, flexibility of time and space, and reduced costs. The objective of this study is map the national higher education distance nursing courses. This exploratory, descriptive study was developed by visiting governmental, non-governmental and institutional websites. Two undergraduate and nine graduate courses in nursing were found, which is considered to be a low number, considering that distance education is an appropriate pedagogical tool that permits to prepare a large number of nurses who are geographically dispersed and who do not have access to the conventional educational processes.

  4. Ethics in Turkish nursing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgülü, Refia Selma; Dinç, Leyla

    2007-11-01

    This descriptive study investigated the current status of ethics instruction in Turkish nursing education programs. The sample for this study comprised 39 nursing schools, which represented 51% of all nursing schools in Turkey. Data were collected through a postal questionnaire. The results revealed that 18 of these nursing schools incorporated an ethics course into undergraduate and three into graduate level programs. Most of the educators focused on the basic concepts of ethics, deontological theory, ethical principles, ethical problems in health care, patient rights and codes of ethics for nurses. More than half of the educators believed that students' theoretical knowledge of ethics is applied to their clinical experiences. The teaching methods used included discussion in class, lectures, case studies, small group discussion, dramatization and demonstration. Assessment was carried out by means of written essays and written examinations.

  5. Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviewed the development of the education of nurses and midwives in Rwanda. Nursing and midwifery education started with missionaries providing general nursing education and later evolved into the integration of nursing education in public and private schools. The establishment of the Kigali Health Institute ...

  6. Oscillating Role Identities: The Academic Experiences of Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazvac-Martek, Marian

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports initial results from a larger qualitative study on doctoral student experiences in the PhD process. The social-psychological notion of "role identities" is introduced as a complimentary framework for gaining insights into doctoral experiences. Findings from qualitative thematic analyses of questionnaire and interview data…

  7. Enhancing Doctoral Research Education through the Institution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A key support service in doctoral research that has increasingly gained attention is academic writing courses. This position paper argues for the institutionalization of graduate writing courses in universities in Ghana in order to acquaint doctoral students with the theoretical, procedural, and practical aspects of the ...

  8. Enhancing Doctoral Research Education through the Institution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A key support service in doctoral research that has increasingly gained attention is academic writing courses. This position paper argues for the institutionalization of graduate writing courses in universities in Ghana in order to acquaint doctoral students with the theoretical, procedural, and practical aspects of the writing of ...

  9. Doctors in ancient Greek and Roman rhetorical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    This article collects and examines all references to doctors in rhetorical exercises used in ancient Greek and Roman schools in the Roman Empire. While doctors are sometimes portrayed positively as philanthropic, expert practitioners of their divinely sanctioned art, they are more often depicted as facing charges for poisoning their patients.

  10. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  11. Education Committee of the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Community/public health nursing (C/PHN) educators and practitioners need a framework from which to plan, implement, and evaluate curriculum and community-based practice. The Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE) periodically updates the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community/Public Health Nursing to reflect changes in core knowledge, basic competencies, and practice. This update reflects relevance to 21st-century health care and to national trends influencing nursing education. The 2009 revision is based on critical analysis of key C/PHN literature and input from public health nursing educators and practitioners. A key assumption is that a baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum requirement for professional C/PHN. Fifteen essential concepts for baccalaureate nursing education are delineated along with related competencies. Newly defined essentials include communication, social justice, and emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. Issues related to didactic and clinical experiences are addressed. The ACHNE Essentials is an important guide for baccalaureate education curriculum planning and evaluation. The Essentials may be useful as a baseline from which to develop competencies of graduate nursing programs. The document is also useful for guiding practice setting orientation and professional development.

  12. Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prichard, David

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. METHOD: A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors\\' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.

  13. Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David; Collins, Niamh; Boohan, Mairead; Wall, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.

  14. Nurse educators and professional ethics--ethical principles and their implementation from nurse educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Metsämäki, Riikka; Numminen, Olivia H; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-02-01

    This study describes nurse educators' knowledge of the ethical principles of professional codes of ethics and educators' assessment of the implementation of principles of fairness and human respect. Data for this study was collected from nurse educators in Finland. The data was analyzed by SPSS (15.0) for Windows. A total of 342 nurse educators participated. The response rate was 46%. Nurse educators knew well the ethical principles of professional codes governing their work. Older and more experienced educators knew the principles better than younger and less experienced. According to the educators the principle of fairness was implemented the best whereas fair treatment of nurse educators and respect for educators' opinions in the society were implemented the weakest. Educators who knew the principles well assessed themselves to act in a fairer way and to respect other persons' opinions in a better way than educators who knew these principles less well. They also felt themselves to be better treated than educators having less knowledge of the principles. These findings can be utilized to develop nurse educators' ethics education. Further research should focus on students', colleagues' and superiors' assessments of nurse educators' ethical knowledge base to gain comparative data on the phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abstract: Identifying Nurse Education Needs with Documentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultural differences have led to the development and implementation of educational topics not reflected in the documentation audit such as professional and institutional accountability rules and regulations for nurses. Conclusions: As nurses in Rwanda implement the change in clinical practice following this study, detailed ...

  16. NURSING INFORMATICS EDUCATION AND USE: CHALLENGES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    This paper examines the current state of nursing informatics education and use in Nigeria and proffer solutions .... science; this places emphasis on the human factor in ..... Health Informatics in Africa—HELINA. 93: Proceedings of the First International. Conference. Ile-Ife, Nigeria. National League for Nursing (NLN)., 2008.

  17. Conceptualization of responsiveness of nursing education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to explore the concept of responsive nursing education programme by stakeholders at a Nursing College to the health needs of the Eastern Cape community. A qualitative approach and ethnography design, using purposive sampling methods guided the study. Focus group interviews were ...

  18. Improving Academic Writing in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: At a specialist nursing education in intensive care, located at a University college in Sweden, there was a desire among the faculty to develop their ability to support specialist nursing students in their academic development, as well as in their academic writing, to improve the overall quality of the master theses. A quality…

  19. The DNP by 2015: A Study of the Institutional, Political, and Professional Issues That Facilitate or Impede Establishing a Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Pearson, Marjorie L.; Taylor, Erin Audrey; Zaydman, Mikhail; Muchow, Ashley; Spetz, Joanne; Dower, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In 2004, members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) voted to endorse a position statement identifying the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the most appropriate degree for advanced-practice registered nurses (APRNs) to enter practice. At the same time, AACN members voted to approve the position that all master's…

  20. Global Health Education in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lydia C; DiPietro Mager, Natalie A

    2016-05-25

    The objective of this Review is to characterize content related to global health in didactic and experiential curricula of doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs in the United States. The review was completed through a systematic website search of 133 US PharmD programs accredited or currently in the process of obtaining accreditation to identify global health dual degrees, minors/concentrations, required and elective courses, and experiential opportunities. Programs' course catalogs were referenced as needed to find more specific course listings/descriptions. More than 50 programs offered an elective course related to global health; eight had a required course; eight offered a minor or certification for global health; three offered dual degrees in pharmacy and global health. Fourteen institutions had a center for global health studies on campus. More than 50 programs offered experiential education opportunities in global health including international advanced pharmacy practice experiences or medical mission trips. Inclusion of and focus on global health-related topics in US PharmD programs was widely varied.

  1. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Ghiyasvandian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  2. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  3. [Environmental education and nursing: a necessary integration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beserra, Eveline Pinheiro; Alves, Maria Dalva Santos; Pinheiro, Patrícia Neyva da Costa; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2010-01-01

    Environmental issue should be discussed in educational actions, because this debate leads people to reflect on what is ecologically healthy. It was aimed to reflect on Health promotion, Environmental education and Nursing. This is a reflexive study on environmental health in three groups: Promotion of environmental and human health; Educational actions in Environmental health; and Nursing and Health education. It was verified that environmental education is a theme that includes human well-being, being necessary actions of health promotion that qualify individual and community to practice their empowerment and autonomy.

  4. Status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Khan, Seher A; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the current status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs. A survey instrument was developed and distributed through SurveyMonkey to American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Biological Sciences section members of 132 PharmD programs. Survey items focused on soliciting qualitative and quantitative information on the delivery of physiology curricular contents and faculty perceptions of physiology education. A total of 114 programs responded to the survey, resulting in a response rate of 86%. Out of 114 schools/colleges, 61 programs (54%) offered standalone physiology courses, and 53 programs (46%) offered physiology integrated with other courses. When integrated, the average contact hours for physiology contents were significantly reduced compared with standalone courses (30 vs. 84 h, P physiology contents. Eighty percent of the responding faculty (n = 204) agree/strongly agree that physiology is underemphasized in PharmD curriculum. Moreover, 67% of the respondents agree/strongly agree that physiology should be taught as a standalone foundational course. A wide variation in the depth and breadth of physiology course offerings in US PharmD programs remains. The reduction of physiology contents is evident when physiology is taught as a component of integrated courses. Given current trends that favor integrated curricula, these data suggest that additional collaboration among basic and clinical science faculty is required to ensure that physiology contents are balanced and not underemphasized in a PharmD curriculum. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Lone Scholar or Community Member? The Role of Student Networks in Doctoral Education in a UK Management School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilbeam, Colin; Denyer, David

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral education in the UK embraces both independent self-directed study and collective shared learning. The extent to which individual doctoral students remain isolated, or become integrated into a network of doctoral students, is a function of the attributes of the individual and the nature of the doctorate and its mode of delivery. Using the…

  6. Use of Action Research in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan D; Vandenbark, R Todd; Pehler, Shelley-Rae; Stombaugh, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe action research in nursing education and to propose a definition of action research for providing guidelines for research proposals and criteria for assessing potential publications for nursing higher education. Methods. The first part of this project involved a search of the literature on action research in nursing higher education from 1994 to 2013. Searches were conducted in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Applying the criteria identified, 80 publications were reviewed. The second part of the project involved a literature review of action research methodology from several disciplines to assist in assessing articles in this review. Results. This article summarizes the nursing higher education literature reviewed and provides processes and content related to four topic areas in nursing higher education. The descriptions assist researchers in learning more about the complexity of both the action research process and the varied outcomes. The literature review of action research in many disciplines along with the review of action research in higher education provided a framework for developing a nursing-education-centric definition of action research. Conclusions. Although guidelines for developing action research and criteria for publication are suggested, continued development of methods for synthesizing action research is recommended.

  7. A Survey of Nurses' and Patients' Opinions about Patient Education and Training and Possible Barriers in Madani Cardiovascular Health and Education Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afkham Varghaei-Paidar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Patient education is an effective nursing care to increase patient satisfaction with health care, reduce anxiety and the length of hospitalization and costs. Despite the importance of patient education, currently available evidence indicates the fact that the nurses do not show a positive and clear attitude towards patient education. The aim of this study was to identify and compare the barriers (related to patient, nurses and management in patient education from the view of patients and nurses in the Shahid Madani Hospital. Material and Methods: This is a descriptive, analytical study. The study population consisted of all nurses in medical, surgical, CCU, ICU  wards and adult patients hospitalized in different wards .With  the census sampling, questionnaires were handed to 193 nurses and 184 patients. The data collection tool of both nurses and patients was a two-part questionnaire (first part Demographic Specifications and second part statements related to patient-related barriers, nurses-related barriers, manager -related barriers. To determine the validity and reliability of the study, content validity and split half method and Cronbach's alpha were used, respectively. Results: The results showed that the most important patient-related barrier towards education from the patients viewpoint includes: I prefer to be taught by my doctor (%22.6 while most important patient-related barrier from nurses' view was lack of understanding of content  because of  illiteracy or low literacy (%20.8 .Also,  Important nurses-related barrier from  patients' view regarding education contains: Nurses do not have enough time for patient education (% 11.5 while this barrier from  nurses'  viewpoint were physical and mental fatigue of nurses due to high duties and shifts (% 33.9 . Important management-related barrier from patients' view contains: There are no rewards for nurses who educate patients (% 26.8 while this barrier

  8. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: The next education wave of change in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Wells, Joe; Mu, Keli

    2016-12-01

    Currently, Canada and the United States are the only two countries that mandate entry to the occupational therapy profession at the master's level. There was a recommendation considered by the American Occupational Therapy Association that by 2025 all education programs would move to the clinical doctorate level. In August 2015, the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education made the formal decision that for now, the entry-level qualification for occupational therapists in the United States will remain at both the master's and clinical doctorate levels. This article presents an overview of the types of doctorates available, the pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate, and some potential questions that will need to be considered. Is the next step in the educational progression of occupational therapy in Canada the entry-level clinical doctorate? What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders? Further discourse and investigation of this issue is needed.

  9. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  10. Professional Education: Post-Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalys, Jurate A.; Watson, Jean

    1986-01-01

    In response to increased interest in interdisciplinary and liberal arts emphases in professional education programs, the University of Colorado has reorganized its nursing education program structure into a core academic unit and four major divisions, and has proposed that the first professional nursing degree be post-baccalaureate. (MSE)

  11. Emergency Nurse Practitioner Core Educational Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbeck, Jennifer; Roberts, Eric; Rudy, Susanna

    Increasing numbers of patients are presenting to national emergency departments (EDs). This is occurring simultaneously with reductions in providers along with ED closures, creating a significant gap in emergency care. According to the advanced practice registered nurse consensus model, specialty-specific knowledge and practice build upon generalist nurse practitioner (NP) population foci. Although the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties provides guidelines for educational programs at the NP population level, determination of core specialty knowledge lies with specialty organizations. Emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs) require additional specialty-specific education to manage patients spanning age and acuity continuums. Although certification mechanisms are now in place to recognize NP specialty knowledge, a nationally standardized curriculum remains to be proposed. This article proposes core educational content for ENP specialty education; the utility of this content may serve as the foundation for the development of standardized ENP academic and postgraduate fellowship programs.

  12. Doctoral Sojourn Experiences of Adapted Physical Education Students from Asian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explain Asian international doctoral students' sojourn experiences into Adapted Physical Education (APE) programs at two universities. The participants were six doctoral students from Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea. This case study was conceptualized within sojourner theory (Siu, 1952). The data…

  13. Peer-Learning Networks in Social Work Doctoral Education: An Interdisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Jay; Duron, Jacquelynn F.; Bosk, Emily Adlin; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Abner, Kristin S.

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning networks (PLN) can be valuable tools for doctoral students. Participation in these networks can aid in the completion of the dissertation, lead to increased scholarship productivity, and assist in student retention. Yet, despite the promise of PLNs, few studies have documented their effect on social work doctoral education. This…

  14. "Con todo mi corazón": Mentoring Latinas in Educational Leadership Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Mariela A.

    2016-01-01

    Personal narrative essays were used to analyze the experiences of four Latina doctoral students who completed their first year in an educational leadership doctoral program in a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in the southwestern U.S. Four themes emerged from their "testimonios" 1) "Con todo el corazón"; 2) "Somos como…

  15. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterman, Ann Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the lived experiences of doctoral women studying Education, a prototypically female field, with women studying Engineering, a prototypically male field to illustrate the phenomenon of doctoral degree progress in the two fields. Using critical feminist theory and Valian's (1999) concept of gender schemas, this…

  16. Peer Support in Negotiating Multiple Relationships within Supervision among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Amanda J.; Pimpleton, Asher; Stinchfield, Tracy; Stevens, Heath; Othman, Nor Asma

    2013-01-01

    Counselor education doctoral students (CEDSs), like other doctoral students, need assistance and support to ensure their self-care. One area markedly affecting self-care is one's relationships with others. The purpose of this article is to examine the multiple relationships involved within CEDSs supervision, the potential areas to utilize peer…

  17. A Critical Race Feminist Analysis of Men of Color Matriculating into a Higher Education Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian D.; Kelly, Bridget Turner; Jourian, T. J.; Byrd, Ajani M.; Manzano, Lester J.; Bumbry, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In Fall, 2012, the Loyola University Chicago Higher Education program faculty admitted a doctoral cohort of 5 men of color. This article is a reflexive and reflective autoethnography that explores the college choice processes of 5 doctoral men of color through a Critical Race Feminist perspective. The faculty program chair's narrative supplements…

  18. Providing Continuing Education for International Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Debra L

    2015-10-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, providing continuing education (CE) for nurses is becoming a more common opportunity for U.S. educators. It is important for educators to provide CE programs in a culturally competent and sensitive environment. The challenges involved include effective communication, appropriate teaching methodologies, contextually appropriate content, and awareness of cultural-specific needs and customs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Arts-based inquiry in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Briege

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the methods, processes, and experiences of using arts-based inquiry within the context of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Exploration of these phenomena was achieved through an ethnographic study that involved participatory research among twenty second year students as they engaged in a Nursing Humanities option module. The capacity of arts-based approaches in the nursing curriculum to foster inquiry and critical thinking; essential attributes in contemporary nursing, is explored through re-presentation and analysis of student artwork/art-making processes, contextual discussions and researcher field notes. The challenges encountered in using arts-informed pedagogical approaches within current nursing curricula are made visible and possibilities for integrating aesthetic inquiry into nurse education programmes are discussed.

  20. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students' perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students' perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran). Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver.14. Chi- square test was used to compare the nursing students' perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66%) were male. 44 students (30.1%) had work experience (3.58±6.48 month). Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05). Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039), how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032), supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001) with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5%) and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%), respectively. Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  1. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran. Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver. 14. Chi-square test was used to compare the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Results: Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66% were male. 44 students (30.1% had work experience (3.58±6.48 month. Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05. Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039, how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032, supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001 with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5% and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%, respectively. Conclusion: Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  2. Mandate for the Nursing Profession to Address Climate Change Through Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffers, Jeanne; Levy, Ruth McDermott; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sweeney, Casey F

    2017-11-01

    The adverse health effects from climate change demand action from the nursing profession. This article examines the calls to action, the status of climate change in nursing education, and challenges and recommendations for nursing education related to climate change and human health. Discussion paper. The integration of climate change into nursing education is essential so that knowledge, skills, and insights critical for clinical practice in our climate-changing world are incorporated in curricula, practice, research, and policy. Our Ecological Planetary Health Model offers a framework for nursing to integrate relevant climate change education into nursing curricula and professional nursing education. Nursing education can offer a leadership role to address the mitigation, adaptation, and resilience strategies for climate change. An ecological framework is valuable for nursing education regarding climate change through its consideration of political, cultural, economic, and environmental interrelationships on human health and the health of the planet. Knowledge of climate change is important for integration into basic and advanced nursing education, as well as professional education for nurses to address adverse health impacts, climate change responses policy, and advocacy roles. For current and future nurses to provide care within a climate-changing environment, nursing education has a mandate to integrate knowledge about climate change issues across all levels of nursing education. Competence in nursing practice follows from knowledge and skill acquisition gained from integration of climate change content into nursing education. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Developing a Serious Game for Nurse Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hege Mari; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann; Slettebø, Åshild

    2018-01-01

    Future nursing education is challenged to develop innovative and effective programs that align with current changes in health care and to educate nurses with a high level of clinical reasoning skills, evidence-based knowledge, and professional autonomy. Serious games (SGs) are computer-based simulations that combine knowledge and skills development with video game-playing aspects to enable active, experiential, situated, and problem-based learning. In a PhD project, a video-based SG was developed to teach nursing students nursing care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in home health care and hospital settings. The current article summarizes the process of the SG development and evaluation. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(1), 15-19.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  5. Nursing education: in pursuit of cosmopolitanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit dit Dariel, Odessa

    2009-07-01

    Changing demographics, globalization, and an increasingly complex health care system demands progressive approaches to reaching our goals of competent transcultural care. Despite original contributions made by pioneers in cultural appreciation, nursing curricula are still falling short in addressing these issues in both education and practice. Many nurses enter their fields with little knowledge of the societal injustices and educational inequities that haunt the populations they care for. A cosmopolitan approach to nursing education is proposed to assist students in recognizing the complexity and uniqueness of individual experiences, rather than merely attempting to place them into categories based on gender, culture, race, or age. Being a global citizen and a cosmopolitan nurse requires participation in, and valuing of, the common good of society as a whole. Practicing the profession outside of comfort zones can lead to an appreciation for how all our choices are part of a complex global network. Nursing education should be responsible for developing in students the deepest knowledge base as well as the highest degree of critical independence. Cosmopolitan nurses could be the model for 21st century practitioners and future nurse leaders.

  6. Conceptual Elaboration Sequencing: An External Validation Study in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderman, Kathy T.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education is a knowledge domain that requires higher order thinking (critical thinking) for making decisions that impact outcomes of human health. The goal of nursing education is to develop novice experts in nursing knowledge and clinical practice. In order to achieve this goal, nursing education must employ instructional approaches that…

  7. Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Dolce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of Americans have unmet oral healthcare needs and profound oral health disparities persist in vulnerable and underserved populations, especially poor children, older adults, and racial and ethnic minorities. Nurses can play a significant role in improving the quality of oral health including access to care with appropriate education and training. The purpose of this paper is to describe New York University College of Nursing’s response to this challenge. The Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice (OHNEP program is a national initiative aimed at preparing a nursing workforce with the competencies to prioritize oral disease prevention and health promotion, provide evidence-based oral healthcare in a variety of practice settings, and collaborate in interprofessional teams across the healthcare system. The overarching goal of this national initiative is to create an educational infrastructure for the nursing profession that advances nursing’s contribution to reducing oral health disparities across the lifespan.

  8. Postcolonial nursing education in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezekiah, J

    1990-01-01

    In this article the impact of the developed nations on basic nursing education in Trinidad and Tobago in the postcolonial period is discussed and analyzed. Subsequent to self-government in 1956, the national government, in its efforts to become independent of its reliance on Great Britain, turned to the United States and Canada for technical and financial aid. Consequently, sources such as the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, and the Canadian International Development Agency were major avenues for the provision of ideas, concepts, and values in health planning and policy making with primary health care endorsed by the government. Nursing education was thus influenced by these industrialized concepts and values. The impact of socioeconomic and nursing events in the Caribbean region coupled with local initiatives taken by the indigenous leadership to improve nursing education resulted in a program that was an amalgamation of British, North American, and indigenous features.

  9. Caring as an imperative for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Patricia R; Cullen, Janice A

    2003-01-01

    Caring is a universal need that is an important component in the delivery of nursing care. Nurse educators face the challenge of teaching the value of caring as a necessary part of nursing. Watson's theoretical framework, which focuses on interpersonal and transpersonal processes in human care, presents an effective model in understanding the concept of caring (1). Krathwohl, Bloom, and Masia's model of affective domain provides a taxonomy of affective competencies that guides the process of value development (2). Both models enhance our understanding of caring and provide the theoretical foundation for integrating caring into nursing education. This article describes an associate degree program's effort to thread the concept of caring across its curriculum. It includes an overview of the steps used for integrating caring in individual clinical courses and emphasizes teaching/learning and assessment strategies used in the educational process.

  10. Rural nursing education: a photovoice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipert, Beverly; Anderson, Emma

    2012-01-01

    For many rural Canadians nursing care is the primary and often the sole access point to health care. As such, rural nurses are an invaluable resource to the health and wellbeing of rural populations. However, due to a nursing workforce that is aging and retiring, limited resources and support, healthcare reform issues, and other factors, these rural professionals are in short supply. Because of limited opportunities to learn about rural practice settings, nursing students may be reluctant to select rural practice locations. Relevant and effective educational initiatives are needed to attract nursing students to underserved rural and remote communities so that rural people receive the health care they require. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of the innovative research approach called photovoice as an educational strategy to foster learning about and interest in rural locations and rural nursing as future practice settings. Fostering of interest in rural may help to address nursing workforce shortages in rural settings. Thirty-eight third and fourth year nursing and health sciences students enrolled in an elective 'Rural Nursing' course used the qualitative research method photovoice to take photographs that represented challenges and facilitators of rural nursing practice. They then engaged in written reflection about their photos. Photos were to be taken in rural settings of their choice, thus fostering both urban and rural student exposure to diverse rural communities. One hundred forty-four photos and reflections were submitted, representing students' appreciation of diverse facilitators and challenges to rural nursing practice. Facilitators included technology, a generalist role, strong sense of community, and slower pace of life. Challenges included inadequate rural education in undergraduate nursing programs, professional isolation, safety issues, few opportunities for professional development, lack of anonymity, and insider/outsider status

  11. Educating advanced practice nurses in using social media in rural health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Carolyn M; Renaud, Michelle; Shepherd, Laurel; Bordelon, Michele; Haney, Tina; Gregory, Donna; Ayers, Paula

    2011-10-03

    Health care in the United States is facing a crisis in providing access to quality care for those in underserved and rural regions. Advanced practice nurses are at the forefront of addressing such issues, through modalities such as health care technology. Many nursing education programs are seeking strategies for better educating students on technology utilization. Health care technology includes electronic health records, telemedicine, and clinical decision support systems. However, little focus has been placed on the role of social media in health care. This paper describes an educational workshop using standardized patients and hands-on experiences to introduce advanced practice nurses in a Doctor of Nursing Practice program to the role of social media in addressing issues inherent in the delivery of rural health care. The students explore innovative approaches for utilizing social media for patient and caregiver support as well as identify online resources that assist providers in a rural setting.

  12. Anti-racist innovation and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortis, J; Law, I G

    2005-04-01

    The focus on institutional racism within the Higher Education (HE) sector in the United Kingdom and nurse education, in particular, has so far been seriously lacking in investigation and scrutiny. The Race Relations (Amendment) Act (RRAA2000) has pushed institutional racism to the forefront of debates in public services, including both education and health services. This paper seeks to operationalise some key aspects of the debate over institutional racism and relates it to both these sectors. Based on empirical work funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England and Wales (HEFCE) Innovations Project, this paper offers nurse education a framework to not only comply with the legal requirement of 'promoting racial harmony' (RRAA 2000) and the expectations from nursing as enshrined in the Code of Professional Conduct (NMC, 2000. The Code of Professional Conduct: Protecting the Public Through Professional Standards. NMC, London), but goes further to consider some key questions for anti-racist interventions.

  13. Nursing Associated Medication Errors: Are Internationally Educated Nurses Different from U.S. Educated Nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J. Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors can be detrimental to patient safety and contribute to additional costs in healthcare. The United States has seen a steady increase in internationally-educated nurses (IENs entering the nursing workforce. The current study builds upon the existing research examining the relationship between IENs and medication errors by controlling for confounding factors and testing whether IENs were more likely to make multiple medication errors compared to USENs. This study was a quasi-case control study. The 2006 and 2010 medication error incident data from hospital risk management departments were used. The final sample was 1,773, representing 788 registered nurse in the case group and 985 registered nurses in the control group. Multivariable analyses were conducted to examine single medication error, multiple errors, and consequence of medication errors, in comparing the IENs to USENs. IENs tended to have multiple errors more often than USENs in 2006 (31.7% for IENs and 20.5% for USENs, p = 0.03, but these differences became marginally significant after combining both years of data and completing the multivariable models adjusting for covariates (Odds ratio = 1.38, p = 0.06. No significant differences in making a single error and medication error consequences were observed between IENs and USENs. Although no significant differences between IENs and USENs in having medication error incidents were observed, IENs might be more likely to have multiple medication error incidents in a year compared to USENs. Policies that encourage targeted orientation addressing implicit belief systems about the nursing role and explains patient safety expectations as well as procedures for medication administration may be beneficial for IENs. Supportive leadership that is culturally competent, ensures ongoing continuing education in pharmacology, and provides culturally appropriate incentives for self-reporting medication errors are important.

  14. Long-term outcomes of a remedial education program for doctors with clinical performance deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Steven; Takai, Nikita; Francis, Sidonie

    2014-01-01

    Medical regulatory authorities need reliable methods of assessing and remediating doctors where there are concerns over competence. There's a small but growing literature describing remediation programs and documenting their effectiveness. This article adds to that literature by describing a program associated with the Medical Council of New Zealand (MCNZ) and reporting outcomes for 24 consecutive doctors required to undergo remediation. Over the 18-month period covered in this study, 24 doctors were required by the MCNZ to enter remediation after a performance assessment. The data set used in this study was drawn from these 24 consecutive cases and included the nature of concerns, severity of concerns, results of remediation and outcome of a second assessment when such an assessment was ordered. Of 24 doctors who underwent initial assessment, 5 failed to engage with remediation and withdrew from clinical work. A 12-month education remediation program was completed by all remaining 19 doctors. Of these, 13 were considered to be practicing at an acceptable standard at the end of remediation on the basis of sequential supervisor reports. Six doctors were required to have a second performance assessment. Of these, only 1 was considered to be functioning at an acceptable standard. Concurrent health concerns were common among this cohort of doctors. Seventy-five percent of doctors who entered remedial education were considered to be practicing at an acceptable standard at the end of remediation. This accords well with international data. A small number of doctors appear to be unresponsive to remediation. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  15. A systematic review of the effectiveness of videoconference-based tele-education for medical and nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Jennifer; Brysiewicz, Petra; Mars, Maurice

    2012-04-01

    Rural nurses and doctors typically have little opportunity to further their education and training. Studies have shown high participant satisfaction with the use of educational technology, such as videoconferencing, for education. A review of effectiveness of videoconference-based tele-education for medical and nursing education was conducted. The aims of this study were to: (1) systematically review the literature and critique the research methods on studies addressing the review question: "How effective is videoconference-based education for the education of doctors and nurses?" (2) summarize the existing evidence on the effectiveness of videoconference education for medical and nursing staff; and (3) apply the findings to South Africa and other countries across the globe. Research citations from 1990 to 2011 from cumulative index of nursing and allied health literature, Medline, Pubmed, PsycInfo, EBSCOhost, SABINET, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Controlled Trial Registry, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, unpublished abstracts through NEXUS and Internet search engines (Google/Google scholar) were searched. Review methods included searching, sifting, abstraction, and quality assessment of relevant studies by two reviewers. Studies were evaluated for sample, design, intervention, threats to validity, and outcomes. No meta-analysis was conducted as the studies provided heterogeneous outcome data. Five studies were reviewed. Videoconference and face-to-face education is at least equivalent and one study reported an increase in knowledge and knowledge integration. Despite the methodological limitations and heterogeneity of the reviewed studies, there appears to be sufficient evidence of effectiveness to provide a rigorous Grade B evidence-based recommendation of moderate support. The use of videoconferencing for nursing and medical education should be encouraged along with guidelines for the use of videoconferencing. The

  16. Social networking policies in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Blake; Culley, Joan M; Hein, Laura C; Williams, Amber; Tavakoli, Abbas S

    2014-03-01

    Social networking use has increased exponentially in the past few years. A literature review related to social networking and nursing revealed a research gap between nursing practice and education. Although there was information available on the appropriate use of social networking sites, there was limited research on the use of social networking policies within nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify current use of social media by faculty and students and a need for policies within nursing education at one institution. A survey was developed and administered to nursing students (n = 273) and nursing faculty (n = 33). Inferential statistics included χ², Fisher exact test, t test, and General Linear Model. Cronbach's α was used to assess internal consistency of social media scales. The χ² result indicates that there were associations with the group and several social media items. t Test results indicate significant differences between student and faculty for average of policies are good (P = .0127), policies and discipline (P = .0315), and policy at the study school (P = .0013). General Linear Model analyses revealed significant differences for "friend" a patient with a bond, unprofessional posts, policy, and nursing with class level. Results showed that students and faculty supported the development of a social networking policy.

  17. Nurses's knowledge of heart failure education principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Collier, Susan; Sumodi, Veronica; Wilkinson, Sandra; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Vopat, Linda; Willis, Cindy; Bittel, Barb

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge of heart failure (HF) self-management education principles. The study was exploratory and descriptive and included a convenience sample. Research took place in a large midwestern health care system that included a university-based hospital, community hospitals, and home or palliative care. Subjects included 300 nurses who provide care to patients with HF. The outcome measures included overall and topic specific perceptions of basic information important to HF self-management. Topics included diet, fluids or weight, signs or symptoms of worsening condition, medications, and exercise. A 20-item, true or false written survey was administered between February 2000 and April 2000. Of the 300 nurses surveyed, 92% were registered nurses and 8% were licensed practical nurses; 38% worked in a large university-based hospital; 44% were employed at 5 community hospitals; and 18% worked in home or hospice-palliative care. Mean HF self-management knowledge score was 15.2 +/- 2.0. Registered nurses scored significantly higher than licensed practical nurses (15.3 vs 14.1; P =.004). Individual questions with overall scores 30% and time. Overall analysis of variance indicated differences by work experience. HF nurses (primary population) scored higher than critical-care, medical-surgical, or telemetry floor nurses (16.2 +/- 1.7; 15.1 +/- 1.8; and 14.7 +/- 2.0, respectively; P part of their daily job role.

  18. Reasons nurses participate in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A B

    1979-01-01

    The study was undertaken to identify dimensions, or motivational orientations that underlie reasons nurses participate in continuing education programs and to determine relationships between these orientations and the legal status of CE and selected demographic characteristics of participants. The sample included 843 nurses who participated in CE programs sponsored by colleges and universities with accredited baccalaureate schools of nursing. Two instruments were used for data collection: a 56-item checklist consisting of reasons for participation (Education Participation Scale) and a personal data sheet. Factor analysis of responses to the EPS indicated that seven motivational orientations underlay the nurses' reasons for participation: compliance with authority, improvement in social relations, improvement in social welfare skills, professional advancement, professional knowledge, relief from routine, and acquisition of credentials. Mean scores on each orientation for the entire sample ranged from 6.55 (professional knowledge) to 1.57 (improvement in social relations) on a 10-point scale. Analysis of variance to determine the relationship between motivational orientation scores and legal status of continuing nursing education revealed no differences among the three legal conditions studied---mandatory, proposed, and voluntary CE---except on the acquisition of credentials orientation. Scores on this orientation varied significantly (p less than .001), but only for respondents employed part-time; for these nurses mean scores were ranked mandatory, proposed, then voluntary. Study findings suggest that, for these nurses, the presence or threat of a mandatory CE law had little influence in motivating participation. Rather, these nurses participated in continuing nursing education programs for reasons related to maintaining professional currency and improving their ability to serve the public.

  19. Educational Plans in Nursing Departments The Current State of Nurse Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Yukio; Murata, Atsuo; Kitaoka, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    With the recent diversification of career paths in nursing, the establishment of a career development plan (CDP) system for nurses is becoming more important for improving the quality of nursing. The present study, conducted on chief nurses in general hospitals in Japan, aimed to ascertain how nursing education fosters the individual career development of nurses. As a result, We understood the next matter. 1) Training for mid-level nurses is provided by most hospitals, primarily in the form o...

  20. What am I going to say here? The experiences of doctors and nurses communicating with patients in a cancer unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret eMcLean

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study investigating the provider-patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus group discussions. Interpretative Phenomenological analysis (IPA was used to underpin data collection and analysis. Twenty-six staff participated in the project (18 nurses and 8 doctors. Both professional groups identified an inherent emotional strain in their daily interactions with patients. The strategies they adopted to reduce this strain fell into two main categories: 1 Handling or managing the patient to keep negative emotion at bay; and 2 Managing self to keep negative emotion at bay. These strategies allowed staff to maintain a sense of control in an emotionally-stressful environment. Most believed that their communication skills were sufficient. In conclusion, communicating with and caring for cancer patients causes considerable psycho-social burden for doctors and nurses. Managing this burden influences their communication with patients. Without recognition of the need for staff to protect their own emotional well-being, communication skills training programmes, emphasised in current UK cancer care guidelines, may have little impact on practice.

  1. Health information wanted and obtained from doctors/nurses: a comparison of Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bo; Su, Zhaohui; Liu, Yihao; Wang, Mo; Zhang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    To assess and compare health information wanted and obtained from doctors/nurses by Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers. (1) What are the instrument's psychometrics in Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers? (2) How might Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers differ in the amount of different types of health information they want to have? and (3) How might Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers differ in the amount of different types of information they were able to obtain from doctors/nurses? This was a cross-sectional study using a paper-pen questionnaire. A total of 198 participants (79 cancer patients; 119 family caregivers) from a general hospital in Sichuan, China completed the instrument in March 2014. The instrument has excellent reliability and validity. Participants wanted to have a wide range of health information, including but not limited to information about diagnosis or treatment. Across all types of information, participants obtained from doctors/nurses significantly less than what they wanted. The discrepancy between information wanted and obtained varied across different types of information. The discrepancy was largest for information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and psychosocial aspects and smallest for information about diagnosis and self-care. Patients and caregivers did not differ in the amount of different types of information they wanted or obtained from medical professionals. There is a great need for providing more information to both patients and their families, particularly information about CAM and psychosocial aspects.

  2. Does ageism still exist in nurse education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide demographic changes mean that older people represent a significant group of patients for nurses everywhere. Ageism is increasingly recognised as an issue among healthcare professionals and evidence suggests that problems with quality of care remain. Nursing curricula have to address the needs of an ageing population in a variety of settings, reflect the importance of therapeutic care and explore nursing students' attitudes, in order to provide them with the appropriate skills to meet the needs of older people. This article debates the main factors influencing gerontological content in nursing curricula and suggests that ageism is still evident in nurse education. A variety of strategies are identified to assist in developing appropriate curriculum content.

  3. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  4. The Importance of Simulation in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyikara, Evrim; Baykara, Zehra Gocmen

    2017-01-01

    Nursing education involves a practice-oriented curriculum in which emphasis is placed on both theoretical knowledge and psychomotor skills. In skill-based education, where learning through practice occupies a central role, it is important to ensure the integration of theoretical knowledge into practice. In this context, simulations represent an…

  5. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  6. Plagiarism in nursing education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Joan; Everett, Bronwyn; Ramjan, Lucie M; Callins, Renee; Glew, Paul; Salamonson, Yenna

    2017-10-01

    To identify the prevalence and antecedents of plagiarism within nursing education and approaches to prevention and management. There has been growing media attention highlighting the prevalence of plagiarism in universities, including the academic integrity of undergraduate nursing students. A breach of academic integrity among nursing students also raises further concern with the potential transfer of this dishonest behaviour to the clinical setting. Integrative review. A systematic search of five electronic databases including CINAHL, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source, and ERIC was undertaken. Only primary studies related to plagiarism and nursing students (undergraduate or postgraduate) studying at a tertiary education institution or nursing faculty were included. Both qualitative and quantitative study designs were included. Twenty studies were included in this review with six key themes identified: (1) prevalence; (2) knowledge, understanding and attitudes; (3) types of plagiarism; (4) antecedents to plagiarism; (5) interventions to reduce or prevent plagiarism; and (6) the relationship between academic honesty and professional integrity. Plagiarism is common among university nursing students, with a difference in perception of this behaviour between students and academics. The review also highlighted the importance of distinguishing between inadvertent and deliberate plagiarism, with differing strategies suggested to address this behaviour. Nevertheless, interventions to reduce plagiarism have not been shown to be effective. The current punitive approach to plagiarism within nursing faculties has not reduced its occurrence. There is a need to promote awareness, knowledge and provide students with the appropriate referencing skills, to reduce the significant amount of inadvertent plagiarism. The importance of promoting honesty and academic integrity in nursing education is highlighted. Cheating within the academic setting has been

  7. Learner-centered characteristics of nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Annette G; Pokorny, Marie; Clay, Maria C; Brown, Sylvia; Steele, Linda L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the learner-centered teaching characteristics of nurse faculty who report using contemporary pedagogy. A secondary analysis of data collected by an international survey of nurse educators regarding pedagogical teaching approaches and strategies was used to answer the research questions. The study sought to: 1) describe characteristics emerging from faculty response, 2) make inferences from faculty responses regarding meaning, and 3) make inferences regarding the importance of the meaning to nursing. A qualitative research design was used to address the research question. Themes that emerged were placed under the concepts of power, role of teacher, responsibility of learner, and philosophy of evaluation guided by Weimer's (2002) conceptual framework of a learner-centered philosophy of teaching. Themes and meaning units derived from the study helped to generate textual and structure statements that represent the characterizations of learner-centered nurse educators.

  8. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls...... in the clinical practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. The purpose of this paper is to show and discuss how it is possible methodologically to do ethnographic research in clinical education and how the field of clinical nursing education in the hospital wards might...... be improved after insights obtained through ethnographic research. Methods: Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon...

  9. The Use of Phenomenology in Nursing Education: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derico, Sherika P

    The purpose of this integrative review was to synthesize research to address two questions about phenomenology in nursing education: How has Husserlian phenomenology been used in nursing education? What is the importance of Husserlian phenomenology in nursing education? Phenomenology is utilized in nursing education to explore the experiences of faculty and students. Whittemore and Knafl's integrative method guided the analysis of the research. Nine articles meeting inclusion criteria were reviewed. Studies addressed faculty student experiences. The reviewed research revealed that phenomenology is used in nursing education to understand, identify, describe, and explore various phenomena. New knowledge gained from this integrative review about phenomenology is beneficial to nursing education.

  10. Motivational Orientations: Evaluation of the Education Participation Scale in a Nontraditional Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garst, William C.; Ried, L. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated the Education Participation Scale (EPS) in determining motivational orientations of nontraditional doctor of pharmacy students (n=17) compared to continuing education pharmacists (n=83). Nontraditional pharmacy students were significantly different from the continuing education pharmacists on the "professional advancement" and…

  11. Voice Simulation in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Britney B; Lee, Heeyoung; Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to improve prelicensure nursing students' attitudes toward and self-efficacy related to delivering nursing care to patients with auditory hallucinations. Based on the Hearing Voices That Are Distressing curriculum, 87 participants were instructed to complete 3 tasks while wearing headphones delivering distressing voices. Comparing presimulation and postsimulation results, this study suggests that the simulation significantly improved attitudes toward patients with auditory hallucinations; however, self-efficacy related to caring for these patients remained largely unchanged.

  12. Effective education in radiation safety for nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, K.; Kaori, T.

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish an efficient training program of radiation safety for nurses, studies have been carried out on the basis of questionnaires. Collaboration of nurses, who are usually standing closest to the patient, is necessary in order to offer safe radiological diagnostics/treatment. The authors distributed the questionnaire to 134 nurses in five polyclinic hospitals in Japan. Important questions were: fear of radiation exposure, knowledge on the radiation treatment, understanding the impact on pregnancy, and so on. Most of the nurses feel themselves uneasy against exposure to radiation. They do not have enough knowledge of radiological treatment. They do not know exactly what is the impact of the radiation on pregnant women. Such tendency is more pronounced, when nurses spend less time working in the radiological department. Nurses play important roles in radiological diagnostics/treatment. Therefore, a well-developed education system for radiation safety is essential. The training for the radiation safety in medicine should be done in the context of general safety in medicine. Education programs in undergraduate school and at the working place should be coordinated efficiently in order to ensure that both nurses and patients are informed about the meaning of radiation safety. (authors)

  13. The Pedagogic-Educational Aspect of Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Žnidarec Žagar

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author demonstrates that adult education in the field of health care can make a great contribution to the general health of the Slovene population. This function is currently performed by nurses who advise patients as to what to do during illness and how to do it. Naturally, nurses must be appropriately qualified to provide such advice. They need expertise and communication skills as well as the ability to empathise with patients. The traditional role of a nurse is not sufficient; they must also act as counsellors. In any case, this function already exists in many health care institutions in Slovenia.

  14. Utilizing Team Debate to Increase Student Abilities for Mentoring and Critical Appraisal of Global Health Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Naomi; Farnum, Karen; Beauchesne, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although graduates of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs are expected to demonstrate competence in advanced clinical scholarship, mentoring, and leadership, little is published about how team debate on a global health care topic supports DNP student learning and skill development. This article reports on an illuminative evaluation of DNP student learning experiences of team debate in the context of a 2-week international school program in Ireland. A focused illuminative evaluation approach involving a cohort of seven DNP students, who had participated in an international school team debate, was used. Data were collected using a Web-based qualitative questionnaire designed to elicit in-depth reflective accounts of DNP students' learning experiences. Content analysis revealed that team debate on a global health care topic enhanced learning in relation to fostering critical thinking and critical appraisal skills; encouraging teamwork; providing opportunities for mentoring, relationship building, and socialization into profession; and, from the DNP student perspective, increasing knowledge and global understanding of health care. This evaluation provides insights for nurse educators into the benefits of introducing team debate as a group activity to enhancing scholarly inquiry and mentoring skills of DNP students. Further research to evaluate team debate in other nurse education programs is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of nursing education and job characteristics on nurse's perceptions of their family nursing practice skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Sigurdardottir, Anna Olafia; Konradsdottir, Elisabet; Tryggvadottir, Gudny Bergthora

    2018-04-25

    Implementing family system nursing in clinical settings is on the rise. However, little is known about the impact of graduate school education as well as continuing education in family systems nursing (FSN) on nurses' perceptions of their family nursing practice. To evaluate the level of nursing education, having taken a continuing hospital educational course in family system nursing (FN-ETI programme), and the impact of job characteristics on nurses' perceptions of their family nursing practice skills. Participants were 436 nurses with either a BSc degree or graduate degree in nursing. The Job Demand, Control and Support model guided the study (R. Karasek and T. Theorell, 1992, Healthy Work: Stress, Productivity, and the Reconstruction of Working Life, Basic Books, New York, NY). Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorise participants into four job types: high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control) and active (high demand, high control). Nurses with a graduate education who had taken the FN-ETI programme scored significantly higher on the Family Nursing Practice Scale than nurses with an undergraduate education. Nurses who were characterised as low strain or active scored significantly higher on the Family Nursing Practice Scale than the nurses who were characterised as high strain. Further, the interaction of education by job type was significant regarding family nursing practice skills. Hierarchical regression revealed 25% of the variance in family nursing practice skills was explained by job control, family policy on the unit, graduate education and employment on the following divisions: Maternal-Child, Emergency, Mental Health or Internal Medicine. Graduate education plus continuing education in FSN can offer nurses increased job opportunities more control over one's work as well as increased skills working with families in clinical settings.

  16. From practice to education: perspectives from three nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Denise; Schaubhut, Rose M; Jones, John R

    2010-02-01

    Three nurse leaders recount their experiences transitioning from a practice career to an academic career. These nurse leaders discuss their experiences with role transition and gaining new competencies, comparing and contrasting the competencies of nurse educators and nurse leaders. Specific examples are presented addressing collaborative efforts between practice and education. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Long distance education for croatian nurses with open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenovic, Aleksandar; Kalauz, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Croatian Nursing Informatics Association (CNIA) has been established as result of continuing work on promoting nursing informatics in Croatia. Main goals of CNIA are promoting nursing informatics and education of nurses about nursing informatics and using information technology in nursing process. CNIA in start of work is developed three courses from nursing informatics all designed with support of long distance education with open source software. Courses are: A - 'From Data to Wisdom', B - 'Introduction to Nursing Informatics' and C - 'Nursing Informatics I'. Courses A and B are obligatory for C course. Technology used to implement these online courses is based on the open source Learning Management System (LMS), Claroline, free online collaborative learning platform. Courses are divided in two modules/days. First module/day participants have classical approach to education and second day with E-learning from home. These courses represent first courses from nursing informatics' and first long distance education for nurses also.

  18. The DNP/MPH Dual Degree: An Innovative Graduate Education Program for Advanced Public Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kathy; Harpin, Scott; Steinke, Geraldine; Stember, Marilyn; Krajicek, Marilyn

    2017-03-01

    Strong professional priorities, evolving Affordable Care Act requirements, and a significantly limited public health nursing workforce prompted the University of Colorado College of Nursing to collaborate with the School of Public Health to implement one of the first Doctor of Nursing Practice/Master of Public Health dual degree programs in the nation. Federal grant funding supported the development, implementation, and evaluation of this unique post-baccalaureate dual degree program, for which there were no roadmaps, models, or best practices to follow. Several key issues emerged that serve as lessons learned in creating a new, novel higher education pathway for Advanced Public Health Nursing. This paper highlights two of those: (1) marketing, admission, and matriculation across two programs, and (2) enhancing curricula through distance coursework and interprofessional education. When collaboration with a school of public health is possible, the Doctor of Nursing Practice/Master of Public Health dual degree is an efficient way to prepare public health nurses' with the highest level of public health knowledge, practice, and leadership expertise. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pediatric dentistry clinical education venues evaluation by pre and post-doctoral students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimstein, E; Mayes, A; Mittal, Hc

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dental students' perspectives about pre- and post-doctoral pediatric dentistry education venues. Surveys with visual analog scales (from 0 to 100) measuring the educational contribution of pediatric dentistry venues were conducted. The pre-doctoral venues included a 3rd year university twilight clinic (UTC), a 3rd year urban community based clinic (CBC) and 4th year mobile clinics (MCs). The post-doctoral venues included treatment of children under general anesthesia, oral sedations, a regular clinic (no sedations), seminars, journal club, case conferences and studding for the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Analyses of variance between the scores indicated that the 3rd year CBC score (68.2 ± 4.5) was statistically significant higher (p= .007) than the one for the 3rd year UTC score (44.9 ± 6.1). The 4th year students' MCs score (61.4 ± 4.0) was statistically significant higher than their retrospective scores for the 3rd year CBC (56.4 ± 4.4) or UTC (42.2 ± 4.9) scores (p= .03 and .004 respectively). Among the didactic or clinical post-doctoral venues, the regular clinic and the seminars received the highest scores (84.3 ± 1.7 and 71.6 ± 2.8 respectively). pre-doctoral community-based clinical education and post-doctoral regular university based clinic are considered by students to provide the main contribution to pediatric dental education.

  20. TRAINING COURSES AND PROFESSIONAL INTEGRATION OF DOCTORS IN EDUCATION: PATHS AND DESTINATION OF GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altair Alberto Fávero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the trajectories and institutional destinations of graduates of doctoral programs in Education from Brazilian public universities in the last twelve years (2000-2012. The research is characterized as Mixed Methods (CRESWELL and CLARK, 2013 and was developed from data available in the electronic site of the CAPES, referring to graduate programs and Lattes Platform. Of the 3,598 graduates surveyed, a small number represents researchers who went straight to masters and doctorate degrees shortly after undergraduate studies. Almost one-third of respondents obtained doctorate degrees in between 10 and 15 years after graduation. About 15% held a doctorate between 20 and 25 years after graduation. We found that less than 25% of respondents were master's degree students in 2013 and less than 10% have contributed to the training of young doctors. We believe that the development of this research, unprecedented on this scale in the area of education, can contribute to the evaluation of expansion conditions and qualification programs and courses. In addition to taking a look at the activities and the working arrangements of the young doctors in Education in Brazil and prepare analytical frameworks that can contribute to the proposition of strategic funding policies and the setting of teachers in disadvantaged regions. Keywords: Postgraduate studies. Education. Graduate student training. Employability.

  1. Telematic education: a reality in post-basic nursing education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continued education by means of a distant education method will serve as an academic solution to professional nurses in the rural areas of South Africa. Lecturers who teach by means of telematic education ... Geen instansie is immuun teen tegnologiese veranderinge nie. Die bekendstelling van satelliet en kabeltelevisie ...

  2. Nursing education development in China (1887-1949): influences on contemporary nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; Li, J An; McDonald, T

    2014-09-01

    On 8 May 2013, the Chinese Nursing Association joined the International Council of Nurses. It is hoped that by sharing the history of nursing in China, scholars globally can incorporate into current thinking the challenges that Chinese nurses have faced in pursuing educational development and professional acknowledgement. To review the history of nurse education in China between 1887 and 1949 and summarize events marking its development; and to provide historical references for considering contemporary nurse education and discipline development in China. Content analysis using bibliometric and historical research methods on available documentation sources. Milestone events were listed and their historical significance analysed. Nurse education development during this period was affected by three major influences: (1) international nursing collaboration and involvement with Chinese nursing in China and abroad, (2) the determination of leaders to develop nursing as a unique and ethical profession, and (3) the pressure of war and civilian need on the focus of nursing development in China. The development of nurse education in China occurred within an environment of social change, war and international collaboration. Throughout the Modern China period (1887-1949), nursing leadership has guided the growth of nurse education to be responsive to individual and community needs as well as ensuring nurse accountability for conduct and nursing practice. Contemporary Chinese nursing and education owes much to those throughout the Modern China period, who laid the foundations that support the current position and status of nursing. The study displays the benefits and challenges of participation in policy and forums that help nurse scholars and practitioners understand the development of nurse education in China. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  3. [New parenting education in maternal child nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jih-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    Taiwan society is today typified by low birth rates amongst Taiwanese and a rising number of children born to immigrant and trans-cultural marriage families. Unhealthy behavior and anxiety on the part of pregnant women increase postpartum depression and complications and negatively affect neonatal heath. Such may further negatively impact upon romantic feelings between the new parents and the nascent parent-child relationship. New parenting education is a proactive and innovative strategy that may be used to improve maternal and child health. Therefore, it is worthy to explore how best to achieve cost-effective education interventions. First, the importance of new parenting education and its influence factors must be understood. Factors of women's health and nursing responsibilities potentially addressed by new parenting education include pregnancy complications, fetal death and malformation, accidents and traumas during childhood and adolescence, childhood obesity, and pediatric health-care delivery systems. It is the responsibility of nursing professionals to collect and interpret information on health promotion, disease prevention and childcare in cooperation with other disciplines. Nurses are also responsible to participate in family education and services that target new parents. Therefore, nursing professionals participate in planning and intervention actions related to health promotion, develop support group and counseling centers, collect and organize relevant information, and develop family education and health promotion models. Achieving preventive health service goals while maintaining family competencies and empowerment is an essential aspect of the parenthood mission and vision.

  4. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFlore, Judy L; Thomas, Patricia E

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system.

  5. Consumer-directed health plans: do doctors and nurses buy in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lucinda B; Escarce, José J

    2017-03-01

    Aiming to increase healthcare value, consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs)-high-deductible health insurance plus a personal spending account-equip enrollees with decision-support tools and expose them to the financial implications of their medical decisions. This study examines whether medically knowledgeable consumers are more or less likely to select a CDHP than individuals without medical knowledge. Using University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) human resources data, our observational cross-sectional study analyzed the health plan enrollment choices of 3552 faculty and 8429 staff employees. We compared CDHP selection in 2 cohorts: 1) physicians and nonphysician faculty and 2) nurses and nonmedical staff. We used probit regression models to predict CDHP selection, adjusted for job title, demographics (ie, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, employee income), and coverage type (eg, single). Approximately 5% of UCLA employees chose the CDHP. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and coverage type, physicians were less likely to choose these plans than nonmedical faculty, when all other covariates were fixed at their means (predicted probability change [ΔP], -1.6%; standard error [SE], 0.8%; P = .05). Nurses also appeared less inclined to choose these plans than nonmedical staff, which approached statistical significance (ΔP, -1.9%; SE, 1.0%; P = .07). Overall low rates of CDHP selection were observed in consumers with and without medical knowledge. Although physicians and nurses seem to be better positioned as CDHP consumers, they appeared less likely to select these health plans compared with nonmedical faculty and staff in our study.

  6. Training doctors for primary care in China: Transformation of general practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donald

    2016-01-01

    China is known for developing a cadre of "Barefoot Doctors" to address her rural healthcare needs in past. The tradition of barefoot doctors has inspired similar developments in several other countries across world. Recently China has embarked upon an ambitious new mission to create a primary care workforce consisting of trained general practitioners having international standard skillsets. This editorial provides an insight into the current status of policy deliberations with regards to training of primary care doctors and a new surge in general practice education in China.

  7. A humanistic-educative approach to evaluation in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Dolly; Dietrich, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    A continuing challenge for nurse educators is to create a learning environment in which students receive fair and timely evaluations. Traditional or behavioural evaluation methods have been criticized as being too limited. A humanistic-educative evaluation method is offered with its emancipation of faculty and students and emphasis on collaboration, caring, creativity, critical thinking and self-assessment. A teacher-student shared home visit for a Family Nursing clinical assignment is provided to illustrate this approach. The potential benefit of the method for developing self-directed and competent professional nurses is proposed. Copyright 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Primary care education: medical student and young doctors' perspective from Brazil, India and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman; Nunes Barata, Ana; Floss, Mayara

    2016-09-01

    This opinion paper is a collaborative effort describing recent developments in primary care education in three different countries; representing diverse socioeconomic and political systems. The authors describe their respective perspectives from the point of student (Brazil), trainee (Portugal) and young doctor (India). The section on Brazil focuses on the response of the medical education system to the developments before and after political reforms, leading to creation of the Unified Health System. The Indian experience focuses on the challenges faced by recently qualified doctors and ongoing debates about the medical education system in a highly populated but rapidly growing economy. The Portuguese section presents an evolving primary care education system for family doctors and describes the detail of the training programme. Education in primary care is an ever-evolving process that needs to be adequate for each country's health care system. Reading and learning from other experiences may highlight education strategies that may be adopted by peers from other countries. Medical students, doctors in training and recently qualified doctors are the key stakeholders in this process.

  9. Narrative Pedagogy: Transforming Nursing Education Through 15 Years of Research in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela M

    This article provides a review of current disciplinary understanding of Narrative Pedagogy and describes the implications for ongoing transformation in nursing education. Narrative Pedagogy has been enacted and investigated by teachers around the world for more than 15 years. Few nursing educational innovations or pedagogies in nursing have been adopted in such an array of settings/levels. A review of the nursing literature was conducted to locate reports of research on and teaching innovations derived from Narrative Pedagogy. Narrative Pedagogy has an extensive and longitudinal body of research describing how the approach contributes to the educational transformation the discipline seeks. Narrative Pedagogy and the growing literature describing how it is enacted provides a way for teachers and students to persist in questioning their current understanding of nursing, the ways they think about the situations they encounter, and how their practice can best be learned.

  10. Bioethics education of nursing curriculum in Korea: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwisoon; Kang, Youngmi; Lee, Woon-Yong

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the current profile of bioethics education in the nursing curriculum as perceived by nursing students and faculty in Korea. A convenience sampling method was used for recruiting 1223 undergraduate nursing students and 140 nursing faculty in Korea. Experience of Bioethics Education, Quality of Bioethics Education, and Demand for Bioethics Education Scales were developed. The Experience of Bioethics Education Scale showed that the nursing curriculum in Korea does not provide adequate bioethics education. The Quality of Bioethics Education Scale revealed that the topics of human nature and human rights were relatively well taught compared to other topics. The Demand for Bioethics Education Scale determined that the majority of the participants believed that bioethics education should be a major requirement in the nursing curriculum. The findings of this study suggest that bioethics should be systemically incorporated into nursing courses, clinical practice during the program, and during continuing education.

  11. Diagnóstico educativo sobre adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral en médicos y enfermeras de la atención primaria de salud Educative diagnosis on adherence to antiretroviral treatment in doctors and nurses in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gloria Romero González

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la deficiente adherencia a los tratamientos antirretrovirales, se ha convertido en un problema de salud de gran importancia, por lo que es necesario promover una correcta relación terapéutica, entre el profesional de la salud, y la persona con VIH/sida. Objetivos: identificar el nivel de conocimientos relacionados con la adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral, las principales prácticas profesionales que se realizan, y la percepción de capacitación que tienen los médicos y enfermeras del municipio Camagüey, en el periodo de septiembre de 2006 a junio de 2007. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, la población estuvo constituida por 150 enfermeras y 90 médicos. La muestra quedó conformada por 100 enfermeras y 65 médicos de la atención primaria de salud, que atendían en los consultorios, a las personas con VIH/sida. Resultados: los médicos y las enfermeras muestran escasos conocimientos en algunos elementos esenciales, relacionados con la adherencia a los tratamientos de larga duración, y la repercusión que tienen en la calidad de vida de las personas con VIH/sida. Existen dificultades en algunas prácticas profesionales, llevadas a cabo con los pacientes. Hubo insuficiente percepción de capacitación relacionada con el tema, para promover la adherencia en los pacientes. Conclusiones: los conocimientos que poseen los médicos y enfermeras de la familia, son insuficientes para abordar con calidad, la atención a las personas con VIH/sida, que se acogen al sistema de atención ambulatorio.Introduction: poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has become an important health issue, so it is necessary to promote proper therapeutic relationship between health professional and the persons with HIV/AIDS. Objectives: to identify the level of knowledge related to the antiretroviral therapy adherence, the major professional practices performed and the training perception of doctors and nurses

  12. Impact (s) of Doctoral Degrees Held by Faculty Members in Portuguese Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão, João Carlos Pereira Mira

    2013-01-01

    In order to verify the impact(s) of doctoral programs processes of faculty members in higher education in Portugal. we applied a questionnaire survey to the completed PhD of teachers. This study is based on a questionnaire survey to the doctoral degrees of faculty members in Portuguese higher education, completed between 2007 and 2012, the survey was held between April 16 and May 6, 2012, to all teachers in Portuguese higher education having quickly reached 1001 answers that we briefly analyz...

  13. Preparing nursing students for education in the global village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Fulmer, Holly; Meedzan, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Educating nurses for the 21st century requires a broad understanding of the health needs of local and global communities. With an increasingly diverse population, nursing students in the United States can gain a unique perspective on health disparities and challenges in providing healthcare for diverse populations. Nursing education has the opportunity to engage students in our global village by providing clinical and theory-based educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Some nursing educational settings in schools of nursing provide global nursing opportunities to explore the social responsibility of nursing. This paper details a specific framework and opportunities for engaging undergraduate and graduate nursing students in caring for the underserved in our global village. Opportunities in the Fulbright Student Exchange Program and Fulbright Senior Scholar Award mechanisms are discussed, and partnerships with international nursing programs are explored.

  14. Teaching the ESL Nursing Student: The Relationship between Nurse Educator Background Attributes, Beliefs Concerning the ESL Nursing Student and Instructional Strategies Used by Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bonnie L.

    2012-01-01

    As the U.S. population quickly moves toward linguistic diversity, it is essential that sufficient numbers of linguistically diverse nurses be available to provide care, and nurse educators play a significant role in the preparation of these nurses. Little information was found in the literature about factors that influence the practices of the…

  15. Cross border mobility of nurse educators: Case studies from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to raise awareness on cross border mobility of nurse educators and draw on Foucault's analysis to conceptualise the means by which cross border migration of nurse educators could be revisited. A case study design of seven nurse educators who had migrated and came back to their countries ...

  16. Does classroom-based crew resource management training have an effect on attitudes between doctors and nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christina K W; So, Hang-kwong; Ng, Wing-yiu; Chan, Pei-kei; Ma, Wai-ling; Chan, Kin-ling; Leung, Siu-ha; Ho, Lap-yin

    2016-04-09

    To evaluate participant reactions and attitudes to crew resource management teamwork classroom-based training by comparing Likert responses before and after the intervention and exploring potential differences in attitudes across the different healthcare professionals. Between 26 January and 27 March, 2015, a randomly selected sample of 240 frontline healthcare professionals offering direct patient care were recruited to undergo a 4-hour crew resource management classroom-based training programme. Participants were asked to complete a 22-item human factors attitude survey before and after training and a 10-item end-of-programme evaluation. Paired samples t-test was used to assess differences between the participants' pretest and posttest scores on each item. A total of 167 (70%) from 17 different specialties underwent the training and 164 (68.3%) completed (139 nurses, 25 doctors) the survey. The nurses were of similar age to the doctors (38.2 vs 36.9, p=0.83) and were more likely to be women (75.6% vs 24.6%, p management classroom-based training programme appeared to have a positive effect on frontline healthcare professionals' attitudes. The implementation of such programme is feasible and acceptable, especially for nurses, in a public hospital setting in Hong Kong.

  17. Educational Leaders' Doctoral Research That Informed Strategies to Steer Their Organizations towards Cultural Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This research generates new knowledge about how 24 educational leaders in the USA and England used their doctoral research to build narrative capital to inform strategies to steer their organizations towards cultural alignment. Cultural alignment prevents forms of segregation rooted in nation-states' wider historiography of education segregation…

  18. A View from within: How Doctoral Students in Educational Administration Develop Research Knowledge and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Militello, Matthew; Piert, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on experiences of doctoral students in educational administration at a time when the effectiveness of programs preparing practitioners and academics in this field are being questioned. Concerns related to how students in educational administration developed knowledge about research and identity as researchers were closely…

  19. Experiential Workshop with Educational Leadership Doctoral Students: Managing Affective Reactions to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Leigh; Jara, Teresa; Sever, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Managing change processes, resistance to change, and organizational members' emotional reactions to change are crucial skills for future educational leaders to learn. Our case study is based on a workshop conducted using two experiential exercises to facilitate current educational leadership doctoral students' reflections on their own reactions to…

  20. The Perspectives of Two First-Generation College Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Martina; McCall, Joyce M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this autoethnographic multiple case study was to compare experiences of two first-generation college students pursuing doctoral degrees in music education. Motivations for pursuing an advanced degree were to enact change in the field of music education and fulfill personal ambitions. Participants encountered two challenges,…

  1. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  2. The situation of nursing education in Latin America and the Caribbean towards universal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Wilson, Lynda Law; Mikael, Sabrina de Souza Elias; Peña, Laura Morán; Grajales, Rosa Amarilis Zarate; McCreary, Linda L.; Theus, Lisa; Agudelo, Maria del Carmen Gutierrez; Felix, Adriana da Silva; de Uriza, Jacqueline Molina; Gutierrez, Nathaly Rozo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: to assess the situation of nursing education and to analyze the extent to which baccalaureate level nursing education programs in Latin America and the Caribbean are preparing graduates to contribute to the achievement of Universal Health. Method: quantitative, descriptive/exploratory, cross-sectional study carried out in 25 countries. Results: a total of 246 nursing schools participated in the study. Faculty with doctoral level degrees totaled 31.3%, without Brazil this is reduced to 8.3%. The ratio of clinical experiences in primary health care services to hospital-based services was 0.63, indicating that students receive more clinical experiences in hospital settings. The results suggested a need for improvement in internet access; information technology; accessibility for the disabled; program, faculty and student evaluation; and teaching/learning methods. Conclusion: there is heterogeneity in nursing education in Latin America and the Caribbean. The nursing curricula generally includes the principles and values of Universal Health and primary health care, as well as those principles underpinning transformative education modalities such as critical and complex thinking development, problem-solving, evidence-based clinical decision-making, and lifelong learning. However, there is a need to promote a paradigm shift in nursing education to include more training in primary health care. PMID:28513769

  3. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via ...

  4. [The application of creative thinking teaching in nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Chang, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Sheu, Sheila

    2010-04-01

    Nursing education is increasingly expected to cultivate nursing student creative abilities in line with general Ministry of Education promotion of greater creativity within education and the greater leeway for creativity won domestically for nurses by professional nursing organizations. Creative thinking has been named by education experts in the United States as the third most important goal of nursing education. However, nursing students in Taiwan have been shown to test lower in terms of creativity than students enrolled in business management. Leaders in nursing education should consider methods by which to improve the creative thinking capabilities of nursing students. Articles in the literature indicate that courses in creative studies are concentrated in the field of education, with few designed specifically for nursing. The teaching of constructing creative thinking is particularly weak in the nursing field. The purpose of this article was to review literature on education and nursing in order to explore current definitions, teaching strategies, and evaluation approaches related to creativity, and to develop a foundation for teaching creativity in nursing. The authors hope that an appropriate creative thinking course for nursing students may be constructed by referencing guidance provided in this in order to further cultivate creative thinking abilities in nursing students that will facilitate their application of creative thinking in their future clinical practicum.

  5. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekoe, Eunice

    2014-04-24

    South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997). The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis) in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied.  The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro) based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation.  The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  6. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Seekoe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997. The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Objectives: To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Method: A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied. Results: The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation. Conclusion: The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  7. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION IN NURSING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. B. Costa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies in education, transforms not only the way we communicate, but also work, decide and think, as well as allows you to create rich, complex and diversified learning situations, through sharing the tasks between teachers and students , providing an interactive, continuous and lifelong learning. The paper aims to reflect on the importance of the use of information and communication technologies in higher education and show the potential in promoting changes and challenges for teachers of undergraduate nursing course. This is a literary review concerning the issue at hand, in the period from February to March 2014. The result indicates that the resources of information and communication technologies are strategies for the education of future nurses and promote the changing process for teachers , providing quality education to students and understanding that we must seek new opportunities to build a new style of training.

  8. Arts Analysis in the Danish Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines ideas and results of a design-for-learning experiment, involving arts analysis in the nurse education in Denmark. The original purpose of the experiment was to investigate new ways of supporting personal knowledge building and building of professional judgement skills...

  9. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Student Incivility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Myrna Milwee

    2011-01-01

    Incivility is currently a topic of concern in nursing and higher education. There is a serious and growing concern on college campuses across the United States as many forms of incivility are occurring, ranging from offensive language and rude behavior to hostility and violent behavior. The problem this study addresses is the need for specific…

  10. The past, present and future of nursing education in the People's Republic of China: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ling-Ling; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Cheng, Bing-Shu

    2012-06-01

      This article presents a discussion of nursing education development in the People's Republic of China in its historical, economic and sociopolitical contexts.   China has a population of 1·3 billion with about 2·18 million nurses. With the recent surging economic and social development in China, nursing education has undergone transformation changes in the past two decades.   Online bibliographical databases from 1990 to 2010 were searched including CINAHL, MEDLINE, Wan Fang Data and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Search terms included nursing education, China and development.   Thematic analysis and narrative synthesis were used to identify and report themes from literature.   Database searches yielded 1674 papers, and 34 met the inclusion criteria for review. The standard of nursing education varies greatly in different parts of China, because of its huge size and population, with pre-registration programmes offered at the secondary, associate degree and baccalaureate level. Multi-level nursing education is one of the major barriers for professional development. There is a need to upgrade the pre-registration education to at least associate degree level. There is also a need to enhance graduate nursing education at master and doctoral level to prepare advanced practice nurses, nurse scientists and nursing faculty. conclusion:  The challenges for nursing education development in China are echoed and encountered in many parts of the world. The experience in China and the lessons learned would be relevant to developing countries. Nursing in China must continue to develop in parallel to international trends. Promoting communication and maintaining international links are important for the global development of nursing practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. NISE (Nursing Inservice Education Group)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clubine, Marilyn; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the Toronto Inservice Education Group became to meet regularly in order to provide an opportunity to assist and guide those responsible for formulating and carrying out inservice education. Article outlines their objectives. (Author/RK)

  12. Palliative care for older people - exploring the views of doctors and nurses from different fields in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, Torben; Schumacher, Martin; Schneider, Nils

    2009-06-23

    Providing appropriate palliative care for older people is a major task for health care systems worldwide, and up to now it has also been one of the most neglected. Focusing on the German health care system, we sought to explore the attitudes of health professionals regarding their understanding of palliative care for older patients and its implementation. In a qualitative study design, focus groups were established consisting of general practitioners, geriatricians, palliative care physicians, palliative care nurses and general nurses (a total of 29 participants). The group discussions were recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed using the methodological approach of Qualitative Description. Deficiencies in teamwork and conflicting role definitions between doctors and nurses and between family practitioners and medical specialists were found to be central problems affecting the provision of appropriate palliative care for older people. It was emphasized that there are great advantages to family doctors playing a leading role, as they usually have the longest contacts to the patients. However, the professional qualifications of family doctors were to some extent criticized. The general practitioners for their part criticized the increasing specialization on the field of palliative care. All groups complained that the German compensation system gives insufficient consideration to the time-consuming care of older patients, and about excessive bureaucracy. General practitioners are the central health professionals in the delivery of palliative care for older people. They should however be encouraged to involve specialized services such as palliative care teams where necessary. With the German health care reform of 2007, a legal framework has been created that allows for this. As far as its realization is concerned, it must be ensured that the spotlight remains on the needs of the patients and not on policy conflicts and rivalries between health care professionals

  13. Palliative care for older people – exploring the views of doctors and nurses from different fields in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Nils

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing appropriate palliative care for older people is a major task for health care systems worldwide, and up to now it has also been one of the most neglected. Focusing on the German health care system, we sought to explore the attitudes of health professionals regarding their understanding of palliative care for older patients and its implementation. Methods In a qualitative study design, focus groups were established consisting of general practitioners, geriatricians, palliative care physicians, palliative care nurses and general nurses (a total of 29 participants. The group discussions were recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed using the methodological approach of Qualitative Description. Results Deficiencies in teamwork and conflicting role definitions between doctors and nurses and between family practitioners and medical specialists were found to be central problems affecting the provision of appropriate palliative care for older people. It was emphasized that there are great advantages to family doctors playing a leading role, as they usually have the longest contacts to the patients. However, the professional qualifications of family doctors were to some extent criticized. The general practitioners for their part criticized the increasing specialization on the field of palliative care. All groups complained that the German compensation system gives insufficient consideration to the time-consuming care of older patients, and about excessive bureaucracy. Conclusion General practitioners are the central health professionals in the delivery of palliative care for older people. They should however be encouraged to involve specialized services such as palliative care teams where necessary. With the German health care reform of 2007, a legal framework has been created that allows for this. As far as its realization is concerned, it must be ensured that the spotlight remains on the needs of the patients and not on

  14. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception of Postmortem Examination Among Doctors and Nurses in a Tertiary Hospital of Sokoto, Nigeria

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    A U Kaoje

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmortem examination is a highly specialized surgical procedure that consists of a thorough examination of a corpse to determine the cause and manner of death and to evaluate any disease or injury that may be present. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and perception of postmortem examination among doctors and nurses in a tertiary health care of Sokoto state. A cross-sectional study design was used, and a total of 149 doctors and nurses participated in the study. Respondents were recruited into the study using probability proportionate to size followed by a simple random sampling method. Data were obtained through self-administered questionnaires, and the data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 17.0. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, and multinomial logistic regression analysis were carried out. The mean age of respondents was 31.6 (5.6 years. There were more nurses than doctors (60.4% vs. 39.6% in the study. More than three-quarter (80% of the respondents had fair to good knowledge of postmortem examination. While many respondents expressed positive attitudes and perceptions, less than half were willing to accept organs from deceased donors. Respondents' profession influenced both the knowledge (P > 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 13.95 and attitude (P < 0.04, OR = 2.49 to postmortem examination. Although greater than three-quarter of respondents had fair to good knowledge and many expressed positive attitudes and perceptions with respect to postmortem examination, there is need to create more awareness on medical benefit of postmortem examination.

  15. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  16. Exploring provision of Innovative Community Education Placements (ICEPs) for junior doctors in training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ann; Jones, Melvyn M; Khan, Nada; Park, Sophie; Rosenthal, Joe; Chrysikou, Vasiliki

    2016-02-09

    Medical education in community settings is an essential ingredient of doctors' training and a key factor in recruiting general practitioners (GP). Health Education England's report 'Broadening the Foundation' recommends foundation doctors complete 4-month community placements. While Foundation GP schemes exist; other community settings, are not yet used for postgraduate training. The objective of this study was to explore how community-based training of junior doctors might be expanded into possible 'innovative community education placements' (ICEPs), examining opportunities and barriers to these developments. A qualitative study where semistructured interviews were undertaken and themes were generated deductively from the research questions, and iteratively from transcripts. UK community healthcare. Stakeholders from UK Community healthcare providers and undergraduate GP and community educators. Nine participants were interviewed; those experienced in delivering community-based undergraduate education, and others working in community settings that had not previously trained doctors. Themes identified were practicalities such as 'finance and governance', 'communication and interaction', 'delivery of training' and 'perceptions of community'. ICEPs were willing to train Foundation doctors. However, concerns were raised that large numbers and inadequate resources could undermine the quality of educational opportunities, and even cause reputational damage. Organisation was seen as a challenge, which might be best met by placing some responsibility with trainees to manage their placements. ICEP providers agreed that defined service contribution by trainees was required to make placements sustainable, and enhance learning. ICEPs stated the need for positive articulation of the learning value of placements to learners and stakeholders. This study highlighted the opportunities for foundation doctors to gain specialist and generalist knowledge in ICEPs from diverse clinical

  17. Doctoral surplus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities in the United States are producing about 25% more doctorates in science and engineering than the U.S. economy can absorb, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation and Stanford University's Institute for Higher Education Research. The study looked at 13 science and engineering fields, covering 210 doctorate-granting institutions and more than 1,000 educational institutions that employ people with doctorates. The study was done by Stanford Professor William Massy and Charles Goldman of Rand, with graduate students Marc Chun and Beryle Hsiao.The researchers found that supply and demand do not work in the usual way to regulate the employment market for doctoral candidates. In labor markets, when job opportunities decrease, fewer people usually seek to enter the field. In the case of Ph.D.s, however, the researchers found that neither departments nor prospective doctoral students take close accounting of the doctorate employment gap.

  18. Nursing informatics education and use: challenges and prospects in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to function in the increasingly complex healthcare environment, every nurse is required to have basic computer competencies, be able to access, use and evaluate relevant nursing information and possess information management skills. Nurse Faculty, Nurse/Midwife educators are vested with the responsibility of ...

  19. Quality and safety education for advanced nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronenwett, Linda; Sherwood, Gwen; Pohl, Joanne; Barnsteiner, Jane; Moore, Shirley; Sullivan, Dori Taylor; Ward, Deborah; Warren, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project is a national initiative to transform nursing education to integrate quality and safety competencies. This article describes a two-year process to generate educational objectives related to quality and safety competency development in graduate programs that prepare advanced practice nurses in clinical roles. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes for each of 6 competencies are proposed to stimulate development of teaching strategies in programs preparing the next generation of advanced practice nurses.

  20. Governmentality, student autonomy and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, Chris; Fleming, Valerie E M

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore how governmental practices operated in nurse education. Background. Since the 1980s nurse education internationally has been strongly influenced by educational theories that aim to promote student autonomy by encouraging self-direction and critical thinking. Newer curriculum models advocate transformative approaches leading to greater emancipation, social equity and inclusion. Although these changes have been positively evaluated there had been limited critical research on how student behaviour is governed. A discourse analytic study was conducted from 2000 to 2004 using interviews (n = 30) with a purposive sample students and teachers in one United Kingdom university. Data were also collated from the course curriculum and student handbook for the students' programme. Data were analysed to identify how student behaviour is governed. Two governing practices are described: control and technologies of the self. These practices contribute to an overall system of governing student behaviour that creates tension between the avowed progressive empowerment discourse and taken for granted everyday educational practices. Students are subjected to a range of governmental and disciplinary strategies and, through a process of normalization, ultimately become their own supervisors within the system. The tensions between the demands of a professional outcome-based nursing programme and notions of empowerment and student autonomy have not been resolved. Instead, present educational practice is characterized by normalizing discursive practices that aim to produce a specific version of a student subject as autonomous learner. Thus, discourses of both empowerment and professional behaviour govern students.

  1. The importance of simulation in nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Eyikara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nursing education involves a practice-oriented curriculum in which emphasis is placed on both theoretical knowledge and psychomotor skills. In skill-based education, where learning through practice occupies a central role, it is important to ensure the integration of theoretical knowledge into practice. In this context, simulations represent an innovative teaching method that stimulates a number of senses at the same time among learners. Simulation is a method which can be designed to reflect real-life conditions, and which provides the opportunity to work in contexts that are closer and more representative of real settings. Depending on the clinical situation or scenario; the simulation method will involve a student or a group of students performing a number of patient care activities on a manikin, player or standardized patient. The simulation method allows students to repeatedly practice their clinical skills until they develop a sense of proficiency; to learn at their own pace; and to freely make mistakes. Simulations is an educational process that can replicate clinical practices in a safe environment. Nursing students who take part in education programs involving simulations perform less medical mistakes in clinical settings, and are able to better develop their critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills. For these reasons, we recommend that simulations, which represent an interactive learning method, are rendered more common in institutions providing nursing education.

  2. Nurse educators' experiences of case-based education in a South African nursing programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Felicity M; Fakude, Lorraine P; Linda, Ntombizodwa S; Marie Modeste, Rugira R

    2015-12-09

    A school of nursing at a university in the Western Cape experienced an increase in student enrolments from an intake of 150 students to 300 students in the space of one year. This required a review of the teaching and learning approach to ensure that it was appropriate for effective facilitation of large classes. The case-based education (CBE) approach was adopted for the delivery of the Bachelor of Nursing programme in 2005. The aim of the study was to explore nurse educators' experiences, current practices and possible improvements to inform best practice of CBE at the nursing school in the Western Cape. A participatory action research method was applied in a two day workshop conducted with nurse educators in the undergraduate nursing programme. The nominal group technique was used to collect the data. Three themes emerged from the final synthesis of the findings, namely: teaching and learning related issues, student issues and teacher issues. Amongst other aspects, theory and practice integration, as well as the need for peer support in facilitation of CBE, were identified as requiring strengthening. It was concluded that case-based education should continue to be used in the school, however, more workshops should be arranged to keep educators updated and new staff orientated in respect of this teaching and learning approach.

  3. Evaluation of palliative care nursing education seminars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; Virani, Rose; Paice, Judith A; Coyle, Nessa; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    More than 50 million people die each year around the world. Nurses are crucial in providing care to these individuals and their families as they spend the most time at the bedside with patients and families. Yet many nurses have received little or no education about palliative care. The Open Society Institute (OSI) and the Open Medical Institute (OMI) partnered with End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) to develop an international nursing palliative care curriculum. This international curriculum was implemented with two training courses held in Salzburg, Austria in October 2006 (n=38) and April 2008 (n=39) representing 22 Eastern European/Central Asian countries. Participants were asked to establish goals in disseminating the palliative care information when they returned to their country. The participants were mentored/followed for a 12-month period to evaluate their palliative care knowledge as well as challenges encountered. The participants provided excellent ratings for the training courses indicating that the courses were stimulating and met their expectations. The 12-month follow-up demonstrated many challenges (i.e., lack of funds, institutional support, fear of death), in advancing palliative care within each participant's setting/country as well as many examples of successful implementation. There is an urgent need for improved palliative care throughout the world. The ELNEC-International curriculum is designed to address the need for increased palliative care education in nursing. In order to improve the quality of life for those facing life-threatening illnesses around the world, ongoing support is needed for world-wide palliative care educational efforts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Can the Institute of Medicine trump the dominant logic of nursing? Leading change in advanced practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Melanie C; Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM; 2010) has called for a transformation of the nursing profession to lead the redesign of health care in the United States. It acknowledges the need for profound change in nursing education, particularly advanced practice education, to produce the next generation of leaders in sufficient quantity to expand access, improve quality, and reduce cost. Although the IOM provides welcome validation of nursing's significant role, most of the recommendations are not new and have been advocated by nurse educators for decades. What has prevented us from creating the nimble and responsive educational programs that would ensure a sufficient corpus of advanced practice nurses with the relevant knowledge and skill to transform our ailing health system? Conceptualizing nursing as a complex, adaptive system (J.W. Begun and K. White, 1997), this article explores three examples of the dominant logic, grounded in a historical legacy that has kept the nursing profession from realizing its promise as a potent force: (a) the continuing preference for experience over education, (b) the belief that only nurses can teach nurses, and (c) the hegemony of the research doctorate. © 2014.

  5. Ethical values in nurse education perceived by students and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozaripour, Mahsa; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Shahriari, Mohsen; Borhani, Fariba

    2018-03-01

    Education is considered the first function and mission of the university, and observing educational ethics guarantees the health of the teaching-learning process in the university. The aim of this study was to explore ethical values in nursing education from the perspective of Iranian nursing students and educators. This qualitative study was conducted using the Thematic Content Analyses method. The data were collected from seven semi-structured individual interviews and three focus group discussions from July to November 2015. Participants and research context: The participants were faculty educators of nursing and nursing students in Tehran, capital of Iran, who were selected through purposive sampling. They were recruited gradually. Sampling was continued until data saturation when no new codes were extracted. Ethical committee: This study was conducted after obtaining the approval of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Ethics Committee, and informed consent were ensured before conducting the research. The principles of voluntariness, confidentiality, and anonymity were respected during the research process. Seven major themes emerged: human dignity, constructive human relations, educational justice, competency enhancement, excellence view, wisdom, and commitment and accountability. The results of this study indicated that although many of the values, as universal values, were similar to those of other countries-which can be a reflection of the globalization process in the nursing profession and the presence of humanistic and spiritual approaches at the roots of the discipline, some differences could be found in the content of values due to factors such as the people's beliefs, culture, and religion. Iranian nursing students and educators revealed a unique and culture-based set of ethical values.

  6. An international comparison of Korean and Chinese nursing students with nursing curricula and educational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Yeon; Kim, Yoonhee; Kang, Hyunsook; Fan, Xiuzhen; Ling, Min; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Lee, Jia

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare Korean and Chinese nursing students with respect to their nursing curricula and educational outcomes including critical thinking, professionalism, leadership, communication skills, and nursing practice skills. Data were collected from 762 nursing college students (355 in Korea and 407 in China) using the validated self-report questionnaires. The instruments were translated into Chinese for the Chinese students. Korea offered various nursing courses more focused on specific nursing compared to China. With respect to critical thinking skills, the Korean students had significantly higher scores than the Chinese students. The Chinese students had significantly higher scores than the Korean students on the professionalism and communication skills. There were no differences between the groups in scores of leadership and nursing practice skills. This study provides preliminary information on cross-national nursing educational outcomes. A comparison of educational outcomes among nursing students of other countries as well as China will determine differences in nursing educational outcomes that the nursing program is located in, and an international flow of students through the nursing educational should develop a general direction for nursing education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Twitter, Millennials, and Nursing Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Teresa M; Gunther, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the use of Twitter as an intervention delivery method in a multisite experimental nursing research study. A form of social networking, Twitter is considered a useful means of communication, particularly with millennials. This method was chosen based on current literature exploring the characteristics of millennial students. Ahern's Model of Adolescent Resilience served as the theoretical framework. Participants were 70 junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two state-supported universities. Twitter was found to be a convenient, cost-effective, and enjoyable means of intervention delivery for the researcher. Participants in the experimental and control groups expressed positive feelings about the use of Twitter. The findings contribute to future efforts to use social media in nursing research and education to increase faculty-student engagement, promote critical reflection, provide social support, reinforce course content, and increase the sense of community.

  8. [Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2015-12-01

    To identify the perception of the coordinators of the Specialization Courses in Cardiovascular Nursing about inserting content from Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and analyze them in relation to the technological competencies and regarding its applicability, relevance and importance in assisting, teaching and management. Descriptive study with 10 coordinators of the Specialization course in Cardiologic Nursing, who replied to the questionnaire for the development of technological competency adapted from the Technology Initiative Guidelines Education Reforms (TIGER), and analyzed using the Delphi technique for obtaining consensus and scored according to the relevance, pertinence and applicability using Likert scale according to degree of agreement. Six courses developed ICT content. The contents of the TIGER were considered relevant, pertinent and applicable. The coordinators recognize the need for technological competencies of the Cardiovascular Nurse for healthcare applicability.

  9. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyab Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tayyab HasanPAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, University Brunei Darussalam, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality management model. Industrial quality management models can measure the training component in terms of competencies, but they lack the educational component measurement. These models use performance indicators to assess their process improvement efforts. Researchers suggest that the performance indicators used in educational institutions may only measure their fiscal efficiency without measuring the quality of the educational experience of the students. In most of the institutions, where industrial models are used for quality assurance, students are considered as customers and are provided with the maximum services and facilities possible. Institutions are required to fulfill a list of recommendations from the quality control agencies in order to enhance student satisfaction and to guarantee standard services. Quality of medical education should be assessed by measuring the impact of the educational program and quality improvement procedures in terms of knowledge base development, behavioral change, and patient care. Industrial quality models may focus on academic support services and processes, but educational quality models should be introduced in parallel to focus on educational standards and products.Keywords: educational quality, medical education, quality control, quality assessment, quality management models

  10. The delivery of distance education--is it time for doctoral programs in gerontology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter; Doll, Gayle; Pearson-Scott, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of higher education in gerontology is changing; students are now able to receive an education solely online. Perhaps it is time to consider offering this option at the doctoral level. A needs assessment was conducted to assess whether a doctoral program in gerontology should be created in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA) program. An online survey was sent to 247 students enrolled in the GPIDEA program and to students who had taken a GPIDEA course in gerontology but were not currently enrolled in the program. One hundred and twenty-three students began the survey, although only 120 students completed the survey. Findings indicated students are interested in a doctoral program in gerontology. Approximately 65% of students were interested in obtaining a PhD from a distance education program. However, an applied program focusing on community outreach and leadership was of most interest to students. Students were less interested in research-based programs or in research residency. Therefore, the development of distance education doctoral degree programs in gerontology may need to be created differently than "traditional" formats.

  11. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students’ motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing...

  12. Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 069

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Darren; Eisl-Culkin, Judy; Desjardins, Louise

    2008-01-01

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral…

  13. Critical care nursing practice and education in Rwanda | Munyiginya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical care nursing practice and education in Rwanda is a young specialty. There are very few critical care nurses practising in either hospital or academic settings, and typically nurses taking care of critically ill patients receive only a brief period of informal education prior to practising. Intensive care units are found ...

  14. National Survey on Doctoral-Level Education in Health Information Management: Perceptions and Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Angela L; Houser, Shannon H; Wapola, Janelle

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to understand the perceptions and educational goals of the health information management (HIM) workforce in regard to pursuing doctoral-level degrees. Survey data were collected from members of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) to gain further insight into their interest in pursuing a doctoral degree, their reasons for obtaining such a degree, their methods of learning, and their financial support for an advanced degree. Descriptive characteristics were collected from AHIMA profile information. A total of 13,020 surveys were electronically sent to selected AHIMA members, of which 1,453 were returned, for an 11 percent response rate. Of the 651 respondents who indicated that they were interested in obtaining a doctoral-level degree, close to half would like to start their doctoral-level study in the next one to five years. This research points to recommendations for efforts to increase student funding opportunities, to increase the number of accredited HIM schools/programs, to create opportunities for doctoral-level study in HIM, to offer options for blended online learning, and to increase the number of doctorally prepared and qualified HIM faculty.

  15. Nurse practitioner continuing education: exploring influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, JoEllen

    2015-07-01

    This article introduces the interrelated concepts of nurse practitioner (NP) continuing education (CE) funding patterns, regulatory guidance surrounding NP CE, and its effect on patient outcomes in the United States. A literature review was done by searching online databases: MEDLINE and CINAHL. Searches included review of NP certifying body websites, Institute of Medicine, Josiah Macy Foundation, and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing websites. The nursing literature supports no connection between required CE and improvement in provision of care to patients, nor does it support improvement in individual provider competence. The funding patterns for nursing and medicine indicate a bias toward biomedical and pharmacological interventions. This type of funding stream may contribute to practice gaps rather than improve them. Understanding factors that influence CE program availability, plus the choices NPs make regarding mandatory CE, can provide planning guidance. This guidance can help reach the goal of improved patient outcomes and decreased healthcare disparities as a result of CE interventions. NP-specific findings may potentially influence regulatory reform relevant to mandatory CE and maintenance of certification. It is important that NPs recognize existing conflicts of interest in order to make informed program choices. © 2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Virtual worlds: a new frontier for nurse education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Virtual worlds have the potential to offer nursing students social networking and, learning, opportunities through the use of collaborative and immersive learning. If nursing educators, are to stay, abreast of contemporary learning opportunities an exploration of the potential benefits of, virtual, worlds and their possibilities is needed. Literature was sourced that explored virtual worlds, and their, use in education, but nursing education specifically. It is clear that immersive learning has, positive, benefits for nursing, however the best way to approach virtual reality in nursing education, has yet to, be ascertained.

  17. Strengthening healthcare delivery in Haiti through nursing continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M; Julmisse, M; Marcelin, N; Merry, L; Tuck, J; Gagnon, A J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to (1) highlight nursing continuing education as a key initiative for strengthening healthcare delivery in low-resource settings, and (2) provide an example of a nursing continuing education programme in Haiti. Haiti and other low-resource settings face extreme challenges including severe shortages of healthcare workers, high rates of nurse out-migration and variations in nurse competency at entry-to-practice. Nursing continuing education has the potential to address these challenges and improve healthcare delivery through enhanced nurse performance and retention; however, it is underutilized in low-resource settings. A case study is presented from the Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais in Mirebalais, Haiti of a new nursing continuing education programme called the Beyond Expert Program. The case study highlights eight key dimensions of nursing continuing education in low-resource settings: (1) involving local stakeholders in planning process, (2) targeting programme to nurse participant level and area of care, (3) basing course content on local context, (4) including diverse range of nursing topics, (5) using participatory teaching methods, (6) addressing resource constraints in time and scheduling, (7) evaluating and monitoring outcomes, and (8) establishing partnerships. The case study provides guidance for others wishing to develop programmes in similar settings. Creating a nursing continuing education programme in a low-resource setting is possible when there is commitment and engagement for nursing continuing education at all levels of the organization. Our report suggests a need for policy-makers in resource-limited settings to make greater investments in nursing continuing education as a focus of human resources for health, as it is an important strategy for promoting nurse retention, building the knowledge and skill of the existing nursing workforce, and raising the image of nursing in low-resource settings. © 2015

  18. Evolution of doctoral education in Pakistan: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a part of the findings from a larger study undertaken to explore the experience of graduate students in education in Pakistan. Analysis of a smaller slice of data collected from students who were enrolled in the PhD and MPhil programmes of the Department of Education in a large public sector university ...

  19. The Concept of Socialization in Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dimitriadou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Education is a specialized form of socialization. The concept of socialization indicates the systemic effects of the old to the new generation, in order to develop those characteristics that society deems necessary for the integration of young people in this.The professional socialization is a developmental process in adult socialization and is of central importanceAim: the aim of the present study is the presentation of professional socialization in nursing educationResults: The socialization into the profession is a process of transforming a beginner to a professional and the newcomers adopt ethical standards and even lifestyle team who seek to become members. The socialization the individual adopts social group's mission, organizational goals and underpin knowledge, learning technology and language of the profession, and finally integrates the professional role in identity. The educational system is the official institution in which society disseminates-instills-perpetuates the prevailing values and conceptions, creating citizens and professionals neededfor maintenance operations and meeting its needs.Conclusions: The existence of both factors, without taking drastic measures in education and the organizational characteristics of the exercise areas of nursing, will feedback the crisis in the nursing profession and mainly will undermine any effort to change and improve the quality of the supplied project.

  20. Educational mobility. American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As health care shifts from a fragmented system of disparate providers and payers into integrated managed systems, nurses and other health professionals are encountering tremendous changes. The environments in which nurses practice are becoming increasingly diverse, and the skills required to practice in these settings are becoming increasingly specific to the services offered and the patients served. Advances in health-related technologies call for enhanced knowledge and application of computing and other technical skills. Nurses are faced with complex ethical dilemmas created by rationing-of-health-care decisions and research advances such as the human genome project. Practicing nurses must continue to update their skills as their work environments adapt to reforms in health care delivery. Furthermore, nurses' practice will be influenced by changes in the regulatory system that will accompany multistate recognition of licensure. Over the years, the nursing educational system, through multiple entry and exit routes, has prepared nurses for the variety of settings in which health care is delivered. The nursing educational system must continue to produce the most qualified and prepared nurses to produce the most qualified prepared nurses to deliver cost-effective and quality care. Nurse educators must continue to analyze health care trends and create flexible curricula that provide individuals with the skills and knowledge needed for diverse settings. Furthermore, nurse educators must continue to offer continuing education for nurses as they fine-tune skills for new settings. Educational mobility in nursing is the vehicle by which nurses and aspiring nurses gain new knowledge and skills through formal and informal educational offerings. Educational mobility serves the public, the profession, and the individual nurse. Educational mobility should continue to focus on promoting high standards and maintaining the quality and integrity of baccalaureate and graduate

  1. Nurse education: factors associated with attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Easton, Katherine; Littlewood, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study to identify the factors having an impact on student completion rates in a preregistration programme. Nursing student attrition is an international issue causing concern in many parts of the developed world including Australia, the United States and Europe. In the United Kingdom, nursing student attrition has become a major issue, despite having one of the lowest general university dropout rates in the developed world. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 2007 using routinely-collected demographic and completion data on four cohorts of nursing students (1259 in total) studying at a large English university. Students who were older on entry were more likely to complete the programme than younger students, and those who had only the minimum educational qualifications on entry were less likely to complete than those with higher-level qualifications. There was some evidence of increased risk of resigning from the course in students taking the child branch, and increased risk of discontinuation (involuntary removal) from the course in both male and black/minority ethnic students. There was also some evidence that the healthcare organization responsible for a student's placement could influence completion rates. To improve attrition rates on preregistration nursing programmes, higher education institutions should actively target recruitment at mature candidates; increase the level of qualification required to gain entry; examine course structures for flexibility and provide multi-level student support.

  2. Nursing educators' recognition of ethical issues and its relationship to ethical education

    OpenAIRE

    中尾, 久子

    2007-01-01

    Enrichment of ethical education is a current issue for nursing educators. However, many of nursing educators in charge of such education received relevant training after ethical education ceased to be an independent course due to the revision of the specified regulations. Thus a study was conducted on the recognition of ethical issues, the current situation of ethical education, and previous ethical education of the nursing educators who participated in an educational seminar. The results ind...

  3. Critical Thinking and the Standards of Nursing Education

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Heui Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Critical thinking is the basis of professional nursing practice and is essential in the current complex health care delivery system. A major goal of baccalaureate nursing education is the development and promotion of students' ability to think critically. In America, the National League for nursing outcome-oriented accreditation process challenged nursing faculty to think about teaching and evaluating critical thinking. Based on nursing literature, the findings were inconsistent because ...

  4. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. History of Continuing Nursing Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Nursing history since 1853 is presented to identify issues in continuing nursing education, such as the influence of feminism and professionalism, changing constituencies, and philosophies in health care. (SK)

  6. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  7. [Environmental education for nursing faculty members: perception and relation to nurse training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Roger Rodrigues; Camponogara, Silviamar; Costa, Valdecir Zavarese da; Terra, Marlene Gomes; Nietsche, Elisabeta Albertina

    2015-01-01

    to describe the perception of nursing teachers on environmental education and its relation to the professional training received by nurses. exploratory-descriptive, qualitative study performed with 17 nurses working in Undergraduate Nursing courses at Federal Institutions of Higher Education of Rio Grande do Sul. Data were collected between January and April 2013, through semi-structured interviews and the analysis of pedagogical projects. Content analysis framework was used for data analysis. the following categories emerged: multiplicity of perceptions about environmental education, where environmental education, although still perceived through a naturalist bias, also includes a well rounded vision for socio-cultural context and human values; and environmental education in in the nursing education program, showing an incipient approach in vocational training, while recognizing its importance in nursing care. Environmental education must be fostered with the goal of providing training committed to environmental sustainability.

  8. Effective educator-student relationships in nursing education to strengthen nursing students' resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froneman, Kathleen; Du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdelene P

    2016-06-10

    Little research has been conducted in private nursing schools with regard to the educator-student relationship to strengthen the resilience of nursing students and to improve the educator-student relationship. An effective educator-student relationship is a key factor to ensure a positive learning climate where learning can take place and resilience can be strengthened. The purpose was to explore and describe nursing students' view on the basic elements required for an effective educator-student relationship to strengthen their resilience and the educator-student relationship. This study followed an explorative, descriptive and contextual qualitative design in a private nursing education institution in the North West Province. Purposive sampling was used. The sample consisted of 40 enrolled nursing auxiliary students. The World Café Method was used to collect data, which were analysed by means of content analysis. The following five main themes were identified and included: (1) teaching-learning environment, (2) educator-student interaction, (3) educator qualities, (4) staying resilient and (5) strategies to strengthen resilience. Students need a caring and supportive environment; interaction that is constructive, acknowledges human rights and makes use of appropriate non-verbal communication. The educator must display qualities such as love and care, respect, responsibility, morality, patience, being open to new ideas, motivation, willingness to 'go the extra mile' and punctuality. Students reported on various ways how they manage to stay resilient. It thus seems that basic elements required in an effective educator-student relationship to strengthen the resilience of students include the environment, interaction, educator and student's qualities and resilience.

  9. Doctorate Needs in Educational Administration During the 1970's and 1980's: A Preliminary Analysis. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevich, S. J.

    There are no data in this research report that would support the generalization that educational administration will face a doctorate glut during the 1970's or 1980's. There is far more reason to be worried about a glut in the number of institutions producing doctorates in educational administration than about a glut in the number of doctorates…

  10. From Doctor to Nurse Triage in the Danish Out-of-Hours Primary Care Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth, Grete; Huibers, Linda; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    applied experiences from The Netherlands on nurse performance in the OOH triage concerning the number of calls per hour. Using the 2011 number of calls in one region, we examined three hypothetical scenarios with nurse triage and calculated the differences in fee costs. Results. A new organisation with 97...

  11. Paving the Pathway: Exploring Student Perceptions of Professional Development Preparation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflinger, Craig Anne; Doykos, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The breadth of doctoral education has expanded to include professional development activities in order to prepare students for academic and nonacademic careers. This mixed methods study focused on students' perceptions of professional development opportunities at a Research One university. The findings suggest that most students feel prepared in…

  12. A Qualitative Study of Challenges Faced by International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education Supervision Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoo Jin; Woo, Hongryun; Henfield, Malik S.

    2014-01-01

    Using consensual qualitative research methodology, this study examines the challenges doctoral-level international students encountered in counselor education programs, during supervisor training, specifically. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants and revealed a variety of difficulties. Despite the wide variability in…

  13. Research versus Problem Solving for the Education Leadership Doctoral Thesis: Implications for Form and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbald, Doug

    2008-01-01

    Background: A growing literature is questioning the appropriateness of a research dissertation for practitioners in education doctoral programs. Although this literature persuasively critiques the prevailing theory-research orientation of most programs and theses, it goes little beyond exhorting change and describing extant alternatives in a few…

  14. Perceptions Regarding the Professional Identity of Counselor Education Doctoral Graduates in Private Practice: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickert, Mary Lee

    1997-01-01

    Reports on interviews of 10 doctoral graduates of counselor education programs to determine how they viewed professional identity. Results focus on uniqueness of counselors, career development issues, dislike of research, grouping for support, dislike of managed care, anger over turf wars, and affinity with holistic and preventive medicine. (RJM)

  15. Becoming an Academic: The Role of Doctoral Capital in the Field of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jude; Yoon, EeSeul

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws on Bourdieu's concepts of "field," "capital" and "habitus" to examine the learning and enculturation of alumni of a Canadian PhD programme in the discipline of Education. We introduce the concept of "doctoral capital" to help explain how and why some PhD graduates go on to secure faculty…

  16. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country communicate sub-optimally regardless of patients' educational background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claramita, M.; Dalen, J.V.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between the style of doctor-patient communication and patients' educational background in a Southeast Asian teaching hospital setting using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). METHODS: We analyzed a total of 245 audio-taped consultations involving 30

  17. Admission and Graduation Requirements for Special Education Doctoral Programs at 20 Top American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the admissions and graduation requirements guidelines of the special education doctoral programs at 20 top American universities was conducted. Admission requirements typically include an application fee, previous coursework GPA, previous field experience, GRE scores, TOEFL scores, professional writing sample(s), and…

  18. Gender Differences in Educational Attainment: The Case of Doctoral Degrees in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastekaasa, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Despite strong trends in most Western countries towards gender equality in educational attainments, men are still considerably more likely to obtain doctoral degrees. Using data comprising nearly all students graduating from Norwegian universities during 1981-1996, separate event history analyses are carried out of recruitment to and completion of…

  19. Doctoral Social Work Education: Responding to Trends in Society and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; Ghose, Toorjo

    2018-01-01

    This article is intended to forecast major environmental changes that may impact social work doctoral education and assess what should be done in anticipation of these changes. We apply an open system and future studies perspective to guide our work. We present a set of predicted societal changes that will impact social work as a profession and…

  20. Post-Monolingual Research Methodology: Multilingual Researchers Democratizing Theorizing and Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the ground-breaking research in the study of languages in doctoral education. It argues for democratizing the production and dissemination of original contributions to knowledge through activating and mobilizing multilingual Higher Degree Researchers' (HDRs) capabilities for theorizing through them using their full linguistic…

  1. A Content Analysis of Doctoral Research in String Education, 1936-1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorski, Vincent J.

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes the contents of doctoral research between 1936 and 1992 related to stringed instrument education. Examines "Dissertation Abstracts International" for year of completion, type of degree, instrument, and main topic. The most researched instrument was the violin and main topics included techniques and skills, performance practice, and…

  2. Hispanic women in doctoral medical education in 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernández-Cano

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: A key conclusion is that Hispanic women have produced six pioneering dissertations of singular importance with a multidisciplinary medical scope covering the topics, such as women education, hygiene, ophthalmology, gynecology, and pharmacology.

  3. Flipping the statistics classroom in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-04-01

    Flipped classrooms are so named because they substitute the traditional lecture that commonly encompasses the entire class period with active learning techniques, such as small-group work. The lectures are delivered instead by using an alternative mode--video recordings--that are made available for viewing online outside the class period. Due to this inverted approach, students are engaged with the course material during the class period, rather than participating only passively. This flipped approach is gaining popularity in many areas of education due to its enhancement of student learning and represents an opportunity for utilization by instructors of statistics courses in nursing education. This article presents the author's recent experiences with flipping a statistics course for nursing students in a PhD program, including practical considerations and student outcomes and reaction. This transformative experience deepened the level of student learning in a way that may not have occurred using a traditional format. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Nurse educators and student nurse neophytes’ perceptions of good interaction in the classroom setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friddah R. Mathevula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The first session of interaction in the classroom often sets an atmosphere for the entire period of learning. In terms of nurse educator and student nurse neophyte relations, good interaction is essential in helping students to recognise their own responsibilities and to respond positively during the learning process. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurse educators’ and student nurse neophytes’ perceptions of good interaction in the classroom setting. The study attempted to answer the following specific question: ‘What do nurse educators and student nurse neophytes regard as examples of good interaction in the classroom setting?’ The accessible population in this study were all student nurse neophytes registered with the University of Venda for the Baccalaureus Curationis, and nurse educators responsible for teaching first-year student nurses in this programme. The study used probability stratified random sampling to obtain two heterogeneous groups of student participants. Forty first-year student nurses were divided into homogenous subsets of 15 male and 25 female students. A random sampling was conducted to arrive at 10 male and 15 female students. The sampling method relating to nurse educators was purposive sampling. Focus groups were used to interview students using individual in-depth interviews to gather data from nurse educators. Coding was used to organise the data collected during the interviews. The study revealed that nurse educators and student nurse neophytes concur that the ethical behaviours influencing good interaction are respect and support, good communication, honesty and openness. Age, gender and cultural background were also factors. The participants further indicated that good interaction has benefits such as improved co-operation levels, the enhancement of learning, the improvement of pass rates, and a reduction in dropout rates. In conclusion, there is a need for nurse educators and student nurses

  5. Learning theories application in nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including socia...

  6. Cultural Competence in Rural Nursing Education: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu

    This multimethod study assessed the capacity of nursing education programs to promote culturally congruent practice in a single rural state. An important objective of our HRSA-funded Advanced Education in Nursing grant was to increase nurse educator proficiency in teaching cultural concepts. This study served as a statewide baseline assessment to inform future faculty development efforts. Subjects included faculty, graduate students, and clinical educators representing all levels of nursing education programs. Self-report cultural proficiency data were collected via survey while focus groups and electronic surveys were utilized to assess curricula. No significant differences in proficiency were found by faculty age or education. Qualitative data indicated that concepts of culture are not easily identified across the curriculum. There is need for increased and explicit focus on concepts of culture in nursing education programs to prepare nurses for culturally congruent practice with potential to reduce health disparities.

  7. Educational issues in preparing community health nurses to use nursing diagnosis with population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, A; Harrison, M J

    1996-06-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in the use of nursing diagnosis by community health nurses who work with population groups in community settings. The purpose of this article is to discuss educational issues important in the preparation of undergraduate students and practising community health nurses in the use of nursing diagnosis with population groups. The educational issues discussed emerged from the findings of a preliminary survey of undergraduate students and community health nurses and were related to: differences in the learning requirements of novice and expert practitioners; common errors in the use of nursing diagnosis; and the perceived benefits and barriers in using nursing diagnosis. There is a need to develop an educational strategy to address these concerns for both undergraduate students and community health nurses.

  8. [Nursing competences and basic education: descriptive study on new-graduate nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecugni, Daniela; Sforacchi, Federica; Amaducci, Giovanna; Iemmi, Marina; Finotto, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The pressing need by the health organizations of new-graduate nurses immediately able to take full charge of the ward, together with the radical changes of nursing education, led the professional community to discuss the education of new-graduate nurses. To describe if new-graduate nurses at the Nursing Degree Course in Reggio Emilia, have the competences adequate to the demands of the health care organizations. Fifty ward Nursing Manager of a National health Service, where new-graduate nurses of the 2009-2010 academic year were emploied by at least one month were interviewed by phone. A list of 34 competences were identified and grouped into six skill areas (taking care, technical, managerial, communication, professional ethics, education and professional updating); for each, respondents had to rank the level of compentence on a Likert scale from 1 not able to 5 fully able. According to Nursing Managers new-graduate nurses are able to identify the patient care problems (mean score 4.1+0.8), to perform nursing techniques (mean score 4.4+0.7) and to meet the deadlines of the organizations (mean score 4.2+0.8). All Nursing Managers agree that new-graduate nurses have required skills and knowledge to work in their units. The level of expertise of by new-graduates in the areas investigated appears adequate to fulfill the role of nurse in health care organizations after a short period of coaching by a senior nurse.

  9. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  10. DOCTORAL STUDIES IN THE HOMELAND HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPERIENCE AND PROSPECTS OF THE EUROPEAN DIMENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Holovko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ensuring compliance of doctoral training in Ukraine with the European standards is an objective condition for the complete integration of our state into the united educational and scientific environment. In order to ensure the effectiveness of this process, the necessity of research conducted on the European experience as well as the first achievements and difficulties in the national high school, the determining factors, in particular, the state and prospects of the legal area development for the implementation of the new model appears to be urgent. Methods: general and specific scientific (special methods were used to achieve the research target. Applying the methods of the first group made it possible to outline the tendencies of the doctoral training transformation in European countries and in Ukraine. By means of the comparative legal method, the peculiarities of the development of the normative-legal field of doctoral training in the national high school were analyzed, and the areas of its improvement were determined. Results: The features of development of doctoral training in the European educational space and the prospects of its introduction in the national higher education were considered. The formation of the legal area of doctoral training in Ukraine was argued, and the ways of its improvement were outlined. Exemplified on the National Aviation University, as one of the leading research institutions, the first experience of introducing a European model for training scientific staff is summarized. Discussion: In doctoral training, one of the leading trends is the issue of ensuring the quality of the implementation of curricula of the Doctor of Philosophy, enhancing the autonomy and responsibility of postgraduate students and academic leaders, improving the academic and geographical mobility of scholars, increasing funding for research and enhancing its innovation. In the projection of this issue on the national university

  11. Net Generation's Learning Styles in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Eleni; Kalokairinou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Numerous surveys have confirmed that emerging technologies and Web 2.0 tools have been a defining feature in the lives of current students, estimating that there is a fundamental shift in the way young people communicate, socialize and learn. Nursing students in higher education are characterized as digital literate with distinct traits which influence their learning styles. Millennials exhibit distinct learning preferences such as teamwork, experiential activities, structure, instant feedback and technology integration. Higher education institutions should be aware of the implications of the Net Generation coming to university and be prepared to meet their expectations and learning needs.

  12. Promoting cultures of thinking: transforming nursing education to transform nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary nursing education is highly invested in the development of the academic, critical, and empirical aspects of education that represent the science of nursing, and concomitantly less attentive to the development of the creative, interpersonal aspects of education typically associated with the art of nursing. This represents a reversal of historic patterns in nursing education, but the pendulum may have swung so far that there could be costs to nursing practice unless the creative, interpersonal aspects of education can be reclaimed and balanced. Ideas and suggestions regarding how nurse educators might foster the creation of cultures of thinking, which represent whole-brain, integrated teaching approaches that are based on emerging neurocognitive evidence, are discussed.

  13. Efficacy of purposeful educational workshop on nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoroaia, Mahin; Mashhadi, Mortaza; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Attari, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to define the efficacy of a nursing care educational workshop on nurses' knowledge and attitude until 3 months after holding the workshop in psychiatric wards of educational hospitals in Isfahan. This is a quasi-experimental study. The study population comprised all nurses working in psychiatric wards of Nour and Farabi hospitals in Isfahan in 2012. An educational workshop was held through educational sessions in the form of lectures and group discussion in the two above-mentioned hospitals. Nurses' level of knowledge and attitude were investigated by a researcher-made questionnaire before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical tests of repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni. A significant increase was observed in mean scores of nurses' knowledge immediately after and 3 months after education compared to before education. Nurses' knowledge mean scores increased from 59.2 ± 14.8 before education to 88.6 ± 8.4 immediately after and to 71 ± 9.8 3 months after (P ≤ 0.016). There was no significant difference in mean scores of nurses' attitude in the three above-mentioned time points. Educational sessions notably affected the promotion of nurses' knowledge. With regard to nurses' satisfaction with the workshop that was held, designing and organizing educational workshops based on constant needs assessment is suggested for promotion of nursing cares.

  14. IFNA approved Chinese Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program: A Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiale; Fallacaro, Michael D; Jiang, Lili; Wu, Junyan; Jiang, Hong; Shi, Zhen; Ruan, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Numerous nurses work in operating rooms and recovery rooms or participate in the performance of anaesthesia in China. However, the scope of practice and the education for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses is not standardized, varying from one geographic location to another. Furthermore, most nurses are not trained sufficiently to provide anaesthesia care. This study aimed to develop the first Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program in Mainland China based on the Educational Standards of the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists. The Delphi technique was applied to develop the scope of practice, competencies for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses and education program. In 2014 the Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program established by the hospital applied for recognition by the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists. The Program's curriculum was evaluated against the IFNA Standards and recognition was awarded in 2015. The four-category, 50-item practice scope, and the three-domain, 45-item competency list were identified for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses. The education program, which was established based on the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists educational standards and Chinese context, included nine curriculum modules. In March 2015, 13 candidates received and passed the 21-month education program. The Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program became the first program approved by the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists in China. Policy makers and hospital leaders can be confident that anaesthesia nurses graduating from this Chinese program will be prepared to demonstrate high level patient care as reflected in the recognition by IFNA of their adoption of international nurse anaesthesia education standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transformational Leadership in Nursing Education: Making the Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Shelly Ann

    2017-04-01

    Transformational leadership is a trending style and competency that has been embraced by many industries and nursing practice settings. Similar positive influence on follower engagement, teamwork, and solidarity might be experienced if transformational leadership is employed by administration and faculty as a guiding framework for nursing education. The impact of embedding a teamwork culture in basic nursing education could be significant on students and ultimately on the nursing profession. Further research is needed to develop and test application of the transformational leadership framework in nursing education.

  16. Nostalgic constructions of nurse education in British national newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Karen

    2014-11-01

    To explore nostalgic constructions of nurse education in British National newspapers. British newspaper discourse relating to the increased academic level of nurse education in the UK is negative, evoking comparisons between negative constructions of nurse education in the present and an idealized nostalgic view of the past. Discussion paper. This study used a critical discourse analysis approach to analyse 11 British Newspaper articles, which exemplify nostalgic constructions of nurse education. This was a purposive sample from a database search (LexisNexis) of British national newspaper articles relating to the increasing academic level of nurse education in the period from 1999-2012. A dominant nostalgic discourse constructs a 'golden era' of nurse education, which idealizes the past, making the present flawed in comparison. Nostalgic constructions create group identities creating contrasting 'caring' nurses educated in the idealized past with those educated now, who are perceived as too educated to care. An inherent characteristic of the nostalgic discourse is the notion that the solution to current problems with nurse education is a return to an idealized version of the past. Another less common newspaper discourse views nostalgia as a problematic construct. Nostalgic discourse with a focus on the past potentially acts as a barrier to creating an effective nurse education system for the 21(st) Century. This focus on an idealized past also has potential consequences in terms of public opinion and legitimization of government policy, which might otherwise be viewed as retrograde. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Teaching in higher education in nursing: an integrative literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Daniele Delacanal; Martini, Jussara Gue; de Amorim Busana, Juliano

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the knowledge produced about teaching in higher education in nursing. Integrative literature review of full articles available on the LILACS, SciELO, BDENF and ERIC databases, through the descriptors "nursing faculty"and "practices of nursing faculty" and keywords "Teaching in nursing" or "Education in nursing"and "Nursing professors" and "Teaching knowledge" in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published from January 2008 to November 2013. 31 articles were identified. The data led to the following thematic categories: Training for faculty, Conflict of roles: being a nurse and being a teacher and Organization of the teaching work. It was found that there are numerous gaps in understanding the teaching activity in nursing. The concerns identified may offer help for understanding the teaching world and conceptions about being a teacher in nursing.

  18. Community-Based Research (CBR in the Education Doctorate: Lessons Learned and Promising Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Stevahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Community-based research (CBR is an advanced form of academic service-learning through which university students, faculty, and community organizations collaborate to conduct inquiry projects aimed at producing social change. Despite its potential for advancing learning in graduate studies, little research exists on CBR implementations or outcomes in doctoral programs. This study examined the effectiveness of integrating CBR into an educational leadership doctorate across three consecutive cohorts in which students worked in teams to conduct CBR projects, each in partnership with a community organization pursuing a social justice initiative. A mixed-methods developmental case study design produced quantitative and qualitative data on students’ perceived effectiveness of cooperative/collaborative interaction and team decision making in CBR, experience with and learning from CBR in the education doctorate, and development of CBR competencies. Triangulated results overall revealed students’ (a positive attitudes toward CBR, (b enhanced understanding of and commitment to CBR and how to conduct it, (c expanded understanding and application of technical research skills, (d growth in coopera-tive/collaborative and conflict resolution skills, and (e development of leadership project management skills. These findings may assist faculty in planning innovative, authentic, applied, professional training in the education doctorate capable of advancing students’ graduate inquiry skills while also enhancing competencies for successful leadership in the field.

  19. Teaching excellence in nursing education: a caring framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Enns, Carol L; Ashcroft, Terri J; Davis, Penny L; Harder, B Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education plays a central role in the ability to practice effectively. It follows that an optimally educated nursing workforce begets optimal patient care. A framework for excellence in nursing education could guide the development of novice educators, establish the basis for evaluating teaching excellence, and provide the impetus for research in this area. However, a review of the social sciences and nursing literature as well as a search for existing models for teaching excellence revealed an apparent dearth of evidence specific to excellence in nursing education. Therefore, we developed the Caring Framework for Excellence in Nursing Education. This framework evolved from a review of the generic constructs that exemplify teaching excellence: excellence in teaching practice, teaching scholarship, and teaching leadership. Nursing is grounded in the ethic of caring. Hence, caring establishes the foundation for this uniquely nursing framework. Because a teaching philosophy is intimately intertwined with one's nursing philosophy and the ethic of caring, it is also fundamental to the caring framework. Ideally, this framework will contribute to excellence in nursing education and as a consequence excellence in nursing practice and optimal patient care.

  20. [A Taiwan nursing perspective on current imbalances in educating, licensing and hiring new nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

    2012-10-01

    Level of development in the nursing profession affects healthcare quality and safety. The nursing profession in Taiwan today faces myriad external pressures such as the global financial crisis and rapidly changing national health insurance policies and social issues. For example, cutbacks in nursing manpower at medical institutions and increasingly difficult healthcare working conditions are increasing nurse workloads and turnover, conflict in the workplace, and difficulties in recruiting new nursing staff. Such negative developments directly and negatively impact professional development, healthcare quality, healthcare safety, and workplace morale. In terms of maintaining and enhancing the quality of new nurses entering the profession, rapid growth in numbers of technology schools and nursing students have severely strained insufficient resources and resulted in teaching quality and education outcomes below expectations. Poor passing rates on the national nursing license examination and increasingly high new nurse turnover are now significant negative factors influencing clinical manpower availability. Imbalances among education, licensing, and hiring clearly and negatively impact nursing professional development and social needs and cause the inefficient allocation of limited education resources. This article discusses and analyzes the causes underlying current imbalances in nurse hiring, licensing, and education. We provide the following suggestions: (1) Integrate education and licensing activities based on professional recruitment considerations to promote nursing competent and manpower stability; (2) revise the focus and content of the national license examination to resolve the current disconnect between license examination and hiring needs; (3) redesign curricula, update teaching material, and adjust teaching methods based on professional competencies in order to resolve key education and recruitment problems. All nursing schools should prepare their

  1. Integrating genomics into undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Dieter, Carla; Quinn Griffin, Mary T

    2011-09-01

    To prepare the next generation of nurses, faculty are now faced with the challenge of incorporating genomics into curricula. Here we discuss how to meet this challenge. Steps to initiate curricular changes to include genomics are presented along with a discussion on creating a genomic curriculum thread versus a standalone course. Ideas for use of print material and technology on genomic topics are also presented. Information is based on review of the literature and curriculum change efforts by the authors. In recognition of advances in genomics, the nursing profession is increasing an emphasis on the integration of genomics into professional practice and educational standards. Incorporating genomics into nurses' practices begins with changes in our undergraduate curricula. Information given in didactic courses should be reinforced in clinical practica, and Internet-based tools such as WebQuest, Second Life, and wikis offer attractive, up-to-date platforms to deliver this now crucial content. To provide information that may assist faculty to prepare the next generation of nurses to practice using genomics. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Lifestyle-associated risk for cardiovascular diseases among doctors and nurses working in a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Kumar B Hegde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Globally, about 17 million people die of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs every year and a substantial number of these deaths are attributed to four major risk factors namely unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco consumption, and alcohol consumption. Doctors and nurses often have a sedentary lifestyle. Aims: This study aimed at assessing the lifestyle-associated risk for CVDs among doctors and nurses in a medical college hospital. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study among 250 doctors and nurses, selected using a stratified random sampling, working at a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu. Subjects and Methods: After consenting, each participant answered a questionnaire comprising questions pertaining to the sociodemographic characteristics as well as lifestyle-related risk factors. Risk was categorized into low, moderate, and high based on general risk factors, physical activity risk factors, and dietary risk factors separately. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics and Chi-square analysis were used to analyze the data. Results: It was found that 31.2% of all study subjects and 49.2% of doctors were at high general risk for CVDs; 30.4% of all study subjects and 42.1% of doctors were at high physical activity-related risk for CVDs; 14.4% of all study subjects and 19.8% of all doctors were at high dietary pattern-related risk for CVDs. Advancing age is a statistically significant risk factor across all risk groups. Conclusions: Doctors are at a higher risk for CVDs as compared to nurses as well as the general population.

  3. Humanist ideology and nurse education. I. Humanist educational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, M

    1997-06-01

    Nurse education is dominated by the humanist perspective and the educational theory that it generates. Following a brief description of the perspective's phenomenological foundations and definition of humanist ideology, humanist educational theory is illustrated in an outline of the key contributions of John Dewey, Carl Rogers, Malcolm Knowles and Paulo Freire. The article concludes by noting Freire's sociological challenge to the individualism of the humanist perspective. This challenge recognizes the ideological and social control role of education in securing the reproduction of power relations and leads to questioning the function of individualism and the interests that humanist ideology may serve.

  4. Structured Doctoral Education in Hannover - Joint Programme IMPRS-GW and geo-Q RTG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Bruns, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Two structured doctoral programmes that we have in Hannover, the IMPRS on Gravitational Wave Astronomy and SFB on relativistic geodesy and gravimetry with quantum sensors geo-Q, have not only become major resources for education in each field but have also started to provide substantial synergy to members of both programmes. Our strong crossdisciplinary approach to create a joint programme has received excellent feedback not only from researchers inside the programme but also from various external committee. Building on experience that we have acquired over the last decade, we propose to set up a common doctoral programme within the international gravitational wave astronomy and physics. We envisage that with a common doctoral programme we will create a strong team of young researchers who will carry on building a strong network of third generation gravitational wave detectors and observatories.

  5. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the communication strategies that nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use when managing medications. Patient-centred medication management is best accomplished through interdisciplinary practice. Effective communication about managing medications between clinicians and patients has a direct influence on patient outcomes. There is a lack of research that adopts a multidisciplinary approach and involves critical in-depth analysis of medication interactions among nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients. A critical ethnographic approach with video reflexivity was adopted to capture communication strategies during medication activities in two general medical wards of an acute care hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A mixed ethnographic approach combining participant observations, field interviews, video recordings and video reflexive focus groups and interviews was employed. Seventy-six nurses, 31 doctors, 1 pharmacist and 27 patients gave written consent to participate in the study. Data analysis was informed by Fairclough's critical discourse analytic framework. Clinicians' use of communication strategies was demonstrated in their interpersonal, authoritative and instructive talk with patients. Doctors adopted the language discourse of normalisation to standardise patients' illness experiences. Nurses and pharmacists employed the language discourses of preparedness and scrutiny to ensure that patient safety was maintained. Patients took up the discourse of politeness to raise medication concerns and question treatment decisions made by doctors, in their attempts to challenge decision-making about their health care treatment. In addition, the video method revealed clinicians' extensive use of body language in communication processes for medication management. The use of communication strategies by nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients created opportunities for improved interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred medication

  6. The professionalization of psychiatric nursing. From doctors' handmaidens to empowered professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boling, Anita

    2003-10-01

    The professionalization of psychiatric nursing in the United States has been subject to political, economic, and theoretical influences, and prominent individuals such as Florence Nightingale and Hildegard Peplau have caused changes over time. Throughout history, professional and societal beliefs about mental illness have affected the nature of psychiatric nursing. In colonial times, people with mental illnesses were considered to be either possessed by demons or inferior and treated as animals. Today, psychobiological causes of mental illness are better understood, and treatment is aimed at adjusting disordered physiology and implementing psychosocial interventions. Care of people with mental illnesses has echoed this shift with increasing professionalization of psychiatric nurses. Attention to the lessons of history can help psychiatric nurses identify current societal influences, act on them according to their own vision, and further increase their professionalism.

  7. Exploring nursing educators' use of theory and methods in search for evidence based credibility in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaria, Lisa; Kek, Megan Y C A; Huijser, Henk

    2018-03-02

    In this paper, a review of nursing education literature is employed to ascertain the extent to which nursing educators apply theory to their research, as well as the types of theory they employ. In addition, the use of research methodologies in the nursing education literature is explored. An integrative review. A systematic search was conducted for English-language, peer reviewed publications of any research design via Academic Search Complete, Science Direct, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition databases from 2001 to 2016, of which 140 were reviewed. The findings suggest that within current nursing education literature the scholarship of discovery, and the exploration of epistemologies other than nursing, in particular as they relate to teaching and learning, shows significant potential for expansion and diversification. The analysis highlights opportunities for nursing educators to incorporate broader theoretical, pedagogical, methodological and philosophical perspectives within teaching and the scholarship of teaching. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving the working relationship between doctors and pharmacists: is inter-professional education the answer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Ruth M

    2012-05-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate doctor-pharmacist collaboration within certain clinical settings significantly improves patient care. This may be particularly true for those patients with chronic illnesses and\\/or requiring regular medication reviews. Moreover, in hospitals, clinical and antibiotic pharmacists are successfully influencing prescribing and infection control policy. Under the new Irish Pharmacy Act (2007), pharmacists are legally obliged to provide pharmaceutical care to their patients, thus fulfilling a more patient-centred role than their traditional \\'dispensing\\' one. However, meeting this obligation relies on the existence of good doctor-pharmacist working relationships, such that inter-disciplinary teamwork in monitoring patients becomes the norm in all healthcare settings. As discussed here, efforts to improve these relationships must focus on the strategic introduction of agreed changes in working practices between the two professions and on educational aspects of pharmaceutical care. For example, standardized education of doctors\\/medical students such that they learn to prescribe in an optimal manner and ongoing inter-professional education of doctors and pharmacists in therapeutics, are likely to be of paramount importance. Here, insights into the types of factors that help or hinder the improvement of these working relationships and the importance of education and agreed working practices in defining the separate but inter-dependent professions of pharmacy and medicine are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Developing a center for nursing research: an influence on nursing education and research through mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Sarcone, Annaruth; Samms, Kimika; Boyd, Zakiya N

    2013-03-01

    Nursing research, education, and mentoring are effective strategies to enhance and generate nursing knowledge. In order to explore new opportunities using an international and interdisciplinary approach, a Center for Nursing Research (CNR) was developed at Kean University a public institution for higher education in the United States. At the CNR, nursing professionals and students collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and the research process from a global perspective and across disciplines. The advancement of knowledge and understanding is of absolute importance to the field of nursing and other collaborative fields. The CNR functions to educate nursing faculty and students through scholarly activities with an ongoing commitment to nursing education and research. Mentorship in nursing education and research fosters professional, scholarly, and personal growth for both the mentor and mentee. The CNR serves as a model vehicle of applied, functional mentoring strategies and provides the venue to allow the mentor and mentee to collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Nursing History in Preparing Nursing for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Arlene W.; Ramos, Mary Carol

    1995-01-01

    The development of curricula for nursing education has been a concern of nurse scholars since the genesis of the Standard Curriculum in 1917. The challenge is to build on this knowledge using traditional and nontraditional methods. If doctorally prepared nurses are to lead their profession, nursing history cannot be merely an elective. (Author/JOW)

  11. Nursing students’ experiences of clinical education setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Appropriate clinical environment has an important role in preparing students to use learned knowledge in practice through providing learning opportunities. Since the students’ experiences in the clinical setting affect on quality of their learning, the current study aimed to explain the experiences of nursing students concerning clinical education setting. Materials and Method: The current study was conducted based on conventional content analysis. Sampling was done purposively and the participants were 13 last year nursing students in Zabol Nursing and Midwifery School in 2013-2014. Data collection was done through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was conducted through qualitative content analysis approach. Results: Based on the results, five major categories including threats, vision, dual forces, mindset and students’ action to clinical education and also10 subcategorie were identified. Conclusion: Since the formation of students’ experiences in these environments is one of the predictive factors in achieving their learning and in facilitating the professionalization process, thus the attention of managers in clinical settings is very important for decreasing the threats and concerns for students. In this way, the marred prospects of profession can be recovered through the meeting students’ expectations, attractiveness of the profession can be increased and the positive belief, actions and feelings can be created in students.

  12. Exploring talent development environments –inspirations to medical education at doctoral level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    of a successful talent development environment in Danish doctoral education. Talent development is an extensive and well-established research field. So far, research within this field has mainly focused on sport and other artistic professions and to a minor degree on academic performance. In addition, the focus...... has been on cognitive skills of individual talents and to a minor degree on institutional conditions and constraints within talent development environments. However, recent studies on talent development in sport recognize ‘talent’ as a social construction (1) and institutional and environmental...... features playing a decisive role in talent development (2). Our research question is: do concepts and models for talent development environments in sport apply to medical education at doctoral level? Considering the uniqueness of the two domains (they refer to different overall social fields: education...

  13. Constructivist strategies in online distance education in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Timothy J; Adelman, Deborah; Mueller, Dale; Levitt, Cheryle

    2009-02-01

    This article reviews the use of constructivism in traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms, as opposed to the online learning environment. The applicability of constructivism to nursing education is discussed. The article concludes with recommendations for online nursing education programs, offering ways that constructivist methodologies can be applied to online distance education.

  14. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country communicate sub-optimally regardless of patients' educational background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Dalen, Jan Van; Van Der Vleuten, Cees Pm

    2011-12-01

    To explore the relationship between the style of doctor-patient communication and patients' educational background in a Southeast Asian teaching hospital setting using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). We analyzed a total of 245 audio-taped consultations involving 30 internal medicine residents with 7-10 patients each in the internal medicine outpatient clinics. The patients were categorized into a group with a high and a group with a low educational level. We ranked the data into 41 RIAS utterances and RIAS-based composite categories in order of observed frequency during consultations. The residents invariantly used a paternalistic style irrespective of patients' educational background. The RIAS utterances and the composite categories show no significant relationship between communication style and patients' educational level. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country use a paternalistic communication style during consultations, regardless of patients' educational background. To approach a more partnership doctor-patient communication, culture and clinical environment concern of Southeast Asian should be further investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [The perspectives on palliative nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2015-04-01

    The numbers of people who suffer from age-related and chronic diseases have been increased worldwide. This has lead to an increased emphasis in the medical community on end of life care. This paper references the processes followed overseas in developing palliative care education programs as well as the domestic experiences promoting the hospitalization, home care, and "share care" models of palliative care. Particular emphasis is given to considerations of cultural diversity in palliative care. The aim of this paper is to elaborate on the prevalent clinical end-of-life care issues that are faced in Taiwan, to cultivate core capabilities in end-of-life care, to elicit the current status and development of formal nursing education, and to promote continuing education in palliative care. Kern formulated a six-step approach to curriculum development in education and the details has been discussed . Finally, this paper reflects on the current bottlenecks, challenges, and expectations related to palliative care curriculum development in order to help medical professionals further put humanistic and social care into practice, increase ethical reflection in end of life care and nursing competency, and encourage the creation of localized textbooks / multimedia e-teaching materials. The fostering of "patient-centered, family unit and the social-cultural contexture" for palliative care professionals and the ability to respond to the needs of terminal patients and patients with chronic diseases are critical to increasing the quality of Taiwan healthcare.

  16. [Development of postgraduate education for doctors-internists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozulia, I S; Verner, O M; Murashko, N K

    2012-01-01

    Medical progress and to optimize the management of health is largely dependent upon the effectiveness of the modernization of education and science. The primary objective in this regard is the creation of a new management model clinics. International experience has confirmed the effectiveness of the cluster approach. Another important development is the transition to single-channel financing, improving the monitoring of the quality of medical care. To solve these problems it is necessary to develop a model management model clinic based on modern technologies of strategic management and information technology, optimizations of economic activity, social monitoring system of public satisfaction with the quality of medical care.

  17. Guidelines for Cognitive Behavioral Training within Doctoral Psychology Programs in the United States: Report of the Inter-Organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K.; Ronan, George F.; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D.; Belar, Cynthia D.; Berry, Sharon L.; Christofff, Karen A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Dougher, Michael J.; Dowd, E. Thomas; Herbert, James D.; McFarr, Lynn M.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Sauer, Eric M.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a yearlong series of…

  18. Doctoral Dissertation Topics in Education: Do They Align with Critical Issues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan J Allen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available American society faces complex educational issues which impact many facets of its national interests. Institutions of higher education are granting doctoral degrees to educational leaders, but it is not known to what extent their dissertation topics are aligned with both longstanding and critical issues in education. Using a theoretical framework synthesizing Paul and Elder’s critical thinking model and Kuhlthau’s information seeking process, this study examines a set of education doctoral dissertation topical selections and categorizes them by general themes in relationship to many of the recognized educational issues in the United States. Investigators categorized dissertations from four departments within the College of Education of their home institution. The dataset, retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, consisted of 231 documents published between 2005 and 2014. Through an inter-rater process examining dissertation titles, abstracts, and keywords, the dissertations were assigned critical issue themes culled from nine editions of a college text, and then categorized under a broader topical scheme situated within a well-used educational research website. Findings indicated that most dissertations concentrated in studies that researched problems and issues within schools. Further, some of the issues considered longstanding were not studied by dissertation authors within the sample. For example, privatization of schools and classroom discipline and justice were not selected for study. Findings also suggest new directions for those responsible for dissertation supervision and topic selection. The study adds to the literature on dissertation topic selection that addresses existing educational issues.

  19. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses.

  20. Development of an institutional review board preapproval process for Doctor of Nursing Practice students: process and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanton, Sarah L; Taylor, Holly A; Terhaar, Mary

    2013-01-01

    As Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs proliferate, effective collaboration with institutional review boards (IRBs) is important to protect human subjects. It is particularly important that faculty and students recognize which DNP students' projects should be considered as "human subjects research" or "quality improvement." The former require IRB review, whereas the latter may be eligible for expedited review or may be considered exempt. We report outcomes following implementation of a combination of didactic training, one-to-one consultation, and a decision support protocol to improve preparation for and collaboration with the IRB at a large university. In the first year of using this protocol, 53% of projects were deemed human subjects research and received IRB review. The other 47% were deemed quality improvement projects and did not require IRB review. We offer our experience as an approach for teaching students how to protect the subjects included in their quality improvement activities. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Linking global citizenship, undergraduate nursing education, and professional nursing: curricular innovation in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mill, Judy; Astle, Barbara J; Ogilvie, Linda; Gastaldo, Denise

    2010-01-01

    As we move into the 21st century, our roles as nurses are becoming more complex. Inequities in health within and across nations demand that nursing students examine the interconnectedness between local and global health challenges and contribute to the development and implementation of solutions to these challenges. In this article, we examine concepts related to global citizenship, globalization, social responsibility, and professionalism and link them to curricular innovation in nursing education. We argue that the development of global citizenship is a fundamental goal for all nursing students and that to achieve this, nurse educators must move beyond the creation of international placement opportunities or the use of global examples within existing courses. Nurse educators must develop strategies and design innovative curricula to provide opportunities for all students to become engaged with the concept of global citizenship and the role of nurses in a global world.

  2. Humanistic Approach to Nursing Education: Lived Experiences of Iranian Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Yekta, Zohreh Parsa

    2015-01-01

    The nurse teachers tried to have a complete understanding of the educational contents, to transfer knowledge to nursing students better, and to facilitate the process of education. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of Iranian nursing students regarding the characteristics of academic nurse teachers. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, data were collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 Iranian nursing students and the audio-taped and transcribed interviews analyzed according to Van Manen´s method. The main theme emerged during data analysis, was “humanistic approach to nursing education”. The theme was extracted from 2 sub-themes including ‘ethical necessities’ and ‘effective interaction’. The findings present greater understanding of humanistic approach to nursing education. PMID:25716394

  3. Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York. University ... Background. New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) is one of the original U.S. institutions to support the ... Results. Successful faculty recruitment and retention: Since the program's inception NYU has had 33 nursing and mid-.

  4. Cancer Nursing Education: Literature Review and Documentary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Helen; Blunden, Gillian; Hek, Gill

    The knowledge and skills needed by cancer nurses and the content and strategies of England's existing cancer nursing education programs were examined. The study included a comprehensive literature review and an analysis of course documents from selected English National Board-approved post-qualifying cancer nursing and palliative care courses…

  5. Developments in Nursing Education since 1918. Bulletin, 1921, No. 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Isabel M.

    1921-01-01

    This bulletin details developments in nursing education since 1918. The following sections are included: (1) The situation in nursing before 1918; (2) The demands of the war and how they were met; (3) Decline in applicants following the war; (4) The work of student nurses in hospitals; (5) Hours of duty in hospitals; (6) Health, recreation, and…

  6. Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York University College of Nursing Working with Rwandan Colleagues. ... Conclusion: NYUCN collaboration in the HRH-Rwanda project has demonstrated success in raising the skill level of the nursing and midwifery workforce in Rwandan ...

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Nursing Education and Other Forms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper was to highlight points that are necessary to bridge the gaps, where they exist, in relation to the structures, process and outcome of nursing education when compared with those of other professions. As a profession, nursing is broad in scope, and nurse practitioners are expected to possess a body ...

  8. Behind Closed Doors: School Nurses and Sexual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Dorothy; Koren, Ainat; Morgan, Betty; Shipley, Sara; Hardy, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    School nurses can play a key role in providing sexual education in schools. However, they often face barriers from the school administration and concerned parents. Additionally, school nurses may have limited formal preparation in managing sexual health issues. This study used a descriptive qualitative method to explore the school nurses'…

  9. International education. A United Kingdom nursing student partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L K; Brancato, V C

    1998-01-01

    An international educational exchange between nursing students in the United States and the United Kingdom provides the critical link to develop global partnership to share and exchange information and knowledge on nursing and healthcare systems. This study program assists nurses to view themselves as part of the global community and encourages cooperation in advancing the vision of healthcare reform worldwide.

  10. Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

    The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

  11. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Ways of seeing: using the visual arts in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Judith; Alvarez, Sarah E; Alexander, Michelle B

    2010-12-01

    Professional nursing defines its foundation of practice as embedded in the sciences and humanities of a liberal education. This liberal education is commonly alluded to with the phrase "the art and science of nursing." Yet how do we as nursing educators integrate these two concepts? This article describes a method of integrating the humanities as part of an innovative clinical experience. A defined visual art experience was used to improve professional nursing students' observational and communication skills, narrative sequencing abilities, and empathy. The nursing and medical literature describing the use of visual art encounters in health care education is reviewed. The incorporation of an art education program into the curriculum of a cohort of accelerated baccalaureate nursing students is described. Qualitative evaluation measures from the students suggest this was an experience that broadened their understanding of patient encounters. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available.

  14. Internationalization of higher education: potentials and pitfalls for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M; Ogilvie, L

    2004-06-01

    Internationalization, an integral part of strategic planning initiatives in universities around the world, is occurring within the context of globalization. As we move toward greater internationalization in nursing education, we must understand the ideologies that currently underpin globalization and their fit with the vision and mission of nursing. To outline the current debates surrounding internationalization and globalization and their potential consequences for universities. The historical and current interest in internationalization and globalization are reviewed briefly in order to set the context for this discussion. What emerges from an analysis of current internationalization directions is the complexity of the relationship between internationalization and the conflicting ideologies underpinning globalization. Nursing can play a key role within universities to ensure that varying viewpoints are debated and the implications of varying internationalization decisions are understood.

  15. [Implementing the "last mile" program in new nurse clinical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Jane, Sui-Whi; Fan, Jun-Yu; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The shortage of working nurses has made Taiwan's low nursing retention rate a critical issue in domestic healthcare. Main reasons for new nurses leaving their jobs include high pressure, overtime work, heavy workload, interpersonal relationship problems with colleagues, and inadequate support from administrators. In response, nursing educators designed the "last mile" program to improve the hands-on competence of nursing students with the goal of increasing post-graduation retention rates. This article introduces the last mile program in its present form and discusses the challenges faced in transitioning the program from the classroom into the clinical training environment. The authors suggest establishing a challenge test prior to implementing the last mile program, recruiting role-model preceptors, adjusting training program / project budgets, and developing partnerships between nursing educators and clinicians to enhance the clinical competence of new nurses and ultimately increase professional nurse retention rates, competence, and accountability.

  16. Developing the professional competence of future doctors in the instructional setting of higher medical educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokhovets, Halyna Yu; Lysanets, Yuliia V

    The main objectives of higher medical education is the continuous professional improvement of physicians to meet the needs dictated by the modern world both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this respect, the system of higher medical education has undergone certain changes - from determining the range of professional competences to the adoption of new standards of education in medicine. The article aims to analyze the parameters of doctor's professionalism in the context of competence-based approach and to develop practical recommendations for the improvement of instruction techniques. The authors reviewed the psycho-pedagogical materials and summarized the acquired experience of teachers at higher medical institutions as to the development of instruction techniques in the modern educational process. The study is based on the results of testing via the technique developed by T.I. Ilyina. Analytical and biblio-semantic methods were used in the paper. It has been found that the training process at medical educational institution should be focused on the learning outcomes. The authors defined the quality parameters of doctors' training and suggested the model for developing the professional competence of medical students. This model explains the cause-and-effect relationships between the forms of instruction, teaching techniques and specific components of professional competence in future doctors. The paper provides practical recommendations on developing the core competencies which a qualified doctor should master. The analysis of existing interactive media in Ukraine and abroad has been performed. It has been found that teaching the core disciplines with the use of latest technologies and interactive means keeps abreast of the times, while teaching social studies and humanities to medical students still involves certain difficulties.

  17. Scaling up nurse education: An evaluation of a national PhD capacity development programme in South Africa, in the context of the global shortage of nursing graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiskey, Catherine M; Matthews, Anne; Williamson, Charmaine; Bruce, Judith; Mulaudzi, Mavis; Klopper, Hester

    2015-05-01

    The global shortage of nursing professionals educated at baccalaureate level and beyond has been highlighted. Within America, services are preparing to treat an additional 32 million individuals under the Health Reform Bill. Within South Africa nursing education outputs do not meet demands. Countries are addressing these shortages by developing advanced nurse roles which require research degrees. To evaluate a national PhD programme within the context of a nurse education strategy and a national health insurance plan. A comparative effectiveness research design was employed. The setting was in South Africa between 2011 and 2013, a county with 51.7 million inhabitants. Participants included PhD candidates, programme facilitators, supervisors and key stakeholders. Data from a one day workshop was analysed using an inductive thematic analysis. Three years of evaluation reports were analysed. A mapping of the alignment of the PhD topics with healthcare priorities, and a comparison of the development of nurse education, of the national and international funder were conducted. The evaluation reports rated the programme highly. Three themes were identified from the workshop. These were, "support" with the sub-themes of burden, leveraging and a physical supportive place; "planning" with the sub-themes of the national context and practice, and "quality" with the sub-themes of processes and monitoring and evaluation. The mapping of PhD topics revealed that research was in line with development priorities. However, further investment and infrastructural changes were necessary to sustain the programme and its impact. To address sustainability and capacity in nations scaling up nurse education and healthcare insurance, it was recommended that top-up degrees for diploma educated nurses be developed along with, the implementation of a national nursing strategy for PhD and post-doctoral training encompassing clinical practice implementation and collaboration. Copyright © 2015

  18. Feasibility and Impact of Doctor-Nurse Task Delegation in Preventive Child Health Care in the Netherlands, a Controlled Before-After Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamins, S Janine; Damen, Maurice L W; van Stel, Henk F

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands a need is felt for more flexible Child Health Care services, both efficient and tailored to needs. We set up a study on impact and feasibility of task delegation to child health care nurses performing all regular checkups on children aged 2 months to 4 years. Abnormal findings were discussed with the attending child health care doctor. This article describes impact and feasibility of this task delegation from four viewpoints: competences of nurses; percentage of children assigned to the nurse; change in abnormal findings and referrals; experiences of professionals and parents. Two experiment teams and two control teams were compared before and after starting task delegation. Nurses in the experiment teams were trained to carry out regular checkups on healthy children. Assignment to the experiment schedule was a joint decision by doctor and nurse. Nursing competences were measured by means of questionnaires. Percentage of children assigned to the nurse and screening results of eyes, heart, hips, growth and development were extracted from the electronic health record. Difference in change was compared between experiment and control teams. Mann-Whitney tests and logistic generalized estimating equations were used to test for significance. Experiences of professionals and parents were evaluated through focus group interviews, which were subjected to a qualitative analysis. Nurses in the experiment regions showed improvement in medical screening skills. No difference in change was perceived in general nursing competences. In the experiment group, 69% of all children were assigned to the nurse. There were no significant differences in change in the percentages of abnormal findings or referrals in the experiment teams compared to the control teams, except for hips. Interviews showed that both doctors and nurses thought positively of the new working method, yet made some recommendations for improvements. Parents felt well-informed and experienced an

  19. Feasibility and Impact of Doctor-Nurse Task Delegation in Preventive Child Health Care in the Netherlands, a Controlled Before-After Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Janine Benjamins

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands a need is felt for more flexible Child Health Care services, both efficient and tailored to needs. We set up a study on impact and feasibility of task delegation to child health care nurses performing all regular checkups on children aged 2 months to 4 years. Abnormal findings were discussed with the attending child health care doctor. This article describes impact and feasibility of this task delegation from four viewpoints: competences of nurses; percentage of children assigned to the nurse; change in abnormal findings and referrals; experiences of professionals and parents.Two experiment teams and two control teams were compared before and after starting task delegation. Nurses in the experiment teams were trained to carry out regular checkups on healthy children. Assignment to the experiment schedule was a joint decision by doctor and nurse. Nursing competences were measured by means of questionnaires. Percentage of children assigned to the nurse and screening results of eyes, heart, hips, growth and development were extracted from the electronic health record. Difference in change was compared between experiment and control teams. Mann-Whitney tests and logistic generalized estimating equations were used to test for significance. Experiences of professionals and parents were evaluated through focus group interviews, which were subjected to a qualitative analysis.Nurses in the experiment regions showed improvement in medical screening skills. No difference in change was perceived in general nursing competences. In the experiment group, 69% of all children were assigned to the nurse. There were no significant differences in change in the percentages of abnormal findings or referrals in the experiment teams compared to the control teams, except for hips. Interviews showed that both doctors and nurses thought positively of the new working method, yet made some recommendations for improvements. Parents felt well-informed and

  20. A Substantive Medical Education System for Students and Doctors in Collaboration with Obstetricians and Gynecologist, and Pediatricians

    OpenAIRE

    金子, 政時; Masatoki, KANEKO; 宮崎大学医学部医学教育改革推進センター,産婦人科; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki

    2008-01-01

    A substantive medical education system is very important for training young and talented doctors in order to avoid shortage of specialists in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Before the establishment of a substantive medical education system in Miyazaki prefecture, the prefecture had the highest perinatal mortality rate in Japan. In order to overcome this situation, we began to educate the young and talented doctors who specialized in obstetrics and gynecology. As a result of this prog...

  1. Evaluation of Educational Goals Achievement in Fundamental Nursing Clinical Skills: Application OSCE among Senior Nursing Students in ICU

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Dadvar; Ali Dadgari; Malihe Mirzaee; Maryam Rezaee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical education is an essential component and the heart of nursing education. Nursing is a practice-based discipline and the evaluation of educational goal achievement of nursing competency is essential. The objective of this study was to identify the achievement of clinical educational goals in fundamental skills among senior nursing students in ICU. Methods: This descriptive-analytical research was conducted on 56 senior nursing students. Subjects of this study were purp...

  2. Nurses, Inc.: expansion and commercialization of nursing education in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselink, Leah E; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Exporting nurses has been a long-standing economic strategy for the Philippine government, despite the fact that the Philippines' domestic health system is weak and existing supplies of health workers are poorly distributed. This study explores the role of nursing schools as "migrant institutions" in expanding and commercializing nursing education and perpetuating the link between nursing education and migration. Data were collected primarily via in-depth interviews of key informants (nursing school administrators and policymakers) in the Philippines. Results suggest that nursing schools have expanded migration opportunities by making nursing educational available to more students and more diverse student populations. Also, some nursing schools have acted to control the licensure and recruitment processes by establishing commercial relationships with licensure exam review centers and recruitment agencies. These activities perpetuate the culture of migration in the country's nursing profession and indirectly contribute to declining quality of nursing education, misuse of scarce resources, corruption in the nursing sector, and exacerbation of existing health workforce imbalances. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education: a comparison by level of education and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Tanya K

    2012-01-01

    The education of nurses has an influence on patient safety and outcomes, the nursing shortage, the faculty shortage, and nurses' attitudes and actions. This article reports on a dissertation study designed to examine the attitudes of nurses, initially registered with an associate degree or diploma in nursing, toward continuing formal education. Actively licensed registered nurses in the eastern and western United States (n=535) participated. The main finding of this study was that, although nurses held positive attitudes overall, attitudes ranked barely above neutral. The findings suggest that work needs to be done to improve nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education and research needs to be undertaken to understand what would entice nurses back to school. Implications for nursing practice and education are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

  4. Ethical principles in the work of nurse educator-A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Stolt, Minna; Metsämäki, Riikka; Rinne, Jenni; Kasen, Anne; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The application of ethical principles within the teaching profession and nursing practice forms the core of the nurse educator's professional ethics. However, research focusing on the professional ethics of nurse educators is scarce. To describe ethical principles and issues relating to the work of nurse educators from the perspectives of both nurse educators themselves and nursing students. A descriptive study using cross-sectional data and content analysis. Nursing education program involving students from nine polytechnics in Finland. Nursing students (n=202) and nurse educators (n=342). Data were derived from an online survey, with two open-ended questions: Nursing students and nurse educators were asked to name the three main ethical principles that guide the work of nurse educators and also to describe ethical issues involved in the work. Students most often named professionalism, justice, and equality as the main ethical principles for a nurse educator. Nurse educators considered justice, equality, and honesty as the main ethical principles. The content analysis showed that professionalism and the relationship between educator and student were the key categories for ethical issues as perceived by nursing students. Nursing students most often identified inequality between the nurse educator and nursing student as the ethical issue faced by the nurse educator. Nursing students and nurse educators differed somewhat both in their views of the ethical principles guiding an educator's work and in the ethical issues arising in the work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nursing Education Trial Using a Virtual Nightingale Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Iwata, Naomi; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Takai, Kiyako; Sasaki, Yoko; Nagata, Yoshie; Matsumoto, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nursing department students are expected to correctly grasp the entire concept of nursing through their education. The authors created a movie of a Nightingale ward (virtual ward, hereafter) with an architectural computer design software for education. The students' reaction to the virtual ward was categorized into three viewpoints: that of nurses, of patients, and of nurses and patients in common. Most of the reactions in each viewpoint were: "easy to observe patients" in the nurses' viewpoint; "no privacy" in the patients' viewpoint; and "wide room" in the common viewpoint, respectively. These reactions show the effectiveness of using a virtual ward in nursing education. Because these reactions are characteristics of a Nightingale ward, and even students, who have generally less experiences, recognized these characteristics from the both viewpoints of nurses and patients.

  6. Expanding leadership capacity: educational levels for nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Scott, Elaine S; Sullivan, Dori Taylor

    2013-06-01

    A master's degree in nursing administration prepares the nurse to lead nursing and interprofessional teams, to create new and innovative approaches to improve care processes and outcomes, as well as traditional management responsibilities related to budgets, human resources, quality and safety, and a healthy work environment. Are we not at a critical juncture in our profession when we should challenge the profession to require a master's degree education for all levels of nursing administration?

  7. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses′ fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

  8. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  9. The Relationship between Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Student Retention in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmon, Brandy H.

    2015-01-01

    Retention in higher education, especially nursing education, is a concern for nurse educators. Due to the needs of nurse graduates and practicing nurses, the characteristic of self-directed learning in students is often an educational goal of a rigorous nursing curriculum. Program retention is often impacted by such demands. This study, based upon…

  10. Business Professional Doctoral Programs: Student Motivations, Educational Process, and Graduate Career Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J. Grabowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging body of research on business professional doctoral programs has focused primarily on the programs’ composition and management, offering limited insight into students’ motivations and the impact the degree has on graduates and their careers. However, understanding these student motivations and career impacts is valuable for several reasons. In addition to helping future candidates assess various programs and the business professional doctoral degree itself, it can help enrolled students maximize their academic experience and help administrators improve these programs so that they better meet students’ personal and professional expectations. To bridge this research gap, this study pursued a mixed-methods approach to glean insights into why people pursue professional doctorates in business, the ultimate personal and professional outcomes of students, and the educational process producing those outcomes. The study revealed that most students entered these programs with a desire for personal or professional transformation, including the possibility of entering academia or a new industry. Moreover, the vast majority of program graduates believed they had experienced such a transformation, often in both professional and personal ways. Further, while important to personal growth, alumni perceived that certain program elements—such as the student networks they created and non-research related coursework—had little to no effect upon their career and viewed their research and the research process as far more important to their professional development. Based upon these findings, the researchers propose a comprehensive process model to explain the personal and professional factors and outcomes for graduates of business professional doctoral programs. They also suggest practical steps that students and administrators can take to improve the business professional doctoral educational experience.

  11. Social accountability and nursing education in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Susan J; Rispel, Laetitia C

    2015-01-01

    There is global emphasis on transforming health workforce education in support of universal health coverage. This paper uses a social accountability framework, specifically the World Health Organization's six building blocks for transformative education, to explore key informants' perspectives on nursing education in South Africa. Using a snowballing sampling technique, 44 key informants were selected purposively on the basis of their expertise or knowledge of the research area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the key informants after informed consent had been obtained. The interviews were analysed using template analysis. South Africa has strategic plans on human resources for health and nursing education, training, and practice and has a well-established system of regulation and accreditation of nursing education through the South African Nursing Council (SANC). Key informants criticised the following: the lack of national staffing norms; sub-optimal governance by both the SANC and the Department of Health; outdated curricula that are unresponsive to population and health system needs; lack of preparedness of nurse educators; and the unsuitability of the majority of nursing students. These problems are exacerbated by a perceived lack of prioritisation of nursing, resource constraints in both the nursing education institutions and the health training facilities, and general implementation inertia. Social accountability, which is an essential component of transformative education, necessitates that attention be paid to the issues of governance, responsive curricula, educator preparedness, and appropriate student recruitment and selection.

  12. Promoting Interdisciplinary Education: The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Bucher, Christian; Carr, Gemma; Farnleitner, Andreas; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    An interdisciplinary approach is often described as a valuable strategy to assist in overcoming the existing and emerging challenges to water resource management. The development of educational approaches to instil a culture of interdisciplinarity in the future generation of water resource professionals will help to meet this strategic need. The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems demonstrates how the adoption of an interdisciplinary education framework has been applied to a graduate programme in the water sciences. The interdisciplinary approach aims to provide doctoral research students with an understanding of the wide spectrum of processes relevant to water resource systems. This will enable them to bring together a range of ideas, strategies and methods to their current research and future careers. The education programme also aims to teach the softer skills required for successful interdisciplinary work such as the ability to communicate clearly with non-specialist professionals and the capacity to listen to and accommodate suggestions from experts in different disciplines, which have often not traditionally been grouped together. The Vienna Doctoral Programme achieves these aims through teaching an appreciation for a wide variety of approaches including laboratory analysis, field studies and numerical methods across the fields of hydrology, remote sensing, hydrogeology, structural mechanics, microbiology, water quality and resource management. Teaching takes the form of a detailed study programme on topics such as socio-economic concepts, resource and river basin management, modelling and simulation methods, health related water quality targets, urban water management, spatial data from remote sensing and basics for stochastic mechanics. Courses are also held by internationally recognised top scientists, and a guest scientist seminar series allows doctoral researchers to profit from the expertise of senior researchers from around the world

  13. Nursing education in Turkey: from past to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçecik, Nefise; Alpar, Sule Ecevit

    2009-10-01

    Nursing education in Turkey first began in 1912 with the introduction of a 6-month course to train voluntary medical attendants, with Dr. Besim Omer Pasha's advice to the Red Crescent Association regarding the inadequacy of healthcare services, as a crucial need for nursing services resulted due to significant losses given during Tripoli (1911) and the Balkan (1912) wars. Carrying out their duties in battlefields and hospitals with great devotion, the first nurses graduated from the course played a significant role in promoting the nursing profession and its importance. Nursing education which used to continue at the secondary and high-school levels increased to bachelor's level in 1955. Master's program in nursing was opened in 1968, and Ph.D. programs was opened in 1972. Professional members of the practice, well-equipped in accordance with the requirements of the age, who conduct their studies at the national and international levels, are trained as the consequence of the recent developments in nursing education. The number of nurses at the universities who offered higher levels of academic degree, and especially the number of nurses who gained 'science expert' title at the inpatient medical establishments has increased. This situation and globalization, which ensures an easier access to nursing literature through internet, enable a more systematic and of a better quality healthcare. This article explains the nursing education in Turkey from past to present. The developments in nursing education which have taken place in Turkey are expressed in a chronological order, starting from the Ottoman Empire, until the present. Compared with other countries, nursing education is given on different levels in Turkey. Recently, however, the obstacles regarding the differences especially at the bachelor's degree level were overcome, appropriate changes were made, and education melioration efforts gained speed.

  14. Pedagogy and Academic Success in Prelicensure Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Teri A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a brief description of the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program; highlight the features of the NCIN Preentry Immersion program designed to help students achieve academic success; introduce two NCIN innovation teaching projects that used active learning strategies to foster student engagement; and conduct an integrative review on the pedagogies used to foster academic success in nursing education. The integrative review revealed that interactive pedagogies fostered student engagement and increased the students' knowledge acquisition, competence, confidence, and satisfaction. Significant variations in the methodological rigor for the studies included in this review were noted in addition to nebulousness between nursing education research and evaluation. The review validated the need for more rigorous research in nursing education to improve the students' academic experience and subsequent success of all nursing students, including those from underrepresented or disadvantaged backgrounds, enrolled in prelicensure nursing education programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First year doctors experience of work related wellbeing and implications for educational provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    To explore factors which affect newly qualified doctors' wellbeing and look at the implications for educational provision. Data were collected by free association narrative interviews of nine Foundation doctors and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Two Foundation programme directors were interviewed to verify data validity. Two main themes emerged: newly qualified doctors' wellbeing is affected by 1) personal experience and 2) work related factors. They start work feeling unprepared by medical school, work experience ("shadowing") or induction programmes at the beginning of the post. Senior colleague support and feedback are much valued but often lacking with little discussion of critical incidents and difficult issues. Challenges include sick patients, prescribing, patient/relative communication and no consistent team structure. Working shift patterns affects personal and social life. Enjoyment and reward come from helping patients, feelings of making a difference or teaching medical students. Whilst becoming familiar with their roles, newly qualified doctors search for identity and build up resilience. The support given during this process affects their wellbeing including coping with day to day challenges, whether posts are experienced as rewarding and how work influences their personal and social lives.

  16. Learning theories application in nursing education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is

  17. Learning theories application in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is

  18. Management and leadership in nursing: an Australian educational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Denise; Duffield, Christine; Stasa, Helen; Gray, Joanne; Jackson, Debra; Daly, John

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an Australian perspective on issues influencing management and leadership education in nursing. Nurse leaders and managers work in a context of high pressure, uncertainty and rapid change, and face unprecedented challenges on a daily basis. In the present paper, we reflect on the issues and challenges facing providers of management education for nursing, and consider these challenges in relationship to current trends and imperatives. Collaborative approaches between educational and clinical settings are needed to ensure quality, relevant educational support for managers and leaders, and enhance curriculum integrity. There is a need for contemporaneous and relevant research to inform innovative models of collaborative education. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Hospital doctors' Opinions regarding educational Utility, public Sentiment and career Effects of Medical television Dramas: the HOUSE MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboubi, Hasan N; Morgan, Holly; Aldalati, Omar

    2015-12-14

    To evaluate the opinions of practicing clinicians on medical television dramas and the effects these series have on society as well as their own practice. Observational study using a structured questionnaire disseminated among doctors of all grades and specialties at one tertiary centre and two large secondary care district general hospitals in Wales, United Kingdom. Three hundred and seventy-two questionnaires were distributed over a 3-month period, with 200 completed questionnaires received (response rate, 54%). Frequency and reasons for watching these programs, and opinions regarding realism, educational value and public perception, evaluated by doctors' grades and specialties. Identification of work practice with any observed traits in fictional doctors was also analysed. 65% of doctors surveyed admitted to watching these programs on more than one occasion. Junior doctors (interns and resident medical officers) were more regular viewers. Most doctors who admitted to watching medical dramas did so for entertainment purposes (69%); 8% watched for educational purposes and, of these, 100% watched House MD, 82% felt that these dramas were unrepresentative of daily practice, and 10% thought that they accurately portrayed reality. Most of the positive responses were from junior doctors. 61% of doctors identified some aspect of their clinical practice with another doctor (fictional or non-fictional; most junior doctors identified with a fictional doctor, compared with non-fictional role models for more senior practicing clinicians. This survey shows that a large body of the medical workforce watches medical television dramas and that such programs exercise a growing influence on the practice of junior doctors, particularly those in physicianly specialties. The reasons for certain role model selections remain unknown and may require further evaluation.

  20. [Core values in nursing education enhances nursing competence: example of oxygen administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Li; Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Lin, Li-Chuan; Chang, Pei-Rong

    2010-10-01

    The goal of nursing education is to enhance the capabilities of nurses for the benefit of patients and their families. Training toward this goal should begin from the nursing school curriculum, with courses addressing professional knowledge, psychomotor skills, and appropriate attitudes. However, course design has traditionally focused largely on psychomotor skills only. The purpose of this study was to describe the core value infused teaching strategy for nursing competency using nasal cannula oxygen administration as an example. Oxygen therapy standard procedures comprise twenty-eight nursing care steps. Six main nursing behaviors enforced in the enhanced curricula covered cleansing and asepsis, physical comfort and safety, psychological well-being, interpersonal interaction, caring, and critical thinking and reasoning concepts. The teaching method covered teaching goals, content, strategies, and evaluation. Findings support the efficacy of improving student nursing competency using teaching courses infused with core nursing values and enhanced through simulation-based teaching.